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Sample records for altered p53 cdkn2a

  1. Aberrations of the p53 pathway components p53, MDM2 and CDKN2A appear independent in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Ino, Y; Gerdes, A M;

    1999-01-01

    The two gene products of the CDKN2A gene, p16 and p19ARF, have recently been linked to each of two major tumour suppressor pathways in human carcinogenesis, the RB1 pathway and the p53 pathway. p16 inhibits the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma gene product by cyclin D-dependent kinases, wher...

  2. Germline CDKN2A/ARF alterations in human melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hashemi, Jamileh

    2002-01-01

    Approximately 10% of cases of human cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) have been estimated to occur in individuals with a familial predisposition, frequently in association with dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS). The genetics of familial melanoma is complex and heterogeneous. To date only two melanoma predisposing genes have been identified. The CDKN2A/ARF locus on human chromosome 9p21 encodes two distinct cell cycle regulatory proteins, p16 and p14ARF. Germline alterations i...

  3. p53 protein alterations in adult astrocytic tumors and oligodendrogliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayak Anupma

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: p53 is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the genesis of a variety of malignancies including brain tumors. Overexpression of the p53 protein is often used as a surrogate indicator of alterations in the p53 gene. AIMS: In this study, data is presented on p53 protein expression in adult cases (>15 years of age of astrocytic (n=152 and oligodendroglial (n=28 tumors of all grades. Of the astrocytic tumors, 86% were supratentorial in location while remaining 14% were located infratentorially - 8 in the the cerebellum and 13 in the brainstem. All the oligodendrogliomas were supratentorial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: p53 protein expression was evaluated on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections using streptavidin biotin immunoperoxidase technique after high temperature antigen retrieval. RESULTS: Overall 52% of supratentorial astrocytic tumors showed p53 immunopositivity with no correlation to the histological grade. Thus, 58.8% of diffuse astrocytomas (WHO Grade II, 53.8% of anaplastic astrocytomas (WHO Grade III and 50% of glioblastomas (WHO Grade IV were p53 protein positive. In contrast, all the infratentorial tumors were p53 negative except for one brainstem glioblastoma. Similarly, pilocytic astrocytomas were uniformly p53 negative irrespective of the location. Among oligodendroglial tumors, the overall frequency of p53 immunopositivity was lower (only 28%, though a trend of positive correlation with the tumor grade was noted - 25% in Grade II and 31.5% in grade III (anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Interestingly, p53 labeling index (p53 LI did not correlate with the histopathological grade in both astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, this study gives an insight into the genetic and hence biological heterogeneity of gliomas, not only between astrocytic tumors vs. oligodendrogliomas but also within astrocytic tumors with regard to their grade and location. With p53 gene therapy trials in progress, this will

  4. G-actin guides p53 nuclear transport: potential contribution of monomeric actin in altered localization of mutant p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Taniya; Guha, Deblina; Manna, Argha; Panda, Abir Kumar; Bhat, Jyotsna; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2016-01-01

    p53 preserves genomic integrity by restricting anomaly at the gene level. Till date, limited information is available for cytosol to nuclear shuttling of p53; except microtubule-based trafficking route, which utilizes minus-end directed motor dynein. The present study suggests that monomeric actin (G-actin) guides p53 traffic towards the nucleus. Histidine-tag pull-down assay using purified p53(1–393)-His and G-actin confirms direct physical association between p53 and monomeric G-actin. Co-immunoprecipitation data supports the same. Confocal imaging explores intense perinuclear colocalization between p53 and G-actin. To address atomistic details of the complex, constraint-based docked model of p53:G-actin complex was generated based on crystal structures. MD simulation reveals that p53 DNA-binding domain arrests very well the G-actin protein. Docking benchmark studies have been carried out for a known crystal structure, 1YCS (complex between p53DBD and BP2), which validates the docking protocol we adopted. Co-immunoprecipitation study using “hot-spot” p53 mutants suggested reduced G-actin association with cancer-associated p53 conformational mutants (R175H and R249S). Considering these findings, we hypothesized that point mutation in p53 structure, which diminishes p53:G-actin complexation results in mutant p53 altered subcellular localization. Our model suggests p53Arg249 form polar-contact with Arg357 of G-actin, which upon mutation, destabilizes p53:G-actin interaction and results in cytoplasmic retention of p53R249S. PMID:27601274

  5. G-actin guides p53 nuclear transport: potential contribution of monomeric actin in altered localization of mutant p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Taniya; Guha, Deblina; Manna, Argha; Panda, Abir Kumar; Bhat, Jyotsna; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2016-01-01

    p53 preserves genomic integrity by restricting anomaly at the gene level. Till date, limited information is available for cytosol to nuclear shuttling of p53; except microtubule-based trafficking route, which utilizes minus-end directed motor dynein. The present study suggests that monomeric actin (G-actin) guides p53 traffic towards the nucleus. Histidine-tag pull-down assay using purified p53(1-393)-His and G-actin confirms direct physical association between p53 and monomeric G-actin. Co-immunoprecipitation data supports the same. Confocal imaging explores intense perinuclear colocalization between p53 and G-actin. To address atomistic details of the complex, constraint-based docked model of p53:G-actin complex was generated based on crystal structures. MD simulation reveals that p53 DNA-binding domain arrests very well the G-actin protein. Docking benchmark studies have been carried out for a known crystal structure, 1YCS (complex between p53DBD and BP2), which validates the docking protocol we adopted. Co-immunoprecipitation study using "hot-spot" p53 mutants suggested reduced G-actin association with cancer-associated p53 conformational mutants (R175H and R249S). Considering these findings, we hypothesized that point mutation in p53 structure, which diminishes p53:G-actin complexation results in mutant p53 altered subcellular localization. Our model suggests p53Arg249 form polar-contact with Arg357 of G-actin, which upon mutation, destabilizes p53:G-actin interaction and results in cytoplasmic retention of p53R249S. PMID:27601274

  6. Papillomavirus, p53 alteration, and primary carcinoma of the vulva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotti, S; D'Amato, L; Della Torre, G; Donghi, R; Longoni, A; Giarola, M; Sampietro, G; De Palo, G; Pierotti, M A; Rilke, F

    1995-12-01

    Twenty-nine samples from 28 cases of vulvar squamous cell carcinoma, of which 13 fulfilled the criteria of the bowenoid subtype (mean age 45 years, range 31-68) and 16 of the usual subtype of invasive squamous cell carcinoma (ISCC) (mean age 67.5 years, range 34-83) were investigated for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA, TP53 alterations, and mdm2 and bcl-2 gene product deregulation. Microscopically all the bowenoid subtype cases (group I) showed a high-grade intraepithelial (VIN 3, carcinoma in situ) lesion associated with early invasive carcinoma in six cases and overt invasive carcinoma in one. By contrast, no evidence of early carcinoma was present in the ISCCs (group II). By in situ hybridization and/or Southern blot hybridization or polymerase chain reaction (PCR), HPV DNA was detected in all cases of group I and in four of 16 cases (25%) of group II, two only by Southern blot after PCR. By single-strand conformation polymorphism and immunocytochemistry only wild-type TP53 and absence of detectable p53 product, respectively, were found in all cases of group I, i.e., in high-risk HPV-positive carcinomas, whereas mutations and/or p53 overexpression accounted for 75% in group II, i.e., in mainly HPV-negative carcinomas. The TP53 gene mutations observed in invasive carcinomas were significantly related to node-positive cases (p = 0.04). Taken together and in agreement with in vitro data, these results support the view that an alteration of TP53, gained either by interaction with viral oncoproteins or by somatic mutations, is a crucial event in the pathogenesis of vulvar carcinomas, but that TP53 mutations are mainly associated with disease progression. Finally, a preliminary immunocytochemical analysis seems to speak against the possible involvement of both MDM2 and BCL-2 gene products in the development of vulvar carcinoma.

  7. Aging-Associated Truncated Form of p53 Interacts with Wild-Type p53 and Alters p53 Stability, Localization, and Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Lynette; Lu, Xiongbin; Ghebranious, Nader; Tyner, Stuart; Donehower, Lawrence A.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated that p53, a prototypical tumor suppressor, may also influence aspects of organismal aging. We have previously described a p53 mutant mouse model, the p53+/m mouse, which is cancer resistant yet exhibits reduced longevity and premature aging phenotypes. p53+/m mice express one full length p53 allele and one truncated p53 allele that is translated into a C-terminal fragment of p53 termed the M protein. The augmented cancer resistance and premature aging phenotypes in th...

  8. p53 alteration in morphologically normal/benign breast tissue in patients with triple-negative high-grade breast carcinomas: breast p53 signature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Stolla, Moritz; Ring, Brian Z; Yang, Qi; Laughlin, Todd S; Rothberg, Paul G; Skinner, Kristin; Hicks, David G

    2016-09-01

    p53 alterations have been identified in approximately 23% of breast carcinomas, particularly in hormone receptor-negative high-grade carcinomas. It is considered to be an early event in breast carcinogenesis. Nevertheless, the putative precursor lesion of high-grade breast carcinoma remains elusive. Breast excision specimens from 93 triple-negative high-grade invasive ductal carcinomas, 48 estrogen receptor (ER)-positive/progesterone receptor-positive/Her2-negative non-high-grade invasive ductal carcinomas, and 50 mammoplasty breasts were selected. At least 2 tissue blocks with tumor and adjacent benign tissue were sectioned and subjected to immunohistochemistry staining for p53. TP53 gene sequencing was performed on select tumors. Further immunohistochemistry staining for ER and Ki-67 was performed on consecutive sections of tissue with p53-positive normal/benign cells. Of the 93 high-grade carcinomas, 51 (55%) were positive for p53 alteration, whereas only 3 (6.25%) of the 48 non-high-grade carcinomas were p53 altered. Focal p53 positivity in adjacent normal/benign breast tissue was identified in 19 cases, and 18 of them also had p53 alteration in their carcinomas. Only 1 case had focal p53 staining in normal/benign tissue, but the tumor was negative for p53 alteration. No p53 staining positivity was identified in the mammoplasty specimens. The p53-stained normal/benign cells were ER negative and did not show an increase in the Ki-67 labeling index. These findings indicate that the p53 staining positivity in normal/benign breast tissue is not a random event. It could be considered as the "p53 signature" in breast and serve as an indicator for future potential risk of p53-positive high-grade breast carcinoma. PMID:27246177

  9. Altered microRNA Expression Profiles and Regulation of INK4A/CDKN2A Tumor Suppressor Genes in Canine Breast Cancer Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutful Kabir, Farruk Mohammad; DeInnocentes, Patricia; Bird, Richard Curtis

    2015-12-01

    microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling of cancer versus normal cells may reveal the characteristic regulatory features that can be correlated to altered gene expression in both human and animal models of cancers. In this study, the comprehensive expression profiles of the 277 highly characterized miRNAs from the canine genome were evaluated in spontaneous canine mammary tumor (CMT) models harboring defects in a group of cell cycle regulatory and potent tumor suppressor genes of INK4/CDKN2 family including p16/INK4A, p14ARF, and p15/INK4B. A large number of differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in three CMT cell lines to potentially target oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and cancer biomarkers. A group of the altered miRNAs were identified by miRNA target prediction tools for regulation of the INK4/CDKN2 family tumor suppressor genes. miRNA-141 was experimentally validated for INK4A 3'-UTR target binding in the CMT cell lines providing an essential mechanism for the post-transcriptional regulation of the INK4A tumor suppressor gene in CMT models. A well-recognized group of miRNAs including miR-21, miR-155, miR-9, miR-34a, miR-143/145, and miR-31 were found to be altered in both CMTs and human breast cancer. These altered miRNAs might serve as potential targets for advancing the development of future therapeutic reagents. These findings further strengthen the validity and use of canine breast cancers as appropriate models for the study of human breast cancers. PMID:26095675

  10. Skin human papillomavirus type 38 alters p53 functions by accumulation of ΔNp73

    OpenAIRE

    Accardi, Rosita; Dong, Wen; Smet, Anouk; Cui, Rutao; Hautefeuille, Agnes; Gabet, Anne-Sophie; Sylla, Bakary S.; Gissmann, Lutz; Hainaut, Pierre; Tommasino, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    The E6 and E7 of the cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) type 38 immortalize primary human keratinocytes, an event normally associated with the inactivation of pathways controlled by the tumour suppressor p53. Here, we show for the first time that HPV38 alters p53 functions. Expression of HPV38 E6 and E7 in human keratinocytes or in the skin of transgenic mice induces stabilization of wild-type p53. This selectively activates the transcription of ΔNp73, an isoform of the p53-related protein ...

  11. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from Indian patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pornima Phatak; S Kalai Selvi; T Divya; A S Hegde; Sridevi Hegde; Kumaravel Somasundaram

    2002-12-01

    Alterations in the tumour suppressor p53 gene are among the most common defects seen in a variety of human cancers. In order to study the significance of the p53 gene in the genesis and development of human glioma from Indian patients, we checked 44 untreated primary gliomas for mutations in exons 5–9 of the p53 gene by PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing. Sequencing analysis revealed six missense mutations. The incidence of p53 mutations was 13.6% (6 of 44). All the six mutations were found to be located in the central core domain of p53, which carries the sequence-specific DNA-binding domain. These results suggest a rather low incidence but a definite involvement of p53 mutations in the gliomas of Indian patients.

  12. HPV detection and p53 alteration in squamous cell verrucous malignancies of the lower genital tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotti, S; Donghi, R; D'Amato, L; Giarola, M; Longoni, A; Della Torre, G; De Palo, G; Pierotti, M A; Rilke, F

    1993-12-01

    We examined five cases of verrucous carcinoma (VC) and two cases of giant condyloma of Buschke-Löwenstein (GCBL) associated with invasive squamous cell carcinoma (ISCC), by immunocytochemistry and molecular techniques. Neither human papillomavirus (HPV) footprints nor p53-altered expression and/or mutation were observed among the cases of VC. By contrast, both cases of GCBL with ISCC turned out to be HPV 6 or 11 positive, showed overexpression of p53 and, one of the two, a mutation in the nucleotide sequence of this tumor suppressor gene. The results point out that VC and GCBL with ISCC, in spite of some morphologic similarities, are two distinct entities, the former being unrelated to both HPV and p53 inactivation and the latter related to both. Regarding p53, immunocytochemical and molecular data on GCBL with ISCC suggest a role of mutant p53 in the progression of malignancy into invasion.

  13. Skin human papillomavirus type 38 alters p53 functions by accumulation of ΔNp73

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardi, Rosita; Dong, Wen; Smet, Anouk; Cui, Rutao; Hautefeuille, Agnes; Gabet, Anne-Sophie; Sylla, Bakary S; Gissmann, Lutz; Hainaut, Pierre; Tommasino, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    The E6 and E7 of the cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) type 38 immortalize primary human keratinocytes, an event normally associated with the inactivation of pathways controlled by the tumour suppressor p53. Here, we show for the first time that HPV38 alters p53 functions. Expression of HPV38 E6 and E7 in human keratinocytes or in the skin of transgenic mice induces stabilization of wild-type p53. This selectively activates the transcription of ΔNp73, an isoform of the p53-related protein p73, which in turn inhibits the capacity of p53 to induce the transcription of genes involved in growth suppression and apoptosis. ΔNp73 downregulation by an antisense oligonucleotide leads to transcriptional re-activation of p53-regulated genes and apoptosis. Our findings illustrate a novel mechanism of the alteration of p53 function that is mediated by a cutaneous HPV type and support the role of HPV38 and ΔNp73 in human carcinogenesis. PMID:16397624

  14. Skin human papillomavirus type 38 alters p53 functions by accumulation of deltaNp73.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardi, Rosita; Dong, Wen; Smet, Anouk; Cui, Rutao; Hautefeuille, Agnes; Gabet, Anne-Sophie; Sylla, Bakary S; Gissmann, Lutz; Hainaut, Pierre; Tommasino, Massimo

    2006-03-01

    The E6 and E7 of the cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) type 38 immortalize primary human keratinocytes, an event normally associated with the inactivation of pathways controlled by the tumour suppressor p53. Here, we show for the first time that HPV38 alters p53 functions. Expression of HPV38 E6 and E7 in human keratinocytes or in the skin of transgenic mice induces stabilization of wild-type p53. This selectively activates the transcription of deltaNp73, an isoform of the p53-related protein p73, which in turn inhibits the capacity of p53 to induce the transcription of genes involved in growth suppression and apoptosis. DeltaNp73 downregulation by an antisense oligonucleotide leads to transcriptional re-activation of p53-regulated genes and apoptosis. Our findings illustrate a novel mechanism of the alteration of p53 function that is mediated by a cutaneous HPV type and support the role of HPV38 and deltaNp73 in human carcinogenesis. PMID:16397624

  15. Anal cancer in Chinese: human papillomavirus infection and altered expression of p53

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    AIM To detect the presence of HPV DNA and study the alteration of p53 expression in anal cancers in Chinese.METHODS HPV DNA was amplified by PCR. The amplified HPV DNA was classified by DBH. HPV antigen and p53 expression were respectively detected by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS HPV DNA was amplified only in one case of squamous cell carcinoma of the 72 Chinese anal cancers and further classified as HPV type 16. Others were all HPV negative. HPV antigen and p53 expression were also detected in this case. Positive stainings with anti-p53 antibody were seen in 61.2% anal cancers. There were no statistically significant differences between anal squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas and between anal adenocarcinomas and rectal adenocarcinomas. p53 protein expression was observed in the basal cells of squamous epithelium of condyloma acuminatum and morphologically normal squamous epithelium in 2 cases invaded by anal adenocarcinoma.CONCLUSION HPV infection was not associated with these cases of anal cancer. p53 alteration was a common event. Positive p53 immunostaining can not be regarded as a marker for differentiating benign from malignant lesions.

  16. Alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells correlate with metastatic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, C. Q.; Willey, J. C.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced lung cancer are not known. In the present study, alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human papillomavirus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by a single low dose of either alpha-particles or 1 GeV/nucleon (56)Fe were analyzed by PCR-single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) coupled with sequencing analysis and immunoprecipitation assay. A total of nine primary and four secondary tumor cell lines, three of which were metastatic, together with the parental BEP2D and primary human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were studied. The immunoprecipitation assay showed overexpression of mutant p53 proteins in all the tumor lines but not in NHBE and BEP2D cells. PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis found band shifts and gene mutations in all four of the secondary tumors. A G-->T transversion in codon 139 in exon 5 that replaced Lys with Asn was detected in two tumor lines. One mutation each, involving a G-->T transversion in codon 215 in exon 6 (Ser-->lle) and a G-->A transition in codon 373 in exon 8 (Arg-->His), was identified in the remaining two secondary tumors. These results suggest that p53 alterations correlate with tumorigenesis in the BEP2D cell model and that mutations in the p53 gene may be indicative of metastatic potential.

  17. Frequent alteration of MDM2 and p53 in the molecular progression of recurring non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Nielsen, O; Pedersen, Niels Tinggaard

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: Recurrence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with or without transformation is often associated with increased clinical drug resistance and poor prognosis indicating molecular progression. The study addresses the currently poorly understood molecular mechanisms underlying relapsing non-Hodgkin......'s lymphoma. METHODS AND RESULTS: We have analysed sequential biopsies from 42 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients immunohistochemically for p53 alterations (based on p53 and p21Waf1 expression), as well as for expression of MDM2, p27Kip1 and cyclin D3. Relapse of follicle centre lymphoma was associated with p53...... alterations as 5/6 (83%) follicle centre lymphomas with normal p53 at diagnosis showed p53 alterations at relapse. Of these cases, three showed transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. p53 alteration was also associated with relapse of de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and T-cell non-Hodgkin...

  18. Alteration of p53and p21 during hepatocarcinogenesis in shrews

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Jia Su; Rui-Qi Yang; Ke-Chen Ban; Yuan Li; Liu-Liang Qin; Hui-Yun Wang; Chun Yang; Chao Ou; Xiao-Xian Duan; Young-Lk Lee

    2004-01-01

    development exists between HBV and AFB1. p53 mutation promotes the development of HCC. HBV and AFB1 may synergistically induce p53 gene mutation, and stimulate fas gene expression. fas gene is activated at the earlier stage during hepatocarcinogenesis. p21 protein may be an early marker, and the alterations of p53 may be a late event in the development of HCC.

  19. Correlation of p53 over-expression and alteration in p53 gene detected by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism in adenocarcinoma of gastric cancer patients from India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sajjad Karim; Arif Ali

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the alterations in p53 gene among Indian gastric cancer patients and to correlate them with the various clinicopathological parameters.METHODS: A total of 103 gastric cancer patients were included in this study. The p53 alterations were studied by both immunohistochemical method as well as polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. We only studied four (exon 5, 6, 7, and 8) of the 11 p53 exons. The alterations in p53 were also correlated with respect to various clinicopathological parameters.RESULTS: Among 103 cases, p53 over-expression and alteration were detected in 37 (35.92%) and 19 (18.44%) cases, respectively. Most of the p53 alterations were found at exon 5 (31.54%), followed by exon 6 (26.31%), exon 7 (21.04%) and exon 8 (21.04%). A significant correlation of p53 overexpression was found with p53 alteration ( P = 0.000).Concordance between p53 alteration (as detected by SSCP) and over-expression [as detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC)] was found in 75% cases.We found that IHC-positive/SSCP-negative cases accounted for 21% of cases and IHC-negative/SSCPpositive cases accounted for remaining 4% cases.CONCLUSION: Our results show that p53 gene mutations are significantly correlated with p53 protein over-expression, with 75% concordance in overexpression and alteration in the p53 gene, but 25% disconcordance also cautions against the assumption that p53 over-expression is always associated with a gene mutation. There may be other mechanisms responsible for stabilization and accumulation of p53 protein with no evidence of gene mutation that reflect an accumulation of a non-mutated protein, or a false negative SSCP result.

  20. Phosphorylation at Ser-15 and Ser-392 in mutant p53 molecules from human tumors is altered compared to wild-type p53.

    OpenAIRE

    Ullrich, S J; K. Sakaguchi; Lees-Miller, S P; Fiscella, M.; Mercer, W E; Anderson, C W; Appella, E

    1993-01-01

    The product of the p53 gene suppresses cell growth and plays a critical role in suppressing development of human tumors. p53 protein binds DNA, activates transcription, and can be phosphorylated at N- and C-terminal sites. Previously, wild-type p53 was shown to be hyperphosphorylated compared to mutant p53 during p53-mediated growth arrest in vivo. Here we show that Ser-15 and Ser-9 in the N-terminal transactivation domain of wild-type human p53 are phosphorylated in vivo in cells derived fro...

  1. P53 alters the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity for oxidized graphene in human B-lymphoblastoid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibone, Dayton Matthew

    Widespread use of oxidized graphene nanomaterials in industry, medicine, and consumer products raises concern about potential adverse impacts on human health. The p53 tumor suppressor protein is crucial to maintaining cellular and genetic stability to prevent carcinogenesis. Here, we show that oxygen functionalized graphene (f-G) absorption and p53 functional status correlate with cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human B-lymphoblastoid cells. Trends in f-G absorption by were dose-dependent. Cells with functional p53 exposed to f-G arrested in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, suppressed f-G induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), and had elevated apoptosis. While compared to p53 competent cells, the p53 deficient cells exposed to f-G accumulated in S-phase of the cell cycle, had elevated ROS levels, and evaded apoptosis. The f-G genotoxicity was evident as increased loss-of-heterozygosity mutants independent of p53 status, and structural chromosome damage in p53 deficient cells. These findings have broad implications for the safety and efficacy of oxidized graphene nanomaterials in industrial, consumer products and biomedical applications.

  2. Differential regulation and synthetic lethality of exclusive RB1 and CDKN2A mutations in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nayoung; Song, Mee; Kim, Somin; Seo, Yujeong; Kim, Yonghwan; Yoon, Sukjoon

    2016-01-01

    Genetic alterations in lung cancer are distinctly represented in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Mutation of the RB1 and CDKN2A genes, which are tightly associated with cell cycle regulation, is exclusive to SCLC and NSCLC cells, respectively. Through the systematic analysis of transcriptome and proteome datasets for 318 cancer cell lines, we characterized differential gene expression and protein regulation in RB1-mutant SCLC and CDKN2A-mutant NSCLC. Many of the genes and proteins associated with RB1-mutant SCLC cell lines belong to functional categories of gene expression and transcription, whereas those associated with CDKN2A-mutant NSCLC cell lines were enriched in gene sets of the extracellular matrix and focal adhesion. These results indicate that the loss of RB1 and CDKN2A function induces distinctively different signaling cascades in SCLC and NSCLC cells. In addition, knockdown of the RB1 gene in CKDN2A-mutant cell lines (and vice versa) synergistically inhibits cancer cell proliferation. The present study on the exclusive role of RB1 and CDKN2A mutations in lung cancer subtypes demonstrates a synthetic lethal strategy for cancer regulation. PMID:26647789

  3. Pharmacological activation of wild-type p53 in the therapy of leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kensuke; Ishizawa, Jo; Andreeff, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is inactivated by mutations in the majority of human solid tumors. Conversely, p53 mutations are rare in leukemias and are only observed in a small fraction of the patient population, predominately in patients with complex karyotype acute myeloid leukemia or hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the loss of p53 function in leukemic cells is often caused by abnormalities in p53-regulatory proteins, including overexpression of MDM2/MDMX, deletion of CDKN2A/ARF, and alterations in ATM. For example, MDM2 inhibits p53-mediated transcription, promotes its nuclear export, and induces proteasome-dependent degradation. The MDM2 homolog MDMX is another direct regulator of p53 that inhibits p53-mediated transcription. Several small-molecule inhibitors and stapled peptides targeting MDM2 and MDMX have been developed and have recently entered clinical trials. The clinical trial results of the first clinically used MDM2 inhibitor, RG7112, illustrated promising p53 activation and apoptosis induction in leukemia cells as proof of concept. Side effects of RG7112 were most prominent in suppression of thrombopoiesis and gastrointestinal symptoms in leukemia patients. Predictive biomarkers for response to MDM2 inhibitors have been proposed, but they require further validation both in vitro and in vivo so that the accumulated knowledge concerning pathological p53 dysregulation in leukemia and novel molecular-targeted strategies to overcome this dysregulation can be translated safely and efficiently into novel clinical therapeutics.

  4. Pharmacological activation of wild-type p53 in the therapy of leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kensuke; Ishizawa, Jo; Andreeff, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is inactivated by mutations in the majority of human solid tumors. Conversely, p53 mutations are rare in leukemias and are only observed in a small fraction of the patient population, predominately in patients with complex karyotype acute myeloid leukemia or hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the loss of p53 function in leukemic cells is often caused by abnormalities in p53-regulatory proteins, including overexpression of MDM2/MDMX, deletion of CDKN2A/ARF, and alterations in ATM. For example, MDM2 inhibits p53-mediated transcription, promotes its nuclear export, and induces proteasome-dependent degradation. The MDM2 homolog MDMX is another direct regulator of p53 that inhibits p53-mediated transcription. Several small-molecule inhibitors and stapled peptides targeting MDM2 and MDMX have been developed and have recently entered clinical trials. The clinical trial results of the first clinically used MDM2 inhibitor, RG7112, illustrated promising p53 activation and apoptosis induction in leukemia cells as proof of concept. Side effects of RG7112 were most prominent in suppression of thrombopoiesis and gastrointestinal symptoms in leukemia patients. Predictive biomarkers for response to MDM2 inhibitors have been proposed, but they require further validation both in vitro and in vivo so that the accumulated knowledge concerning pathological p53 dysregulation in leukemia and novel molecular-targeted strategies to overcome this dysregulation can be translated safely and efficiently into novel clinical therapeutics. PMID:27327543

  5. Indication for CDKN2A-mutation analysis in familial pancreatic cancer families without melanomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harinck, Femme; Kluijt, Irma; van der Stoep, Nienke; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Wagner, Anja; Aalfs, Cora M.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Poley, Jan-Werner; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Fockens, Paul; van Os, Theo A. M.; Bruno, Marco J.

    2012-01-01

    Background CDKN2A-mutation carriers run a high risk of developing melanomas and have an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer (PC). Familial PC (FPC) patients with a personal history or family history of melanomas are therefore offered CDKN2A-mutation analysis. In contrast, CDKN2A testing i

  6. Mutant p53 uses p63 as a molecular chaperone to alter gene expression and induce a pro-invasive secretome

    OpenAIRE

    Paul M. Neilsen; Noll, Jacqueline E.; Suetani, Rachel J; Schulz, Renee B.; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Evdokiou, Andreas; Lane, David P; David F. Callen

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the TP53 gene commonly result in the expression of a full-length protein that drives cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Herein, we have deciphered the global landscape of transcriptional regulation by mutant p53 through the application of a panel of isogenic H1299 derivatives with inducible expression of several common cancer-associated p53 mutants. We found that the ability of mutant p53 to alter the transcriptional profile of cancer cells is remarkably conserved across differ...

  7. The cytoskeleton adaptor protein ankyrin-1 is upregulated by p53 following DNA damage and alters cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, A E; Lu, W-T; Godfrey, J D; Antonov, A V; Paicu, C; Moxon, S; Dalmay, T; Wilczynska, A; Muller, P A J; Bushell, M

    2016-01-01

    The integrity of the genome is maintained by a host of surveillance and repair mechanisms that are pivotal for cellular function. The tumour suppressor protein p53 is a major component of the DNA damage response pathway and plays a vital role in the maintenance of cell-cycle checkpoints. Here we show that a microRNA, miR-486, and its host gene ankyrin-1 (ANK1) are induced by p53 following DNA damage. Strikingly, the cytoskeleton adaptor protein ankyrin-1 was induced over 80-fold following DNA damage. ANK1 is upregulated in response to a variety of DNA damage agents in a range of cell types. We demonstrate that miR-486-5p is involved in controlling G1/S transition following DNA damage, whereas the induction of the ankyrin-1 protein alters the structure of the actin cytoskeleton and sustains limited cell migration during DNA damage. Importantly, we found that higher ANK1 expression correlates with decreased survival in cancer patients. Thus, these observations highlight ANK1 as an important effector downstream of the p53 pathway. PMID:27054339

  8. p53 isoforms change p53 paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Bourdon, JC

    2014-01-01

    Although p53 defines cellular responses to cancer treatment it is not clear how p53 can be used to control cell fate outcome. Data demonstrate that so-called p53 does not exist as a single protein, but is in fact a group of p53 protein isoforms whose expression can be manipulated to control the cellular response to treatment.

  9. Over-expression of p53 mutants in LNCaP cells alters tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perryman, L A; Blair, J M; Kingsley, E A;

    2006-01-01

    This study has investigated the impact of three specific dominant-negative p53 mutants (F134L, M237L, and R273H) on tumorigenesis by LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Mutant p53 proteins were associated with an increased subcutaneous "take rate" in NOD-SCID mice, and increased production of PSA. Tumors...... lower levels of VEGF and endostatin compared with supernatants from tumors expressing other mutants. Our results support the possibility that decreased angiogenesis might account for reduced growth rate of tumor cells expressing the F134L p53 mutation....

  10. NOTCH, ASCL1, p53 and RB alterations define an alternative pathway driving neuroendocrine and small cell lung carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meder, Lydia; König, Katharina; Ozretić, Luka; Schultheis, Anne M; Ueckeroth, Frank; Ade, Carsten P; Albus, Kerstin; Boehm, Diana; Rommerscheidt-Fuss, Ursula; Florin, Alexandra; Buhl, Theresa; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Wolf, Jürgen; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Eilers, Martin; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas C; Buettner, Reinhard

    2016-02-15

    Small cell lung cancers (SCLCs) and extrapulmonary small cell cancers (SCCs) are very aggressive tumors arising de novo as primary small cell cancer with characteristic genetic lesions in RB1 and TP53. Based on murine models, neuroendocrine stem cells of the terminal bronchioli have been postulated as the cellular origin of primary SCLC. However, both in lung and many other organs, combined small cell/non-small cell tumors and secondary transitions from non-small cell carcinomas upon cancer therapy to neuroendocrine and small cell tumors occur. We define features of "small cell-ness" based on neuroendocrine markers, characteristic RB1 and TP53 mutations and small cell morphology. Furthermore, here we identify a pathway driving the pathogenesis of secondary SCLC involving inactivating NOTCH mutations, activation of the NOTCH target ASCL1 and canonical WNT-signaling in the context of mutual bi-allelic RB1 and TP53 lesions. Additionally, we explored ASCL1 dependent RB inactivation by phosphorylation, which is reversible by CDK5 inhibition. We experimentally verify the NOTCH-ASCL1-RB-p53 signaling axis in vitro and validate its activation by genetic alterations in vivo. We analyzed clinical tumor samples including SCLC, SCC and pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas and adenocarcinomas using amplicon-based Next Generation Sequencing, immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization. In conclusion, we identified a novel pathway underlying rare secondary SCLC which may drive small cell carcinomas in organs other than lung, as well. PMID:26340530

  11. Losses of both products of the Cdkn2a/Arf locus contribute to asbestos-induced mesothelioma development and cooperate to accelerate tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A Altomare

    Full Text Available The CDKN2A/ARF locus encompasses overlapping tumor suppressor genes p16(INK4A and p14(ARF, which are frequently co-deleted in human malignant mesothelioma (MM. The importance of p16(INK4A loss in human cancer is well established, but the relative significance of p14(ARF loss has been debated. The tumor predisposition of mice singly deficient for either Ink4a or Arf, due to targeting of exons 1α or 1β, respectively, supports the idea that both play significant and nonredundant roles in suppressing spontaneous tumors. To further test this notion, we exposed Ink4a(+/- and Arf(+/- mice to asbestos, the major cause of MM. Asbestos-treated Ink4a(+/- and Arf(+/- mice showed increased incidence and shorter latency of MM relative to wild-type littermates. MMs from Ink4a(+/- mice exhibited biallelic inactivation of Ink4a, loss of Arf or p53 expression and frequent loss of p15(Ink4b. In contrast, MMs from Arf(+/- mice exhibited loss of Arf expression, but did not require loss of Ink4a or Ink4b. Mice doubly deficient for Ink4a and Arf, due to deletion of Cdkn2a/Arf exon 2, showed accelerated asbestos-induced MM formation relative to mice deficient for Ink4a or Arf alone, and MMs exhibited biallelic loss of both tumor suppressor genes. The tumor suppressor function of Arf in MM was p53-independent, since MMs with loss of Arf retained functional p53. Collectively, these in vivo data indicate that both CDKN2A/ARF gene products suppress asbestos carcinogenicity. Furthermore, while inactivation of Arf appears to be crucial for MM pathogenesis, the inactivation of both p16(Ink4a and p19(Arf cooperate to accelerate asbestos-induced tumorigenesis.

  12. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutations (IDH1) and p16/CDKN2A copy number change in conventional chondrosarcomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Amary, M. F.; Ye, H; Forbes, G.; Damato, S; Maggiani, F.; Pollock, R; Tirabosco, R.; Flanagan, A M

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether IDH1 mutations are present in primary and relapsed (local and distal) conventional central chondrosarcomas; and secondly, to assess if loss of p16/CDKN2A is associated with tumour grade progression, 102 tumour samples from 37 patients, including material from presenting and relapse events, were assessed. All wild-type cases for IDH1 R132 substitutions were also tested for IDH2 R172 and R140 alterations. The primary tumour and the most recent relapse sample were tested for...

  13. The absence of Ser389 phosphorylation in p53 affects the basal gene expression level of many p53-dependent genes and alters the biphasic response to UV exposure in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Bruning; W. Bruins; M.J. Jonker; E. Zwart; T.V. van der Hoeven; J.L.A. Pennings; H. Rauwerda; A. de Vries; T.M. Breit

    2008-01-01

    Phosphorylation is important in p53-mediated DNA damage responses. After UV irradiation, p53 is phosphorylated specifically at murine residue Ser389. Phosphorylation mutant p53.S389A cells and mice show reduced apoptosis and compromised tumor suppression after UV irradiation. We investigated the und

  14. Neurodegeneration in Autoimmune Optic Neuritis Is Associated with Altered APP Cleavage in Neurons and Up-Regulation of p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Herold

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS. Histopathological and radiological analysis revealed that neurodegeneration occurs early in the disease course. However, the pathological mechanisms involved in neurodegeneration are poorly understood. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in Brown Norway rats (BN-rats is a well-established animal model, especially of the neurodegenerative aspects of MS. Previous studies in this animal model indicated that loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, the neurons that form the axons of the optic nerve, occurs in the preclinical phase of the disease and is in part independent of overt histopathological changes of the optic nerve. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genes which are involved in neuronal cell loss at different disease stages of EAE. Furthermore, genes that are highly specific for autoimmune-driven neurodegeneration were compared to those regulated in RGCs after optic nerve axotomy at corresponding time points. Using laser capture micro dissection we isolated RNA from unfixed RGCs and performed global transcriptome analysis of retinal neurons. In total, we detected 582 genes sequentially expressed in the preclinical phase and 1150 genes in the clinical manifest EAE (P 1.5. Furthermore, using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA, we identified amyloid precursor protein (APP as a potential upstream regulator of changes in gene expression in the preclinical EAE but neither in clinical EAE, nor at any time point after optic nerve transection. Therefore, the gene pathway analysis lead to the hypothesis that altered cleavage of APP in neurons in the preclinical phase of EAE leads to the enhanced production of APP intracellular domain (AICD, which in turn acts as a transcriptional regulator and thereby initiates an apoptotic signaling cascade via up-regulation of the target gene p

  15. Islet biology, the CDKN2A/B locus and type 2 diabetes risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yahui; Sharma, Rohit B; Nwosu, Benjamin U; Alonso, Laura C

    2016-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes, fuelled by the obesity epidemic, is an escalating worldwide cause of personal hardship and public cost. Diabetes incidence increases with age, and many studies link the classic senescence and ageing protein p16(INK4A) to diabetes pathophysiology via pancreatic islet biology. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have unequivocally linked the CDKN2A/B locus, which encodes p16 inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (p16(INK4A)) and three other gene products, p14 alternate reading frame (p14(ARF)), p15(INK4B) and antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL), with human diabetes risk. However, the mechanism by which the CDKN2A/B locus influences diabetes risk remains uncertain. Here, we weigh the evidence that CDKN2A/B polymorphisms impact metabolic health via islet biology vs effects in other tissues. Structured in a bedside-to-bench-to-bedside approach, we begin with a summary of the evidence that the CDKN2A/B locus impacts diabetes risk and a brief review of the basic biology of CDKN2A/B gene products. The main emphasis of this work is an in-depth look at the nuanced roles that CDKN2A/B gene products and related proteins play in the regulation of beta cell mass, proliferation and insulin secretory function, as well as roles in other metabolic tissues. We finish with a synthesis of basic biology and clinical observations, incorporating human physiology data. We conclude that it is likely that the CDKN2A/B locus influences diabetes risk through both islet and non-islet mechanisms. PMID:27155872

  16. Celecoxib Treatment Alters p53 and MDM2 Expression via COX-2 Crosstalk in A549 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharghabi, Mehdi; Rezaei, Farhang; Mir Mohammadrezaei, Fereshteh; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of the lung cancer. It is known that COX-2 negatively regulates the activity of a number of tumor suppressors, including p53. Consequently, inhibition of COX-2 signaling is anticipated to be a promising approach to stabilize p53 functionality. In this regard, we investigated the effect of COX-2 signaling blockade on p53 and COX-2expression in A549 cells. Cell viability was assessed using MTT and protein expression was measured using Western Blot assay. Results revealed that Celecoxib dose-dependently induced growth inhibition within 24 h. However, prolonged exposure to the drug up to 48 h led to increase cell viability compared to the corresponding control. Western blot analysis demonstrated that Celecoxib could augment p53 expression within 24 h, independently of COX-2 inhibition. In contrast, Celecoxib treatment not only returned p53 to the control level, but also strikingly induced COX-2 expression within 48 h. Of further relevance, Celecoxib exposure could significantly result in MDM2 elevation at 48 h. These findings represent p53 as a molecular target being interconnected with COX-2 signaling axis upon Celecoxib treatment. Moreover, our data point toward the possibility that Celecoxib treatment may not be a proper therapeutic strategy in lung cancer cells owing to its potential role in the activation of oncogenes, including COX-2 and MDM2 which seemingly confers a chemoresistance circumstance to the cell. Consequently, these results underscore intensive preclinical assessment prior to applying COX-2 inhibitors in the treatment of lung tumors. PMID:27642319

  17. Radiosensitivity profiles from a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines exhibiting genetic alterations in p53 and disparate DNA-dependent protein kinase activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langland, Gregory T.; Yannone, Steven M.; Langland, Rachel A.; Nakao, Aki; Guan, Yinghui; Long, Sydney B.T.; Vonguyen, Lien; Chen, David J.; Gray, Joe W; Chen, Fanqing

    2009-09-07

    The variability of radiation responses in ovarian tumors and tumor-derived cell lines is poorly understood. Since both DNA repair capacity and p53 status can significantly alter radiation sensitivity, we evaluated these factors along with radiation sensitivity in a panel of sporadic human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. We observed a gradation of radiation sensitivity among these sixteen lines, with a five-fold difference in the LD50 between the most radiosensitive and the most radioresistant cells. The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is essential for the repair of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks in human somatic cells. Therefore, we measured gene copy number, expression levels, protein abundance, genomic copy and kinase activity for DNA-PK in all of our cell lines. While there were detectable differences in DNA-PK between the cell lines, there was no clear correlation with any of these differences and radiation sensitivity. In contrast, p53 function as determined by two independent methods, correlated well with radiation sensitivity, indicating p53 mutant ovarian cancer cells are typically radioresistant relative to p53 wild-type lines. These data suggest that the activity of regulatory molecules such as p53 may be better indicators of radiation sensitivity than DNA repair enzymes such as DNAPK in ovarian cancer.

  18. CDKN2A-mutation i en familie med arveligt malignt melanom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djursby, Malene; Wadt, Karin; Lorentzen, Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) is a frequent form of cancer with increasing incidence. 6-10% of patients with MM report a family history of MM, and in most populations 2% of unselected cases of MM carry a CDKN2A mutation. tvWe present a family with 24 cases of MM in nine persons from several generations......, caused by a previously undescribed germ-line intronic mutation in CDKN2A. Through genetic counselling and genetic testing high-risk persons in the family are located and offered regular screening for MM.......Malignant melanoma (MM) is a frequent form of cancer with increasing incidence. 6-10% of patients with MM report a family history of MM, and in most populations 2% of unselected cases of MM carry a CDKN2A mutation. tvWe present a family with 24 cases of MM in nine persons from several generations...

  19. Over-expression of p53 mutants in LNCaP cells alters tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study has investigated the impact of three specific dominant-negative p53 mutants (F134L, M237L, and R273H) on tumorigenesis by LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Mutant p53 proteins were associated with an increased subcutaneous 'take rate' in NOD-SCID mice, and increased production of PSA. Tumors expressing F134L and R273H grew slower than controls, and were associated with decreased necrosis and apoptosis, but not hypoxia. Interestingly, hypoxia levels were increased in tumors expressing M237L. There was less proliferation in F134L-bearing tumors compared to control, but this was not statistically significant. Angiogenesis was decreased in tumors expressing F134L and R273H compared with M237L, or controls. Conditioned medium from F134L tumors inhibited growth of normal human umbilical-vein endothelial cells but not telomerase-immortalized bone marrow endothelial cells. F134L tumor supernatants showed lower levels of VEGF and endostatin compared with supernatants from tumors expressing other mutants. Our results support the possibility that decreased angiogenesis might account for reduced growth rate of tumor cells expressing the F134L p53 mutation

  20. Detection of Homozygous Deletions and Mutations in the CDKN2A Gene in Hydatidiform Moles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Shuying Wu; Ying Gu; Yan Zhu; Xiaowei Zhang

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate homozygous deletions and mutations in the CDKN2A gene (p16INK4a and p14ARF gene) in hydatidiform moles.METHODS A total of 38 hydatidiform mole samples and 30 villi samples were examined for homozygous deletions in the CDKN2A gene by PCR and for mutations by DHPLC.RESULTS I) Among 38 hydatidiform mole samples,homozygous deletions in the p16INK4a exon 1 were identified in 5 cases (13.2%), while no homozygous deletions were found in the p16INK4a exon 1 of 30 early-pregnancy samples. The rates of those deletions in hydatidiform compared to early-pregnancy villi samples was statistically significant (P = 0.036). Ii) No homozygous deletions in the p14ARF exon 1 or p16INK4a exon 2 were found in any of the hydatidiform moles or early-preganancy samples, iii)In all hydatidiform moles and early-pregnancy villi samples, no mutations were detected by DHPLC.CONCLUSION We suggest there may be a close correlation between homozygous deletions in the CDKN2A gene and occurrence of hydatidiform moles variation in the CDKN2A gene is mainly caused by homozygous deletions, while mutations may be not a major cause.

  1. Alterations in p53-specific T cells and other lymphocyte subsets in breast cancer patients during vaccination with p53-peptide loaded dendritic cells and low-dose interleukin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Pedersen, Anders E; Nikolajsen, Kirsten;

    2008-01-01

    We have previously established a cancer vaccine using autologous DCs, generated by in vitro stimulation with IL-4 and GM-CSF, and pulsed with six HLA-A*0201 binding wild-type p53 derived peptides. This vaccine was used in combination with low-dose interleukin-2 in a recently published clinical...... Phase II trial where 26 HLA-A2+ patients with progressive late-stage metastatic breast cancer (BC) were included. Almost 1/3rd of the patients obtained stable disease or minor regression during treatment with a positive correlation to tumour over-expression of p53. In the present study, we performed...... a comprehensive analysis of the effector stage of the p53-specific CD8+ T cells by the use of Dextramer Technology and multicolour FACS. Pre- and post-treatment blood samples from eight BC patients were analysed. Independent of clinical outcome p53-specific T cells were phenotypic distinctly antigen experienced...

  2. Dominant effects of Δ40p53 on p53 function and melanoma cell fate

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Rie; Markovic, Svetomir; Scrable, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    The p53 gene encodes 12 distinct isoforms some of which can alter p53 activity in the absence of genomic alteration. Endogenous p53 isoforms have been identified in cancers; however, the function of these isoforms remains unclear. In melanoma, the frequency of p53 mutations is relatively low compared to other cancers suggesting that these isoforms may play a larger role in regulating p53 activity. We hypothesized that p53 function and therefore cell fate might be altered by the presence of Δ4...

  3. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we rev...

  4. CDKN2A and BAP1 germline mutations predispose to melanoma and mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, M; Aspesi, A; Biasi, A; Casalone, E; Ferrante, D; Ogliara, P; Gironi, L C; Giorgione, R; Farinelli, P; Grosso, F; Libener, R; Rosato, S; Turchetti, D; Maffè, A; Casadio, C; Ascoli, V; Dianzani, C; Colombo, E; Piccolini, E; Pavesi, M; Miccoli, S; Mirabelli, D; Bracco, C; Righi, L; Boldorini, R; Papotti, M; Matullo, G; Magnani, C; Pasini, B; Dianzani, I

    2016-08-10

    BAP1 germline mutations predispose to a cancer predisposition syndrome that includes mesothelioma, cutaneous melanoma, uveal melanoma and other cancers. This co-occurrence suggests that these tumors share a common carcinogenic pathway. To evaluate this hypothesis, we studied 40 Italian families with mesothelioma and/or melanoma. The probands were sequenced for BAP1 and for the most common melanoma predisposition genes (i.e. CDKN2A, CDK4, TERT, MITF and POT1) to investigate if these genes may also confer susceptibility to mesothelioma. In two out of six families with both mesothelioma and melanoma we identified either a germline nonsense mutation (c.1153C > T, p.Arg385*) in BAP1 or a recurrent pathogenic germline mutation (c.301G > T, p.Gly101Trp) in CDKN2A. Our study suggests that CDKN2A, in addition to BAP1, could be involved in the melanoma and mesothelioma susceptibility, leading to the rare familial cancer syndromes. It also suggests that these tumors share key steps that drive carcinogenesis and that other genes may be involved in inherited predisposition to malignant mesothelioma and melanoma. PMID:27181379

  5. Mutant p53: multiple mechanisms define biologic activity in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Paul Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of p53 alterations involve missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may acquire novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in multiple model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 are reviewed and their limitations discussed.

  6. DNA Methylation in exon 1 of CDKN2A gene in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colon cancer samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Faramarzi

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: The result of this study has been confirmed the role of CDKN2A gene promoter methylation of CpG sites of colorectal cancer as the leading cause of colorectal cancer. These data suggest that epigenetic silencing via aberrant methylation of the CDKN2A promoter plays a critical role in the inactivation of this tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer and can be used as a marker for early detection and identification of potential applications.

  7. The meta-analysis between p53 alteration and smoking, alcohol consumption in esophageal cancer among Chinese population%中国食管癌患者p53基因改变与吸烟、饮酒的Meta分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉雪; 吴海燕; 李慧岩

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨吸烟、饮酒与中国人群食管癌p53基因改变的关系.方法 在Medline和CNKI数据库中系统检索相关文献,应用Meta分析的方法 进行定量综合分析.结果 共纳入14篇文献,累积食管癌2108例,p53基因改变1142例,平均阳性率为54.2%.在中国人群中,吸烟与食管癌p53基因改变的合并OR值为1.61(95% CI:1.09-2.38),P=0.003;饮酒与食管癌p53基因改变的合并OR值为1.91(95% CI:1.44-2.53),P<0.001.结论 中国人群中,吸烟、饮酒均与食管癌p53基因改变有显著联系.%Objective To explore the association between smoking, alcohol consumption and p53 alteration in esophageal cancer among Chinese population. Method A systematic search was performed using the Medline and CNKI databases, and the eligible literatures were systematic reviewed. Results Fourteen studies were eligible for analysis,involving 2108 esophageal cancer cases and 1142( 54.2% )p53 alteration cases. Among Chinese population, the pooled OR for the association between smoking,alcohol drinking and p53 alteration in esophageal cancer were 1.61( 95% CI:l.09 - 2.38 ;P = 0.003 )and 1.91( 95 % CI:1.44 - 2.53 ;P < 0.001 ) , respectively. Conclusion The findings of this meta - analysis indicated that there were significant associations between smoking, alcohol consumption and p53 alteration in esophageal cancer among Chinese population.

  8. DNA-mediated oxidation of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Kathryn N; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2014-06-01

    Transcription factor p53 is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer. As a redox-active protein in direct contact with DNA, p53 can directly sense oxidative stress through DNA-mediated charge transport. Electron hole transport occurs over long distances through the π-stacked bases and leads to the oxidative dissociation of p53. The extent of protein dissociation depends upon the redox potential of the DNA in direct contact with each p53 monomer. The DNA sequence dependence of p53 oxidative dissociation was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assays using oligonucleotides containing both synthetic and human p53 consensus sequences with an appended photooxidant, anthraquinone. Greater p53 dissociation is observed from sequences containing low-redox potential purine regions, particularly guanine triplets. Using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of irradiated anthraquinone-modified DNA, the DNA damage sites corresponding to sites of preferred electron hole localization were determined. The resulting DNA damage preferentially localizes to guanine doublets and triplets. Oxidative DNA damage is inhibited in the presence of p53, but only at sites in direct contact with p53. From these data, predictions about the sensitivity of human p53-binding sites to oxidative stress as well as possible biological implications have been made. On the basis of our data, the guanine pattern within the purine region of each p53-binding site determines the response of p53 to DNA oxidation, yielding for some sequences the oxidative dissociation of p53 from a distance and thereby providing another potential role for DNA charge transport chemistry within the cell. PMID:24853816

  9. The MTAP-CDKN2A Locus Confers Susceptibility to a Naturally Occurring Canine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearin, Abigail L.; Hedan, Benoit; Cadieu, Edouard; Erich, Suzanne A.; Schmidt, Emmett V.; Faden, Daniel L.; Cullen, John; Abadie, Jerome; Kwon, Erika M.; Gröne, Andrea; Devauchelle, Patrick; Rimbault, Maud; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Lynch, Mary; Galibert, Francis; Breen, Matthew; Rutteman, Gerard R.; André, Catherine; Parker, Heidi G.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Advantages offered by canine population substructure, combined with clinical presentations similar to human disorders, makes the dog an attractive system for studies of cancer genetics. Cancers that have been difficult to study in human families or populations are of particular interest. Histiocytic sarcoma is a rare and poorly understood neoplasm in humans that occurs in 15–25% of Bernese Mountain Dogs (BMD). Methods Genomic DNA was collected from affected and unaffected BMD in North America (NA) and Europe. Both independent and combined genome wide association studies (GWAS) were used to identify cancer-associated loci. Fine mapping and sequencing narrowed the primary locus to a single gene region. Results Both populations shared the same primary locus, which features a single haplotype spanning MTAP and part of CDKN2A and is present in 96% of affected BMD. The haplotype is within the region homologous to human chromosome 9p21, which has been implicated in several types of cancer. Conclusions We present the first GWAS for HS in any species. The data identify an associated haplotype in the highly cited tumor suppressor locus near CDKN2A. These data demonstrate the power of studying distinctive malignancies in highly predisposed dog breeds. Impact Here, we establish a naturally-occurring model of cancer susceptibility due to CDKN2 dysregulation, thus providing insight regarding this cancer-associated, complex, and poorly understood genomic region. PMID:22623710

  10. Altered expression profile of glycolytic enzymes during testicular ischemia reperfusion injury is associated with the p53/TIGAR pathway: effect of fructose 1,6-diphosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renno, Waleed M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Testicular ischemia reperfusion injury (tIRI) is considered the mechanism underlying the pathology of testicular torsion and detorsion. Left untreated, tIRI can induce testis dysfunction, damage to spermatogenesis and possible infertility. In this study, we aimed to assess the activities and expression of glycolytic enzymes (GEs) in the testis and their possible modulation during tIRI. The effect of fructose 1,6-diphosphate (FDP), a glycolytic intermediate, on tIRI was also investigated. Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: sham, unilateral tIRI, and tIRI + FDP (2 mg/kg). tIRI was induced by occlusion of the testicular artery for 1 h followed by 4 h of reperfusion. FDP was injected peritoneally 30 min prior to reperfusion. Histological and biochemical analyses were used to assess damage to spermatogenesis, activities of major GEs, and energy and oxidative stress markers. The relative mRNA expression of GEs was evaluated by real-time PCR. ELISA and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the expression of p53 and TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR). Results. Histological analysis revealed tIRI-induced spermatogenic damage as represented by a significant decrease in the Johnsen biopsy score. In addition, tIRI reduced the activities of hexokinase 1, phosphofructokinase-1, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and lactate dehydrogenase C. However, mRNA expression downregulation was detected only for hexokinase 1, phosphoglycerate kinase 2, and lactate dehydrogenase C. ATP and NADPH depletion was also induced by tIRI and was accompanied by an increased Malondialdehyde concentration, reduced glutathione level, and reduced superoxide dismutase and catalase enzyme activities. The immunoexpression of p53 and TIGAR was markedly increased after tIRI. The above tIRI-induced alterations were attenuated by FDP treatment. Discussion. Our findings indicate that tIRI-induced spermatogenic damage is associated with

  11. Altered expression profile of glycolytic enzymes during testicular ischemia reperfusion injury is associated with the p53/TIGAR pathway: effect of fructose 1,6-diphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maghrebi, May; Renno, Waleed M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Testicular ischemia reperfusion injury (tIRI) is considered the mechanism underlying the pathology of testicular torsion and detorsion. Left untreated, tIRI can induce testis dysfunction, damage to spermatogenesis and possible infertility. In this study, we aimed to assess the activities and expression of glycolytic enzymes (GEs) in the testis and their possible modulation during tIRI. The effect of fructose 1,6-diphosphate (FDP), a glycolytic intermediate, on tIRI was also investigated. Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: sham, unilateral tIRI, and tIRI + FDP (2 mg/kg). tIRI was induced by occlusion of the testicular artery for 1 h followed by 4 h of reperfusion. FDP was injected peritoneally 30 min prior to reperfusion. Histological and biochemical analyses were used to assess damage to spermatogenesis, activities of major GEs, and energy and oxidative stress markers. The relative mRNA expression of GEs was evaluated by real-time PCR. ELISA and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the expression of p53 and TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR). Results. Histological analysis revealed tIRI-induced spermatogenic damage as represented by a significant decrease in the Johnsen biopsy score. In addition, tIRI reduced the activities of hexokinase 1, phosphofructokinase-1, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and lactate dehydrogenase C. However, mRNA expression downregulation was detected only for hexokinase 1, phosphoglycerate kinase 2, and lactate dehydrogenase C. ATP and NADPH depletion was also induced by tIRI and was accompanied by an increased Malondialdehyde concentration, reduced glutathione level, and reduced superoxide dismutase and catalase enzyme activities. The immunoexpression of p53 and TIGAR was markedly increased after tIRI. The above tIRI-induced alterations were attenuated by FDP treatment. Discussion. Our findings indicate that tIRI-induced spermatogenic damage is associated with

  12. Genotyping Cancer-Associated Genes in Chordoma Identifies Mutations in Oncogenes and Areas of Chromosomal Loss Involving CDKN2A, PTEN, and SMARCB1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Edwin; MacConaill, Laura E.; Cote, Gregory M.; Le, Long P.; Shen, Jacson K.; Nielsen, Gunnlaugur P.; Iafrate, Anthony J.; Garraway, Levi A.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying chordoma pathogenesis are unknown. We therefore sought to identify novel mutations to better understand chordoma biology and to potentially identify therapeutic targets. Given the relatively high costs of whole genome sequencing, we performed a focused genetic analysis using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometer (Sequenom iPLEX genotyping). We tested 865 hotspot mutations in 111 oncogenes and selected tumor suppressor genes (OncoMap v. 3.0) of 45 human chordoma tumor samples. Of the analyzed samples, seven were identified with at least one mutation. Six of these were from fresh frozen samples, and one was from a paraffin embedded sample. These observations were validated using an independent platform using homogeneous mass extend MALDI-TOF (Sequenom hME Genotyping). These genetic alterations include: ALK (A877S), CTNNB1 (T41A), NRAS (Q61R), PIK3CA (E545K), PTEN (R130), CDKN2A (R58*), and SMARCB1 (R40*). This study reports on the largest comprehensive mutational analysis of chordomas performed to date. To focus on mutations that have the greatest chance of clinical relevance, we tested only oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been previously implicated in the tumorigenesis of more common malignancies. We identified rare genetic changes that may have functional significance to the underlying biology and potential therapeutics for chordomas. Mutations in CDKN2A and PTEN occurred in areas of chromosomal copy loss. When this data is paired with the studies showing 18 of 21 chordoma samples displaying copy loss at the locus for CDKN2A, 17 of 21 chordoma samples displaying copy loss at PTEN, and 3 of 4 chordoma samples displaying deletion at the SMARCB1 locus, we can infer that a loss of heterozygosity at these three loci may play a significant role in chordoma pathogenesis. PMID:24983247

  13. Genotyping cancer-associated genes in chordoma identifies mutations in oncogenes and areas of chromosomal loss involving CDKN2A, PTEN, and SMARCB1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Choy

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying chordoma pathogenesis are unknown. We therefore sought to identify novel mutations to better understand chordoma biology and to potentially identify therapeutic targets. Given the relatively high costs of whole genome sequencing, we performed a focused genetic analysis using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometer (Sequenom iPLEX genotyping. We tested 865 hotspot mutations in 111 oncogenes and selected tumor suppressor genes (OncoMap v. 3.0 of 45 human chordoma tumor samples. Of the analyzed samples, seven were identified with at least one mutation. Six of these were from fresh frozen samples, and one was from a paraffin embedded sample. These observations were validated using an independent platform using homogeneous mass extend MALDI-TOF (Sequenom hME Genotyping. These genetic alterations include: ALK (A877S, CTNNB1 (T41A, NRAS (Q61R, PIK3CA (E545K, PTEN (R130, CDKN2A (R58*, and SMARCB1 (R40*. This study reports on the largest comprehensive mutational analysis of chordomas performed to date. To focus on mutations that have the greatest chance of clinical relevance, we tested only oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been previously implicated in the tumorigenesis of more common malignancies. We identified rare genetic changes that may have functional significance to the underlying biology and potential therapeutics for chordomas. Mutations in CDKN2A and PTEN occurred in areas of chromosomal copy loss. When this data is paired with the studies showing 18 of 21 chordoma samples displaying copy loss at the locus for CDKN2A, 17 of 21 chordoma samples displaying copy loss at PTEN, and 3 of 4 chordoma samples displaying deletion at the SMARCB1 locus, we can infer that a loss of heterozygosity at these three loci may play a significant role in chordoma pathogenesis.

  14. P53 mutations in Ewing's sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y K; Chi, S G; Kim, Y W; Park, H R; Unni, K K

    2001-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is one of the most frequently altered genes in human malignancies. To explore the implication of p53 alteration in Ewing's sarcoma, we analyzed the deletion and sequence alterations of p53 and abnormal amplification of MDM2, which acts as a functional inhibitor of p53, in 35 tissue specimens. Quantitative genomic PCR analysis showed that 2 of 35 tumors have extremely low levels of the p53 gene, indicating a homozygous deletion of the gene. Mutational analysis of exons 4 to 9 of p53 by PCR-SSCP revealed that 3 of 35 tumors carry sequence alterations in exons 5 or 8, and DNA sequencing analysis identified missense point mutations at codon 132 (AAG-->ATG, lysine-->methionine) and codon 135 (TGC-->TCC, cystein-->serine) in exon 5, and codon 287 (GAG-->GTG, glutamic acid-->valine) in exon 8 from these tumors. No abnormal amplification of the MDM2 gene was recognized. Taken together, our data demonstrate that p53 is genetically altered in a small fraction of Ewing's sarcoma.

  15. A study on p53 gene alterations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and their correlation to common dietary risk factors among population of the Kashmir valley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Imtiyaz Murtaza; Dhuha Mushtaq; Mushtaq A Margoob; Amit Dutt; Nisar Ahmad Wani; Ishfaq Ahmad; Mohan Lal Bhat

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To systematically examine the extent of correlation of risk factors, such as age, consumed dietary habit and familial predisposition with somatic Tp53 molecular lesion causal to elevate carcinogenesis severity of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) among the Kashmiri population of Northern India.METHODS: All cases (n = 51) and controls (n = 150) were permanent residents of the Kashmir valley. Genetic alterations were determined in exons 5-8 of Tp53 tumor suppressor gene among 45 ESCC cases histologically confirmed by PCR-SSCP analysis. Data for individual cancer cases (n = 45) and inpatient controls (n = 150) with non-cancer disease included information on family history of cancer, thirty prevailing common dietary risk factors along with patient's age group. Correlation of genetic lesion in p53 exons to animistic data from these parameters was generated by Chi-square test to all 45 histologically confirmed ESCC cases along with healthy controls.RESULTS: Thirty-five of 45 (77.8%) histologically characterized tumor samples had analogous somatic mutation as opposed to 1 of 45 normal sample obtained from adjacent region from the same patient showed germline mutation. The SSCP analysis demonstrated that most common p53 gene alterations were found in exon 6 (77.7%), that did not correlate with the age of the individual and clinicopathological parameters but showed significant concordance (P < 0.05) with familial history of cancer (CD = 58), suggesting germline predisposition at an unknown locus, and dietary habit of consuming locally grown Brassica vegetable "Hakh" (CD = 19.5),red chillies (CD = 20.2), hot salty soda tea (CD = 2.37) and local baked bread (CD = 1.1).CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that somatic chromosomal mutations, especially in exon 6 of Tp53 gene, among esophageal cancer patients of an ethnically homogenous population of Kashmir valley are closely related to continued exposure to various common dietary risk factors, especially hot salty tea

  16. Microbial Regulation of p53 Tumor Suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaika, Alexander I; Wei, Jinxiong; Noto, Jennifer M; Peek, Richard M

    2015-09-01

    p53 tumor suppressor has been identified as a protein interacting with the large T antigen produced by simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40). Subsequent research on p53 inhibition by SV40 and other tumor viruses has not only helped to gain a better understanding of viral biology, but also shaped our knowledge of human tumorigenesis. Recent studies have found, however, that inhibition of p53 is not strictly in the realm of viruses. Some bacterial pathogens also actively inhibit p53 protein and induce its degradation, resulting in alteration of cellular stress responses. This phenomenon was initially characterized in gastric epithelial cells infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that commonly infects the human stomach and is strongly linked to gastric cancer. Besides H. pylori, a number of other bacterial species were recently discovered to inhibit p53. These findings provide novel insights into host-bacteria interactions and tumorigenesis associated with bacterial infections. PMID:26379246

  17. Microbial Regulation of p53 Tumor Suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I Zaika

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor has been identified as a protein interacting with the large T antigen produced by simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40. Subsequent research on p53 inhibition by SV40 and other tumor viruses has not only helped to gain a better understanding of viral biology, but also shaped our knowledge of human tumorigenesis. Recent studies have found, however, that inhibition of p53 is not strictly in the realm of viruses. Some bacterial pathogens also actively inhibit p53 protein and induce its degradation, resulting in alteration of cellular stress responses. This phenomenon was initially characterized in gastric epithelial cells infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that commonly infects the human stomach and is strongly linked to gastric cancer. Besides H. pylori, a number of other bacterial species were recently discovered to inhibit p53. These findings provide novel insights into host-bacteria interactions and tumorigenesis associated with bacterial infections.

  18. Promoter methylation of CDKN2A and lack of p16 expression characterize patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The product of CDKN2A, p16 is an essential regulator of the cell cycle controlling the entry into the S-phase. Herein, we evaluated CDKN2A promoter methylation and p16 protein expression for the differentiation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from other liver tumors. Tumor and corresponding non-tumor liver tissue samples were obtained from 85 patients with liver tumors. CDKN2A promoter methylation was studied using MethyLight technique and methylation-specific PCR (MSP). In the MethyLight analysis, samples with ≥ 4% of PMR (percentage of methylated reference) were regarded as hypermethylated. p16 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in tissue sections (n = 148) obtained from 81 patients using an immunoreactivity score (IRS) ranging from 0 (no expression) to 6 (strong expression). Hypermethylation of the CDKN2A promoter was found in 23 HCCs (69.7%; mean PMR = 42.34 ± 27.8%), six (20.7%; mean PMR = 31.85 ± 18%) liver metastases and in the extralesional tissue of only one patient. Using MSP, 32% of the non-tumor (n = 85), 70% of the HCCs, 40% of the CCCs and 24% of the liver metastases were hypermethylated. Correspondingly, nuclear p16 expression was found immunohistochemically in five (10.9%, mean IRS = 0.5) HCCs, 23 (92%; mean IRS = 4.9) metastases and only occasionally in hepatocytes of non-lesional liver tissues (mean IRS = 1.2). The difference of CDKN2A-methylation and p16 protein expression between HCCs and liver metastases was statistically significant (p < 0.01, respectively). Promoter methylation of CDKN2A gene and lack of p16 expression characterize patients with HCC

  19. Mutation analysis of genes that control the G1/S cell cycle in melanoma: TP53, CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Nevot Miguel

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of genes involved in the control of progression from the G1 to the S phase of the cell cycle in melanoma tumors in not fully known. The aim of our study was to analyse mutations in TP53, CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B genes in melanoma tumors and melanoma cell lines Methods We analysed 39 primary and metastatic melanomas and 9 melanoma cell lines by single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP. Results The single-stranded technique showed heterozygous defects in the TP53 gene in 8 of 39 (20.5% melanoma tumors: three new single point mutations in intronic sequences (introns 1 and 2 and exon 10, and three new single nucleotide polymorphisms located in introns 1 and 2 (C to T transition at position 11701 in intron 1; C insertion at position 11818 in intron 2; and C insertion at position 11875 in intron 2. One melanoma tumor exhibited two heterozygous alterations in the CDKN2A exon 1 one of which was novel (stop codon, and missense mutation. No defects were found in the remaining genes. Conclusion These results suggest that these genes are involved in melanoma tumorigenesis, although they may be not the major targets. Other suppressor genes that may be informative of the mechanism of tumorigenesis in skin melanomas should be studied.

  20. Risk of Non-Melanoma Cancers in First-Degree Relatives of CDKN2A Mutation Carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Bhramar; DeLancey, John Oliver; Raskin, Leon; Everett, Jessica; Jeter, Joanne; Begg, Colin B; Orlow, Irene; Berwick, Marianne; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Kricker, Anne; Marrett, Loraine D; Millikan, Robert C.; Culver, Hoda Anton; Rosso, Stefano; Zanetti, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the risk of cancers other than melanoma among family members of CDKN2A mutation carriers using data from the Genes, Environment and Melanoma study. Relative risks (RRs) of all non-melanoma cancers among first-degree relatives (FDRs) of melanoma patients with CDKN2A mutations (n = 65) and FDRs of melanoma patients without mutations (n = 3537) were calculated as the ratio of estimated event rates (number of cancers/total person-years) in FDRs of carrier...

  1. Correlation of p53 gene mutation and expression of P53 protein in cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Fang Liu; Hao Zhang; Shi-Guang Zhu; Xian-Ting Zhou; Hai-Long Su; Zheng Xu; Shao-Jun Li

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the tumor suppressor gene p53 mutations and study the correlation of p53 gene mutation and the expression of P53 protein in cholangiocarcinoma.METHODS: A total of 36 unselected, frozen samples of cholangiocarcinoma were collected. p53 gene status(exon 5-8) and P53 protein were examined by automated sequencing and immunohistochemical staining, combined with the clinical parameters of patients.RESULTS: p53 gene mutations were found in 22 of 36 (61.1%) patients. Nineteen of 36 (52.8%) patients were positive for P53 protein expression. There were significant differences in extent of differentiation and invasion between the positive and negative expression of P53 protein. However, there were no significant differences in pathologic parameters between the mutations and non-mutations.CONCLUSION: The alterations of the p53 gene evaluated by DNA sequence analysis is relatively accurate. Expression of P53 protein could not act as an independent index to estimate the prognosis of cholangiocarcinoma.

  2. OTUD5 regulates p53 stability by deubiquitinating p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judong Luo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The p53 tumour suppressor protein is a transcription factor that prevents oncogenic progression by activating the expression of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest genes in stressed cells. The stability of p53 is tightly regulated by ubiquitin-dependent degradation, driven mainly by its negative regulators ubiquitin ligase MDM2. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we have identified OTUD5 as a DUB that interacts with and deubiquitinates p53. OTUD5 forms a direct complex with p53 and controls level of ubiquitination. The function of OTUD5 is required to allow the rapid activation of p53-dependent transcription and a p53-dependent apoptosis in response to DNA damage stress. CONCLUSIONS: As a novel deubiquitinating enzyme for p53, OTUD5 is required for the stabilization and the activation of a p53 response.

  3. Genome-wide retroviral insertional tagging of genes involved in cancer in Cdkn2a-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders H; Turner, Geoffrey; Trubetskoy, Alla;

    2002-01-01

    We have used large-scale insertional mutagenesis to identify functional landmarks relevant to cancer in the recently completed mouse genome sequence. We infected Cdkn2a(-/-) mice with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) to screen for loci that can participate in tumorigenesis in collaboration ...

  4. Genome-wide retroviral insertional tagging of genes involved in cancer in Cdkn2a-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Anders H; Turner, Geoffrey; Trubetskoy, Alla; Verhoeven, Els; Wientjens, Ellen; Hulsman, Danielle; Russell, Robert; DePinho, Ronald A; Lenz, Jack; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2002-09-01

    We have used large-scale insertional mutagenesis to identify functional landmarks relevant to cancer in the recently completed mouse genome sequence. We infected Cdkn2a(-/-) mice with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) to screen for loci that can participate in tumorigenesis in collaboration with loss of the Cdkn2a-encoded tumor suppressors p16INK4a and p19ARF. Insertional mutagenesis by the latent retrovirus was synergistic with loss of Cdkn2a expression, as indicated by a marked acceleration in the development of both myeloid and lymphoid tumors. We isolated 747 unique sequences flanking retroviral integration sites and mapped them against the mouse genome sequence databases from Celera and Ensembl. In addition to 17 insertions targeting gene loci known to be cancer-related, we identified a total of 37 new common insertion sites (CISs), of which 8 encode components of signaling pathways that are involved in cancer. The effectiveness of large-scale insertional mutagenesis in a sensitized genetic background is demonstrated by the preference for activation of MAP kinase signaling, collaborating with Cdkn2a loss in generating the lymphoid and myeloid tumors. Collectively, our results show that large-scale retroviral insertional mutagenesis in genetically predisposed mice is useful both as a system for identifying genes underlying cancer and as a genetic framework for the assignment of such genes to specific oncogenic pathways.

  5. A neurogenic tumor containing a low-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) component with loss of p16 expression and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A/p16: a case report showing progression from a neurofibroma to a high-grade MPNST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Shogo; Koda, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Development of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) is a stepwise process that involves the alteration of many cell cycle regulators and the double inactivation of the NF1 gene. Inactivation of the TP53 gene and deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene are known to play an important role in the process. Herein, we present a 19-year-old man with a familial history of neurofibromatosis type 1, in whom the tumor arose from the intercostal nerve and showed 3 components: a neurofibroma, a low-grade MPNST, and a high-grade MPNST. Loss of p16 expression and homozygous deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene were observed in both the low-grade and the high-grade MPNST. In contrast to low-grade MPNSTs, high-grade MPNSTs generally tend to lose expression of p16 and harbor homozygous deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene. Loss of p16 expression and homozygous deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene in low-grade MPNST in our case might be related to its progression to high-grade MPNST. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study correlating the p16 expression status and CDKN2A/p16 gene alteration in low-grade MPNSTs. PMID:26191206

  6. P53 MUTATIONS IN HUMAN LUNG-TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MILLER, CW; ASLO, A; KOK, K; YOKOTA, J; BUYS, CHCM; TERADA, M; KOEFFLER, HP; Simon, K.

    1992-01-01

    Mutation of one p53 allele and loss of the normal p53 allele [loss of heterozygosity (LOH)] occur in many tumors including lung cancers. These alterations apparently contribute to development of cancer by interfering with the tumor suppressor activity of p53. We directly sequenced amplified DNA in t

  7. Targeting Oncogenic Mutant p53 for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p53 in ...

  8. Exposure to depleted uranium does not alter the co-expression of HER-2/neu and p53 in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Toriahi Kaswer M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amongst the extensive literature on immunohistochemical profile of breast cancer, very little is found on populations exposed to a potential risk factor such as depleted uranium. This study looked at the immunohistochemical expression of HER-2/neu (c-erbB2 and p53 in different histological types of breast cancer found in the middle Euphrates region of Iraq, where the population has been exposed to high levels of depleted uranium. Findings The present investigation was performed over a period starting from September 2008 to April 2009. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded blocks from 70 patients with breast cancer (62 ductal and 8 lobular carcinoma were included in this study. A group of 25 patients with fibroadenoma was included as a comparative group, and 20 samples of normal breast tissue sections were used as controls. Labeled streptavidin-biotin (LSAB+ complex method was employed for immunohistochemical detection of HER-2/neu and p53. The detection rate of HER-2/neu and p53 immunohistochemical expression were 47.14% and 35.71% respectively in malignant tumors; expression was negative in the comparative and control groups (p HER-2/neu immunostaining was significantly associated with histological type, tumor size, nodal involvement, and recurrence of breast carcinoma (p p Both biomarkers were positively correlated with each other. Furthermore, all the cases that co-expressed both HER-2/neu and p53 showed the most unfavorable biopathological profile. Conclusion P53 and HER-2/neu over-expression play an important role in pathogenesis of breast carcinoma. The findings indicate that in regions exposed to high levels of depleted uranium, although p53 and HER-2/neu overexpression are both high, correlation of their expression with age, grade, tumor size, recurrence and lymph node involvement is similar to studies that have been conducted on populations not exposed to depleted uranium. HER-2/neu expression in breast cancer was higher

  9. p53 Cellular Localization and Function in Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweddle, Deborah A.; Malcolm, Archie J.; Cole, Michael; Pearson, Andrew D.J.; Lunec, John

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that p53 accumulation in neuroblastoma, in the absence of mutation, is associated with functional inactivation, which interferes with downstream mediators of p53 function. To test this hypothesis, p53 expression, location, and functional integrity was examined in neuroblastoma by irradiating 6 neuroblastoma cell lines and studying the effects on p53 transcriptional function, cell cycle arrest, and induction of apoptosis, together with the transcriptional function of p53 after irradiation in three ex vivo primary, untreated neuroblastoma tumors. p53 sequencing showed five neuroblastoma cell lines, two of which were MYCN-amplified, and that all of the tumors were wild-type for p53. p53 was found to be predominantly nuclear before and after irradiation and to up-regulate the p53 responsive genes WAF1 and MDM2 in wild-type p53 cell lines and a poorly-differentiated neuroblastoma, but not a differentiating neuroblastoma or the ganglioneuroblastoma part of a nodular ganglioneuroblastoma in short term culture. This suggests intact p53 transcriptional activity in proliferating neuroblastoma. Irradiation of wild-type p53 neuroblastoma cell lines led to G1 cell cycle arrest in cell lines without MYCN amplification, but not in those with MYCN amplification, despite induction of WAF1. This suggests MYCN amplification may alter downstream mediators of p53 function in neuroblastoma. PMID:11395384

  10. Exposure to depleted uranium does not alter the co-expression of HER-2/neu and p53 in breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Toriahi Kaswer M; Jumaa Alaa S; Al-Janabi Asad A; Al-Mumen Mais M; Yasseen Akeel A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Amongst the extensive literature on immunohistochemical profile of breast cancer, very little is found on populations exposed to a potential risk factor such as depleted uranium. This study looked at the immunohistochemical expression of HER-2/neu (c-erbB2) and p53 in different histological types of breast cancer found in the middle Euphrates region of Iraq, where the population has been exposed to high levels of depleted uranium. Findings The present investigation was per...

  11. Sulphur alters NFκB-p300 cross-talk in favour of p53-p300 to induce apoptosis in non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shilpi; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Guha, Deblina; Kajal, Kirti; Khan, Poulami; Chakraborty, Sreeparna; Mukherjee, Shravanti; Paul, Shrutarshi; Manchanda, Rajkumar; Khurana, Anil; Nayak, Debadatta; Chakrabarty, Rathin; Sa, Gaurisankar; Das, Tanya

    2015-08-01

    Adverse side effects of chemotherapy during cancer treatment have shifted considerable focus towards therapies that are not only targeted but are also devoid of toxic side effects. We evaluated the antitumorigenic activity of sulphur, and delineated the molecular mechanisms underlying sulphur-induced apoptosis in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells. A search for the underlying mechanism revealed that the choice between the two cellular processes, NFκBp65-mediated survival and p53-mediated apoptosis, was decided by the competition for a limited pool of transcriptional coactivator protein p300 in NSCLC cells. In contrast, sulphur inhibited otherwise upregulated survival signaling in NSCLC cells by perturbing the nuclear translocation of p65NFκB, its association with p300 histone acetylase, and subsequent transcription of Bcl-2. Under such anti-survival condition, induction of p53-p300 cross-talk enhanced the transcriptional activity of p53 and intrinsic mitochondrial death cascade. Overall, the findings of this preclinical study clearly delineated the molecular mechanism underlying the apoptogenic effect of the non-toxic homeopathic remedy, sulphur, in NSCLC cells.

  12. p53 mutations increase resistance to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouse and human tumors of diverse origin frequently have somatically acquired mutations or rearrangements of the p53 gene, or they have lost one or both copies of the gene. Although wild-type p53 protein is believed to function as a tumor-suppressor gene, it is as yet unclear how p53 mutations lead to neoplastic development. Wild-type p53 has been postulated to play a role in DNA repair, suggesting that expression of mutant forms of p53 might alter cellular resistance to the DNA damage caused by γ radiation. Moreover, p53 is thought to function as a cell cycle checkpoint after irradiation, also suggesting that mutant p53 might change the cellular proliferative response to radiation. The authors have used transgenic mice expressing one of two mutant alleles of p53 to test this prediction. Their results show that expression of both mutant variants of the mouse p53 gene significantly increases the cellular resistance of a variety of hematopoietic cell lineages to γ radiation. These observations provide direct evidence that p53 mutations affect the cellular response to DNA damage, either by increasing DNA repair processes or, possibly, by increasing cellular tolerance to DNA damage. The association of p53 mutations with increased radioresistance suggests possible mechanisms through which alterations in the p53 gene might lead to oncogenic transformation. 53 refs., 5 figs

  13. DNA Methylation in exon 1 of CDKN2A gene in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colon cancer samples

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Faramarzi; Elham Moslemi; Amir Izadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The molecular studies indicate some of the genes in the promoter region itself, will undergo methylation. Methylation of CpG islands in the promoter region of that cause silence or reduced expression of genes involved in cell growth pathways, which are colorectal cancer causing agents. Detection of methylation status can be used as a marker for cancer diagnosis and prediction of disease. CDKN2A tumor suppressor gene encodes a protein, which inhibit CDK 4/6 and loss of retinoblasto...

  14. Genome-wide analyses implicate 33 loci in heritable dog osteosarcoma, including regulatory variants near CDKN2A/B

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Elinor K.; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Ivansson, Emma; Thomas, Rachael; Elvers, Ingegerd; Wright, Jason; Howald, Cedric; Tonomura, Noriko; Perloski, Michele; Swofford, Ross; Biagi, Tara; Fryc, Sarah; Anderson, Nathan; Courtay-Cahen, Celine; Youell, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Canine osteosarcoma is clinically nearly identical to the human disease, but is common and highly heritable, making genetic dissection feasible. Results: Through genome-wide association analyses in three breeds (greyhounds, Rottweilers, and Irish wolfhounds), we identify 33 inherited risk loci explaining 55% to 85% of phenotype variance in each breed. The greyhound locus exhibiting the strongest association, located 150 kilobases upstream of the genes CDKN2A/B, is also the most re...

  15. Genome-wide analyses implicate 33 loci in heritable dog osteosarcoma, including regulatory variants near CDKN2A/B

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Elinor K.; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Ivansson, Emma; Thomas, Rachael; Elvers, Ingegerd; Wright, Jason; Howald, Cedric; Tonomura, Noriko; Perloski, Michele; Swofford, Ross; Biagi, Tara; Fryc, Sarah; Anderson, Nathan; Courtay-Cahen, Celine; Youell, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Canine osteosarcoma is clinically nearly identical to the human disease, but is common and highly heritable, making genetic dissection feasible. RESULTS: Through genome-wide association analyses in three breeds (greyhounds, Rottweilers, and Irish wolfhounds), we identify 33 inherited risk loci explaining 55% to 85% of phenotype variance in each breed. The greyhound locus exhibiting the strongest association, located 150 kilobases upstream of the genes CDKN2A/B, is also the most re...

  16. Genome-wide analyses implicate 33 loci in heritable dog osteosarcoma, including regulatory variants near CDKN2A/B

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Elinor K.; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Ivansson, Emma; Thomas, Rachael; Elvers, Ingegerd; Wright, Jason; Howald, Cedric; Tonomura, Noriko; Perloski, Michele; Swofford, Ross; Biagi, Tara; Fryc, Sarah; Anderson, Nathan; Courtay-Cahen, Celine; Youell, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Canine osteosarcoma is clinically nearly identical to the human disease, but is common and highly heritable, making genetic dissection feasible. Results: Through genome-wide association analyses in three breeds (greyhounds, Rottweilers, and Irish wolfhounds), we identify 33 inherited risk loci explaining 55% to 85% of phenotype variance in each breed. The greyhound locus exhibiting the strongest association, located 150 kilobases upstream of the genes CDKN2A/B, is also th...

  17. P53 Mdm2 Inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoury, Kareem; Doemling, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The protein-protein interaction (PPI) between p53 and its negative regulator MDM2 comprises one of the most important and intensely studied PPI's involved in preventing the initiation of cancer. The interaction between p53 and MDM2 is conformation-based and is tightly regulated on multiple levels. D

  18. p53 in stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valeriya; Solozobova; Christine; Blattner

    2011-01-01

    p53 is well known as a "guardian of the genome" for differentiated cells,in which it induces cell cycle arrest and cell death after DNA damage and thus contributes to the maintenance of genomic stability.In addition to this tumor suppressor function for differentiated cells,p53 also plays an important role in stem cells.In this cell type,p53 not only ensures genomic integrity after genotoxic insults but also controls their proliferation and differentiation.Additionally,p53 provides an effective barrier for the generation of pluripotent stem celllike cells from terminally differentiated cells.In this review,we summarize our current knowledge about p53 activities in embryonic,adult and induced pluripotent stem cells.

  19. JC Virus T-Antigen in Colorectal Cancer Is Associated with p53 Expression and Chromosomal Instability, Independent of CpG Island Methylator Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko Nosho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available JC virus has a transforming gene encoding JC virus T-antigen (JCVT. JCVT may inactivate wild-type p53, cause chromosomal instability (CIN, and stabilize β-catenin. A link between JCVT and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP has been suggested. However, no large-scale study has examined the relations of JCVT with molecular alterations, clinical outcome, or prognosis in colon cancer. We detected JCVT expression (by immunohistochemistry in 271 (35% of 766 colorectal cancers. We quantified DNA methylation in eight CIMP-specific promoters (CACNA1G, CDKN2A, CRABP1, IGF2, MLH1, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1 and eight other loci (CHFR, HIC1, IGFBP3, MGMT, MINT1, MINT31, p14, WRN by MethyLight. We examined loss of heterozygosity in 2p, 5q, 17q, and 18q. JCVT was significantly associated with p53 expression (P < .0001, p21 loss (P < .0001, CIN (≥2 chromosomal segments with LOH; P < .0001, nuclear β-catenin (P = .006, LINE-1 hypomethylation (P = .002, and inversely with CIMP-high (P = .0005 and microsatellite instability (MSI (P < .0001, but not with PIK3CA mutation. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the associations of JCVT with p53 [adjusted odds ratio (OR, 8.45; P < .0001], CIN (adjusted OR, 2.53; P = .003, cyclin D1 (adjusted OR, 1.57; P = .02, LINE-1 hypomethylation (adjusted OR, 1.97 for a 30% decline as a unit; P = .03, BRAF mutation (adjusted OR, 2.20; P = .04, and family history of colorectal cancer (adjusted OR, 0.64; P = .04 remained statistically significant. However, JCVT was no longer significantly associated with CIMP, MSI, β-catenin, or cyclooxygenase-2 expression in multivariate analysis. JCVT was unrelated with patient survival. In conclusion, JCVT expression in colorectal cancer is independently associated with p53 expression and CIN, which may lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

  20. Promoter methylation status of hMLH1,MGMT,and CDKN2A/p16 in colorectal adenomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vasiliki; Psofaki; Chryssoula; Kalogera; Nikolaos; Tzambouras; Dimitrios; Stephanou; Epameinondas; Tsianos; Konstantin; Seferiadis; Georgios; Kolios

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate aberrant DNA methylation of CpG islands and subsequent low-or high-level DNA microsatellite instability(MSI)which is assumed to drive colon carcinogenesis. METHODS:DNA of healthy individuals,adenoma(tu-bular or villous/tubulovillous)patients,and colorectal carcinoma patients who underwent colonoscopy was used for assessing the prevalence of aberrant DNA methylation of human DNA mismatch repair gene mutator L homologue 1(hMLH1),Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A(CDKN2A/p16),and O-6-methy...

  1. Uropathogenic E. coli infection provokes epigenetic downregulation of CDKN2A (p16INK4A) in uroepithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolg, Cornelia; Sabha, Nesrin; Cortese, Rene; Panchal, Trupti; Ahsan, Alya; Soliman, Ashraf; Aitken, Karen J; Petronis, Arturas; Bägli, Darius J

    2011-06-01

    Host cell and bacterial factors determine severity and duration of infections. To allow for bacteria pathogenicity and persistence, bacteria have developed mechanisms that modify expression of host genes involved in cell cycle progression, apoptosis, differentiation and the immune response. Recently, Helicobacter pylori infection of the stomach has been correlated with epigenetic changes in the host genome. To identify epigenetic changes during Escherichia coli induced urinary tract infection (UTI), we developed an in vitro model of persistent infection of human uroepithelial cells with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), resulting in intracellular bacteria colonies. Cells inoculated with FimH-negative E. coli (N-UPEC) that are not internalized and non-inoculated cells were used as controls. UPEC infection significantly induced de novo methyltransferase (DNMT) activity (12.5-fold P=0.002 UPEC vs non-inoculated and 250-fold P=0.001 UPEC vs N-UPEC inoculated cells) and Dnmt1 RNA expression (6-fold P=0.04 UPEC vs non-inoculated cells) compared with controls. DNMT1 protein levels were significantly increased in three uroepithelial cell lines (5637, J82, HT-1197) in response to UPEC infection as demonstrated by confocal analysis. Real-time PCR analysis of candidate genes previously associated with bacteria infection and/or innate immunity, revealed UPEC-induced downregulation of the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2A (3.3-fold P=0.007 UPEC vs non-inoculated and 3.3-fold P=0.001 UPEC vs N-UPEC) and the DNA repair gene MGMT (9-fold P=0.03 UPEC vs non-inoculated). Expression of CDH1, MLH1, DAPK1 and TLR4 was not affected. Pyrosequencing of CDKN2A and MGMT CpG islands revealed increased methylation in CDKN2A exon 1 (3.8-fold P=0.04 UPEC vs N-UPEC and UPEC vs non-inoculated). Methylation of MGMT was not affected. UPEC-induced methylation of CDKN2A exon 1 may increase bladder cancer and presage UTI risk, and be useful as a biological marker for UTI susceptibility or recurrence.

  2. Targeting oncogenic mutant p53 for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tomoo eIwakuma; Alejandro eParrales

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function (GOF) activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p...

  3. Restoring expression of wild-type p53 suppresses tumor growth but does not cause tumor regression in mice with a p53 missense mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yongxing; Suh, Young-Ah; Fuller, Maren Y.; Jackson, James G.; Xiong, Shunbin; Terzian, Tamara; Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Bankson, James A.; El-Naggar, Adel K; Lozano, Guillermina

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 is a tumor suppressor. As such, the P53 gene is frequently altered in human cancers. However, over 80% of the P53 mutations found in human cancers are missense mutations that lead to expression of mutant proteins that not only lack p53 transcriptional activity but exhibit new functions as well. Recent studies show that restoration of p53 expression leads to tumor regression in mice carrying p53 deletions. However, the therapeutic efficacy of restoring p53 expressi...

  4. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the MDM2-p53 Protein-Protein Interaction to Reactivate p53 Function: A Novel Approach for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Shangary, Sanjeev; Wang, Shaomeng

    2009-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is an attractive cancer therapeutic target because it can be functionally activated to eradicate tumors. Direct gene alterations in p53 or interaction between p53 and MDM2 proteins are two alternative mechanisms for the inactivation of p53 function. Designing small molecules to block the MDM2-p53 interaction and reactivate the p53 function is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers retaining wild-type p53. This review will highlight recent advances i...

  5. Functional repair of p53 mutation in colorectal cancer cells using trans-splicing

    OpenAIRE

    He, Xingxing; Liao, Jiazhi; Liu, Fang; Yan, Junwei; Yan, Jingjun; Shang, Haitao; Dou, Qian; CHANG Ying; Lin, Jusheng; Song, Yuhu

    2014-01-01

    Mutation in the p53 gene is arguably the most frequent type of gene-specific alterations in human cancers. Current p53-based gene therapy contains the administration of wt-p53 or the suppression of mutant p53 expression in p53-defective cancer cells. We hypothesized that trans-splicing could be exploited as a tool for the correction of mutant p53 transcripts in p53-mutated human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. In this study, the plasmids encoding p53 pre-trans-splicing molecules (PTM) were tra...

  6. Stability of p53 homologs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Brandt

    Full Text Available Most proteins have not evolved for maximal thermal stability. Some are only marginally stable, as for example, the DNA-binding domains of p53 and its homologs, whose kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities are strongly correlated. Here, we applied high-throughput methods using a real-time PCR thermocycler to study the stability of several full-length orthologs and paralogs of the p53 family of transcription factors, which have diverse functions, ranging from tumour suppression to control of developmental processes. From isothermal denaturation fluorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry, we found that full-length proteins showed the same correlation between kinetic and thermodynamic stability as their isolated DNA-binding domains. The stabilities of the full-length p53 orthologs were marginal and correlated with the temperature of their organism, paralleling the stability of the isolated DNA-binding domains. Additionally, the paralogs p63 and p73 were significantly more stable and long-lived than p53. The short half-life of p53 orthologs and the greater persistence of the paralogs may be biologically relevant.

  7. Disordered methionine metabolism in MTAP/CDKN2A-deleted cancers leads to dependence on PRMT5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrakis, Konstantinos J; McDonald, E Robert; Schlabach, Michael R; Billy, Eric; Hoffman, Gregory R; deWeck, Antoine; Ruddy, David A; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Yu, Jianjun; McAllister, Gregg; Stump, Mark; deBeaumont, Rosalie; Ho, Samuel; Yue, Yingzi; Liu, Yue; Yan-Neale, Yan; Yang, Guizhi; Lin, Fallon; Yin, Hong; Gao, Hui; Kipp, D Randal; Zhao, Songping; McNamara, Joshua T; Sprague, Elizabeth R; Zheng, Bing; Lin, Ying; Cho, Young Shin; Gu, Justin; Crawford, Kenneth; Ciccone, David; Vitari, Alberto C; Lai, Albert; Capka, Vladimir; Hurov, Kristen; Porter, Jeffery A; Tallarico, John; Mickanin, Craig; Lees, Emma; Pagliarini, Raymond; Keen, Nicholas; Schmelzle, Tobias; Hofmann, Francesco; Stegmeier, Frank; Sellers, William R

    2016-03-11

    5-Methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) is a key enzyme in the methionine salvage pathway. The MTAP gene is frequently deleted in human cancers because of its chromosomal proximity to the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2A. By interrogating data from a large-scale short hairpin RNA-mediated screen across 390 cancer cell line models, we found that the viability of MTAP-deficient cancer cells is impaired by depletion of the protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5. MTAP-deleted cells accumulate the metabolite methylthioadenosine (MTA), which we found to inhibit PRMT5 methyltransferase activity. Deletion of MTAP in MTAP-proficient cells rendered them sensitive to PRMT5 depletion. Conversely, reconstitution of MTAP in an MTAP-deficient cell line rescued PRMT5 dependence. Thus, MTA accumulation in MTAP-deleted cancers creates a hypomorphic PRMT5 state that is selectively sensitized toward further PRMT5 inhibition. Inhibitors of PRMT5 that leverage this dysregulated metabolic state merit further investigation as a potential therapy for MTAP/CDKN2A-deleted tumors.

  8. Immunohistochemical Determination of p53 Protein Overexpression for Predicting p53 Gene Mutations in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Miao; Liu, Dechun; Ma, Qingyong; Feng, Xiaoshan

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether increased expression of the tumor suppressor protein p53 indicates a p53 gene mutation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine whether p53 protein overexpression detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) offers a diagnostic prediction for p53 gene mutations in HCC patients. Methods Systematic literature searches were conducted with an end date of December 2015. A meta-analysis was performed to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of IHC-determined p53 protein overexpression in the prediction of p53 gene mutations in HCC. Sensitivity, subgroup, and publication bias analyses were also conducted. Results Thirty-six studies were included in the meta-analysis. The results showed that the overall sensitivity and specificity for IHC-determined p53 overexpression in the diagnostic prediction of p53 mutations in HCC were 0.83 (95% CI: 0.80–0.86) and 0.74 (95% CI: 0.71–0.76), respectively. The summary positive likelihood ratio (PLR) and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) were 2.65 (95% CI: 2.21–3.18) and 0.36 (95% CI: 0.26–0.50), respectively. The diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of IHC-determined p53 overexpression in predicting p53 mutations ranged from 0.56 to 105.00 (pooled, 9.77; 95% CI: 6.35–15.02), with significant heterogeneity between the included studies (I2 = 40.7%, P = 0.0067). Moreover, subgroup and sensitivity analyses did not alter the results of the meta-analysis. However, potential publication bias was present in the current meta-analysis. Conclusion The upregulation of the tumor suppressor protein p53 was indeed linked to p53 gene mutations. IHC determination of p53 overexpression can predict p53 gene mutations in HCC patients. PMID:27428001

  9. Human surfactant protein D alters oxidative stress and HMGA1 expression to induce p53 apoptotic pathway in eosinophil leukemic cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshna Mahajan

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein D (SP-D, an innate immune molecule, has an indispensable role in host defense and regulation of inflammation. Immune related functions regulated by SP-D include agglutination of pathogens, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, antigen presentation, T lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine secretion, induction of apoptosis and clearance of apoptotic cells. The present study unravels a novel ability of SP-D to reduce the viability of leukemic cells (eosinophilic leukemic cell line, AML14.3D10; acute myeloid leukemia cell line, THP-1; acute lymphoid leukemia cell lines, Jurkat, Raji; and human breast epithelial cell line, MCF-7, and explains the underlying mechanisms. SP-D and a recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rhSP-D induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest, and dose and time-dependent apoptosis in the AML14.3D10 eosinophilic leukemia cell line. Levels of various apoptotic markers viz. activated p53, cleaved caspase-9 and PARP, along with G2/M checkpoints (p21 and Tyr15 phosphorylation of cdc2 showed significant increase in these cells. We further attempted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of rhSP-D induced apoptosis using proteomic analysis. This approach identified large scale molecular changes initiated by SP-D in a human cell for the first time. Among others, the proteomics analysis highlighted a decreased expression of survival related proteins such as HMGA1, overexpression of proteins to protect the cells from oxidative burst, while a drastic decrease in mitochondrial antioxidant defense system. rhSP-D mediated enhanced oxidative burst in AML14.3D10 cells was confirmed, while antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, abrogated the rhSP-D induced apoptosis. The rhSP-D mediated reduced viability was specific to the cancer cell lines and viability of human PBMCs from healthy controls was not affected. The study suggests involvement of SP-D in host's immunosurveillance and therapeutic potential of rhSP-D in the eosinophilic leukemia and

  10. Influenza A Viruses Control Expression of Proviral Human p53 Isoforms p53β and Δ133p53α

    OpenAIRE

    Terrier, Olivier; Marcel, Virginie; Cartet, Gaëlle; Lane, David P; Lina, Bruno; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have described the role of p53 isoforms, including p53β and Δ133p53α, in the modulation of the activity of full-length p53, which regulates cell fate. In the context of influenza virus infection, an interplay between influenza viruses and p53 has been described, with p53 being involved in the antiviral response. However, the role of physiological p53 isoforms has never been explored in this context. Here, we demonstrate that p53 isoforms play a role in influenza A virus infec...

  11. Knockdown of Merm1/Wbscr22 attenuates sensitivity of H460 non-small cell lung cancer cells to SN-38 and 5-FU without alteration to p53 expression levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dongmei; Zheng, Xiaoliang; Tu, Linglan; Jia, Jing; Li, Qin; Cheng, Liyan; Wang, Xiaoju

    2015-01-01

    Merm1/Wbscr22 is a novel metastasis promoter that has been shown to be involved in tumor metastasis, viability and apoptosis. To the best of our knowledge, there are currently no studies suggesting the possible correlation between the expression of Merm1/Wbscr22 in tumor cells and chemosensitivity to antitumor agents. In the present study, two human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, H1299 and H460, were used to investigate whether Merm1/Wbscr22 affects chemosensitivity to antitumor agents, including cisplatin (CDDP), doxorubicin (ADM), paclitaxel (PTX), mitomycin (MMC), 7-Ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38; the active metabolite of camptothecin) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Merm1/Wbscr22 knockdown cell lines (H1299-shRNA and H460-shRNA) and negative control cell lines (H1299-NC and H460-NC) were established by stable transfection, and the efficiency of Merm1/Wbscr22 knockdown was confirmed by western blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that shRNA-mediated knockdown of Merm1/Wbscr22 did not affect cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The H460 cells harboring wild type p53 were markedly more sensitive to all six antitumor agents as compared with the p53-null H1299 cells. Downregulation of Merm1/Wbscr22 did not affect H1299 sensitivity to any of the six antitumor agents, whereas attenuated H460 sensitivity to SN-38 and 5-FU, without significant alteration in p53 at both mRNA and protein levels, was identified. The reduced H460 sensitivity to SN-38 was further confirmed in vivo. SN-38 demonstrated significant tumor growth inhibitory activity in both H460 and H460‑NC tumor xenograft models, but only marginally suppressed the H460-shRNA xenograft tumor growth. Furthermore, CDDP (4, 10, 15 µg/ml)-resistant human non-small lung cancer cells A549 (A549-CDDPr-4, 10, 15) expressed significant amounts of Merm1/Wbscr22 protein, as compared with the parental A549 cells. In conclusion, sh

  12. The association between methylated CDKN2A and cervical carcinogenesis, and its diagnostic value in cervical cancer: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jinyun Li,1,2,* Chongchang Zhou,1,* Haojie Zhou,3,* Tianlian Bao,1 Tengjiao Gao,1 Xiangling Jiang,1 Meng Ye1,2 1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, 2Department of Medical Oncology, Affiliated Hospital, Ningbo University, 3Department of Molecular Diagnosis, Ningbo Diagnostic Pathology Center, Ningbo, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors are co-first authors of this work Background: Cervical cancer is the second deadliest gynecologic malignancy, characterized by apparently precancerous lesions and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN, and having a long course from the development of CIN to cervical cancer. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A is a well-documented tumor suppressor gene and is commonly methylated in cervical cancer. However, the relationship between methylated CDKN2A and carcinogenesis in cervical cancer is inconsistent, and the diagnostic accuracy of methylated CDKN2A is underinvestigated. In this study, we attempted to quantify the association between CDKN2A methylation and the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer, and its diagnostic power.Methods: We systematically reviewed four electronic databases and identified 26 studies involving 1,490 cervical cancers, 1,291 CINs, and 964 controls. A pooled odds ratio (OR with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI was calculated to evaluate the association between methylated CDKN2A and the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer. Specificity, sensitivity, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and the diagnostic odds ratio were computed to assess the effect of methylated CDKN2A in the diagnosis of cervical cancer.Results: Our results indicated an upward trend in the methylation frequency of CDKN2A in the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer (cancer vs control: OR =23.67, 95% CI =15.54–36.06; cancer vs CIN: OR =2.53, 95% CI =1.79–3.5; CIN vs control: OR =9.68, 95% CI =5.82–16.02. The

  13. The p53 pathway in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gasco, Milena; Shami, Shukri; Crook, Tim

    2002-01-01

    p53 mutation remains the most common genetic change identified in human neoplasia. In breast cancer, p53 mutation is associated with more aggressive disease and worse overall survival. The frequency of mutation in p53 is, however, lower in breast cancer than in other solid tumours. Changes, both genetic and epigenetic, have been identified in regulators of p53 activity and in some downstream transcriptional targets of p53 in breast cancers that express wild-type p53. Molecular pathological an...

  14. p53 isoform Δ113p53 is a p53 target gene that antagonizes p53 apoptotic activity via BclxL activation in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jun; Ng, Sok Meng; Chang, Changqing; Zhang, Zhenhai; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe; Lane, David P.; Peng, Jinrong

    2009-01-01

    p53 is a well-known tumor suppressor and is also involved in processes of organismal aging and developmental control. A recent exciting development in the p53 field is the discovery of various p53 isoforms. One p53 isoform is human Δ133p53 and its zebrafish counterpart Δ113p53. These N-terminal-truncated p53 isoforms are initiated from an alternative p53 promoter, but their expression regulation and physiological significance at the organismal level are not well understood. We show here that ...

  15. p53-Dependent transcriptional responses to interleukin-3 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anissa M Jabbour

    Full Text Available p53 is critical in the normal response to a variety of cellular stresses including DNA damage and loss of p53 function is a common feature of many cancers. In hematological malignancies, p53 deletion is less common than in solid malignancies but is associated with poor prognosis and resistance to chemotherapy. Compared to their wild-type (WT counterparts, hematopoietic progenitor cells lacking p53 have a greater propensity to survive cytokine loss, in part, due to the failure to transcribe Puma, a proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member. Using expression arrays, we have further characterized the differences that distinguish p53(-/- cells from WT myeloid cells in the presence of Interleukin-3 (IL-3 to determine if such differences contribute to the increased clonogenicity and survival responses observed in p53(-/- cells. We show that p53(-/- cells have a deregulated intracellular signaling environment and display a more rapid and sustained response to IL-3. This was accompanied by an increase in active ERK1/2 and a dependence on an intact MAP kinase signaling pathway. Contrastingly, we find that p53(-/- cells are independent on AKT for their survival. Thus, loss of p53 in myeloid cells results in an altered transcriptional and kinase signaling environment that favors enhanced cytokine signaling.

  16. p53 isoforms regulate astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnquist, C; Horikawa, I; Foran, E; Major, E O; Vojtesek, B; Lane, D P; Lu, X; Harris, B T; Harris, C C

    2016-09-01

    Bidirectional interactions between astrocytes and neurons have physiological roles in the central nervous system and an altered state or dysfunction of such interactions may be associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Astrocytes exert structural, metabolic and functional effects on neurons, which can be either neurotoxic or neuroprotective. Their neurotoxic effect is mediated via the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) involving pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-6), while their neuroprotective effect is attributed to neurotrophic growth factors (e.g., NGF). We here demonstrate that the p53 isoforms Δ133p53 and p53β are expressed in astrocytes and regulate their toxic and protective effects on neurons. Primary human astrocytes undergoing cellular senescence upon serial passaging in vitro showed diminished expression of Δ133p53 and increased p53β, which were attributed to the autophagic degradation and the SRSF3-mediated alternative RNA splicing, respectively. Early-passage astrocytes with Δ133p53 knockdown or p53β overexpression were induced to show SASP and to exert neurotoxicity in co-culture with neurons. Restored expression of Δ133p53 in near-senescent, otherwise neurotoxic astrocytes conferred them with neuroprotective activity through repression of SASP and induction of neurotrophic growth factors. Brain tissues from AD and ALS patients possessed increased numbers of senescent astrocytes and, like senescent astrocytes in vitro, showed decreased Δ133p53 and increased p53β expression, supporting that our in vitro findings recapitulate in vivo pathology of these neurodegenerative diseases. Our finding that Δ133p53 enhances the neuroprotective function of aged and senescent astrocytes suggests that the p53 isoforms and their regulatory mechanisms are potential targets for therapeutic intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27104929

  17. Analysis of mutations in the p16/CDKN2A gene in sporadic and familial melanoma in the Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamperska, Katarzyna; Karezewska, Aldona; Kwiatkowska, Eliza; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in CDKN2A have been found in sporadic cutaneous malignant (CMM), in familial CMM and in other syndromes associated with melanoma. In this study DNA was obtained from 207 individuals and five cell lines. There were 157 CMM patients and 50 healthy members of melanoma patients families. The CMM group included patients with one or two melanoma cases in the family, families with dysplastic nevus syndrom (DNS) and patients with a spectrum of other types of cancers in the family. PCR-SSCP analysis and sequencing identified: six substitutions in codon 58 CGA/TGA (Arg/Stop), 16 substitutions GAC/GAT in codon 84 (Asp/Asp), six substitutions CGA/TGA in codon 148 (Arg/Thr), 14 substitutions G/C in 3'UTR and 4 double changes (two in codon 84 and 3'UTR; two in codon 148 and 3'UTR). The mutation identified in codon 58 was found in tissue only. Other substitutions were polymorphisms found in DNA from tissue and blood samples. Most of them were identified in sporadic CMM (six in codon 148 Ala/Thr, 12 in codon 84 Asp/Asp and six in 3'UTR). The frequency of the polymorphisms was also high in DNS and CMM/DNS families (four in codon 84 Asp/Asp and six in 3'UTR). No mutations or polymorphisms were found in CMM patients with one or two melanoma cases and CMM patients, with other cancers in family history. The analysis of the CDKN2A gene mutations in the Polish population demonstrated: (i) no germline mutations; (ii) a relatively high number of genetic changes in sporadic melanoma; (iii) a high number of polymorphisms in DNS and CMM/DNS families. PMID:12362978

  18. Classical and novel roles of p53 and prospects for anticancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Fuster, José J.; Sanz-González, Silvia M.; Moll, Ute M.; Andrés, Vicente

    2007-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that is frequently inactivated in human tumors. Therefore,restoring its function has been considered an attractive approach to restrain cancer. Typically, p53-dependent growth arrest, senescence and apoptosis of tumor cells have been attributed to transcriptional activity of nuclear p53. Notably, wild-type p53 gain-of-function enhances cancer resistance in the mouse, but it also accelerates aging in some models, possibly due to altered p53...

  19. NSAIDs Modulate CDKN2A, TP53, and DNA Content Risk for Progression to Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Galipeau, Patricia C.; Xiaohong Li; Blount, Patricia L.; Maley, Carlo C.; Sanchez, Carissa A.; Odze, Robert D.; Kamran Ayub; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Reid, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Normally, the cells in the human body divide only when extra cells are needed, after an injury, for example. Sometimes, however, cells accumulate genetic changes (mutations) that allow them to divide uncontrollably to form a disorganized mass or tumor. If these altered cells also acquire mutations that allow them to spread around the body, a malignant tumor or cancer results. Scientists have identified numerous genetic changes that occur in tumors and are now inve...

  20. p53 and its isoforms in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bourdon, J-C

    2007-01-01

    p53, p63 and p73 are members of the p53 gene family involved in development, differentiation and response to cellular stress. p53 gene is a transcription factor essential for the prevention of cancer formation. The p53 pathway is ubiquitously lost in human cancer either by p53 gene mutation (60% of cancers) or by lost of cell signalling upstream and downstream of p53 in the remaining cancers expressing WTp53 gene. As p53 pathway inactivation is a common denominator to all cancers, the underst...

  1. Biological activity and safety of adenoviral vector-expressed wild-type p53 after intratumoral injection in melanoma and breast cancer patients with p53-overexpressing tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dummer, R; Bergh, J; Karlsson, Y; Horovitz, JA; Mulder, NH; Huinin, DT; Burg, G; Hofbauer, G; Osanto, S

    2000-01-01

    p53 mutations are common genetic alterations in human cancer. Gene transfer of a wild-type (wt) p53 gene reverses the loss of normal p53 function in vitro and in vivo. A phase I dose escalation study of single intratumoral (i.t.) injection of a replication-defective adenoviral expression vector cont

  2. Acetylation Is Indispensable for p53 Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yi; Zhao, Wenhui; Chen, Yue; Zhao, Yingming; Gu, Wei

    2008-01-01

    The activation of the tumor suppressor p53 facilitates the cellular response to genotoxic stress; however, the p53 response can only be executed if its interaction with its inhibitor Mdm2 is abolished. There have been conflicting reports on the question of whether p53 posttranslational modifications, such as phosphorylation or acetylation, are essential or only play a subtle, fine-tuning role in the p53 response. Thus, it remains unclear whether p53 modification is absolutely required for its...

  3. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be e...

  4. p53 isoforms, Δ133p53 and p53β, are endogenous regulators of replicative cellular senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Kaori; Mondal, Abdul M.; Horikawa, Izumi; Nguyen, Giang H.; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Sohn, Jane J.; Bowman, Elise D.; Mathe, Ewy A.; Schetter, Aaron J.; Pine, Sharon R.; Ji, Helen; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe; Lane, David P; Harris, Curtis C.

    2009-01-01

    The finite proliferative potential of normal human cells leads to replicative cellular senescence, which is a critical barrier to tumour progression in vivo1–3. We show that human p53 isoforms (Δ133p53 and p53β)4 constitute an endogenous regulatory mechanism for p53-mediated replicative senescence. Induced p53β and diminished Δ133p53 were associated with replicative senescence, but not oncogene-induced senescence, in normal human fibroblasts. The replicatively senescent fibroblasts also expre...

  5. Capturing the biological impact of CDKN2A and MC1R genes as an early predisposing event in melanoma and non melanoma skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Escámez, María José; Garcia-Garcia, Francisco; Tell-Marti, Gemma; Fabra, Àngels; Martínez-Santamaría, Lucía; Badenas, Celia; Aguilera, Paula; Pevida, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín; del Río, Marcela; Puig, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Germline mutations in CDKN2A and/or red hair color variants in MC1R genes are associated with an increased susceptibility to develop cutaneous melanoma or non melanoma skin cancer. We studied the impact of the CDKN2A germinal mutation p.G101W and MC1R variants on gene expression and transcription profiles associated with skin cancer. To this end we set-up primary skin cell co-cultures from siblings of melanoma prone-families that were later analyzed using the expression array approach. As a result, we found that 1535 transcripts were deregulated in CDKN2A mutated cells, with over-expression of immunity-related genes (HLA-DPB1, CLEC2B, IFI44, IFI44L, IFI27, IFIT1, IFIT2, SP110 and IFNK) and down-regulation of genes playing a role in the Notch signaling pathway. 3570 transcripts were deregulated in MC1R variant carriers. In particular, genes related to oxidative stress and DNA damage pathways were up-regulated as well as genes associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer and Huntington. Finally, we observed that the expression signatures indentified in phenotypically normal cells carrying CDKN2A mutations or MC1R variants are maintained in skin cancer tumors (melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma). These results indicate that transcriptome deregulation represents an early event critical for skin cancer development. PMID:24742402

  6. Telomere length and the risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma in melanoma-prone families with and without CDKN2A mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura S Burke

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Recent evidence suggests a link between constitutional telomere length (TL and cancer risk. Previous studies have suggested that longer telomeres were associated with an increased risk of melanoma and larger size and number of nevi. The goal of this study was to examine whether TL modified the risk of melanoma in melanoma-prone families with and without CDKN2A germline mutations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We measured TL in blood DNA in 119 cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM cases and 208 unaffected individuals. We also genotyped 13 tagging SNPs in TERT. RESULTS: We found that longer telomeres were associated with an increased risk of CMM (adjusted OR = 2.81, 95% CI = 1.02-7.72, P = 0.04. The association of longer TL with CMM risk was seen in CDKN2A- cases but not in CDKN2A+ cases. Among CMM cases, the presence of solar injury was associated with shorter telomeres (P = 0.002. One SNP in TERT, rs2735940, was significantly associated with TL (P = 0.002 after Bonferroni correction. DISCUSSION: Our findings suggest that TL regulation could be variable by CDKN2A mutation status, sun exposure, and pigmentation phenotype. Therefore, TL measurement alone may not be a good marker for predicting CMM risk.

  7. Skp2B overexpression alters a prohibitin-p53 axis and the transcription of PAPP-A, the protease of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Chander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously reported that the degradation of prohibitin by the SCF(Skp2B ubiquitin ligase results in a defect in the activity of p53. We also reported that MMTV-Skp2B transgenic mice develop mammary gland tumors that are characterized by an increased proteolytic cleavage of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4, an inhibitor of IGF signaling. However, whether a link exists between a defect in p53 activity and proteolysis of IGFBP-4 was not established. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed the levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A, the protease of IGFBP-4, in MMTV-Skp2B transgenic mice and found that PAPP-A levels are elevated. Further, we found a p53 binding site in intron 1 of the PAPP-A gene and that both wild type and mutant p53 bind to this site. However, binding of wild type p53 results in the transcriptional repression of PAPP-A, while binding of mutant p53 results in the transcriptional activation of PAPP-A. Since MMTV-Skp2B mice express wild type p53 and yet show elevated levels of PAPP-A, at first, these observations appeared contradictory. However, further analysis revealed that the defect in p53 activity in Skp2B overexpressing cells does not only abolish the activity of wild type of p53 but actually mimics that of mutant p53. Our results suggest that in absence of prohibitin, the half-life of p53 is increased and like mutant p53, the conformation of p53 is denatured. CONCLUSIONS: These observations revealed a novel function of prohibitin as a chaperone of p53. Further, they suggest that binding of denatured p53 in intron 1 causes an enhancer effect and increases the transcription of PAPP-A. Therefore, these findings indicate that the defect in p53 function and the increased proteolysis of IGFBP-4, we had observed, represent two components of the same pathway, which contributes to the oncogenic function of Skp2B.

  8. Arginine methylation regulates the p53 response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Martin; Durant, Stephen T; Cho, Er-Chieh;

    2008-01-01

    on the p53 response. We show that the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) 5, as a co-factor in a DNA damage responsive co-activator complex that interacts with p53, is responsible for methylating p53. Arginine methylation is regulated during the p53 response and affects the target gene specificity......Activation of the p53 tumour suppressor protein in response to DNA damage leads to apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. Enzymatic modifications are widely believed to affect and regulate p53 activity. We describe here a level of post-translational control that has an important functional consequence...

  9. Comparison study of MS-HRM and pyrosequencing techniques for quantification of APC and CDKN2A gene methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Migheli

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the development of cost-effective techniques for the quantification of DNA methylation biomarkers. We analyzed 90 samples of surgically resected colorectal cancer tissues for APC and CDKN2A promoter methylation using methylation sensitive-high resolution melting (MS-HRM and pyrosequencing. MS-HRM is a less expensive technique compared with pyrosequencing but is usually more limited because it gives a range of methylation estimates rather than a single value. Here, we developed a method for deriving single estimates, rather than a range, of methylation using MS-HRM and compared the values obtained in this way with those obtained using the gold standard quantitative method of pyrosequencing. We derived an interpolation curve using standards of known methylated/unmethylated ratio (0%, 12.5%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of methylation to obtain the best estimate of the extent of methylation for each of our samples. We observed similar profiles of methylation and a high correlation coefficient between the two techniques. Overall, our new approach allows MS-HRM to be used as a quantitative assay which provides results which are comparable with those obtained by pyrosequencing.

  10. Comparison Study of MS-HRM and Pyrosequencing Techniques for Quantification of APC and CDKN2A Gene Methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migheli, Francesca; Stoccoro, Andrea; Coppedè, Fabio; Wan Omar, Wan Adnan; Failli, Alessandra; Consolini, Rita; Seccia, Massimo; Spisni, Roberto; Miccoli, Paolo; Mathers, John C.; Migliore, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the development of cost-effective techniques for the quantification of DNA methylation biomarkers. We analyzed 90 samples of surgically resected colorectal cancer tissues for APC and CDKN2A promoter methylation using methylation sensitive-high resolution melting (MS-HRM) and pyrosequencing. MS-HRM is a less expensive technique compared with pyrosequencing but is usually more limited because it gives a range of methylation estimates rather than a single value. Here, we developed a method for deriving single estimates, rather than a range, of methylation using MS-HRM and compared the values obtained in this way with those obtained using the gold standard quantitative method of pyrosequencing. We derived an interpolation curve using standards of known methylated/unmethylated ratio (0%, 12.5%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of methylation) to obtain the best estimate of the extent of methylation for each of our samples. We observed similar profiles of methylation and a high correlation coefficient between the two techniques. Overall, our new approach allows MS-HRM to be used as a quantitative assay which provides results which are comparable with those obtained by pyrosequencing. PMID:23326336

  11. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Sara M. [Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Medical Scientist Training Program, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Quelle, Dawn E., E-mail: dawn-quelle@uiowa.edu [Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Medical Scientist Training Program, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Pathology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2014-12-23

    Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites) as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis) to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer.

  12. Non-p53 p53RE binding protein, a human transcription factor functionally analogous to P53

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Xiaoya; Levine, Arnold J.; Lu, Hua

    1998-01-01

    The transactivation activity of the p53 tumor suppressor protein is critical for regulating cell growth and apoptosis. We describe the identification of a transcription factor that is functionally similar to p53 and contains the same DNA binding and transcription activities specific for the p53 responsive DNA element (p53RE). This protein was highly purified through chromatography from HeLa cell extracts. The purified protein was able to bind specifically to the p53RE derived from a p21waf1 p...

  13. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Sara M.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo ev...

  14. p53 gene mutations, p53 protein accumulation and compartmentalization in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Bosari, S.; Viale, G.; Roncalli, M; Graziani, D.; Borsani, G; Lee, A. K.; Coggi, G.

    1995-01-01

    p53 accumulation may occur in the nucleus and/or cytoplasm of neoplastic cells. Cytoplasmic accumulation has been reported to be an unfavorable, but not established, prognostic indicator in colorectal cancer. Different types of p53 intracellular compartmentalization could depend either on p53 gene mutations or on the interaction with p53 protein ligands. The purposes of our study were (1) to assess whether the different patterns of p53 accumulation are selectively associated with p53 mutation...

  15. Constant rate of p53 tetramerization in response to DNA damage controls the p53 response

    OpenAIRE

    Gaglia, Giorgio; Lahav, Galit

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of the tumor suppressor protein p53 have been previously investigated in single cells using fluorescently tagged p53. Such approach reports on the total abundance of p53 but does not provide a measure for functional p53. We used fluorescent protein-fragment complementation assay (PCA) to quantify in single cells the dynamics of p53 tetramers, the functional units of p53. We found that while total p53 increases proportionally to the input strength, p53 tetramers are formed in cell...

  16. Effect of p53 genotype on gene expression profiles in murine liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 is a key regulatory element in the cell and is regarded as the 'guardian of the genome'. Much of the present knowledge of p53 function has come from studies of transgenic mice in which the p53 gene has undergone a targeted deletion. In order to provide additional insight into the impact on the cellular regulatory networks associated with the loss of this gene, microarray technology was utilized to assess gene expression in tissues from both the p53-/- and p53+/- mice. Six male mice from each genotype (p53+/+, p53+/-, and p53-/-) were humanely killed and the tissues processed for microarray analysis. The initial studies have been performed in the liver for which the Dunnett test revealed 1406 genes to be differentially expressed between p53+/+ and p53+/- or between p53+/+ and p53-/- at the level of p ≤ 0.05. Both genes with increased expression and decreased expression were identified in p53+/- and in p53-/- mice. Most notable in the gene list derived from the p53+/- mice was the significant reduction in p53 mRNA. In the p53-/- mice, not only was there reduced expression of the p53 genes on the array, but genes associated with DNA repair, apoptosis, and cell proliferation were differentially expressed, as expected. However, altered expression was noted for many genes in the Cdc42-GTPase pathways that influence cell proliferation. This may indicate that alternate pathways are brought into play in the unperturbed liver when loss or reduction in p53 levels occurs

  17. 56例口腔鳞癌患者HPV感染和p53蛋白表达的临床病理学意义%The Alterative Expression of p53 and Infections of HPV in Uygur Patients with Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李良忠; 王凌; 林兆全; 王新平; 王光荣

    2001-01-01

    应用免疫组化LSAB法检测56例口腔鳞癌患者p53蛋白的表达及变化,用PCR技术检测HPV感染率,探讨人乳头状瘤病毒(HPV)感染及抑癌基因p53在维吾尔族口腔鳞癌患者中的异常表达与肿瘤病理生物学特征间关系及临床病理学意义,为维吾尔族口腔鳞癌有效防治提供实验科学依据.本研究得出:(1)免疫组化法检测抑癌基因p53在细胞内的表达可对良恶性病变从分子水平进行评估,并可作为早期诊断及临床治疗口腔鳞癌的分子生物学指标;(2)HPV16、18型感染与口腔鳞癌的发生密切相关,可能是口腔鳞癌发生中的重要环节.

  18. Allele Specific p53 Mutant Reactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xin; Vazquez, Alexei; Levine, Arnold J.; Carpizo, Darren R.

    2012-01-01

    Rescuing the function of mutant p53 protein is an attractive cancer therapeutic strategy. Using the NCI anticancer drug screen data, we identified two compounds from the thiosemicarbazone family that manifest increased growth inhibitory activity in mutant p53 cells, particularly for the p53R175 mutant. Mechanistic studies reveal that NSC319726 restores WT structure and function to the p53R175 mutant. This compound kills p53R172H knock-in mice with extensive apoptosis and inhibits xenograft tu...

  19. Updates on p53: modulation of p53 degradation as a therapeutic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Dey, A; Verma, C S; LANE, D. P.

    2008-01-01

    The p53 pathway is aberrant in most human tumours with over 50% expressing mutant p53 proteins. The pathway is critically controlled by protein degradation. Here, we discuss the latest developments in the search for small molecules that can modulate p53 pathway protein stability and restore p53 activity for cancer therapy.

  20. Cellular functions of p53 and p53 gene family members p63 and p73

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadir Koçak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available p53 is a transcription factor that regulates multiple cellular processes that are also important in cellular fates such as cell cycle arrest or programmed cell death. Induction of growth arrest or cell death by p53 prevents the replication of damaged DNA and proliferation of genetically abnormal cells. Therefore, inactivation of p53 by mutation or deletion is also important in ensuring the cellular homeostasis. However, studies showed that p53 deficient mice and cells such as Saos-2 cells are maintaining their life. This situation suggests that p53-related proteins might compensate the functions of p53 in p53 deficient organisms. The identification of two p53-related proteins, p63 and p73 revealed the transcription of p53 responsive genes in p53 deficient organisms. Both p63 and p73 proteins have high homology with the p53 protein and share some of the functions of p53. In contrast to p53, p63 and p73 rarely mutated in human cancers. Here we studied to summarize the current information about the p53 and other p53-related proteins, p63 and p73 that are included into the p53 gene family.

  1. Tumor suppressor p53: analysis of wild-type and mutant p53 complexes.

    OpenAIRE

    Milner, J; Medcalf, E A; Cook, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    It has been suggested that the dominant effect of mutant p53 on tumor progression may reflect the mutant protein binding to wild-type p53, with inactivation of suppressor function. To date, evidence for wild-type/mutant p53 complexes involves p53 from different species. To investigate wild-type/mutant p53 complexes in relation to natural tumor progression, we sought to identify intraspecific complexes, using murine p53. The mutant phenotype p53-246(0) was used because this phenotype is immuno...

  2. The CDKN2A G500 allele is more frequent in GBM patients with no defined telomere maintenance mechanism tumors and is associated with poorer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice A Royds

    Full Text Available Prognostic markers for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM are important for patient management. Recent advances have identified prognostic markers for GBMs that use telomerase or the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT mechanism for telomere maintenance. Approximately 40% of GBMs have no defined telomere maintenance mechanism (NDTMM, with a mixed survival for affected individuals. This study examined genetic variants in the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A gene that encodes the p16(INK4a and p14(ARF tumor suppressors, and the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1 gene as potential markers of survival for 40 individuals with NDTMM GBMs (telomerase negative and ALT negative by standard assays, 50 individuals with telomerase, and 17 individuals with ALT positive tumors. The analysis of CDKN2A showed NDTMM GBMs had an increased minor allele frequency for the C500G (rs11515 polymorphism compared to those with telomerase and ALT positive GBMs (p = 0.002. Patients with the G500 allele had reduced survival that was independent of age, extent of surgery, and treatment. In the NDTMM group G500 allele carriers had increased loss of CDKN2A gene dosage compared to C500 homozygotes. An analysis of IDH1 mutations showed the R132H mutation was associated with ALT positive tumors, and was largely absent in NDTMM and telomerase positive tumors. In the ALT positive tumors cohort, IDH1 mutations were associated with a younger age for the affected individual. In conclusion, the G500 CDKN2A allele was associated with NDTMM GBMs from older individuals with poorer survival. Mutations in IDH1 were not associated with NDTMM GBMs, and instead were a marker for ALT positive tumors in younger individuals.

  3. Alterative expression of p53、PCNA and infections of HPV in Uygur patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma in Xinjiang%维吾尔族口腔鳞癌HPV感染及P53、PCNA表达及临床病理学意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林兆全; 李良忠; 杨文军; 郅克谦; 刘楠; 张国山

    2001-01-01

    目的:探讨人乳头状瘤病毒HPV感染及抑癌基因p53、增殖细胞核抗原PCNA在维吾尔族口腔鳞癌中的异常表达与肿瘤病理生物学特征间关系及临床意义,为维吾尔族口腔鳞癌有效防治提供实验科学依据.方法:(1)应用免疫组化LSAB法检测维吾尔族口腔鳞癌p53蛋白及PCNA的表达及变化.(2)用PCR技术检测HPV感染率.结果:p53及PCNA在维吾尔族口腔鳞癌中阳性率分别为71.2%、84.8%,而在口腔正常组织中阳性率分别为8.3%、16.7%,肿瘤与正常组织间差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).HPV在维吾尔族口腔鳞癌中阳性率为42.4%(28/66),而在口腔正常组织中阳性率为8.3%(1/12),两者间差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:(1)抑癌基因p53,增殖细胞核抗原PCNA在细胞内的过度表达可能在口腔鳞状上皮组织良性病变的恶性转化过程起关键性的作用,可对良恶性病变从分子水平进行评估,并可作为早期诊断及临床治疗维吾尔族鳞癌的分子生物学指标.(2)HPV16、18型感染与口腔鳞癌的发生密切相关,可能是口腔鳞癌发生中的重要环节.

  4. Transcriptional upregulation of restin by p53

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG RuiHua; LU Fan; FU HaiYan; WU YouSheng; YANG GuoDong; ZHAO WenMing; Zhao ZhongLiang

    2007-01-01

    Restin, belonging to the melanoma-associated antigen superfamily, was firstly cloned from the differentiated HL-60 cells when induced by all-trans retinoic acid ( ATRA ) in our lab. Our previous results showed that restin might be correlated to cell cycle arrest. Due to the importance of p53 in the regulation of cell growth and the relationship between p53 and ATRA, we tried to test the relationship between p53 and restin. Firstly, transfection results showed that p53 was able to upregulate the expression of restin at the transcriptional level when p53 was transfected into eukaryotic cells. Secondly, the bioinformatics analysis revealed that the upstream sequence (about 2 kb) from the first ATG of the ORF of restin gene contained a p53 binding site. In order to confirm that p53 was involved in the transcriptional regulation of restin, we cloned the upstream sequence of restin and constructed the promoter luciferase reporter system. From the luciferase activity, we demonstrated that the promoter of restin gene could be induced by ATRA. Then, another two luciferase reporter plasmids driven by the reporter of restin with no (RP△p53-luc) or mutant (mRP-luc) p53 binding site were constructed to see the regulation of restin by p53. Results showed that the transcriptional upregulation of restin gene was not due to the putative p53 binding site on the upstream of restin gene. We proposed that p53 upregulated restin transcription through an indirect way rather than direct interaction with the cis-activating element of the restin promoter.

  5. Transcriptional upregulation of restin by p53

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Restin, belonging to the melanoma-associated antigen superfamily, was firstly cloned from the differentiated HL-60 cells when induced by all-trans retinoic acid ( ATRA ) in our lab. Our previous results showed that restin might be correlated to cell cycle arrest. Due to the importance of p53 in the regulation of cell growth and the relationship between p53 and ATRA, we tried to test the relationship between p53 and restin. Firstly, transfection results showed that p53 was able to upregulate the expression of restin at the transcriptional level when p53 was transfected into eukaryotic cells. Secondly, the bioinformatics analysis revealed that the upstream sequence (about 2 kb) from the first ATG of the ORF of restin gene contained a p53 binding site. In order to confirm that p53 was involved in the transcriptional regulation of restin, we cloned the upstream sequence of restin and constructed the promoter luciferase reporter system. From the luciferase activity, we demonstrated that the promoter of restin gene could be induced by ATRA. Then, another two luciferase reporter plasmids driven by the reporter of restin with no (RP?p53-luc) or mutant (mRP-luc) p53 binding site were constructed to see the regulation of restin by p53. Results showed that the transcriptional upregulation of restin gene was not due to the putative p53 binding site on the upstream of restin gene. We proposed that p53 upregulated restin transcription through an indirect way rather than direct interaction with the cis-activating element of the restin promoter.

  6. The effect of adenovirus expressing wild-type p53 on 5-fiuorouracil chemosensitivity is related to p53 status in pancreatic cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sven Eisold; Michael Linnebacher; Eduard Ryschich; Dalibor Antolovic; Ulf Hinz; Ernst Klar; Jan Schmidt

    2004-01-01

    AIM: There are conflicting data about p53 function on cellular sensitivity to the cytotoxic action of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU).Therefore the objective of this study was to determine the combined effects of adenovirus-mediated wild-type (wt) p53gene transfer and 5-FU chemotherapy on pancreatic cancer cells with different p53 gene status.METHODS: Human pancreatic cancer cell lines Capan-1p53mut,Capan-2p53wt, FAMPACp53mut, PANC1p53mut, and rat pancreatic cancer cell lines ASp53wt and DSL6Ap53null were used for in vitro studies. Following infection with different ratios of Adp53-particles (MOI) in combination with 5-FU, proliferation of tumor cells and apoptosis were quantified by cell proliferation assay (WST-1) and FACS (PI-staining). In addition, DSL6A syngeneic pancreatic tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously in to Lewis rats for in vivo studies.Tumor size, apoptosis (TUNEL) and survival were determined.RESULTS: Ad-p53 gene transfer combined with 5-FU significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation and substantially enhanced apoptosis in all four cell lines with an alteration in the p53 gene compared to those two cell lines containing wt-p53. In vivo experiments showed the most effective tumor regression in animals treated with Ad-p53 plus 5-FU. Both in vitro and in vivo analyses revealed that a sublethal dose of Ad-p53 augmented the apoptotic response induced by 5-FU.CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that Ad-p53 may synergistically enhance 5-FU-chemosensitivity most strikingly in pancreatic cancer cells lacking p53 function. These findings illustrate that the anticancer efficacy of this combination treatment is dependent on the p53 gene status of the target tumor cells.

  7. Structure of the E6/E6AP/p53 complex required for HPV-mediated degradation of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Zapien, Denise; Ruiz, Francesc Xavier; Poirson, Juline; Mitschler, André; Ramirez-Ramos, Juan; Forster, Anne; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Masson, Murielle; Pol, Scott Vande; Podjarny, Alberto; Travé, Gilles; Zanier, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Summary The p53 pro-apoptotic tumor suppressor is mutated or functionally altered in most cancers. In epithelial tumors induced by “high-risk” mucosal Human Papillomaviruses (hrm-HPVs), including human cervical carcinoma and a growing number of head-and-neck cancers 1, p53 is degraded by the viral oncoprotein E6 2. In this process, E6 binds to a short LxxLL consensus sequence within the cellular ubiquitin ligase E6AP 3. Subsequently, the E6/E6AP heterodimer recruits and degrades p53 4. Neither E6 nor E6AP are separately able to recruit p53 3,5, and the precise mode of assembly of E6, E6AP and p53 is unknown. Here, we solved the crystal structure of a ternary complex comprising full-length HPV16 E6, the LxxLL motif of E6AP and the core domain of p53. The LxxLL motif of E6AP renders the conformation of E6 competent for interaction with p53 by structuring a p53-binding cleft on E6. Mutagenesis of critical positions at the E6-p53 interface disrupts p53 degradation. The E6-binding site of p53 is distal from previously described DNA- and protein-binding surfaces of the core domain. This suggests that, in principle, E6 may avoid competition with cellular factors by targeting both free and bound p53 molecules. The E6/E6AP/p53 complex represents a prototype of viral hijacking of both the ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation pathway and the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. The present structure provides a framework for the design of inhibitory therapeutic strategies against HPV-mediated oncogenesis. PMID:26789255

  8. HCV NS5A abrogates p53 protein function by interfering with p53-DNA binding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Zhong Gong; Yong-Fang Jiang; Yan He; Li-Ying Lai; Ying-Hua Zhu; Xian-Shi Su

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the inhibition effect of HCV NS5A on p53 transactivation on p21 promoter and explore its possible mechanism for influencing p53 function.METHODS: p53 function of transactivation on p21 promoter was studied with a luciferase reporter system in which the luciferase gene is driven by p21 promoter, and the p53-DNA binding ability was observed with the use of electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA). Lipofectin mediated p53 or HCV NS5A expression vectors were used to transfect hepatoma cell lines to observe whether HCV NS5A could abrogate the binding ability of p53 to its specific DNA sequence and p53 transactivation on p21 promoter.Western blot experiment was used for detection of HCV NS5A and p53 proteins expression.RESULTS: Relative luciferase activity driven by p21 promoter increased significantly in the presence of endogenous p53 protein. Compared to the control group, exogenous p53 protein also stimulated p21 promoter driven luciferase gene expression in a dose-dependent way. HCV NS5A protein gradually inhibited both endogenous and exogenous p53 transactivation on p21 promoter with increase of the dose of HCV NS5A expression plasmid. By the experiment of EMSA, we could find p53 binding to its specific DNA sequence and, when co-transfected with increased dose of HCV NS5A expression vector, the p53 binding affinity to its DNA gradually decreased and finally disappeared. Between the Huh 7 cells transfected with p53 expression vector alone or co-transfected with HCV NS5A expression vector, there was no difference in the p53 protein expression.CONCLUSION: HCV NS5A inhibits p53 transactivation on p21 promoter through abrogating p53 binding affinity to its specific DNA sequence. It does not affect p53 protein expression.

  9. The p53-dependent radioadaptive response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    We already reported that conditioning exposures at low doses, or at low dose-rates, lowered radiation-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in cultured cells in vitro and in the spleens of mice in vivo. In this study, the aim was to characterize the p53-dependent radioadaptive response at the molecular level. We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 containing cells derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53-null. Cellular radiation sensitivities were determined with a colony-forming assay. The accumulation of p53, Hdm2, and iNOS was analyzed with Western blotting. The quantification of chromosomal aberrations was estimated by scoring dicentrics per cell. In wtp53 cells, it was demonstrated that the lack of p53 accumulation was coupled with the activation of Hdm2 after low dose irradiation (0.02 Gy). Although NO radicals were only minimally induced in wtp53 cells irradiated with a challenging irradiation (6 Gy) alone, NO radicals were seen to increase about 2-4 fold after challenging irradiation following a priming irradiation (0.02 Gy). Under similar irradiation conditions with a priming and challenging irradiation in wtp53 cells, induction of radioresistance and a depression of chromosomal aberrations were observed only in the absence of Pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor), RITA or Nutlin-3 (p53-Hdm2 interaction inhibitors), aminoguanidine (an iNOS inhibitor) and c-PTIO (an NO radical scavenger). On the other hand, in p53 dysfunctional cells, a radioadaptive response was not observed in the presence or absence of those inhibitors. Moreover, radioresistance developed when wtp53 cells were treated with ISDN (an NO generating agent) alone. These findings suggest that NO radicals are an initiator of the radioadaptive response acting through the activation of Hdm2 and the depression of p53 accumulations.

  10. Identification of p53 and Its Isoforms in Human Breast Carcinoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zorka Milićević; Vladan Bajić; Lada Živković; Jelena Kasapović; Uroš Andjelković; Biljana Spremo-Potparević

    2014-01-01

    In breast carcinoma, disruption of the p53 pathway is one of the most common genetic alterations. The observation that the p53 can express multiple protein isoforms adds a novel level of complexity to the outcome of p53 mutations. p53 expression was analysed by Western immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies DO-7, Pab240, and polyclonal antiserum CM-1. The more frequently p53-positive nuclear staining has been found in the invasive breast tumors. One of the most in...

  11. p53 expression in biopsies from children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Micha I; Lundegaard, Pia Rengtved; Carstensen, Henrik;

    2002-01-01

    based on CD1a positivity. The slides were stained with p53 antibody and semiquantitatively evaluated using a grading system from 1 to 5 as an estimate for 0% to 20%, 20% to 40%, 40% to 60%, 60% to 80%, and 80% to 100% p53-positive for pathologic Langerhans cells (pLC), respectively. RESULTS: The p53...... protein was expressed in various degrees in pLC in all lesions. The degree of p53 expression could not be correlated to either clinical manifestation or outcome. CONCLUSIONS: An increased expression of p53 in pLC indicates an altered DNA repair control with or without abnormal control of apoptosis....

  12. p53: The Janus of autophagy?

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Beth; Abrams, John

    2008-01-01

    The autophagy pathway functions in adaptation to nutrient stress and tumour suppression. The p53 tumour suppressor, previously thought to positively regulate autophagy, may also inhibit it. This dual interplay between p53 and autophagy regulation is enigmatic, but may underlie key aspects of metabolism and cancer biology.

  13. Exclusive Association of p53 Mutation with Super-High Methylation of Tumor Suppressor Genes in the p53 Pathway in a Unique Gastric Cancer Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Mina Waraya; Keishi Yamashita; Akira Ema; Natsuya Katada; Shiro Kikuchi; Masahiko Watanabe

    2015-01-01

    Background A comprehensive search for DNA methylated genes identified candidate tumor suppressor genes that have been proven to be involved in the apoptotic process of the p53 pathway. In this study, we investigated p53 mutation in relation to such epigenetic alteration in primary gastric cancer. Methods The methylation profiles of the 3 genes: PGP9.5, NMDAR2B, and CCNA1, which are involved in the p53 tumor suppressor pathway in combination with p53 mutation were examined in 163 primary gastr...

  14. p53 mutant breast cancer patients expressing p53γ have as good a prognosis as wild-type p53 breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bourdon, Jean-Christophe; Khoury, Marie,; Diot, Alexandra; Baker, Lee; Fernandes, Kenneth; Aoubala, Mustapha; Quinlan, Philip; Purdie, Colin; Jordan, Lee; Prats, Anne-Catherine; Lane, David; Thompson, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    International audience INTRODUCTION: Normal function of the p53 network is lost in most cancers, often through p53 mutation. The clinical impact of p53 mutations in breast cancer remains uncertain, especially where p53 isoforms may modify the effects of these p53 mutations. METHODS: Expression of p53β and p53γ isoforms, the isoforms identified in normal breast tissue, was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction from a cohort of 127 primary breast tumours. Expression of ...

  15. Cellular functions of p53 and p53 gene family members p63 and p73

    OpenAIRE

    Nadir Koçak; İbrahim Halil Yıldırım; Seval Cing Yıldırım

    2011-01-01

    p53 is a transcription factor that regulates multiple cellular processes that are also important in cellular fates such as cell cycle arrest or programmed cell death. Induction of growth arrest or cell death by p53 prevents the replication of damaged DNA and proliferation of genetically abnormal cells. Therefore, inactivation of p53 by mutation or deletion is also important in ensuring the cellular homeostasis. However, studies showed that p53 deficient mice and cells such as Saos-2 cells are...

  16. The heme–p53 interaction: Linking iron metabolism to p53 signaling and tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Jia; Sheng, Xiangpeng; Chang, ZeNan; Wu, Qian; Xie, Dong; Wang, Fudi; HU, Ronggui

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we reported that heme binds to tumor suppressor p53 protein (TP53, best known as p53) and promotes its nuclear export and cytosolic degradation, whereas iron chelation stabilizes p53 protein and suppresses tumors in a p53-dependent manner. This not only provides mechanistic insights into tumorigenesis associated with iron excess, but also helps guide the administration of chemotherapy based on iron deprivation in the clinic.

  17. p53-Dependent suppression of genome instability in germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otozai, Shinji [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Oda, Shoji [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Kamei, Yasuhiro [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ryo, Haruko [Nomura Project, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 565-0085 (Japan); Sato, Ayuko [Department of Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Nomura, Taisei [Nomura Project, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 565-0085 (Japan); Mitani, Hiroshi [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Tsujimura, Tohru [Department of Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Inohara, Hidenori [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Todo, Takeshi, E-mail: todo@radbio.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Radiation-induced microsatellite instability (MSI) was investigated in medaka fish. • msh2{sup −/−} fish had a high frequency of spontaneous MSI. • p53{sup −/−} fish had a high frequency of radiation-induced MSI. • p53 and msh2 suppress MSI by different pathways: mismatch removal and apoptosis. - Abstract: Radiation increases mutation frequencies at tandem repeat loci. Germline mutations in γ-ray-irradiated medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were studied, focusing on the microsatellite loci. Mismatch-repair genes suppress microsatellite mutation by directly removing altered sequences at the nucleotide level, whereas the p53 gene suppresses genetic alterations by eliminating damaged cells. The contribution of these two defense mechanisms to radiation-induced microsatellite instability was addressed. The spontaneous mutation frequency was significantly higher in msh2{sup −/−} males than in wild-type fish, whereas there was no difference in the frequency of radiation-induced mutations between msh2{sup −/−} and wild-type fish. By contrast, irradiated p53{sup −/−} fish exhibited markedly increased mutation frequencies, whereas their spontaneous mutation frequency was the same as that of wild-type fish. In the spermatogonia of the testis, radiation induced a high level of apoptosis both in wild-type and msh2{sup −/−} fish, but negligible levels in p53{sup −/−} fish. The results demonstrate that the msh2 and p53 genes protect genome integrity against spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation by two different pathways: direct removal of mismatches and elimination of damaged cells.

  18. p53-Dependent suppression of genome instability in germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Radiation-induced microsatellite instability (MSI) was investigated in medaka fish. • msh2−/− fish had a high frequency of spontaneous MSI. • p53−/− fish had a high frequency of radiation-induced MSI. • p53 and msh2 suppress MSI by different pathways: mismatch removal and apoptosis. - Abstract: Radiation increases mutation frequencies at tandem repeat loci. Germline mutations in γ-ray-irradiated medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were studied, focusing on the microsatellite loci. Mismatch-repair genes suppress microsatellite mutation by directly removing altered sequences at the nucleotide level, whereas the p53 gene suppresses genetic alterations by eliminating damaged cells. The contribution of these two defense mechanisms to radiation-induced microsatellite instability was addressed. The spontaneous mutation frequency was significantly higher in msh2−/− males than in wild-type fish, whereas there was no difference in the frequency of radiation-induced mutations between msh2−/− and wild-type fish. By contrast, irradiated p53−/− fish exhibited markedly increased mutation frequencies, whereas their spontaneous mutation frequency was the same as that of wild-type fish. In the spermatogonia of the testis, radiation induced a high level of apoptosis both in wild-type and msh2−/− fish, but negligible levels in p53−/− fish. The results demonstrate that the msh2 and p53 genes protect genome integrity against spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation by two different pathways: direct removal of mismatches and elimination of damaged cells

  19. Immune response to p53 is dependent upon p53/HSP70 complexes in breast cancers.

    OpenAIRE

    Davidoff, A.M.; Iglehart, J D; Marks, J R

    1992-01-01

    Overexpression of the p53 protein, resulting from gene mutations that increase protein stability, has been detected in greater than 25% of primary human breast cancers. In addition, approximately 10% of breast cancer patients have circulating antibodies to the p53 protein. In this study, the anti-p53 humoral response is correlated with the presence and type of mutant p53 protein expressed in the tumor. In a series of 60 breast cancer patients, 0 of 30 tumors with normal, low-level p53 express...

  20. A neurogenic tumor containing a low-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) component with loss of p16 expression and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A/p16: a case report showing progression from a neurofibroma to a high-grade MPNST

    OpenAIRE

    Tajima, Shogo; Koda, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Development of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) is a stepwise process that involves the alteration of many cell cycle regulators and the double inactivation of the NF1 gene. Inactivation of the TP53 gene and deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene are known to play an important role in the process. Herein, we present a 19-year-old man with a familial history of neurofibromatosis type 1, in whom the tumor arose from the intercostal nerve and showed 3 components: a neurofibroma, a low-...

  1. Global genomic profiling reveals an extensive p53-regulated autophagy program contributing to key p53 responses

    OpenAIRE

    Kenzelmann Broz, Daniela; Spano Mello, Stephano; Bieging, Kathryn T.; Jiang, Dadi; Rachel L Dusek; Brady, Colleen A.; Sidow, Arend; Attardi, Laura D.

    2013-01-01

    To gain new insights into p53 biology, Kenzelmann Broz et al. used high-throughput sequencing to analyze global p53 transcriptional networks in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts in response to DNA damage. This approach identified autophagy genes as direct p53 target genes. p53-induced autophagy was important for both p53-dependent apoptosis and transformation suppression by p53. These data highlight an intimate connection between p53 and autophagy and suggest that autophagy contributes to p53-...

  2. Expression of p53 in endometrial polyps with special reference to the p53 signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sho, Tomoko; Hachisuga, Toru; Kawagoe, Toshinori; Urabe, Rie; Kurita, Tomoko; Kagami, Seiji; Shimajiri, Shohei; Fujino, Yoshihisa

    2016-07-01

    We herein examined the significance of the p53 expression in endometrial polyps (EMPs). A total of 133 EMPs, including 62 premenopausal and 71 postmenopausal women with EMP, were immunohistochemically studied for the expression of estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha, Ki-67 and p53. Apoptotic cells were identified using a TUNEL assay. A DNA sequence analysis of TP53 exons 5 to 9 was performed. Among the premenopausal EMPs, a multivariate analysis showed the labeling index (LI) for Ki-67 to correlate significantly with that for p53 (PEMPs, the LI for Ki-67 correlated significantly with that for apoptosis (PEMPs (mean age: 70.2 years). The median Ki-67 index for the p53S was 7%, with no significant difference from that of the glands of the postmenopausal EMPs without the p53S (P=0.058). The median apoptotic index for the p53S was 0%, which was significantly lower than that of the postmenopausal EMPs without the p53S (P=0.002). Two of four p53Ss showed TP53 mutations according to the DNA sequence analysis. The presence of the p53S is not rare in postmenopausal EMPs with an advanced age. Among postmenopausal EMPs, the LI of Ki-67 significantly correlates with that of apoptosis. However, such a positive correlation between the LI of Ki-67 and apoptosis is not observed in p53S. PMID:26727623

  3. Transcriptional Activation by Wild-Type But Not Transforming Mutants of the p53 Anti-Oncogene

    OpenAIRE

    Raycroft, Loretta; Wu, Hongyun; Lozano, Guillermina

    1990-01-01

    The protein encoded by the wild-type p53 proto-oncogene has been shown to suppress transformation, whereas certain mutations that alter p53 become transformation competent. Fusion proteins between p53 and the GAL4 DNA binding domain were made to anchor p53 to a DNA target sequence and to allow measurement of transcriptional activation of a reporter plasmid. The wild-type p53 stimulated transcription in this assay, but two transforming mutations in p53 were unable to act as transcriptional act...

  4. Effects of Δ40p53, an isoform of p53 lacking the N-terminus, on transactivation capacity of the tumor suppressor protein p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The p53 protein is expressed as multiple isoforms that differ in their N- and C-terminus due to alternative splicing, promoter or codon initiation usage. Δ40p53 lacks the first 39 residues containing the main transcriptional activation domain, resulting from initiation of translation at AUG +40 in fully spliced p53 mRNA or in a specific variant mRNA retaining intron 2. Overexpression of Δ40p53 antagonizes wild-type p53 in vitro. However, animal models of Δ40p53 in mouse or Zebrafish have shown complex phenotypes suggestive of p53-dependent growth suppressive effects. We have co-transfected expression vectors for p53 and Δ40p53 in p53-null cell lines Saos-2 and H1299 to show that Δ40p53 forms mixed oligomers with p53 that bind to DNA and modulate the transcription of a generic p53-dependent reporter gene. In H1299 cells, co-expression of the two proteins induced a decrease in transcription with amplitude that depended upon the predicted composition of the hetero-tetramer. In Saos-2, a paradoxical effect was observed, with a small increase in activity for hetero-tetramers predicted to contain 1 or 2 monomers of Δ40p53 and a decrease at higher Δ40p53/p53 ratios. In this cell line, co-transfection of Δ40p53 prevented Hdm2-mediated degradation of p53. Δ40p53 modulates transcriptional activity by interfering with the binding of Hdm2 to hetero-tetramers containing both Δ40p53 and p53. These results provide a basis for growth suppressive effects in animal models co-expressing roughly similar levels of p53 and Δ40p53

  5. The tumor suppressor p53 regulates its own transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Deffie, A; H. Wu; Reinke, V.; Lozano, G.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of p53 to suppress transformation correlates with its ability to activate transcription. To identify targets of p53 transactivation, we examined the p53 promoter itself. Northern (RNA) analysis and transient transfection experiments showed that p53 transcriptionally regulated itself. A functionally inactive mutant p53 could not regulate the p53 promoter. Deletion analysis of the p53 promoter delineated sequences between +22 and +67 as being critical for regulation. Electrophoretic...

  6. Viral Oncoproteins Discriminate between p53 and the p53 Homolog p73

    OpenAIRE

    Marin, Maria Carmen; Jost, Christine A.; Irwin, Meredith S; DeCaprio, James A.; Caput, Daniel; William G Kaelin

    1998-01-01

    p73 is a recently identified member of the p53 family. Previously it was shown that p73 can, when overproduced in p53-defective tumor cells, activate p53-responsive promoters and induce apoptosis. In this report we describe the generation of anti-p73 monoclonal antibodies and confirm that two previously described p73 isoforms are produced in mammalian cells. Furthermore, we show that these two isoforms can bind to canonical p53 DNA-binding sites in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Despi...

  7. Suppression of glucosylceramide synthase restores p53-dependent apoptosis in mutant p53 cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yong-Yu; Patwardhan, Gauri A.; Bhinge, Kaustubh; Gupta, Vineet; Gu, Xin; Jazwinski, S. Michal

    2011-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays an essential role in protecting cells from malignant transformation by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Mutant p53 that is detected in over 50% cases of cancers not only loses its role in suppressing of tumor but also gains oncogenic function. Strategies to convert mutant p53 into wild-type of p53 have been suggested for cancer prevention and treatment, but they face a variety of challenges. Here we report an alternate approach that involves suppression of ...

  8. Urodele p53 tolerates amino acid changes found in p53 variants linked to human cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villiard Éric

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urodele amphibians like the axolotl are unique among vertebrates in their ability to regenerate and their resistance to develop cancers. It is unknown whether these traits are linked at the molecular level. Results Blocking p53 signaling in axolotls using the p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α, inhibited limb regeneration and the expression of p53 target genes such as Mdm2 and Gadd45, suggesting a link between tumor suppression and regeneration. To understand this relationship we cloned the p53 gene from axolotl. When comparing its sequence with p53 from other organisms, and more specifically human we observed multiple amino acids changes found in human tumors. Phylogenetic analysis of p53 protein sequences from various species is in general agreement with standard vertebrate phylogeny; however, both mice-like rodents and teleost fishes are fast evolving. This leads to long branch attraction resulting in an artefactual basal emergence of these groups in the phylogenetic tree. It is tempting to assume a correlation between certain life style traits (e.g. lifespan and the evolutionary rate of the corresponding p53 sequences. Functional assays of the axolotl p53 in human or axolotl cells using p53 promoter reporters demonstrated a temperature sensitivity (ts, which was further confirmed by performing colony assays at 37°C. In addition, axolotl p53 was capable of efficient transactivation at the Hmd2 promoter but has moderate activity at the p21 promoter. Endogenous axolotl p53 was activated following UV irradiation (100 j/m2 or treatment with an alkylating agent as measured using serine 15 phosphorylation and the expression of the endogenous p53 target Gadd45. Conclusion Urodele p53 may play a role in regeneration and has evolved to contain multiple amino acid changes predicted to render the human protein defective in tumor suppression. Some of these mutations were probably selected to maintain p53 activity at low temperature. However

  9. Divergence between the high rate of p53 mutations in skin carcinomas and the low prevalence of anti-p53 antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moch, C; Moysan, A; Lubin, R; Salmonière, P de La; Soufir, N; Galisson, F; Vilmer, C; Venutolo, E; Pelletier, F Le; Janin, A; Basset-Séguin, N

    2001-01-01

    Circulating anti-p53 antibodies have been described and used as tumoural markers in patients with various cancers and strongly correlate with the p53 mutated status of the tumours. No study has yet looked at the prevalence of such antibodies in skin carcinoma patients although these tumours have been shown to be frequently p53 mutated. Most skin carcinoma can be diagnosed by examination or biopsy, but aggressive, recurrent and/or non-surgical cases' follow up would be helped by a biological marker of residual disease. We performed a prospective study looking at the prevalence of anti-p53 antibodies using an ELISA technique in a series of 105 skin carcinoma patients in comparison with a sex- and age-matched control skin carcinoma-free group (n = 130). Additionally, p53 accumulation was studied by immunohistochemistry to confirm p53 protein altered expression in a sample of tumours. Anti-p53 antibodies were detected in 2.9% of the cases, with a higher prevalence in patients suffering from the more aggressive squamous cell type (SCC) of skin carcinoma (8%) than for the more common and slowly growing basal cell carcinoma type or BCC (1.5%). p53 protein stabilization could be confirmed in 80% of tumours studied by IHC. This low level of anti-p53 antibody detection contrasts with the high rate of p53 mutations reported in these tumours. This observation shows that the anti-p53 humoral response is a complex and tissue-specific mechanism. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747330

  10. Estrogen receptor prevents p53-dependent apoptosis in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Shannon T.; Shin, Hyunjin; Westerling, Thomas; Liu, Xiaole Shirley; Brown, Myles

    2012-01-01

    More than two-thirds of breast cancers express the estrogen receptor (ER) and depend on estrogen for growth and survival. Therapies targeting ER function, including aromatase inhibitors that block the production of estrogens and ER antagonists that alter ER transcriptional activity, play a central role in the treatment of ER+ breast cancers of all stages. In contrast to ER− breast cancers, which frequently harbor mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor, ER+ breast cancers are predominantly wild...

  11. p53 Response to Ultrasound: Preliminary Observations in MCF7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Janis M.; Campbell, Paul A.

    2011-09-01

    Mutated p53 can be found in approximately half of all human cancers. Strategies which seek to restore, or at least exercise a level of external control over, p53 functionality are thus potentially useful as adjuncts to therapy. Here, we report our preliminary measurements in this area, and demonstrate that short-burst pulsed ultrasound can indeed affect p53 activity. Specifically, we have observed that expression of the p53 protein can be regulated in the period immediately following low intensity short pulse (millisecond) ultrasound exposure, and that altered activity levels return to basal levels over a 24 hour period post-insonation.

  12. Genome wide expression profiling of p53 regulated miRNAs in neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Rihani, Ali; Van Goethem, Alan; Ongenaert, Maté; De Brouwer, Sara; Volders, Pieter-Jan; Agarwal, Saurabh; De Preter, Katleen; Mestdagh, Pieter; Shohet, Jason; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo; VAN MAERKEN, TOM

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of the antitumor activity of p53 could offer a promising approach for the treatment of neuroblastoma. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important mediators of p53 activity, but their role in the p53 response has not yet been comprehensively addressed in neuroblastoma. Therefore, we set out to characterize alterations in miRNA expression that are induced by p53 activation in neuroblastoma cells. Genome-wide miRNA expression analysis showed that miR-34a-5p, miR-182-5p, miR-203a, miR-222-3p, an...

  13. p53 regulation and activity in mouse embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Solozobova, Valeriya

    2010-01-01

    P53 is a tumour development p53. The aim of this work was to study the regulation of p53 in embryonic stem cells and its activation in response to DNA damage. p53 was found that p53 becomes transcriptionally active in ES cells after DNA damage. Embryonic stem cells contain a relatively high amount of p53 protein and p53 RNA. After differentiation p53 level is rapidly downregulated. The high abundance of p53 in undifferentiated ES cells is a result of enhanced translation.

  14. THE EXPRESSION OF P53 PROTEIN AND P21WAFl/cipl/sdil IN GASTRIC CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the relation along p53, p21 protein, p21 gene and their clinical significances in 40 gastric comparing with normal gastric tissues.Methods In this study, the p53 and p21 protein were investigated in 40 gastric carcinomas using IHC(Immunohistochemistry). At the same time, the possible presence of p21 gene mutation was also analyzed by silver staining PCR-SSCP method.Results The abnormal expression of p53 and p21 protein occurs only in gastric carcinoma; The expression of p53 protein and p21 is not related to the clinico pathological features. There was relationship between the expression of p53 protein and p21 protein. In 40 cases of gastric carcinoma, single strand conformational polymorphism of PCR product for p21 gene in tumor tissue shows no altered band or mobility shifting.Conclusion The abnormal expression of p53 and p21 protein occurs only in gastric carcinoma and is not related to the clinicopathological features. The expression of p21 protein is related to that of p53 protein. The mutation of p21 gene was not found in all of 40 tumor specimens. This suggests that p21 alteration in gastric carcinoma is caused through the inactivation of p53 protein rather than through intragenic mutation of the p21 gene itself.Using drugs which can stimulate p21 gene is a new method to cure gastric cancer with mutation-p53 protein.

  15. Genome-scale functional analysis of the human genes modulating p53 activity by regulating MDM2 expression in a p53-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Min; Choi, Seung-Hyun; Yeom, Young Il; Min, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Il-Chul

    2016-09-16

    MDM2, a critical negative regulator of p53, is often overexpressed in leukemia, but few p53 mutations are found, suggesting that p53-independent MDM2 expression occurs due to alterations in MDM2 upstream regulators. In this study, a high MDM2 transcription level was observed (41.17%) regardless of p53 expression in patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Therefore, we performed genome-scale functional screening of the human genes modulating MDM2 expression in a p53-independent manner. We searched co-expression profiles of genes showing a positive or negative pattern with MDM2 expression in a DNA microarray database, selected1089 links, and composed a screening library of 368 genes. Using MDM2 P1 and P2 promoter-reporter systems, we screened clones regulating MDM2 transcriptions in a p53-independent manner by overexpression. Nine clones from the screening library showed enhanced MDM2 promoter activity and MDM2 expression in p53-deficient HCT116 cells. Among them, six clones, including NTRK2, GNA15, SFRS2, EIF5A, ELAVL1, and YWHAB mediated MAPK signaling for expressing MDM2. These results indicate that p53-independent upregulation of MDM2 by increasing selected clones may lead to oncogenesis in AML and that MDM2-modulating genes are novel potential targets for AML treatment. PMID:27524244

  16. Genome-scale functional analysis of the human genes modulating p53 activity by regulating MDM2 expression in a p53-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Min; Choi, Seung-Hyun; Yeom, Young Il; Min, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Il-Chul

    2016-09-16

    MDM2, a critical negative regulator of p53, is often overexpressed in leukemia, but few p53 mutations are found, suggesting that p53-independent MDM2 expression occurs due to alterations in MDM2 upstream regulators. In this study, a high MDM2 transcription level was observed (41.17%) regardless of p53 expression in patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Therefore, we performed genome-scale functional screening of the human genes modulating MDM2 expression in a p53-independent manner. We searched co-expression profiles of genes showing a positive or negative pattern with MDM2 expression in a DNA microarray database, selected1089 links, and composed a screening library of 368 genes. Using MDM2 P1 and P2 promoter-reporter systems, we screened clones regulating MDM2 transcriptions in a p53-independent manner by overexpression. Nine clones from the screening library showed enhanced MDM2 promoter activity and MDM2 expression in p53-deficient HCT116 cells. Among them, six clones, including NTRK2, GNA15, SFRS2, EIF5A, ELAVL1, and YWHAB mediated MAPK signaling for expressing MDM2. These results indicate that p53-independent upregulation of MDM2 by increasing selected clones may lead to oncogenesis in AML and that MDM2-modulating genes are novel potential targets for AML treatment.

  17. p53 Gene and Tumorigenesis%p53基因与肿瘤形成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩涛; 杨德吉

    2008-01-01

    肿瘤抑制基因的研究已经成为继癌基因之后肿瘤遗传学、分子生物学领域的前沿和热点,尤其是抑癌基因p53越来越被人们重视.研究表明正常的p53,又称野生型p53,在细胞损伤后的修复过程中发挥重要作用.正常p53的功能像"分子警察"一样监视着基因组DNA的完整性.在细胞发生DNA损伤时,p53蛋白能使细胞分裂终止在G1/S期,以使细胞有足够的时间修复损伤,恢复正常状态.若不能修复,野生型p53还能启动细胞的凋亡过程从而引发细胞的程序性死亡,阻止具有癌变倾向的突变细胞产生.而突变型p53基因会导致肿瘤的发生,大多数肿瘤与p53的突变有关.文章着重阐述了p53的表达与突变、p53的稳定调节及p53的转录调控等.

  18. Δ122p53, a mouse model of Δ133p53α, enhances the tumor-suppressor activities of an attenuated p53 mutant

    OpenAIRE

    Slatter, T L; Hung, N. Van; Bowie, S; Campbell, H.; Rubio, C; Speidel, D; Wilson, M.; Baird, M.; Royds, J. A.; Braithwaite, A W

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests the Δ133p53α isoform may function as an oncogene. It is overexpressed in many tumors, stimulates pathways involved in tumor progression, and inhibits some activities of wild-type p53, including transactivation and apoptosis. We hypothesized that Δ133p53α would have an even more profound effect on p53 variants with weaker tumor-suppressor capability. We tested this using a mouse model heterozygous for a Δ133p53α-like isoform (Δ122p53) and a p53 mutant with weak tumor-...

  19. IGFBP3 Promoter Methylation in Colorectal Cancer: Relationship with Microsatellite Instability, CpG Island Methylator Phenotype, p53

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    Takako Kawasaki

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3, which is induced by wild-type p53, regulates IGF and interacts with the TGF-β pathway. IGFBP3 promoter methylation may occur in colorectal cancer with or without the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP, which is associated with microsatellite instability (MSI and TGFBR2 mutation. We examined the relationship between IGFBP3 methylation, p53 expression, CIMP and MSI in 902 population-based colorectal cancers. Utilizing real-time PCR (MethyLight, we quantified promoter methylation in IGFBP3 and eight other CIMP-high-specific promoters (CACNA1G, CDKN2A, CRABP1, IGF2, MLH1, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1. IGFBP3 methylation was far more frequent in non-MSI-high CIMP-high tumors (85% = 35/41 than in MSI-high CIMPhigh (49% = 44/90, P < .0001, MSI-high non-CIMP-high (17% = 6/36, P < .0001, non-MSI-high non-CIMP-high tumors (22% = 152/680, P < .0001. Among CIMPhigh tumors, the inverse relationship between MSI and IGFBP3 methylation persisted in p53-negative tumors (P < .0001, but not in p53-positive tumors. IGFBP3 methylation was associated inversely with TGFBR2 mutation in MSI-high non-CIMP-high tumors (P = .02. In conclusion, IGFBP3 methylation is inversely associated with MSI in CIMP-high colorectal cancers, this relationship is limited to p53-negative tumors. Our data suggest complex relationship between global genomic/epigenomic phenomena (such as MSI/ CIMP, single molecular events (e.g., IGFBP3 methylation, TP53 mutation, TGFBR2 mutation, the related pathways.

  20. Acquisition of p53 mutations in response to the non-genotoxic p53 activator Nutlin-3

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz, Moammir H.; Shen, Hong; Carl G Maki

    2011-01-01

    Wild-type p53 is a stress-responsive tumor suppressor and potent growth inhibitor. Genotoxic stresses (e.g. ionizing and UV radiation or chemotherapeutic drug treatment) can activate p53, but also induce mutations in the P53 gene and thus select for p53-mutated cells. Nutlin-3a (Nutlin) is pre-clinical drug that activates p53 in a non-genotoxic fashion. Nutlin occupies the p53-binding pocket of MDM2, activating p53 by blocking the p53-MDM2 interaction. Because Nutlin neither binds p53 directl...

  1. Autoantibody recognition mechanisms of p53 epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need for economical blood based, noninvasive molecular biomarkers to assist in the detection and diagnosis of cancers in a cost-effective manner at an early stage, when curative interventions are still possible. Serum autoantibodies are attractive biomarkers for early cancer detection, but their development has been hindered by the punctuated genetic nature of the ten million known cancer mutations. A landmark study of 50,000 patients (Pedersen et al., 2013) showed that a few p53 15-mer epitopes are much more sensitive colon cancer biomarkers than p53, which in turn is a more sensitive cancer biomarker than any other protein. The function of p53 as a nearly universal "tumor suppressor" is well established, because of its strong immunogenicity in terms of not only antibody recruitment, but also stimulation of autoantibodies. Here we examine dimensionally compressed bioinformatic fractal scaling analysis for identifying the few sensitive epitopes from the p53 amino acid sequence, and show how it could be used for early cancer detection (ECD). We trim 15-mers to 7-mers, and identify specific 7-mers from other species that could be more sensitive to aggressive human cancers, such as liver cancer. Our results could provide a roadmap for ECD.

  2. Regulation of p53 tetramerization and nuclear export by ARC

    OpenAIRE

    Foo, Roger S.-Y.; Nam, Young-Jae; Ostreicher, Marc Jason; Metzl, Mark D.; Whelan, Russell S.; Peng, Chang-Fu; Ashton, Anthony W.; Fu, Weimin; Mani, Kartik; Chin, Suet-Feung; Provenzano, Elena; Ellis, Ian; Figg, Nichola; Pinder, Sarah; Bennett, Martin R.

    2007-01-01

    Inactivation of the transcription factor p53 is central to carcinogenesis. Yet only approximately one-half of cancers have p53 loss-of-function mutations. Here, we demonstrate a mechanism for p53 inactivation by apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), a protein induced in multiple cancer cells. The direct binding in the nucleus of ARC to the p53 tetramerization domain inhibits p53 tetramerization. This exposes a nuclear export signal in p53, triggering Crm1-dependent reloca...

  3. Molecular mechanisms of growth suppression by pharmacologically activated p53

    OpenAIRE

    Hedström, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that is crucial for protecting cells from cancer development. The importance of p53 tumor suppression function is highlighted by the fact that the p53 pathway is inactivated in most, if not all cancers. Mutation of the p53 gene occurs in about 50% of all tumors, whereas in the tumors which retain wild-type p53, the function of p53 is abolished due to deregulation of the p53 pathway. Due to the potency of p53 in suppressing t...

  4. Driving p53 Response to Bax Activation Greatly Enhances Sensitivity to Taxol by Inducing Massive Apoptosis

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    Paola De Feudis

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The proapoptotic gene bax is one of the downstream effectors of p53. The p53 binding site in the bax promoter is less responsive to p53 than the one in the growth arrest mediating gene p21. We introduced the bax gene under the control of 13 copies of a strong p53 responsive element into two ovarian cancer cell lines. The clones expressing bax under the control of p53 obtained from the wild-type (wt p53-expressing cell line A2780 were much more sensitive (500- to 1000-fold to the anticancer agent taxol than the parent cell line, with a higher percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis after drug treatment that was clearly p53-dependent and bax-mediated. Xenografts established in nude mice from one selected clone (A2780/C3 were more responsive to taxol than the parental line and the apoptotic response of A2780/C3 tumors was also increased after treatment. Introduction of the same plasmid into the p53 null SKOV3 cell line did not alter the sensitivity to taxol or the induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, driving the p53 response (after taxol treatment by activating the bax gene rather than the p21 gene results in induction of massive apoptosis, in vitro and in vivo, and greatly enhances sensitivity to the drug.

  5. Peran p53 Sebagai Jalur Kritis pada Mekanisme Kontrol Siklus Sel Sebagai Pencegah Terjadinya Kanker Mulut

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    Herlia Nur Istindiah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In cell cycle control, p53 acts as an emergency brake, where its important checkpoint function is to maintain the genome integrity by preventing the formation and proliferation of mutant cells. P53 activity is increased by DNA damage occurs caused by agents (such as radioation, UV light or drugs or oncogenes. Mdm2 protein can inhibit the p53 activation, but oncogenes can inhibit Mdm2 or activate p53. If DNA damage occurs, then p53 prevents the cells from replicating their DNA by arresting the cell cycle, so that the cells can repair the damage. Alternatively, p53 instructs the cells to undergo apoptosis by inducing bax gene expression, so that irregular cell growth, and cancer can be avoided. Cancer, including oral cancer, oftenthuolved cells with altered p53. Exogenous factors, such as tobacco and alcohol, presumably plays a role in triggering p53 mutations. Several techniques, such as immunohistochemistry and PCR can be used to investigation their etiology and development of oral cancer. The results hopefully be applied clinically in early detection, prevention and prediction of cancer. This paper discusses the role on p53 in preventing the occurrence and proliferation of mutated cells that lead to cancer, including oral cancer.

  6. Wip1 and p53 contribute to HTLV-1 Tax-induced tumorigenesis

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    Zane Linda

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell Leukemia Virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infects 20 million individuals world-wide and causes Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL, a highly aggressive T-cell cancer. ATLL is refractory to treatment with conventional chemotherapy and fewer than 10% of afflicted individuals survive more than 5 years after diagnosis. HTLV-1 encodes a viral oncoprotein, Tax, that functions in transforming virus-infected T-cells into leukemic cells. All ATLL cases are believed to have reduced p53 activity although only a minority of ATLLs have genetic mutations in their p53 gene. It has been suggested that p53 function is inactivated by the Tax protein. Results Using genetically altered mice, we report here that Tax expression does not achieve a functional equivalence of p53 inactivation as that seen with genetic mutation of p53 (i.e. a p53−/− genotype. Thus, we find statistically significant differences in tumorigenesis between Tax+p53+/+versus Tax+p53−/− mice. We also find a role contributed by the cellular Wip1 phosphatase protein in tumor formation in Tax transgenic mice. Notably, Tax+Wip1−/− mice show statistically significant reduced prevalence of tumorigenesis compared to Tax+Wip1+/+ counterparts. Conclusions Our findings provide new insights into contributions by p53 and Wip1 in the in vivo oncogenesis of Tax-induced tumors in mice.

  7. P53 regulates disruption of neuronal development in the adult hippocampus after irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y-Q; Cheng, ZW-C; Liu, SK-W; Aubert, I; Wong, C S

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis is implicated in neurocognitive dysfunction after cranial irradiation for brain tumors. How irradiation results in impaired neuronal development remains poorly understood. The Trp53 (p53) gene is known to regulate cellular DNA damage response after irradiation. Whether it has a role in disruption of late neuronal development remains unknown. Here we characterized the effects of p53 on neuronal development in adult mouse hippocampus after irradiation. Different bromodeoxyuridine incorporation paradigms and a transplantation study were used for cell fate mapping. Compared with wild-type mice, we observed profound inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis after irradiation in mice deficient in p53 despite the absence of acute apoptosis of neuroblasts. The putative neural stem cells were apoptosis resistant after irradiation regardless of p53 genotype. Cell fate mapping using different bromodeoxyuridine incorporation paradigms revealed enhanced activation of neural stem cells and their consequential exhaustion in the absence of p53 after irradiation. Both p53-knockout and wild-type mice demonstrated similar extent of microglial activation in the hippocampus after irradiation. Impairment of neuronal differentiation of neural progenitors transplanted in irradiated hippocampus was not altered by p53 genotype of the recipient mice. We conclude that by inhibiting neural progenitor activation, p53 serves to mitigate disruption of neuronal development after irradiation independent of apoptosis and perturbation of the neural stem cell niche. These findings suggest for the first time that p53 may have a key role in late effects in brain after irradiation.

  8. Systems-level analysis of the regulation and function of p53 dynamics in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Eric

    Living cells use complex signaling pathways to detect environmental stimuli and generate appropriate responses. As methods for quantifying intracellular signaling have improved, several signaling pathways have been found to transmit information using signals that pulse in time. The transcription factor p53 is a key tumor suppressor and stress-response regulator that exhibits pulsatile dynamics. In response to DNA double-strand breaks, the concentration of p53 in the cell nucleus increases in pulses with a fixed amplitude, duration, and period; the mean number of pulses increases with DNA damage. p53 regulates the expression of over 100 target genes involved in a range of cellular stress responses including apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and changes in metabolism. p53 pulsing directly impacts p53 function: altering p53 dynamics by pharmacologically inhibiting p53 degradation changes patterns of target gene expression and cell fate. While p53 pulsing serves an important signaling function, it is less clear what it accomplishes mechanistically. Here we will describe our recent efforts to determine the impact of p53 pulsing on the dynamics and coordination of target gene expression.

  9. p53 transactivation and the impact of mutations, cofactors and small molecules using a simplified yeast-based screening system.

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    Virginia Andreotti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The p53 tumor suppressor, which is altered in most cancers, is a sequence-specific transcription factor that is able to modulate the expression of many target genes and influence a variety of cellular pathways. Inactivation of the p53 pathway in cancer frequently occurs through the expression of mutant p53 protein. In tumors that retain wild type p53, the pathway can be altered by upstream modulators, particularly the p53 negative regulators MDM2 and MDM4. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Given the many factors that might influence p53 function, including expression levels, mutations, cofactor proteins and small molecules, we expanded our previously described yeast-based system to provide the opportunity for efficient investigation of their individual and combined impacts in a miniaturized format. The system integrates i variable expression of p53 proteins under the finely tunable GAL1,10 promoter, ii single copy, chromosomally located p53-responsive and control luminescence reporters, iii enhanced chemical uptake using modified ABC-transporters, iv small-volume formats for treatment and dual-luciferase assays, and v opportunities to co-express p53 with other cofactor proteins. This robust system can distinguish different levels of expression of WT and mutant p53 as well as interactions with MDM2 or 53BP1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found that the small molecules Nutlin and RITA could both relieve the MDM2-dependent inhibition of WT p53 transactivation function, while only RITA could impact p53/53BP1 functional interactions. PRIMA-1 was ineffective in modifying the transactivation capacity of WT p53 and missense p53 mutations. This dual-luciferase assay can, therefore, provide a high-throughput assessment tool for investigating a matrix of factors that can influence the p53 network, including the effectiveness of newly developed small molecules, on WT and tumor-associated p53 mutants as well as interacting proteins.

  10. The p53 Isoform Δ133p53β Promotes Cancer Stem Cell Potential

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    Nikola Arsic

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSC are responsible for cancer chemoresistance and metastasis formation. Here we report that Δ133p53β, a TP53 splice variant, enhanced cancer cell stemness in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, while its depletion reduced it. Δ133p53β stimulated the expression of the key pluripotency factors SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG. Similarly, in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, aggressiveness was coupled with enhanced CSC potential and Δ133p53β expression. Like in MCF-7 cells, SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG expression were positively regulated by Δ133p53β in these cells. Finally, treatment of MCF-7 cells with etoposide, a cytotoxic anti-cancer drug, increased CSC formation and SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG expression via Δ133p53, thus potentially increasing the risk of cancer recurrence. Our findings show that Δ133p53β supports CSC potential. Moreover, they indicate that the TP53 gene, which is considered a major tumor suppressor gene, also acts as an oncogene via the Δ133p53β isoform.

  11. Effects of Chronic Ochratoxin A Exposure on p53 Heterozygous and p53 Homozygous Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, Genevieve S; Caldwell, Donald S; Aziz, Syed A; Coady, Laurie C; Armstrong, Cheryl L; Curran, Ivan H A; Koffman, Robyn L; Kapal, Kamla; Lefebvre, David E; Mehta, Rekha

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to the mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) causes nephropathy in domestic animals and rodents and renal tumors in rodents and poultry. Humans are exposed to OTA by consuming foods made with contaminated cereal grains and other commodities. Management of human health risks due to OTA exposure depends, in part, on establishing a mode of action (MOA) for OTA carcinogenesis. To further investigate OTA's MOA, p53 heterozygous (p53+/-) and p53 homozygous (p53+/+) mice were exposed to OTA in diet for 26 weeks. The former are susceptible to tumorigenesis upon chronic exposure to genotoxic carcinogens. OTA-induced renal damage but no tumors were observed in either strain, indicating that p53 heterozygosity conferred little additional sensitivity to OTA. Renal changes included dose-dependent increases in cellular proliferation, apoptosis, karyomegaly, and tubular degeneration in proximal tubules, which were consistent with ochratoxicosis. The lowest observed effect level for renal changes in p53+/- and p53+/+ mice was 200 μg OTA/kg bw/day. Based on the lack of tumors and the severity of renal and body weight changes at a maximum tolerated dose, the results were interpreted as suggestive of a primarily nongenotoxic (epigenetic) MOA for OTA carcinogenesis in this mouse model.

  12. Diabetes susceptibility in Mayas: Evidence for the involvement of polymorphisms in HHEX, HNF4α, KCNJ11, PPARγ, CDKN2A/2B, SLC30A8, CDC123/CAMK1D, TCF7L2, ABCA1 and SLC16A11 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Riegos, J C; Ortiz-López, M G; Peña-Espinoza, B I; Montúfar-Robles, I; Peña-Rico, M A; Sánchez-Pozos, K; Granados-Silvestre, M A; Menjivar, M

    2015-07-01

    Association of type 2 diabetes (T2D) with common variants in HHEX, HNF4α, KCNJ11, PPARγ, CDKN2A/2B, SLC30A8, CDC123/CAMK1D, TCF7L2, ABCA1 and SLC16A11 genes have been reported, mainly in populations of European and Asian ancestry and to a lesser extent in Latin Americans. Thus, we aimed to investigate the contribution of rs1111875 (HHEX), rs1800961 (HNF4α), rs5219 (KCNJ11), rs1801282 (PPARγ), rs10811661 (CDKN2A/2B), rs13266634 (SLC30A8), rs12779790 (CDC123/CAMK1D), rs7903146 (TCF7L2), rs9282541 (ABCA1) and rs13342692 (SLC16A11) polymorphisms in the genetic background of Maya population to associate their susceptibility to develop T2D. This is one of the first studies designed specifically to investigate the inherited component of T2D in the indigenous population of Mexico. SNPs were genotyped by allelic discrimination method in 575 unrelated Maya individuals. Two SNPs rs10811661 and rs928254 were significantly associated with T2D after adjusting for BMI; rs10811661 in a recessive and rs9282541 in a dominant model. Additionally, we found phenotypical alterations associated with genetic variants: HDL to rs9282541 and insulin to rs13342692. In conclusion, these findings support an association of genetic polymorphisms to develop T2D in Maya population.

  13. p53 Aggregates penetrate cells and induce the co-aggregation of intracellular p53.

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    Karolyn J Forget

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are unique pathologies in which the infectious particles are prions, a protein aggregate. The prion protein has many particular features, such as spontaneous aggregation, conformation transmission to other native PrP proteins and transmission from an individual to another. Protein aggregation is now frequently associated to many human diseases, for example Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or type 2 diabetes. A few proteins associated to these conformational diseases are part of a new category of proteins, called prionoids: proteins that share some, but not all, of the characteristics associated with prions. The p53 protein, a transcription factor that plays a major role in cancer, has recently been suggested to be a possible prionoid. The protein has been shown to accumulate in multiple cancer cell types, and its aggregation has also been reproduced in vitro by many independent groups. These observations suggest a role for p53 aggregates in cancer development. This study aims to test the «prion-like» features of p53. Our results show in vitro aggregation of the full length and N-terminally truncated protein (p53C, and penetration of these aggregates into cells. According to our findings, the aggregates enter cells using macropinocytosis, a non-specific pathway of entry. Lastly, we also show that once internalized by the cell, p53C aggregates can co-aggregate with endogenous p53 protein. Together, these findings suggest prion-like characteristics for p53 protein, based on the fact that p53 can spontaneously aggregate, these aggregates can penetrate cells and co-aggregate with cellular p53.

  14. Status quo of p53 in the treatment of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yong-Song; He, Qing; Zou, Qing

    2016-10-01

    The p53 gene is pivotal for oncogenesis in a combination of mutations in oncogenes and antioncogenes. The ubiquitous loss of the p53 pathway in human cancers has generated considerable interest in developing p53-targeted cancer therapies, but current ideas and approaches targeting p53 are conflicting. Current researches focus on cancer-selective drugs with therapeutic strategies that both activate and inhibit p53. As p53 is ubiquitously lost in human cancers, the strategy of exogenous p53 addition is reasonable. However, p53 acts not equally in all cell types; thus, individualized p53 therapy is the direction of future research. To clarify the controversies on p53 for improvement of future antitumor studies, the review focuses on the available technological protocols, including their advantages and limitations in terms of future therapeutic use of p53 in the management of tumors.

  15. Effects of Δ40p53, an isoform of p53 lacking the N-terminus, on transactivation capacity of the tumor suppressor protein p53

    OpenAIRE

    Hafsi, Hind; Santos-Silva, Daniela; Courtois-Cox, Stéphanie; Hainaut, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Background The p53 protein is expressed as multiple isoforms that differ in their N- and C-terminus due to alternative splicing, promoter or codon initiation usage. Δ40p53 lacks the first 39 residues containing the main transcriptional activation domain, resulting from initiation of translation at AUG +40 in fully spliced p53 mRNA or in a specific variant mRNA retaining intron 2. Overexpression of Δ40p53 antagonizes wild-type p53 in vitro. However, animal models of Δ40p53 in mouse or Zebrafis...

  16. A Chromatin-Focused siRNA Screen for Regulators of p53-Dependent Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Morgan A; Zhu, Jiajun; Berger, Shelley L

    2016-01-01

    The protein product of the Homo sapiens TP53 gene is a transcription factor (p53) that regulates the expression of genes critical for the response to DNA damage and tumor suppression, including genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, metabolism, and a number of other tumorigenesis-related pathways. Differential transcriptional regulation of these genes is believed to alter the balance between two p53-dependent cell fates: cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. A number of previously identified p53 cofactors covalently modify and alter the function of both the p53 protein and histone proteins. Both gain- and loss-of-function mutations in chromatin modifiers have been strongly implicated in cancer development; thus, we sought to identify novel chromatin regulatory proteins that affect p53-dependent transcription and the balance between the expression of pro-cell cycle arrest and proapoptotic genes. We utilized an siRNA library designed against predicted chromatin regulatory proteins, and identified known and novel chromatin-related factors that affect both global p53-dependent transcription and gene-specific regulators of p53 transcriptional activation. The results from this screen will serve as a comprehensive resource for those interested in further characterizing chromatin and epigenetic factors that regulate p53 transcription. PMID:27334938

  17. Phosphorylation of Thr18 and Ser20 of p53 in Ad-p53 – induced apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamizo, Akira; Amano, Toshiyuko; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xin-qiao; Ramdas, Latha; Liu, Ta-Jen; Bekele, B. Nebiyou; Shono, Tadahisa; Sasaki, Tomio; Benedict, William F.; Sawaya, Raymond; Lang, Frederick F.

    2008-01-01

    The p53 protein plays a critical role in inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. Because p53 is inactivated in human gliomas, restoring p53 function is a major focus of glioma therapy. The most clinically tested strategy for replacing p53 has been adenoviral-mediated p53 gene therapy (Ad-p53). In addition to their therapeutic implications, investigations into Ad-p53 provide model systems for understanding p53’s ability to induce cell cycle arrest versus apoptosis, particularly because wild-t...

  18. Comparison of Nuclear Accumulation of p53 Protein with Mutations in the p53 Gene of Human Breast Cancer Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萱仪; 查小明; 武正炎; 范萍

    2001-01-01

    Objective The objective was to compare nuclear accumulation of p53 protein with mutations in the p53 gene on the tissues of human breast cancer. Methods Fifty-four invasive ductal carcinomas of breast were analyzed by the method of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) silver stain and strep-avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (SABC) immunohistochemistry. Results A statistically significant association between the presence of p53 gene mutation and nuclear accumulation of p53 protein was found (P<0.01). 22 tumors that demonstrated p53 gene mutations showed nuclear accumulation of p53 protein, while only 9 (28%) showed nuclear accumulation of p53 protein in 32 tumors without p53 gene mutations. Both p53 mutation protein and p53 gene mutations were prevalent in steroid and progesterone receptors negative tumors (P<0.05). A statistically significant association was found between the nuclear accumulation of p53 protein and lymph node invasion (P<0.05), and between p53 gene mutations and lymph node invasion (P<0.05). p53 abnormalities might be associated with an aggressive phenotype in breast cancer. Conclusion The immunohistochemical detection of nuclear p53 protein accumulation is highly associated with p53 gene mutations in breast cancer tissues, and that this method is useful for rapid screening of p53 abnormalities. However, in order to avoid false positive reaction, the p53 gene mutations should be determined in cases slightly positive for p53 nuclear protein.

  19. Interactions of chromatin context, binding site sequence content, and sequence evolution in stress-induced p53 occupancy and transactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular stresses activate the tumor suppressor p53 protein leading to selective binding to DNA response elements (REs and gene transactivation from a large pool of potential p53 REs (p53REs. To elucidate how p53RE sequences and local chromatin context interact to affect p53 binding and gene transactivation, we mapped genome-wide binding localizations of p53 and H3K4me3 in untreated and doxorubicin (DXR-treated human lymphoblastoid cells. We examined the relationships among p53 occupancy, gene expression, H3K4me3, chromatin accessibility (DNase 1 hypersensitivity, DHS, ENCODE chromatin states, p53RE sequence, and evolutionary conservation. We observed that the inducible expression of p53-regulated genes was associated with the steady-state chromatin status of the cell. Most highly inducible p53-regulated genes were suppressed at baseline and marked by repressive histone modifications or displayed CTCF binding. Comparison of p53RE sequences residing in different chromatin contexts demonstrated that weaker p53REs resided in open promoters, while stronger p53REs were located within enhancers and repressed chromatin. p53 occupancy was strongly correlated with similarity of the target DNA sequences to the p53RE consensus, but surprisingly, inversely correlated with pre-existing nucleosome accessibility (DHS and evolutionary conservation at the p53RE. Occupancy by p53 of REs that overlapped transposable element (TE repeats was significantly higher (p<10-7 and correlated with stronger p53RE sequences (p<10-110 relative to nonTE-associated p53REs, particularly for MLT1H, LTR10B, and Mer61 TEs. However, binding at these elements was generally not associated with transactivation of adjacent genes. Occupied p53REs located in L2-like TEs were unique in displaying highly negative PhyloP scores (predicted fast-evolving and being associated with altered H3K4me3 and DHS levels. These results underscore the systematic interaction between chromatin status and p53

  20. Expression screening using a Medaka cDNA library identifies evolutionarily conserved regulators of the p53/Mdm2 pathway

    OpenAIRE

    P. Zhang; Kratz, A.S.; M. Salama; Elabd, S.; Heinrich, T; Wittbrodt, J.; Blattner, C.; G Davidson

    2015-01-01

    Background The p53 tumor suppressor protein is mainly regulated by alterations in the half-life of the protein, resulting in significant differences in p53 protein levels in cells. The major regulator of this process is Mdm2, which ubiquitinates p53 and targets it for proteasomal degradation. This process can be enhanced or reduced by proteins that associate with p53 or Mdm2 and several proteins have been identified with such an activity. Furthermore, additional ubiquitin ligases for p53 have...

  1. P53 FUSION PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN PROKARYOTE AND PREPARATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY TO P53

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Caiyun; Shou Chengchao; Sun Sulian; ZhangLei; Zeng Li

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Conventional immunohistochemistry (IHC) is available to assess P53 mutations, and expensive imported anti-P53 monoclonal antibody has been used in China, it is necessary to study a new monoclonal antibody.Methods: The P53 DNA fragment enconding N-terminal 180 amiao acide was obtained by PCR and was cloned into PGEX-2T plasmid expressing glutathione S-transferase (GST). The P53-GST fusion protein expressed by JM109was used for immunizing BALB/C mice. We have raised one hybridoma strain secreting McAb to human P53(named M126). Results: The IHC analysis of 52paraffin-embedded sections from human breast cancer with M126 and PAB1801 (Zymed Co.) has showed that the positive immunoreactions were 25 cases (48%) and 22cases (42.3%) respectively. The staining of M126 was stronger and preferable to PAB1801. Conclusion: M126can be instead of PAB1801 for studying immunohistochemical analysis on P53 Protein.

  2. Role of p53 in Cell Death and Human Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Toshinori Ozaki; Akira Nakagawara

    2011-01-01

    p53 is a nuclear transcription factor with a pro-apoptotic function. Since over 50% of human cancers carry loss of function mutations in p53 gene, p53 has been considered to be one of the classical type tumor suppressors. Mutant p53 acts as the dominant-negative inhibitor toward wild-type p53. Indeed, mutant p53 has an oncogenic potential. In some cases, malignant cancer cells bearing p53 mutations display a chemo-resistant phenotype. In response to a variety of cellular stresses such as DNA ...

  3. Transcriptional repression in normal human keratinocytes by wild-type and mutant p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Salas, L M; Velazquez, A; Lopez-Bayghen, E; Woodworth, C D; Garrido, E; Gariglio, P; DiPaolo, J A

    1995-05-01

    Wild-type p53 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that inhibits cell proliferation and represses transcriptionally most TATA box-containing promoters in transformed or tumor-derived cell lines. This study demonstrates that p53 alters transcription of the long control region (LCR) of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18). Wild-type and mutant p53 143Val to Ala repressed the HPV-18 LCR promoter in normal human keratinocytes, the natural host cell for HPV infections. Repression by wild-type p53 was also observed in C-33A cells and in an HPV-16-immortalized cell line with an inducible wild-type p53. However, when C-33A cells were cotransfected with the HPV-18 LCR and mutant 143Val to Ala, repression did not occur. Mutant p53 135Cys to Ser did not induce repression in either normal human keratinocytes or in the C-33A line; although like 143Val to Ala, it is thought to affect the DNA binding activity of the wild-type protein. The ability of mutant p53 143Val to Ala to inactivate the HPV early promoter in normal cells (by approximately 60% reduction) suggests that this mutant may be able to associate with wild-type p53 and interact with TATA box-binding proteins. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the transcriptional activities of p53 mutants may be dependent upon the cell type assayed and the form of its endogenous p53. Furthermore, normal human keratinocytes represent an alternative model for determining the activities of p53 mutants.

  4. Controlling the Mdm2-Mdmx-p53 Circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Waning, David L.; Lehman, Jason A.; Batuello, Christopher N.; Mayo, Lindsey D.

    2010-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a key protein in maintaining the integrity of the genome by inducing either cell cycle arrest or apoptosis following cellular stress signals. Two human family members, Mdm2 and Mdmx, are primarily responsible for inactivating p53 transcription and targeting p53 protein for ubiquitin-mediated degradation. In response to genotoxic stress, post-translational modifications to p53, Mdm2 and Mdmx stabilize and activate p53. The role that phosphorylation of these molecule...

  5. Ferroptosis: A missing puzzle piece in the p53 blueprint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang-Jui; Ou, Yang; Jiang, Le; Gu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Recent evidence indicates that canonical functions of p53 (i.e., apoptosis and growth arrest) are dispensable for p53-mediated tumor suppression. We have uncovered a novel function of p53 that contributes to tumor suppression through regulation of cystine metabolism, reactive oxygen species responses, and ferroptosis. The p53-mediated ferroptotic response via SLC7A11 denotes an extra layer of defense against tumorigenesis in conjunction with other p53 functions. PMID:27314071

  6. Progesterone facilitates chromosome instability (aneuploidy) in p53 null normal mammary epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goepfert, T. M.; McCarthy, M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Stephens, C.; Ullrich, R. L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Medina, D.

    2000-01-01

    Mammary epithelial cells from p53 null mice have been shown recently to exhibit an increased risk for tumor development. Hormonal stimulation markedly increased tumor development in p53 null mammary cells. Here we demonstrate that mammary tumors arising in p53 null mammary cells are highly aneuploid, with greater than 70% of the tumor cells containing altered chromosome number and a mean chromosome number of 56. Normal mammary cells of p53 null genotype and aged less than 14 wk do not exhibit aneuploidy in primary cell culture. Significantly, the hormone progesterone, but not estrogen, increases the incidence of aneuploidy in morphologically normal p53 null mammary epithelial cells. Such cells exhibited 40% aneuploidy and a mean chromosome number of 54. The increase in aneuploidy measured in p53 null tumor cells or hormonally stimulated normal p53 null cells was not accompanied by centrosome amplification. These results suggest that normal levels of progesterone can facilitate chromosomal instability in the absence of the tumor suppressor gene, p53. The results support the emerging hypothesis based both on human epidemiological and animal model studies that progesterone markedly enhances mammary tumorigenesis.

  7. The p53 target Wig-1 regulates p53 mRNA stability through an AU-rich element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilborg, Anna; Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Wilhelm, Margareta T;

    2009-01-01

    The p53 target gene Wig-1 encodes a double-stranded-RNA-binding zinc finger protein. We show here that Wig-1 binds to p53 mRNA and stabilizes it through an AU-rich element (ARE) in the 3' UTR of the p53 mRNA. This effect is mirrored by enhanced p53 protein levels in both unstressed cells and cells...... exposed to p53-activating stress agents. Thus, the p53 target Wig-1 is a previously undescribed ARE-regulating protein that acts as a positive feedback regulator of p53, with implications both for the steady-state levels of p53 and for the p53 stress response. Our data reveal a previously undescribed link...... between the tumor suppressor p53 and posttranscriptional gene regulation via AREs in mRNA....

  8. Cancer-derived p53 mutants suppress p53-target gene expression—potential mechanism for gain of function of mutant p53

    OpenAIRE

    Vikhanskaya, Faina; Lee, Ming Kei; Mazzoletti, Marco; Broggini, Massimo; Sabapathy, Kanaga

    2007-01-01

    Tumour-derived p53 mutants are thought to have acquired ‘gain-of-function’ properties that contribute to oncogenicity. We have tested the hypothesis that p53 mutants suppress p53-target gene expression, leading to enhanced cellular growth. Silencing of mutant p53 expression in several human cell lines was found to lead to the upregulation of wild-type p53-target genes such as p21, gadd45, PERP and PTEN. The expression of these genes was also suppressed in H1299-based isogenic cell lines expre...

  9. Retention of wild-type p53 in tumors from p53 heterozygous mice: reduction of p53 dosage can promote cancer formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatachalam, S; Shi, Y P; Jones, S N; Vogel, H.; Bradley, A.; Pinkel, D; Donehower, L A

    1998-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes are generally viewed as being recessive at the cellular level, so that mutation or loss of both tumor suppressor alleles is a prerequisite for tumor formation. The tumor suppressor gene, p53, is mutated in approximately 50% of human sporadic cancers and in an inherited cancer predisposition (Li-Fraumeni syndrome). We have analyzed the status of the wild-type p53 allele in tumors taken from p53-deficient heterozygous (p53+/-) mice. These mice inherit a single null p53 al...

  10. Effects of p53 mutants derived from lung carcinomas on the p53-responsive element (p53RE) of the MDM2 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Gorgoulis, V. G.; Zacharatos, P. V.; Manolis, E.; Ikonomopoulos, J. A.; Damalas, A.; Lamprinopoulos, C.; Rassidakis, G Z; Zoumpourlis, Vassilis; Kotsinas, A.; Rassidakis, A. N.; Halazonetis, T. D.; KITTAS, C.

    2008-01-01

    The present study represents a continuation of previous works in which we observed that lung carcinomas co-expressing MDM2 protein and p53 mutants (mt p53) exhibited more aggressive behaviour. In the above studies, we suggested a 'gain of function' mechanism of mt p53 proteins based on the fact that the MDM2 gene possesses a p53-responsive element (MDM2-p53RE). In this study, to prove our hypothesis, we selected 12 cases from a series of 51 bronchogenic carcinomas. In these 12 cases, we exami...

  11. Distribution of p53 expression in tissue from 774 Danish ovarian tumour patients and its prognostic significance in ovarian carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogdall, E.V.S.; Christensen, L.; Frederiksen, K.;

    2008-01-01

    The clinical roles played by normal and altered p53 in cancer are under intensive investigation, but larger studies describing the pattern as well as the prognostic value are still needed. The aim of this study was, using tissue array (TA), to examine the overexpression of p53 protein in 774...... epithelial ovarian tumour tissues from Danish women and to evaluate whether p53 tissue expression levels correlate with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis. The distribution of p53 expression levels at different stages of disease, in different histological subtypes, and the prognostic value of p53...... tissue expression were examined. Overall, p53 was expressed in 24/189 (13%) low malignant potential ovarian tumours (LMP) and in 278/585 (48%) ovarian cancers (OC). No significant difference in frequency of p53 tissue expression in LMP tissue was noted with increasing tumour stage (p=0.98). By contrast...

  12. Small-molecule modulators of p53 family signaling and antitumor effects in p53-deficient human colon tumor xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wenge; Kim, Seok-Hyun; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2006-01-01

    p53 deficiency is common in almost all human tumors and contributes to an aggressive chemo- or radiotherapy-resistant phenotype, therefore providing a target for drug development. Molecular targeting to restore wild-type p53 activity has been attempted in drug development and has led to the identification of CP-31398, PRIMA1, and the Nutlins. However, strategies targeting p53-activated transcriptional responses or p53 family member expression in p53-deficient tumors have yet to be explored. H...

  13. Soft-shell clam (Mya arenaria) p53: A structural and functional comparison to human p53

    OpenAIRE

    Holbrook, Lauren A.C.; Butler, Rondi A.; Cashon, Robert E.; Van Beneden, Rebecca J.

    2008-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 regulates genes involved in progression through the cell cycle, DNA repair, senescence or apoptosis in response to cell stress. Dysregulation of p53 can result in uncontrolled cellular proliferation. Invertebrate homologues to human p53 (Hsp53) have been identified, including a putative p53 gene (Map53) from the soft-shell clam (Mya arenaria). Predicted sequences for human and clam p53 proteins exhibit conservation in key domains. In light of this similarity, and the ...

  14. Iron Metabolism Regulates p53 Signaling through Direct Heme-p53 Interaction and Modulation of p53 Localization, Stability, and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Shen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron excess is closely associated with tumorigenesis in multiple types of human cancers, with underlying mechanisms yet unclear. Recently, iron deprivation has emerged as a major strategy for chemotherapy, but it exerts tumor suppression only on select human malignancies. Here, we report that the tumor suppressor protein p53 is downregulated during iron excess. Strikingly, the iron polyporphyrin heme binds to p53 protein, interferes with p53-DNA interactions, and triggers both nuclear export and cytosolic degradation of p53. Moreover, in a tumorigenicity assay, iron deprivation suppressed wild-type p53-dependent tumor growth, suggesting that upregulation of wild-type p53 signaling underlies the selective efficacy of iron deprivation. Our findings thus identify a direct link between iron/heme homeostasis and the regulation of p53 signaling, which not only provides mechanistic insights into iron-excess-associated tumorigenesis but may also help predict and improve outcomes in iron-deprivation-based chemotherapy.

  15. Mechanisms that enhance sustainability of p53 pulses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Kyoung Kim

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p53 protein shows various dynamic responses depending on the types and extent of cellular stresses. In particular, in response to DNA damage induced by γ-irradiation, cells generate a series of p53 pulses. Recent research has shown the importance of sustaining repeated p53 pulses for recovery from DNA damage. However, far too little attention has been paid to understanding how cells can sustain p53 pulses given the complexities of genetic heterogeneity and intrinsic noise. Here, we explore potential molecular mechanisms that enhance the sustainability of p53 pulses by developing a new mathematical model of the p53 regulatory system. This model can reproduce many experimental results that describe the dynamics of p53 pulses. By simulating the model both deterministically and stochastically, we found three potential mechanisms that improve the sustainability of p53 pulses: 1 the recently identified positive feedback loop between p53 and Rorα allows cells to sustain p53 pulses with high amplitude over a wide range of conditions, 2 intrinsic noise can often prevent the dampening of p53 pulses even after mutations, and 3 coupling of p53 pulses in neighboring cells via cytochrome-c significantly reduces the chance of failure in sustaining p53 pulses in the presence of heterogeneity among cells. Finally, in light of these results, we propose testable experiments that can reveal important mechanisms underlying p53 dynamics.

  16. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  17. Potential role of p53 mutation in chemical hepatocarcinogenesis of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Guo Deng; Yan Fu; Yu-Lin Li; Toshihiro Sugiyama

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Inactivation of p53 gene is one of the most frequent genetic alterations in carcinogenesis. The mutation status of p53 gene was analyzed, in order to understand the effect of p53 mutation on chemical hepatocarcinogenesis of rats.METHODS: During hepatocarcinogenesis of rats induced by 3′-methyl-4- dimethylaminoazobenzene (3′-Me-DAB),prehepatocarcinoma and hepatocarcinoma foci were collected by laser capture microdissection (LCMl), and quantitatively analyzed for levels of p53 mRNA by LightCyclerTM real-time RT-PCR and for mutations in p53 gene exons 5-8 by direct sequencing.RESULTS: Samples consisting of 44 precancerous foci and 24 cancerous foci were collected by LCMl. A quantitative analysis of p53 mRNA showed that p53 mRNA peaked at an early stage (week 6) in the prehepatocarcinoma lesion, more than ten times that of adjacent normal tissue, and gradually decreased from week 6 to week 24. The expression of p53 mRNA in adjacent normal tissue was significantly lower than that in prehepatocarcinoma. Similar to prehepatocarcinoma,p53 mRNA in cancer was markedly higher than that in adjacent normal tissue at week 12, and was closer to normal at week 24. Direct p53 gene sequencing showed that 35.3% (24/68) (9 precancer, 15 cancer) LCM samples exhibited point mutations, 20.5% of prehepatocarcinoma LCM samples presented missense mutations at exon 6/7 or/and 8, and was markedly lower than 62.5% of hepatocarcinoma ones (P<0.01). Mlutation of p53 gene formed the mutant hot spots at 5 codons. Positive immunostaining for p53 protein could be seen in prehepatocarcinoma and hepatocarcinoma foci at 24 weeks.CONCLUSION: p53 gene mutation is present in initial chemical hepatocarcinogenesis, and the mutation of p53 gene induced by 3′-Me-DAB is an important factor of hepatocarcinogenesis.

  18. Analysis of p53 mutants for transcriptional activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Raycroft, L.; Schmidt, J. R.; Yoas, K; Hao, M M; Lozano, G.

    1991-01-01

    The wild-type p53 protein functions to suppress transformation, but numerous mutant p53 proteins are transformation competent. To examine the role of p53 as a transcription factor, we made fusion proteins containing human or mouse p53 sequences fused to the DNA binding domain of a known transcription factor, GAL4. Human and mouse wild-type p53/GAL4 specifically transactivated expression of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter in HeLa, CHO, and NIH 3T3 cells. Several mutant p53 protein...

  19. SCH529074, a Small Molecule Activator of Mutant p53, Which Binds p53 DNA Binding Domain (DBD), Restores Growth-suppressive Function to Mutant p53 and Interrupts HDM2-mediated Ubiquitination of Wild Type p53

    OpenAIRE

    Demma, Mark; Maxwell, Eugene; Ramos, Robert; Liang, Lianzhu; Li, Cheng; Hesk, David; Rossman, Randall; Mallams, Alan; Doll, Ronald; Liu, Ming; Seidel-Dugan, Cynthia; Bishop, W. Robert; Dasmahapatra, Bimalendu

    2010-01-01

    Abrogation of p53 function occurs in almost all human cancers, with more than 50% of cancers harboring inactivating mutations in p53 itself. Mutation of p53 is indicative of highly aggressive cancers and poor prognosis. The vast majority of mutations in p53 occur in its core DNA binding domain (DBD) and result in inactivation of p53 by reducing its thermodynamic stability at physiological temperature. Here, we report a small molecule, SCH529074, that binds specifically to the p53 DBD in a sat...

  20. Activation and activities of the p53 tumour suppressor protein

    OpenAIRE

    Bálint, É; Vousden, K H

    2001-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor protein inhibits malignant progression by mediating cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or repair following cellular stress. One of the major regulators of p53 function is the MDM2 protein, and multiple forms of cellular stress activate p53 by inhibiting the MDM2-mediated degradation of p53. Mutations in p53, or disruption of the pathways that allow activation of p53, seem to be a general feature of all cancers. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the pat...

  1. 乳癌病人血清p53抗体与组织p53的比较%The relationship between serum p53Abs and tissue p53

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭美琴; 郭铁柱; 丰美芳

    2002-01-01

    目的比较乳癌病人血清p53抗体和组织p53表达之间的关系.方法 68例乳癌病人血清p53抗体用酶联免疫法(ELISA)检测,组织p53蛋白用免疫组织化学法检测.结果 68例乳癌病人血清p53抗体阳性19例,阳性率28%,组织p53阳性27例,阳性率40%,组织p53阳性同时血清p53抗体阳性者14例,组织p53阳性而血清p53抗体阴性者13例,组织p53阴性但血清p53抗体阳性者5例.结论组织和血清之间具有密切相关性,但非完全一致,p53抗体的检测更是一个预测乳癌复发或高危险性的指标.

  2. Expression of TP53 isoforms p53β or p53γ enhances chemosensitivity in TP53(null cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Silden

    Full Text Available The carboxy-terminal truncated p53 alternative spliced isoforms, p53β and p53γ, are expressed at disparate levels in cancer and are suggested to influence treatment response and therapy outcome. However, their functional role in cancer remains to be elucidated. We investigated their individual functionality in the p53(null background of cell lines H1299 and SAOS-2 by stable retroviral transduction or transient transfection. Expression status of p53β and p53γ protein was found to correlate with increased response to camptothecin and doxorubicin chemotherapy. Decreased DNA synthesis and clonogenicity in p53β and p53γ congenic H1299 was accompanied by increased p21((CIP1/WAF1, Bax and Mdm2 proteins. Chemotherapy induced p53 isoform degradation, most prominent for p53γ. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib substantially increased basal p53γ protein level, while the level of p53β protein was unaffected. Treatment with dicoumarol, a putative blocker of the proteasome-related NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductase NQO1, effectively attenuated basal p53γ protein level in spite of bortezomib treatment. Although in vitro proliferation and clonogenicity assays indicated a weak suppressive effect by p53β and p53γ expression, studies of in vivo subcutaneous H1299 tumor growth demonstrated a significantly increased growth by expression of either p53 isoforms. This study suggests that p53β and p53γ share functionality in chemosensitizing and tumor growth enhancement but comprise distinct regulation at the protein level.

  3. Expression of TP53 isoforms p53β or p53γ enhances chemosensitivity in TP53(null) cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silden, Elisabeth; Hjelle, Sigrun M; Wergeland, Line; Sulen, André; Andresen, Vibeke; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe; Micklem, David R; McCormack, Emmet; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore

    2013-01-01

    The carboxy-terminal truncated p53 alternative spliced isoforms, p53β and p53γ, are expressed at disparate levels in cancer and are suggested to influence treatment response and therapy outcome. However, their functional role in cancer remains to be elucidated. We investigated their individual functionality in the p53(null) background of cell lines H1299 and SAOS-2 by stable retroviral transduction or transient transfection. Expression status of p53β and p53γ protein was found to correlate with increased response to camptothecin and doxorubicin chemotherapy. Decreased DNA synthesis and clonogenicity in p53β and p53γ congenic H1299 was accompanied by increased p21((CIP1/WAF1)), Bax and Mdm2 proteins. Chemotherapy induced p53 isoform degradation, most prominent for p53γ. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib substantially increased basal p53γ protein level, while the level of p53β protein was unaffected. Treatment with dicoumarol, a putative blocker of the proteasome-related NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase NQO1, effectively attenuated basal p53γ protein level in spite of bortezomib treatment. Although in vitro proliferation and clonogenicity assays indicated a weak suppressive effect by p53β and p53γ expression, studies of in vivo subcutaneous H1299 tumor growth demonstrated a significantly increased growth by expression of either p53 isoforms. This study suggests that p53β and p53γ share functionality in chemosensitizing and tumor growth enhancement but comprise distinct regulation at the protein level. PMID:23409163

  4. Orphan Nuclear Receptor PNR/NR2E3 Stimulates p53 Functions by Enhancing p53 Acetylation

    OpenAIRE

    WEN, ZHI; Pyeon, Dohun; Wang, Yidan; Lambert, Paul; Xu, Wei; Ahlquist, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Since inactivation of tumor suppressor p53 functions is one of the most common features of human cancer cells, restoring p53 expression and activity is an important focus in cancer therapy. Here we report identification of photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor (PNR)/NR2E3 as a positive regulator of p53 in a high-throughput genetic screen. In HeLa cells, PNR stimulated p53-responsive promoters in a p53-dependent fashion and induced apoptosis in several cell types. PNR also increased p53 prot...

  5. Expression of TP53 Isoforms p53β or p53γ Enhances Chemosensitivity in TP53null Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeth Silden; Hjelle, Sigrun M; Line Wergeland; André Sulen; Vibeke Andresen; Jean-Christophe Bourdon; Micklem, David R; Emmet McCormack; Bjørn Tore Gjertsen

    2013-01-01

    The carboxy-terminal truncated p53 alternative spliced isoforms, p53β and p53γ, are expressed at disparate levels in cancer and are suggested to influence treatment response and therapy outcome. However, their functional role in cancer remains to be elucidated. We investigated their individual functionality in the p53(null) background of cell lines H1299 and SAOS-2 by stable retroviral transduction or transient transfection. Expression status of p53β and p53γ protein was found to correlate wi...

  6. Adenovirus Ad-p53AIP1-mediated gene therapy and its regulation of p53-MDM2 interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yunbo; Chen, Huihua; JIA, HAIQUAN; XU, YUANJI; Liu, Gang; Wang, Yan; Yang, Xiaohe; Yinglin LU

    2010-01-01

    We generated replication-defective adenovirus Ad-p53AIP1 and studied its anti-tumor efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that Ad-p53AIP1 infection elicited high levels of p53AIP1 expression in cancer cells. We also found that Ad-p53AIP1 expression induced marked apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells. Moreover, Ad-p53AIP1 infection significantly inhibited the tumorigenesis of 4T1 mouse mammary cancer cells in vivo. In particular, we discovered that p53AIP1 overexpressio...

  7. Quaternary structure of the specific p53–DNA complex reveals the mechanism of p53 mutant dominance

    OpenAIRE

    Aramayo, Ricardo; Sherman, Michael B.; Brownless, Kathryne; Lurz, Rudi; Okorokov, Andrei L.; Orlova, Elena V

    2011-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor is a transcriptional activator that controls cell fate in response to various stresses. p53 can initiate cell cycle arrest, senescence and/or apoptosis via transactivation of p53 target genes, thus preventing cancer onset. Mutations that impair p53 usually occur in the core domain and negate the p53 sequence-specific DNA binding. Moreover, these mutations exhibit a dominant negative effect on the remaining wild-type p53. Here, we report the cryo electron microscopy s...

  8. Expression of TP53 Isoforms p53β or p53γ Enhances Chemosensitivity in TP53null Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Silden, Elisabeth; Hjelle, Sigrun M; Wergeland, Line; Sulen, André; Andresen, Vibeke; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe; Micklem, David R.; McCormack, Emmet; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore

    2013-01-01

    The carboxy-terminal truncated p53 alternative spliced isoforms, p53β and p53γ, are expressed at disparate levels in cancer and are suggested to influence treatment response and therapy outcome. However, their functional role in cancer remains to be elucidated. We investigated their individual functionality in the p53null background of cell lines H1299 and SAOS-2 by stable retroviral transduction or transient transfection. Expression status of p53β and p53γ protein was found to correlate with...

  9. Restriction of human herpesvirus 6B replication by p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øster, Bodil; Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Bundgaard, Bettina;

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) induces significant accumulation of p53 in both the nucleus and cytoplasm during infection. Activation of p53 by DNA damage is known to induce either growth arrest or apoptosis; nevertheless, HHV-6B-infected cells are arrested in their cell cycle independently of p53......, and only a minor fraction of the infected cells undergoes apoptosis. Using pifithrin-alpha, a p53 inhibitor, and p53-null cells, this study showed that infected epithelial cells accumulated viral transcripts and proteins to a significantly higher degree in the absence of active p53. Moreover, HHV-6B......-induced cytopathic effects were greatly enhanced in the absence of p53. This suggests that, in epithelial cells, some of the functions of p53 leading to cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis are restrained by HHV-6B infection, whereas other cellular defences, causing inhibition of virus transcription, are partially...

  10. p63 is required beside p53 for PERP-mediated apoptosis in uveal melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Raheela; Spiller, David G; White, Michael R H; Paraoan, Luminita

    2016-01-01

    Background: PERP (p53 apoptosis effector related to PMP-22), a transcriptional target of p53, is downregulated and contributes to the impairment of apoptosis in uveal melanoma (UM). Intriguingly, PERP is not induced in UM despite functional p53. p63, located on chromosome 3, which is characteristically altered in high-risk UM, can transactivate PERP. Here, we determine the functional role of p63 expression in the initiation of p53/PERP-mediated apoptosis in UM. Methods: PERP expression was monitored by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and immunoblotting in UM cell lines treated with DNA-damaging agents. The functional role of p63 was assessed by transient expression of p63-turbo GFP (p63-tGFP) in the apoptosis- resistant, 3q-deficient OCM-1 cells. Expression and localisation of p63, PERP and p53, and induction of apoptosis were characterised by qPCR, immunoblotting and live cell confocal microscopy. Results: PERP expression was significantly downregulated in all UM cell lines. DNA-damaging treatments failed to induce apoptosis and activate PERP in OCM-1 cells, which displayed non-functional levels of p63. Expression of p63-tGFP induced apoptosis with marked increase in PERP expression and associated p53 accumulation. Conclusions: Lack of p63 contributes to reduced PERP levels and impaired p53-mediated apoptosis in UM. p63 expression is required for PERP-mediated apoptosis in UM. PMID:27584665

  11. Changing the p53 master regulatory network: ELEMENTary, my dear Mr Watson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, D; Inga, A; Jordan, J J; Resnick, M A

    2007-04-01

    The p53 master regulatory network provides for the stress-responsive direct control of a vast number of genes in humans that can be grouped into several biological categories including cell-cycle control, apoptosis and DNA repair. Similar to other sequence-specific master regulators, there is a matrix of key components, which provide for variation within the p53 master regulatory network that include p53 itself, target response element sequences (REs) that provide for p53 regulation of target genes, chromatin, accessory proteins and transcription machinery. Changes in any of these can impact the expression of individual genes, groups of genes and the eventual biological responses. The many REs represent the core of the master regulatory network. Since defects or altered expression of p53 are associated with over 50% of all cancers and greater than 90% of p53 mutations are in the sequence-specific DNA-binding domain, it is important to understand the relationship between wild-type or mutant p53 proteins and the target response elements. In the words of the legendary detective Sherlock Holmes, it is 'Elementary, my dear Mr. Watson'. PMID:17401428

  12. Modulation of p53's transcriptional function by small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Nikulenkov, Fedor

    2011-01-01

    p53 tumour suppressor is a transcriptional factor which induces apoptosis or growth arrest in response to stress thus eliminating damaged cells. p53 function is frequently abrogated in tumours either via inactivation mutations in the TP53 gene or by elevated activity of p53 negative regulators HDM2 and HDMX. Therefore application of small molecules that reactivate p53 function is a promising strategy for anti-cancer therapy. In addition, small molecules can serve as valuable research tool to ...

  13. Targeting p53 and its domains for cancer gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Karina Julia Matissek

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is one of the most frequently mutated proteins in human cancer and has been extensively targeted for cancer therapy. This resulted in wild type p53 gene therapeutic approval for the treatment of head and neck cancer in China. p53 mainly functions as a transcription factor and stimulates a variety of genes involved in the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathway by binding to p53 responsive elements as a t...

  14. Implication of K-ras and p53 in colorectal cancer carcinogenesis in Tunisian population cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ines, Chaar; Donia, Ounissi; Rahma, Boughriba; Ben Ammar, Azza; Sameh, Amara; Khalfallah, Taher; Abdelmajid, Ben Hmida; Sabeh, Mzabi; Saadia, Bouraoui

    2014-07-01

    According to the multistep route of genetic alterations in the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence, the complex K-ras/p53 mutation is one of the first alterations to occur and represent an important genetic event in colorectal cancer (CRC). An evaluation of the mutation spectra in K-ras and p53 gene was effected in 167 Tunisian patients with sporadic CRC to determine whether our populations have similar pattern of genetic alteration as in Maghrebin's population. Mutation patterns of codon 12-13 of K-ras and exon 5-8 of p53 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and PCR-SSCP and confirmed by sequencing. Mutations in the K-ras gene were detected in 31.13 % and affect the women more than the men (p = 0.008). Immunostaining showed that expression of p21 ras was correlated with the advanced age (p = 0.004), whereas loss of signal was associated with mucinous histotype (p = 0.003). Kaplan-Meier survival curve found that patients with the K-ras mutation had a shorter survival compared with patients without mutation (p = 0.005). Alteration in p53 was seen in 17.4 % of patients and affects three hot spot codons such as 175, 245, and 248. Overexpression of p53 was seen in 34.1 % and correlated with tumor node metastasis (TNM) advanced stage (p = 0.037) and mucinous histotype (p = 0.001). A high concordance between p53 expression and alteration (p<0.005) was shown. Concomitant mutations in K-ras and p53 gene were detected in only 4 % of tumors. K-ras and p53 undergo separate pathways in colorectal tumorogenesis. Interestingly, mutations in the K-ras gene might be considered a valuable prognostic factor correlated to poor outcome. p53 gene alterations were rather low in our set, and methylation pattern of p53 is required to elucidate the molecular basis of this protein in CRC. PMID:24763823

  15. Identification of p53-target genes in Danio rerio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandriani, Barbara; Castellana, Stefano; Rinaldi, Carmela; Manzoni, Marta; Venuto, Santina; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Galceran, Juan; Nieto, M. Angela; Borsani, Giuseppe; Monti, Eugenio; Mazza, Tommaso; Merla, Giuseppe; Micale, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    To orchestrate the genomic response to cellular stress signals, p53 recognizes and binds to DNA containing specific and well-characterized p53-responsive elements (REs). Differences in RE sequences can strongly affect the p53 transactivation capacity and occur even between closely related species. Therefore, the identification and characterization of a species-specific p53 Binding sistes (BS) consensus sequence and of the associated target genes may help to provide new insights into the evolution of the p53 regulatory networks across different species. Although p53 functions were studied in a wide range of species, little is known about the p53-mediated transcriptional signature in Danio rerio. Here, we designed and biochemically validated a computational approach to identify novel p53 target genes in Danio rerio genome. Screening all the Danio rerio genome by pattern-matching-based analysis, we found p53 RE-like patterns proximal to 979 annotated Danio rerio genes. Prioritization analysis identified a subset of 134 candidate pattern-related genes, 31 of which have been investigated in further biochemical assays. Our study identified runx1, axin1, traf4a, hspa8, col4a5, necab2, and dnajc9 genes as novel direct p53 targets and 12 additional p53-controlled genes in Danio rerio genome. The proposed combinatorial approach resulted to be highly sensitive and robust for identifying new p53 target genes also in additional animal species. PMID:27581768

  16. Identification of p53-target genes in Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandriani, Barbara; Castellana, Stefano; Rinaldi, Carmela; Manzoni, Marta; Venuto, Santina; Rodriguez-Aznar, Eva; Galceran, Juan; Nieto, M Angela; Borsani, Giuseppe; Monti, Eugenio; Mazza, Tommaso; Merla, Giuseppe; Micale, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    To orchestrate the genomic response to cellular stress signals, p53 recognizes and binds to DNA containing specific and well-characterized p53-responsive elements (REs). Differences in RE sequences can strongly affect the p53 transactivation capacity and occur even between closely related species. Therefore, the identification and characterization of a species-specific p53 Binding sistes (BS) consensus sequence and of the associated target genes may help to provide new insights into the evolution of the p53 regulatory networks across different species. Although p53 functions were studied in a wide range of species, little is known about the p53-mediated transcriptional signature in Danio rerio. Here, we designed and biochemically validated a computational approach to identify novel p53 target genes in Danio rerio genome. Screening all the Danio rerio genome by pattern-matching-based analysis, we found p53 RE-like patterns proximal to 979 annotated Danio rerio genes. Prioritization analysis identified a subset of 134 candidate pattern-related genes, 31 of which have been investigated in further biochemical assays. Our study identified runx1, axin1, traf4a, hspa8, col4a5, necab2, and dnajc9 genes as novel direct p53 targets and 12 additional p53-controlled genes in Danio rerio genome. The proposed combinatorial approach resulted to be highly sensitive and robust for identifying new p53 target genes also in additional animal species. PMID:27581768

  17. Mutual interactions between P53 and growth factors in cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asschert, JGW; Vellenga, E; De Jong, S; De Vries, EGE

    1998-01-01

    The function of p53 armour suppressor protein is determined by various intrinsic properties of the protein. The effect of p53 DNA-binding, and platein-protein interactions are determined by the conformation of the protein. Thus p53 fulfils its role in cell cycle control and the onset of apoptotic ce

  18. Tumor suppressor p53 protects mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Pingping; Wei, Jianchao; Zhu, Zixiang; Shi, Zixue; Shao, Donghua; Ma, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is involved in regulating immune responses, which contribute to antitumor and antiviral activity. However, whether p53 has anti-bacterial functions remains unclear. Listeria monocytogenes (LM) causes listeriosis in humans and animals, and it is a powerful model for studying innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, we illustrate an important regulatory role of p53 during LM infection. p53 knockout (p53KO) mice were more susceptible to LM infection, which was manifested by a shorter survival time and lower survival rate. p53KO mice showed significant impairments in LM eradication. Knockdown of p53 in RAW264.7 and HeLa cells resulted in increased invasion and intracellular survival of LM. Furthermore, the invasion and intracellular survival of LM was inhibited in p53-overexpressing RAW264.7 and HeLa cells. LM-infected p53KO mice exhibited severe clinical symptoms and organ injury, presumably because of the abnormal production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-18. Decreased IFN-γ and GBP1 productions were observed in LM-infected p53-deficient mice or cells. The combination of these defects likely resulted in the overwhelming LM infection in the p53KO mice. These observations indicate that p53 serves as an important regulator of the host innate immune that protects against LM infection. PMID:27644341

  19. p53 specific (auto)immunity in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauwen, Marjolein Monique

    2008-01-01

    Self-tolerance to p53 is a major potential limitation for the activation of the endogenous T-cell repertoire. So far, p53 specific CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell immunity has been described in cancer patients and healthy individuals. However, the restrictions of tolerance on the recruitment of p53 specific T

  20. Prima-1 induces apoptosis in bladder cancer cell lines by activating p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila B. Piantino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Bladder cancer represents 3% of all carcinomas in the Brazilian population and ranks second in incidence among urological tumors, after prostate cancer. The loss of p53 function is the main genetic alteration related to the development of high-grade muscle-invasive disease. Prima-1 is a small molecule that restores tumor suppressor function to mutant p53 and induces cancer cell death in various cancer types. Our aim was to investigate the ability of Prima-1 to induce apoptosis after DNA damage in bladder cancer cell lines. METHOD: The therapeutic effect of Prima-1 was studied in two bladder cancer cell lines: T24, which is characterized by a p53 mutation, and RT4, which is the wild-type for the p53 gene. Morphological features of apoptosis induced by p53, including mitochondrial membrane potential changes and the expression of thirteen genes involved in apoptosis, were assessed by microscopic observation and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. RESULTS: Prima-1 was able to reactivate p53 function in the T24 (p53 mt bladder cancer cell line and promote apoptosis via the induction of Bax and Puma expression, activation of the caspase cascade and disruption of the mitochondrial membrane in a BAK-independent manner. CONCLUSION: Prima-1 is able to restore the transcriptional activity of p53. Experimental studies in vivo may be conducted to test this molecule as a new therapeutic agent for urothelial carcinomas of the bladder, which characteristically harbor p53 mutations.

  1. Resistance of mitochondrial p53 to dominant inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mestres Pedro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutation of a tumor suppressor allele leaves the second as backup. Not necessarily so with p53. This homo-tetrameric transcription factor can become contaminated with mutant p53 through hetero-tetramerization. In addition, it can be out-competed by the binding to p53 DNA recognition motifs of transactivation-incompetent isoforms (ΔN and ΔTA-isoforms of the p53/p63/p73 family of proteins. Countermeasures against such dominant-negative or dominant-inhibitory action might include the evolutionary gain of novel, transactivation-independent tumor suppressor functions by the wild-type monomer. Results Here we have studied, mostly in human HCT116 colon adenocarcinoma cells with an intact p53 pathway, the effects of dominant-inhibitory p53 mutants and of Δex2/3p73, a tumor-associated ΔTA-competitor of wild-type p53, on the nuclear transactivation-dependent and extra-nuclear transactivation-independent functions of wild-type p53. We report that mutant p53 and Δex2/3p73, expressed from a single gene copy per cell, interfere with the stress-induced expression of p53-responsive genes but leave the extra-nuclear apoptosis by mitochondrial p53 largely unaffected, although both wild-type and mutant p53 associate with the mitochondria. In accord with these observations, we present evidence that in contrast to nuclear p53 the vast majority of mitochondrial p53, be it wild-type or mutant, is consisting of monomeric protein. Conclusion The extra-nuclear p53-dependent apoptosis may constitute a fail-safe mechanism against dominant inhibition.

  2. Cellular adaptation to hypoxia and p53 transcription regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang ZHAO; Xue-qun CHEN; Ji-zeng DU

    2009-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human tumors. Meanwhile, under stress conditions, p53 also acts as a transcription factor, regulating the expression of a series of target genes to maintain the integrity of genome. The target genes of p53 can be classified into genes regulating cell cycle arrest, genes involved in apoptosis, and genes inhibiting angiogenesis. p53 protein contains a transactivation domain, a sequence-specific DNA binding domain, a tetramerization domain, a non-specific DNA binding domain that recognizes damaged DNA, and a later identified proline-rich domain. Under stress, p53 proteins accumulate and are activated through two mechanisms. One, involving ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein (ATM), is that the interaction between p53 and its down-regulation factor murine double minute 2 (MDM2) decreases, leading to p53 phosphorylation on Ser15, as determined by the post-translational mechanism; the other holds that p53 increases and is activated through the binding of ribosomal protein L26 (RPL26) or nucleolin to p53 mRNA 5' untranslated region (UTR), regulating p53 translation. Under hypoxia, p53 decreases transactivation and increases transrepression. The mutations outside the DNA binding domain of p53 also contribute to tumor progress, so further studies on p53 should also be focused on this direction. The subterranean blind mole rat Spalax in Israel is a good model for hypoxia-adaptation. The p53 of Spalax mutated in residue 172 and residue 207 from arginine to lysine, conferring it the ability to survive hypoxic conditions. This model indicates that p53 acts as a master gene of diversity formation during evolution.

  3. The prognostic value of p53 mutation in pediatric marrow hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharaf Alzahraa EA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor suppressor gene p53 is involved in the control of cell proliferation, particularly in stressed cells. p 53 gene mutations are the most frequent genetic event found in human cancers. Fanconi Anemia (FA is the most common representative of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS with a leukemic propensity. P 53 DNA alteration has not been studied before in Egyptian children with FA. Patients and methods we investigated p53 mutation in the bone marrow and peripheral blood of forty children, FA (n = 10, acquired aplastic anemia (AAA (n = 10, and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP as a control (n = 20, using real-time PCR by TaqMan probe assay Results Mutation of p53 gene was demonstrated in the BM of 90% (9/10 of children with FA, compared to 10% (1/10 in AAA (p Conclusion mutation of p53 gene in hypoplastic marrow especially FA may represent an early indicator of significant DNA genetic alteration with cancer propensity.

  4. p53CP, a putative p53 competing protein that specifically binds to the consensus p53 DNA binding sites: A third member of the p53 family?

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, Junhui; Sun, Yi

    1997-01-01

    p53 tumor suppressor protein negatively regulates cell growth, mainly through the transactivation of its downstream target genes. As a sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factor, p53 specifically binds to a 20-bp consensus motif 5′-PuPuPuC(A/T) (T/A)GPyPyPyPuPuPuC(A/T)(T/A)GPyPyPy-3′. We have now identified, partially purified, and characterized an additional ≈40-kDa nuclear protein, p53CP (p53 competing protein), that specifically binds to the consensus p53 binding sites found in sev...

  5. Inhibitor or promoter? The performance of polysaccharides from Ganoderma lucidum on human tumor cells with different p53 statuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jue; Chen, Jun-ming; Wang, Xiao-xia; Xia, Yong-mei; Cui, Steve W; Li, Jian; Ding, Zhong-yang

    2016-04-01

    Polysaccharides from Ganoderma lucidum (GLPs) have been taken as effective supplements by both healthy people and cancer patients for many years. However, this short survey indicates that instead of inhibiting cancer cell growth, both submerge-cultured intracellular GLP and fruiting body GLP can stimulate the growth of human carcinoma cell lines lacking functional p53, such as HCT-116 p53(-/-), Saos-2, H1299, HL-60, MDA-MB-157. Conversely, the two GLPs inhibit all other assayed cells with functional p53. These results could be an alert since mutational inactivation of the tumor suppressor protein p53 is the most frequent genetic alteration found in human tumors. PMID:26999513

  6. Tumor suppressor p53 meets microRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaohui Feng; Cen Zhang; Rui Wu; Wenwei Hu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in tumor prevention. As a transcription factor, p53 mainly exerts its function through transcription regulation of its target genes to initiate various cellular responses. To maintain its proper function, p53 is tightly regulated by a wide variety of regulators in cells. Thus, p53, its regulators and regulated genes form a complex p53 network which is composed of hundreds of genes and their products. microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenously expressed, small non-coding RNA molecules which play a key role in regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs interact with p53 and its network at multiple levels. p53 regulates the transcription expression and the maturation of a group of miRNAs. On the other hand, miRNAs can regulate the activity and function of p53 through direct repression of p53 or its regulators in cells. These findings have demonstrated that miRNAs are important components in the p53 network, and also added another layer of complexity to the p53 network.

  7. Epigenetic changes in the CDKN2A locus are associated with differential expression of P16INK4A and P14ARF in HPV-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is recognized as a distinct disease entity associated with improved survival. DNA hypermethylation profiles differ significantly by HPV status suggesting that a specific subset of methylated CpG loci could give mechanistic insight into HPV-driven OPSCC. We analyzed genome-wide DNA methylation of primary tumor samples and adjacent normal mucosa from 46 OPSCC patients undergoing treatment at Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY using the Illumina HumanMethylation27 beadchip. For each matched tissue set, we measured differentially methylated CpG loci using a change in methylation level (M value). From these analyses, we identified a 22 CpG loci panel for HPV+ OPSCC that included four CDKN2A loci downstream of the p16(INK4A) and p14(ARF) transcription start sites. This panel was significantly associated with overall HPV detection (P < 0.05; ROC area under the curve = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.91–1.0) similar to the subset of four CDKN2A-specific CpG loci (0.90, 95% CI: 0.82–0.99) with equivalence to the full 22 CpG panel. DNA hypermethylation correlated with a significant increase in alternative open reading frame (ARF) expression in HPV+ OPSCC primary tumors, but not to the other transcript variant encoded by the CDKN2A locus. Overall, this study provides evidence of epigenetic changes to the downstream region of the CDKN2A locus in HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer that are associated with changes in expression of the coded protein products

  8. A novel p53-binding domain in CUL7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Jocelyn S; Arai, Takehiro; DeCaprio, James A

    2006-09-15

    CUL7 is a member of the cullin RING ligase family and forms an SCF-like complex with SKP1 and FBXW8. CUL7 is required for normal mouse embryonic development and cellular proliferation, and is highly homologous to PARC, a p53-associated, parkin-like cytoplasmic protein. We determined that CUL7, in a manner similar to PARC, can bind directly to p53 but does not affect p53 expression. We identified a discrete, co-linear domain in CUL7 that is conserved in PARC and HERC2, and is necessary and sufficient for p53-binding. The presence of p53 stabilized expression of this domain and we demonstrate that this p53-binding domain of CUL7 contributes to the cytoplasmic localization of CUL7. The results support the model that p53 plays a role in regulation of CUL7 activity. PMID:16875676

  9. Chemical Variations on the p53 Reactivation Theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. A. Ribeiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Among the tumor suppressor genes, p53 is one of the most studied. It is widely regarded as the “guardian of the genome”, playing a major role in carcinogenesis. In fact, direct inactivation of the TP53 gene occurs in more than 50% of malignancies, and in tumors that retain wild-type p53 status, its function is usually inactivated by overexpression of negative regulators (e.g., MDM2 and MDMX. Hence, restoring p53 function in cancer cells represents a valuable anticancer approach. In this review, we will present an updated overview of the most relevant small molecules developed to restore p53 function in cancer cells through inhibition of the p53-MDMs interaction, or direct targeting of wild-type p53 or mutated p53. In addition, optimization approaches used for the development of small molecules that have entered clinical trials will be presented.

  10. The p53-MDM2 network: from oscillations to apoptosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indrani Bose; Bhaswar Ghosh

    2007-08-01

    The p53 protein is well-known for its tumour suppressor function. The p53-MDM2 negative feedback loop constitutes the core module of a network of regulatory interactions activated under cellular stress. In normal cells, the level of p53 proteins is kept low by MDM2, i.e. MDM2 negatively regulates the activity of p53. In the case of DNA damage, the p53-mediated pathways are activated leading to cell cycle arrest and repair of the DNA. If repair is not possible due to excessive damage, the p53-mediated apoptotic pathway is activated bringing about cell death. In this paper, we give an overview of our studies on the p53-MDM2 module and the associated pathways from a systems biology perspective. We discuss a number of key predictions, related to some specific aspects of cell cycle arrest and cell death, which could be tested in experiments.

  11. A Cohort Study of p53 Mutations and Protein Accumulation in Benign Breast Tissue and Subsequent Breast Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C. Kabat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene and accumulation of its protein in breast tissue are thought to play a role in breast carcinogenesis. However, few studies have prospectively investigated the association of p53 immunopositivity and/or p53 alterations in women with benign breast disease in relation to the subsequent risk of invasive breast cancer. We carried out a case-control study nested within a large cohort of women biopsied for benign breast disease in order to address this question. After exclusions, 491 breast cancer cases and 471 controls were available for analysis. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Neither p53 immunopositivity nor genetic alterations in p53 (either missense mutations or polymorphisms was associated with altered risk of subsequent breast cancer. However, the combination of both p53 immunopositivity and any p53 nucleotide change was associated with an approximate 5-fold nonsignificant increase in risk (adjusted OR 4.79, 95% CI 0.28–82.31 but the confidence intervals were extremely wide. Our findings raise the possibility that the combination of p53 protein accumulation and the presence of genetic alterations may identify a group at increased risk of breast cancer.

  12. Human neuroblastoma cells with acquired resistance to the p53 activator RITA retain functional p53 and sensitivity to other p53 activating agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michaelis, M.; Rothweiler, F.; Agha, B.; Barth, S.; Voges, Y.; Loeschmann, N.; von Deimling, A.; Breitling, R.; Doerr, H. Wilhelm; Roedel, F.; Speidel, D.; Cinatl, J.; Cinatl Jr., J.; Stephanou, A.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation of wild-type p53 expressing UKF-NB-3 cancer cells to the murine double minute 2 inhibitor nutlin-3 causes de novo p53 mutations at high frequency (13/20) and multi-drug resistance. Here, we show that the same cells respond very differently when adapted to RITA, a drug that, like nutlin-3,

  13. Loss of p53-regulatory protein IFI16 induces NBS1 leading to activation of p53-mediated checkpoint by phosphorylation of p53 SER37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawara, Hideyuki; Fujiuchi, Nobuko; Sironi, Juan; Martin, Sarah; Aglipay, Jason; Ouchi, Mutsuko; Taga, Makoto; Chen, Phang-Lang; Ouchi, Toru

    2008-01-01

    Our previous results that IFI16 is involved in p53 transcription activity under conditions of ionizing radiation (IR), and that the protein is frequently lost in human breast cancer cell lines and breast adenocarcinoma tissues suggesting that IFI16 plays a crucial role in controlling cell growth. Here, we show that loss of IFI16 by RNA interference in cell culture causes elevated phosphorylation of p53 Ser37 and accumulated NBS1 (nibrin) and p21WAF1, leading to growth retardation. Consistent with these observations, doxycyclin-induced NBS1 caused accumulation of p21WAF1 and increased phosphorylation of p53 Ser37, leading to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. Wortmannin treatment was found to decrease p53 Ser37 phosphorylation in NBS-induced cells. These results suggest that loss of IFI16 activates p53 checkpoint through NBS1-DNA-PKcs pathway. PMID:17981542

  14. p53 facilitates pRb cleavage in IL-3-deprived cells: novel pro-apoptotic activity of p53.

    OpenAIRE

    Gottlieb, E; Oren, M.

    1998-01-01

    In the interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent lymphoid cell line DA-1, functional p53 is required for efficient apoptosis in response to IL-3 withdrawal. Activation of p53 in these cells, by either DNA damage or p53 overexpression, results in a vital growth arrest in the presence of IL-3 and in accelerated apoptosis in its absence. Thus, IL-3 can control the choice between p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Here we report that the cross-talk between p53 and IL-3 involves joint control of ...

  15. A naturally occurring 4-bp deletion in the intron 4 of p53 creates a spectrum of novel p53 isoforms with anti-apoptosis function

    OpenAIRE

    SHI, HUI; Tao, Ting; Huang, Delai; Ou, Zhao; Chen, Jun; Peng, Jinrong

    2014-01-01

    p53 functions as a tumor suppressor by transcriptionally regulating the expression of genes involved in controlling cell proliferation or apoptosis. p53 and its isoform Δ133p53/Δ113p53 form a negative regulation loop in that p53 activates the expression of Δ133p53/Δ113p53 while Δ133p53/Δ113p53 specifically antagonizes p53 apoptotic activity. This pathway is especially important to safeguard the process of embryogenesis because sudden activation of p53 by DNA damage signals or developmental st...

  16. Targeting the p53 Pathway in Ewing Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Neilsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumour suppressor plays a pivotal role in the prevention of oncogenic transformation. Cancers frequently evade the potent antitumour surveillance mechanisms of p53 through mutation of the TP53 gene, with approximately 50% of all human malignancies expressing dysfunctional, mutated p53 proteins. Interestingly, genetic lesions in the TP53 gene are only observed in 10% of Ewing Sarcomas, with the majority of these sarcomas expressing a functional wild-type p53. In addition, the p53 downstream signaling pathways and DNA-damage cell cycle checkpoints remain functionally intact in these sarcomas. This paper summarizes recent insights into the functional capabilities and regulation of p53 in Ewing Sarcoma, with a particular focus on the cross-talk between p53 and the EWS-FLI1 gene rearrangement frequently associated with this disease. The development of several activators of p53 is discussed, with recent evidence demonstrating the potential of small molecule p53 activators as a promising systemic therapeutic approach for the treatment of Ewing Sarcomas with wild-type p53.

  17. Role of p53 isoforms and aggregations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, SeJin; An, Seong Soo A

    2016-06-01

    p53 is a master regulatory protein that is involved in diverse cellular metabolic processes such as apoptosis, DNA repair, and cell cycle arrest. The protective function of p53 (in its homotetrameric form) as a tumor suppressor is lost in more than 50% of human cancers.Despite considerable experimental evidence suggesting the presence of multiple p53 states, it has been difficult to correlate the status of p53 with cancer response to treatments and clinical outcomes, which suggest the importance of complex but essential p53 regulatory pathways.Recent studies have indicated that the expression pattern of p53 isoforms may play a crucial role in regulating normal and cancer cell fates in response to diverse stresses. The human TP53 gene encodes at least 12 p53 isoforms, which are produced in normal tissue through alternative initiation of translation, usage of alternative promoters, and alternative splicing. Furthermore, some researchers have suggested that the formation of mutant p53 aggregates may be associated with cancer pathogenesis due to loss-of function (LoF), dominant-negative (DN), and gain-of function (GoF) effects.As different isoforms or the aggregation state of p53 may influence tumorigenesis, this review aims to examine the correlation of p53 isoforms and aggregation with cancer. PMID:27368003

  18. P53 family and cellular stress responses in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna ePflaum

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available p53 is an important tumor suppressor gene, which is stimulated by cellular stress like ionizing radiation, hypoxia, carcinogens and oxidative stress. Upon activation p53 leads to cell cycle arrest and promotes DNA repair or induces apoptosis via several pathways. p63 and p73 are structural homologs of p53 that can act similarly to the protein but also hold functions distinct from p53. Today more than forty different isoforms of the p53 family members are known. They result from transcription via different promoters and alternative splicing. Some isoforms have carcinogenic properties and mediate resistance to chemotherapy. Therefore, expression patterns of the p53 family genes can offer prognostic information in several malignant tumors. Furthermore, the p53 family constitutes a potential target for cancer therapy. Small molecules (e.g. Nutlins, RITA, PRIMA-1, and MIRA-1 among others have been objects of intense research interest in recent years. They restore pro-apoptotic wild-type p53 function and were shown to break chemotherapeutic resistance. Due to p53 family interactions small molecules also influence p63 and p73 activity. Thus, the members of the p53 family are key players in the cellular stress response in cancer and are expected to grow in importance as therapeutic targets.

  19. P53 family members modulate the expression of PRODH, but not PRODH2, via intronic p53 response elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Raimondi

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p53 was previously shown to markedly up-regulate the expression of the PRODH gene, encoding the proline dehydrogenase (PRODH enzyme, which catalyzes the first step in proline degradation. Also PRODH2, which degrades 4-hydroxy-L-proline, a product of protein (e.g. collagen catabolism, was recently described as a p53 target. Here, we confirmed p53-dependent induction of endogenous PRODH in response to genotoxic damage in cell lines of different histological origin. We established that over-expression of TAp73β or TAp63β is sufficient to induce PRODH expression in p53-null cells and that PRODH expression parallels the modulation of endogenous p73 by genotoxic drugs in several cell lines. The p53, p63, and p73-dependent transcriptional activation was linked to specific intronic response elements (REs, among those predicted by bioinformatics tools and experimentally validated by a yeast-based transactivation assay. p53 occupancy measurements were validated in HCT116 and MCF7 human cell lines. Conversely, PRODH2 was not responsive to p63 nor p73 and, at best, could be considered a weak p53 target. In fact, minimal levels of PRODH2 transcript induction by genotoxic stress was observed exclusively in one of four p53 wild-type cell lines tested. Consistently, all predicted p53 REs in PRODH2 were poor matches to the p53 RE consensus and showed very weak responsiveness, only to p53, in the functional assay. Taken together, our results highlight that PRODH, but not PRODH2, expression is under the control of p53 family members, specifically p53 and p73. This supports a deeper link between proteins of the p53-family and metabolic pathways, as PRODH modulates the balance of proline and glutamate levels and those of their derivative alpha-keto-glutarate (α-KG under normal and pathological (tumor conditions.

  20. Oncogenomic Approaches in Exploring Gain of Function of Mutant p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzelli, Sara; Biagioni, Francesca; Fausti, Francesca; Strano, Sabrina; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Blandino, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Cancer is caused by the spatial and temporal accumulation of alterations in the genome of a given cell. This leads to the deregulation of key signalling pathways that play a pivotal role in the control of cell proliferation and cell fate. The p53 tumor suppressor gene is the most frequent target in genetic alterations in human cancers. The primary selective advantage of such mutations is the elimination of cellular wild type p53 activity. In addition, many evidences in vitro and in vivo have demonstrated that at least certain mutant forms of p53 may possess a gain of function, whereby they contribute positively to cancer progression. The fine mapping and deciphering of specific cancer phenotypes is taking advantage of molecular-profiling studies based on genome-wide approaches. Currently, high-throughput methods such as array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH array), single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP array), expression arrays and ChIP-on-chip arrays are available to study mutant p53-associated alterations in human cancers. Here we will mainly focus on the integration of the results raised through oncogenomic platforms that aim to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying mutant p53 gain of function activities and to provide useful information on the molecular stratification of tumor patients. PMID:19440517

  1. Genome wide expression profiling of p53 regulated miRNAs in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihani, Ali; Van Goethem, Alan; Ongenaert, Maté; De Brouwer, Sara; Volders, Pieter-Jan; Agarwal, Saurabh; De Preter, Katleen; Mestdagh, Pieter; Shohet, Jason; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo; Van Maerken, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of the antitumor activity of p53 could offer a promising approach for the treatment of neuroblastoma. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important mediators of p53 activity, but their role in the p53 response has not yet been comprehensively addressed in neuroblastoma. Therefore, we set out to characterize alterations in miRNA expression that are induced by p53 activation in neuroblastoma cells. Genome-wide miRNA expression analysis showed that miR-34a-5p, miR-182-5p, miR-203a, miR-222-3p, and miR-432-5p are upregulated following nutlin-3 treatment in a p53 dependent manner. The function of miR-182-5p, miR-203a, miR-222-3p, and miR-432-5p was analyzed by ectopic overexpression of miRNA mimics. We observed that these p53-regulated miRNAs inhibit the proliferation of neuroblastoma cells to varying degrees, with the most profound growth inhibition recorded for miR-182-5p. Overexpression of miR-182-5p promoted apoptosis in some neuroblastoma cell lines and induced neuronal differentiation of NGP cells. Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation-qPCR (ChIP-qPCR), we did not observe direct binding of p53 to MIR182, MIR203, MIR222, and MIR432 in neuroblastoma cells. Taken together, our findings yield new insights in the network of p53-regulated miRNAs in neuroblastoma. PMID:25762502

  2. Rb and p53 Liver Functions Are Essential for Xenobiotic Metabolism and Tumor Suppression.

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    Sathidpak Nantasanti

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressors Retinoblastoma (Rb and p53 are frequently inactivated in liver diseases, such as hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC or infections with Hepatitis B or C viruses. Here, we discovered a novel role for Rb and p53 in xenobiotic metabolism, which represent a key function of the liver for metabolizing therapeutic drugs or toxins. We demonstrate that Rb and p53 cooperate to metabolize the xenobiotic 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC. DDC is metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (Cyp3a enzymes resulting in inhibition of heme synthesis and accumulation of protoporphyrin, an intermediate of heme pathway. Protoporphyrin accumulation causes bile injury and ductular reaction. We show that loss of Rb and p53 resulted in reduced Cyp3a expression decreased accumulation of protoporphyrin and consequently less ductular reaction in livers of mice fed with DDC for 3 weeks. These findings provide strong evidence that synergistic functions of Rb and p53 are essential for metabolism of DDC. Because Rb and p53 functions are frequently disabled in liver diseases, our results suggest that liver patients might have altered ability to remove toxins or properly metabolize therapeutic drugs. Strikingly the reduced biliary injury towards the oxidative stress inducer DCC was accompanied by enhanced hepatocellular injury and formation of HCCs in Rb and p53 deficient livers. The increase in hepatocellular injury might be related to reduce protoporphyrin accumulation, because protoporphrin is well known for its anti-oxidative activity. Furthermore our results indicate that Rb and p53 not only function as tumor suppressors in response to carcinogenic injury, but also in response to non-carcinogenic injury such as DDC.

  3. Mutant p53 in cell adhesion and motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeudall, W Andrew; Wrighton, Katharine H; Deb, Sumitra

    2013-01-01

    Pro-oncogenic properties of mutant p53 were investigated with the aid of migration assays, adhesion assays, and soft agar growth assays using cells stably expressing gain-of-function p53 mutants. To determine cell migration, "wound-healing" (scratch) assays and haptotactic (chamber) assays were used. H1299 cells expressing mutant p53 were found to migrate more rapidly than cells transfected with empty vector alone. Results from both types of migration assay were broadly similar. Migratory ability differed for different p53 mutants, suggesting allele-specific effects. Cells expressing p53 mutants also showed enhanced adhesion to extracellular matrix compare to controls. Furthermore, stable transfection of mutant p53-H179L into NIH3T3 fibroblasts was sufficient to allow anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. PMID:23150443

  4. Relationship of p53 Mutations to Epidermal Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis in Human UV-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis

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    Janine G. Einspahr

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is continually subjected to UV-irradiation with the p53 gene playing a pivotal role in repair of UV-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Consequently, p53 alterations are early events in human UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. We studied 13 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC, 16 actinic keratoses (AK, 13 samples adjacent to an AK (chronically sun-damaged, and 14 normal-appearing skin samples for p53 mutation, p53 immunostaining (IHC, apoptosis (in situ TUNEL and morphology, and proliferation (PCNA. The frequency of p53 mutation increased from 14% in normal skin, to 38.5% in sun-damaged skin, 63% in AK, and 54% in SCC. p53 IHC increased similarly. Apoptosis (TUNEL increased from 0.06 ± 0.02%, to 0.1 ± 0.2, 0.3 ± 0.3, and 0.4 ± 0.3 in normal skin, sun-damaged skin, AK, and SCC, respectively. Apoptosis was strongly correlated with proliferation (i.e., TUNEL and PCNA, r = 0.7, P < 0.0001, and proliferation was significantly increased in the progression from normal skin to SCC. Bax was significantly increased in SCC compared to AK. These data imply that apoptosis in samples with a high frequency of p53 mutation may not necessarily be p53-dependent. We suggest that there is a mechanism for apoptosis in response to increased cellular proliferation that is p53-independent.

  5. A synthetic interaction screen identifies factors selectively required for proliferation and TERT transcription in p53-deficient human cancer cells.

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    Li Xie

    Full Text Available Numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations render cancer cells selectively dependent on specific genes and regulatory pathways, and represent potential vulnerabilities that can be therapeutically exploited. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi-based synthetic interaction screen to identify genes preferentially required for proliferation of p53-deficient (p53- human cancer cells. We find that compared to p53-competent (p53+ human cancer cell lines, diverse p53- human cancer cell lines are preferentially sensitive to loss of the transcription factor ETV1 and the DNA damage kinase ATR. In p53- cells, RNAi-mediated knockdown of ETV1 or ATR results in decreased expression of the telomerase catalytic subunit TERT leading to growth arrest, which can be reversed by ectopic TERT expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis reveals that ETV1 binds to a region downstream of the TERT transcriptional start-site in p53- but not p53+ cells. We find that the role of ATR is to phosphorylate and thereby stabilize ETV1. Our collective results identify a regulatory pathway involving ETV1, ATR, and TERT that is preferentially important for proliferation of diverse p53- cancer cells.

  6. Attenuating the p53 Pathway in Human Cancers: Many Means to the Same End.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylishen, Amanda R; Lozano, Guillermina

    2016-01-01

    The p53 pathway is perturbed in the majority of human cancers. Although this most frequently occurs through the direct mutation or deletion of p53 itself, there are a number of other alterations that can attenuate the pathway and contribute to tumorigenesis. For example, amplification of important negative regulators, MDM2 and MDM4, occurs in a number of cancers. In this work, we will review both the normal regulation of the p53 pathway and the different mechanisms of pathway inhibition in cancer, discuss these alterations in the context of the global genomic analyses that have been conducted across tumor types, and highlight the translational implications for cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27329033

  7. Resistance of mitochondrial p53 to dominant inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Mestres Pedro; Armbruester Vivienne; Mueller Daniel; Schmitt Katrin; Heyne Kristina; Roemer Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Mutation of a tumor suppressor allele leaves the second as backup. Not necessarily so with p53. This homo-tetrameric transcription factor can become contaminated with mutant p53 through hetero-tetramerization. In addition, it can be out-competed by the binding to p53 DNA recognition motifs of transactivation-incompetent isoforms (ΔN and ΔTA-isoforms) of the p53/p63/p73 family of proteins. Countermeasures against such dominant-negative or dominant-inhibitory action might in...

  8. MEKK1/JNK signaling stabilizes and activates p53

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, Serge Y.; Adler, Victor; Pincus, Matthew R.; Ronai, Ze’ev

    1998-01-01

    Activation of the tumor suppressor p53 by stress and damage stimuli often correlates with induction of stress kinases, Jun-NH2 kinase (JNK). As JNK association with p53 plays an important role in p53 stability, in the present study we have elucidated the relationship between the JNK-signaling pathway and p53 stability and activity. Expression of a constitutively active form of JNKK upstream kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (ΔMEKK1), increased the level of the exogenously...

  9. Immunoexpression of p53 in cutaneous and subcutaneous leiomyosarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Flores, Angel; Monteagudo, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    The diagnosis of malignancy in cutaneous and subcutaneous smooth muscle tumors is based on subtle criteria. Therefore, any ancillary technique useful in this differential diagnosis is always welcome. In this report, we study the immunoexpression of p53 in 19 malignant smooth muscle tumors of the skin (15 cutaneous leiomyosarcomas, 2 subcutaneous leiomyosarcomas, and 2 cutaneous metastases of leiomyosarcoma), as well as in 1 leiomyoma with cellular atypia, therefore complementing a previous study on p53 immunoexpression in leiomyomas of the skin. The p53 staining was positive in 12 (63.16%) of 19 leiomyosarcomas. Percentages of immunostaining in the positive cases varied from 2% to 95%. Ten (66.66%) of 15 cutaneous leiomyosarcomas were positive for p53, and in 4 of these cases, immunoexpression was demonstrated by more than 50% of the cells. Five (33.33%) cutaneous leiomyosarcomas did not show any expression of p53. Of the 2 subcutaneous leiomyosarcomas, one was negative for p53 and the other expressed the marker in 70% of the cells. The only atypical leiomyoma included in the study did not express p53. Of the 2 cutaneous metastases of leiomyosarcoma, one was negative and the other expressed p53 in 20% of the cells. The current study supports our previous conclusions that p53 immunoexpression in more than 1% of the cells in a cutaneous smooth muscle tumor is indicative of malignancy. However, we believe that additional studies on atypical leiomyoma are needed. PMID:27649950

  10. Wild-type alternatively spliced p53: binding to DNA and interaction with the major p53 protein in vitro and in cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Y; Liu, Y.; Lee, L.; Miner, Z; Kulesz-Martin, M

    1994-01-01

    A p53 variant protein (p53as) generated from alternatively spliced p53 RNA is expressed in normal and malignant mouse cells and tissues, and p53as antigen activity is preferentially associated with the G2 phase of the cell cycle, suggesting that p53as and p53 protein may have distinct properties. Using p53as and p53 proteins translated in vitro, we now provide evidence that p53as protein has efficient sequence-specific DNA-binding ability. DNA binding by p53 protein is inefficient in comparis...

  11. p53 Antibody and Malignant Tumor%p53抗体与恶性肿瘤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾常茜; 王振明

    2002-01-01

    p53基因是人类肿瘤中突变频率最高的抑癌基因,几乎发生于所有的恶性肿瘤.突变基因编码的p53蛋白释放入血,可诱发机体自身免疫应答,产生p53自身抗体.在肿瘤病人和高危人群中检测血清p53抗体可以反映早期p53基因突变,作为一种新的肿瘤生物学指标,p53抗体有望在恶性肿瘤的早期诊断、治疗、预后、监测、复发等方面发挥重要作用.

  12. p53 Amino-terminus region (1-125 stabilizes and restores heat denatured p53 wild phenotype.

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    Anuj Kumar Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intrinsically disordered N-ter domain (NTD of p53 encompasses approximately hundred amino acids that contain a transactivation domain (1-73 and a proline-rich domain (64-92 and is responsible for transactivation function and apoptosis. It also possesses an auto-inhibitory function as its removal results in remarkable reduction in dissociation of p53 from DNA. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS/METHODOLOGY: In this report, we have discovered that p53-NTD spanning amino acid residues 1-125 (NTD125 interacted with WT p53 and stabilized its wild type conformation under physiological and elevated temperatures, both in vitro and in cellular systems. NTD125 prevented irreversible thermal aggregation of heat denatured p53, enhanced p21-5'-DBS binding and further restored DBS binding activity of heat-denatured p53, in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo ELISA and immunoprecipitation analysis of NTD125-transfected cells revealed that NTD125 shifted equilibrium from p53 mutant to wild type under heat stress conditions. Further, NTD125 initiated nuclear translocation of cytoplasmic p53 in transcriptionally active state in order to activate p53 downstream genes such as p21, Bax, PUMA, Noxa and SUMO. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Here, we showed that a novel chaperone-like activity resides in p53-N-ter region. This study might have significance in understanding the role of p53-NTD in p53 stabilization, conformational activation and apoptosis under heat-stress conditions.

  13. Effects of p53 knockout on ochratoxin A-induced genotoxicity in p53-deficient gpt delta mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, Daisuke; Kijima, Aki; Suzuki, Yuta; Ishii, Yuji; Jin, Meilan; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Yanai, Tokuma; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Umemura, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin produced by fungal species and is carcinogenic targeting the S3 segment of the renal proximal tubules in rodents. We previously reported that exposure of gpt delta rats to OTA induced both mutations in the red/gam gene (Spi(-)), suggesting large deletion mutations, and fluctuations in genes transcribed by p53 in the kidneys, which were associated with DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, particularly homologous recombination (HR) repair. In the present study, to investigate the effects of p53 knockout on OTA-induced mutagenicity, apoptosis, and karyomegaly in renal tubular cells, p53-proficient and p53-deficient gpt delta mice were given 1 and 5mg/kg of OTA for 4 weeks. Significant increases in Spi(-) mutant frequencies (MFs) were observed in the kidneys of p53-deficient gpt delta mice given 5 mg/kg of OTA, but not in the kidneys of p53-proficient gpt delta mice given the same dose. There were no changes in gpt MFs in both genotypes of mice treated with OTA. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that p53 protein levels in the kidneys of p53-proficient mice given OTA were significantly increased compared with the control. Incidences of apoptosis and karyomegaly in not only the outer stripe of outer medulla but also the cortex were significantly higher in p53-deficient at 5mg/kg than in p53-proficient gpt delta mice at same dose, which had no change in the cortex, the inner stripe of outer stripe, and the inner medulla. Given that p53 regulates HR repair in DSBs, these results suggest that OTA may promote large deletion mutations in the process of HR repair for DSBs. Additionally, the lower incidence of karyomegaly and apoptosis found in the p53-proficient gpt delta mice suggests that these phenomena may arise from OTA-induced DNA damage.

  14. Induction of wild-type p53 activity in human cancer cells by ribozymes that repair mutant p53 transcripts

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Takashi; Sullenger, Bruce A

    2000-01-01

    Several groups have attempted to develop gene therapy strategies to treat cancer via introduction of the wild-type (wt) p53 cDNA into cancer cells. Unfortunately, these approaches do not result in regulated expression of the p53 gene and do not reduce expression of the mutant p53 that is overexpressed in cancerous cells. These shortcomings may greatly limit the utility of this gene replacement approach. We describe an alternative strategy with trans-splicing ribozymes that can simultaneously ...

  15. Influence of Human p53 on Plant Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huimin; Song, Teng; Wang, Tianhua; Wang, Shui

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian p53 is a super tumor suppressor and plays a key role in guarding genome from DNA damage. However, p53 has not been found in plants which do not bear cancer although they constantly expose to ionizing radiation of ultraviolet light. Here we introduced p53 into the model plant Arabidopsis and examined p53-conferred phenotype in plant. Most strikingly, p53 caused early senescence and fasciation. In plants, fasciation has been shown as a result of the elevated homologous DNA recombination. Consistently, a reporter with overlapping segments of the GUS gene (1445) showed that the frequency of homologous recombination was highly induced in p53-transgenic plants. In contrast to p53, SUPPRESSOR OF NPR1-1 INDUCIBLE 1 (SNI1), as a negative regulator of homologous recombination in plants, is not present in mammals. Comet assay and clonogenic survival assay demonstrated that SNI1 inhibited DNA damage repair caused by either ionizing radiation or hydroxyurea in human osteosarcoma U2OS cancer cells. RAD51D is a recombinase in homologous recombination and functions downstream of SNI1 in plants. Interestingly, p53 rendered the sni1 mutants madly branching of inflorescence, a phenotype of fasciation, whereas rad51d mutant fully suppressed the p53-induced phenotype, indicating that human p53 action in plant is mediated by the SNI1-RAD51D signaling pathway. The reciprocal species-swap tests of p53 and SNI1 in human and Arabidopsis manifest that these species-specific proteins play a common role in homologous recombination across kingdoms of animals and plants. PMID:27648563

  16. Modeling the basal dynamics of p53 system.

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    Tingzhe Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The tumor suppressor p53 has become one of most investigated genes. Once activated by stress, p53 leads to cellular responses such as cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Most previous models have ignored the basal dynamics of p53 under nonstressed conditions. To explore the basal dynamics of p53, we constructed a stochastic delay model by incorporating two negative feedback loops. We found that protein distribution of p53 under nonstressed condition is highly skewed with a fraction of cells showing high p53 levels comparable to those observed under stressed conditions. Under nonstressed conditions, asynchronous and spontaneous p53 pulses are triggered by basal DNA double strand breaks produced during normal cell cycle progression. The first peaking times show a predominant G1 distribution while the second ones are more widely distributed. The spontaneous pulses are triggered by an excitable mechanism. Once initiated, the amplitude and duration of pulses remain unchanged. Furthermore, the spontaneous pulses are filtered by ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein mediated posttranslational modifications and do not result in substantial p21 transcription. If challenged by externally severe DNA damage, cells generate synchronous p53 pulses and induce significantly high levels of p21. The high expression of p21 can also be partially induced by lowering the deacetylation rate. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrated that the dynamics of p53 under nonstressed conditions is initiated by an excitable mechanism and cells become fully responsive only when cells are confronted with severe damage. These findings advance our understanding of the mechanism of p53 pulses and unlock many opportunities to p53-based therapy.

  17. Dmp1 physically interacts with p53 and positively regulates p53’s stability, nuclear localization, and function

    OpenAIRE

    Frazier, Donna P.; Kendig, Robert D.; Kai, Fumitake; Maglic, Dejan; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Rachel L. Morgan; Fry, Elizabeth A.; Lagedrost, Sarah J.; Sui, Guangchao; Inoue, Kazushi

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor Dmp1 is a Ras/HER2-activated haplo-insufficient tumor suppressor that activates the Arf/p53 pathway of cell cycle arrest. Recent evidence suggests that Dmp1 may activate p53 independently of Arf in certain cell types. Here we report findings supporting this concept with the definition an Arf-independent function for Dmp1 in tumor suppression. We found that Dmp1 and p53 can interact directly in mammalian cells via the carboxyl-terminus of p53 and the DNA-binding domain...

  18. P53 Gene Mutation and Expression of MDM2, P53, P16 Protein and their Relationship in Human Glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Wen; WU Renliang; CAO Huiling; GAO Jifa; WANG Xu; REN Qiwei

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effect of P53 protein accumulation and p53 gene mutation in the pathogenesis of glioma and to study the role of MDM2, P53 and P16 protein in glioma formation and progression and their relationship with each other, LSAB immunohistochemical staining method and non-isotopic PCR-SSCP techniques were used to detect the expression of MDM2, P53 and P16 pro tein and p53 gene mutation in 48 cases of gliomas. The results showed that the positive expression rate of MDM2, P53 and the negative rate of P16 was 22.9 %, 41.7 % and 60.4 %, respectively.The latter two in high grade (grade Ⅲ , Ⅳ) gliomas had a significantly higher rate than in the low grade (grade Ⅱ ) gliomas. Moreover, the co-expression of MDM2 and P53 protein was confirmed in only 1 of 48 cases. No significant difference was found in the rate of the expression of MDM2 between high grade and low grade gliomas (P>0.1) . PCR SSCP results showed that mutation of 5-8 exons of p53 gene was detected in 17 out of 48 cases (35.42 %) . Mutation was detected in 16of 20 cases of positive p53 expression, and another one was detected in 28 cases of negative expression cases. The correlation between p53 mutation and p53 immunopositivity was observed in 89.6% of the cases. P53 gene mutation and the level of MDM2, P53 and P16 protein were not related to age, gender of the patients, tumor location and size. It is concluded that the mutation of p53 and deletion of p16 might play important roles in the tumorigenesis of gliomas and it was significantly associated with the grade of tumor differentiation. P53 protein accumulation can indirectly reflect p53 mutation. MDM2 amplification and overexpression might be an early event in the growth of human gliomas.

  19. Expression of pRb, p53, p16 and cyclin D1 and their clinical implications in urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyungji; Jung, Eun Sun; Choi, Young-Jin; Lee, Kyo Young; Lee, Ahwon

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess immunohistochemical expression of p53, pRb, p16, and cyclin D1, alone or in combination, as prognostic indicators and to investigate their correlation with clinocopathologic features of urothelial carcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining for p53, pRb, p16, and cyclin D1 was performed on a tissue microarray from 103 patients with urothelial carcinoma who underwent radical cystectomy. Of the patient samples analyzed, 36 (35%), 61 (59%), 47 (46%) and 30 (29%) had altered expression of p53, pRb, p16, and cyclin D1, respectively. Abnormal expression of p53 and pRb correlated with depth of invasion (P=0.040 and P=0.044, respectively). Cyclin D1 expression was associated with tumor stage and recurrence (P=0.017 and P=0.036, respectively). Altered pRb was significantly correlated with overall survival (P=0.040). According to the expression pattern of pRb and p53, p53/pRb (altered/normal) had worse survival than p53/pRb (normal/altered) (P=0.022). Alteration of all markers had worse survival than all normal (P=0.029). As determined by multivariate analysis, tumor stage, lymph node metastasis and the combined expression of p53 and pRb are independent prognostic factors. In conclusion, immunohistochemical evaluation of cell cycle regulators, especially the p53/pRb combination, might be useful in planning appropriate treatment strategies.

  20. p53 as an intervention target for cancer and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Hasty

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available p53 is well known for suppressing tumors but could also affect other aging processes not associated with tumor suppression. As a transcription factor, p53 responds to a variety of stresses to either induce apoptosis (cell death or cell cycle arrest (cell preservation to suppress tumor development. Yet, the effect p53 has on the non-cancer aspects of aging is complicated and not well understood. On one side, p53 could induce cellular senescence or apoptosis to suppress cancer but as an unintended consequence enhance the aging process especially if these responses diminish stem and progenitor cell populations. But on the flip side, p53 could reduce growth and growth-related stress to enable cell survival and ultimately delay the aging process. A better understanding of diverse functions of p53 is essential to elucidate its influences on the aging process and the possibility of targeting p53 or p53 transcriptional targets to treat cancer and ameliorate general aging.

  1. A Platform for Interrogating Cancer-Associated p53 Alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Brot, Alejandro; Kurtz, Paula; Regan, Erin; Jakubowski, Brandon; Abrams, John M

    2016-01-01

    p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. Compelling evidence argues that full transformation involves loss of growth suppression encoded by wild-type p53 together with poorly understood oncogenic activity encoded by missense mutations. Furthermore, distinguishing disease alleles from natural polymorphisms is an important clinical challenge. To interrogate the genetic activity of human p53 variants, we leveraged the Drosophila model as an in vivo platform. We engineered strains that replace the fly p53 gene with human alleles, producing a collection of stocks that are, in effect, ‘humanized’ for p53 variants. Like the fly counterpart, human p53 transcriptionally activated a biosensor and induced apoptosis after DNA damage. However, all humanized strains representing common alleles found in cancer patients failed to complement in these assays. Surprisingly, stimulus-dependent activation of hp53 occurred without stabilization, demonstrating that these two processes can be uncoupled. Like its fly counterpart, hp53 formed prominent nuclear foci in germline cells but cancer-associated p53 variants did not. Moreover, these same mutant alleles disrupted hp53 foci and inhibited biosensor activity, suggesting that these properties are functionally linked. Together these findings establish a functional platform for interrogating human p53 alleles and suggest that simple phenotypes could be used to stratify disease variants. PMID:26996664

  2. Distinct pattern of p53 mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spruck, C H; Rideout, W M; Olumi, A F;

    1993-01-01

    A distinct mutational spectrum for the p53 tumor suppressor gene in bladder carcinomas was established in patients with known exposures to cigarette smoke. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of exons 5 through 8 of the p53 gene showed inactivating mutations in 16 of 40 (40%) bladd...

  3. p53 immunoreactivity is uncommon in primary cutaneous lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, J M; Dublin, E A; Levison, D A; MacDonald, D M; Smith, N P; Whittaker, S

    1995-03-01

    p53 gene mutation appears to play an important role in the development of systemic lymphoma, and may be associated with tumour progression. Its role in cutaneous lymphoma is currently unknown. We examined p53 expression in 55 biopsies of cutaneous lymphoma, including patch-, plaque- and tumour-stage mycosis fungoides (MF), T- and B-cell lymphoma and lymphomatoid papulosis. Strong, homogeneous p53 expression, thought to correlate most closely with p53 gene mutation, was seen in only three cases; in a plaque and tumour from a patient with tumour-stage MF, in plaque-stage MF in a patient without tumours, and in one case of CD30+ large-cell anaplastic lymphoma. These data suggest that p53 gene mutation is not a critical step in the development of the majority of primary cutaneous lymphomas.

  4. The p53 Codon 72 Polymorphism Modifies the Cellular Response to Inflammatory Challenge in the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Julia I-Ju; Murphy, Maureen E; George, Donna L

    2013-01-01

    The p53 protein is a critical stress-response mediator and signal coordinator in cellular metabolism and environmental exposure to deleterious agents. In human populations, the p53 gene contains a common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) affecting codon 72 that determines whether a proline (P72) or an arginine (R72) is present at this amino acid position of the polypeptide. Previous studies carried out using human populations, mouse models, and cell culture analyses have provided evidence that this amino acid difference can alter p53 functional activities, and potentially also can affect clinical presentation of disease. The clinical presentation associated with many forms of liver disease is variable, but few of the responsible underlying genetic factors or molecular pathways have been identified. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the p53 codon 72 polymorphism influences the cellular response to hepatic stresses. A humanized p53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse model was used to address this issue. Mice expressing either the P72 or R72 normal variation of p53 were given an acute-, intermittent- or a chronic challenge, associated with exposure to lipopolysaccharide, D-galactosamine, or a high-fat diet. The results reveal that the livers of the P72 and R72 mice exhibit notable differences in inflammatory and apoptotic response to these distinct forms of stress. Interestingly the influence of this polymorphism on the response to stress is context dependent, with P72 showing increased response to liver toxins (lipopolysaccharide and D-galactosamine), but R72 showing increased response to metabolic stress (high fat diet). When taken together, these data point to the p53 codon 72 polymorphism as an important molecular mediator of events contributing to hepatic inflammation and metabolic homeostasis.

  5. Loss of p53 expression is accompanied by upregulation of beta-catenin in meningiomas: a concomitant reciprocal expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Vladušić, Tomislav; Tomas, Davor; Logara, Monika; Skoko, Josip; Hrašćan, Reno

    2016-04-01

    Crosstalk between Wnt and p53 signalling pathways in cancer has long been suggested. Therefore in this study we have investigated the involvement of these pathways in meningiomas by analysing their main effector molecules, beta-catenin and p53. Cellular expression of p53 and beta-catenin proteins and genetic changes in TP53 were analysed by immunohistochemistry, PCR/RFLP and direct sequencing of TP53 exon 4. All the findings were analysed statistically. Our analysis showed that 47.5% of the 59 meningiomas demonstrated loss of expression of p53 protein. Moderate and strong p53 expression in the nuclei was observed in 8.5% and 6.8% of meningiomas respectively. Gross deletion of TP53 gene was observed in one meningioma, but nucleotide alterations were observed in 35.7% of meningiomas. In contrast, beta-catenin, the main Wnt signalling molecule, was upregulated in 71.2%, while strong expression was observed in 28.8% of meningiomas. The concomitant expressions of p53 and beta-catenin were investigated in the same patients. In the analysed meningiomas, the levels of the two proteins were significantly negatively correlated (P = 0.002). This indicates that meningiomas with lost p53 upregulate beta-catenin and activate Wnt signalling. Besides showing the reciprocal relationship between proteins, we also showed that the expression of p53 was significantly (P = 0.021) associated with higher meningioma grades (II and III), while beta-catenin upregulation was not associated with malignancy grades. Additionally, women exhibited significantly higher values of p53 loss when compared to males (P = 0.005). Our findings provide novel information about p53 involvement in meningeal brain tumours and reveal the complex relationship between Wnt and p53 signalling, they suggest an important role for beta-catenin in these tumours.

  6. p53 selectively regulates developmental apoptosis of rod photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Vuong

    Full Text Available Retinal cells become post-mitotic early during post-natal development. It is likely that p53, a well-known cell cycle regulator, is involved in regulating the genesis, differentiation and death of retinal cells. Furthermore, retinal cells are under constant oxidative stress that can result in DNA damage, due to the extremely high level of metabolic activity associated with phototransduction. If not repaired, this damage may result in p53-dependent cell death and ensuing vision loss. In this study, the role of p53 during retinal development and in the post-mitotic retina is investigated. A previously described super p53 transgenic mouse that expresses an extra copy of the mouse p53 gene driven by its endogenous promoter is utilized. Another transgenic mouse (HIP that expresses the p53 gene in rod and cone photoreceptors driven by the human interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein promoter was generated. The electroretinogram (ERG of the super p53 mouse exhibited reduced rod-driven scotopic a and b wave and cone-driven photopic b wave responses. This deficit resulted from a reduced number of rod photoreceptors and inner nuclear layer cells. However, the reduced photopic signal arose only from lost inner retinal neurons, as cone numbers did not change. Furthermore, cell loss was non-progressive and resulted from increased apoptosis during retinal developmental as determined by TUNEL staining. In contrast, the continuous and specific expression of p53 in rod and cone photoreceptors in the mature retinas of HIP mice led to the selective loss of both rods and cones. These findings strongly support a role for p53 in regulating developmental apoptosis in the retina and suggest a potential role, either direct or indirect, for p53 in the degenerative photoreceptor loss associated with human blinding disorders.

  7. Mitochondrial dysfunction impairs tumor suppressor p53 expression/function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Shannon; Kim, Chul; Griner, Nicholas B; Potluri, Prasanth; Scheffler, Immo E; Sen, Sabyasachi; Jerry, D Joseph; Schneider, Sallie; Yadava, Nagendra

    2011-06-10

    Recently, mitochondria have been suggested to act in tumor suppression. However, the underlying mechanisms by which mitochondria suppress tumorigenesis are far from being clear. In this study, we have investigated the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and the tumor suppressor protein p53 using a set of respiration-deficient (Res(-)) mammalian cell mutants with impaired assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation machinery. Our data suggest that normal mitochondrial function is required for γ-irradiation (γIR)-induced cell death, which is mainly a p53-dependent process. The Res(-) cells are protected against γIR-induced cell death due to impaired p53 expression/function. We find that the loss of complex I biogenesis in the absence of the MWFE subunit reduces the steady-state level of the p53 protein, although there is no effect on the p53 protein level in the absence of the ESSS subunit that is also essential for complex I assembly. The p53 protein level was also reduced to undetectable levels in Res(-) cells with severely impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis. This suggests that p53 protein expression is differentially regulated depending upon the type of electron transport chain/respiratory chain deficiency. Moreover, irrespective of the differences in the p53 protein expression profile, γIR-induced p53 activity is compromised in all Res(-) cells. Using two different conditional systems for complex I assembly, we also show that the effect of mitochondrial dysfunction on p53 expression/function is a reversible phenomenon. We believe that these findings will have major implications in the understanding of cancer development and therapy. PMID:21502317

  8. p53 regulates the transcription of its Delta133p53 isoform through specific response elements contained within the TP53 P2 internal promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel, V; Vijayakumar, V; Fernández-Cuesta, L; Hafsi, H; Sagne, C; Hautefeuille, A; Olivier, M; Hainaut, P

    2010-05-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 protein is activated by genotoxic stress and regulates genes involved in senescence, apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. Nine p53 isoforms have been described that may modulate suppressive functions of the canonical p53 protein. Among them, Delta133p53 lacks the 132 proximal residues and has been shown to modulate p53-induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. Delta133p53 is expressed from a specific mRNA, p53I4, driven by an alternative promoter P2 located between intron 1 and exon 5 of TP53 gene. Here, we report that the P2 promoter is regulated in a p53-dependent manner. Delta133p53 expression is increased in response to DNA damage by doxorubicin in p53 wild-type cell lines, but not in p53-mutated cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays using P2 promoter deletion constructs indicate that p53 binds functional response elements located within the P2 promoter. We also show that Delta133p53 does not bind specifically to p53 consensus DNA sequence in vitro, but competes with wild-type p53 in specific DNA-binding assays. Finally, we report that Delta133p53 counteracts p53-dependent growth suppression in clonogenic assays. These observations indicate that Delta133p53 is a novel target of p53 that may participate in a negative feedback loop controlling p53 function. PMID:20190805

  9. Energetic Landscape of MDM2-p53 Interactions by Computational Mutagenesis of the MDM2-p53 Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Kelly M; Beyer, George A

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligase MDM2, a principle regulator of the tumor suppressor p53, plays an integral role in regulating cellular levels of p53 and thus a prominent role in current cancer research. Computational analysis used MUMBO to rotamerize the MDM2-p53 crystal structure 1YCR to obtain an exhaustive search of point mutations, resulting in the calculation of the ΔΔG comprehensive energy landscape for the p53-bound regulator. The results herein have revealed a set of residues R65-E69 on MDM2 proximal to the p53 hydrophobic binding pocket that exhibited an energetic profile deviating significantly from similar residues elsewhere in the protein. In light of the continued search for novel competitive inhibitors for MDM2, we discuss possible implications of our findings on the drug discovery field. PMID:26992014

  10. Fuzzy tandem repeats containing p53 response elements may define species-specific p53 target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Simeonova

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary forces that shape regulatory networks remain poorly understood. In mammals, the Rb pathway is a classic example of species-specific gene regulation, as a germline mutation in one Rb allele promotes retinoblastoma in humans, but not in mice. Here we show that p53 transactivates the Retinoblastoma-like 2 (Rbl2 gene to produce p130 in murine, but not human, cells. We found intronic fuzzy tandem repeats containing perfect p53 response elements to be important for this regulation. We next identified two other murine genes regulated by p53 via fuzzy tandem repeats: Ncoa1 and Klhl26. The repeats are poorly conserved in evolution, and the p53-dependent regulation of the murine genes is lost in humans. Our results indicate a role for the rapid evolution of tandem repeats in shaping differences in p53 regulatory networks between mammalian species.

  11. HEXIM1, a New Player in the p53 Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, Qiao Jing; Chu, Kai Ling; Chia, Yi Ling; Cheong, Nge [Expression Engineering Group, Bioprocessing Technology Institute, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 20 Biopolis Way, #06-01, Singapore 138668 (Singapore); Chao, Sheng-Hao, E-mail: jimmy_chao@bti.a-star.edu.sg [Expression Engineering Group, Bioprocessing Technology Institute, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 20 Biopolis Way, #06-01, Singapore 138668 (Singapore); Department of Microbiology, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597 (Singapore)

    2013-07-04

    Hexamethylene bisacetamide-inducible protein 1 (HEXIM1) is best known as the inhibitor of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which controls transcription elongation of RNA polymerase II and Tat transactivation of human immunodeficiency virus. Besides P-TEFb, several proteins have been identified as HEXIM1 binding proteins. It is noteworthy that more than half of the HEXIM1 binding partners are involved in cancers. P53 and two key regulators of the p53 pathway, nucleophosmin (NPM) and human double minute-2 protein (HDM2), are among the factors identified. This review will focus on the functional importance of the interactions between HEXIM1 and p53/NPM/HDM2. NPM and the cytoplasmic mutant of NPM, NPMc+, were found to regulate P-TEFb activity and RNA polymerase II transcription through the interaction with HEXIM1. Importantly, more than one-third of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients carry NPMc+, suggesting the involvement of HEXIM1 in tumorigenesis of AML. HDM2 was found to ubiquitinate HEXIM1. The HDM2-mediated ubiquitination of HEXIM1 did not lead to protein degradation of HEXIM1 but enhanced its inhibitory activity on P-TEFb. Recently, HEXIM1 was identified as a novel positive regulator of p53. HEXIM1 prevented p53 ubiquitination by competing with HDM2 in binding to p53. Taken together, the new evidence suggests a role of HEXIM1 in regulating the p53 pathway and tumorigenesis.

  12. HEXIM1, a New Player in the p53 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nge Cheong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hexamethylene bisacetamide-inducible protein 1 (HEXIM1 is best known as the inhibitor of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb, which controls transcription elongation of RNA polymerase II and Tat transactivation of human immunodeficiency virus. Besides P-TEFb, several proteins have been identified as HEXIM1 binding proteins. It is noteworthy that more than half of the HEXIM1 binding partners are involved in cancers. P53 and two key regulators of the p53 pathway, nucleophosmin (NPM and human double minute-2 protein (HDM2, are among the factors identified. This review will focus on the functional importance of the interactions between HEXIM1 and p53/NPM/HDM2. NPM and the cytoplasmic mutant of NPM, NPMc+, were found to regulate P-TEFb activity and RNA polymerase II transcription through the interaction with HEXIM1. Importantly, more than one-third of acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients carry NPMc+, suggesting the involvement of HEXIM1 in tumorigenesis of AML. HDM2 was found to ubiquitinate HEXIM1. The HDM2-mediated ubiquitination of HEXIM1 did not lead to protein degradation of HEXIM1 but enhanced its inhibitory activity on P-TEFb. Recently, HEXIM1 was identified as a novel positive regulator of p53. HEXIM1 prevented p53 ubiquitination by competing with HDM2 in binding to p53. Taken together, the new evidence suggests a role of HEXIM1 in regulating the p53 pathway and tumorigenesis.

  13. RAS AND p53 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN THYROID CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the possible interaction between the ras and p53 genes over-expression in thyroid carcinoma, and whether there is a correlation between the ras and p53 over-expression and clinicopathological criteria. Methods: Eighty patients with thyroid lesions were examined for expression of ras and p53 genes by the labeled streptavidin biotin peroxidase (LSAB) method. Of these patients, 54 were diagnosed (average age: 39.9± 15.9 years) with malignant lesions. Of those included in the study, 31 has papillary carcinoma, 13 had follicular carcinoma, 7 had medullary carcinoma, 3 had undifferentiated carcinoma and 19 were stratified to stage I, 28 to stage II, 2 to stage III and 5 to stage IV according to TNM staging system. Twenty-six benign nodular thyroid disorders were studied as control. Results: Positive immunostain results for ras and p53 genes were statistically significant between thyroid carcinomas and benign disorders (90.7% vs 23%, 55.5% vs 30.7%, P<0.05). Both p53 and ras overexpressions coexisted in 30 thyroid carcinomas, and of these, 3 died and 5 had recurrences within 4 years. Conclusions: Activation of ras gene and inactivation of p53 gene were cooperatively associated in thyroid tumorigenesis. The concurrent overexpressions of ras and p53 could result in a poor prognosis.

  14. Cisplatinum and Taxol Induce Different Patterns of p53 Phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Damia

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational modifications of p53 induced by two widely used anticancer agents, cisplatinum (DDP and taxol were investigated in two human cancer cell lines. Although both drugs were able to induce phosphorylation at serine 20 (Ser20, only DDP treatment induced p53 phosphorylation at serine 15 (Ser15. Moreover, both drug treatments were able to increase p53 levels and consequently the transcription of waf1 and mdm-2 genes, although DDP treatment resulted in a stronger inducer of both genes. Using two ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM cell lines, the role of ATM in druginduced p53 phosphorylations was investigated. No differences in drug-induced p53 phosphorylation could be observed, indicating that ATM is not the kinase involved in these phosphorylation events. In addition, inhibition of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity by wortmannin did not abolish p53 phosphorylation at Ser15 and Ser20, again indicating that DNA-PK is unlikely to be the kinase involved. After both taxol and DDP treatments, an activation of hCHK2 was found and this is likely to be responsible for phosphorylation at Ser20. In contrast, only DDP was able to activate ATR, which is the candidate kinase for phosphorylation of Ser15 by this drug. This data clearly suggests that differential mechanisms are involved in phosphorylation and activation of p53 depending on the drug type.

  15. p53-dependent apoptosis suppresses radiation-induced teratogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About half of human conceptions are estimated not to be implanted in the uterus, resulting in unrecognizable spontaneous abortions. Experimental studies with mice have established that irradiation during the preimplantation period of the embryo induces a high incidence of prenatal deaths but virtually no malformations. This suggests that some mechanism is screening out the damaged fetuses. In order to elucidate the mechanisms of tissue repair of radiation-induced teratogenic injury, we compared the incidences of radiation-induced malformations and abortions in p53 null (p53-/-) and wild-type (p53+/+) mice. After X-irradiation with 2 Gy on day 9.5 of gestation, p53-/- mice showed a 70% incidence of anomalies and a 7% incidence of deaths, whereas p53+/+ mice had a 20% incidence of anomalies and a 60% incidence of deaths. Similar results were obtained after irradiation on day 3.5 of gestation. This reciprocal relationship of radiosensitivity to anomalies and to embryonic or fetal lethality supports the notion that the p53 gene protects embryos and fetuses against the teratogenic effects of radiation by eliminating cells that have been badly damaged. In fact, after X-irradiation, the frequency of dying cells by apoptosis was greatly increased in tissues of the p53+/+ fetuses but not at all in those of the p53-/- fetuses. Mammals are protected from radiation-induced injury by two mechanisms, p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair in addition to well known DNA repair. Therefore, there are threshold doses below which there is no induction of teratogenic and carcinogenic effects after exposure to low-level radiation. (author)

  16. POSTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATIONS OF P53: UPSTREAM SIGNALING PATHWAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2003-10-23

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is posttranslational modified at >20 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the upstream signaling pathways whose activation in response to various genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses result in p53 posttranslational modifications.

  17. Stochastic modeling of p53-regulated apoptosis upon radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatt, Divesh; Bahar, Ivet

    2011-01-01

    We develop and study the evolution of a model of radiation induced apoptosis in cells using stochastic simulations, and identified key protein targets for effective mitigation of radiation damage. We identified several key proteins associated with cellular apoptosis using an extensive literature survey. In particular, we focus on the p53 transcription dependent and p53 transcription independent pathways for mitochondrial apoptosis. Our model reproduces known p53 oscillations following radiation damage. The key, experimentally testable hypotheses that we generate are - inhibition of PUMA is an effective strategy for mitigation of radiation damage if the treatment is administered immediately, at later stages following radiation damage, inhibition of tBid is more effective.

  18. The emerging role of p53 in exercise metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jonathan D; Close, Graeme L; Drust, Barry; Morton, James P

    2014-03-01

    The major tumour suppressor protein, p53, is one of the most well-studied proteins in cell biology. Often referred to as the Guardian of the Genome, the list of known functions of p53 include regulatory roles in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, angiogenesis, DNA repair and cell senescence. More recently, p53 has been implicated as a key molecular player regulating substrate metabolism and exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. In this context, the study of p53 therefore has obvious implications for both human health and performance, given that impaired mitochondrial content and function is associated with the pathology of many metabolic disorders such as ageing, type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer, as well as reduced exercise performance. Studies on p53 knockout (KO) mice collectively demonstrate that ablation of p53 content reduces intermyofibrillar (IMF) and subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondrial yield, reduces cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-α protein content whilst also reducing mitochondrial respiration and increasing reactive oxygen species production during state 3 respiration in IMF mitochondria. Additionally, p53 KO mice exhibit marked reductions in exercise capacity (in the magnitude of 50 %) during fatiguing swimming, treadmill running and electrical stimulation protocols. p53 may regulate contractile-induced increases in mitochondrial content via modulating mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) content and/or activity, given that p53 KO mice display reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA, Tfam messenger RNA and protein levels. Furthermore, upon muscle contraction, p53 is phosphorylated on serine 15 and subsequently translocates to the mitochondria where it forms a complex with Tfam to modulate expression of mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the COX complex. In human skeletal muscle, the exercise-induced phosphorylation of p53(Ser15) is enhanced in conditions

  19. Resuscitation of wild-type p53 expression by disrupting ceramide glycosylation: a novel approach to target mutant p53 tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yong-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Mutant p53 is frequently detected in cancers lose of its ability in tumor suppression and gain of function in promoting tumor progression. Restoration of p53 functions by replacement of wild-type p53 and inhibition of its degradation or increment of its transcriptional activity has been applied in prevention and treatment of cancers. Recent evidence indicates that disrupting ceramide glycosylation can resuscitate wild-type p53 expression and p53-dependent apoptosis in mutant p53 tumors. Actin...

  20. Dual Roles of MDM2 in the Regulation of p53: Ubiquitination Dependent and Ubiquitination Independent Mechanisms of MDM2 Repression of p53 Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Dingding; Gu, Wei

    2012-01-01

    MDM2 oncogenic protein is the principal cellular antagonist of the p53 tumor suppresser gene. p53 activity needs exquisite control to elicit appropriate responses to differential cellular stress conditions. p53 becomes stabilized and active upon various types of stresses. However, too much p53 is not beneficial to cells and causes lethality. At the steady state, p53 activity needs to be leashed for cell survival. Early studies suggested that the MDM2 oncoprotein negatively regulates p53 activ...

  1. Biologic effect of exogenous wild p53 combined with irradiation on human melanoma cell lines with different p53 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of low dose irradiation on gene transfer efficiency and the effect of adenoviral-mediated exogenous P53 overexpression on apoptosis and radiosensitivity of radioresistant human melanoma cell lines A375(wild type p53)and WM983a(mutant type p53). Methods: Control vector, a replication deficient recombinant adenoviral vector containing a CMV promoter and green fluorescent protein (AdCMV-GFP), was used to transfect A375 cells and WM983a cells preirradiated with or without 1 Gy X-ray. The transduction efficiency of GFP gene was determined with fluorescence microscope directly. These two types of cells irradiated by 1 Gy X-ray were transfected with a replication deficient recombinant adenoviral vector carrying human wild p53 (AdCMV-p53), and mRNA level was detected by RT-PCR. The cell cycle delay and the expression of exogenous P53 were detected using flow cytometry (FCM) at different times after transfection. Tunel technique was used to detect cell apoptosis. The radiosensivity of A375 and WM983a cells after p53 transduction was analyzed by colony formation. Results: It is found that 1 Gy irradiation increased the gene transfection efficiency of A375 and WM983a cells. The expression of exogenous P53 was found to range from 60% to 80% among transfected cells during the first three days after transduction and then declined continuously down to the control level on day 10. G1 cell cycle arrest was also observed after p53 gene transduction. WM983a cells transfected with p53 showed higher sensitivity to X-ray-induced cell killing than A375 cells. Conclusions: It is indicated that low dose of ionizing radiation can improve gene transfection efficiency of A375 and WM983a cells mediated by adenovirus vector. Althrough the overexpresion of exogenous p53 may not inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis of melanoma cell line A375 and WM983a irt vitro, the two cell lines are much more sensitive to cell death induced by irradiation. It is

  2. Mechanisms of p53-mediated mitochondrial membrane permeabilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eugenia Morselli; Lorenzo Galluzzi; Guido Kroemer

    2008-01-01

    @@ The p53 protein is mutated or inactivated in more than 50% of human cancers, underscoring its cardinal importance as an oncosuppressor, p53 is expressed in all nucleated cells and can be activated by a plethora of post-transcriptional modifications (in particular by the phosphorylation of critical serine residues), as well as by the inhibition of its degradation (mainly mediated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2).

  3. p53 aerobics: the major tumor suppressor fuels your workout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Jan-Philipp; Gu, Wei

    2006-07-01

    In addition to its role as the central regulator of the cellular stress response, p53 can regulate aerobic respiration via the novel transcriptional target SCO2, a critical regulator of the cytochrome c oxidase complex (Matoba et al., 2006). Loss of p53 results in decreased oxygen consumption and aerobic respiration and promotes a switch to glycolysis, thereby reducing endurance during physical exercise. PMID:16814724

  4. Targeting p53 for Novel Anticancer Therapy1

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhen; Sun, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process, involving oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inactivation as well as complex interactions between tumor and host tissues, leading ultimately to an aggressive metastatic phenotype. Among many genetic lesions, mutational inactivation of p53 tumor suppressor, the “guardian of the genome,” is the most frequent event found in 50% of human cancers. p53 plays a critical role in tumor suppression mainly by inducing growth arrest, apoptosis, and senes...

  5. UHRF2, another E3 ubiquitin ligase for p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Lu; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Fangmin; Yang, Yan; Qian, Guanhua [Department of Cell Biology and Medical Genetics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Duan, Changzhu, E-mail: duanchzhu@cqmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics of Ministry of Education, Faculty of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Cell Biology and Medical Genetics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 associates with p53 in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 interacts with p53 through its SRA/YDG domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 ubiquitinates p53 in vivo and in vitro. -- Abstract: UHRF2, ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 2, is a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is involved in cell cycle and epigenetic regulation. UHRF2 interacts with multiple cell cycle proteins, including cyclins (A2, B1, D1, and E1), CDK2, and pRb; moreover, UHRF2 could ubiquitinate cyclin D1 and cyclin E1. Also, UHRF2 has been shown to be implicated in epigenetic regulation by associating with DNMTs, G9a, HDAC1, H3K9me2/3 and hemi-methylated DNA. We found that UHRF2 associates with tumor suppressor protein p53, and p53 is ubiquitinated by UHRF2 in vivo and in vitro. Given that both UHRF2 and p53 are involved in cell cycle regulation, this study may suggest a novel signaling pathway on cell proliferation.

  6. The RP-Mdm2-p53 Pathway and Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Zhang, Yanping

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic processes of cell growth and division are under constant surveillance. As one of the primary “gatekeepers” of the cell, the p53 tumor suppressor plays a major role in sensing and responding to a variety of stressors to maintain cellular homeostasis. Recent studies have shown that inhibition of ribosomal biogenesis can activate p53 through ribosomal protein (RP)-mediated suppression of Mdm2 E3 ligase activity. Mutations in Mdm2 that disrupt RP binding have been detected in human cancers; however, the physiological significance of the RP-Mdm2 interaction is not completely understood. We generated mice carrying a single cysteine-to-phenylalanine substitution in the central zinc finger of Mdm2 (Mdm2C305F) that disrupts Mdm2’s binding to RPL11 and RPL5. Despite being developmentally normal and maintaining an intact p53 response to DNA damage, the Mdm2C305F mice demonstrate a diminished p53 response to perturbations in ribosomal biogenesis, providing the first in vivo evidence for an RP-Mdm2-p53 signaling pathway. Here we review some recent studies about RP-Mdm2-p53 signaling and speculate on the relevance of this pathway to human cancer. PMID:21406728

  7. p53 exon 5 mutations in two cases of leukemic mantle cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, D; Moretti, S; Latorraca, A; De Angeli, C; Lanza, F; Cuneo, A; Castoldi, G; del Senno, L

    1996-02-01

    Although p53 mutations have been described frequently in high-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), they have only been reported occasionally in low-grade NHL. We therefore describe clincobiologic and molecular genetic findings in two patients with p53 mutations and leukemic mantle cell lymphoma featuring an unusually aggressive course. Circulating malignant cells showed irregularity of nuclear outline with frequent deep clefts in both cases. Immunologic studies of neoplastic cells from peripheral blood samples and from cells obtained from an involved lymph node showed a mantle B-cell phenotype (CD5+, CD19+, CD22+, CD23- or weakly+ and bright expression for surface immunoglobulins). Malignant cells were shown to be hyperdiploid by cytofluorimetric study of DNA content and the presence of the t(11;14)(q13q32) was documented in one case. An altered electrophoretic mobility of p53 exon 5 was seen in both cases, with a missense mutation at codon 158 present in one case and a CAG to TAG mutation resulting in a 167-stop codon present in the second case. The percent of reactive cells with the 1801 monoclonal antibody detecting an epitope of the p53 was 37% in one case and 1% in the second case, supporting the notion that immunologic overexpression cannot be used for a selection criterion for the detection of p53 mutations. From these findings and from data available in the literature the conclusion can be drawn that p53 gene mutations at codons 158 and 167 may be associated with lymphoproliferative disorders and that low- or intermediate-grade NHL, including leukemic mantle cell lymphoma, may frequently carry this genetic change. PMID:8603336

  8. Association of Human Papilloma Virus 16 Infection and p53 Polymorphism among Tobacco using Oral Leukoplakia Patients: A Clinicopathologic and Genotypic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Seema Sikka; Pranav Sikka

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) and p53 alterations are speculated to play a role in carcinogenesis. This study was carried out to find out the association of HPV and p53 with precancerous lesions of the oral cavity such as leukoplakia: The objective of this study was to find the association among human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 infections and p53 polymorphism in tobacco using the oral leukoplakia patients. Methods: A total of 91 oral leukoplakia patients and 100 controls were rando...

  9. Xenogeneic human p53 DNA vaccination by electroporation breaks immune tolerance to control murine tumors expressing mouse p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Shyang Soong

    Full Text Available The pivotal role of p53 as a tumor suppressor protein is illustrated by the fact that this protein is found mutated in more than 50% of human cancers. In most cases, mutations in p53 greatly increase the otherwise short half-life of this protein in normal tissue and cause it to accumulate in the cytoplasm of tumors. The overexpression of mutated p53 in tumor cells makes p53 a potentially desirable target for the development of cancer immunotherapy. However, p53 protein represents an endogenous tumor-associated antigen (TAA. Immunization against a self-antigen is challenging because an antigen-specific immune response likely generates only low affinity antigen-specific CD8(+ T-cells. This represents a bottleneck of tumor immunotherapy when targeting endogenous TAAs expressed by tumors. The objective of the current study is to develop a safe cancer immunotherapy using a naked DNA vaccine. The vaccine employs a xenogeneic p53 gene to break immune tolerance resulting in a potent therapeutic antitumor effect against tumors expressing mutated p53. Our study assessed the therapeutic antitumor effect after immunization with DNA encoding human p53 (hp53 or mouse p53 (mp53. Mice immunized with xenogeneic full length hp53 DNA plasmid intramuscularly followed by electroporation were protected against challenge with murine colon cancer MC38 while those immunized with mp53 DNA were not. In a therapeutic model, established MC38 tumors were also well controlled by treatment with hp53 DNA therapy in tumor bearing mice compared to mp53 DNA. Mice vaccinated with hp53 DNA plasmid also exhibited an increase in mp53-specific CD8(+ T-cell precursors compared to vaccination with mp53 DNA. Antibody depletion experiments also demonstrated that CD8(+ T-cells play crucial roles in the antitumor effects. This study showed intramuscular vaccination with xenogeneic p53 DNA vaccine followed by electroporation is capable of inducing potent antitumor effects against tumors

  10. Skeletons in the p53 tumor suppressor closet: genetic evidence that p53 blocks bone differentiation and development

    OpenAIRE

    Zambetti, Gerard P; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Schipani, Ernestina

    2006-01-01

    A series of in vitro tissue culture studies indicated that the p53 tumor suppressor promotes cellular differentiation, which could explain its role in preventing cancer. Quite surprisingly, however, two new in vivo studies (Lengner et al., 2006; Wang et al., 2006) provide genetic evidence that p53 blocks osteoblast differentiation and bone development. These interesting results and their biological and clinical implications are the focus of this comment.

  11. Che-1/AATF: a critical co-factor for both wild type- and mutant-p53 proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana eBruno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The p53 protein is a key player in a wide range of protein networks that allow the state of good health of the cell. Not surprisingly, mutations of the p53 gene are one of the most common alterations associated to cancer cells. Mutated forms of p53 (mtp53 not only lose the ability to protect the integrity of the genetic heritage of the cell, but acquire pro-oncogenic functions, behaving like dangerous accelerators of transformation and tumor progression. In recent years, many studies focused on investigating possible strategies aiming to counteract this mutant p53 gain of function but the results have not always been satisfactory. Che-1/AATF is a nuclear protein that binds to RNA polymerase II and plays a role in multiple fundamental processes, including control of transcription, cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response and apoptosis. Several studies showed Che-1/AATF as an important endogenous regulator of p53 expression and activity in a variety of biological processes. Notably, this same regulation was more recently observed also on mtp53. The depletion of Che-1/AATF strongly reduces the expression of mutant p53 in several tumors in vitro and in vivo, making the cells an easier target for chemotherapy treatments. In this mini review, we report an overview of Che-1/AATF functions and discuss a possible role of Che-1/AATF in cancer therapy, with particular regard to its action on p53/mtp53.

  12. Association of p53 codon 72 polymorphism with liver metastases of colorectal cancers positive for p53 overexpression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-zheng ZHU; Bing LIU; Ai-zhong WANG; Hang-ruo JIA; Xia-xiang JIN; Xiang-lei HE; Li-fang HOU; Guan-shan ZHU

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism (R72P) and the risk of colorectal liver metastases. Methods: The p53 R72P genotype was identified by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fi'agment length poly-morphism (PCR-RFLP) method in 78 consecutive colorectal cancer patients with liver metastases and 214 age- and sex-matched cases with nonmetastatic colorectai cancer. Results: The R allele of the p53 R72P polymorphism was more frequently found in metastatic cases than in nonmetastatic cases (P=0.075). Carriers of the 72R allele had a 2.25-fold (95% CI (confidence inter-val)=1.05~4.83) increased risk of liver metastases. On the stratification analysis, 72R-carrying genotype conferred a 3.46-fold (95% CI=1.02~11.72) and a 1.05-fold (95% CI=0.36~3.08) increased risk of liver metastases for p53 overexpression-positive and negative colorectal cancers, respectively. Conclusion: These results demonstrate for the first time that the 72R allele of the p53 polymorphism has an increased risk for liver metastases in colorectal cancers positive for p53 overexpression.

  13. EXPRESSION OF p16 AND p53 IN GASTRIC CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical significance of p53 and p16 expression in gastric carcinoma with special reference to the prognosis.Methods:One hundred and fifty-two patients with gastric carcinoma undergoing operation in our hospital between 1991 and 1998 were evaluated for expression of p53 and p16 in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tumor tissue utilizing Avidin-Biotin immunohistochemistry techniques. Statistical correlations with stage, histological type, differentiation degree, location, size, and overall survival were done. The Cox proportional hazard model was also performed to evaluate which factors had an independent prognostic value.Results:In 152 cases of resected gastric cancer, 110 (72.4%) were p16 positive and 49 (32.2%) showed p53 overexpression. Differences were observed in the frequency of p16 positivity with respect to age, gender and tumor size. The frequency of p53 positivity cells in well-differentiated tumors was significantly higher than that in poorly differentiated tumors (41.9% vs. 25.6%; P= 0.034). In a multivariate analysis, tumor TNM stage, perioperation chemotherapy and the expression of p16 were independent prognostic factors in gastric cancer.Conclusions:The results of the current study suggest that expression of p16 may be a useful prognostic factor for patients with gastric carcinoma, but the expression of p53 as detected by immunohistochemistry were of no value in predicting the prognosis of patients with gastric carcinoma independently.

  14. The expanding regulatory universe of p53 in gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesler, Andrew; Zhang, Ning; Ju, Jingfang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppresser gene TP53 is one of the most frequently deleted or mutated genes in gastrointestinal cancers. As a transcription factor, p53 regulates a number of important protein coding genes to control cell cycle, cell death, DNA damage/repair, stemness, differentiation and other key cellular functions. In addition, p53 is also able to activate the expression of a number of small non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) through direct binding to the promoter region of these miRNAs.  Many miRNAs have been identified to be potential tumor suppressors by regulating key effecter target mRNAs. Our understanding of the regulatory network of p53 has recently expanded to include long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Like miRNA, lncRNAs have been found to play important roles in cancer biology.  With our increased understanding of the important functions of these non-coding RNAs and their relationship with p53, we are gaining exciting new insights into the biology and function of cells in response to various growth environment changes. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the ever expanding involvement of non-coding RNAs in the p53 regulatory network and its implications for our understanding of gastrointestinal cancer.

  15. p53 Prevents Entry into Mitosis with Uncapped Telomeres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanasoula, Maria; Escandell, Jose Miguel; Martinez, Paula; Badie, Sophie; Muñoz, Purificacion; Blasco, María A.; Tarsounas, Madalena

    2016-01-01

    Summary Telomeres are protected by capping structures consisting of core protein complexes that bind with sequence specificity to telomeric DNA (reviewed in [1]). In their absence, telomeres trigger a DNA damage response, materialized in accumulation at the telomere of damage response proteins, e.g., phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), into telomere-dysfunction-induced foci [2, 3]. Telomere uncapping occurs transiently in every cell cycle in G2 [4], following DNA replication, but little is known about how protective structures are reassembled or whether this process is controlled by the cell-cycle surveillance machinery. Here, we report that telomere capping is monitored at the G2/M transition by the p53/p21 damage response pathway. Unlike their wild-type counterparts, human and mouse cells lacking p53 or p21 progress into mitosis prematurely with persisting uncapped telomeres. Furthermore, artificially uncapped telomeres delay mitotic entry in a p53- and p21-dependent manner. Uncapped telomeres that persist in mitotic p53-deficient cells are shorter than average and religate to generate end-to-end fusions. These results suggest that a p53-dependent pathway monitors telomere capping after DNA replication and delays G2/M progression in the presence of unprotected telomeres. This mechanism maintains a cell-cycle stage conducive for capping reactions and prevents progression into stages during which uncapped telomeres are prone to deleterious end fusions. PMID:20226664

  16. Conversion of Fibroblasts to Neural Cells by p53 Depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Zhou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Conversion from fibroblasts to neurons has recently been successfully induced. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we find that depletion of p53 alone converts fibroblasts into all three major neural lineages. The induced neuronal cells express multiple neuron-specific proteins and generate action potentials and transmitter-receptor-mediated currents. Surprisingly, depletion does not affect the well-known tumorigenic p53 target, p21. Instead, knockdown of p53 upregulates neurogenic transcription factors, which in turn boosts fibroblast-neuron conversion. p53 binds the promoter of the neurogenic transcription factor Neurod2 and regulates its expression during fibroblast-neuron conversion. Furthermore, our method provides a high efficiency of conversion in late-passage fibroblasts. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis shows that the p53-deficiency-induced neurons exhibit an expression profile different from parental fibroblasts and similar to control-induced neurons. The results may help to understand and improve neural conversion mechanisms to develop robust neuron-replacement therapy strategies.

  17. Nucleolar proteins suppress Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity by inhibiting p53/CEP-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Fuhrman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p53 has been implicated in multiple functions that play key roles in health and disease, including ribosome biogenesis, control of aging, and cell cycle regulation. A genetic screen for negative regulators of innate immunity in Caenorhabditis elegans led to the identification of a mutation in NOL-6, a nucleolar RNA-associated protein (NRAP, which is involved in ribosome biogenesis and conserved across eukaryotic organisms. Mutation or silencing of NOL-6 and other nucleolar proteins results in an enhanced resistance to bacterial infections. A full-genome microarray analysis on animals with altered immune function due to mutation in nol-6 shows increased transcriptional levels of genes regulated by a p53 homologue, CEP-1. Further studies indicate that the activation of innate immunity by inhibition of nucleolar proteins requires p53/CEP-1 and its transcriptional target SYM-1. Since nucleoli and p53/CEP-1 are conserved, our results reveal an ancient immune mechanism by which the nucleolus may regulate immune responses against bacterial pathogens.

  18. Mutant p53 - heat shock response oncogenic cooperation: a new mechanism of cancer cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evguenia eAlexandrova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main tumor suppressor function of p53 as a ‘guardian of the genome’ is to respond to cellular stress by transcriptional activation of apoptosis, growth arrest or senescence in damaged cells. Not surprisingly, mutations in the p53 gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in human cancers. Importantly, mutant p53 (mutp53 proteins not only lose their wild-type tumor suppressor activity, but also can actively promote tumor development. Two main mechanisms accounting for mutp53 proto-oncogenic activity are inhibition of the wild-type p53 in a dominant-negative fashion and gain of additional oncogenic activities known as gain-of-function (GOF. Here we discuss a novel mechanism of mutp53 GOF, which relies on its oncogenic cooperation with the heat shock machinery. This coordinated adaptive mechanism renders cancer cells more resistant to proteotoxic stress and provides both, a strong survival advantage to cancer cells and a promising means for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Haploinsufficiency for Core Exon Junction Complex Components Disrupts Embryonic Neurogenesis and Causes p53-Mediated Microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hanqian; McMahon, John J; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Zefeng; Silver, Debra L

    2016-09-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is an RNA binding complex comprised of the core components Magoh, Rbm8a, and Eif4a3. Human mutations in EJC components cause neurodevelopmental pathologies. Further, mice heterozygous for either Magoh or Rbm8a exhibit aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly. Yet despite the requirement of these genes for neurodevelopment, the pathogenic mechanisms linking EJC dysfunction to microcephaly remain poorly understood. Here we employ mouse genetics, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses to demonstrate that haploinsufficiency for each of the 3 core EJC components causes microcephaly via converging regulation of p53 signaling. Using a new conditional allele, we first show that Eif4a3 haploinsufficiency phenocopies aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly of Magoh and Rbm8a mutant mice. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of embryonic brains at the onset of neurogenesis identifies common pathways altered in each of the 3 EJC mutants, including ribosome, proteasome, and p53 signaling components. We further demonstrate all 3 mutants exhibit defective splicing of RNA regulatory proteins, implying an EJC dependent RNA regulatory network that fine-tunes gene expression. Finally, we show that genetic ablation of one downstream pathway, p53, significantly rescues microcephaly of all 3 EJC mutants. This implicates p53 activation as a major node of neurodevelopmental pathogenesis following EJC impairment. Altogether our study reveals new mechanisms to help explain how EJC mutations influence neurogenesis and underlie neurodevelopmental disease. PMID:27618312

  20. Involvement of human ribosomal proteins in nucleolar structure and p53-dependent nucleolar stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Emilien; Parisot, Pascaline; Pinto-Monteiro, Celina; de Walque, Roxane; De Vleeschouwer, Christophe; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolus is a potent disease biomarker and a target in cancer therapy. Ribosome biogenesis is initiated in the nucleolus where most ribosomal (r-) proteins assemble onto precursor rRNAs. Here we systematically investigate how depletion of each of the 80 human r-proteins affects nucleolar structure, pre-rRNA processing, mature rRNA accumulation and p53 steady-state level. We developed an image-processing programme for qualitative and quantitative discrimination of normal from altered nucleolar morphology. Remarkably, we find that uL5 (formerly RPL11) and uL18 (RPL5) are the strongest contributors to nucleolar integrity. Together with the 5S rRNA, they form the late-assembling central protuberance on mature 60S subunits, and act as an Hdm2 trap and p53 stabilizer. Other major contributors to p53 homeostasis are also strictly late-assembling large subunit r-proteins essential to nucleolar structure. The identification of the r-proteins that specifically contribute to maintaining nucleolar structure and p53 steady-state level provides insights into fundamental aspects of cell and cancer biology. PMID:27265389

  1. Small Molecule Modulator of p53 Signaling Pathway: Application for Radiosensitizing or Radioprotection Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sang Taek; Cho, Mun Ju; Gwak, Jung Sug; Ryu, Min Jung [PharmacoGenomics Research Center, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jie Young; Yun, Yeon Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    The tumor suppressor p53 is key molecule to protect the cell against genotoxic stress and..the most frequently mutated..protein..in cancer cells. Lack of functional p53..is accompanied by high rate of genomic instability, rapid tumor progression, resistance to anticancer therapy, and increased angiogenesis. In response to DNA damage, p53 protein rapidly accumulated through attenuated proteolysis and is also activated as transcription factor. Activated p53 up-regulates target genes involved in cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis and then lead to suppression of malignant transformation and the maintenance of genomic integrity. Chemical genetics is a new technology to uncover the signaling networks that regulated biological phenotype using exogenous reagents such as small molecules. Analogous to classical forward genetic screens in model organism, this approach makes use of high throughput, phenotypic assay to identify small molecules that disrupt gene product function in a way that alters a phenotype of interest. Recently, interesting small molecules were identified from cell based high throughput screening and its target protein or mechanism of action were identified by various methods including affinity chromatography, protein array profiling, mRNA or phage display, transcription profiling, and RNA interference.

  2. Crosstalk of EDA-A2/XEDAR in the p53 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, Chizu; Ri, Cui; Kumar, Vinod; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsuda, Koichi

    2010-06-01

    We recently identified X-linked ectodermal dysplasia receptor (XEDAR, also known as TNFRSF27 or EDA2R) as a direct p53 target that was frequently downregulated in colorectal cancer tissues due to its epigenetic alterations or through the p53 gene mutations. However, the role of the posttranslational regulation of XEDAR protein in colorectal carcinogenesis was not well clarified thus far. Here, we report that the extracellular NH(2) terminus of XEDAR protein was cleaved by a metalloproteinase and released into culture media. The remaining COOH-terminal membrane-anchored fragment was rapidly degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Interestingly, ectopic p53 expression also transactivated an XEDAR ligand, EDA-A2, together with XEDAR. Moreover, EDA-A2 blocked the cleavage of XEDAR and subsequently inhibited cell growth. We also found a missense mutation of the XEDAR gene in NCI-H716 colorectal cancer cells, which caused the translocation of XEDAR protein from cell membrane to cytoplasm. This mutation attenuated the growth-suppressive effect of XEDAR, indicating that membrane localization is critical for physiologic XEDAR function. Thus, our findings clearly revealed the crucial role of EDA-A2/XEDAR interaction in the p53-signaling pathway. PMID:20501644

  3. Immunohistochemical expression of p53 and its clinicopathological correlation with modified Anneroth′s histological grading system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajal V Dave

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is an epithelial neoplasm generally beginning as focal overgrowth of altered stem cells near the basement membrane, moving upward and laterally, replacing the normal epithelium. Histopathological grading has been used for many decades in an attempt to predict the clinical behavior of oral squamous cell carcinoma. In the present study, Forty biopsies were studied for histological grading and p53 expression. The p53 expression was studied in relation to clinical parameters such as age, sex of patient and site of tumors. Relation between histological grade of malignancy and p53 protein expression was analysed. All cases were classified according to Anneroth′s histological malignancy grading system (1987. Materials and Methods: 40 cases of OSCC were assessed for clinical parameters, Anneroth′s histological grading and immunohistochemically stained with p53 protien. Statistical Analysis: The results obtained were analyzed using Spearman′s Co-relation. Observations and Results: The positive expression of p53 was found in 62% of carcinomas studied. Positivity of p53 showed correlation with histological grade of malignancy and with individual parameters like degree of keratinization, nuclear polymorphism, number of mitoses and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration while showed a negative correlation with pattern of invasion. Conclusion: Our study showed a significant correlation between parameters of tumor cell population, lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and p53 expression. A significant association between high grade of malignancy and p53 overexpression and insignificant correlation of p53 with age, sex of the patient and site of the tumor was found.

  4. miR-605 joins p53 network to form a p53:miR-605:Mdm2 positive feedback loop in response to stress

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Jiening; Lin, Huixian; Luo, Xiaobin; Luo, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhiguo

    2011-01-01

    Mdm2, a transcriptional target of p53, promotes p53 degradation in a well-established negative feedback loop. Here, microRNA miR-605 is found to break this loop: being induced by p53 in response to stress, and downregulating Mdm2 to promote robust p53 expression.

  5. The p53 gene as a modifier of intrinsic radiosensitivity: implications for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Experimental studies have implicated the normal or 'wild type' p53 protein (i.e. WTp53) in the cellular response to ionizing radiation and other DNA damaging agents. Whether altered WTp53 protein function can lead to changes in cellular radiosensitivity and/or clinical radiocurability remains an area of ongoing study. In this review, we describe the potential implications of altered WTp53 protein function in normal and tumour cells as it relates to clinical radiotherapy, and describe novel treatment strategies designed to re-institute WTp53 protein function as a means of sensitizing cells to ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: A number of experimental and clinical studies are critically reviewed with respect to the role of the p53 protein as a determinant of cellular oncogenesis, genomic stability, apoptosis, DNA repair and radioresponse in normal and transformed mammalian cells. Results: In normal fibroblasts, exposure to ionizing radiation leads to a G1 cell cycle delay (i.e. a 'G1 checkpoint') as a result of WTp53-mediated inhibition of G1-cyclin-kinase and retinoblastoma (pRb) protein function. The G1 checkpoint response is absent in tumour cells which express a mutant form of the p53 protein (i.e. MTp53), leading to acquired radioresistance in vitro. Depending on the cell type studied, this increase in cellular radiation survival can be mediated through decreased radiation-induced apoptosis, or altered kinetics of the radiation-induced G1 checkpoint. Recent biochemical studies support an indirect role for the p53 protein in both nucleotide excision and recombinational DNA repair pathways. However, based on clinicopathologic data, it remains unclear as to whether WTp53 protein function can predict for human tumour radiocurability and normal tissue radioresponse. Conclusions: Alterations in cell cycle control secondary to aberrant WTp53 protein function may be clinically significant if they lead to the acquisition of mutant

  6. Suppression of Id2, a member of the inhibitor of differentiation family and a target of mutant p53, is required for mutant p53 gain of function

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Wensheng; Liu, Gang; Scoumanne, Ariane; Chen, Xinbin

    2008-01-01

    Over-expression of mutant p53 is a common theme in human tumors, suggesting a tumor-promoting gain of function for mutant p53. To elucidate whether and how mutant p53 acquires its gain of function, mutant p53 is inducibly knocked down in SW480 colon cancer cell line, which contains mutant p53(R273H/P309S), and MIA-PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cell line, which contains mutant p53(R248W). We found that knockdown of mutant p53 markedly inhibits cell proliferation. In addition, knockdown of mutant p5...

  7. Involvement of human ribosomal proteins in nucleolar structure and p53-dependent nucleolar stress

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas, Emilien; Parisot, Pascaline; Pinto-Monteiro, Celina; de Walque, Roxane; De Vleeschouwer, Christophe; Lafontaine, Denis L. J.

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolus is a potent disease biomarker and a target in cancer therapy. Ribosome biogenesis is initiated in the nucleolus where most ribosomal (r-) proteins assemble onto precursor rRNAs. Here we systematically investigate how depletion of each of the 80 human r-proteins affects nucleolar structure, pre-rRNA processing, mature rRNA accumulation and p53 steady-state level. We developed an image-processing programme for qualitative and quantitative discrimination of normal from altered nucl...

  8. 胃癌患者血清P53蛋白与抗体检测的比较%Detection of serum P53 protein and P53 antibody in patients with gastric carcinoma*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘辉琦; 刘慧; 刘杰; 王生兰

    2011-01-01

    目的 比较胃癌患者血清P53蛋白与抗体检测的敏感性.方法 采用间接ELISA法检测胃癌患者血清P53抗体,夹心ELISA法检测胃癌患者血清P53蛋白.结果 胃癌患者血清P53蛋白阳性率为14.0%,抗体阳性率为32.0%,二者差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 胃癌患者血清P53抗体的检测比P53蛋白的检测更敏感.%Objective To compare the detection sensitivity of serum P53 protein and P53 antibody in patients with gastric carci noma. Methods Indirect ELISA was adopted to detect serum P53 antibody,and double antibodies sandwich ELISA technique was used to measure serum P53 protein. Results The positive rates of serum P53 protein and P53 antibody were 14.0% and 32.0% re spectively,which were with significant difference. Conclusion P53 antibody detection could be more sensitive than P53 protein in patients with gastric carcinoma.

  9. L-GILZ binds p53 and MDM2 and suppresses tumor growth through p53 activation in human cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ayroldi, E; Petrillo, M G; Bastianelli, A; Marchetti, M C; Ronchetti, S; Nocentini, G; Ricciotti, L; Cannarile, L; Riccardi, C

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 regulates the expression of genes crucial for biological processes such as cell proliferation, metabolism, cell repair, senescence and apoptosis. Activation of p53 also suppresses neoplastic transformations, thereby inhibiting the growth of mutated and/or damaged cells. p53-binding proteins, such as mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2), inhibit p53 activation and thus regulate p53-mediated stress responses. Here, we found that long glucocorticoid-induced leucine z...

  10. p53 Family: Role of Protein Isoforms in Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxiong Wei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available TP53, TP63, and TP73 genes comprise the p53 family. Each gene produces protein isoforms through multiple mechanisms including extensive alternative mRNA splicing. Accumulating evidence shows that these isoforms play a critical role in the regulation of many biological processes in normal cells. Their abnormal expression contributes to tumorigenesis and has a profound effect on tumor response to curative therapy. This paper is an overview of isoform diversity in the p53 family and its role in cancer.

  11. P53 GENE MUTATIONS IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER DETECTED BY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION SINGLE-STRAND CONFORMATION POLYMORPHISM ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ Mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequent genetic alterations detected in human lung cancer. To assess the pathogenic significance of p53 gene alterations in Chinese non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC),74 paired samples of primary lung cancer and normal lung tissue far away from the cancer were analyzed for mutations of the p53 gene(exons 5-8) using exon-specific PCR, single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP). p53 mutations were observed in 55.4%(41/74) of the samples. No linkages were detected between the incidence of p53 mutations and histological type, lymph node metastasis,age or sex. Significant association between p53 mutations and degree of differentiation in adenocarcinomas, not in squamous cell carcinomas, was observed. The frequency of p53 mutations in smokers(65.3%) was higher than in nonsmokers(33.3%) and reached statistical significance.We also found p53 mutations in 6/7 samples which had tissue invasion and distant metastasis.These results suggest that smoking could be an important factor in lung carcinogenesis,p53 mutation is a worse prognosis indicator in adenocarcinomas and related to high aggressive behavior of human lung cancer.

  12. Mdm2’s Dilemma: To Degrade or To Translate p53?

    OpenAIRE

    Hamard, Pierre-Jacques; Manfredi, James J

    2012-01-01

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Gajjar et al. provide insight into how Mdm2 can both inhibit and enhance p53 activity. In the basal setting, Mdm2 binds p53 and promotes p53 degradation. Under stress conditions, ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Mdm2 results in its recruitment to p53 mRNA, thereby stimulating p53 translation.

  13. Activation of endogenous p53 by combined p19Arf gene transfer and nutlin-3 drug treatment modalities in the murine cell lines B16 and C6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactivation of p53 by either gene transfer or pharmacologic approaches may compensate for loss of p19Arf or excess mdm2 expression, common events in melanoma and glioma. In our previous work, we constructed the pCLPG retroviral vector where transgene expression is controlled by p53 through a p53-responsive promoter. The use of this vector to introduce p19Arf into tumor cells that harbor p53wt should yield viral expression of p19Arf which, in turn, would activate the endogenous p53 and result in enhanced vector expression and tumor suppression. Since nutlin-3 can activate p53 by blocking its interaction with mdm2, we explored the possibility that the combination of p19Arf gene transfer and nutlin-3 drug treatment may provide an additive benefit in stimulating p53 function. B16 (mouse melanoma) and C6 (rat glioma) cell lines, which harbor p53wt, were transduced with pCLPGp19 and these were additionally treated with nutlin-3 or the DNA damaging agent, doxorubicin. Viral expression was confirmed by Western, Northern and immunofluorescence assays. p53 function was assessed by reporter gene activity provided by a p53-responsive construct. Alterations in proliferation and viability were measured by colony formation, growth curve, cell cycle and MTT assays. In an animal model, B16 cells were treated with the pCLPGp19 virus and/or drugs before subcutaneous injection in C57BL/6 mice, observation of tumor progression and histopathologic analyses. Here we show that the functional activation of endogenous p53wt in B16 was particularly challenging, but accomplished when combined gene transfer and drug treatments were applied, resulting in increased transactivation by p53, marked cell cycle alteration and reduced viability in culture. In an animal model, B16 cells treated with both p19Arf and nutlin-3 yielded increased necrosis and decreased BrdU marking. In comparison, C6 cells were quite susceptible to either treatment, yet p53 was further activated by the combination of p19

  14. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen, p53 and micro vessel density: Grade II vs. Grade III astrocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malhan Priya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Histological classification and grading are prime procedures in the management of patients with astrocytoma, providing vital data for therapeutic decision making and prognostication. However, it has limitations in assessing biological tumor behavior. This can be overcome by using newer immunohistochemical techniques. This study was carried out to compare proliferative indices using proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, extent of p53 expression and micro vessel morphometric parameters in patients with low grade and anaplastic astrocytoma. Twenty-five patients, each of grade II and grade III astrocytoma were evaluated using monoclonal antibodies to PCNA, p53 protein and factor VIII related antigen. PCNA, p53-labeling indices were calculated along with micro vessel morphometric analysis using Biovis Image plus Software. Patients with grade III astrocytoma had higher PCNA and p53 labeling indices as compared with grade II astrocytoma (29.14 plus/minus 9.87% vs. 16.84 plus/minus 6.57%, p 0.001; 18.18 plus/minus 6.14% vs. 6.14 plus/minus 7.23%, p 0.001, respectively. Micro vessel percentage area of patients with grade III astrocytoma was also (4.26 plus/minus 3.70 vs. 1.05 plus/minus 0.56, p 0.001, higher along with other micro vessel morphometric parameters. Discordance between histology and one or more IHC parameters was seen in 5/25 (20% of patients with grade III astrocytoma and 9/25 (36% of patients with grade II disease. PCNA and p53 labeling indices were positively correlated with Pearson′s correlation, p less than 0.001 for both. Increased proliferative fraction, genetic alterations and neovascularization mark biological aggressiveness in astrocytoma. Immunohistochemical evaluation scores over meet the challenge of accurate prognostication of this potentially fatal malignancy.

  15. IGF-I enhances cellular senescence via the reactive oxygen species-p53 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handayaningsih, Anastasia-Evi; Takahashi, Michiko; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Iguchi, Genzo; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Suda, Kentaro [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Takahashi, Yutaka, E-mail: takahash@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular senescence plays an important role in tumorigenesis and aging process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrated IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in primary confluent cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These results may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging. -- Abstract: Cellular senescence is characterized by growth arrest, enlarged and flattened cell morphology, the expression of senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal), and by activation of tumor suppressor networks. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a critical role in cellular growth, proliferation, tumorigenesis, and regulation of aging. In the present study, we show that IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in mouse, rat, and human primary cells in the confluent state. IGF-I induced expression of a DNA damage marker, {gamma}H2AX, the increased levels of p53 and p21 proteins, and activated SA-{beta}-gal. In the confluent state, an altered downstream signaling of IGF-I receptor was observed. Treatment with a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, N-acetylcystein (NAC) significantly suppressed induction of these markers, indicating that ROS are involved in the induction of cellular senescence by IGF-I. In p53-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts, the IGF-I-induced augmentation of SA-{beta}-gal and p21 was inhibited, demonstrating that p53 is required for cellular senescence induced by IGF-I. Thus, these data reveal a novel pathway whereby IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner and may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging.

  16. Differential effects of garcinol and curcumin on histone and p53 modifications in tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    summary, although garcinol and curcumin can both inhibit histone acetyltransferase activities, our results show that these compounds have differential effects on cancer cells in culture. Garcinol treatment alters expression of chromatin modifying enzymes in MCF7 cells, resulting in reprogramming of key histone and p53 PTMs and growth arrest, underscoring its potential as a cancer chemopreventive agent

  17. Structures of oncogenic, suppressor and rescued p53 core-domain variants: mechanisms of mutant p53 rescue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallentine, Brad D.; Wang, Ying; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Tan, Martha; Senear, Donald F. [University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Luecke, Hartmut, E-mail: hudel@uci.edu [University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Universidad del Pais Vasco, 48940 Leioa (Spain)

    2013-10-01

    X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined in order to gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53. To gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53, X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined. These include an oncogenic mutant, V157F, two single-site suppressor mutants, N235K and N239Y, and the rescued cancer mutant V157F/N235K/N239Y. The V157F mutation substitutes a smaller hydrophobic valine with a larger hydrophobic phenylalanine within strand S4 of the hydrophobic core. The structure of this cancer mutant shows no gross structural changes in the overall fold of the p53 core domain, only minor rearrangements of side chains within the hydrophobic core of the protein. Based on biochemical analysis, these small local perturbations induce instability in the protein, increasing the free energy by 3.6 kcal mol{sup −1} (15.1 kJ mol{sup −1}). Further biochemical evidence shows that each suppressor mutation, N235K or N239Y, acts individually to restore thermodynamic stability to V157F and that both together are more effective than either alone. All rescued mutants were found to have wild-type DNA-binding activity when assessed at a permissive temperature, thus pointing to thermodynamic stability as the critical underlying variable. Interestingly, thermodynamic analysis shows that while N239Y demonstrates stabilization of the wild-type p53 core domain, N235K does not. These observations suggest distinct structural mechanisms of rescue. A new salt bridge between Lys235 and Glu198, found in both the N235K and rescued cancer mutant structures, suggests a rescue mechanism that relies on stabilizing the

  18. A role for p53 in selenium-induced senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The tumor suppressor p53 and the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase play important roles in the senescence response to oncogene activation and DNA damage. We have previously shown that selenium-containing compounds can activate an ATM-dependent senescence response in MRC-5 normal fibroblasts...

  19. NRF2 and p53: Januses in cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotblat, Barak; Melino, Gerry; Knight, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, also known as NFE2L2 or NRF2, is a master regulator of the anti-oxidative stress response and positively controls the expression of a battery of anti-oxidative stress response proteins and enzymes implicated in detoxification and glutathione generation. Although its detoxifying activity is important in cancer prevention, it has recently been shown that cancer cells also exploit its protective functions to thrive and resist chemotherapy. NRF2 was also shown to the pentose phosphate pathway and glutaminolysis, which promotes purine synthesis for supporting rapid proliferation and glutathione for providing anti-oxidative stress protection. Evidence obtained from cancer patients and cell lines suggest that NRF2 is highly active in a variety of human cancers and is associated with aggressiveness. p53 is a tumor suppressor that also promotes an anti-oxidative stress metabolic program and glutaminolysis. Here we will discuss the similarities between NRF2 and p53 and review evidence that p53 might be exploited by cancer cells to gain protection against oxidative stress, as is the case for NRF2. We discuss findings of co-regulation between these transcription factors and propose possible therapeutic strategies that can be used for treatment of cancers that harbor WT p53 and express high levels of NRF2. PMID:23174755

  20. 调节p53途径—提高癌症治疗效率%Modulating the p53 pathway may improve the efficiency of anti-cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦宏伟; 关婉怡; 刘东; 赵宝华

    2013-01-01

    p53肿瘤抑制蛋白,也被称为基因组监控因子,是一种保护细胞免受一系列生理逆境(例如致癌基因活化、辐射、有丝分裂压力、核糖体压力和化学损害)的转录控制因子.这些生理逆境会导致依赖于p53激活的信号产生,并通过复杂的相互作用网络定位到细胞核,起始转录或抑制许多基因的表达,这些基因与诱导生长停滞、修复、细胞凋亡、衰老或者改变新陈代谢有关.由于p53途径对于调控疾病有如此重要的作用,使得针对该途径的药物干预日益成为人们关注的焦点.本文对调节p53功能的最新研究进展进行综述,并对有关p53基因的癌症治疗前景进行展望.%The p53 tumor suppressor protein,also nicknamed the "guardian of the genome",is a transcription factor that protects cells against a range of physiological stresses,such as oncogene activation,radiation,mitotic stress,ribosomal stress and chemical insults.These events lead to signals that are relayed to p53 which gets activated,and gets localized to the nucleus through a complex network of interactions.It turns on a program of transcription or repression of myriad genes that induce growth arrest,repair,apoptosis,senescence or altered metabolism.P53 pathway has such an important role in modulating diseases.This makes pharmacological intervention in the p53 pathway to obtain an increasing focus of attention.We summarized recent developments that attempt to modulate the function of p53 and expected the future of on the p53 gene for anti-cancer treatment.

  1. Transfection of p53-knockout mouse fibroblasts with wild-type p53 increases the thermo sensitivity and stimulates apoptosis induced by heat stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The relationship between p53 functions and cellular thermo sensitivity was evaluated using murine fibroblasts transfected with either wild-type p53 or mutated p53, or those with a null p53 genotype. Methods and Materials: Cellular thermo sensitivity was determined using the clonogenic assay. Cell cycle distribution was assayed by determining DNA content using flow cytometry. Apoptosis was analyzed by detection of both apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation. Results: Stable transfectant with either wild-type p53 or mutated p53 was established. The transfectants with wild-type p53 were more thermo sensitive than either those with a null p53 or with mutated p53. Although heat-induced G1 cell cycle arrest was substantially observed in all transfectants, wild-type p53 enhanced and prolonged the G1 arrest; furthermore, wild-type p53 stimulated the induction of apoptosis by heat stress, whereas mutated p53 delayed it extremely. Conclusion: The p53 gene is a factor for determining cellular thermo sensitivity and wild-type p53 contributes to thermo sensitization resulting in enhancement of heat-induced apoptosis

  2. Status of p53 and p27KIP1 in Iranian Patients With Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad-Moghadam, Shahroo; Keyhani, Amanollah; Yazdani, Kamran; Alaeddini, Mojgan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alterations in p53 and p27KIP1 have been documented as important events in the carcinogenesis of various cancers, but their prognostic role in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remains controversial. Objectives: The present investigation aimed to evaluate the clinicopathologic and prognostic significance of p53 and p27KIP1 expression in a group of Iranian patients with OSCC. Patients and Methods: In this analytical cross-sectional study, medical records of patients with primary OSCC, diagnosed from 1994 to 2004 were reviewed and 28 subjects were selected based on the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal antibodies against p53 and p27KIP1 was performed on representative archival paraffin blocks. Demographic data along with information on p53 and p27KIP1 expression, recurrence, and tumor grade was statistically analyzed using the Fischer exact test. Prognostic factors for overall survival were determined by Cox regression analysis (P 0.05). In survival analysis, only histopathologic differentiation (17 low and moderate, 11 poor) demonstrated a significant correlation with overall survival (P = 0.048). Conclusions: Despite the fact that abnormalities in p53 and p27KIP1 may be involved in the development of OSCC, their clinical significance in the studied population seems limited. Further investigation on the combined p53/p27KIP1 expression may be helpful in predicting the biologic behavior of this tumor. PMID:26568852

  3. Transcriptome profiling identifies genes and pathways deregulated upon floxuridine treatment in colorectal cancer cells harboring GOF mutant p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Datta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutation in TP53 is a common genetic alteration in human cancers. Certain tumor associated p53 missense mutants acquire gain-of-function (GOF properties and confer oncogenic phenotypes including enhanced chemoresistance. The colorectal cancers (CRC harboring mutant p53 are generally aggressive in nature and difficult to treat. To identify a potential gene expression signature of GOF mutant p53-driven acquired chemoresistance in CRC, we performed transcriptome profiling of floxuridine (FUdR treated SW480 cells expressing mutant p53R273H (GEO#: GSE77533. We obtained several genes differentially regulated between FUdR treated and untreated cells. Further, functional characterization and pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of crucial biological processes and pathways upon FUdR treatment in SW480 cells. Our data suggest that in response to chemotherapeutics treatment, cancer cells with GOF mutant p53 can modulate key cellular pathways to withstand the cytotoxic effect of the drugs. The genes and pathways identified in the present study can be further validated and targeted for better chemotherapy response in colorectal cancer patients harboring mutant p53.

  4. Translational approaches targeting the p53 pathway for anti-cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Essmann, Frank; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor blocks cancer development by triggering apoptosis or cellular senescence in response to oncogenic stress or DNA damage. Consequently, the p53 signalling pathway is virtually always inactivated in human cancer cells. This unifying feature has commenced tremendous efforts to develop p53-based anti-cancer therapies. Different strategies exist that are adapted to the mechanisms of p53 inactivation. In p53-mutated tumours, delivery of wild-type p53 by adenovirus-based gen...

  5. Activities of wildtype and mutant p53 in suppression of homologous recombination as measured by a retroviral vector system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Xiongbin; Lozano, Guillermina; Donehower, Lawrence A

    2003-01-28

    DNA repair of double strand breaks, interstrand DNA cross-links, and other types of DNA damage utilizes the processes of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining to repair the damage. Aberrant homologous recombination is likely to be responsible for a significant fraction of chromosomal deletions, duplications, and translocations that are observed in cancer cells. To facilitate measurement of homologous recombination frequencies in normal cells, mutant cells, and cancer cells, we have developed a high titer retroviral vector containing tandem repeats of mutant versions of a GFP-Zeocin resistance fusion gene and an intact neomycin resistance marker. Recombination between the tandem repeats regenerates a functional GFP-Zeo{sup R} marker that can be easily scored. This retroviral vector was used to assess homologous recombination frequencies in human cancer cells and rodent fibroblasts with differing dosages of wild type or mutant p53. Absence of wild type p53 stimulated spontaneous and ionizing radiation-induced homologous recombination, confirming previous studies. Moreover, p53{sup +/-} mouse fibroblasts show elevated levels of homologous recombination compared to their p53{sup +/+} counterparts following retroviral vector infection, indicating that p53 is haploinsufficient for suppression of homologous recombination. Transfection of vector-containing p53 null Saos-2 cells with various human cancer-associated p53 mutants revealed that these altered p53 proteins retain some recombination suppression function despite being totally inactive for transcriptional transactivation. The retroviral vector utilized in these studies may be useful in performing recombination assays on a wide array of cell types, including those not readily transfected by normal vectors.

  6. The epidemiology of Her-2/ neu and P53 in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernstein Jonine L.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is an etiologically heterogeneous disease with marked geographical variations. Joint consideration of the relationship between specific molecular alterations and known or suspected epidemiologic risk factors for this disease should help distinguish subgroups of women that are at elevated risk of developing breast cancer. In this article, we present a comprehensive literature review of the etiologic and prognostic roles of Her-2/neu and P53 among women. In addition, we discuss the advantages and limitations of using biomarkers in epidemiological studies. We conclude that more research is needed to understand the complex relationships between genetic alterations and etiologic risk factors for breast cancer.

  7. Modulation of p53β and p53γ expression by regulating the alternative splicing of TP53 gene modifies cellular response

    OpenAIRE

    Marcel, V; Fernandes, K; Terrier, O; LANE, D. P.; Bourdon, J-C

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the tumor suppressor p53 protein, also termed p53α, the TP53 gene produces p53β and p53γ through alternative splicing of exons 9β and 9γ located within TP53 intron 9. Here we report that both TG003, a specific inhibitor of Cdc2-like kinases (Clk) that regulates the alternative splicing pre-mRNA pathway, and knockdown of SFRS1 increase expression of endogenous p53β and p53γ at mRNA and protein levels. Development of a TP53 intron 9 minigene shows that TG003 treatment and knockdo...

  8. Differential regulation of the REGγ–proteasome pathway by p53/TGF-β signalling and mutant p53 in cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Amjad; Wang, Zhuo; Fu, Junjiang; Lei, Ji; Liu, Jiang; Lei, Li; Wang,; Chen, Jiwu; Caulin, Carlos; Jeffrey, N. Myers; Zhang, Pei; Xiao, Jianru; Zhang, Bianhong; Li, Xiaotao

    2013-01-01

    Proteasome activity is frequently enhanced in cancer to accelerate metastasis and tumorigenesis. REGγ, a proteasome activator known to promote p53/p21/p16 degradation, is often overexpressed in cancer cells. Here we show that p53/TGF-β signalling inhibits the REGγ–20S proteasome pathway by repressing REGγ expression. Smad3 and p53 interact on the REGγ promoter via the p53RE/SBE region. Conversely, mutant p53 binds to the REGγ promoter and recruits p300. Importantly, mutant p53 prevents Smad3/...

  9. Re-Engineered p53 Chimera with Enhanced Homo-Oligomerization That Maintains Tumor Suppressor Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Okal, Abood; Cornillie, Sean; Matissek, Stephan J.; Matissek, Karina J.; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Lim, Carol S

    2014-01-01

    The use of the tumor suppressor p53 for gene therapy of cancer is limited by the dominant negative inactivating effect of mutant endogenous p53 in cancer cells. We have shown previously that swapping the tetramerization domain (TD) of p53 with the coiled-coil (CC) from Bcr allows for our chimeric p53 (p53-CC) to evade hetero-oligomerization with endogenous mutant p53. This enhances the utility of this construct, p53-CC, for cancer gene therapy. Because domain swapping to create p53-CC could r...

  10. Tumour suppression in skin and other tissues via cross-talk between vitamin D- and p53-signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg eReichrath

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available P53 and its family members have been implicated in the direct regulation of the vitamin D receptor (VDR. Vitamin D- and p53-signaling pathways have a significant impact on spontaneous or carcinogen-induced malignant transformation of cells, with VDR and p53 representing important tumour suppressors. VDR and the p53/p63/p73 proteins all function typically as receptors or sensors that turn into transcriptional regulators upon stimulus, with the main difference being that the nuclear VDR is activated as a transcription factor after binding its naturally occurring ligand 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D with high affinity while the p53 family of transcription factors, mostly in the nucleoplasm, responds to a large number of alterations in cell homeostasis commonly referred to as stress. An increasing body of evidence now convincingly demonstrates a cross-talk between vitamin D- and p53-signaling that occurs at different levels, has genome-wide implications and that should be of high importance for many malignancies, including non-melanoma skin cancer. One interaction involves the ability of p53 to increase skin pigmentation via POMC derivatives including alpha-MSH and ACTH. Pigmentation protects the skin against UV-induced DNA damage and skin carcinogenesis, yet on the other hand reduces cutaneous synthesis of vitamin D. A second level of interaction may be through the ability of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to increase the survival of skin cells after UV irradiation. UV irradiation-surviving cells show significant reductions in thymine dimers in the presence of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D that are associated with increased nuclear p53 protein expression, and significantly reduced NO products. A third level of interaction is documented by the ability of vitamin D compounds to regulate the expression of the murine double minute 2 (MDM2 gene in dependence of the presence of wild-type p53. MDM2 has a well established role as a key negative regulator of p53 activity

  11. Depression of p53-independent Akt survival signals after high-LET radiation in mutated p53 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Takahashi, Akihisa; Nakagawa, Yosuke

    Although mutations and deletions in the p53 tumor suppressor gene lead to resistance to low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, high-LET radiation efficiently induces cell lethality and apoptosis regardless of the p53 gene status. Recently, it has been suggested that the induction of p53-independent apoptosis takes place through the activation of Caspase-9 which results in the cleavage of Caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). This study was designed to examine if high-LET radiation depresses the activities of serine/threonine protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt) and Akt-related proteins. Human gingival cancer cells (Ca9-22 cells) harboring a mutated p53 (mp53) gene were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays or Fe-ion beams. The cellular contents of Akt-related proteins participating in cell survival signals were analyzed with Western blotting analysis 1 h, 2 h, 3 h and 6 h after irradiation. Cell cycle distributions after irradiation were assayed with flow cytometric analysis.Akt-related protein levels were decreased when cells were irradiated with high-LET radiation. High-LET radiation increased G _{2}/M phase arrests and suppressed the progression of the cell cycle much more efficiently when compared to low-LET radiation. These results suggest that high-LET radiation enhances apoptosis through the activation of Caspase-3 and Caspase-9, and depresses cell growth by suppressing Akt-related signals, even in the mp53 cells.

  12. P53-specific T cell responses in patients with malignant and benign ovarian tumors : Implications for p53 based immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, Annechien; Leffers, Ninke; Hoogeboom, Baukje-Nynke; Sluiter, Wim; Hamming, Ineke; Klip, Harry; ten Hoor, Klaske; Esajas, Martha; van Oven, Magda; Drijfhout, Jan-Wouter; Platteel, Inge; Offringa, Rienk; Hollema, Harry; Melief, Kees; van der Burg, Sjoerd; van der Zee, Ate; Daemen, Toos; Nijman, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Despite intensive treatment, 70% of the ovarian cancer patients will develop recurrent disease, emphasizing the need for new approaches such as immunotherapy. A promising antigenic target for immunotherapy in ovarian cancer is the frequently overexpressed p53 protein. The aim of the study was to eva

  13. Construction of a triple modified p53 containing DNA vaccine to enhance processing and presentation of the p53 antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospers, Geke A. P.; Meijer, Coby; Dam, Wendy A.; Roossink, Frank; Mulder, Nanno H.

    2009-01-01

    More effective and less toxic treatments are urgently needed in the treatment of patients with cancer. The turnout suppressor protein p53 is a tumour-associated antigen that could serve that purpose when applied in an immunologic approval to cancer. It is mutated in similar to 50% of the tumours res

  14. P53 GENE MUTATIONS IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER DETECTED BY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION SINGLE-STRAND CONFORMATION POLYMORPHISM ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵永良; 吴德昌; 项晓琼; 张宝仁; 周乃康; 胡迎春

    1999-01-01

    Mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gone are the most frequent genetic akerations detected in human lung cancer. To assess the pathogenic significance of p53 gone alterations in Chlnege non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 74 paired samples of primary lung cancer and normal lung tissue far away from the cancer were analyzed for mutations of the p53 gene(exons 5-8) using exon-specific PCR, single-gtrand conformation polymorphimax (PCR-SSCP). p53 mutations were observed in 55.4% (41/74) of the samples.No linkaiges were detected between the incidence of p53 mutations and histological type, lymph node metastasis, age or sex. Significant association between p53 mutations and degree of differentiation in edenotmremmnas, not in squamous cell carcinomas, was observed, The frequency of p53 mutations in(65. 3%) was higher than in nonsmokers (33. 3%) and reached stafisrical significance. We also found p53 mutations in 6/7 samples which had tissue invasion and distant metastasis. These results suggest that smcking could be an important factor in lung carcinogenesis, p53 mutation is a worse prognosis indicator in ade and nocarcinomas and related to high aggressive behavior of human lung cancer.

  15. Identification of two novel functional p53 responsive elements in the Herpes Simplex Virus-1 genome

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Jui-Cheng; Kuta, Ryan; Armour, Courtney R.; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) genome reveals two candidate p53 responsive elements (p53RE), located in proximity to the replication origins oriL and oriS, referred to as p53RE-L and p53RE-S, respectively. The sequences of p53RE-L and p53RE-S conform to the p53 consensus site and are present in HSV-1 strains KOS, 17, and F. p53 binds to both elements in vitro and in virus-infected cells. Both p53RE-L and p53RE-S are capable of conferring p53-dependent transcriptional activatio...

  16. Paracrine Apoptotic Effect of p53 Mediated by Tumor Suppressor Par-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravshan Burikhanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The guardian of the genome, p53, is often mutated in cancer and may contribute to therapeutic resistance. Given that p53 is intact and functional in normal tissues, we harnessed its potential to inhibit the growth of p53-deficient cancer cells. Specific activation of p53 in normal fibroblasts selectively induced apoptosis in p53-deficient cancer cells. This paracrine effect was mediated by p53-dependent secretion of the tumor suppressor Par-4. Accordingly, the activation of p53 in normal mice, but not p53−/− or Par-4−/− mice, caused systemic elevation of Par-4, which induced apoptosis of p53-deficient tumor cells. Mechanistically, p53 induced Par-4 secretion by suppressing the expression of its binding partner, UACA, which sequesters Par-4. Thus, normal cells can be empowered by p53 activation to induce Par-4 secretion for the inhibition of therapy-resistant tumors.

  17. Low doses of arsenic, via perturbing p53, promotes tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy, Suthakar; Li, Ping; Fagman, Johan; Yu, Tianqi; Lafontant, Jean; Zhang, Guojun; Chen, Changyan

    2016-09-01

    In drinking water and in workplace or living environments, low doses of arsenic can exist and operate as a potent carcinogen. Due to insufficient understanding and information on the pervasiveness of environmental exposures to arsenic, there is an urgent need to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of arsenic regarding its carcinogenic effect on human health. In this study, we demonstrate that low doses of arsenic exposure mitigate or mask p53 function and further perturb intracellular redox state, which triggers persistent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activates UPR (unfolded protein response), leading to transformation or tumorigenesis. Thus, the results suggest that low doses of arsenic exposure, through attenuating p53-regulated tumor suppressive function, change the state of intracellular redox and create a microenvironment for tumorigenesis. Our study also provides the information for designing more effective strategies to prevent or treat human cancers initiated by arsenic exposure. PMID:27425828

  18. P53 gene mutations and risk factors in Egyptian laryngeal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laryngeal cancer (LC) is one of the most fatal cancers in the world; it represents the sixth most common cancer in the world and the second most common respiratory cancer, with approximately 500,000 new cases worldwide, annually. The mechanisms of tumorigenesis in LC remain unknown, although smoking and alcohol consumption are considered to be major risk factors. Numerous genetic alterations have been described in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, but the molecular mechanisms contributing to initiation and progression of laryngeal are still poorly understood. Mutations within P53 have been strongly implicated as frequent events in several cancers. In the present study, exons 5-8 of P53 for mutations in DNA from tumor biopsies (n 50), beside 20 samples of normal tissues adjacent to the malignant area, blood samples (n = 25) from the LC patients, and blood samples from a healthy, matched control group (n = 20), were screened using polymerase chain reaction, single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis and direct sequencing was done . Significant positive correlations were found between the occurrence of LC and age and smoking. In tumor-derived samples, mutations were found in three of the exons under investigation, representing 18 % of the samples. The mutations were unique to the tumor biopsies, indicating a somatic origin for mutations. The data confirm that the exons 6-8 of P53 is a mutational hotspot for laryngeal cancers in Egypt; ten mutations were found within this region.

  19. p53-dependent release of Alarmin HMGB1 is a central mediator of senescent phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davalos, Albert R; Kawahara, Misako; Malhotra, Gautam K; Schaum, Nicholas; Huang, Jiahao; Ved, Urvi; Beausejour, Christian M; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Rodier, Francis; Campisi, Judith

    2013-05-13

    Cellular senescence irreversibly arrests proliferation in response to potentially oncogenic stress. Senescent cells also secrete inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, which promote age-associated inflammation and pathology. HMGB1 (high mobility group box 1) modulates gene expression in the nucleus, but certain immune cells secrete HMGB1 as an extracellular Alarmin to signal tissue damage. We show that nuclear HMGB1 relocalized to the extracellular milieu in senescent human and mouse cells in culture and in vivo. In contrast to cytokine secretion, HMGB1 redistribution required the p53 tumor suppressor, but not its activator ATM. Moreover, altered HMGB1 expression induced a p53-dependent senescent growth arrest. Senescent fibroblasts secreted oxidized HMGB1, which stimulated cytokine secretion through TLR-4 signaling. HMGB1 depletion, HMGB1 blocking antibody, or TLR-4 inhibition attenuated senescence-associated IL-6 secretion, and exogenous HMGB1 stimulated NF-κB activity and restored IL-6 secretion to HMGB1-depleted cells. Our findings identify senescence as a novel biological setting in which HMGB1 functions and link HMGB1 redistribution to p53 activity and senescence-associated inflammation.

  20. Role of p53 in the cellular response following oleic acid accumulation in Chang liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Jung; Lee, Ah Young; Chang, Seung-Hee; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Kim, Jae-Ho; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of fatty acids triggers the harmful cellular response called lipotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the cellular response following accumulation of oleic acid (OA), a monounsaturated fatty acid, in human Chang liver cells. OA droplets were distributed freely in the cytoplasm and/or degraded within lysosomes. OA exposure increased ATP production and concomitantly dilated mitochondria. At 24h after OA exposure, cell viability decreased slightly and was coupled with a reduction in mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration, the alteration in cell viability was also associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species and changes in the cell cycle. Moreover, OA treatment increased the expression of autophagy- and apoptotic cell death-related proteins in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we investigated the role of p53, a tumor suppressor protein, in the cellular response elicited by OA accumulation. OA-induced changes in cell viability and ATP production were rescued to control levels when cells were pretreated with pifithrin-alpha (PTA), a p53 inhibitor. By contrast, the expressions of LC3-II and perilipin, proteins required for lipophagy, were down-regulated by PTA pretreatment. Taken together, our results suggest that p53 plays a key role in the cellular response elicited by OA accumulation in Chang liver cells.

  1. p53 gene targeting by homologous recombination in fish ES cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene targeting (GT provides a powerful tool for the generation of precise genetic alterations in embryonic stem (ES cells to elucidate gene function and create animal models for human diseases. This technology has, however, been limited to mouse and rat. We have previously established ES cell lines and procedures for gene transfer and selection for homologous recombination (HR events in the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report HR-mediated GT in this organism. We designed a GT vector to disrupt the tumor suppressor gene p53 (also known as tp53. We show that all the three medaka ES cell lines, MES1∼MES3, are highly proficient for HR, as they produced detectable HR without drug selection. Furthermore, the positive-negative selection (PNS procedure enhanced HR by ∼12 folds. Out of 39 PNS-resistant colonies analyzed, 19 (48.7% were positive for GT by PCR genotyping. When 11 of the PCR-positive colonies were further analyzed, 6 (54.5% were found to be bona fide homologous recombinants by Southern blot analysis, sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization. This produces a high efficiency of up to 26.6% for p53 GT under PNS conditions. We show that p53 disruption and long-term propagation under drug selection conditions do not compromise the pluripotency, as p53-targeted ES cells retained stable growth, undifferentiated phenotype, pluripotency gene expression profile and differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that medaka ES cells are proficient for HR-mediated GT, offering a first model organism of lower vertebrates towards the development of full ES cell-based GT technology.

  2. Oxazoloisoindolinones with in vitro antitumor activity selectively activate a p53-pathway through potential inhibition of the p53-MDM2 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Joana; Pereira, Nuno A L; Monteiro, Ângelo; Leão, Mariana; Bessa, Cláudia; Dos Santos, Daniel J V A; Raimundo, Liliana; Queiroz, Glória; Bisio, Alessandra; Inga, Alberto; Pereira, Clara; Santos, Maria M M; Saraiva, Lucília

    2015-01-23

    One of the most appealing targets for anticancer treatment is the p53 tumor suppressor protein. In half of human cancers, this protein is inactivated due to endogenous negative regulators such as MDM2. Actually, restoring the p53 activity, particularly through the inhibition of its interaction with MDM2, is considered a valuable therapeutic strategy against cancers with a wild-type p53 status. In this work, we report the synthesis of nine enantiopure phenylalaninol-derived oxazolopyrrolidone lactams and the evaluation of their biological effects as p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. Using a yeast-based screening assay, two oxazoloisoindolinones, compounds 1b and 3a, were identified as potential p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. The molecular mechanism of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further validated in human colon adenocarcinoma HCT116 cells with wild-type p53 (HCT116 p53(+/+)) and in its isogenic derivative without p53 (HCT116 p53(-/-)). Indeed, using these cells, we demonstrated that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a exhibited a p53-dependent in vitro antitumor activity through induction of G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The selective activation of a p53-apoptotic pathway by oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further supported by the occurrence of PARP cleavage only in p53-expressing HCT116 cells. Moreover, oxazoloisoindolinone 3a led to p53 protein stabilization and to the up-regulation of p53 transcriptional activity with increased expression levels of several p53 target genes, as p21(WAF1/CIP1), MDM2, BAX and PUMA, in p53(+/+) but not in p53(-/-) HCT116 cells. Additionally, the ability of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a to block the p53-MDM2 interaction in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Finally, the molecular docking analysis of the interactions between the synthesized compounds and MDM2 revealed that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a binds to MDM2. Altogether, this work adds, for the first time, the oxazoloisoindolinone scaffold to the list of

  3. Suicide genes or p53 gene and p53 target genes as targets for cancer gene therapy by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy has some disadvantages due to the severe side-effect on the normal tissues at a curative dose of ionizing radiation (IR). Similarly, as a new developing approach, gene therapy also has some disadvantages, such as lack of specificity for tumors, limited expression of therapeutic gene, potential biological risk. To certain extent, above problems would be solved by the suicide genes or p53 gene and its target genes therapies targeted by ionizing radiation. This strategy not only makes up the disadvantage from radiotherapy or gene therapy alone, but also promotes success rate on the base of lower dose. By present, there have been several vectors measuring up to be reaching clinical trials. This review focused on the development of the cancer gene therapy through suicide genes or p53 and its target genes mediated by IR. (authors)

  4. Release of targeted p53 from the mitochondrion as an early signal during mitochondrial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased accumulation of p53 tumor suppressor protein is an early response to low-level stressors. To investigate the fate of mitochondrial-sequestered p53, mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) on a p53-deficient genetic background were transfected with p53-EGFP fusion protei...

  5. Mutant Mice Lacking the p53 C-Terminal Domain Model Telomere Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simeonova, I.; Jaber, S.; Draskovic, I.; Bardot, B.; Fang, M.; Bouarich-Bourimi, R.; Lejour, V.; Charbonnier, L.; Soudais, C.; Bourdon, J.C.; Huerre, M.; Londono-Vallejo, A.; Toledo, F.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in p53, although frequent in human cancers, have not been implicated in telomere-related syndromes. Here, we show that homozygous mutant mice expressing p53(Delta31), a p53 lacking the C-terminal domain, exhibit increased p53 activity and suffer from aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis,

  6. p53 gene in treatment of hepatic carcinoma:Status quo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Song Guan; Zi La; Lin Yang; Qing He; Ping Li

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC)is one of the 10 most common cancers worldwide.There is no ideal treatment for HCC yet and many researchers are trying to improve the effects of treatment by changing therapeutic strategies.As the majority of human cancers seem to exhibit either abnormal p53 gene or disrupted p53 gene activation pathways,intervention to restore wild-type p53 (wt-p53)activities is an attractive anti-cancer therapy including HCC.Abnormalities of p53 are also considered a predisposition factor for hepatocarcinogenesis.p53 is frequently mutated in HCC.Most HCCs have defects in the p53-mediated apoptotic pathway although they carry wt-p53.High expression of p53 in vivo may exert therapeutic effects on HCC in two aspects:(1)High expression of exogenous p53 protein induces apoptosis of tumor cells by inhibiting proliferation of cells through several biologic pathways and(2)Exogenous p53 renders HCC more sensitive to some chemotherapeutic agents.Several approaches have been designed for the treatment of HCC via the p53 pathway by restoring the tumor suppression function from inactivation,rescuing the mutated p53 gene from instability,or delivering therapeutic exogenous p53.Products with p53 status as the target have been studied extensively in vitro and in vivo.This review elaborates some therapeutic mechanisms and advances in using recombinant human adenovirus p53 and oncolytic virus products for the treatment of HCC.

  7. p53 spreads out further:suppression of EMT and stemness by activating miR-200c expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J(o)rg Schubert; Thomas Brabletz

    2011-01-01

    @@ There is no need to emphasize the overwhelming importance of p53 for crucial cellular processes and of genetic alterations resulting from its loss of function or a dominant oncogenic mutant in many human cancer types.These functions are well described and include control of cell cycle progression, apoptosis, senescence, DNA-repair mechanisms and autophagy[1].

  8. Ser18 and 23 phosphorylation is required for p53-dependent apoptosis and tumor suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Connie; Herr, Deron; Chun, Jerold; Xu, Yang

    2006-01-01

    Mouse p53 is phosphorylated at Ser18 and Ser23 after DNA damage. To determine whether these two phosphorylation events have synergistic functions in activating p53 responses, we simultaneously introduced Ser18/23 to Ala mutations into the endogenous p53 locus in mice. While partial defects in apoptosis are observed in p53S18A and p53S23A thymocytes exposed to IR, p53-dependent apoptosis is essentially abolished in p53S18/23A thymocytes, indicating that these two events have critical and syner...

  9. p53-Induced Growth Arrest Is Regulated by the Mitochondrial SirT3 Deacetylase

    OpenAIRE

    SiDe Li; Michaela Banck; Shiraz Mujtaba; Ming-Ming Zhou; Mary M Sugrue; Walsh, Martin J

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of p53 function is to regulate a transcriptional program in response to extracellular and intracellular stress that directs cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Independent of the role of p53 in the nucleus, some of the anti-proliferative functions of p53 reside within the mitochondria [1]. p53 can arrest cell growth in response to mitochondrial p53 in an EJ bladder carcinoma cell environment that is naïve of p53 function until induced to express p53 [2]. TP53 can...

  10. Paracrine Apoptotic Effect of p53 Mediated by Tumor Suppressor Par-4

    OpenAIRE

    Ravshan Burikhanov; Tripti Shrestha-Bhattarai; Nikhil Hebbar; Shirley Qiu; Yanming Zhao; Gerard P. Zambetti; Vivek M. Rangnekar

    2014-01-01

    The guardian of the genome, p53, is often mutated in cancer and may contribute to therapeutic resistance. Given that p53 is intact and functional in normal tissues, we harnessed its potential to inhibit the growth of p53-deficient cancer cells. Specific activation of p53 in normal fibroblasts selectively induced apoptosis in p53-deficient cancer cells. This paracrine effect was mediated by p53-dependent secretion of the tumor suppressor Par-4. Accordingly, the activation of p53 in normal mice...

  11. In vivo analysis of p53 tumor suppressor function using genetically engineered mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Brož, Daniela Kenzelmann; Attardi, Laura D.

    2010-01-01

    p53 is a crucial tumor suppressor, as evidenced by the high propensity for p53 mutation during human cancer development. Already more than a decade ago, p53 knockout mice confirmed that p53 is critical for preventing tumorigenesis. More recently, a host of p53 knock-in mouse strains has been generated, with the aim of either more precisely modeling p53 mutations in human cancer or better understanding p53's regulation and downstream activities. In the first category, several mouse strains exp...

  12. A common Gain of function of p53 cancer mutants in inducing genetic instability

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Dong-Ping; Song, Hoseok; Xu, Yang

    2009-01-01

    The critical tumor suppressor p53 is mutated in over half of all human cancers. The majority of p53 cancer mutations are missense mutations, which can be classified into contact mutations that directly disrupt the DNA-binding motif of p53 but have modest impact on p53 conformation and structural mutations that greatly disrupt p53 conformation. Many p53 cancer mutants, including the hotspot mutations (R175H, R248W and R273H), not only lose p53-dependent tumor suppressor activities, but also ac...

  13. Insights into p53 transcriptional function via genome-wide chromatin occupancy and gene expression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    F Nikulenkov; Spinnler, C; Li, H.; Tonelli, C; Shi, Y; Turunen, M.; Kivioja, T; Ignatiev, I.; Kel, A; Taipale, J; Selivanova, G

    2012-01-01

    The tumor-suppressor p53 can induce various biological responses. Yet, it is not clear whether it is p53 in vivo promoter selectivity that triggers different transcription programs leading to different outcomes. Our analysis of genome-wide chromatin occupancy by p53 using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq revealed ‘p53 default program', that is, the pattern of major p53-bound sites that is similar upon p53 activation by nutlin3a, reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosi...

  14. Evidence for allosteric variants of wild-type p53, a tumour suppressor protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, A; Milner, J

    1990-01-01

    A tumour suppressor function for p53 is indicated in human lung cancer and in carcinoma of the colorectum. Loss of suppressor function, by mutation of the p53 gene, is associated with activation of p53 as an oncogene. The suppressor (wild type) and oncogenic (mutant) forms of the murine p53 protein are distinguishable at the molecular level by reactivity with anti-p53 monoclonal antibodies. For example, activated mutant p53 fails to react with PAb246 (p53-246 degrees). We now demonstrate that...

  15. Ribosomal protein S7 as a novel modulator of p53-MDM2 interaction: binding to MDM2, stabilization of p53 protein, and activation of p53 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D; Zhang, Z; Li, M; Wang, W; Li, Y; Rayburn, E R; Hill, D L; Wang, H; Zhang, R

    2007-08-01

    As a major negative regulator of p53, the MDM2 oncogene plays an important role in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. MDM2 promotes p53 proteasomal degradation and negatively regulates p53 function. The mechanisms by which the MDM2-p53 interaction is regulated are not fully understood, although several MDM2-interacting molecules have recently been identified. To search for novel MDM2-binding partners, we screened a human prostate cDNA library by the yeast two-hybrid assay using full-length MDM2 protein as the bait. Among the candidate proteins, ribosomal protein S7 was identified and confirmed as a novel MDM2-interacting protein. Herein, we demonstrate that S7 binds to MDM2, in vitro and in vivo, and that the interaction between MDM2 and S7 leads to modulation of MDM2-p53 binding by forming a ternary complex among MDM2, p53 and S7. This results in the stabilization of p53 protein through abrogation of MDM2-mediated p53 ubiquitination. Consequently, S7 overexpression increases p53 transactivational activities, induces apoptosis, and inhibits cell proliferation. The identification of S7 as a novel MDM2-interacting partner contributes to elucidation of the complex regulation of the MDM2-p53 interaction and has implications in cancer prevention and therapy.

  16. p53 acetylation enhances Taxol-induced apoptosis in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyeong; Yoon, Eun-Kyung; Chung, Hye-Jin; Park, Seong-Yeol; Hong, Kyeong-Man; Lee, Chang-Hun; Lee, Yeon-Su; Choi, Kyungho; Yang, Young; Kim, Kyungtae; Kim, In-Hoo

    2013-01-01

    Microtubule inhibitors (MTIs) such as Taxol have been used for treating various malignant tumors. Although MTIs have been known to induce cell death through mitotic arrest, other mechanisms can operate in MTI-induced cell death. Especially, the role of p53 in this process has been controversial for a long time. Here we investigated the function of p53 in Taxol-induced apoptosis using p53 wild type and p53 null cancer cell lines. p53 was upregulated upon Taxol treatment in p53 wild type cells and deletion of p53 diminished Taxol-induced apoptosis. p53 target proteins including MDM2, p21, BAX, and β-isoform of PUMA were also upregulated by Taxol in p53 wild type cells. Conversely, when the wild type p53 was re-introduced into two different p53 null cancer cell lines, Taxol-induced apoptosis was enhanced. Among post-translational modifications that affect p53 stability and function, p53 acetylation, rather than phosphorylation, increased significantly in Taxol-treated cells. When acetylation was enhanced by anti-Sirt1 siRNA or an HDAC inhibitor, Taxol-induced apoptosis was enhanced, which was not observed in p53 null cells. When an acetylation-defective mutant of p53 was re-introduced to p53 null cells, apoptosis was partially reduced compared to the re-introduction of the wild type p53. Thus, p53 plays a pro-apoptotic role in Taxol-induced apoptosis and acetylation of p53 contributes to this pro-apoptotic function in response to Taxol in several human cancer cell lines, suggesting that enhancing acetylation of p53 could have potential implication for increasing the sensitivity of cancer cells to Taxol.

  17. Gene expression profiles resulting from stable loss of p53 mirrors its role in tissue differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Couture

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene p53 is involved in a variety of cellular activities such as cellular stress responses, cell cycle regulation and differentiation. In our previous studies we have shown p53's transcription activating role to be important in osteoblast differentiation. There is still a debate in the literature as to whether p53 inhibits or promotes differentiation. We have found p53 heterozygous mice to show a p53 dependency on some bone marker gene expression that is absent in knockout mice. Mice heterozygous for p53 also show a higher incidence of osteosarcomas than p53 knockout mice. This suggests that p53 is able to modify the environment within osteoblasts. In this study we compare changes in gene expression resulting after either a transient or stable reduction in p53. Accordingly we reduced p53 levels transiently and stably in C2C12 cells, which are capable of both myoblast and osteoblast differentiation, and compared the changes in gene expression of candidate genes regulated by the p53 pathway. Using a PCR array to assay for p53 target genes, we have found different expression profiles when comparing stable versus transient knockdown of p53. As expected, several genes with profound changes after transient p53 loss were related to apoptosis and cell cycle regulation. In contrast, stable p53 loss produced a greater change in MyoD and other transcription factors with tissue specific roles, suggesting that long term loss of p53 affects tissue homeostasis to a greater degree than changes resulting from acute loss of p53. These differences in gene expression were validated by measuring promoter activity of different pathway specific genes involved in differentiation. These studies suggest that an important role for p53 is context dependent, with a stable reduction in p53 expression affecting normal tissue physiology more than acute loss of p53.

  18. Posttranscriptional Regulation of p53 and Its Targets by RNA-Binding Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jin; Chen, Xinbin

    2008-01-01

    p53 tumor suppressor plays a pivotal role in maintaining genomic integrity and preventing cancer development. The importance of p53 in tumor suppression is illustrated by the observation that about 50% human tumor cells have a dysfunctional p53 pathway. Although it has been well accepted that the activity of p53 is mainly controlled through post-translational modifications, recent studies have revealed that posttranscriptional regulations of p53 by various RNA-binding proteins also play a cru...

  19. Regulation of p53 Localization and Activity by Ubc13▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Laine, Aaron; Topisirovic, Ivan; Zhai, Dayong; John C Reed; Borden, Katherine L. B.; Ronai, Ze'ev

    2006-01-01

    The abundance and activity of p53 are regulated largely by ubiquitin ligases. Here we demonstrate a previously undisclosed regulation of p53 localization and activity by Ubc13, an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. While increasing p53 stability, Ubc13 decreases p53 transcriptional activity and increases its localization to the cytoplasm, changes that require its ubiquitin-conjugating activity. Ubc13 elicits K63-dependent ubiquitination of p53, which attenuates Hdm2-induced polyubiquitination o...

  20. Tumor suppressor p53 and its gain-of-function mutants in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Juan; Zhang, Cen; Feng, Zhaohui

    2013-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppression. p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in cancer. As a transcription factor, p53 mainly exerts its role in tumor suppression through transcriptional regulation of its downstream target genes. Thus, p53 and its target genes form a complex p53 signaling pathway to regulate a wide variety of biological processes to prevent tumorigenesis. Recent studies have revealed that in addition to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence, p...

  1. MSL2 Promotes Mdm2-independent Cytoplasmic Localization of p53*

    OpenAIRE

    Kruse, Jan-Philipp; Gu, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Although it was originally thought of as a passive way to block the nuclear function of p53, accumulating evidence suggests that cytoplasmic localization of p53 plays an active role in p53-mediated functions such as apoptosis and autophagy. Previous studies by us and others demonstrated that Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination induces both degradation and cytoplasmic localization. Here we describe MSL2, a novel E3 ligase for p53 that promotes ubiquitin-dependent cytoplasm...

  2. Transcriptional Regulation of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) by p53 in p53-null Saos-2 cells%p53对乳腺癌耐药蛋白基因的转录调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴新刚; 彭姝彬; 闾四平; 张年凤; 邹进

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. BCRP confers drug resistance in cancer by transporting chemotherapeutic agents such as mitoxantrone, topotecan, and methotrexate. Although a recent study demonstrated that wild type p53 (wt-p53) may suppress BCRP expression through the nuclear factor-KB (NF-kB) pathway in breast cancer cell line MCF-7, which expresses wt-p53 at low level, the detailed molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation on BCRP remain unclear. Here, we set out to reveal the exogenous p53's role on the expression of BCRP. In the human osteosarcoma cell line Saos-2, a p53-null cell line, transient transfection assays showed that the BCRP expression was activated by wt-p53 but not p53 mutants, p53R175H and p53R248W. We further co-transfected the p53 expression plasmid with BCRP luciferasepromoter reporter construct into the Saos-2 cell, and the results revealed that wt-p53 may facilitate the BCRP promoter activity. However, we did not find any p53 binding site by applying Matlnspector. Strikingly, NF-kB activity inhibition downplayed the activation effect of BCRP promoter activity by wt-p53. These results suggested that transcriptional activation of BCRP by wt-p53 is NF-kB- dependent.%乳腺癌耐药蛋白(breast cancer resistance protein,BCRP)是ATP结合盒转运蛋白超家族成员之一,其通过主动外排化疗药物如米托蒽醌、托泊替康和甲氨蝶呤,进而介导肿瘤化疗耐受.最近有研究发现,在野生型p53 (wild type p53,wt-p53)低表达的乳腺癌细胞系MCF-7中,外源性wt-p53通过抑制核转录因子-κB (nuclear factor-κB,NF-κB)的活性进而抑制BCRP的表达,但其详细的分子机制有待进一步阐明.本研究选用p53缺失的骨肉瘤细胞系Saos-2,通过瞬时转染技术发现,wt-p53可以激活BCRP的表达,而突变型p53的激活作用消失;报告基因试验显示,wt-p53可以上调BCRP启动子活性;通过生

  3. ACTIVATION OF p53 IN DOWN SYNDROME AND IN THE Ts65Dn MOUSE BRAIN IS ASSOCIATED WITH A PRO-APOPTOTIC PHENOTYPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, Fabio; Barone, Eugenio; Arena, Andrea; Lanzillotta, Chiara; Brokeaart, Diede; Blarzino, Carla; Head, Elizabeth; Butterfield, D Allan; Perluigi, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability resulting from trisomy of chromosome 21. The main feature of DS neuropathology includes early onset of Alzheimer's disease, with deposition of senile plaques and tangles. We hypothesized that apoptosis may be activated in the presence of AD neuropathology in DS, thus we measured proteins associated with upstream and downstream pathways of p53 in the frontal cortex from DS cases with and without AD pathology and from Ts65Dn mice, at different ages. We observed increased acetylation and phosphorylation of p53, coupled to reduced MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and lower levels of SIRT1. Activation of p53 was associated with a number of down-stream targets (bax, PARP1, caspase-3, heat shock proteins and PGC1α) that were modulated in both DS and DS/AD compared with age-matched controls. In particular, the most relevant changes (increased p-p53, acetyl-p53 and reduced formation of MDM2/p53 complex) were found to be modified only in the presence of AD pathology in DS. In addition, a similar pattern of alterations in the p53 pathway were found in Ts65Dn mice. These results suggest that p53 may integrate different signals, which can result in a pro-apoptotic-phenotype contributing to AD neuropathology in people with DS. PMID:26967221

  4. High-level expression of wild-type p53 in melanoma cells is frequently associated with inactivity in p53 reporter gene assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Houben

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inactivation of the p53 pathway that controls cell cycle progression, apoptosis and senescence, has been proposed to occur in virtually all human tumors and p53 is the protein most frequently mutated in human cancer. However, the mutational status of p53 in melanoma is still controversial; to clarify this notion we analysed the largest series of melanoma samples reported to date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistochemical analysis of more than 180 melanoma specimens demonstrated that high levels of p53 are expressed in the vast majority of cases. Subsequent sequencing of the p53 exons 5-8, however, revealed only in one case the presence of a mutation. Nevertheless, by means of two different p53 reporter constructs we demonstrate transcriptional inactivity of wild type p53 in 6 out of 10 melanoma cell lines; the 4 other p53 wild type melanoma cell lines exhibit p53 reporter gene activity, which can be blocked by shRNA knock down of p53. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In melanomas expressing high levels of wild type p53 this tumor suppressor is frequently inactivated at transcriptional level.

  5. Proteasome inhibition mediates p53 reactivation and anti-cancer activity of 6-gingerol in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Namrata; Duggal, Shivali; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Porwal, Konica; Srivastava, Vikas Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh; Bhatt, M L B; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2015-12-22

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) expressing E6 and E7 oncoproteins, is known to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 through proteasomal degradation in cervical cancers. Therefore, use of small molecules for inhibition of proteasome function and induction of p53 reactivation is a promising strategy for induction of apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. The polyphenolic alkanone, 6-Gingerol (6G), present in the pungent extracts of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has shown potent anti-tumorigenic and pro-apoptotic activities against a variety of cancers. In this study we explored the molecular mechanism of action of 6G in human cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. 6G potently inhibited proliferation of the HPV positive cervical cancer cells. 6G was found to: (i) inhibit the chymotrypsin activity of proteasomes, (ii) induce reactivation of p53, (iii) increase levels of p21, (iv) induce DNA damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest, (v) alter expression levels of p53-associated apoptotic markers like, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP, and (vi) potentiate the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. 6G treatment induced significant reduction of tumor volume, tumor weight, proteasome inhibition and p53 accumulation in HeLa xenograft tumor cells in vivo. The 6G treatment was devoid of toxic effects as it did not affect body weights, hematological and osteogenic parameters. Taken together, our data underscores the therapeutic and chemosensitizing effects of 6G in the management and treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:26621832

  6. p53-induced microRNA-1246 inhibits the cell growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by targeting NFIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan; Cao, Li-Ye; Cheng, Shu-Jie; Zhang, Ai-Min; Jin, Xiao-Shi; Li, Yong

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, miR-1246 has been identified as a transcriptional target of p53 in Down syndrome and may provide a new p53-miR-1246-DYRK1A-NFAT pathway in cancer. The present study aimed to explore the role of miR-1246 in the tumorigenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We found that wild-type p53 regulated the expression of miR-1246 in HCC cell lines, and alteration of miR-1246 modulated cell proliferation, colony formation ability and apoptosis. The nuclear factor I/B (NFIB), an oncogene, was identified as a direct target gene of miR-1246 using a fluorescent reporter assay. Overexpression of NFIB abolished the regulation of cell apoptosis caused by miR-1246 in HepG2 cells. This finding suggests that miR-1246 is regulated by p53 and suppresses the growth of human HCC by targeting NFIB. Here, we propose a new p53-miR-1246-NFIB pathway in HCC. PMID:25591821

  7. Escape from p53-mediated tumor surveillance in neuroblastoma: switching off the p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Maerken, T; Vandesompele, J; Rihani, A; De Paepe, A; Speleman, F

    2009-12-01

    A primary failsafe program against unrestrained proliferation and oncogenesis is provided by the p53 tumor suppressor protein, inactivation of which is considered as a hallmark of cancer. Intriguingly, mutations of the TP53 gene are rarely encountered in neuroblastoma tumors, suggesting that alternative p53-inactivating lesions account for escape from p53 control in this childhood malignancy. Several recent studies have shed light on the mechanisms by which neuroblastoma cells circumvent the p53-driven antitumor barrier. We review here these mechanisms for evasion of p53-mediated growth control and conclude that deregulation of the p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 axis seems to be the principal mode of p53 inactivation in neuroblastoma, opening new perspectives for targeted therapeutic intervention. PMID:19779493

  8. Mutational myriad of tumor suppressor p53 in Filipino breast cancer: results and perspectives in molecular pathology and epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The p53 tumor suppressor is by far the most widely mutated gene in human cancers. p53 encodes a 53-kDa phosphoprotein, transcription-activator whose targets include genes and gene products that orchestrate genomic stability, cellular response to DNA damage, cell cycle progression apoptosis and aging (senescence). Analysis of the p53 gene profile has previously resulted in identifying several cancer-causative factors in the human setting, as well as, in creating a unique molecular profile of a tumor useful in the design of tailored-therapies for individual cancer patients. Our results in screening for p53 abnormalities in 140 Filipino patients with primary breast lesions confined from 1997-1998 in 5 major hospitals in Manila reveal that p53 plays an important role in the development and progression of breast cancer in at least 48% of all cases. Two methods of p53 analysis are employed, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction-temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (PCR-TTGE). Inter-comparisons of method exhibit 63.3% concordance in 21 fresh breast carcinoma samples, with ELISA demonstrating 14% false-positives and 10% false-negatives. Only mutations in exon 7 (p=0.063) in the tumor samples how significant correlation with abnormal cellular elevation of p53. PCR-TTGE screening in a large series of 140 patients show that most genetic lesions are localized in exons 5 (41% of the total cases) and 6 (27% of the total cases). No mutations are, however, detected in the transactivation (exons 2-4) and oligomerization (exons 10-11) domains. Invasive carcinomas (stages II and III) are characterized with more frequent and diverse genetic alterations compared with benign tumors, most significantly at exon 5B (p=0.066) and at independently multiple sites (p=0.066). Earlier-onset cases (age of diagnosis < 50 yrs), known to be more clinico-pathologically aggressive, are diagnosed harboring more frequent p53 mutations centered at exon 7 (p=0

  9. 结肠癌组织中P53基因及其产物变化的研究%Mutation of P53 Gene and Expression of P53 Protein in Colon Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉敏; 尹德霞; 朱桂钱

    2001-01-01

    目的 探索P53基因突变在结肠癌发生过程中的作用.方法应用多聚酶链反应-单纯构象多态分析及免疫组化ABC法研究结肠癌组织中的P53基因及其产物蛋白质的变化.结果结肠癌中有45%发生P53基因突变,52.50% P53蛋白阳性;所获数据经χ2检验.结论对P53基因突变和P53蛋白的检测可作为判断结肠癌生物学行为的重要标志.

  10. Transponder-induced sarcoma in the heterozygous p53+/- mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, K T; Barthel, C; French, J E; Holden, H E; Moretz, R; Pack, F D; Tennant, R W; Stoll, R E

    1999-01-01

    Heterozygous p53+/- transgenic mice are being studied for utility as a short-term alternative model to the 2-yr rodent carcinogenicity bioassay. During a 26-wk study to assess the potential carcinogenicity of oxymetholone using p-cresidine as a positive control, glass/polypropylene microchips (radio transponder identification devices) were subcutaneously implanted into male and female p53+/- mice. During week 15, the first palpable mass was clinically observed at an implant site. This rapidly growing mass virtually quadrupled in size by week 25. Microscopic examination of all implant sites revealed that 18 of 177 animals had a subcutaneous histologically malignant sarcoma. The neoplasms were characterized as undifferentiated sarcomas unrelated to drug treatment, as indicated by the relatively even distribution among dose groups, including controls. An unusual preneoplastic mesenchymal change characterized by the term "mesenchymal dysplasia" was present in most groups and was considered to be a prodromal change to sarcoma development. The tumors were observed to arise from dysplastic mesenchymal tissue that developed within the tissue capsule surrounding the transponder. The preneoplastic changes, including mesenchymal dysplasia, appeared to arise at the transponder's plastic anchoring barb and then progressed as a neoplasm to eventually surround the entire microchip. Capsule membrane endothelialization, inflammation, mesenchymal basophilia and dysplasia, and sarcoma were considered unequivocal preneoplastic/neoplastic responses to the transponder and were not related to treatment with either oxymetholone or p-cresidine.

  11. P53 but not cyclin E acts in a negative regulatory loop to control HER-2 expression in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Montazeri

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin E, HER-2 and p53, are considered as major prognostic markers in breast cancer. As they are related in patho-clinical level, we aimed to check if they have any direct interaction on expression of each other. To study the effect of cyclin E on HER-2 expression, cell lines stably overexpressing cyclin E or its low molecular weight (LMW isoforms were generated. To understand the results of p53 silencing either alone or in combination with cyclin E overexpression, we created three different p53 stably knocked down cell lines. Protein expression was analyzed by western blot, HER-2 expression in the established cell lines were determined using SYBR green real time PCR and data analyzed by REST software. Results indicate that HER-2 expression is only downregulated following p53 silencing and none of cyclin E isoforms can alter its expression. The presence of cyclin E isoforms in p53 silenced clones also does not altered HER-2 expression. Given the fact that p53 degradation is increased by HER-2 overexpression, these data can draw a regulatory loop in which a non-mutated functional p53 and HER-2 can bidirectionally regulate the expression of these two genes. This study improves our understandings of these pathways and these proteins can be introduced either as a marker or as a target in cancer treatment.

  12. Transient transfection of a wild-type p53 gene triggers resveratrol-induced apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz da Costa, Danielly Cristiny; Casanova, Fabiana Alves; Quarti, Julia; Malheiros, Maitê Santos; Sanches, Daniel; Dos Santos, Patricia Souza; Fialho, Eliane; Silva, Jerson L

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol is a promising chemopreventive agent that mediates many cellular targets involved in cancer signaling pathways. p53 has been suggested to play a role in the anticancer properties of resveratrol. We investigated resveratrol-induced cytotoxicity in H1299 cells, which are non-small lung cancer cells that have a partial deletion of the gene that encodes the p53 protein. The results for H1299 cells were compared with those for three cell lines that constitutively express wild-type p53: breast cancer MCF-7, adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelia A549 and non-small lung cancer H460. Cell viability assays revealed that resveratrol reduced the viability of all four of these cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MCF-7, A549 and H460 cells were more sensitive to resveratrol than were H1299 cells when exposed to the drug for 24 h at concentrations above 100 µM. Resveratrol also increased the p53 protein levels in MCF-7 cells without altering the p53 mRNA levels, suggesting a post-translational modulation of the protein. The resveratrol-induced cytotoxicity in these cells was partially mediated by p53 and involved the activation of caspases 9 and 7 and the cleavage of PARP. In H1299 cells, resveratrol-induced cytotoxicity was less pronounced and (in contrast to MCF-7 cells) cell death was not accompanied by caspase activation. These findings are consistent with the observation that MCF-7 cells were positively labeled by TUNEL following exposure to 100 µM resveratrol whereas H1299 cells under similar conditions were not labeled by TUNEL. The transient transfection of a wild-type p53-GFP gene caused H1299 cells to become more responsive to the pro-apoptotic properties of resveratrol, similarly to findings in the p53-positive MCF-7 cells. Our results suggest a possible therapeutic strategy based on the use of resveratrol for the treatment of tumors that are typically unresponsive to conventional therapies because of the loss of normal p53 function. PMID

  13. Transient transfection of a wild-type p53 gene triggers resveratrol-induced apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielly Cristiny Ferraz da Costa

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a promising chemopreventive agent that mediates many cellular targets involved in cancer signaling pathways. p53 has been suggested to play a role in the anticancer properties of resveratrol. We investigated resveratrol-induced cytotoxicity in H1299 cells, which are non-small lung cancer cells that have a partial deletion of the gene that encodes the p53 protein. The results for H1299 cells were compared with those for three cell lines that constitutively express wild-type p53: breast cancer MCF-7, adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelia A549 and non-small lung cancer H460. Cell viability assays revealed that resveratrol reduced the viability of all four of these cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MCF-7, A549 and H460 cells were more sensitive to resveratrol than were H1299 cells when exposed to the drug for 24 h at concentrations above 100 µM. Resveratrol also increased the p53 protein levels in MCF-7 cells without altering the p53 mRNA levels, suggesting a post-translational modulation of the protein. The resveratrol-induced cytotoxicity in these cells was partially mediated by p53 and involved the activation of caspases 9 and 7 and the cleavage of PARP. In H1299 cells, resveratrol-induced cytotoxicity was less pronounced and (in contrast to MCF-7 cells cell death was not accompanied by caspase activation. These findings are consistent with the observation that MCF-7 cells were positively labeled by TUNEL following exposure to 100 µM resveratrol whereas H1299 cells under similar conditions were not labeled by TUNEL. The transient transfection of a wild-type p53-GFP gene caused H1299 cells to become more responsive to the pro-apoptotic properties of resveratrol, similarly to findings in the p53-positive MCF-7 cells. Our results suggest a possible therapeutic strategy based on the use of resveratrol for the treatment of tumors that are typically unresponsive to conventional therapies because of the loss of normal

  14. Research advances on the p53 gene network%p53基因调控网络研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒坤贤; 王光利; 邬力祥

    2008-01-01

    肿瘤抑制基因p53表达的p53蛋白是一个通用转录因子,与其上、下游功能相关基因组成了一个复杂的基因调控网络,在这个基因网络中p53基因起着关键作用;DNA损伤、缺氧、原癌基因的激活等均能刺激p53基因表达;p53表达升高后,可通过p53-MDM2反馈环路与泛素系统等对p53表达水平进行精确调节;p53通过调控多种下游/靶基因表达完成多种生物学功能,主要包括阻滞细胞周期、促进细胞凋亡、维持基因组稳定性等;认识p53基因调控网络的功能有助于理解p53及其下游/靶基因间的具体作用机制.

  15. Shifting p53-induced senescence to cell death by TIS21(/BTG2/Pc3) gene through posttranslational modification of p53 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ok Ran; Ryu, Min Sook; Lim, In Kyoung

    2016-09-01

    Cellular senescence and apoptosis can be regulated by p53 activity, although the underlying mechanism of the switch between the two events remains largely unknown. Cells exposed to cancer chemotherapy can escape to senescence phenotype rather than undergoing apoptosis. By employing adenoviral transduction of p53 or TIS21 genes, we observed shifting of p53 induced-senescence to apoptosis in EJ bladder cancer cells, which express H-RasV12 and mutant p53; transduction of p53 increased H-RasV12 expression along with senescence phenotypes, whereas coexpression with TIS21 (p53+TIS21) induced cell death rather than senescence. The TIS21-mediated switch of senescence to apoptosis was accompanied by nuclear translocation of p53 protein and its modifications on Ser-15 and Ser-46 phosphorylation and acetylations on Lys-120, -320, -373 and -382 residues. Mechanistically, TIS21(/BTG2) regulated posttranslational modification of p53 via enhancing miR34a and Bax expressions as opposed to inhibiting SIRT1 and Bcl2 expression. At the same time, TIS21 increased APAF-1 and p53AIP1 expressions, but inhibited the interaction of p53 with iASPP. In vitro tumorigenicity was significantly reduced in the p53+TIS21 expresser through inhibiting micro-colony proliferation by TIS21. Effect of TIS21 on the regulation of p53 activity was confirmed by knockdown of TIS21 expression by RNA interference. Therefore, we suggest TIS21 expression as an endogenous cell death inducer at the downstream of p53 gene, which might be useful for intractable cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27208501

  16. The Corepressor mSin3a Interacts with the Proline-Rich Domain of p53 and Protects p53 from Proteasome-Mediated Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilfou, Jack T.; Hoffman, William H.; Sank, Michael; George, Donna L.; Murphy, Maureen

    2001-01-01

    While the transactivation function of the tumor suppressor p53 is well understood, less is known about the transrepression functions of this protein. We have previously shown that p53 interacts with the corepressor protein mSin3a (hereafter designated Sin3) in vivo and that this interaction is critical for the ability of p53 to repress gene expression. In the present study, we demonstrate that expression of Sin3 results in posttranslational stabilization of both exogenous and endogenous p53, due to an inhibition of proteasome-mediated degradation of this protein. Stabilization of p53 by Sin3 requires the Sin3-binding domain, determined here to map to the proline-rich region of p53, from amino acids 61 to 75. The correlation between Sin3 binding and stabilization supports the hypothesis that this domain of p53 may normally be subject to a destabilizing influence. The finding that a synthetic mutant of p53 lacking the Sin3-binding domain has an increased half-life in cells, compared to wild-type p53, supports this premise. Interestingly, unlike retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein, MDMX, and p14ARF, Sin3 stabilizes p53 in an MDM2-independent manner. The ability of Sin3 to stabilize p53 is consistent with the model whereby these two proteins must exist on a promoter for extended periods, in order for repression to be an effective mechanism of gene regulation. This model is consistent with our data indicating that, unlike the p300-p53 complex, the p53-Sin3 complex is immunologically detectable for prolonged periods following exposure of cells to agents of DNA damage. PMID:11359905

  17. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shi-Wei [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chun-Ying [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Yen-Ting [Department of Medical Research and Education, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kao, Jun-Kai [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chia-Che; Mu, Szu-Wei; Chen, Yu-Yu [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Husan-Wen [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chuan-Hsun [Department of Surgical Oncology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Nutrition Therapy, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liang, Shu-Mei [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Ju [Department of Dermatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Jau-Ling [Department of Bioscience Technology, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Shieh, Jeng-Jer, E-mail: shiehjj@vghtc.gov.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Education and Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-15

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status.

  18. Inhibition of p53 transcriptional activity by human cytomegalovirus UL44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yejin; Kim, Mi-Na; Young Choi, Eun; Heon Kim, Jung; Hwang, Eung-Soo; Cha, Chang-Yong

    2012-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) stimulates cellular synthesis of DNA and proteins and induces transition of the cell cycle from G(1) to S and G(2) /M phase, in spite of increased amounts of p53 in the infected cells. The immediate early protein IE2-86  kDa (IE86) tethers a transcriptional repression domain to p53; however, its repression of p53 function is not enough to abrogate the G(1) checkpoint function of p53. Other HCMV proteins that suppress the activity of p53 were investigated in this study. Of the HCMV proteins that bind to p53 when assessed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblot analysis, HCMV UL44 was chosen as a candidate protein. It was found that reporter gene containing p53 consensus sequence was activated by transfection with wild type p53, but when plasmids of p53 with IE86 or UL44 were co-transfected, p53 transcriptional activity was decreased to 3-7% of the p53 control in a dose-dependent manner. When the deletion mutant of UL44 was co-transected with p53, the carboxyl one-third portion of UL44 had little effect on inhibition of p53 transcriptional activity. The amount of mRNA p21 was measured in H1299 by real time PCR after transfection of the combination of p53 and UL44 vectors and it was found that p21 transcription by p53 was inhibited dose-dependently by UL44. Increased G0/G1 and decreased S phases in p53 wild type-transfected H1299 cells were recovered to the level of p53 mutant type-transfected ones by the additional transfection of UL44 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, the transcriptional activity of p53 is suppressed by UL44 as well as by IE86. PMID:22376288

  19. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status

  20. Construction and application of mouse PLJM1-p53-GFP plasmid%p53基因真核表达质粒PLJM1-p53-GFP构建及其应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱伟东; 辛婧; 周苏明; 沈捷; 杜新丽; 张日华; 刘云

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To construct PLJM1-p53-GFP plasmid of mouse p53 gene and study the role of p53 in the prostate cancer cells PC3. Methods:The open reading frame (ORF) of mouse p53 gene was amplified from mouse 3T3-L1 cells by RT-PCR,and inserted into the PLJM1-NRG1-GFP vector. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into DH5a competent E. coli. The positive clones were screened by PCR and the inserts were confirmed by DNA sequencing. The PLJM1-p53-GFP plasmid was transfected into the prostate cancer cells PC3. QPCR was used to detect the efficiency of the transfection. The invasive activity and proliferation of PC3 cells were measured after transfecting the PLJM1-p53-GFP plasmid. Results:DNA sequencing demonstrated that the recombinant plasmid PLJMl-p53-GFP was constructed successfully. The invasive activity and proliferation of PC3 cells were obviously decreased after transfection of the PLJM1-p53-GFP plasmid. Conclusion: The plasmid of PLJM1-p53-GFP of mouse p53 gene was successfully constructed. It can be used in the functional research for cancer.%目的:构建小鼠p53基因真核表达质粒PLJM1-p53-GFP,研究其对前列腺癌细胞株PC3侵袭、增殖能力的影响.方法:从小鼠3T3-L1细胞提取总RNA,经RT-PCR获得cDNA,扩增p53基因,经酶切纯化后的产物与双酶切后的PLJM1-NRG1-GFP慢病毒载体连接,得到PLJM1-p53-GFP慢病毒载体并转化感受态细菌DH5α,通过PCR筛选阳性克隆,抽提质粒并测序鉴定.将PLJM1-p53-GFP质粒瞬时转染到PC3细胞中,提取RNA,定量PCR鉴定p53高表达水平,采用细胞侵袭实验观察高表达p53的前列腺癌细胞株PC3的侵袭能力,采用流式细胞及划痕试验研究p53对前列腺癌细胞株PC3增殖活性的影响.结果:测序证实,目的基因p53插入完全正确且无任何突变;高表达p53的PC3细胞的侵袭能力、增殖能力明显下降.结论:成功构建小鼠p53基因真核表达质粒PLJM1-p53-GFP,为深入研究肿瘤等相关疾病提供了有效的工具.

  1. The “Two faces” of Tumor Suppressor p53-revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Martin L.; Kumar, M.A. Suresh

    2010-01-01

    About 15 years ago, several groups including ours had used matched pairs of cell lines carrying wild type or mutant p53 genes to ascertain a role for p53 in cell survival. These were isogenic cell lines differing only by p53 status. The trend at that time was to support p53-mediated apoptosis. Accordingly, p53-wildtype cells were sensitive to DNA damage compared to p53-mutant cells which were thought to evade apoptosis. However, this finding was not universal. In particular, after UV-radiatio...

  2. Wildtype p53-specific Antibody and T-Cell Responses in Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Stryhn, Anette; Justesen, Sune;

    2011-01-01

    patients. Detection of antibodies against wt p53 protein has been used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker and discovery of new T-cell epitopes has enabled design of cancer vaccination protocols with promising results. Here, we identified wt p53-specific antibodies in various cancer patients...... and identified a broad range of responses against wt p53 protein and 15-mer peptides using a novel print array technology. Likewise, using bioinformatic tools in silico, we identified CD8 T-cell specificity or reactivity against HLA-A*02:01 binding peptides wt p53(65-73), wt p53(187-197), and wt p53...

  3. Abrogation of the Transactivation Activity of p53 by BCCIP Down-regulation*

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Xiangbing; Yue, Jingyin; Liu, Zhihe; Shen, Zhiyuan

    2006-01-01

    The tumor suppression function of p53 is mostly conferred by its transactivation activity, which is inactivated by p53 mutations in ~50% of human cancers. In cancers harboring wild type p53, the p53 transactivation activity may be compromised by other mechanisms. Identifying the mechanisms by which wild type p53 transactivation activity can be abrogated may provide insights into the molecular etiology of cancers harboring wild type p53. In this report, we show that BCCIP, a BRCA2 and CDKN1A-i...

  4. Illuminating p53 function in cancer with genetically engineered mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Patty B.; Attardi, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    The key role of the p53 protein in tumor suppression is highlighted by its frequent mutation in human cancers and by the completely penetrant cancer predisposition of p53 null mice. Beyond providing definitive evidence for the critical function of p53 in tumor suppression, genetically engineered mouse models have offered numerous additional insights into p53 function. p53 knock-in mice expressing tumor-derived p53 mutants have revealed that these mutants display gain-of-function activities th...

  5. Negative Regulation-Resistant p53 Variant Enhances Oncolytic Adenoviral Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Koo, Taeyoung; Choi, Il-Kyu; Kim, Minjung; Lee, Jung-Sun; Oh, Eonju; Kim, Jungho; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2012-01-01

    Intact p53 function is essential for responsiveness to cancer therapy. However, p53 activity is attenuated by the proto-oncoprotein Mdm2, the adenovirus protein E1B 55kD, and the p53 C-terminal domain. To confer resistance to Mdm2, E1B 55kD, and C-terminal negative regulation, we generated a p53 variant (p53VPΔ30) by deleting the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of wild-type p53 and inserting the transcriptional activation domain of herpes simplex virus VP16 protein. The oncolytic adenovirus...

  6. Tumor protein translationally controlled 1 is a p53 target gene that promotes cell survival

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Weimin; Wang, Huihui; Tao, Shasha; Zheng, Yi; Wu, Wei; Lian, Fangru; Jaramillo, Melba; Fang, Deyu; Zhang, Donna D.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 maintains genome stability by differentially activating target genes that control diverse cellular responses, such as the antioxidant response, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Despite the fact that many p53 downstream genes have been well characterized, novel p53 target genes are continuously being identified. Here, we report that Tpt1 is a direct target gene of p53. We found that p53 upregulates the transcription of Tpt1 and identified a p53-responsive element in the pr...

  7. Regulation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Expression by Tumor Suppressor Protein p53*

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Sreerama; Shetty, Praveenkumar; Idell, Steven; Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Bhandary, Yashodhar P.; Shetty, Rashmi S.

    2008-01-01

    H1299 lung carcinoma cells lacking p53 (p53-/-) express minimal amounts of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) protein as well as mRNA. p53-/- cells express highly unstable PAI-1 mRNA. Transfection of p53 in p53-/- cells enhanced PAI-1 expression and stabilized PAI-1 mRNA. On the contrary, inhibition of p53 expression by RNA silencing in non-malignant human lung epithelial (Beas2B) cells decreased basal as well as urokinase-type plasminogen activator-induced PAI-...

  8. Co-mutation of p53, K-ras genes and accumulation of p53 protein and its correlation to clinicopathological features in rectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Zhong Pan; De-Sen Wan; Gong Chen; Li-Ren Li; Zhen-Hai Lu; Bi-Jun Huang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the accuracy of p53 gene mutations predicted by overexpression of p53 protein immunohistochemically,and to investigate the co-mutation of p53 and K-rasgenes in rectal cancer and its effect on promoting malignant biologic behaviors of tumors.METHODS: Ninety-seven specimens of rectal cancer were surgically resected in our hospital from August 1996 to October 1997. The hot mutation areas of p53 gene (in exons 5-8) and K-ras gene (in codon 5/12 and 13) were detected with polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP), and overexpression of p53 protein was detected with immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the 97 specimens of rectal cancer. Correlation between gene mutations and tumor clinicopathologic factors was studied, and survival analysis was penfomed as well.RESULTS: There were 36 cases of p53 gene mutations in 61 p53 protein positive cases, and 21 cases of p53 gene non-mutation in 36 p53 protein negative cases respectively.The coincidence rate of p53 gene mutation by IHC method with PCR-SSCP method was 58.8% (57/97). The mutation rate of p53 gene was 52.6% (51/97), while K-ras gene mutation was observed in codons 12 and 13 in 61 cases with a mutation rate of 62.9% (61/97). Single gene mutation of p53 or K-raswas found in 32 cases. Both p53 and K-ras gene mutation were found in 48 cases. Statistical analysis showed that p53 and K-rasgene mutations were not related to the clinicopathologic factors, including tumor size, gross tumor type, histological classification, differentiation, invasion to intestinal veins, lymphatics and nerves, invasive depth to wall, lymph node metastasis, and Dukes' stages (P>0.05).The survival in patients with no gene mutation, single gene mutation and both gene mutations were similar (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: IHC has a certain false positive and false negative rate in detecting p53 gene mutations. Malignant biological behaviours of rectal cancer are not enhanced by p53 and K-rasgene mutations. Co

  9. Both p53-PUMA/NOXA-Bax-mitochondrion and p53-p21cip1 pathways are involved in the CDglyTK-mediated tumor cell suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhendong, E-mail: zdyu@hotmail.com [Department of Clinical laboratory, Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Guangdong (China); Wang, Hao [Department of pathology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Zhang, Libin; Tang, Aifa; Zhai, Qinna; Wen, Jianxiang; Yao, Li [Department of Clinical laboratory, Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Guangdong (China); Li, Pengfei, E-mail: lipengfei@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of pathology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2009-09-04

    CDglyTK fusion suicide gene has been well characterized to effectively kill tumor cells. However, the exact mechanism and downstream target genes are not fully understood. In our study, we found that CDglyTK/prodrug treatment works more efficiently in p53 wild-type (HONE1) cells than in p53 mutant (CNE1) cells. We then used adenovirus-mediated gene delivery system to either knockdown or overexpress p53 and its target genes in these cells. Consistent results showed that both p53-PUMA/NOXA/Bcl2-Bax and p53-p21 pathways contribute to the CDglyTK induced tumor cell suppression. Our work for the first time addressed the role of p53 related genes in the CDglyTK/prodrug system.

  10. Both p53-PUMA/NOXA-Bax-mitochondrion and p53-p21cip1 pathways are involved in the CDglyTK-mediated tumor cell suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CDglyTK fusion suicide gene has been well characterized to effectively kill tumor cells. However, the exact mechanism and downstream target genes are not fully understood. In our study, we found that CDglyTK/prodrug treatment works more efficiently in p53 wild-type (HONE1) cells than in p53 mutant (CNE1) cells. We then used adenovirus-mediated gene delivery system to either knockdown or overexpress p53 and its target genes in these cells. Consistent results showed that both p53-PUMA/NOXA/Bcl2-Bax and p53-p21 pathways contribute to the CDglyTK induced tumor cell suppression. Our work for the first time addressed the role of p53 related genes in the CDglyTK/prodrug system.

  11. Research progress on the structure and function of the P53 gene%P53基因与肿瘤的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田云鹏

    2013-01-01

    编码P53蛋白的P53基因是最重要的肿瘤抑制基因之一.人类的大多数肿瘤都存在着P53途径的失活.变异的P53不仅不具备肿瘤抑制子的功能,还可能发挥促进肿瘤发生、发展的作用.P53的基本功能是对细胞应激的应答.因此,我们就P53基因的结构和功能做一综述.

  12. Full p53 transcriptional activation potential is dispensable for tumor suppression in diverse lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dadi; Brady, Colleen A; Johnson, Thomas M; Lee, Eunice Y; Park, Eunice J; Scott, Matthew P; Attardi, Laura D

    2011-10-11

    Over half of all human cancers, of a wide variety of types, sustain mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Although p53 limits tumorigenesis through the induction of apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, its molecular mechanism of action in tumor suppression has been elusive. The best-characterized p53 activity in vitro is as a transcriptional activator, but the identification of numerous additional p53 biochemical activities in vitro has made it unclear which mechanism accounts for tumor suppression. Here, we assess the importance of transcriptional activation for p53 tumor suppression function in vivo in several tissues, using a knock-in mouse strain expressing a p53 mutant compromised for transcriptional activation, p53(25,26). p53(25,26) is severely impaired for the transactivation of numerous classical p53 target genes, including p21, Noxa, and Puma, but it retains the ability to activate a small subset of p53 target genes, including Bax. Surprisingly, p53(25,26) can nonetheless suppress tumor growth in cancers derived from the epithelial, mesenchymal, central nervous system, and lymphoid lineages. Therefore, full transactivation of most p53 target genes is dispensable for p53 tumor suppressor function in a range of tissue types. In contrast, a transcriptional activation mutant that is completely defective for transactivation, p53(25,26,53,54), fails to suppress tumor development. These findings demonstrate that transcriptional activation is indeed broadly critical for p53 tumor suppressor function, although this requirement reflects the limited transcriptional activity observed with p53(25,26) rather than robust transactivation of a full complement of p53 target genes.

  13. High frequency of p53 intronic point mutations in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xu; LI Fucai; SONG Yutong; LI Yinghui; FU Weineng; XU Zhenming; SUN Kailai

    2004-01-01

    Intronic point mutations are rare and totally unknown for human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). To explore the relationship of p53 gene intronic mutation to the development of human LSCC, DNA was extracted from both tumor tissues and matched normal tissues of 55 patients with LSCC in northeast of China. Polymerase chain reaction amplification-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) combined with silver staining and DNA direct sequencing were used to detect mutations in exons 7~8 (p53E7 and p53E8) and introns 7~8 (p53I7 and p53I8) of p53 gene. The p53E7 mutation was detected in 17 out of 55 patients, and the p53I7 mutation in 21 patients. No mutation was found at p53E8 or p53I8 site. The difference between tumor group and paired normal group on the rates of both p53E7 and p53I7 mutations was statistically significant. The rate of p53I7 mutations in tumor tissue was higher than that of normal tissue, and so was that of p53E7. Sequence analysis revealed that most p53I7 mutations were at the nucleotides in the branch point sequence or the polypyrimidine tract in the 3′-splice acceptor site of the intron 7. The high incidence of p53 gene intronic mutation in LSCC indicates that genetic changes within the noncoding region of the p53 gene may serve as an alternative mechanism of activating the pathogenesis of human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Mutations in the noncoding region of this gene should be further studied.

  14. Radiosensitivity in lung cancer with focus on p53

    CERN Document Server

    Bergqvist, M

    2002-01-01

    In Sweden approximately 2800 new lung cancer patients are diagnosed every year. Radiotherapy is used with curative intention in certain groups of patients. The aim of this thesis is to study the basis of differences in radioresistance and the possibility to predict response to radiotherapy. In the first study we investigated, using the comet assay, four lung cancer cell lines with different sensitivity towards radiation. A clear dose-response relationship for radiation-induced DNA single strand and double strand breaks were found. All cell lines showed a remarkably efficient repair of both the DNA single strand and double strand breaks one hour after irradiation. However, further studies in one radioresistant and one radiosensitive cell line demonstrated that repair during the first 15 min had the best accordance with radiosensitivity measured as surviving fraction. In the second and third study, sequencing studies of the p53 gene were performed on cell lines as well as on tumour material. Cell lines that wer...

  15. Knockdown of p53 suppresses Nanog expression in embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelalim, Essam Mohamed, E-mail: emohamed@qf.org.qa [Qatar Biomedical Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, Doha 5825 (Qatar); Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Department of Cytology and Histology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Tooyama, Ikuo [Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We investigate the role of p53 in ESCs in the absence of DNA damage. •p53 knockdown suppresses ESC proliferation. •p53 knockdown downregulates Nanog expression. •p53 is essential for mouse ESC self-renewal. -- Abstract: Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) express high levels of cytoplasmic p53. Exposure of mouse ESCs to DNA damage leads to activation of p53, inducing Nanog suppression. In contrast to earlier studies, we recently reported that chemical inhibition of p53 suppresses ESC proliferation. Here, we confirm that p53 signaling is involved in the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of p53 induced downregulation of p21 and defects in ESC proliferation. Furthermore, p53 knockdown resulted in a significant downregulation in Nanog expression at 24 and 48 h post-transfection. p53 knockdown also caused a reduction in Oct4 expression at 48 h post-transfection. Conversely, exposure of ESCs to DNA damage caused a higher reduction of Nanog expression in control siRNA-treated cells than in p53 siRNA-treated cells. These data show that in the absence of DNA damage, p53 is required for the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal by regulating Nanog expression.

  16. Effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha on mutant p53 protein expression in colorectal cancer cell lines%肿瘤坏死因子alpha上调人结肠癌细胞株突变型p53蛋白的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包成梅; 毕大鹏; 周德明

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of TNF-alpha on mutant p53 expression in colorectal cancer cell lines. Methods: The cell lines HT-29 (which expresses mutant p53) and HCT116 (which expresses wild-type p53) were stimulated with TNF-alpha at different concentrations. Immunofluorescence and real-time quantitative RT-PCR were performed to detect the alterations of p53 protein and transcripts. Results: Immunofluorescence indicated that TNF-alpha can markedly induce nuclear p53 protein expression in HT-29 cells; in contrast, the effect of TNF-alpha on p53 expression in HCT116 cells was minimal. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR showed no substantial change of p53 mRNA in HT-29 or HCT116 cells after stimulation with TNF-atpha. Conclusions: TNF-alpha can dramatically induce nuclear mutant p53 protein expression in HT-29 cell line which expresses mutant p53, and this induction wasn't ascribed to the transcription upregulation But this p53-induction effect of TNF-alpha was minimal in HCT116 cell line which expresses wild-type p53. Our findings suggest that TNF-alpha may be a risk factor in the carcinogenesis of IBD patients carrying a p53 mutation.%目的:研究TNF-alpha对人结肠癌细胞株HT-29及HCT116 p53表达的影响.方法:给予人结肠癌细胞株HT-29(表达突变型p53蛋白)及HCT116(表达野生型p53蛋白)不同浓度的TNF-alpha刺激后,应用细胞免疫荧光及实时荧光定量PCR检测突变型p53蛋白表达及p53 mRNA水平的改变.结果:免疫荧光显示TNF-alpha刺激后能显著提高HT-29细胞核突变型p53蛋白的表达(P<0.05),而对表达野生型p53的HCT116的p53水平无明显改变.实时荧光定量PCR结果表明TNF-alpha刺激对HT-29及HCT-116的p53 mRNA水平无明显改变.结论:TNF-alpha能显著上调HT-29突变型p53蛋白的表达,但是该上调作用并不是发生于转录水平.TNF-alpha刺激对表达野生型p53的HCT116细胞株p53水平无明显改变.

  17. Gain of Cellular Adaptation Due to Prolonged p53 Impairment Leads to Functional Switchover from p53 to p73 during DNA Damage in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Juni; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Ray, Pallab; Hossain, Dewan Md Sakib; Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Adhikary, Arghya; Chattopadhyay, Sreya; Das, Tanya; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2010-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays the central role in regulating apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. From an evolutionary perspective, the activity of p53 has to be backed up by other protein(s) in case of any functional impairment of this protein, to trigger DNA damage-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. We adopted multiple experimental approaches to demonstrate that in p53-impaired cancer cells, DNA damage caused accumulation of p53 paralogue p73 via Chk-1 that strongly impacted Bax expressi...

  18. Studies on The Interactions Between NIRF and P53%NIRF对P53蛋白泛素化作用的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段昌柱; 蒲淑萍; TSUTOMU; MORI; HIDEO; KOCHI; 邱宗荫

    2006-01-01

    HEK293和HeLa细胞分别被Np95/ICBP90-like RING finger protein(NIRF)和P53转染后,细胞上清和免疫沉淀产物用SDS-聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳免疫印迹法分析;细菌合成GST-P53后,用GST pull-down技术检测NIRF与P53相互作用;在GST-P53、E1、E2和NIRF体外泛素化反应系统中,检测NIRF对P53的体外泛素化.结果表明:NIRF能与P53相互作用,NIRF不仅能与P53特异性结合,而且还会将P53泛素化,这种相互作用在细胞内和细胞外均能发生.推测NIRF可能是P53的一个新的负调节蛋白.

  19. Identification of Semaphorin3B as a Direct Target of p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensuke Ochi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A cDNA microarray analysis indicated that Semaphorin3B. (20Sema3B, a gene whose product is involved in axon guidance and axonal repulsion, is inducible by p53. Introduction of exogenous p53 into a glioblastoma cell line lacking wild-type p53. (20U373MG dramatically induced expression of Sema3B mRNA. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and a reporter assay confirmed that a potential p53 binding site present in the promoter region had p53-dependent transcriptional activity. Expression of endogenous Sema3B was induced in response to genotoxic stresses caused by adriamycin treatment or UV irradiation in a p53-dependent manner. Ectopic expression of Sema3B in p53-defective cells reduced the number of colonies in colony formation assays. These results suggest that Sema3B might play some role in regulating cell growth as a mediator of p53 tumor- suppressor activity.

  20. Nerve growth factor receptor negates the tumor suppressor p53 as a feedback regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Hao, Qian; Liao, Peng; Luo, Shiwen; Zhang, Minhong; Hu, Guohui; Liu, Hongbing; Zhang, Yiwei; Cao, Bo; Baddoo, Melody; Flemington, Erik K; Zeng, Shelya X; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer develops and progresses often by inactivating p53. Here, we unveil nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR, p75NTR or CD271) as a novel p53 inactivator. p53 activates NGFR transcription, whereas NGFR inactivates p53 by promoting its MDM2-mediated ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and by directly binding to its central DNA binding domain and preventing its DNA-binding activity. Inversely, NGFR ablation activates p53, consequently inducing apoptosis, attenuating survival, and reducing clonogenic capability of cancer cells, as well as sensitizing human cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents that induce p53 and suppressing mouse xenograft tumor growth. NGFR is highly expressed in human glioblastomas, and its gene is often amplified in breast cancers with wild type p53. Altogether, our results demonstrate that cancers hijack NGFR as an oncogenic inhibitor of p53. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15099.001 PMID:27282385

  1. Mitochondrial localization of the low level p53 protein in proliferative cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    p53 protein plays a central role in suppressing tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis through transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Emerging publications suggest that following stress, a fraction of p53 translocates to mitochondria to induce cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, the localization of p53 under unstressed conditions remains largely unexplored. Here we show that p53 is localized at mitochondria in absence of apoptotic stimuli, when cells are proliferating, localization observed in various cell types (rodent and human). This is also supported by acellular assays in which p53 bind strongly to mitochondria isolated from rat liver. Furthermore, the mitochondria subfractionation study and the alkaline treatment of the mitochondrial p53 revealed that the majority of mitochondrial p53 is present in the membranous compartments. Finally, we identified VDAC, a protein of the mitochondrial outer-membrane, as a putative partner of p53 in unstressed/proliferative cells.

  2. Mitochondrial localization of the low level p53 protein in proliferative cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferecatu, Ioana; Bergeaud, Marie; Rodriguez-Enfedaque, Aida; Le Floch, Nathalie [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Oliver, Lisa [INSERM U601, Universite de Nantes, Faculte de Medecine, Nantes Cedex (France); Rincheval, Vincent; Renaud, Flore [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Vallette, Francois M. [INSERM U601, Universite de Nantes, Faculte de Medecine, Nantes Cedex (France); Mignotte, Bernard [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Vayssiere, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jean-luc.vayssiere@uvsq.fr [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France)

    2009-10-02

    p53 protein plays a central role in suppressing tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis through transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Emerging publications suggest that following stress, a fraction of p53 translocates to mitochondria to induce cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, the localization of p53 under unstressed conditions remains largely unexplored. Here we show that p53 is localized at mitochondria in absence of apoptotic stimuli, when cells are proliferating, localization observed in various cell types (rodent and human). This is also supported by acellular assays in which p53 bind strongly to mitochondria isolated from rat liver. Furthermore, the mitochondria subfractionation study and the alkaline treatment of the mitochondrial p53 revealed that the majority of mitochondrial p53 is present in the membranous compartments. Finally, we identified VDAC, a protein of the mitochondrial outer-membrane, as a putative partner of p53 in unstressed/proliferative cells.

  3. Relation between p53 (exon 7) mutation and p53 overexpression in human cervical cancers%宫颈癌p53外显子7突变与p53蛋白高表达的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张娜; 李惠芳; 常艳丽; 梁莎

    2001-01-01

    目的探讨宫颈癌p53外显子7突变与p53蛋白高表达的关系。方法采用免疫组织化学、聚合酶链反应(PCR)、限制性酶解片段长度多态性(RFLP)分析等方法对49例宫颈癌组织石蜡包埋标本中p53外显子7的突变与p53蛋白表达进行了检测。结果 p53外显子7的突变率8.2%(4/49)显著低于p53蛋白阳性率49.0%(24/49)(χ2=18.05,P<0.001);p53外显子7突变不一定p53蛋白阳性。结论 p53外显子7突变可能是部分宫颈癌变的一个重要因素;大部分宫颈癌可能主要由于高危人乳头状瘤病毒(HPV)感染后,通过E6/p53蛋白复合物的形成使p53蛋白失活所致。%Objective To investigate the relation between p53 (exon 7) mutations and p53 overexpression in human cervical cancer.Methods p53 (exon 7) mutation and p53 overexpression were examined by immunohistochemistry,polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis in 49 cases of cervical cancers on their paraffin-embedded tissue specimens.Results There was significant difference between p53 (exon 7) mutation 4/49 (8.2%) and p53 overexpression 24/49 (49.0%) in cervical cancer (χ2=18.05,P<0.001);not all cases of p53 mutation had p53 protein positive.Conclusion The p53 (exon 7) mutation is an important factor in part of cervical cancers,but anomalous structure and inactivation of p53 proteins caused by E6/p53 protein complex formed in high risk HPV infection are the significant cause of the greater part of cervical cancers.

  4. The role and prognostic significance of p53 mutation in colorectal carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yang Ji; DR Smith; HS Goh

    2000-01-01

    AIM To study the prognostic significance of the p53 cDNA mutation and mutant p53 protein in colorectaladenocarcinomas.METHODS p53 cDNA mutaiton was detected with RT-PCR-SSCP, and mutant p53 protein overexpressionwas detected by PAb 240 monoclonal antibody in 100 cases of colorectal adenocarcinomas. The follow-upsurvey of all patients were done within the five years after operation, and comparing with p53 cDNAmutation and mutant p53 protein overexpression for the prognostic significance of colorectaladenocarcinomas. The data is treated with SPSS computer program, Kaplan-Meier Survival Plots werecalculated and analyzed by Log-rank analysis.RESULTS Fifty-one cases of p53 eDNA mutations (51%) were found with RT-PCR-SSCP and 76 cases ofmutant p53 protein overexpression (76%) found with PAb 240 monoclonal antibody immunohistochemistrystaining in 100 cases of colorectal adenocarcinomas. There are no relationship with Dukes stage in thestatistics in p53 eDNA mutation (mutation: Dukes A 9%, B 10%, C 20%, D 12%; No mutation: A 13%, B12%, C 12%, D 12%) and mutant p53 protein overexpression (positive: Dukes A 17%, B 6%, C 27%, D16%; negative: A 5%, B 6%, C 5%, D 8%) (P<0.05). Moreover, the data show p53 cDNA mutation isassociated with mutant p53 protein overexpression (both positive 49%, single positive 29%, both negative22%) (P<0.01), p53 eDNA mutation can provide prognostic information (p53 eDNA mutation positive:alive 35, dead 16; negative: alive 42, dead 7) (P<0.05), and mutant p53 protein overexpression isambiguous and does not assess prognosis (p53 protein overexpression positive: alive 58, dead 18; negative:alive 19, dead 5) (P = 0.72) with Kaplan-Meier Survival Plots and Log-rank analysis.CONCLUSION p53 eDNA mutation is associated with mutant p53 protein overexpression (p53 eDNAmutation and mutant p53 protein overexpression both positive 49%, single positive 29%, both negative 22%)(P<0.01) and p53 eDNA mutation can provide poor prognostic information, and is the

  5. ISG20L1 is a p53 family target gene that modulates genotoxic stress-induced autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Kimberly N

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autophagy is characterized by the sequestration of cytoplasm and organelles into multimembrane vesicles and subsequent degradation by the cell's lysosomal system. It is linked to many physiological functions in human cells including stress response, protein degradation, organelle turnover, caspase-independent cell death and tumor suppression. Malignant transformation is frequently associated with deregulation of autophagy and several tumor suppressors can modulate autophagic processes. The tumor suppressor p53 can induce autophagy after metabolic or genotoxic stress through transcriptionally-dependent and -independent mechanisms. In this study we expand on the former mechanism by functionally characterizing a p53 family target gene, ISG20L1 under conditions of genotoxic stress. Results We identified a p53 target gene, ISG20L1, and show that transcription of the gene can be regulated by all three p53 family members (p53, p63, and p73. We generated an antibody to ISG20L1 and found that it localizes to the nucleolar and perinucleolar regions of the nucleus and its protein levels increase in a p53- and p73-dependent manner after various forms of genotoxic stress. When ectopically expressed in epithelial cancer-derived cell lines, ISG20L1 expression decreased clonogenic survival without a concomitant elevation in apoptosis and this effect was partially rescued in cells that were ATG5 deficient. Knockdown of ISG20L1 did not alter 5-FU induced apoptosis as assessed by PARP and caspase-3 cleavage, sub-G1 content, and DNA laddering. Thus, we investigated the role of ISG20L1 in autophagy, a process commonly associated with type II cell death, and found that ISG20L1 knockdown decreased levels of autophagic vacuoles and LC3-II after genotoxic stress as assessed by electron microscopy, biochemical, and immunohistochemical measurements of LC3-II. Conclusions Our identification of ISG20L1 as a p53 family target and discovery that modulation

  6. Def defines a conserved nucleolar pathway that leads p53 to proteasome-independent degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Ting; Hui SHI; Guan, Yihong; Huang, Delai; Chen, Ye; Lane, David P; Chen, Jun; Peng, Jinrong

    2013-01-01

    p53 protein turnover through the ubiquitination pathway is a vital mechanism in the regulation of its transcriptional activity; however, little is known about p53 turnover through proteasome-independent pathway(s). The digestive organ expansion factor (Def) protein is essential for the development of digestive organs. In zebrafish, loss of function of def selectively upregulates the expression of p53 response genes, which raises a question as to what is the relationship between Def and p53. W...

  7. Clinical Significance of Mutant P53 Protein Expression in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chun’an BIAN; Li, Zhongyou; Youtao XU; Wang, Jie; Xu, Lin; Shen, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective P53 is a tumor protein that acts as a tumor suppressor. The mutation of P53 may cause loss of tumor suppressor functions and gain of functions favoring cellular proliferation and apoptosis inhibition. The clinical implications of the tumor protein P53 gene (TP53) mutation in lung adenocarcinoma are indefinite. The aim of this study is to explore the clinical significance of the mutant P53 protein expression in lung adenocarcinoma tissues. Methods The clinicopathologic...

  8. New tricks of an old molecule: lifespan regulation by p53

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Johannes H.; HELFAND, STEPHEN L.

    2006-01-01

    As guardian of the genome the tumor suppressor p53 controls a crucial point in protection from cellular damage and response to stressors. Activation of p53 can have beneficial (DNA repair) or detrimental (apoptosis) consequences for individual cells. In either case activation of p53 is thought to safeguard the organism at large from the deleterious effects of various stresses. Recent data suggest that the function of p53 might also play a role in the regulation of organismal lifespan. Increas...

  9. Expression of p53 and CD44 in Canine Breast Tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yun; CUI Wen; CHENG Xi; FENG Xinchang

    2008-01-01

    The p53 and CD44 expression of 10 cases in canine breast tumor were examined utilizing immunohistochemical assay with rabbit anti-mouse polyclonal antibodies against p53 or CD44,respectively.The p53 expression was significantly higher in malignant than in benign breast tumor.The expression of CD44 was not significantly different in malignant breast cancer and benign breast tumor.This suggests that p53 can be used as an indicator for animal prognosis.

  10. p53 immunoreaction in endoscopic biopsy specimens of colorectal cancer, and its prognostic significance.

    OpenAIRE

    A. Yamaguchi; Nakagawara, G.; Kurosaka, Y.; Nishimura, G.; Yonemura, Y.; Miyazaki, I.

    1993-01-01

    The expression of p53 protein was immunohistochemically studied in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens of 203 colorectal carcinomas by use of a monoclonal antibody specific for the p53 protein. PAb1801. p53 protein expression with its reactivity localised in nuclei was found in 121 (59.6%) of the cancers. There was no correlation of p53 immunoreactivity with histological classification, wall invasion, lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, lymph node metastases, or peritoneal meta...

  11. p53 increases MHC class I expression by upregulating the endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase ERAP1

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bei; Niu, Dandan; Lai, Liyun; Ren, Ee Chee

    2013-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor has an important role in cancer cells. Here we show that p53 regulates expression of major histocompatibility complex I on the cell surface. We show that the tumour cell line HCT116, which lacks p53 exhibits significantly lower major histocompatibility complex I expression than its wild-type counterpart. Using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and gene expression analysis, we demonstrate that p53 upregulates expression of endoplasmic reticulum...

  12. Nuclear accumulation and activation of p53 in embryonic stem cells after DNA damage

    OpenAIRE

    Rolletschek Alexandra; Solozobova Valeriya; Blattner Christine

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background P53 is a key tumor suppressor protein. In response to DNA damage, p53 accumulates to high levels in differentiated cells and activates target genes that initiate cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Since stem cells provide the proliferative cell pool within organisms, an efficient DNA damage response is crucial. Results In proliferating embryonic stem cells, p53 is localized predominantly in the cytoplasm. DNA damage-induced nuclear accumulation of p53 in embryonic stem cells...

  13. Interaction of hepatitis B virus with tumor suppressor gene p53: its significance and biological function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of the interaction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) with tumor suppressor p53 and its role in the hepatocarcinogenesis have been studied by PCR-directed sequencing, gel shift assays and in situ ultraviolet cross-linking assay. The biological function of the interaction of HBV with p53 gene was investigated by co-transfection of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene, p53 and HBV DNA, and quantitative PCR. Among the 16 primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC) samples, 13 were HBV-DNA positive,10 HBxAg positive and 9 p53 protein positive. The p53 gene point mutation was found in 5 samples, one of which had a G to T substitution located at codon 249. After analyzing the HBV genome by a computer program, a p53 response element binding sequence was found in HBV genome at upstream of enhancer I, from 1047 to 1059 nucleotides. This sequence could specifically bind to p53 protein, increase p53 protein accumulation in the PHC cells and stimulate the transactivating activity of p53 and HBV replication .The results also revealed that HBxAg could combine with p53 protein to form a complex in the cells and enhance CAT expression. Immunocytochemical staining showed that p53 protein complex was located in the cytoplasm and the process of p53 entry to nuclei was, in part, blocked. From our results, we conclude that the mutation of p53 gene at codon 249 is infrequent in HBV-associated PHC, the DNA-protein binding between HBV and p53, and the protein-protein binding between HBxAg and p53 might lead to the reduction or inactivation of p53 protein, which in turn resulting in HBV-associated hepatocarcinogenesis.

  14. p53 Mutations and Protein Overexpression in Primary Colorectal Cancer and its Liver Metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To compare p53 status in primary and hepatic metastatic colorectal cancer in 34 patients. Methods: p53 gene status (exons 5- 9) was examined by PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and automated sequencing. P53 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibody DO-7. Results: p53 mutations were found in exons 5 through 9 in 21 of 34 patients (61.8%). Among them, 5 patients had mutation in liver metastasis but not in their primary tumors while in the other patients the same mutations were found in both primary and metastatic colorectal cancers. In no patients was p53 mutation exclusively found in the primary colorectal tumors. Moreover, additional mutation was detected in the metastatic lesions in two cases. Of the 37 mutations within the exons examined, 73% was missense mutation and 16% was nonsense mutation. There were 4 microinsertions. P53 protein was overexpressed in both primary and metastatic colorectal cancers with p53 gene mutations. The presence of p53 mutation significantly correlated with p53 protein accumulation (r=0.96, p< 0.001). However, in 4 patients with p53 nonsense mutation, immunohistochemical staining was negative. In three patients who showed no p53 mutation of the primary tumor, p53 protein was consistently overexpressed. Conclusion: In colorectal cancers, p53 gene mutation usually appears first in the primary tumor and maintains as such but is more prominent when metastasized to the liver. However, p53 gene mutation may occur only after being metastasized.Although p53 gene mutation and p53 protein overexpression correlate with each other, either parameter examined alone may lead to false positive or negative results.

  15. Translational regulation of p53 as a potential tumor therapy target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Schumacher (Björn); A. Gartner (Anton)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe tumor suppressor p53 is a central player in apoptosis induction in response to oncogenic stimuli and DNA damage. As activation of p53 has been suggested as a prime strategy for future tumor therapy, inhibition of negative regulators of p53 activity would be a similarly desirable stra

  16. Out of the jaws of death: PRMT5 steers p53

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Shelley L.

    2008-01-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 triggers either cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis. Now, arginine methylation joins a panoply of other post-translational modifications that regulate p53. PRMT5 mediates p53 methylation, which disposes the cell to arrest rather than death.

  17. Treating cancer when pRb and p53 cannot be reactivated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Activation of oncoproteins and inactivation of tumor suppressors induces tumorigenesis. When these events happen upstream of pRb and p53, cancer therapies may initially succeed and then fail when pRb and p53 are activated and then re-inactivated. Therapies might succeed if they remain effective when pRb and p53 are genetically inactivated.

  18. The XPB and XPD DNA helicases are components of the p53-mediated apoptosis pathway.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X.W. Wang (Xin Wei); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.D. Coursen; M.K. Gibson (Michael); S.E. Lupold; K. Forrester; G. Xu; L. Elmore; H. Yeh; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); C.C. Harris

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe molecular pathway of p53-dependent apoptosis (programmed cell death) is poorly understood. Because p53 binds to the basal transcription-repair complex TFIIH and modulates its DNA helicase activities, we hypothesized that TFIIH DNA helicases XPB and XPD are members of the p53-mediated

  19. Genotoxic exposure: novel cause of selection for a functional ΔN-p53 isoform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P.M. Melis; E.M. Hoogervorst; C.T.M. van Oostrom; E. Zwart; T.M. Breit; J.L.A. Pennings; A de Vries; H. van Steeg

    2011-01-01

    The p53 gene is frequently mutated in cancers and it is vital for cell cycle control, homeostasis and carcinogenesis. We describe a novel p53 mutational spectrum, different to those generally observed in human and murine tumors. Our study shows a high prevalence of nonsense mutations in the p53 N te

  20. Loss of p53 Ser18 and Atm results in embryonic lethality without cooperation in tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Armata

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation at murine Serine 18 (human Serine 15 is a critical regulatory process for the tumor suppressor function of p53. p53Ser18 residue is a substrate for ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM and ATM-related (ATR protein kinases. Studies of mice with a germ-line mutation that replaces Ser18 with Ala (p53(S18A mice have demonstrated that loss of phosphorylation of p53Ser18 leads to the development of tumors, including lymphomas, fibrosarcomas, leukemia and leiomyosarcomas. The predominant lymphoma is B-cell lymphoma, which is in contrast to the lymphomas observed in Atm(-/- animals. This observation and the fact that multiple kinases phosphorylate p53Ser18 suggest Atm-independent tumor suppressive functions of p53Ser18. Therefore, in order to examine p53Ser18 function in relationship to ATM, we analyzed the lifespan and tumorigenesis of mice with combined mutations in p53Ser18 and Atm. Surprisingly, we observed no cooperation in survival and tumorigenesis in compound p53(S18A and Atm(-/- animals. However, we observed embryonic lethality in the compound mutant animals. In addition, the homozygous p53Ser18 mutant allele impacted the weight of Atm(-/- animals. These studies examine the genetic interaction of p53Ser18 and Atm in vivo. Furthermore, these studies demonstrate a role of p53Ser18 in regulating embryonic survival and motor coordination.

  1. KSHV latent protein LANA2 inhibits sumo2 modification of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura, Marcos-Villar; de la Cruz-Herrera, Carlos F; Ferreirós, Alba; Baz-Martínez, Maite; Lang, Valerie; Vidal, Anxo; Muñoz-Fontela, Cesar; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Collado, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a crucial antiviral role and targeting of p53 by viral proteins is a common mechanism involved in virus oncogenesis. The activity of p53 is tightly regulated at the post-translational levels through a myriad of modifications. Among them, modification of p53 by SUMO has been associated with the onset of cellular senescence. Kaposi´s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) expresses several proteins targeting p53, including the latent protein LANA2 that regulates polyubiquitylation and phosphorylation of p53. Here we show that LANA2 also inhibits the modification of p53 by SUMO2. Furthermore, we show that the reduction of p53-SUMO2 conjugation by LANA2, as well as the p53-LANA2 interaction, both require the SUMOylation of the viral protein and its interaction with SUMO or SUMOylated proteins in a non-covalent manner. Finally, we show that the control of p53-SUMO2 conjugation by LANA2 correlates with its ability to inhibit SUMO2- and type I interferon-induced senescence. These results highlight the importance of p53 SUMOylation in the control of virus infection and suggest that viral oncoproteins could contribute to viral infection and cell transformation by abrogating p53 SUMOylation. PMID:25607652

  2. Substrate phosphorylation and feedback regulation in JFK-promoted p53 destabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luyang; Shi, Lei; Wang, Feng; Huangyang, Peiwei; Si, Wenzhe; Yang, Jie; Yao, Zhi; Shang, Yongfeng

    2011-02-11

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a central role in integrating cellular responses to various stresses. Tight regulation of p53 is thus essential for the maintenance of genome integrity and normal cell proliferation. Previously, we reported that JFK, the only Kelch domain-containing F-box protein in human, promotes ubiquitination and degradation of p53 and that unlike the other E3 ligases for p53, all of which possess an intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity, JFK destabilizes p53 through the assembly of a Skp1-Cul1-F-box complex. Here, we report that the substrate recognition by JFK requires phosphorylation of p53 in its central core region by CSN (COP9 signalosome)-associated kinase. Significantly, inhibition of CSN-associated kinase activity or knockdown of CSN5 impairs JFK-promoted p53 degradation, enhances p53-dependent transcription, and promotes cell growth suppression, G(1) arrest, and apoptosis. Moreover, we showed that JFK is transcriptionally regulated by p53 and forms an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop with p53. These data may shed new light on the functional connection between CSN, Skp1-Cul1-F-box ubiquitin ligase, and p53 and provide a molecular mechanism for the regulation of JFK-promoted p53 degradation.

  3. Immunohistochemical expression of p53, p16 and hTERT in oral squamous cell carcinoma and potentially malignant disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Correa Abrahao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Oral carcinogenesis is a multi-step process. One possible step is the development of potentially malignant disorders known as leukoplakia and erytroplakia. The objective of this study was to use immunohistochemistry to analyze the patterns of expression of the cell-cycle regulatory proteins p53 and p16INK4a in potentially malignant disorders (PMD of the oral mucosa (with varying degrees of dysplasia and in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC to correlate them with the expression of telomerase (hTERT. Fifteen PMD and 30 OSCC tissue samples were analyzed. Additionally, 5 cases of oral epithelial hyperplasia (OEH were added to analyze clinically altered mucosa presenting as histological hyperplasia without dysplasia. p53 positivity was observed in 93.3% of PMD, in 63.3% of OSCC and in 80% of OEH. Although there was no correlation between p53 expression and the grade of dysplasia, all cases with severe dysplasia presented p53 suprabasal immunoexpression. p16INK4a expression was observed in 26.7% of PMD, in 43.3% of OSCC and in 2 cases of OEH. The p16INK4a expression in OEH, PMD and OSCC was unable to differentiate non-dysplastic from dysplastic oral epithelium. hTERT positivity was observed in all samples of OEH and PMD and in 90% of OSCC. The high hTERT immunoexpression in all three lesions indicates that telomerase is present in clinically altered oral mucosa but does not differentiate hyperplastic from dysplastic oral epithelium. In PMD of the oral mucosa, the p53 immunoexpression changes according to the degree of dysplasia by mechanisms independent of p16INK4a and hTERT.

  4. p53-independent ibrutinib responses in an Eμ-TCL1 mouse model demonstrates efficacy in high-risk CLL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H J; Gallardo, M; Ma, H; Zhang, X; Larsson, C A; Mejia, A; Hornbaker, M J; Qi, Y; Su, X; Pageon, L R; Quintas-Cardama, A; Post, S M

    2016-01-01

    Deletion of the short-arm of chromosome 17 (17p-) is one of the most critical genetic alterations used in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) risk stratification. The tumor suppressor TP53 maps to this region, and its loss or mutation accelerates CLL progression, hampers response to chemotherapy and shortens survival. Although florescent in situ hybridization analyses for 17p deletions are routinely performed during clinical diagnoses, p53 mutational status is often unexamined. Given the limited clinical data that exists for frontline treatment of patients with CLL harboring TP53 mutations, there is a need to understand the biology of CLL with TP53 mutations and identify treatment strategies for this subset of patients. Herein, we used a CLL mouse model (Eμ-TCL1) harboring one of the most common TP53 hot-spot mutations observed in CLL (p53(R172H), corresponding to p53(R175H) in humans) to evaluate its impact on disease progression, survival, response to therapy and loss of the remaining wild-type Trp53 allele following ibrutinib treatment. We show that ibrutinib was effective in increasing survival, activating cellular programs outside the p53 pathway and did not place selective pressure on the remaining wild-type Trp53 allele. These data provide evidence that ibrutinib acts as an effective treatment for aggressive forms of CLL with TP53 mutations. PMID:27284738

  5. DNA damage in stem cells activates p21, inhibits p53, and induces symmetric self-renewing divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insinga, Alessandra; Cicalese, Angelo; Faretta, Mario; Gallo, Barbara; Albano, Luisa; Ronzoni, Simona; Furia, Laura; Viale, Andrea; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    DNA damage leads to a halt in proliferation owing to apoptosis or senescence, which prevents transmission of DNA alterations. This cellular response depends on the tumor suppressor p53 and functions as a powerful barrier to tumor development. Adult stem cells are resistant to DNA damage-induced apoptosis or senescence, however, and how they execute this response and suppress tumorigenesis is unknown. We show that irradiation of hematopoietic and mammary stem cells up-regulates the cell cycle inhibitor p21, a known target of p53, which prevents p53 activation and inhibits p53 basal activity, impeding apoptosis and leading to cell cycle entry and symmetric self-renewing divisions. p21 also activates DNA repair, limiting DNA damage accumulation and self-renewal exhaustion. Stem cells with moderate DNA damage and diminished self-renewal persist after irradiation, however. These findings suggest that stem cells have evolved a unique, p21-dependent response to DNA damage that leads to their immediate expansion and limits their long-term survival.

  6. Defective accumulation of p53 protein in x-irradiated human tumor cells with low proteasome activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We established p53-inducible clones, 99-p53 His, by transfecting an ecdyson-inducible vector containing the wild type p53 gene into p53-null H1299, a human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line. In contrast to normal human diploid cells, in which p53 is accumulated after X-irradiation, the level of p53 protein did not change following 4 Gy of X-rays. We found that phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 was induced similarly between 99-p53 His cells and normal human cells. However, p53 was more resistant to degradation in 99-p53 His cells, and its level did not change after treatment with cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, while p53 protein in normal human cells was degraded rapidly. Furthermore, proteasome inhibitors, ALLN, MG115, and MG132 accumulated p53 protein significantly in normal human cells, but there was no accumulation of p53 protein in 99-p53 His cells. These results indicate that DNA damage signaling through ATM is functional in 99-p53 His cells, but they have defect in p53 degradation pathway. Thus, low proteasome activity in 99-p53 His cells could be a reason for the defective accumulation of p53 protein following X-irradiation. Present study shows that proteasome activity is an important determinant of p53 stability, when the wild-type p53 gene is expressed in p53-null cancer cells

  7. The novel fusion proteins, GnRH-p53 and GnRHIII-p53, expression and their anti-tumor effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiyuan Jia

    Full Text Available p53, one of the most well studied tumor suppressor factor, is responsible to a variety of damage owing to the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the tumor cells. More than 50% of human tumors contain mutation or deletion of p53. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH, as the ligand of Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R, was used to deliver p53 into tumor cells. The p53 fusion proteins GnRH-p53 and GnRH iii-p53 were expressed and their targeted anti-tumor effects were determined. GnRH mediates its fusion proteins transformation into cancer cells. The intracellular delivery of p53 fusion proteins exerted the inhibition of the growth of H1299 cells in vitro and the reduction of tumor volume in vivo. Their anti-tumor effect was functioned by the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest induced by p53. Hence, the fusion protein could be a novel protein drug for anti-tumor therapy.

  8. Structural Basis of Competitive Recognition of p53 and MDM2 by HAUSP/USP7: Implications for the Regulation of the p53-MDM2 Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus-associated ubiquitin-specific protease (HAUSP, also known as USP7, a deubiquitylating enzyme of the ubiquitin-specific processing protease family, specifically deubiquitylates both p53 and MDM2, hence playing an important yet enigmatic role in the p53-MDM2 pathway. Here we demonstrate that both p53 and MDM2 specifically recognize the N-terminal tumor necrosis factor-receptor associated factor (TRAF-like domain of HAUSP in a mutually exclusive manner. HAUSP preferentially forms a stable HAUSP-MDM2 complex even in the presence of excess p53. The HAUSP-binding elements were mapped to a peptide fragment in the carboxy-terminus of p53 and to a short-peptide region preceding the acidic domain of MDM2. The crystal structures of the HAUSP TRAF-like domain in complex with p53 and MDM2 peptides, determined at 2.3-A and 1.7-A resolutions, respectively, reveal that the MDM2 peptide recognizes the same surface groove in HAUSP as that recognized by p53 but mediates more extensive interactions. Structural comparison led to the identification of a consensus peptide-recognition sequence by HAUSP. These results, together with the structure of a combined substrate-binding-and-deubiquitylation domain of HAUSP, provide important insights into regulation of the p53-MDM2 pathway by HAUSP.

  9. Evolution of p53 transactivation specificity through the lens of a yeast-based functional assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Lion

    Full Text Available Co-evolution of transcription factors (TFs with their respective cis-regulatory network enhances functional diversity in the course of evolution. We present a new approach to investigate transactivation capacity of sequence-specific TFs in evolutionary studies. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as an in vivo test tube and p53 proteins derived from human and five commonly used animal models were chosen as proof of concept. p53 is a highly conserved master regulator of environmental stress responses. Previous reports indicated conserved p53 DNA binding specificity in vitro, even for evolutionary distant species. We used isogenic yeast strains where p53-dependent transactivation was measured towards chromosomally integrated p53 response elements (REs. Ten REs were chosen to sample a wide range of DNA binding affinity and transactivation capacity for human p53 and proteins were expressed at two levels using an inducible expression system. We showed that the assay is amenable to study thermo-sensitivity of frog p53, and that chimeric constructs containing an ectopic transactivation domain could be rapidly developed to enhance the activity of proteins, such as fruit fly p53, that are poorly effective in engaging the yeast transcriptional machinery. Changes in the profile of relative transactivation towards the ten REs were measured for each p53 protein and compared to the profile obtained with human p53. These results, which are largely independent from relative p53 protein levels, revealed widespread evolutionary divergence of p53 transactivation specificity, even between human and mouse p53. Fruit fly and human p53 exhibited the largest discrimination among REs while zebrafish p53 was the least selective.

  10. 在应答DNA损伤时P53的翻译后修饰

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝春燕; 苏海翔

    2001-01-01

    肿瘤抑制基因p53在肿瘤发生中发挥着重要作用,翻译后修饰是调节P53蛋白水平及活性的主要方式之一.癌基因mdm2编码的Mdm2蛋白是p53的负性调节因子,它可通过调节p53的稳定性来调节P53蛋白的水平.在应答DNA损伤时,P53的翻译后修饰可抑制P53和Mdm2的相互作用,使其半衰期延长,P53水平升高.P53N-末端具有多个可磷酸化的位点,这些位点的磷酸化可抑制P53与Mdm2的相互作用,使P53水平和转录活性升高.而P53 C-末端位点的磷酸化可激活P53与特异序列DNA结合的潜能;且C-末端某些位点的乙酰化亦可激活P53与DNA结合的潜能,进而调节P53的水平及活性.

  11. Loss of p19(Arf facilitates the angiogenic switch and tumor initiation in a multi-stage cancer model via p53-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle B Ulanet

    Full Text Available The Arf tumor suppressor acts as a sensor of oncogenic signals, countering aberrant proliferation in large part via activation of the p53 transcriptional program, though a number of p53-independent functions have been described. Mounting evidence suggests that, in addition to promoting tumorigenesis via disruptions in the homeostatic balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis of overt cancer cells, genetic alterations leading to tumor suppressor loss of function or oncogene gain of function can also incite tumor development via effects on the tumor microenvironment. In a transgenic mouse model of multi-stage pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinogenesis (PNET driven by inhibition of the canonical p53 and Rb tumor suppressors with SV40 large T-antigen (Tag, stochastic progression to tumors is limited in part by a requirement for initiation of an angiogenic switch. Despite inhibition of p53 by Tag in this mouse PNET model, concomitant disruption of Arf via genetic knockout resulted in a significantly accelerated pathway to tumor formation that was surprisingly not driven by alterations in tumor cell proliferation or apoptosis, but rather via earlier activation of the angiogenic switch. In the setting of a constitutional p53 gene knockout, loss of Arf also accelerated tumor development, albeit to a lesser degree. These findings demonstrate that Arf loss of function can promote tumorigenesis via facilitating angiogenesis, at least in part, through p53-independent mechanisms.

  12. Study of the Relations of P53 Expression to the Colorectal Carcinoma%P53表达与大肠癌的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    粟连秀

    2001-01-01

    目的:研究大肠癌中P53的表达与浸润转移的关系.方法:应用S-P免疫组织化学方法检测大肠癌中P53的表达.结果:大肠癌中P53的阳性率为51.2%.大肠癌中P53过表达与浸润程度(P<0.01)和淋巴结转移(P<0.05)有关.结论:P53过表达在大肠癌的浸润转移过程中起着重要作用.

  13. P53 Mutations Change Phosphatidylinositol Acyl Chain Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Naguib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP second messengers relay extracellular growth cues through the phosphorylation status of the inositol sugar, a signal transduction system that is deregulated in cancer. In stark contrast to PIP inositol head-group phosphorylation, changes in phosphatidylinositol (PI lipid acyl chains in cancer have remained ill-defined. Here, we apply a mass-spectrometry-based method capable of unbiased high-throughput identification and quantification of cellular PI acyl chain composition. Using this approach, we find that PI lipid chains represent a cell-specific fingerprint and are unperturbed by serum-mediated signaling in contrast to the inositol head group. We find that mutation of Trp53 results in PIs containing reduced-length fatty acid moieties. Our results suggest that the anchoring tails of lipid second messengers form an additional layer of PIP signaling in cancer that operates independently of PTEN/PI3-kinase activity but is instead linked to p53.

  14. Jasmonates induce nonapoptotic death in high-resistance mutant p53-expressing B-lymphoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fingrut, Orit; Reischer, Dorit; Rotem, Ronit; Goldin, Natalia; Altboum, Irit; Zan-Bar, Israel; Flescher, Eliezer

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in p53, a tumor suppressor gene, occur in more than half of human cancers. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that jasmonates (novel anticancer agents) can induce death in mutated p53-expressing cells.Two clones of B-lymphoma cells were studied, one expressing wild-type (wt) p53 and the other expressing mutated p53.Jasmonic acid and methyl jasmonate (0.25–3 mM) were each equally cytotoxic to both clones, whereas mutant p53-expressing cells were resistant to treatment with the radio...

  15. Autoimmunity against p53 predicts invasive cancer with poor survival in patients with an ovarian mass

    OpenAIRE

    Vogl, F D; M. Frey; Kreienberg, R; Runnebaum, I B

    2000-01-01

    Serum autoantibodies against the p53 protein (p53 AAb) were analysed with a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on highly purified and renatured p53. In a hospital-based cohort study, preoperative sera from 113 patients with ovarian cancer, 15 patients with borderline tumours and 117 patients with benign tumours of the ovaries were studied. The prevalence of p53 AAb in patients with invasive cancer was 19% (21/113). No p53 AAb were found in patients with borderline...

  16. Crystal Structure of a p53 Core Tetramer Bound to DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Malecka, Kimberly A.; Ho, William C.; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2008-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 regulates downstream genes in response to many cellular stresses and is frequently mutated in human cancers. Here, we report the use of a crosslinking strategy to trap a tetrameric p53 DNA binding domain (p53DBD) bound to DNA and the X-ray crystal structure of the protein/DNA complex. The structure reveals that two p53DBD dimers bind to B form DNA with no relative twist and that a p53 tetramer can bind to DNA without introducing significant DNA bending. The numerous d...

  17. The role of tumor suppressor p53 in the antioxidant defense and metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Budanov, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is inactivated in most cancers and the critical role of p53 in the suppression of carcinogenesis has been confirmed in many mouse models. The protein product of the tumor suppressor p53 gene works as a transcriptional regulator, activating expression of numerous genes involved in cell death, cell cycle arrest, senescence, DNA-repair and many other processes. In spite of the multiple efforts to characterize the functions of p53, the mechanisms of tumor suppression by p53 a...

  18. Functions of TAp63 and p53 in restraining the development of metastatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Eh; Morton, JP; Timpson, P; TUCCI P; Melino, G.; Flores, ER; Sansom, OJ; Vousden, KH; Muller, PAJ

    2013-01-01

    Many tumours harbour mutations in the p53 tumour-suppressor gene that result in the expression of a mutant p53 protein. This mutant p53 protein has, in most cases, lost wild-type transcriptional activity and can also acquire novel functions in promoting invasion and metastasis. One of the mechanisms underlying these novel functions involves the ability of the mutant p53 to interfere with other transcription factors, including the p53 family protein TAp63. To investigate whether simultaneous d...

  19. Allele specific gain-of-function activity of p53 mutants in lung cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, Catherine A.; Frum, Rebecca; Pearsall, Isabella; Singh, Shilpa; Windle, Brad; Yeudall, Andrew; Deb, Swati P.; Deb, Sumitra

    2012-01-01

    p53 mutations are mostly single amino acid changes resulting in expression of a stable mutant protein with “gain of function” (GOF) activity having a dominant oncogenic role rather than simple loss of function of wild-type p53. Knock-down of mutant p53 in human lung cancer cell lines with different endogenous p53 mutants results in loss of GOF activity as shown by lowering of cell growth rate. Two lung cancer cell lines, ABC1 and H1437 carrying endogenous mutants p53–P278S and –R267P, both sh...

  20. Coordination of the Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Activities of p53 in Response to DNA Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Pu, Tian; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a key role in the cellular response to various stresses. Most previous studies have focused on either the nuclear or cytoplasmic proapoptotic functions of p53, ignoring the combination of both functions. To explore how the two functions of p53 are coordinated in the DNA damage response via computer simulation, we construct a model for the p53 network comprising coupled positive and negative feedback loops involving p53, Mdm2, and Akt, as well as PUMA and Bax. In...

  1. The novel partnership of L-GILZ and p53: a new affair in cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Ayroldi, Emira; Marchetti, Cristina; Riccardi, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    A recent report from our laboratory reveals how long glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (L-Gilz) protein binds to p53 and mouse double minute 2 homolog (Mdm2), thus dissociating the p53/Mdm2 complex and activating p53 with subsequent activation of downstream genes p21 and p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (Puma). p53 activation appears to be the mechanism by which both basal and glucocorticoid (GC)-induced L-Gilz inhibits proliferation and induces antioncogenic activity in human cancer.

  2. EFFECTIVE NEW CANCER THERAPIES WHICH ARE INDEPENDENT OF P53 GENE STATUS

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken; Kondo, Natsuko; Mori, Eiichiro; Noda, Taichi; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-01-01

    The gene product of the tumor suppressor gene p53 is known to play an important role in cancer therapy. The p53 molecule induces cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA repair after cells are subjected to cancer therapies involving ionizing radiation, hyperthermia and anti-cancer drugs. Patients with cancers bearing mutated (m) p53 or deleted p53 gene often have a poorer prognosis than those with cancers bearing wild-type (wt) p53 gene. We reported that efficient cell lethality by ionizing radia...

  3. Analysis of P53 Mutation and Invasion Front Grading in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐三保; 徐东选; 周彬

    2010-01-01

    We examined P53 mutation and invasion front grading (IFG) in 30 cases of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). The association of P53 mutation and IFG scores with clinicopa-thological parameters was evaluated. P53 mutation existed in exon 5-8 in 15 out of the 30 OSCCs (50%). The incidence of P53 mutation was not associated with age, gender, N value and TNM stage. However, there was a significant correlation between P53 mutation and T value (P=0.046). There were no statistically significant correlations amo...

  4. Cloning and sequencing of a DNA fragment encoding N37 apoptotic peptide derived from p53

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective It was reported that p53 apoptotic peptide (N37) could inhibit p73 gene through being bound with iASPP,which could induce tumor cell apoptosis. To further explore the function of N37,we constructed the cloning plasmid of DNA fragment encoding p53 (N37) apoptotic peptide by using DNA synthesis and molecular biology methods. Methods According to human p53 sequence from the GenBank database,the primer of p53(N37) gene was designed using Primer V7.0 software. The DNA fragment encoding p53 (N37) apopto...

  5. Effects of p53 overexpression on neoplastic cell pro-liferation and apoptosis in thymic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To investigate p53 overexpression and its correlation with neoplastic cell proliferation and apoptosis in 20 thymic carcinomas. Methods: 20 surgical samples of thymic carcinoma were collected randomly during the past 15 years in the Guangzhou area. Immunohistochemical staining was performed using LSAB method with anti-p53 monoclonal antibody (DO-7) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (clone PC 10) as primary antibodies. The p53 index was indicated by the number of p53 positive cells among 100 carcinoma cells. More than 25 percentage of p53 positive cells found in tissue sections was recognized as p53 overexpression. Carcinoma cell proliferation activity was assayed by PCNA index (PI), and apoptosis degree was evaluated by TUNEL (TdT-mediated dUTP-X nick end labeling) index (TI) using Boehringer Mannheim In Situ Death Detection Kit. Results: P53 positive cells could be found in vast majority of thymic carcinomas (19/20) and the overexpression rate reached 35% (7/20). The median PI (40%) of 7 cases with p53 overexpression was higher than that (31%) of 13 cases without p53 overexpression, but there was no statistical significance that existed between these two data (P>0.05). The median TI (0.5/HPF) of 7 p53 overexpression cases was much lower than that (4.5/HPF) of 13 non-overexpression cases, and there was a significant difference statistically (P<0.05). Conclusion: p53 expression was a frequent finding in thymic carcinoma cells, and the p53 overexpression which might represent p53 inactivation or gene mutation was often involved in thymic carcino-genesis. The median PCNA index of p53 overexpression group was higher than that of non-overexpression group though there existed no statistical difference. This indicates that the inhibiting function of p53 on cell proliferation seemed lost in p53 overexpressed thymic carcinomas. It is worthy to be specially mentioned that the inducing function of p53 on cell apoptosis was markedly lost in p53 overexpressed thymic

  6. Urokinase Expression by Tumor Suppressor Protein p53: A Novel Role in mRNA Turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Praveenkumar; Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Bhandary, Yashodhar P.; Shetty, Rashmi S.; Liu, Ming-Cheh; Shetty, Sreerama

    2008-01-01

    Lung carcinoma (H1299) cells deficient in p53 (p53−/−) express large amounts of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) protein and uPA mRNA, and exhibit slower degradation of uPA mRNA than that of p53-expressing nonmalignant Beas2B human airway epithelial cells. Expression of p53 protein in H1299 cells, upon transfection with p53 cDNA, suppressed basal as well as uPA-induced expression of uPA protein in both conditioned media and cell lysates, and decreased the level of steady-state uPA m...

  7. Substrate Phosphorylation and Feedback Regulation in JFK-promoted p53 Destabilization*

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Luyang; SHI, LEI; Wang, Feng; Huangyang, Peiwei; Si, Wenzhe; Yang, Jie; Yao, Zhi; Shang, Yongfeng

    2010-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a central role in integrating cellular responses to various stresses. Tight regulation of p53 is thus essential for the maintenance of genome integrity and normal cell proliferation. Previously, we reported that JFK, the only Kelch domain-containing F-box protein in human, promotes ubiquitination and degradation of p53 and that unlike the other E3 ligases for p53, all of which possess an intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity, JFK destabilizes p53 through the assem...

  8. N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase inhibits p53-mediated cell cycle arrest and coordinates with p53 to determine sensitivity to alkylating agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanshan Song; Guichun Xing; Lin Yuan; Jian Wang; Shan Wang; Yuxin Yin; Chunyan Tian; Fuchu He; Lingqiang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Alkylating agents induce genome-wide base damage,which is repaired mainly by N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG).An elevated expression of MPG in certain types of tumor cells confers higher sensitivity to alkylation agents because MPG-induced apurinic/apyrimidic (AP) sites trigger more strand breaks.However,the determinant of drug sensitivity or insensitivity still remains unclear.Here,we report that the p53 status coordinates with MPG to play a pivotal role in such process.MPG expression is positive in breast,lung and colon cancers (38.7%,43.4% and 25.3%,respectively) but negative in all adjacent normal tissues.MPG directly binds to the tumor suppressor p53 and represses p53 activity in unstressed cells.The overexpression of MPG reduced,whereas depletion of MPG increased,the expression levels of pro-arrest gene downstream of p53 including p21,14-3-3σ and Gadd45 but not pro-apoptotic ones.The N-terminal region of MPG was specifically required for the interaction with the DNA binding domain of p53.Upon DNA alkylation stress,in p53 wild-type tumor cells,p53 dissociated from MPG and induced cell growth arrest.Then,AP sites were repaired efficiently,which led to insensitivity to alkylating agents.By contrast,in p53-mutated cells,the AP sites were repaired with low efficacy.To our knowledge,this is the first direct evidence to show that a DNA repair enzyme functions as a selective regulator of p53,and these findings provide new insights into the functional linkage between MPG and p53 in cancer therapy.

  9. Modeling the role of p53 pulses in DNA damage- induced cell death decision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Jun

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor suppressor p53 plays pivotal roles in tumorigenesis suppression. Although oscillations of p53 have been extensively studied, the mechanism of p53 pulses and their physiological roles in DNA damage response remain unclear. Results To address these questions we presented an integrated model in which Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM activation and p53 oscillation were incorporated with downstream apoptotic events, particularly the interplays between Bcl-2 family proteins. We first reproduced digital oscillation of p53 as the response of normal cells to DNA damage. Subsequent modeling in mutant cells showed that high basal DNA damage is a plausible cause for sustained p53 pulses observed in tumor cells. Further computational analyses indicated that p53-dependent PUMA accumulation and the PUMA-controlled Bax activation switch might play pivotal roles to count p53 pulses and thus decide the cell fate. Conclusion The high levels of basal DNA damage are responsible for generating sustained pulses of p53 in the tumor cells. Meanwhile, the Bax activation switch can count p53 pulses through PUMA accumulation and transfer it into death signal. Our modeling provides a plausible mechanism about how cells generate and orchestrate p53 pulses to tip the balance between survival and death.

  10. The role of p53 molecule in radiation and hyperthermic therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, cancer-related genes have been analyzed at the molecular level as predictive indicators for cancer therapy. Among those genes, the tumor suppressor gene p53 is worthy of notice in cancer therapy, because the p53 molecule prevents the malignant degeneration of non-cancer cells by regulating cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis, and DNA repair. An abnormality of the p53 gene introduces a genetic instability and increases the incidence of carcinogenesis and teratogenesis. Therefore, p53 is called a guardian of the genome. Mutations of p53 are observed at a high frequency in human tumors, and are recognized in about half of all malignant tumors in human head and neck cancers. We previously reported that radio- and heat-sensitivities of human cultured tongue squamous cell carcinoma cells are p53-dependent, and are closely correlated with the induction of apoptosis. In a human cell culture system, the interactive hyperthermic enhancement of radiosensitivity was observed in wild-type p53 cells, but not in mutated p53 cells. In a transplanted tumor system, the combination therapies of radiation and hyperthermia induced efficient tumor growth depression and apoptosis in the wild-type p53 tumors. In this review, we discuss the p53 activation signaling pathways through the modification of p53 molecules, such as phosphorylation after radiation and hyperthermia treatments. (author)

  11. High-LET radiation enhanced apoptosis but not necrosis regardless of p53 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We analyzed the death pattern of human lung cancer cells harboring different p53 statuses after irradiation with different levels of linear energy transfer (LET). Methods and materials: We used three kinds of human lung cancer cell lines with identical genotypes, except for the p53 gene. These cells were exposed to X-rays or accelerated carbon-ion beams. The cellular sensitivities were determined by a colony-forming assay. The detection and quantification of cell death (apoptosis and necrosis) were evaluated and compared by acridine orange/ethidium bromide double staining for fluorescence microscopy. Results: We found that (1) there was no significant difference in cellular sensitivity to LET radiation >70 KeV/μm, although wild-type p53 cell sensitivity to X-rays was higher than that of mutated p53 or p53-null cells; (2) low-LET radiation effectively induced apoptosis in wild-type p53 cells as compared with mutated p53 and p53-null cells; and (3) high-LET radiation induced p53-independent apoptosis. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that high-LET radiotherapy is expected to be a valid application for patients carrying mutated p53 cancer cells. We proposed that the elucidation of the p53-independent apoptosis-related genes might provide new insights into radiotherapy for cancer

  12. Nuclear accumulation and activation of p53 in embryonic stem cells after DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolletschek Alexandra

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P53 is a key tumor suppressor protein. In response to DNA damage, p53 accumulates to high levels in differentiated cells and activates target genes that initiate cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Since stem cells provide the proliferative cell pool within organisms, an efficient DNA damage response is crucial. Results In proliferating embryonic stem cells, p53 is localized predominantly in the cytoplasm. DNA damage-induced nuclear accumulation of p53 in embryonic stem cells activates transcription of the target genes mdm2, p21, puma and noxa. We observed bi-phasic kinetics for nuclear accumulation of p53 after ionizing radiation. During the first wave of nuclear accumulation, p53 levels were increased and the p53 target genes mdm2, p21 and puma were transcribed. Transcription of noxa correlated with the second wave of nuclear accumulation. Transcriptional activation of p53 target genes resulted in an increased amount of proteins with the exception of p21. While p21 transcripts were efficiently translated in 3T3 cells, we failed to see an increase in p21 protein levels after IR in embryonal stem cells. Conclusion In embryonic stem cells where (anti-proliferative p53 activity is not necessary, or even unfavorable, p53 is retained in the cytoplasm and prevented from activating its target genes. However, if its activity is beneficial or required, p53 is allowed to accumulate in the nucleus and activates its target genes, even in embryonic stem cells.

  13. p53-Dependent Nestin Regulation Links Tumor Suppression to Cellular Plasticity in Liver Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; Xue, Wen; Calvisi, Diego F;

    2014-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor coordinates a series of antiproliferative responses that restrict the expansion of malignant cells, and as a consequence, p53 is lost or mutated in the majority of human cancers. Here, we show that p53 restricts expression of the stem and progenitor-cell-associated protei...... by p53 restricts cellular plasticity and tumorigenesis in liver cancer.......The p53 tumor suppressor coordinates a series of antiproliferative responses that restrict the expansion of malignant cells, and as a consequence, p53 is lost or mutated in the majority of human cancers. Here, we show that p53 restricts expression of the stem and progenitor-cell-associated protein...

  14. 血清p53抗体与肿瘤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晓云; 李彬; 王凤安

    2005-01-01

    肿瘤抑制基因p53基因的突变是恶性肿瘤中最常见的基因突变。血清p53抗体是机体对突变型p53蛋白产生免疫应答的产物。Crawford首先在乳腺癌患者的血清中发现p53抗体,随后,相继在肺癌、大肠癌、食管癌、肝癌、膀胱癌、卵巢癌等患者血清中检测到p53抗体。研究进一步发现,p53抗体生物学意义与p53基因相同,

  15. Human papillomavirus and p53 protein immunoreactivity in condylomata acuminatum and squamous cell carcinoma of penis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Hua ZHANG; Gui-Qin SUN; Yu YANG; Tai-He ZHANG

    2001-01-01

    To determine the immunoreactive pattem of human papillomavirus (HPV) antigen and p53 protein in condylomata acuminatum (CA) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of penis. Methods: Immunohistochemistry for HPV and p53 were performed in 40 specimens of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissues using a polyclonal (rabbit) antibody against HPV and a monoclonal (mouse) antibody against human p53 protein. Twenty one cases of CA and nineteen cases of SCC were examined. Results: HPV antigen was detected in all 21 CA and 2 penile SCC. p53 protein overexpression was observed in 12 of 19 (63%) SCC in which 6 cases were strong positive. Five of 21 CA (24%)showed low-grade p53 protein overexpression. Conclusion: CA is related to HPV infection and some cases show p53 protein low-grade overexpression. In contrast, p53 protein overexpression is common in penile SCC, which is seldom related to HPV infection.

  16. P53 and p73 differ in their ability to inhibit glucocorticoid receptor (GR transcriptional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nie Linghu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 is a tumor suppressor and potent inhibitor of cell growth. P73 is highly similar to p53 at both the amino acid sequence and structural levels. Given their similarities, it is important to determine whether p53 and p73 function in similar or distinct pathways. There is abundant evidence for negative cross-talk between glucocorticoid receptor (GR and p53. Neither physical nor functional interactions between GR and p73 have been reported. In this study, we examined the ability of p53 and p73 to interact with and inhibit GR transcriptional activity. Results We show that both p53 and p73 can bind GR, and that p53 and p73-mediated transcriptional activity is inhibited by GR co-expression. Wild-type p53 efficiently inhibited GR transcriptional activity in cells expressing both proteins. Surprisingly, however, p73 was either unable to efficiently inhibit GR, or increased GR activity slightly. To examine the basis for this difference, a series of p53:p73 chimeric proteins were generated in which corresponding regions of either protein have been swapped. Replacing N- and C-terminal sequences in p53 with the corresponding sequences from p73 prevented it from inhibiting GR. In contrast, replacing p73 N- and C-terminal sequences with the corresponding sequences from p53 allowed it to efficiently inhibit GR. Differences in GR inhibition were not related to differences in transcriptional activity of the p53:p73 chimeras or their ability to bind GR. Conclusion Our results indicate that both N- and C-terminal regions of p53 and p73 contribute to their regulation of GR. The differential ability of p53 and p73 to inhibit GR is due, in part, to differences in their N-terminal and C-terminal sequences.

  17. P53-mediated radioresistance does not correlate with metastatic potential in tumorigenic rat embryo cell lines following oncogene transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Changes in wild-type p53 protein function occur in the majority of human tumors, and may alter genomic stability and the cellular response to ionizing radiation. Whether oncoproteins can render tumor cells both radioresistant and metastatic, may have implications for clinical strategies designed to improve local tumor control. In the studies reported here, we tested the hypothesis that acquired radioresistance correlates with metastatic potential within a large panel of transformed rat embryo cell (REF) lines following transfection with activated H-ras, mutant p53, and HPV16-E7 alleles. Methods and Materials: Rat embryo cells (REF cells) were transfected using the calcium-phosphate technique with an activated H-ras gene alone, or in combination with human papillomavirus HPV16-E7 and/or human or murine mutant p53 sequences. Other rat embryo cell clones expressing transfected HPV-E7 and activated ras sequences subsequently acquired endogenous p53 gene mutations during culture in vitro. The relative expression of p21ras and p53 protein for each REF transformant was determined by Western blot analysis following transfection. REF clones were phenotypically characterized at early passage (i.e., passages 5-7) and late passage (i.e., passages 10-20) for their: (a) relative tumor growth rate, and (b) their ability to undergo spontaneous metastasis following intramuscular injection into the hind legs of SCID mice. In vivo phenotypic end points were then compared to previously measured parameters of in vitro radiosensitivity for each cell line. Additionally, the expression of the cellular protease, plasminogen activator, was determined for a number of metastatic and nonmetastatic cell lines. Results: We found no evidence that selected oncogene-transfected REF transformants that were radioresistant in culture had a greater spontaneous metastatic potential than nonradioresistant REF transformants. Neither the level of expression of the p21ras protein nor that of the p

  18. Neem oil limonoids induces p53-independent apoptosis and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Pragya; Yadav, Neelu; Lella, Ravi; Schneider, Andrea; Jones, Anthony; Marlowe, Timothy; Lovett, Gabrielle; O'Loughlin, Kieran; Minderman, Hans; Gogada, Raghu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2012-11-01

    Azadirachta indica, commonly known as neem, has a wide range of medicinal properties. Neem extracts and its purified products have been examined for induction of apoptosis in multiple cancer cell types; however, its underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We show that neem oil (i.e., neem), which contains majority of neem limonoids including azadirachtin, induced apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Gene silencing demonstrated that caspase cascade was initiated by the activation of caspase-9, whereas caspase-8 was also activated late during neem-induced apoptosis. Pretreatment of cancer cells with pan caspase inhibitor, z-VAD inhibited activities of both initiator caspases (e.g., caspase-8 and -9) and executioner caspase-3. Neem induced the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria, suggesting the involvement of both caspase-dependent and AIF-mediated apoptosis. p21 deficiency caused an increase in caspase activities at lower doses of neem, whereas p53 deficiency did not modulate neem-induced caspase activation. Additionally, neem treatment resulted in the accumulation of LC3-II in cancer cells, suggesting the involvement of autophagy in neem-induced cancer cell death. Low doses of autophagy inhibitors (i.e., 3-methyladenine and LY294002) did not prevent accumulation of neem-induced LC3-II in cancer cells. Silencing of ATG5 or Beclin-1 further enhanced neem-induced cell death. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) or autophagy inhibitors increased neem-induced caspase-3 activation and inhibition of caspases enhanced neem-induced autophagy. Together, for the first time, we demonstrate that neem induces caspase-dependent and AIF-mediated apoptosis, and autophagy in cancer cells. PMID:22915764

  19. Neem oil limonoids induces p53-independent apoptosis and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Pragya; Yadav, Neelu; Lella, Ravi; Schneider, Andrea; Jones, Anthony; Marlowe, Timothy; Lovett, Gabrielle; O'Loughlin, Kieran; Minderman, Hans; Gogada, Raghu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2012-11-01

    Azadirachta indica, commonly known as neem, has a wide range of medicinal properties. Neem extracts and its purified products have been examined for induction of apoptosis in multiple cancer cell types; however, its underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We show that neem oil (i.e., neem), which contains majority of neem limonoids including azadirachtin, induced apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Gene silencing demonstrated that caspase cascade was initiated by the activation of caspase-9, whereas caspase-8 was also activated late during neem-induced apoptosis. Pretreatment of cancer cells with pan caspase inhibitor, z-VAD inhibited activities of both initiator caspases (e.g., caspase-8 and -9) and executioner caspase-3. Neem induced the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria, suggesting the involvement of both caspase-dependent and AIF-mediated apoptosis. p21 deficiency caused an increase in caspase activities at lower doses of neem, whereas p53 deficiency did not modulate neem-induced caspase activation. Additionally, neem treatment resulted in the accumulation of LC3-II in cancer cells, suggesting the involvement of autophagy in neem-induced cancer cell death. Low doses of autophagy inhibitors (i.e., 3-methyladenine and LY294002) did not prevent accumulation of neem-induced LC3-II in cancer cells. Silencing of ATG5 or Beclin-1 further enhanced neem-induced cell death. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) or autophagy inhibitors increased neem-induced caspase-3 activation and inhibition of caspases enhanced neem-induced autophagy. Together, for the first time, we demonstrate that neem induces caspase-dependent and AIF-mediated apoptosis, and autophagy in cancer cells.

  20. p53,p21在乳癌中的表达及意义%Significance of expression of p53 and p21 gene protein in breastcancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵春临; 吴飞跃

    2001-01-01

    目的探讨p53,p21蛋白在乳癌中表达的临床意义.方法用免疫组化SP法对20例癌旁乳腺组织和69例乳癌组织中p53和p21蛋白进行半定量检测.结果癌旁乳腺组织中p53和 p21表达阴性;乳腺癌组织中p53和p21阳性率分别为47.8%和43.5%;随细胞分化程度降低 ;p53表达阳性率明显升高,p21表达的阳性率明显降低.p21表达的阳性率在有、无淋巴结转移组差异显著(P<0.05);p53阳性、p21阴性组术后5年无瘤生存率明显低于p53 阴性、p21阳性组(P<0.05);在乳癌组织中p21表达与p53明显相关(P<0.05). 结论 p53和p21在乳癌中的表达可判断乳癌细胞分化程度及患者预后.

  1. Interaction Between P53 and TRF1、TRF2 and Analysis of Binding Domain of P53 in vitro%P53与TRF1、TRF2的体外结合及P53结合功能区的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玲; 张波; 邹万忠; 郑杰; 刘俊平

    2005-01-01

    通过分析端粒结合蛋白TRF1、TRF2与P53的体外结合,探讨P53-端粒途径调节细胞生命活动的分子机制.GST和4种人P53-GST融合蛋白经大肠杆菌表达、谷胱甘肽-SepharoseTM4B纯化后,进行SDS-PAGE和考马斯亮篮染色.人P53包括野生型(1~393)、C端缺失体P53 N5(2~293)、N端缺失体P53 2C(95~393)、单个氨基酸突变体P53 R175H(175 R→H).各纯化蛋白的分子量与预计的完全一致,且纯化率达90%以上.将纯化的GST和P53-GST融合蛋白与人乳腺癌细胞MCF-7细胞蛋白进行体外结合反应,Western印迹检测反应物中P53和TRF1、TRF2的结合.野生型P53P53-R175H均能沉淀MCF-7中的TRF1、TRF2,且结合力相似,而单独的GST则无沉淀TRF1、TRF2的作用.与野生型P53P53 R175H相比,P53 2C与TRF1、TRF2的结合力明显增加,P53 N5与TRF1、TRF2的结合力大大减弱.表明P53和TRF1、TRF2可以进行直接而特异的体外结合,且它们的结合为P53 C端(293~393)结构域依赖性.P53和TRF1、TRF2这种结构域依赖性的结合可能与端粒动态变化所诱导的细胞活动有关.

  2. p53 inactivation upregulates p73 expression through E2F-1 mediated transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitali Tophkhane

    Full Text Available While p73 overexpression has been associated with increased apoptosis in cancer tissues, p73 overexpressing tumors appear to be of high grade malignancy. Why this putative tumor suppressor is overexpressed in cancer cells and what the function of overexpressed p73 is in breast cancers are critical questions to be addressed. By investigating the effect of p53 inactivation on p73 expression, we found that both protein and mRNA levels of TAp73 were increased in MCF-7/p53siRNA cells, MCF-7/p53mt135 cells and HCT-116/p53-/- cells, as compared to wild type control, suggesting that p53 inactivation by various forms upregulates p73. We showed that p53 knockdown induced p73 was mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. However, although p53 has a putative binding site in the TAp73 promoter, deletion of this binding site did not affect p53 knockdown mediated activation of TAp73 promoter. Chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP data demonstrated that loss of p53 results in enhanced occupancy of E2F-1 in the TAp73 promoter. The responsive sequence of p53 inactivation mediated p73 upregulation was mapped to the proximal promoter region of the TAp73 gene. To test the role of E2F-1 in p53 inactivation mediated regulation of p73 transcription, we found that p53 knockdown enhanced E2F-1 dependent p73 transcription, and mutations in E2F-1 binding sites in the TAp73 promoter abrogated p53 knockdown mediated activation of TAp73 promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that p21 is a mediator of p53-E2F crosstalk in the regulation of p73 transcription. We concluded that p53 knockdown/inactivation may upregulate TAp73 expression through E2F-1 mediated transcriptional regulation. p53 inactivation mediated upregulation of p73 suggests an intrinsic rescuing mechanism in response to p53 mutation/inactivation. These findings support further analysis of the correlation between p53 status and p73 expression and its prognostic/predictive significance in human cancers.

  3. The Histone Lysine Demethylase JMJD3/KDM6B Is Recruited to p53 Bound Promoters and Enhancer Elements in a p53 Dependent Manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Rappsilber, Juri;

    2014-01-01

    find that the interaction is dependent on the p53 tetramerization domain. Following DNA damage, JMJD3 is transcriptionally upregulated and by performing genome-wide mapping of JMJD3, we demonstrate that it binds genes involved in basic cellular processes, as well as genes regulating cell cycle......, response to stress and apoptosis. Moreover, we find that JMJD3 binding sites show significant overlap with p53 bound promoters and enhancer elements. The binding of JMJD3 to p53 target sites is increased in response to DNA damage, and we demonstrate that the recruitment of JMJD3 to these sites is dependent...

  4. Disruption of focal adhesion kinase and p53 interaction with small molecule compound R2 reactivated p53 and blocked tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    Golubovskaya, Vita M.; Ho, Baotran; Zheng, Min; Magis, Andrew; Ostrov, David; Morrison, Carl; Cance, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is a 125 kDa non-receptor kinase that plays a major role in cancer cell survival and metastasis. Methods We performed computer modeling of the p53 peptide containing the site of interaction with FAK, predicted the peptide structure and docked it into the three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain of FAK involved in the complex with p53. We screened small molecule compounds that targeted the site of the FAK-p53 interaction and identified compoun...

  5. Salmonella typhimurium infection increases p53 acetylation in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaoping; Ye, Zhongde; Liu, Xingyin; Zhao, Yun; Xia, Yinglin; Steiner, Andrew; Petrof, Elaine O; Claud, Erika C; Sun, Jun

    2010-05-01

    The ability of Salmonella typhimurium to enter intestinal epithelial cells constitutes a crucial step in pathogenesis. Salmonella invasion of the intestinal epithelium requires bacterial type three secretion system. Type three secretion system is a transport device that injects virulence proteins, called effectors, to paralyze or reprogram the eukaryotic cells. Avirulence factor for Salmonella (AvrA) is a Salmonella effector that inhibits the host's inflammatory responses. The mechanism by which AvrA modulates host cell signaling is not entirely clear. p53 is situated at the crossroads of a network of signaling pathways that are essential for genotoxic and nongenotoxic stress responses. We hypothesized that Salmonella infection activates the p53 pathway. We demonstrated that Salmonella infection increased p53 acetylation. Cells infected with AvrA-sufficient Salmonella have increased p53 acetylation, whereas cells infected with AvrA-deficient Salmonella have less p53 acetylation. In a cell-free system, AvrA possessed acetyltransferase activity and used p53 as a substrate. AvrA expression increased p53 transcriptional activity and induced cell cycle arrest. HCT116 p53-/- cells had less inflammatory responses. In a mouse model of Salmonella infection, intestinal epithelial p53 acetylation was increased by AvrA expression. Our studies provide novel mechanistic evidence that Salmonella modulates the p53 pathway during intestinal inflammation and infection.

  6. Aggregation tendencies in the p53 family are modulated by backbone hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cino, Elio A; Soares, Iaci N; Pedrote, Murilo M; de Oliveira, Guilherme A P; Silva, Jerson L

    2016-01-01

    The p53 family of proteins is comprised of p53, p63 and p73. Because the p53 DNA binding domain (DBD) is naturally unstable and possesses an amyloidogenic sequence, it is prone to form amyloid fibrils, causing loss of functions. To develop p53 therapies, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of p53 instability and aggregation. Light scattering, thioflavin T (ThT) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) assays showed that p53 DBD aggregates faster and to a greater extent than p63 and p73 DBDs, and was more susceptible to denaturation. The aggregation tendencies of p53, p63, and p73 DBDs were strongly correlated with their thermal stabilities. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations indicated specific regions of structural heterogeneity unique to p53, which may be promoted by elevated incidence of exposed backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs). The results indicate regions of structural vulnerability in the p53 DBD, suggesting new targetable sites for modulating p53 stability and aggregation, a potential approach to cancer therapy. PMID:27600721

  7. A defect in the p53 response pathway induced by de novo purine synthesis inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronder, Julie L; Moran, Richard G

    2003-12-01

    p53 is believed to sense cellular ribonucleotide depletion in the absence of DNA strand breaks and to respond by imposition of a p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. We now report that the p53-dependent G1 checkpoint is blocked in human carcinoma cell lines after inhibition of de novo purine synthesis by folate analogs inhibitory to glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GART). p53 accumulated in HCT116, MCF7, or A549 carcinoma cells upon GART inhibition, but, surprisingly, transcription of several p53 targets, including p21cip1/waf1, was impaired. The mechanism of this defect was examined. The p53 accumulating in these cells was nuclear but was not phosphorylated at serines 6, 15, and 20, nor was it acetylated at lysines 373 or 382. The DDATHF-stabilized p53 bound to the p21 promoter in vitro and in vivo but did not activate histone acetylation over the p53 binding sites in the p21 promoter that is an integral part of the transcriptional response mediated by the DNA damage pathway. We concluded that the robust initial response of the p53 pathway to GART inhibitors is not transcriptionally propagated to target genes due to a defect in p53 post-translational modifications and a failure to open chromatin structure despite promoter binding of this unmodified p53. PMID:14517211

  8. Synergistic interaction of Rnf8 and p53 in the protection against genomic instability and tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Jo Halaby

    Full Text Available Rnf8 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that plays a key role in the DNA damage response as well as in the maintenanc