WorldWideScience

Sample records for altered p53 cdkn2a

  1. Role of p53 and CDKN2A Inactivation in Human Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Pacifico

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have shown that human SCCs harbour unique mutations in the p53 gene as well as inactivation of the CDKN2A gene. While mutations in the p53 gene are induced by UV radiation and represent tumor initiating events, the majority of alterations detected in the CDKN2A gene do not appear to be UV-dependent. In conclusion, in addition to p53 mutations, silencing of the CDKN2A gene might play a significant role in SCC development.

  2. Aberrations of the p53 pathway components p53, MDM2 and CDKN2A appear independent in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Ino, Y; Gerdes, A M

    1999-01-01

    The two gene products of the CDKN2A gene, p16 and p19ARF, have recently been linked to each of two major tumour suppressor pathways in human carcinogenesis, the RB1 pathway and the p53 pathway. p16 inhibits the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma gene product by cyclin D-dependent kinases......, whereas p19ARF targets MDM2, a p53 inhibitory protein, for degradation. A deletion of CDKN2A would therefore disturb both pathways. To explore the p53 pathway genes as a functional unit in diffuse large B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (DLCL), we wanted to see whether there exists mutually exclusiveness...... hypermethylated at the 5' CpG island of p16. No point mutations were found in CDKN2B or CDKN2A. Immunohistochemical staining of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue for p16 confirmed these results, as all tumours with alterations of CDKN2A were p16 immunonegative. We found p53 mutations in eight (22%) cases...

  3. Aberrations of the p53 pathway components p53, MDM2 and CDKN2A appear independent in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Ino, Y; Gerdes, A M

    1999-01-01

    , whereas p19ARF targets MDM2, a p53 inhibitory protein, for degradation. A deletion of CDKN2A would therefore disturb both pathways. To explore the p53 pathway genes as a functional unit in diffuse large B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (DLCL), we wanted to see whether there exists mutually exclusiveness...... of aberrations of CDKN2A, MDM2 and p53, since this has not been analysed previously. We investigated 37 DLCL for aberrations of p15, p16, p19ARF, MDM2, and p53 at the epigenetic, genetic and/or protein levels. Homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in seven (19%) of 37 tumours, and another three cases were...... and MDM2 overexpression in 16 (43%) tumours. Twenty-three (62%) tumours had alterations of one or more p53 pathway components (p53, p19ARF and MDM2). Furthermore, 7/9 (78%) p16-immunonegative tumours showed co-aberration of p53 and/or MDM2. The lack of correlation between these aberrations suggests...

  4. Implications of Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations of CDKN2A (p16INK4a in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant gene silencing is highly associated with altered cell cycle regulation during carcinogenesis. In particular, silencing of the CDKN2A tumor suppressor gene, which encodes the p16INK4a protein, has a causal link with several different types of cancers. The p16INK4a protein plays an executional role in cell cycle and senescence through the regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK 4/6 and cyclin D complexes. Several genetic and epigenetic aberrations of CDKN2A lead to enhanced tumorigenesis and metastasis with recurrence of cancer and poor prognosis. In these cases, the restoration of genetic and epigenetic reactivation of CDKN2A is a practical approach for the prevention and therapy of cancer. This review highlights the genetic status of CDKN2A as a prognostic and predictive biomarker in various cancers.

  5. CDKN2A/B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yahui; Sharma, Rohit B; Ly, Socheata; Stamateris, Rachel E; Jesdale, William M; Alonso, Laura C

    2018-02-06

    Genome-wide association studies link the CDKN2A/B locus with T2D risk, but mechanisms increasing risk remain unknown. The CDKN2A/B locus encodes cell cycle inhibitors p14 , p15 , and p16, MTAP, and ANRIL , a lncRNA. The goal of this study was to determine whether CDKN2A/B T2D risk-SNPs impact locus gene expression, insulin secretion, or beta cell proliferation, in human islets. Islets from non-diabetic donors (n=95) were tested for SNP genotype ( rs10811661 , rs2383208 , rs564398 , rs10757283 ), gene expression ( p14 , p15 , p16 , MTAP , ANRIL , PCNA , KI67 , CCND2 ), insulin secretion (n=61) and beta cell proliferation (n=47). Intriguingly, locus genes were co-regulated in islets in two physically overlapping cassettes: p14 - p16-ANRIL , which increased with age, and MTAP - p15 , which did not. Risk-alleles at rs10811661 and rs2383208 were differentially associated with expression of ANRIL , but not p14 , p15, p16 or MTAP , in age-dependent fashion, such that younger homozygous-risk donors had higher ANRIL expression, equivalent to older donor levels. We identified several risk-SNP haplotype combinations that may impact locus gene expression, suggesting possible mechanisms by which SNPs impact locus biology. Risk-allele carriers at ANRIL coding SNP rs564398 had reduced beta cell proliferation index. In conclusion, CDKN2A/B locus SNPs may impact T2D risk by modulating islet gene expression and beta cell proliferation. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  6. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Alterations in the tumour suppressor p53 gene are among the most common defects seen in a variety of human cancers. In order ... from Indian patients, we checked 44 untreated primary gliomas for mutations in exons 5–9 of the p53 gene by. PCR-SSCP ... function of p53 is critical to the efficiency of many cancer treatment ...

  7. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alterations in the tumour suppressor p53 gene are among the most common defects seen in a variety of human cancers. In order to study the significance of the p53 gene in the genesis and development of human glioma from Indian patients, we checked 44 untreated primary gliomas for mutations in exons 5–9 of the p53 ...

  8. Tumor suppressor WWOX and p53 alterations and drug resistance in glioblastomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Fu eChiang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor p53 are frequently mutated in glioblastomas (GBMs and appears to contribute, in part, to resistance to temozolomide and therapeutic drugs. WW domain-containing oxidoreductase WWOX (FOR or WOX1 is a proapoptotic protein and is considered as a tumor suppressor. Loss of WWOX gene expression is frequently seen in malignant cancer cells due to promoter hypermethylation, genetic alterations, and translational blockade. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of wild type WWOX preferentially induces apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells harboring mutant p53. WWOX is known to physically bind and stabilize wild type p53. Here, we provide an overview for the updated knowledge in p53 and WWOX, and postulate a potential scenarios that wild type and mutant p53, or isoforms, modulate the apoptotic function of WWOX. We propose that triggering WWOX activation by therapeutic drugs under p53 functional deficiency is needed to overcome TMZ resistance and induce GBM cell death.

  9. PATCHED and p53 gene alterations in sporadic and hereditary basal cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ling, G.; Ahmadian, A.; Persson, A.; Undén, A. B.; Afink, G.; Williams, C.; Uhlén, M.; Toftgård, R.; Lundeberg, J.; Pontén, F.

    2001-01-01

    It is widely accepted that disruption of the hedgehog-patched pathway is a key event in development of basal cell cancer. In addition to patched gene alterations, p53 gene mutations are also frequent in basal cell cancer. We determined loss of heterozygosity in the patched and p53 loci as well as

  10. Preeclampsia is associated with alterations in the p53-pathway in villous trophoblast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew N Sharp

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE is characterized by exaggerated apoptosis of the villous trophoblast of placental villi. Since p53 is a critical regulator of apoptosis we hypothesized that excessive apoptosis in PE is mediated by abnormal expression of proteins participating in the p53 pathway and that modulation of the p53 pathway alters trophoblast apoptosis in vitro.Fresh placental villous tissue was collected from normal pregnancies and pregnancies complicated by PE; Western blotting and real-time PCR were performed on tissue lysate for protein and mRNA expression of p53 and downstream effector proteins, p21, Bax and caspases 3 and 8. To further assess the ability of p53 to modulate apoptosis within trophoblast, BeWo cells and placental villous tissue were exposed to the p53-activator, Nutlin-3, alone or in combination with the p53-inhibitor, Pifithrin-α (PFT-α. Equally, Mdm2 was knocked-down with siRNA.Protein expression of p53, p21 and Bax was significantly increased in pregnancies complicated by PE. Conversely, Mdm2 protein levels were significantly depleted in PE; immunohistochemistry showed these changes to be confined to trophoblast. Reduction in the negative feedback of p53 by Mdm2, using siRNA and Nutlin-3, caused an imbalance between p53 and Mdm2 that triggered apoptosis in term villous explants. In the case of Nutlin, this was attenuated by Pifithrin-α.These data illustrate the potential for an imbalance in p53 and Mdm2 expression to promote excessive apoptosis in villous trophoblast. The upstream regulation of p53 and Mdm2, with regard to exaggerated apoptosis and autophagy in PE, merits further investigation.

  11. Alterations in the K-ras and p53 genes in rat lung tumors

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    Belinsky, S.A.; Swafford, D.S.; Finch, G.L.; Mitchell, C.E. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-06-01

    Activation of the K-ras protooncogene and inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene are events common to many types of human cancers. Molecular epidemiology studies have associated mutational profiles in these genes with specific exposures. The purpose of this paper is to review investigations that have examined the role of the K-ras and p53 genes in lung tumors induced in the F344 rat by mutagenic and nonmutagenic exposures. Mutation profiles within the K-ras and p53 genes, if present in rat lung tumors, would help to define some of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer induction by various environmental agents. Pulmonary adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas were induced by tetranitromethane (TNM), 4-methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), beryllium metal, plutonium-239, X-ray, diesel exhaust, or carbon black. These agents were chosen because the tumors they produced could arise via different types of DNA damage. Mutation of the K-ras gene was determined by approaches that included DNA transfection, direct sequencing, mismatch hybridization, and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The frequency for mutation of the K-ras gene was exposure dependent. The transition mutations formed could have been derived from deamination of cytosine. Alteration in the p53 gene was assessed by immunohistochemical analysis for p53 protein and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of exons 4 to 9. None of the 93 adenocarinomas examined was immunoreactive toward the anti-p53 antibody CM1. In contrast, 14 of 71 squamous cell carcinomas exhibited nuclear p53 immunoreactivity with no correlation to type of exposure. However, SSCP analysis only detected mutations in 2 of 14 squamous cell tumors that were immunoreactive, suggesting that protein stabilization did not stem from mutations within the p53 gene. Thus, the p53 gene does not appear to be involved in the genesis of most rat lung tumors. 2 figs., 2 tabs., 48 refs.

  12. p53 alterations and HPV infections are common in oral SCC: p53 gene mutations correlate with the absence of HPV 16-E6 DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penhallow, J; Steingrimsdottir, H; Elamin, F; Warnakulasuriya, S; Farzaneh, F; Johnson, N; Tavassoli, M

    1998-01-01

    To examine the association between HPV infections and p53 gene aberrations, a panel of 28 oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and 12 potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions were analysed for p53 mutations in exons 2-9. p53 protein was analysed by immunocytochemistry using DO7 antibody. The same panel was also examined for the possible presence of HPV infection. p53 overexpression was detected in 13/26 (50%) malignant and 2/9 (22%) premalignant lesions. Mutations in the coding region of the p53 gene were found in 10 malignant samples. None of the premalignant lesions were shown to have p53 mutations. The total number of p53 mutations in 10 samples were 14 of which 12 (85%) were in exon 5 suggesting the presence of hot spots in exon 5 for carcinogens involved in the transformation of oral epithelial cells. The presence of HPV DNA was first screened with consensus primers to the L1 region and nested PCR approach. HPV 6 and HPV 16 were detected in 14/28 (50%) oral SCC and 4 of 12 (33%) precancerous lesions, 7 tumours harboured both types. The samples were then examined for the presence of E6 oncogenic sequence of HPV16 using E6 specific primers. 7/27 (26%) SCC and 5/9 (55%) premalignant lesions harboured E6 DNA of which 6 (3 SCC and 3 premalignant) were negative with L1 primers suggesting possible integration of the specific viral genes or loss of other viral DNA sequences after integration of larger viral fragments. 9/10 (90%) SCC with p53 mutations were negative for E6 DNA. Our results show that both p53 alterations and HPV infection may be important etiological factors in the development of oral cancer. However, there is: i) No concordance between p53 mutations and its overexpression. ii) the presence of HPV capsid DNA (L1) does not necessarily indicate the presence of HPV oncogenic genes. iii) p53 gene mutations, but not overexpression, correlate with the absence of HPV 16-E6 and not L1 gene.

  13. Alteration of p53 gene in ovarian carcinoma: clinicopathological correlation and prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, K; Itoh, M; Murase, T; Morishita, S; Itoh, N; Mori, H; Tamaya, T

    1994-12-01

    Inactivation of the tumour-suppressor gene p53 has been demonstrated in a variety of human tumours. We extracted DNA from paraffin-embedded tissues of 67 ovarian carcinoma samples (54 primary tumours, seven metastases and six tumours obtained after chemotherapy), and analysed allelic losses and mutations of the p53 gene using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of DNA fragments amplified by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Allelic loss was observed in 24 of 32 informative cases. The mutation was detected in 14 of 54 primary ovarian carcinomas: eight serous cystadenocarcinomas (SCA), 42%), five endometrioid adenocarcinomas (EA, 42%) and one mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (14%). The incidence of the alteration was higher in SCA and EA than in other histological types, but the difference was not statistically significant. The incidence of p53 gene abnormalities in ovarian carcinomas tended to be increased in patients with disease advanced (over FIGO stage II). Mutations were found in exons 5 and 7 only and consisted mainly of single nucleotide substitutions [9 or 14 (64%) in exon 7; 4 of 14 (29%) in exon 5]. In 13 of 14 cases, p53 gene mutations occurred concomitantly with losses of the normal allele. The status of the p53 gene in metastases and the tumours obtained after chemotherapy was identical to that in the primary tumours. The presence of p53 gene mutation did not correlate with histological grade, response to primary therapy and survival. These findings suggest that mutational alterations of the p53 gene are involved in the development of a significant proportion of some ovarian carcinomas (SCAs or EAs), especially in advanced stages. However, they may not be a marker predicting the biological behaviour or the outcome of the disease.

  14. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C → A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C → T, two C → A, one C → G, and one A → T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  15. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    [Phatak P, Selvi S K, Divya T, Hegde A S, Hegde S and Somasundaram K 2002 Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from Indian patients; J. Biosci. 27 673–678]. 1. Introduction. Glioma, a neoplasm of neuroglial cells, is the most common type of brain tumour, constituting more than 50% of all.

  16. The prognostic significance of BAP1, NF2, and CDKN2A in malignant peritoneal mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Aatur D; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Choudry, Haroon A; Bartlett, David L; Pingpank, James F; Zeh, Herbert J; Luvison, Alyssa; Fuhrer, Kimberly; Bahary, Nathan; Seethala, Raja R; Dacic, Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion for patients with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma has resulted in improved disease control and increased survival. Despite these results, there are significant perioperative risks associated with this aggressive procedure that necessitate consideration of prognostic markers during patient selection. The molecular pathogenesis of peritoneal mesothelioma remains relatively unknown, but extrapolation of findings from their pleural counterpart would suggest frequent alterations in CDKN2A, NF2, and BAP1. Homozygous deletions in CDKN2A portend a worse overall survival in peritoneal mesothelioma. However, the prevalence and prognostic significance of NF2 and BAP1 abnormalities has not been studied. Dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization using CDKN2A and NF2 locus-specific probes and BAP1 immunohistochemistry identified homozygous CDKN2A deletions (n=25, 29%), hemizygous NF2 loss (n=30, 35%), and/or loss of BAP1 protein expression (n=49, 57%) in 68 of 86 (79%) peritoneal mesotheliomas. Homozygous CDKN2A deletions or hemizygous NF2 loss correlated with shorter progression-free survival (Pguide future treatment decisions for patients with peritoneal mesothelioma.

  17. Alcohol alters hepatic FoxO1, p53, and mitochondrial SIRT5 deacetylation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieber, Charles S.; Leo, Maria Anna; Wang, Xiaolei; DeCarli, Leonore M.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption affects the gene expression of a NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirtuis 1 (SIRT1) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator1α (PGC-1α). Our aim was to verify that it also alters the forkhead (FoxO1) and p53 transcription factor proteins, critical in the hepatic response to oxidative stress and regulated by SIRT1 through its deacetylating capacity. Accordingly, rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli alcohol-containing liquid diets for 28 days. Alcohol increased hepatic mRNA expression of FoxO1 (p = 0.003) and p53 (p = 0.001) while corresponding protein levels remained unchanged. However phospho-FoxO1 and phospho-Akt (protein kinase) were both decreased by alcohol consumption (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively) while hepatic p53 was found hyperacetylated (p = 0.017). Furthermore, mitochondrial SIRT5 was reduced (p = 0.0025), and PGC-1α hyperacetylated (p = 0.027), establishing their role in protein modification. Thus, alcohol consumption disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial interactions by post-translation protein modifications, which contribute to alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis through the newly discovered reduction of SIRT5

  18. Frequent alteration of MDM2 and p53 in the molecular progression of recurring non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Nielsen, O; Pedersen, Niels Tinggaard

    2002-01-01

    -Hodgkin's lymphoma. METHODS AND RESULTS: We have analysed sequential biopsies from 42 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients immunohistochemically for p53 alterations (based on p53 and p21Waf1 expression), as well as for expression of MDM2, p27Kip1 and cyclin D3. Relapse of follicle centre lymphoma was associated with p53...... alterations as 5/6 (83%) follicle centre lymphomas with normal p53 at diagnosis showed p53 alterations at relapse. Of these cases, three showed transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. p53 alteration was also associated with relapse of de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and T-cell non......-Hodgkin's lymphoma, as 2/5 (40%) diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and 3/9 (33%) T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with normal p53 at diagnosis showed p53 alterations at relapse. No indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma case showed MDM2 over-expression at diagnosis, whereas 4/5 (80%) transformed diffuse large B-cell lymphomas...

  19. Patterns of CDKN2A gene loss in sequential oral epithelial dysplasias and carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnavaz, S A; Bradley, G; Regezi, J A; Thakker, N; Gao, L; Hogg, D; Jordan, R C

    2001-03-15

    The CDKN2A gene locus encodes two different proteins derived from alternative splicing. p16 (exons 1alpha, 2, and 3) acts as a G1 cell cycle regulator, and p14ARF (exons 1beta, 2, and 3) acts to modulate MDM2-mediated degradation of p53. Inactivation of p16 is a common finding in many cancers; however, there is little data on CDKN2A gene abnormalities in oral precancer. In this longitudinal study, we examined changes in the CDKN2A gene locus in sequential epithelial dysplasias and oral carcinomas from 11 patients. Genomic DNA was extracted from laser-microdissected lesional tissue, and exons 1alpha, 1beta, and 2 were analyzed by duplex PCR. Immunohistochemistry was done to identify p16 and p14ARF protein expression. Two adjacent polymorphic microsatellite markers were used for allelotyping. Homozygous deletion of exon 1alpha was identified in 2 of 17 (12%) precancerous lesions. Loss of either exon 1alpha, exon 2, or both was seen in seven of nine (78%) carcinomas. In five of these carcinomas, there was loss of only exon 1alpha. No case showed deletion of exon 1beta. In 5 of 11 patients, microsatellite markers showed differing patterns of allelic imbalance in the precancerous lesions and the subsequent carcinoma, suggesting a complex genetic pattern of progression from dysplasia to carcinoma. We conclude that during oral carcinogenesis homozygous deletion of exon 1alpha of the CDKN2A gene is common but that deletion of exon 2 and 1beta is less frequent. Moreover, our results suggest that the progression from oral precancer to cancer, in some cases, is more complex genetically than predicted by linear models of carcinogenesis.

  20. Frequent alteration of MDM2 and p53 in the molecular progression of recurring non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Nielsen, O; Pedersen, Niels Tinggaard

    2002-01-01

    -Hodgkin's lymphoma. METHODS AND RESULTS: We have analysed sequential biopsies from 42 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients immunohistochemically for p53 alterations (based on p53 and p21Waf1 expression), as well as for expression of MDM2, p27Kip1 and cyclin D3. Relapse of follicle centre lymphoma was associated with p53......-Hodgkin's lymphoma, as 2/5 (40%) diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and 3/9 (33%) T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with normal p53 at diagnosis showed p53 alterations at relapse. No indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma case showed MDM2 over-expression at diagnosis, whereas 4/5 (80%) transformed diffuse large B-cell lymphomas...... developed MDM2 over-expression. CONCLUSION: Our data are consistent with the notion that p53 alterations are important for the histological transformation of follicle centre lymphoma. However, the data also suggest that relapsing follicle centre lymphomas without overt transformation often have p53...

  1. Bladder-like graphical representation of p53 gene alterations in some human cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helal, N.L.; Dorrah, M.; LI, C.

    2005-01-01

    the p53 tumor suppressor gene is mutated in about half of all human cancer cells. These mutations are not only important in tumor progression but apparently also in the response of some tumors to chemotherapy and radiation treatment, thus to clinical outcome. Recent studies have shown that cells carrying p53 mutations are more resistant to radiation and chemotherapy than cells with functional p53. More than 15000 tumors with Tp53 mutations were published, leadingto the description of more than 1500 different Tp53 mutants (at the site http:// p53. curie.fr). To exploit this huge bulk of data, specific analytic tools were highly warranted. Also, new computational techniques for rapid determination of such information and comparative studies of different mutations are required. In the present study, a mathematical method for the IARC library p53 mutation database comparing p53 mutations occurring in four different cancers was described. The sizes of the four cancers in the database were bladder (860), liver (786), brain (1170) and skin (38) cancers, for a total of 2854 of p53 mutations. The study was carried out on exons 4-8 of p53 for the four cancers under investigation. From this study, it can be quantitatively obtained some information for each characteristic sequence. The data showed that exon 8 was the most mutant exon in skin cancer and exon 7 was the lowest one. In hepatocellular carcinoma, exon 4 was the most mutant exon and exon 7 was the lowest mutant exon. Brain cancer showed high mutation in exon 8 and low mutation at exon 6. Finally, bladder mutation was mostly mutated at exon 6 comparing to the least value of exon 7. It is expected that this study of p53 mutation may provide useful information for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cancer

  2. Alteration of p53 gene in ovarian carcinoma: clinicopathological correlation and prognostic significance.

    OpenAIRE

    Niwa, K.; Itoh, M.; Murase, T.; Morishita, S.; Itoh, N.; Mori, H.; Tamaya, T.

    1994-01-01

    Inactivation of the tumour-suppressor gene p53 has been demonstrated in a variety of human tumours. We extracted DNA from paraffin-embedded tissues of 67 ovarian carcinoma samples (54 primary tumours, seven metastases and six tumours obtained after chemotherapy), and analysed allelic losses and mutations of the p53 gene using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of DNA fragments amplified by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Allelic loss was observed in 24 of 32 informativ...

  3. Altered S-nitrosylation of p53 is responsible for impaired antioxidant response in skeletal muscle during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldelli, Sara; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2016-12-20

    p53 transcriptional activity has been proposed to regulate both homeostasis and sarcopenia of skeletal muscle during aging. However, the exact molecular function of p53 remains to be clearly defined. We demonstrated a requirement of nuclear p53 S-nitrosylation in inducing a nitric oxide/PGC-1α-mediated antioxidant pathway in skeletal muscle. Importantly, mutant form of p53-DNA binding domain (C124S) did not undergo nuclear S-nitrosylation and failed in inducing the expression of antioxidant genes (i.e. SOD2 and GCLC). Moreover, we found that during aging the nuclear S-nitrosylation of p53 significantly declines in gastrocnemius/soleus leading to an impairment of redox homeostasis of skeletal muscle. We suggested that decreased level of nuclear neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/Syntrophin complex, which we observed during aging, could be responsible for impaired nuclear S-nitrosylation. Taken together, our data indicate that altered S-nitrosylation of p53 during aging could be a contributing factor of sarcopenia condition and of other skeletal muscle pathologies associated with oxidative/nitrosative stress.

  4. Apoptosis and morphological alterations after UVA irradiation in red blood cells of p53 deficient Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Alla El-Din Hamid; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Morphological alterations in red blood cells were described as hematological bioindicators of UVA exposure to investigate the sensitivity to UVA in wild type Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and a p53 deficient mutant. The fewer abnormal red blood cells were observed in the p53 mutant fish under the control conditions. After exposure to different doses of UVA radiation (15min, 30min and 60min/day for 3days), cellular and nuclear alterations in red blood cells were analyzed in the UVA exposed fish compared with non-exposed controls and those alterations included acanthocytes, cell membrane lysis, swollen cells, teardrop-like cell, hemolyzed cells and sickle cells. Those alterations were increased after the UVA exposure both in wild type and the p53 deficient fish. Moreover, apoptosis analyzed by acridine orange assay showed increased number of apoptosis in red blood cells at the higher UVA exposure dose. No micronuclei but nuclear abnormalities as eccentric nucleus, nuclear budding, deformed nucleus, and bilobed nucleus were observed in each group. These results suggested that UVA exposure induced both p53 dependent and independent apoptosis and morphological alterations in red blood cells but less sensitive to UVA than Wild type in medaka fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Heterozygous loss of TSC2 alters p53 signaling and human stem cell reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Laura C; Westlake, Grant; Snow, John P; Cawthon, Bryan; Armour, Eric; Bowman, Aaron B; Ess, Kevin C

    2017-12-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a pediatric disorder of dysregulated growth and differentiation caused by loss of function mutations in either the TSC1 or TSC2 genes, which regulate mTOR kinase activity. To study aberrations of early development in TSC, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells using dermal fibroblasts obtained from patients with TSC. During validation, we found that stem cells generated from TSC patients had a very high rate of integration of the reprogramming plasmid containing a shRNA against TP53. We also found that loss of one allele of TSC2 in human fibroblasts is sufficient to increase p53 levels and impair stem cell reprogramming. Increased p53 was also observed in TSC2 heterozygous and homozygous mutant human stem cells, suggesting that the interactions between TSC2 and p53 are consistent across cell types and gene dosage. These results support important contributions of TSC2 heterozygous and homozygous mutant cells to the pathogenesis of TSC and the important role of p53 during reprogramming. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Mutant p53 transfection of astrocytic cells results in altered cell cycle control, radiation sensitivity, and tumorigenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanady, Kirk E.; Mei Su; Proulx, Gary; Malkin, David M.; Pardo, Francisco S.

    1995-01-01

    Introduction: Alterations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are one of the most frequent genetic alterations in malignant gliomas. An understanding of the molecular genetic events leading to glial tumor progression would aid in designing therapeutic vectors for controlling these challenging tumor types. We investigated whether mutations in coding exons of the p53 gene result in functional changes altering cell cycle 'checkpoint' control and the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of glial cells. Methods: An astrocytic cell line was derived from a low grade astrocytoma and characterized to be of human karyotype and GFAP positivity. Additionally, the cellular population has never formed tumors in immune-deficient mice. At early passage ( 2 as parameters. Cell kinetic analyses after 2, 5, and 10 Gy of ionizing radiation were conducted using propidium iodide FACS analyses. Results: Overall levels of p53 expression were increased 5-10 fold in the transfected cellular populations. Astrocytic cellular populations transfected with mutant p53 revealed a statistically significant increase in levels of resistance to ionizing radiation in vitro (2-tailed test, SF2, MID). Astrocytic cellular populations transfected with mutant p53, unlike the parental cells, were tumorigenic in SCID mice. Cell kinetic analyses indicated that the untransfected cell line demonstrated dose dependent G1 and G2 arrests. Following transfection, however, the resultant cellular population demonstrated a predominant G2 arrest. Conclusions: Astrocytic cellular populations derived from low grade astrocytomas, are relatively radiation sensitive, non-tumorigenic, and have intact cell cycle ''checkpoints.'' Cellular populations resulting upon transfection of parental cells with a dominant negative p53 mutation, are relatively radiation resistant, when compared to both parental and mock-transfected cells. Transfected cells demonstrate abnormalities of cell cycle control at the G1/S checkpoint, increases in levels

  7. Clinical significance of altered nm23-H1, EGFR, RB and p53 expression in bilharzial bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaled, Hussein M; Bahnassy, Abeer A; Raafat, Amira A; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N; Madboul, Maha S; Mokhtar, Nadia M

    2009-01-01

    Clinical characterization of bladder carcinomas is still inadequate using the standard clinico-pathological prognostic markers. We assessed the correlation between nm23-H1, Rb, EGFR and p53 in relation to the clinical outcome of patients with muscle invasive bilharzial bladder cancer (MI-BBC). nm23-H1, Rb, EGFR and p53 expression was assessed in 59 MI-BBC patients using immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription (RT-PCR) and was correlated to the standard clinico-pathological prognostic factors, patient's outcome and the overall survival (OS) rate. Overexpression of EGFR and p53 proteins was detected in 66.1% and 35.6%; respectively. Loss of nm23-H1and Rb proteins was detected in 42.4% and 57.6%; respectively. Increased EGFR and loss of nm23-H1 RNA were detected in 61.5% and 36.5%; respectively. There was a statistically significant correlation between p53 and EGFR overexpression (p < 0.0001), nm23 loss (protein and RNA), lymph node status (p < 0.0001); between the incidence of local recurrence and EGFR RNA overexpression (p= 0.003) as well as between the incidence of metastasis and altered Rb expression (p = 0.026), p53 overexpression (p < 0.0001) and mutation (p = 0.04). Advanced disease stage correlated significantly with increased EGFR (protein and RNA) (p = 0.003 & 0.01), reduced nm23-H1 RNA (p = 0.02), altered Rb (p = 0.023), and p53 overexpression (p = 0.004). OS rates correlated significantly, in univariate analysis, with p53 overexpression (p = 0.011), increased EGFR (protein and RNA, p = 0.034&0.031), nm23-H1 RNA loss (p = 0.021) and aberrations of ≥ 2 genes. However, multivariate analysis showed that only high EGFR overexpression, metastatic recurrence, high tumor grade and the combination of ≥ 2 affected markers were independent prognostic factors. nm23-H1, EGFR and p53 could be used as prognostic biomarkers in MI-BBC patients. In addition to the standard pathological prognostic factors, a combination of these markers (≥ 2) has

  8. Genomic alterations during p53-dependent apoptosis induced by γ-irradiation of Molt-4 leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouba Hage-Sleiman

    Full Text Available Molt-4 leukemia cells undergo p53-dependent apoptosis accompanied by accumulation of de novo ceramide after 14 hours of γ-irradiation. In order to identify the potential mediators involved in ceramide accumulation and the cell death response, differentially expressed genes were identified by Affymetrix Microarray Analysis. Molt-4-LXSN cells, expressing wild type p53, and p53-deficient Molt-4-E6 cells were irradiated and harvested at 3 and 8 hours post-irradiation. Human genome U133 plus 2.0 array containing >47,000 transcripts was used for gene expression profiling. From over 10,000 probes, 281 and 12 probes were differentially expressed in Molt-4-LXSN and Molt-4-E6 cells, respectively. Data analysis revealed 63 (upregulated and 20 (downregulated genes (>2 fold in Molt-4-LXSN at 3 hours and 140 (upregulated and 21 (downregulated at 8 hours post-irradiation. In Molt-4-E6 cells, 5 (upregulated genes each were found at 3 hours and 8 hours, respectively. In Molt-4-LXSN cells, a significant fraction of the genes with altered expression at 3 hours were found to be involved in apoptosis signaling pathway (BCL2L11, p53 pathway (PMAIP1, CDKN1A and FAS and oxidative stress response (FDXR, CROT and JUN. Similarly, at 8 hours the genes with altered expression were involved in the apoptosis signaling pathway (BAX, BIK and JUN, p53 pathway (BAX, CDKN1A and FAS, oxidative stress response (FDXR and CROT and p53 pathway feedback loops 2 (MDM2 and CDKN1A. A global molecular and biological interaction map analysis showed an association of these altered genes with apoptosis, senescence, DNA damage, oxidative stress, cell cycle arrest and caspase activation. In a targeted study, activation of apoptosis correlated with changes in gene expression of some of the above genes and revealed sequential activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways that precede ceramide accumulation and subsequent execution of apoptosis. One or more of these altered genes

  9. The Amount of Melanin Influences p16 Loss in Spitzoid Melanocytic Lesions: Correlation With CDKN2A Status by FISH and MLPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Ciarpaglini, Carolina; Gonzalez, Jose; Sanchez, Beatriz; Agusti, Jaime; Navarro, Lara; Nieto, Gema; Monteagudo, Carlos

    2018-02-27

    The risk assessment of spitzoid lesions is one of the most difficult challenges in dermatopathology practice. In this regard, the loss of p16 expression and the homozygous deletion of CDKN2A, have been pointed in the literature as reliable indicators of high risk. However, these findings are poorly reproducible, and the molecular bases underlying the loss of p16 expression remain unclear. We aimed to identify the underlying events causing loss of CDKN2A/p16 in spitzoid tumors. We evaluated the immunohistochemical expression of p16, and the presence of CDKN2A genetic alterations detected through fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), in a series of 130 Spitz nevi, 20 atypical spitzoid tumors, and 11 spitzoid melanoma. We found a significant loss of p16 expression in cases with high amount of melanin content in the 3 groups (P<0.000001) and a similar proportion of p16-negative cases in the group of Spitz nevi and atypical spitzoid tumors. MLPA allowed the recognition of CDKN2A microdeletions, which correlated with p16 loss (P=0.01). MLPA and FISH were more accurate than immunohistochemistry to detect CDKN2A alterations; although contrary to MLPA, FISH fails to recognize CDKN2A microdeletions. According to our results, p16 expression may be useful in the study of cases with atypical features and low melanin content, but it has no value in highly pigmented spitzoid lesions.

  10. High-grade fimbrial-ovarian carcinomas are unified by altered p53, PTEN and PAX2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Michael H; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Mehra, Karishma K; Mehrad, Mitra; Monte, Nicolas M; Mutter, George L; Nucci, Marisa R; Ning, Geng; Mckeon, Frank D; Hirsch, Michelle S; Wa, Xian; Crum, Christopher P

    2010-10-01

    High-grade endometrioid and serous carcinomas of the ovary and fallopian tube are responsible for the majority of cancer deaths and comprise a spectrum that includes early or localized (tubal intraepithelial carcinoma) and advanced (invasive or metastatic) disease. We subdivided a series of these tumors into three groups, (1) classic serous, (2) mixed serous and endometrioid and (3) endometrioid carcinomas and determined: (1) the frequencies of coexisting tubal intraepithelial carcinoma, (2) frequency of a dominant ovarian mass suggesting an ovarian origin and (3) immuno-localization of WT-1, p53, PTEN, PAX2 and p16(ink4). All tumors were analyzed for p53 mutations. Thirty six, 25 and 8% of groups 1-3 were associated with tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (P=0.09) and 34, 45 and 62% predominated in one ovary (P=0.028), respectively. Differences in frequencies of diffuse p53 immunostaining (85-93%), WT-1 (70-98%) and p16(ink4) positivity (69-75%) were not significant for all groups. Greater than 95% reduction in PAX2 and PTEN occurred in 67-75 and 5-12%, respectively; however, PAX2 and PTEN staining intensity, when present, was often heterogeneous, highlighting different tumor populations. PAX2 and PTEN expression were markedly reduced or absent in 12 of 12 and 4 of 12 tubal intraepithelial carcinomas. In summary, high-grade müllerian carcinomas share identical frequencies of altered or reduced expression of p53, PTEN and PAX2, all of which can be appreciated in tubal intraepithelial carcinomas. Because only a subset of these tumors appears to arise in the fallopian tube, attention to expression of these biomarkers in the ovary and other müllerian sites might facilitate the identification of other carcinogenic pathways. PAX2 and PTEN, in addition to p53 and p16(ink4), comprise a potentially important gene combination in high-grade pelvic carcinogenesis.

  11. Molecular basis of basal cell carcinogenesis in the atomic-bomb survivor population: p53 and PTCH gene alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Terumi; Tokuoka, Shoji; Kishikawa, Masao; Nakashima, Eiji; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Iwamoto, Keisuke S

    2006-11-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that UV exposure from sunlight is the major etiology for skin cancers, both melanocytic and non-melanocytic. However, the radiation-related risk for skin cancer among atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki is primarily derived from the excess risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), with no demonstrable excess in squamous cell carcinoma or melanoma. The BCCs in this cohort are therefore unusual in being potentially attributable to two types of radiation-UV and ionizing (IR). BCCs have been associated with PTCH and/or p53 tumor suppressor gene alterations. To investigate the roles of these genes in relation to IR and UV exposures, we analyzed both genes in BCC samples from atomic bomb survivors. We examined 47 tumors, of which 70% had non-silent base-substitution p53 mutations independent of IR or UV exposure. However, the distribution of mutation type depends on UV and/or IR exposure. For example, C-to-T transitions at CpG sites adjacent to pyrimidine-pyrimidine (PyPy) sequences were more prevalent in tumors from UV-exposed than UV-shielded body areas and CpG-mutations at non-PyPy sequences were more prevalent in tumors from UV-shielded body areas with high-IR (>or=1 Gy) than low-IR (<0.2 Gy) exposure. And notably, although p53 deletion-frequencies demonstrated no IR-dose associations, deletions at the PTCH locus were more frequent (79% versus 44%) in tumors with high-IR than low-IR exposure. Moreover, 60% of high-IR tumors harbored both p53 and PTCH abnormalities compared with 23% of low-IR tumors. Therefore, alteration of both genes is likely to play a role in radiation-induced basal cell carcinogenesis.

  12. P53 and Rb tumor suppressor gene alterations in gastric cancer Alterações dos genes supressores tumorais p53 e Rb no câncer gástrico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane Mattar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes has been frequently observed in gastric carcinogenesis. Our purpose was to study the involvement of p53, APC, DCC, and Rb genes in gastric carcinoma. METHOD: Loss of heterozygosity of the p53, APC, DCC and Rb genes was studied in 22 gastric cancer tissues using polymerase chain reaction; single-strand conformation polymorphism of the p53 gene exons 5-6 and exons 7-8 was studied using 35S-dATP, and p53 expression was detected using a histological immunoperoxidase method with an anti-p53 clone. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: No loss of heterozygosity was observed in any of these tumor suppressor genes; homozygous deletion was detected in the Rb gene in 23% (3/13 of the cases of intestinal-type gastric carcinoma. Eighteen (81.8% cases showed band mobility shifts in exons 5-6 and/or 7-8 of the p53 gene. The presence of the p53 protein was positive in gastric cancer cells in 14 cases (63.6%. Normal gastric mucosa showed negative staining for p53; thus, the immunoreactivity was likely to represent mutant forms. The correlation of band mobility shift and the immunoreactivity to anti-p53 was not significant (P = .90. There was no correlation of gene alterations with the disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: The inactivation of Rb and p53 genes is involved in gastric carcinogenesis in our environment. Loss of the Rb gene observed only in the intestinal-type gastric cancer should be further evaluated in association with Helicobacter pylori infection. The p53 gene was affected in both intestinal and diffuse histological types of gastric cancer.A inativação de genes supressores tumorais tem sido freqüentemente observada na carcinogênese gástrica. O nosso objetivo foi estudar o envolvimento dos genes p53, APC, DCC e Rb no câncer gástrico. MÉTODO: Vinte e dois casos de câncer gástrico foram estudados por PCR-LOH (reação de polimerase em cadeia- perda de alelo heterozigoto dos genes p53, APC, DCC e Rb; e por PCR-SSCP (rea

  13. p53 alteration in morphologically normal/benign breast luminal cells in BRCA carriers with or without history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; El-Halaby, Amber A; Zhang, Hengwei; Yang, Qi; Laughlin, Todd S; Rothberg, Paul G; Skinner, Kristin; Hicks, David G

    2017-10-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA genes have been shown to predispose patients to breast cancer. Studies have suggested that p53 alteration is a necessary step in tumorigenesis in BRCA carriers. Our previous study showed p53 alteration in morphologically normal/benign breast luminal cells in sporadic breast cancer patients, the so-called breast p53 signature. Here, we studied p53 status in 66 BRCA1/2 carriers' breasts: 29 patients with breast carcinoma (2 patients with bilateral breast carcinomas) and 37 without. Seven of the 12 (58%) triple-negative breast carcinomas in BRCA carriers were positive for p53 alteration (immunohistochemical stain and/or sequencing), the same frequency as in sporadic triple-negative breast carcinomas. Focal p53 positivity in adjacent normal/benign luminal cells was identified in 4 of the 7 cases with p53-positive carcinomas but not in breasts with p53-negative carcinomas, indicating that p53 positivity in normal/benign breast luminal cells is not a random event. Furthermore, in BRCA carriers' prophylactic mastectomies, 12 of the 94 (12.77%) breasts had focal p53 positivity in normal/benign luminal cells, with 2 cases in bilateral breasts, significantly higher than in previously studied mammoplasty specimens (0%). Our study suggests that germline BRCA gene mutations could result in genomic instability and an elevated gene mutation rate (such as the p53 gene) in breast luminal cells compared with the general population, predisposing BRCA carriers to develop p53-positive/triple-negative breast carcinomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Meta-analysis of CDKN2A methylation to find its role in prostate cancer development and progression, and also to find the effect of CDKN2A expression on disease-free survival (PRISMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zipei; Wei, Lijuan; Zhu, Weizhi; Yao, Xuping

    2018-03-01

    Reduction of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) (p16 and p14) expression through DNA methylation has been reported in prostate cancer (PCa). This meta-analysis was conducted to assess the difference of p16 and p14 methylation between PCa and different histological types of nonmalignant controls and the correlation of p16 or p14 methylation with clinicopathological features of PCa. According to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement criteria, articles were searched in PubMed, Embase, EBSCO, Wanfang, and CNKI databases. The strength of correlation was calculated by the pooled odds ratios (ORs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Trial sequential analysis (TSA) was used to estimate the required population information for significant results. A total of 20 studies published from 1997 to 2017 were identified in this meta-analysis, including 1140 PCa patients and 530 cases without cancer. Only p16 methylation in PCa was significantly higher than in benign prostatic lesions (OR = 4.72, P = .011), but had a similar level in PCa and adjacent tissues or high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasias (HGPIN). TSA revealed that this analysis on p16 methylation is a false positive result in cancer versus benign prostatic lesions (the estimated required information size of 5116 participants). p16 methylation was not correlated with PCa in the urine and blood. Besides, p16 methylation was not linked to clinical stage, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, and Gleason score (GS) of patients with PCa. p14 methylation was not correlated with PCa in tissue and urine samples. No correlation was observed between p14 methylation and clinical stage or GS. CDKN2A mutation and copy number alteration were not associated with prognosis of PCa in overall survival and disease-free survival. CDKN2A expression was not correlated with the prognosis of PCa in overall survival (492 cases) (P > .1

  15. Integrative analysis reveals an outcome-associated and targetable pattern of p53 and cell cycle deregulation in diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Stefano; Chapuy, Bjoern; Takeyama, Kunihiko; Rodig, Scott J; Hao, Yansheng; Yeda, Kelly T; Inguilizian, Haig; Mermel, Craig; Currie, Treeve; Dogan, Ahmet; Kutok, Jeffery L; Beroukhim, Rameen; Neuberg, Donna; Habermann, Thomas M; Getz, Gad; Kung, Andrew L; Golub, Todd R; Shipp, Margaret A

    2012-09-11

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a clinically and biologically heterogeneous disease with a high proliferation rate. By integrating copy number data with transcriptional profiles and performing pathway analysis in primary DLBCLs, we identified a comprehensive set of copy number alterations (CNAs) that decreased p53 activity and perturbed cell cycle regulation. Primary tumors either had multiple complementary alterations of p53 and cell cycle components or largely lacked these lesions. DLBCLs with p53 and cell cycle pathway CNAs had decreased abundance of p53 target transcripts and increased expression of E2F target genes and the Ki67 proliferation marker. CNAs of the CDKN2A-TP53-RB-E2F axis provide a structural basis for increased proliferation in DLBCL, predict outcome with current therapy, and suggest targeted treatment approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Integrative Analysis Reveals an Outcome-associated and Targetable Pattern of p53 and Cell Cycle Deregulation in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Stefano; Chapuy, Bjoern; Takeyama, Kunihiko; Rodig, Scott J; Hao, Yangsheng; Yeda, Kelly T.; Inguilizian, Haig; Mermel, Craig; Curie, Treeve; Dogan, Ahmed; Kutok, Jeffery L; Beroukim, Rameen; Neuberg, Donna; Habermann, Thomas; Getz, Gad; Kung, Andrew L; Golub, Todd R; Shipp, Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    Summary Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a clinically and biologically heterogeneous disease with a high proliferation rate. By integrating copy number data with transcriptional profiles and performing pathway analysis in primary DLBCLs, we identified a comprehensive set of copy number alterations (CNAs) that decreased p53 activity and perturbed cell cycle regulation. Primary tumors either had multiple complementary alterations of p53 and cell cycle components or largely lacked these lesions. DLBCLs with p53 and cell cycle pathway CNAs had decreased abundance of p53 target transcripts and increased expression of E2F target genes and the Ki67 proliferation marker. CNAs of the CDKN2A-TP53-RB-E2F axis provide a structural basis for increased proliferation in DLBCL, predict outcome with current therapy and suggest targeted treatment approaches. PMID:22975378

  17. MC1R Genotype Modifies Risk of Melanoma in Families Segregating CDKN2A Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Box, Neil F.; Duffy, David L.; Chen, Wei; Stark, Mitchell; Martin, Nicholas G.; Sturm, Richard A.; Hayward, Nicholas K.

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in the exons of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor gene CDKN2A are melanoma-predisposition alleles which have high penetrance, although they have low population frequencies. In contrast, variants of the melanocortin-1 receptor gene, MC1R, confer much lower melanoma risk but are common in European populations. Fifteen Australian CDKN2A mutation–carrying melanoma pedigrees were assessed for MC1R genotype, to test for possible modifier effects on melanoma risk. A CDKN2A mutation in ...

  18. P53 tumor suppressor gene and protein expression is altered in cell lines derived from spontaneous and alpha-radiation-induced canine lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tierney, L.A.; Johnson, N.F.; Lechner, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequently occurring gene alterations in malignant human cancers, including lung cancer. In lung cancer, common point mutations within conserved exons of the p53 gene result in a stabilized form of mutant protein which is detectable in most cases by immunohistochemistry. In addition to point mutations, allelic loss, rearrangements, and deletions of the p53 gene have also been detected in both human and rodent tumors. It has been suggested that for at least some epithelial neoplasms, the loss of expression of wild-type p53 protein may be more important for malignant transformation than the acquisition of activating mutations. Mechanisms responsible for the loss of expression of wild-type protein include gene deletion or rearrangement, nonsense or stop mutations, mutations within introns or upstream regulatory regions of the gene, and accelerated rates of degradation of the protein by DNA viral oncoproteins

  19. CDKN2A and MC1R variants found in Cypriot patients diagnosed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CM) has never been determined within Cypriot melanomas. This study evaluates the frequency of variants in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) and melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) in 32 patients diagnosed with CM.

  20. The absence of Ser389 phosphorylation in p53 affects the basal gene expression level of many p53-dependent genes and alters the biphasic response to UV exposure in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, Wendy; Bruning, Oskar; Jonker, Martijs J.; Zwart, Edwin; van der Hoeven, Tessa V.; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; Rauwerda, Han; de Vries, Annemieke; Breit, Timo M.

    2008-01-01

    Phosphorylation is important in p53-mediated DNA damage responses. After UV irradiation, p53 is phosphorylated specifically at murine residue Ser389. Phosphorylation mutant p53.S389A cells and mice show reduced apoptosis and compromised tumor suppression after UV irradiation. We investigated the

  1. Neurodegeneration in Autoimmune Optic Neuritis Is Associated with Altered APP Cleavage in Neurons and Up-Regulation of p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Herold

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS. Histopathological and radiological analysis revealed that neurodegeneration occurs early in the disease course. However, the pathological mechanisms involved in neurodegeneration are poorly understood. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in Brown Norway rats (BN-rats is a well-established animal model, especially of the neurodegenerative aspects of MS. Previous studies in this animal model indicated that loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, the neurons that form the axons of the optic nerve, occurs in the preclinical phase of the disease and is in part independent of overt histopathological changes of the optic nerve. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genes which are involved in neuronal cell loss at different disease stages of EAE. Furthermore, genes that are highly specific for autoimmune-driven neurodegeneration were compared to those regulated in RGCs after optic nerve axotomy at corresponding time points. Using laser capture micro dissection we isolated RNA from unfixed RGCs and performed global transcriptome analysis of retinal neurons. In total, we detected 582 genes sequentially expressed in the preclinical phase and 1150 genes in the clinical manifest EAE (P 1.5. Furthermore, using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA, we identified amyloid precursor protein (APP as a potential upstream regulator of changes in gene expression in the preclinical EAE but neither in clinical EAE, nor at any time point after optic nerve transection. Therefore, the gene pathway analysis lead to the hypothesis that altered cleavage of APP in neurons in the preclinical phase of EAE leads to the enhanced production of APP intracellular domain (AICD, which in turn acts as a transcriptional regulator and thereby initiates an apoptotic signaling cascade via up-regulation of the target gene p

  2. The Putative Role of TP53 Alterations and p53 Expression in Borderline Ovarian Tumors - Correlation with Clinicopathological Features and Prognosis: A Mini-Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semczuk, Andrzej; Gogacz, Marek; Semczuk-Sikora, Anna; Jóźwik, Maciej; Rechberger, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors (BOTs) represent an independent group among ovarian malignancies, being diagnosed at clinical stage earlier than invasive ovarian carcinomas (OCs) and characterized by a rather favorable outcome after careful surgical management. Data published worldwide showed a substantial discordance of p53 expression in BOTs. The purpose of this work was to present the current status of knowledge on the significance of TP53 gene and p53 protein product alterations in BOTs. In general, higher p53 expression patterns were reported for ovarian malignancies compared to BOTs. Serous, mucinous, and endometrioid BOTs differ substantially in relation to p53 immunostaining, but data concerning the relationship between the protein's immunoreactivity and other clinico-pathological variables are scarce. Finally, reports published to date support the view that TP53 alterations may not be commonly associated with the borderline phenotype of ovarian tumors but they probably occur during the development of invasive OCs. In light of these uncertainties, the impact of TP53 alterations and p53 expression on overall survival in women affected by BOTs requires further multi-institutional studies in large cohorts of patients. PMID:28928856

  3. Desferrioxamine Attenuates Doxorubicin-Induced Acute Cardiotoxicity through TFG-β/Smad p53 Pathway in Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman A. Al-Shabanah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of doxorubicin DOX with iron and the consequent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS is a major player in DOX-induced cardiomyopathy. Accordingly, this study has been initiated to investigate the preventive effect of the iron chelator, desferrioxamine (DFX, against DOX-induced acute cardiotoxicity in rats. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups and were injected intraperitoneally (I.P. with normal saline, a single dose of DOX (15 mg/kg, a single dose of DFX (250 mg/kg and a combined treatment with DFX (250 mg/kg 30 min prior to a single dose of DOX, (15 mg/kg. A single dose of DOX significantly increased mRNA expression of TGF-β, Smad2, Smad4, CDKN2A and p53 and significantly decreased Samd7 and Mdm2 mRNA expression levels. Administration of DFX prior to DOX resulted in a complete reversal of DOX-induced alteration in cardiac enzymes and gene expression to normal levels. Data from this study suggest that (1 DOX induces its acute cardiotoxicity secondary to increasing genes expression of TGF-β/Smad pathway. (2 DOX increases apoptosis through upregulation of CDKN2A and p53 and downregulation of Mdm2 gene expression. (3 The preventive effect of DFX against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity is mediated via the TGF-β1/Smad pathway.

  4. Losses of both products of the Cdkn2a/Arf locus contribute to asbestos-induced mesothelioma development and cooperate to accelerate tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A Altomare

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The CDKN2A/ARF locus encompasses overlapping tumor suppressor genes p16(INK4A and p14(ARF, which are frequently co-deleted in human malignant mesothelioma (MM. The importance of p16(INK4A loss in human cancer is well established, but the relative significance of p14(ARF loss has been debated. The tumor predisposition of mice singly deficient for either Ink4a or Arf, due to targeting of exons 1α or 1β, respectively, supports the idea that both play significant and nonredundant roles in suppressing spontaneous tumors. To further test this notion, we exposed Ink4a(+/- and Arf(+/- mice to asbestos, the major cause of MM. Asbestos-treated Ink4a(+/- and Arf(+/- mice showed increased incidence and shorter latency of MM relative to wild-type littermates. MMs from Ink4a(+/- mice exhibited biallelic inactivation of Ink4a, loss of Arf or p53 expression and frequent loss of p15(Ink4b. In contrast, MMs from Arf(+/- mice exhibited loss of Arf expression, but did not require loss of Ink4a or Ink4b. Mice doubly deficient for Ink4a and Arf, due to deletion of Cdkn2a/Arf exon 2, showed accelerated asbestos-induced MM formation relative to mice deficient for Ink4a or Arf alone, and MMs exhibited biallelic loss of both tumor suppressor genes. The tumor suppressor function of Arf in MM was p53-independent, since MMs with loss of Arf retained functional p53. Collectively, these in vivo data indicate that both CDKN2A/ARF gene products suppress asbestos carcinogenicity. Furthermore, while inactivation of Arf appears to be crucial for MM pathogenesis, the inactivation of both p16(Ink4a and p19(Arf cooperate to accelerate asbestos-induced tumorigenesis.

  5. Swedish CDKN2A mutation carriers do not present the atypical mole syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kari; Harbst, Katja; Måsbäck, Anna; Jönsson, Göran; Borg, Ake; Olsson, Håkan; Ingvar, Christian

    2010-08-01

    Phenotypic characteristics were examined in melanoma-prone southern Swedish CDKN2A (p16-113insArg/p14ARF-128insSer) mutation families, in relation to the CDKN2A genotype, nevi, clinically atypical nevi (CAN) and melanoma. Individuals from eight melanoma-prone families, with index patients carrying the CDKN2A mutation, were offered skin examinations and genotyping (CDKN2A and MC1R). Ninety-three individuals above 18 years of age participated; 29 invasive melanomas in 16 patients were recorded, all in the 38 verified CDKN2A mutation carriers. Median age at diagnosis was 36 years. Several MC1R variants were observed. A significant correlation to CAN (P=0.01) and red hair colour (P=0.02) could be confirmed in melanoma patients. A positive mutation status (CDKN2A) was correlated to one or more CAN (P=0.007) but neither to blue eyes, red hair colour, heavy freckling nor high number of nevi. For mutation carriers, median total naevus count was 24 and interquartile range was 12-47 (mean 31); whereas for the whole cohort, median total naevus count was 12 and interquartile range was 5-25 (mean 22). No participant fulfilled the atypical mole syndrome phenotype criteria. Melanomas were diagnosed only in mutation carriers, and melanoma diagnosis was statistically correlated to the presence of one or more CAN and red hair colour, supporting the possible synergistic effect of a MC1R mutation on increased risk of melanoma in patients with a CDKN2A mutation. Family history, with verified tumour diagnoses, remains an important clinical tool for finding mutation carriers for referral to clinical geneticists and simultaneous presence of CAN in probable mutation carriers might strengthen this indication. The atypical mole syndrome phenotype was, however, not verified in the studied families and total naevus counts were low.

  6. p53 deficiency alters the yield and spectrum of radiation-induced lacZ mutants in the brain of transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P. Y.; Kanazawa, N.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particle radiation in the galacto-cosmic environment poses a significant risk in space exploration and the evaluation of radiation-induced genetic damage in tissues, especially in the central nervous system, is an important consideration in long-term manned space missions. We used a plasmid-based transgenic mouse model system, with the pUR288 lacZ transgene integrated in the genome of every cell of C57Bl/6(lacZ) mice, to evaluate the genetic damage induced by iron particle radiation. In order to examine the importance of genetic background on the radiation sensitivity of individuals, we cross-bred p53 wild-type lacZ transgenic mice with p53 nullizygous mice, producing lacZ transgenic mice that were either hemizygous or nullizygous for the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Animals were exposed to an acute dose of 1 Gy of iron particles and the lacZ mutation frequency (MF) in the brain was measured at time intervals from 1 to 16 weeks post-irradiation. Our results suggest that iron particles induced an increase in lacZ MF (2.4-fold increase in p53+/+ mice, 1.3-fold increase in p53+/- mice and 2.1-fold increase in p53-/- mice) and that this induction is both temporally regulated and p53 genotype dependent. Characterization of mutants based on their restriction patterns showed that the majority of the mutants arising spontaneously are derived from point mutations or small deletions in all three genotypes. Radiation induced alterations in the spectrum of deletion mutants and reorganization of the genome, as evidenced by the selection of mutants containing mouse genomic DNA. These observations are unique in that mutations in brain tissue after particle radiation exposure have never before been reported owing to technical limitations in most other mutation assays.

  7. The P48T germline mutation and polymorphism in the CDKN2A gene of patients with melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber J.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available CDKN2A has been implicated as a melanoma susceptibility gene in some kindreds with a family history of this disease. Mutations in CDKN2A may produce an imbalance between functional p16ink4a and cyclin D causing abnormal cell growth. We searched for germline mutations in this gene in 22 patients with clinical criteria of hereditary cancer (early onset, presence of multiple primary melanoma or 1 or more first- or second-degree relatives affected by secondary structural content prediction, a mutation scanning method that relies on the propensity for single-strand DNA to take on a three-dimensional structure that is highly sequence dependent, and sequencing the samples with alterations in the electrophoretic mobility. The prevalence of CDKN2A mutation in our study was 4.5% (1/22 and there was a correlation between family history and probability of mutation detection. We found the P48T mutation in 1 patient with 2 melanoma-affected relatives. The patient descends from Italian families and this mutation has been reported previously only in Italian families in two independent studies. This leads us to suggest the presence of a mutational "hotspot" within this gene or a founder mutation. We also detected a high prevalence (59.1% of polymorphisms, mainly alleles 500 C/G (7/31.8% or 540 C/T (6/27.3%, in the 3' untranslated region of exon 3. This result reinforces the idea that these rare polymorphic alleles have been significantly associated with the risk of developing melanoma.

  8. Radiosensitivity profiles from a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines exhibiting genetic alterations in p53 and disparate DNA-dependent protein kinase activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langland, Gregory T.; Yannone, Steven M.; Langland, Rachel A.; Nakao, Aki; Guan, Yinghui; Long, Sydney B.T.; Vonguyen, Lien; Chen, David J.; Gray, Joe W; Chen, Fanqing

    2009-09-07

    The variability of radiation responses in ovarian tumors and tumor-derived cell lines is poorly understood. Since both DNA repair capacity and p53 status can significantly alter radiation sensitivity, we evaluated these factors along with radiation sensitivity in a panel of sporadic human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. We observed a gradation of radiation sensitivity among these sixteen lines, with a five-fold difference in the LD50 between the most radiosensitive and the most radioresistant cells. The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is essential for the repair of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks in human somatic cells. Therefore, we measured gene copy number, expression levels, protein abundance, genomic copy and kinase activity for DNA-PK in all of our cell lines. While there were detectable differences in DNA-PK between the cell lines, there was no clear correlation with any of these differences and radiation sensitivity. In contrast, p53 function as determined by two independent methods, correlated well with radiation sensitivity, indicating p53 mutant ovarian cancer cells are typically radioresistant relative to p53 wild-type lines. These data suggest that the activity of regulatory molecules such as p53 may be better indicators of radiation sensitivity than DNA repair enzymes such as DNAPK in ovarian cancer.

  9. MC1R genotype modifies risk of melanoma in families segregating CDKN2A mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, N F; Duffy, D L; Chen, W; Stark, M; Martin, N G; Sturm, R A; Hayward, N K

    2001-10-01

    Mutations in the exons of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor gene CDKN2A are melanoma-predisposition alleles which have high penetrance, although they have low population frequencies. In contrast, variants of the melanocortin-1 receptor gene, MC1R, confer much lower melanoma risk but are common in European populations. Fifteen Australian CDKN2A mutation-carrying melanoma pedigrees were assessed for MC1R genotype, to test for possible modifier effects on melanoma risk. A CDKN2A mutation in the presence of a homozygous consensus MC1R genotype had a raw penetrance of 50%, with a mean age at onset of 58.1 years. When an MC1R variant allele was also present, the raw penetrance of the CDKN2A mutation increased to 84%, with a mean age at onset of 37.8 years (P=.01). The presence of a CDKN2A mutation gave a hazard ratio of 13.35, and the hazard ratio of 3.72 for MC1R variant alleles was also significant. The impact of MC1R variants on risk of melanoma was mediated largely through the action of three common alleles, Arg151Cys, Arg160Trp, and Asp294His, that have previously been associated with red hair, fair skin, and skin sensitivity to ultraviolet light.

  10. CDKN2A is the main susceptibility gene in Italian pancreatic cancer families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiorzo, Paola; Fornarini, Giuseppe; Sciallero, Stefania; Battistuzzi, Linda; Belli, Fiorenza; Bernard, Loris; Bonelli, Luigina; Borgonovo, Giacomo; Bruno, William; De Cian, Franco; Decensi, Andrea; Filauro, Marco; Faravelli, Francesca; Gozza, Alberto; Gargiulo, Sara; Mariette, Frederique; Nasti, Sabina; Pastorino, Lorenza; Queirolo, Paola; Savarino, Vincenzo; Varesco, Liliana; Scarrà, Giovanna Bianchi

    2012-03-01

    Background Most familial pancreatic cancer (FPC) remains unexplained. The identification of individuals with a high genetic risk of developing pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) is important to elucidate its biological basis and is critical to better define emerging strategies for the detection of early pancreatic neoplasms. Patients and methods A series of 225 consecutively enrolled patients with PC were tested for CDKN2A mutations. After personal and family cancer histories of all the patients had been reviewed, a subset of the patients were classified as FPC and were also tested for mutations in PALLD, PALB2, BRCA1 and BRCA2 as FPC candidate genes. Results The CDKN2A mutation rate in the 225 PC cases was 5.7%. The CDKN2A founder mutations, p.E27X and p.G101W, were predominant, but the mutation spectrum also included p.L65P, p.G67R and two novel, potentially pathogenic variants, promoter variant c.-201ACTC>CTTT and p.R144C. None of the patients with FPC harboured germline mutations in PALLD, PALB2 or BRCA2. One family was positive for the BRCA1 UV variant p.P727L. Strikingly, five of 16 patients with FPC (31%) carried CDKN2A mutations. Conclusion These findings suggest that a sizeable subset of Italian FPC families may carry CDKN2A mutations. This result may be of value for identifying the best candidates for future PC screening trials in Italy.

  11. Exposure to benzene induces oxidative stress, alters the immune response and expression of p53 in gasoline filling workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzma, Nazia; Kumar, B Santhosh; Hazari, Mohammed Abdul Hannan

    2010-12-01

    Chronic exposure to benzene can lead to deleterious effects on many biological systems including blood and blood-forming organs. We investigated the adverse effects of benzene among workers occupationally exposed to benzene in India. Four hundred twenty-eight gasoline filling workers occupationally exposed to benzene and 78 unexposed individuals were recruited for this study. Benzene concentration was determined by gas chromatography, reactive oxygen species (ROS) by dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) method, malondialdehyde (MDA) by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay (TBARS), total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) by RANSOD kit and glutathione (GSH) by 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) reaction, respectively. CD4, CD8, IgG were carried out by using fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS Calibur) and mRNA expression of p53 by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). A significant increase in the concentration of benzene and its byproducts in both blood and urine were found in the workers compared with the controls. The levels of ROS and MDA were significantly elevated, and GSH and total T-SOD were decreased in the workers compared with the controls. A statistically significant decrease in the immunoglobulin levels, CD4T cells, CD4/CD8 ratio was observed in workers (vs. controls), whereas no significant difference was observed in CD8T cells. p53 gene expression was markedly higher in workers than in controls. Occupational exposure to benzene causes oxidative stress, immune suppression and increases the expression of tumor-suppressing gene p53 in gasoline filling workers. These bio-functional markers might be useful in screening and surveillance for occupational hazard.

  12. CDKN2A-mutation hos en familie med arveligt malignt melanom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djursby, Malene; Wadt, Karin; Lorentzen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) is a frequent form of cancer with increasing incidence. 6-10% of patients with MM report a family history of MM, and in most populations 2% of unselected cases of MM carry a CDKN2A mutation. tvWe present a family with 24 cases of MM in nine persons from several generations......, caused by a previously undescribed germ-line intronic mutation in CDKN2A. Through genetic counselling and genetic testing high-risk persons in the family are located and offered regular screening for MM....

  13. CDKN2A-mutation i en familie med arveligt malignt melanom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djursby, Malene; Wadt, Karin; Lorentzen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) is a frequent form of cancer with increasing incidence. 6-10% of patients with MM report a family history of MM, and in most populations 2% of unselected cases of MM carry a CDKN2A mutation. tvWe present a family with 24 cases of MM in nine persons from several generations......, caused by a previously undescribed germ-line intronic mutation in CDKN2A. Through genetic counselling and genetic testing high-risk persons in the family are located and offered regular screening for MM....

  14. Alterations in p53-specific T cells and other lymphocyte subsets in breast cancer patients during vaccination with p53-peptide loaded dendritic cells and low-dose interleukin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Pedersen, Anders E; Nikolajsen, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    We have previously established a cancer vaccine using autologous DCs, generated by in vitro stimulation with IL-4 and GM-CSF, and pulsed with six HLA-A*0201 binding wild-type p53 derived peptides. This vaccine was used in combination with low-dose interleukin-2 in a recently published clinical...... Phase II trial where 26 HLA-A2+ patients with progressive late-stage metastatic breast cancer (BC) were included. Almost 1/3rd of the patients obtained stable disease or minor regression during treatment with a positive correlation to tumour over-expression of p53. In the present study, we performed...... a comprehensive analysis of the effector stage of the p53-specific CD8+ T cells by the use of Dextramer Technology and multicolour FACS. Pre- and post-treatment blood samples from eight BC patients were analysed. Independent of clinical outcome p53-specific T cells were phenotypic distinctly antigen experienced...

  15. CDKN2A and MC1R variants found in Cypriot patients diagnosed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GEORGIA KOULERMOU

    1Department of Plastic Surgery and Burn Unit, Nicosia General Hospital, Nicosia 2029, Cyprus. 2Department of Molecular ... assessed. CDKN2A p.Ala148Thr was detected in three of 32 patients, while the control group revealed no variations ... eral whole blood using GentraPuregene Blood kit (Qiagen,. Hilden, Germany).

  16. NOVEL EPIGENETIC CHANGES IN CDKN2A ARE ASSOCIATED WITH PROGRESSION OF CERVICAL INTRAEPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijetunga, N. Ari; Belbin, Thomas J.; Burk, Robert D.; Whitney, Kathleen; Abadi, Maria; Greally, John M.; Einstein, Mark H.; Schlecht, Nicolas F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To conduct a comprehensive mapping of the genomic DNA methylation in CDKN2A, which codes for the p16INK4A and p14ARF proteins, and 14 of the most promising DNA methylation marker candidates previously reported to be associated with progression of low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN1) to cervical cancer. Methods We analyzed DNA methylation in 68 HIV-seropositive and negative women with incident CIN1, CIN2, CIN3 and invasive cervical cancer, assaying 120 CpG dinucleotide sites spanning APC, CDH1, CDH13, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, DAPK1, FHIT, GSTP1, HIC1, MGMT, MLH1, RARB, RASSF1, TERT and TIMP3 using the Illumina Infinium array. Validation was performed using high resolution mapping of the target genes with HELP-tagging for 286 CpGs, followed by fine mapping of candidate genes with targeted bisulfite sequencing. We assessed for statistical differences in DNA methylation levels for each CpG loci assayed using univariate and multivariate methods correcting for multiple comparisons. Results In our discovery sample set, we identified dose dependent differences in DNA methylation with grade of disease in CDKN2A, APC, MGMT, MLH1 and HIC1, whereas single CpG locus differences between CIN2/3 and cancer groups were seen for CDH13, DAPK1 and TERT. Only those CpGs in the gene body of CDKN2A showed a monotonic increase in methylation between persistent CIN1, CIN2, CIN3 and cancers. Conclusion Our data suggests a novel link between early cervical disease progression and DNA methylation in a region downstream of the CDKN2A transcription start site that may lead to increased p16INK4A/p14ARF expression prior to development of malignant disease. PMID:27401842

  17. Germline Variation at CDKN2A and Associations with Nevus Phenotypes among Members of Melanoma Families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Nicholas J; Mitra, Nandita; Goldstein, Alisa M

    2017-01-01

    Germline mutations in CDKN2A are frequently identified among melanoma kindreds and are associated with increased atypical nevus counts. However, a clear relationship between pathogenic CDKN2A mutation carriage and other nevus phenotypes including counts of common acquired nevi has not yet been es...

  18. Elevated cyclooxygenase-2 expression is associated with altered expression of p53 and SMAD4, amplification of HER-2/neu, and poor outcome in serous ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkinheimo, Tiina-Liisa; Lassus, Heini; Finne, Patrik; van Rees, Bastiaan P; Leminen, Arto; Ylikorkala, Olavi; Haglund, Caj; Butzow, Ralf; Ristimäki, Ari

    2004-01-15

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is frequently expressed in human adenocarcinomas and inhibition of COX-2 suppresses tumor formation in various animal models of carcinogenesis. We analyzed expression of COX-2 protein in human serous ovarian carcinomas by immunohistochemistry (n = 442) and by Western blotting (n = 12) and COX-2 mRNA by reverse transcriptase PCR (n = 12). COX-2 immunoreactivity was correlated to clinicopathological variables and to expression of p53 and SMAD4 as detected by immunohistochemistry and to amplification of HER-2/neu as detected by in situ hybridization. COX-2 mRNA expression was detected in 75% (9 of 12) and COX-2 protein in 42% (5 of 12) of the serous ovarian adenocarcinoma specimens as detected by reverse transcriptase-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Moderate to strong (elevated) immunoreactivity for COX-2 was detected in 70% (310 of 442) of the tumors. Elevated COX-2 expression associated with reduced disease-specific survival (P = 0.0011), high histological grade (P 1 cm (P = 0.0111), and age > 57 years (P = 0.0099). Tumors with altered immunostaining pattern for p53 or SMAD4 expressed more frequently elevated levels of COX-2 when compared with the tumors with normal staining pattern of these tumor suppressor genes (P ovarian carcinomas and that expression of COX-2 may be induced in these tumors by loss of tumor suppressor genes such as p53 and SMAD4 and by amplification of HER-2/neuoncogene.

  19. Multiple primary melanomas in a CDKN2A mutation carrier exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, Mark J; Hansen, Chris B; Hart, Marybeth; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Chen, Wei; Sturm, Richard A; Bowen, Glen; Florell, Scott R; Harris, Ronald M; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Swinyer, Leonard; Leachman, Sancy A

    2007-11-01

    Recent research has shown a possible causal relationship between ionizing radiation exposure and melanoma. Individuals with mutations in CDKN2A (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A), the major melanoma predisposition gene, have an increased susceptibility to melanoma-promoting exposures, such as UV light. We describe a patient from a familial melanoma pedigree with 7 primary melanomas on the right side of her body, the first occurring 5 years after exposure to atmospheric nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s. Physical examination revealed phototype I skin, red hair, and 26 nevi (14 on the right and 12 on the left side of her body). One nevus was larger than 5 mm, and 2 were clinically atypical. Sequence analysis demonstrated a known deleterious mutation in CDKN2A (G-34T) and homozygosity for a red hair color variant in MC1R (melanocortin 1 receptor) (R151C). Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of blood, fibroblasts, and melanocytes from both upper extremities ruled out mosaicism. Individuals such as this patient, who has CDKN2A and MC1R mutations, are likely to be more susceptible to environmental insults. A careful review of environmental exposures in these vulnerable cases may reveal cancer-promoting agents, such as ionizing radiation, that go unnoticed in less susceptible populations.

  20. EZH2 expression in gliomas: Correlation with CDKN2A gene deletion/ p16 loss and MIB-1 proliferation index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkait, Suvendu; Sharma, Vikas; Jha, Prerana; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Suri, Vaishali; Suri, Ashish; Sharma, B S; Sarkar, Chitra

    2015-10-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) mediated down-regulation of CDKN2A/p16 has been observed in cell lines as well as in a few carcinomas. However, there is no study correlating EZH2 expression with CDKN2A/p16 status in gliomas. Hence, the present study was conducted to evaluate EZH2 expression in astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors and correlate with CDKN2A/p16 status as well as MIB-1 labeling index (LI). Gliomas of all grades (n = 118) were studied using immunohistochemistry to assess EZH2, p16 and MIB-1 LI and fluorescence in situ hybrization to evaluate CDKN2A gene status. EZH2 expression and CDKN2A homozygous deletion (HD) were both significantly more frequent in high-grade gliomas (HGG). Further, strong EZH2 expression (LI ≥ 25%) was significantly more common in HGGs without CDKN2A HD (48.7%; 19/39) as compared to cases with deletion (15.8%; 3/19). Loss of p16 expression was noted in 100% and 51.3% of CDKN2A deleted and non-deleted tumors, respectively. Notably, 80% (16/20) of the CDKN2A non-deleted HGGs with p16 loss had strong EZH2 expression, in contrast to only 15.8% (3/19) in the deleted group. Loss of p16 expression significantly correlated with MIB-1 LI, irrespective of EZH2 status. Thus, this study shows that EZH2 expression correlates with tumor grade in both astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors and hence can be used as a diagnostic marker to differentiate between low and HGGs. Further, this is the first report demonstrating an inverse correlation of strong EZH2 expression with CDKN2A HD in HGGs. Loss of p16 protein expression is mostly attributable to CDKN2A HD and correlates significantly with MIB-1 LI. Notably, our study for the first time suggests a possible epigenetic mechanism of p16 loss in CDKN2A non-deleted HGGs mediated by strong EZH2 expression. A hypothetical model for control of proliferative activity in low versus HGGs is therefore proposed. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  1. MC1R variants increase melanoma risk in families with CDKN2A mutations: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargnoli, Maria Concetta; Gandini, Sara; Peris, Ketty; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Raimondi, Sara

    2010-05-01

    We performed a meta-analysis to assess whether MC1R variants increase the risk of melanoma in CDKN2A mutation carriers of melanoma-prone families. Data from 96 CDKN2A-positive melanoma-prone families from seven independent populations of Europe, United States and Australia were included in the analysis. Summary risk estimates were calculated by random-effect models. We explored between-study heterogeneity and publication bias. Association between MC1R variants and age at diagnosis was assessed by the non-parametric Wilcoxon test. CDKN2A mutation carriers with 1 MC1R variant showed a double melanoma risk as compared to CDKN2A mutation carriers without MC1R variants (Summary OR; 95%CI: 2.2; 1.1-4.5). MC1R heterozygous subjects had no significantly higher melanoma risk than wild-type subjects (1.6; 0.5-5.4) while carriers of multiple MC1R variants had a more than four-times higher melanoma risk (4.6; 1.3-16.4). Carriers of red hair colour (RHC) variants showed an increased melanoma risk with a Summary OR of 3.5 (95%CI: 1.3-9.9). CDKN2A mutation carriers with MC1R variants had a statistically significant lower median age at melanoma diagnosis than CDKN2A mutation carriers with no MC1R variants (37years versus 47years, p-valueMC1R variants significantly increase penetrance of CDKN2A mutations in melanoma-prone families, especially with respect to multiple MC1R variants and to RHC variants. A significant anticipation of melanoma diagnosis is observed in CDKN2A mutation carriers with MC1R variants. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The contribution of large genomic deletions at the CDKN2A locus to the burden of familial melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesueur, F; de Lichy, M; Barrois, M; Durand, G; Bombled, J; Avril, M-F; Chompret, A; Boitier, F; Lenoir, G M; Bressac-de Paillerets, B; Baccard, Monique; Bachollet, Bertrand; Berthet, Pascaline; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonnetblanc, Jean-Marie; Caron, Olivier; Chevrant-Breton, Jacqueline; Cuny, Jean-François; Dalle, Stéphane; Delaunay, Michèle; Demange, Liliane; De Quatrebarbes, Julie; Doré, Jean-François; Frénay, Marc; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gesta, Paul; Giraud, Sophie; Gorry, Philippe; Grange, Florent; Green, Andrew; Huiart, Laetitia; Janin, Nicolas; Joly, Pascal; Kérob, Delphine; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Limacher, Jean-Marc; Longy, Michel; Mansard, Sandrine; Marrou, Karine; Martin-Denavit, Tanguy; Mateus, Christine; Maubec, Eve; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Orlandini, Vincent; Pujol, Pascal; Sassolas, Bruno; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Luc; Vabres, Pierre; Venat, Laurence; Wierzbicka, Ewa; Zattara, Hélène

    2008-07-22

    Mutations in two genes encoding cell cycle regulatory proteins have been shown to cause familial cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). About 20% of melanoma-prone families bear a point mutation in the CDKN2A locus at 9p21, which encodes two unrelated proteins, p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF). Rare mutations in CDK4 have also been linked to the disease. Although the CDKN2A gene has been shown to be the major melanoma predisposing gene, there remains a significant proportion of melanoma kindreds linked to 9p21 in which germline mutations of CDKN2A have not been identified through direct exon sequencing. The purpose of this study was to assess the contribution of large rearrangements in CDKN2A to the disease in melanoma-prone families using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. We examined 214 patients from independent pedigrees with at least two CMM cases. All had been tested for CDKN2A and CDK4 point mutation, and 47 were found positive. Among the remaining 167 negative patients, one carried a novel genomic deletion of CDKN2A exon 2. Overall, genomic deletions represented 2.1% of total mutations in this series (1 of 48), confirming that they explain a very small proportion of CMM susceptibility. In addition, we excluded a new gene on 9p21, KLHL9, as being a major CMM gene.

  3. Malignant transformation of neurofibromas in neurofibromatosis 1 is associated with CDKN2A/p16 inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, G P; Stemmer-Rachamimov, A O; Ino, Y

    1999-01-01

    examined the CDKN2A/p16 gene and p16 protein in NFs and MPNSTs from patients with NF1. On immunohistochemical analysis, all NFs expressed p16 protein. The MPNSTs, however, were essentially immunonegative for p16, with striking transitions in cases that contained both benign and malignant elements. None...... of the benign tumors had CDKN2A/p16 deletions, whereas three of six MPNSTs appeared to have homozygous CDKN2A/p16 deletions. Methylation analysis and mutation analysis of CDKN2A/p16 in MPNSTs did not reveal any abnormalities. These results show that malignant transformation of NF is associated with loss of p16...... expression, which is often secondary to homozygous deletion of the CDKN2A/p16 gene. The findings suggest that CDKN2A/p16 inactivation occurs during the malignant transformation of NFs in NF1 patients and raises the possibility that p16 immunohistochemistry may provide ancillary information in the distinction...

  4. Altered expression profile of glycolytic enzymes during testicular ischemia reperfusion injury is associated with the p53/TIGAR pathway: effect of fructose 1,6-diphosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Al-Maghrebi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Testicular ischemia reperfusion injury (tIRI is considered the mechanism underlying the pathology of testicular torsion and detorsion. Left untreated, tIRI can induce testis dysfunction, damage to spermatogenesis and possible infertility. In this study, we aimed to assess the activities and expression of glycolytic enzymes (GEs in the testis and their possible modulation during tIRI. The effect of fructose 1,6-diphosphate (FDP, a glycolytic intermediate, on tIRI was also investigated. Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: sham, unilateral tIRI, and tIRI + FDP (2 mg/kg. tIRI was induced by occlusion of the testicular artery for 1 h followed by 4 h of reperfusion. FDP was injected peritoneally 30 min prior to reperfusion. Histological and biochemical analyses were used to assess damage to spermatogenesis, activities of major GEs, and energy and oxidative stress markers. The relative mRNA expression of GEs was evaluated by real-time PCR. ELISA and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the expression of p53 and TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR. Results. Histological analysis revealed tIRI-induced spermatogenic damage as represented by a significant decrease in the Johnsen biopsy score. In addition, tIRI reduced the activities of hexokinase 1, phosphofructokinase-1, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and lactate dehydrogenase C. However, mRNA expression downregulation was detected only for hexokinase 1, phosphoglycerate kinase 2, and lactate dehydrogenase C. ATP and NADPH depletion was also induced by tIRI and was accompanied by an increased Malondialdehyde concentration, reduced glutathione level, and reduced superoxide dismutase and catalase enzyme activities. The immunoexpression of p53 and TIGAR was markedly increased after tIRI. The above tIRI-induced alterations were attenuated by FDP treatment. Discussion. Our findings indicate that tIRI-induced spermatogenic damage is

  5. CDKN2A and MC1R analysis in amelanotic and pigmented melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiorzo, Paola; Pastorino, Lorenza; Pizzichetta, Maria A; Bono, Riccardo; Queirolo, Paola; Talamini, Renato; Annessi, Giorgio; Bruno, William; Nasti, Sabina; Gargiulo, Sara; Battistuzzi, Linda; Sini, Maria C; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Scarrà, Giovanna Bianchi

    2009-06-01

    Amelanotic melanoma (AM) is a rare subtype of melanoma with little or no clinically visible pigment; it is more difficult to diagnose than pigmented melanoma (PM), and has a worse prognosis. In the attempt to find a genetic explanation for the distinction between AM and PM, we conducted a case-case study, matching AM and PM patients, and testing them for germline mutations in high- (p16INK4A, p14ARF, CDK4) and low-penetrance (MC1R) melanoma susceptibility genes. Similar CDKN2A mutations were found in both sets of melanomas. A p14ARF splice germline mutation was detected for the first time in an Italian family with AM. This rare mutation, which has been described only once previously, may be involved in predisposition to the amelanotic phenotype in combination with germline MC1R variants and coordinate somatic expression of pigmentation genes and their regulators.

  6. Different TP53 mutants in p53 overexpressed epithelial ovarian carcinoma can be associated both with altered and unaltered glycolytic and apoptotic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoun, Stephanie; Atallah, David; Tahtouh, Roula; Alaaeddine, Nada; Moubarak, Malak; Khaddage, Abir; Ayoub, Eliane Nasr; Chahine, George; Hilal, George

    2018-01-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor and key regulator of glycolysis in cancer cells, however highly mutated in tumors. In ovarian cancer, studies concerning p53 mutations focus on the DNA binding domain since the majority of hotspot mutations affects this region. Yet, mutations in other regions such as the proline rich domain may also affect the protein's expression and activity. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of various positions of mutations in TP53 gene on glycolysis, apoptosis and transcription of p53 target genes. Mutations frequency and their effect on p53 expression were assessed by PCR-SSCP, sequencing and immunohistochemistry on 30 ovarian cancer biopsies. Six tumors were cultured, as well as SK-OV-3, OVCAR-3 and Igrov-1. SK-OV-3 cells were transfected with 2 TP53 mutants. p53 transcriptional activity was assayed by qPCR, apoptosis by flow cytometry and glycolysis by glucose and lactate measurements, with quantification of glycolytic enzymes expression. Our results showed a high frequency of the P72R mutant, associated with p53 overexpression in the ovarian biopsies. However, P72R mutant cells showed similar apoptosis and glycolysis as WT cells. DNA binding domain mutations decreased the transcriptional activity of the protein and increased glucose consumption and lactate production. Despite the overexpression of the P72R mutated protein in the biopsies, it showed a similar apoptotic activity and glucose regulation ability as WT p53. Knowing that p53 expression status is used for chemotherapeutic approaches and prognosis in ovarian cancer, the results obtained highlight the importance of locating TP53 mutations.

  7. OTUD5 regulates p53 stability by deubiquitinating p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judong Luo

    Full Text Available The p53 tumour suppressor protein is a transcription factor that prevents oncogenic progression by activating the expression of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest genes in stressed cells. The stability of p53 is tightly regulated by ubiquitin-dependent degradation, driven mainly by its negative regulators ubiquitin ligase MDM2.In this study, we have identified OTUD5 as a DUB that interacts with and deubiquitinates p53. OTUD5 forms a direct complex with p53 and controls level of ubiquitination. The function of OTUD5 is required to allow the rapid activation of p53-dependent transcription and a p53-dependent apoptosis in response to DNA damage stress.As a novel deubiquitinating enzyme for p53, OTUD5 is required for the stabilization and the activation of a p53 response.

  8. Microbial Regulation of p53 Tumor Suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I Zaika

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor has been identified as a protein interacting with the large T antigen produced by simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40. Subsequent research on p53 inhibition by SV40 and other tumor viruses has not only helped to gain a better understanding of viral biology, but also shaped our knowledge of human tumorigenesis. Recent studies have found, however, that inhibition of p53 is not strictly in the realm of viruses. Some bacterial pathogens also actively inhibit p53 protein and induce its degradation, resulting in alteration of cellular stress responses. This phenomenon was initially characterized in gastric epithelial cells infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that commonly infects the human stomach and is strongly linked to gastric cancer. Besides H. pylori, a number of other bacterial species were recently discovered to inhibit p53. These findings provide novel insights into host-bacteria interactions and tumorigenesis associated with bacterial infections.

  9. CDKN2A and MC1R variants influence dermoscopic and confocal features of benign melanocytic lesions in multiple melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassoli, Sara; Maurichi, Andrea; Rodolfo, Monica; Casari, Alice; Frigerio, Simona; Pupelli, Gaia; Farnetani, Francesca; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Santinami, Mario; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2013-06-01

    Non-invasive diagnostic tools are effective in the histomorphological study of melanocytic lesions. The role of melanoma susceptibility genes on melanocytic nevi histopathological features is not clear. The current study aimed to correlate genetic alterations and histomorphological features of melanocytic nevi. Clinical, dermoscopic and confocal features of 34 multiple melanoma patients and 34 controls were compared. Among patients with melanoma, carriers of CDKN2A mutations and/or MC1R variants, and wild-type genes were also compared. In patients with melanoma, a lighter phototype (P = 0.051), a higher number of nevi (P mutation carriers were more frequently younger (P = 0.023), with clinically atypical nevi (P = 0.050), with cytological atypia (P = 0.033) at confocal. G101W mutation and MC1R variants carriers showed hypopigmented nevi (P = 0.002) and, at confocal, roundish cells infiltrating the junction (P = 0.019). These data suggest an influence of CDKN2A mutation and MC1R variants in the development of dysplastic melanocytic lesions. Non-invasive histomorphological evaluation, together with genetic studies, improves melanoma risk identification and early diagnosis, for a patient-tailored management. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Mutation analysis of genes that control the G1/S cell cycle in melanoma: TP53, CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, José Luis; Cabrera, Carmen M; Serrano, Salvio; López-Nevot, Miguel Ángel

    2005-01-01

    The role of genes involved in the control of progression from the G1 to the S phase of the cell cycle in melanoma tumors in not fully known. The aim of our study was to analyse mutations in TP53, CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B genes in melanoma tumors and melanoma cell lines We analysed 39 primary and metastatic melanomas and 9 melanoma cell lines by single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP). The single-stranded technique showed heterozygous defects in the TP53 gene in 8 of 39 (20.5%) melanoma tumors: three new single point mutations in intronic sequences (introns 1 and 2) and exon 10, and three new single nucleotide polymorphisms located in introns 1 and 2 (C to T transition at position 11701 in intron 1; C insertion at position 11818 in intron 2; and C insertion at position 11875 in intron 2). One melanoma tumor exhibited two heterozygous alterations in the CDKN2A exon 1 one of which was novel (stop codon, and missense mutation). No defects were found in the remaining genes. These results suggest that these genes are involved in melanoma tumorigenesis, although they may be not the major targets. Other suppressor genes that may be informative of the mechanism of tumorigenesis in skin melanomas should be studied

  11. The contribution of large genomic deletions at the CDKN2A locus to the burden of familial melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lesueur, F; de Lichy, M; Barrois, M; Durand, G; Bombled, J; Avril, M-F; Chompret, A; Boitier, F; Lenoir, G M; Bressac-de Paillerets, B

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in two genes encoding cell cycle regulatory proteins have been shown to cause familial cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). About 20% of melanoma-prone families bear a point mutation in the CDKN2A locus at 9p21, which encodes two unrelated proteins, p16INK4a and p14ARF. Rare mutations in CDK4 have also been linked to the disease. Although the CDKN2A gene has been shown to be the major melanoma predisposing gene, there remains a significant proportion of melanoma kindreds linked to 9p...

  12. Different TP53 mutants in p53 overexpressed epithelial ovarian carcinoma can be associated both with altered and unaltered glycolytic and apoptotic profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Antoun, Stephanie; Atallah, David; Tahtouh, Roula; Alaaeddine, Nada; Moubarak, Malak; Khaddage, Abir; Ayoub, Eliane Nasr; Chahine, George; Hilal, George

    2018-01-01

    Background p53 is a tumor suppressor and key regulator of glycolysis in cancer cells, however highly mutated in tumors. In ovarian cancer, studies concerning p53 mutations focus on the DNA binding domain since the majority of hotspot mutations affects this region. Yet, mutations in other regions such as the proline rich domain may also affect the protein’s expression and activity. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of various positions of mutations in TP53 gene on glycolysis, ...

  13. Immunofluorometric assay of p53 protein versus sequencing of p53 exons 5 to 9 for the detection of p53 abnormalities in ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lianidou, E S; Levesque, M A; Katsaros, D; Angelopoulou, K; Yu, H; Genta, F; Arisio, R; Massobrio, M; Bharaj, B; Diamandis, E P

    1999-01-01

    p53 alteration, detected as mutation of the p53 gene or as accumulation of mutant p53 protein, is a common feature of most malignancies, including ovarian carcinoma, and may identify patients with unfavorable prognosis and resistance to chemotherapy. Tumor tissues from 55 patients with well or poorly differentiated (grades 1 or 3) primary epithelial ovarian carcinoma were assessed both for p53 protein overexpression by a sensitive time-resolved immunofluorometric assay employing DO-1 and CM-1 antibodies, and for genetic p53 abnormalities by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified exons 5 to 9. Sixteen p53 mutations (29%), including 3 deletions causing frameshifts as well as one nonsense and 12 missense point mutations were found in all exons except exon 9. Overexpression of p53 protein, defined as a concentration exceeding the 75th percentile, was found in 15 cases (27%), 10 of which had missense mutations (P p53-negative by immunoassay. Both p53 mutation (P = 0.04) and p53 protein accumulation (P p53 mutation was more closely related to grade 3 lesions (P = 0.04) and serous histotype (P = 0.01). These results indicate that p53 protein accumulation correlates well with missense point mutation in carcinoma of the ovary and, together with other evidence that p53 abnormality may be prognostic of outcome in this disease, suggest that the immunoassay of p53 protein may have clinical value.

  14. Association of MC1R variants and risk of melanoma in melanoma-prone families with CDKN2A mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Alisa M; Landi, Maria Teresa; Tsang, Shirley; Fraser, Mary C; Munroe, David J; Tucker, Margaret A

    2005-09-01

    Major risk factors for melanoma include many nevi, especially dysplastic nevi, fair pigmentation, freckling, poor tanning ability, and germ line mutations in the CDKN2A, CDK4, or MC1R genes. We evaluated the relationship between MC1R and melanoma risk in CDKN2A melanoma-prone families with extensive clinical and epidemiologic data. We studied 395 subjects from 16 American CDKN2A families. Major melanoma risk factors were assessed by clinical examination or questionnaire; MC1R was sequenced. Odds ratios were estimated by unconditional and conditional logistic regression models. We examined the distribution of MC1R variants and median ages at melanoma diagnosis in multiple primary melanoma (MPM) and single primary melanoma (SPM) patients. Presence of multiple MC1R variants was significantly associated with melanoma, even after adjustment for major melanoma risk factors. All 40 MPM patients had at least one MC1R variant; 65% of MPM patients versus only 17% of SPM patients had at least two MC1R variants (P MC1R variants increased (P = 0.010 and P = 0.008, respectively). In contrast, no significant reduction in age at melanoma diagnosis was observed for SPM patients (P = 0.91). The current study suggests that the presence of multiple MC1R variants is associated with the development of multiple melanoma tumors in patients with CDKN2A mutations. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings and to explore the mechanisms that may contribute to this relationship.

  15. CDKN2A (INK4A-ARF) mutation analysis to distinguish cutaneous melanoma metastasis from a second primary melanoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokx, W.A.M.; Lesterhuis, W.J.; Andriessen, M.P.M.; Verdijk, M.A.J.; Punt, C.J.A.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.

    2007-01-01

    The histologic differential diagnosis between a second primary cutaneous melanoma and cutaneous melanoma metastasis in a patient with a previous history of melanoma can be very difficult. This case report describes the first application of CDKN2A mutation analysis for discriminating a cutaneous

  16. CDKN2A (INK4A-ARF) mutation analysis to distinguish cutaneous melanoma metastasis from a second primary melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokx, Willeke A. M.; Lesterhuis, W. Joost; Andriessen, Monique P. M.; Verdijk, Marian A. J.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.

    2007-01-01

    The histologic differential diagnosis between a second primary cutaneous melanoma and cutaneous melanoma metastasis in a patient with a previous history of melanoma can be very difficult. This case report describes the first application of CDKN2A mutation analysis for discriminating a cutaneous

  17. Genome-wide retroviral insertional tagging of genes involved in cancer in Cdkn2a-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders H; Turner, Geoffrey; Trubetskoy, Alla

    2002-01-01

    We have used large-scale insertional mutagenesis to identify functional landmarks relevant to cancer in the recently completed mouse genome sequence. We infected Cdkn2a(-/-) mice with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) to screen for loci that can participate in tumorigenesis in collaboration...

  18. CDKN2A mutations and MC1R variants in Italian patients with single or multiple primary melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorino, L; Bonelli, L; Ghiorzo, P; Queirolo, P; Battistuzzi, L; Balleari, E; Nasti, S; Gargiulo, S; Gliori, S; Savoia, P; Abate Osella, S; Bernengo, M G; Bianchi Scarrà, G

    2008-12-01

    We evaluated the contribution of germline CDKN2A mutations and MC1R variants to the development of melanoma in a hospital-based study of single (SPM, n = 398) and multiple primary melanoma (MPM, n = 95). The overall frequency of CDKN2A mutations was 15.2%, and four-fold higher in MPM than in SPM cases (OR = 4.27; 95% CI 2.43-7.53). The likelihood of identifying a CDKN2A mutation increased with family history of melanoma and younger age at diagnosis in MPM cases. Compared to SPM patients, the risk of harboring a CDKN2A mutation rose as the number of primary melanomas increased and was not influenced by family history. The G101W and E27X founder mutations were the most common. Several other mutations (W15X, Q50X, R58X, A68L, A127P and H142R) were detected for the first time in Italian patients. One novel mutation, T77A, was identified. Several non-coding variants with unknown functional significance were also found (5'UTR -25C > T, -21C > T, -67G > C, IVS1 +37G > C); the novel 5'UTR -21C > T variant was not detected in controls. The CDKN2A A148T polymorphism was more frequent in MPM patients than in the control population (15.7% versus 6.6%). Compared to the SPM patients, MPM cases had a 2-fold increased probability of being MC1R variant carriers and a higher probability of carrying two or more variants. No specific association was observed between the type of variant and the number of melanomas, suggesting that the number rather than the type of MC1R variant increases the risk of MPM. We observed no interaction between CDKN2A status and the presence of MC1R variants. The high frequency of CDKN2A mutations in our MPM cases, independent of their family history, is of relevance to genetic counseling and testing in our population.

  19. CDKN2a mutation-negative melanoma families have increased risk exclusively for skin cancers but not for other malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgadottir, Hildur; Höiom, Veronica; Tuominen, Rainer; Jönsson, Göran; Månsson-Brahme, Eva; Olsson, Håkan; Hansson, Johan

    2015-11-01

    Germline CDKN2A mutations are found in 5-20% of melanoma families. Numerous studies have shown that carriers of CDKN2A mutations have increased risks of non-melanoma cancers, but so far there have been no studies investigating cancer risks in CDKN2A wild type (wt) melanoma families. In this prospective cohort study, index melanoma cases (n = 224) and their first-degree relatives (n = 944) were identified from 154 confirmed CDKN2A wt melanoma families. Cancer diagnoses in family members and matched controls were obtained from the Swedish Cancer Registry. Relative risks (RR), odds ratios (OR) and two-sided 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. In index cases and first-degree relatives, the prospective RR for melanoma was 56.9 (95% CI 31.4-102.1) and 7.0 (95% CI 4.2-11.4), respectively, and for squamous cell skin cancers 9.1 (95% CI 6.0-13.7) and 3.4 (95% CI 2.2-5.2), respectively. In neither group, elevated risks were seen for non-skin cancers. In a subgroup analysis, CDKN2A wt melanoma families with young (melanoma cases were found to have increased risk of non-skin cancers (RR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-1.5). Further, MC1R gene variants were increased in familial melanoma cases compared to controls (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.6-3.4). Our findings suggest that in the majority of CDKN2A wt melanoma families, a segregation of variants in low-risk melanoma genes such as MC1R causes increased skin cancer susceptibility, rather than mutations in high-risk cancer predisposing genes, such mutations are more probable to be found in melanoma families with young melanoma cases. This study further supports an implication of CDKN2A mutation screening as a clinical test that determines counseling and follows up routines of melanoma families. © 2015 UICC.

  20. Exposure to depleted uranium does not alter the co-expression of HER-2/neu and p53 in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Toriahi Kaswer M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amongst the extensive literature on immunohistochemical profile of breast cancer, very little is found on populations exposed to a potential risk factor such as depleted uranium. This study looked at the immunohistochemical expression of HER-2/neu (c-erbB2 and p53 in different histological types of breast cancer found in the middle Euphrates region of Iraq, where the population has been exposed to high levels of depleted uranium. Findings The present investigation was performed over a period starting from September 2008 to April 2009. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded blocks from 70 patients with breast cancer (62 ductal and 8 lobular carcinoma were included in this study. A group of 25 patients with fibroadenoma was included as a comparative group, and 20 samples of normal breast tissue sections were used as controls. Labeled streptavidin-biotin (LSAB+ complex method was employed for immunohistochemical detection of HER-2/neu and p53. The detection rate of HER-2/neu and p53 immunohistochemical expression were 47.14% and 35.71% respectively in malignant tumors; expression was negative in the comparative and control groups (p HER-2/neu immunostaining was significantly associated with histological type, tumor size, nodal involvement, and recurrence of breast carcinoma (p p Both biomarkers were positively correlated with each other. Furthermore, all the cases that co-expressed both HER-2/neu and p53 showed the most unfavorable biopathological profile. Conclusion P53 and HER-2/neu over-expression play an important role in pathogenesis of breast carcinoma. The findings indicate that in regions exposed to high levels of depleted uranium, although p53 and HER-2/neu overexpression are both high, correlation of their expression with age, grade, tumor size, recurrence and lymph node involvement is similar to studies that have been conducted on populations not exposed to depleted uranium. HER-2/neu expression in breast cancer was higher

  1. Activation of EVI1 transcription by the LEF1/β-catenin complex with p53-alteration in myeloid blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manachai, Nawin; Saito, Yusuke; Nakahata, Shingo; Bahirvani, Avinash Govind; Osato, Motomi; Morishita, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-22

    The presence of a BCR-ABL1 fusion gene is necessary for the pathogenesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) through t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation. Imatinib, an ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is dramatically effective in CML patients; however, 30% of CML patients will need further treatment due to progression of CML to blast crisis (BC). Aberrant high expression of ecotropic viral integration site 1 (EVI1) is frequently observed in CML during myeloid-BC as a potent driver with a CML stem cell signature; however, the precise molecular mechanism of EVI1 transcriptional regulation during CML progression is poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate the transcriptional activity of EVI1 is dependent on activation of lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF1)/β-catenin complex by BCR-ABL with loss of p53 function during CML-BC. The activation of β-catenin is partly dependent on BCR-ABL expression through enhanced GSK3β phosphorylation, and EVI1 expression is directly enhanced by the LEF1/β-catenin complex bound to the EVI1 promoter region. Moreover, the loss of p53 expression is inversely correlated with high expression of EVI1 in CML leukemia cells with an aggressive phase of CML, and a portion of the activation mechanism of EVI1 expression is dependent on β-catenin activation through GSK3β phosphorylation by loss of p53. Therefore, we found that the EVI1 activation in CML-BC is dependent on LEF1/β-catenin activation by BCR-ABL expression with loss of p53 function, representing a novel selective therapeutic approach targeting myeloid blast crisis progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. P53 MUTATIONS IN HUMAN LUNG-TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MILLER, CW; ASLO, A; KOK, K; YOKOTA, J; BUYS, CHCM; TERADA, M; KOEFFLER, HP; Simon, K.

    1992-01-01

    Mutation of one p53 allele and loss of the normal p53 allele [loss of heterozygosity (LOH)] occur in many tumors including lung cancers. These alterations apparently contribute to development of cancer by interfering with the tumor suppressor activity of p53. We directly sequenced amplified DNA in

  3. Serum starvation and thymidine double blocking achieved efficient cell cycle synchronization and altered the expression of p27, p53, bcl-2 in canine breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jinjin; Sun, Dongdong; Yang, Chao; Wang, Yingxue; Sun, Sichao; Li, Qing; Bao, Jun; Liu, Yun

    2016-04-01

    Cell synchronization is an approach to obtain cell populations of the same stage, which is a prerequisite to studying the regulation of cell cycle progression in vivo. Serum starvation and thymidine double blocking (TdR) are two important practices in studying cell cycle synchronization. However, their effects on canine cancer cells as well as the regulatory mechanisms by these two methods are poorly understood. In this study, we determined the optimum conditions of serum starvation and TdR and their effects on cell cycle synchronization. We further explored the involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in the cell cycle synchronization by investigating the expression of three key genes (p27, p53 and bcl-2). Serum starvation resulted in a reversible cell cycle arrest and synchronously progress through G0/G1. The highest percentage of CHMm cells (87.47%) in G0/G1 stage was obtained after 42 h incubation with 0.5% fetal bovine serum (FBS). TdR double blocking could arrest 98.9% of CHMm cells in G1/S phase (0 h of release), and could arrest 93.74% of CHMm cells in S phase after 4h of release. We also found that the p27, p53, bcl-2 genes were most highly expressed in G0/G1 phase. Our current work revealed that serum starvation and TdR methods could achieve sufficient synchronization of CHMm cells. Moreover, the expression of p27, p53 and bcl-2 genes was related to cyclical movements and apoptosis. Our results will provide a new insight into cell cycle regulation and reprogramming of canine cancer cells induced by serum starvation and TdR blocking. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biallelic loss of CDKN2A is associated with poor response to treatment in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Marcin; Pastorczak, Agata; Fendler, Wojciech; Madzio, Joanna; Tomasik, Bartlomiej; Taha, Joanna; Bielska, Marta; Sedek, Lukasz; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Matysiak, Michal; Derwich, Katarzyna; Lejman, Monika; Kowalczyk, Jerzy; Kazanowska, Bernarda; Badowska, Wanda; Styczynski, Jan; Irga-Jaworska, Nina; Trelinska, Joanna; Zalewska-Szewczyk, Beata; Pierlejewski, Filip; Wlodarska, Iwona; Młynarski, Wojciech

    2017-05-01

    The inactivation of tumor suppressor genes located within 9p21 locus (CDKN2A, CDKN2B) occurs in up to 30% of children with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL), but its independent prognostic significance remains controversial. In order to investigate the prognostic impact of deletions and promoter methylation within 9p21, 641 children with newly diagnosed BCP-ALL using methylation specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) were investigated. A total of 169 (26.4%) microdeletions in 9p21 were detected, of which 71 were homozygous. Patients with CDKN2A homozygous deletions were older at diagnosis (p pediatric BCP-ALL.

  5. Higher occurrence of childhood cancer in families with germline mutations in BRCA2, MMR and CDKN2A genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, S.; Borg, A.; Kristoffersson, U.

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of hereditary factors for development of childhood tumors is limited to some few known syndromes associated with predominance of tumors in childhood. Occurrence of childhood tumors in hereditary cancer syndromes such as BRCA1/2 associated breast and ovarian cancer, DNA-mismatch r......-mismatch repair (MMR) genes associated hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer and CDKN2A associated familial malignant melanoma are very little studied. Herein we report the prevalence of childhood tumors (diagnosed...

  6. CDKN2A/B Deletion and Double-hit Mutations of the MAPK Pathway Underlie the Aggressive Behavior of Langerhans Cell Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xerri, Luc; Adélaïde, José; Popovici, Cornel; Garnier, Séverine; Guille, Arnaud; Mescam-Mancini, Lenaïg; Laurent, Camille; Brousset, Pierre; Coze, Carole; Michel, Gérard; Chaffanet, Max; Bouabdallah, Reda; Coso, Diane; Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) has a mostly favorable outcome, whereas Langerhans cell sarcoma (LCS) is an aggressive tumor. It is still unclear whether any specific molecular alterations could underlie the aggressive behavior of Langerhans cell proliferations. We used targeted next-generation sequencing and array-comparative genomic hybridization to profile 22 LCH samples from different patients together with 3 LCS samples corresponding to different relapses from the same patient. The third LCS relapse was a composite tumor including both B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and LCS components. The 22 LCH samples were mostly of bone origin and showed classic histophenotypical features. Array-comparative genomic hybridization showed in all 3 LCS samples a similar homozygous somatic loss affecting the CDKN2A/B locus, whereas the 17 informative LCH samples did not show any detectable abnormality. In the 3 LCS samples, targeted next-generation sequencing of 495 cancer genes detected common mutations in KMT2D/MLL2 and in both MAP2K1 and NRAS genes, whereas BRAF was not mutated. A NOTCH1 mutation was acquired in 2 LCS samples. The composite LCS/B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia tumor showed the same genetic profile in its 2 components. LCH samples showed mutually exclusive mutations of BRAF (8/20) and MAP2K1 (4/19), but no mutation of KMT2D, NRAS nor NOTCH1. These results suggest that CDKN2A/B deletion and/or simultaneous mutations of MAP2K1 and NRAS may underlie the aggressive behavior of Langerhans cell tumors, and thus could be useful for the diagnosis of malignancy in histiocytic neoplasms. The MAPK pathway "double hit" profile provides a basis for targeted therapy in LCS patients.

  7. MC1R variation and melanoma risk in relation to host/clinical and environmental factors in CDKN2A positive and negative melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiorzo, Paola; Bonelli, Luigina; Pastorino, Lorenza; Bruno, William; Barile, Monica; Andreotti, Virginia; Nasti, Sabina; Battistuzzi, Linda; Grosso, Marco; Bianchi-Scarrà, Giovanna; Queirolo, Paola

    2012-09-01

    Host, environmental and genetic factors differently modulate cutaneous melanoma (CM) risk across populations. Currently, the main genetic risk determinants are germline mutations in the major known high-risk susceptibility genes, CDKN2A and CDK4, and variants of the low-risk gene MC1R, which is key in the pigmentation process. This case-control study aimed at investigating the influence of the main host and environmental risk factors and of MC1R variation on CM risk in 390 CDKN2A-negative and 49 CDKN2A-positive Italian individuals. Multivariate analysis showed that MC1R variation, number of nevi and childhood sunburns doubled CM risk in CDKN2A-negative individuals. In CDKN2A-positive individuals, family history of CM and presence of atypical nevi, rather than MC1R status, modified risk (20.75- and 2.83-fold, respectively). Occupational sun exposure increased CM risk (three to sixfold) in both CDKN2A-negative and CDKN2A-positive individuals, reflecting the occupational habits of the Ligurian population and the geographical position of Liguria. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Vitamin C in synergism with cisplatin induces cell death in cervical cancer cells through altered redox cycling and p53 upregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leekha, Ankita; Gurjar, Bahadur S; Tyagi, Aakriti; Rizvi, Moshahid A; Verma, Anita K

    2016-12-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer in women worldwide. Survival of patients has been improved by cisplatin-based chemotherapy, but its effectiveness is limited due to its adverse effects on many tissues, especially nephrotoxicity. To optimize the efficacy of CDDP, we propose a combination therapy using natural products with minimal side effects. Vitamin C being a natural antioxidant is capable of selectively targeting cancer cells at pharmacological concentrations. Vitamin C synergistically enhances the activity of chemotherapeutic agents without increasing toxicity to normal cells. Therefore, we exploited co-therapy with cisplatin and vitamin C to kill cervical cancer cells. We elucidated the role of CDDP and VC on cervical cancer cell line (SiHa) by using cell growth assays, DNA fragmentation analysis, comet assay, in vitro morphological assessment of apoptosis (AO/EB and DAPI staining), ROS analysis by DCFDA, flow cytometry, biochemical assays (GST, GSH, NO, catalase, TPA) and Western blotting. Our results clearly demonstrated that CDDP and VC treatment exhibited ameliorative effect on induction of cell death by p53 overexpression and generation of hydrogen peroxide in SiHa cells, thereby reducing the dosage of CDDP required to induce cell death in cancer cells. These studies provide novel approaches to combat cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer.

  9. JC Virus T-Antigen in Colorectal Cancer Is Associated with p53 Expression and Chromosomal Instability, Independent of CpG Island Methylator Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko Nosho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available JC virus has a transforming gene encoding JC virus T-antigen (JCVT. JCVT may inactivate wild-type p53, cause chromosomal instability (CIN, and stabilize β-catenin. A link between JCVT and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP has been suggested. However, no large-scale study has examined the relations of JCVT with molecular alterations, clinical outcome, or prognosis in colon cancer. We detected JCVT expression (by immunohistochemistry in 271 (35% of 766 colorectal cancers. We quantified DNA methylation in eight CIMP-specific promoters (CACNA1G, CDKN2A, CRABP1, IGF2, MLH1, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1 and eight other loci (CHFR, HIC1, IGFBP3, MGMT, MINT1, MINT31, p14, WRN by MethyLight. We examined loss of heterozygosity in 2p, 5q, 17q, and 18q. JCVT was significantly associated with p53 expression (P < .0001, p21 loss (P < .0001, CIN (≥2 chromosomal segments with LOH; P < .0001, nuclear β-catenin (P = .006, LINE-1 hypomethylation (P = .002, and inversely with CIMP-high (P = .0005 and microsatellite instability (MSI (P < .0001, but not with PIK3CA mutation. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the associations of JCVT with p53 [adjusted odds ratio (OR, 8.45; P < .0001], CIN (adjusted OR, 2.53; P = .003, cyclin D1 (adjusted OR, 1.57; P = .02, LINE-1 hypomethylation (adjusted OR, 1.97 for a 30% decline as a unit; P = .03, BRAF mutation (adjusted OR, 2.20; P = .04, and family history of colorectal cancer (adjusted OR, 0.64; P = .04 remained statistically significant. However, JCVT was no longer significantly associated with CIMP, MSI, β-catenin, or cyclooxygenase-2 expression in multivariate analysis. JCVT was unrelated with patient survival. In conclusion, JCVT expression in colorectal cancer is independently associated with p53 expression and CIN, which may lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

  10. Dermoscopic features of melanomas associated with MC1R variants in Spanish CDKN2A mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuéllar, F; Puig, S; Kolm, I; Puig-Butille, J; Zaballos, P; Martí-Laborda, R; Badenas, C; Malvehy, J

    2009-01-01

    The presence of at least one MC1R gene variant is associated with a reduction in age at melanoma diagnosis in families with CDKN2A mutations. To describe dermoscopic features of early melanoma in CDKN2A gene mutation-positive Spanish individuals and to evaluate the possibility of a correlation between particular dermatoscopic pattern and MC1R gene variants. Patients in whom a melanoma was diagnosed during specific follow up of high-risk individuals carrying CDKN2A mutations (with familial or personal history of previous melanoma) were included in this study. The decision to remove such melanomas was taken on the basis of history, clinical and dermoscopic evaluations including total body photography and digital dermoscopy. Of the nine patients included in this study, three were noncarriers of the red hair MC1R polymorphism, three patients had one red hair MC1R polymorphism and three patients had two red hair MC1R polymorphisms. On dermoscopic analysis of suspect melanocytic lesions we found that the mean +/- SD ABCD total dermoscopy score (TDS) was significantly higher in noncarriers of red hair MC1R polymorphisms than in carriers of two MC1R gene red hair variants (6.8 +/- 0.4 vs. 4.4 +/- 0.9; P = 0.014). Early melanomas in patients with two MC1R red hair variants may be difficult to diagnose definitively by dermoscopy because, in our limited experience, they show fewer colours and structures and have a lower TDS. In such melanomas, subtle atypical vessels and other changes detected by digital image follow up may be useful to confirm the diagnosis of melanoma. An integrated approach including clinical history and dermoscopic data (also considering additional information, such as the presence of atypical vessels) should be utilized in evaluating these high-risk patients. Further studies are necessary to confirm our suggestion.

  11. Genetic susceptibility to cutaneous melanoma in southern Switzerland: role of CDKN2A, MC1R and MITF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas, C; Potrony, M; Mainetti, C; Bianchi, E; Carrozza Merlani, P; Mancarella Eberhardt, A; Maspoli-Postizzi, E; Marazza, G; Marcollo-Pini, A; Pelloni, F; Sessa, C; Simona, B; Puig-Butillé, J A; Badenas, C; Puig, S

    2016-11-01

    Nearly 10% of all cases of cutaneous melanoma (CM) occur in patients with a personal or family history of the disease. To obtain information about genetic predisposition to CM in Ticino, the southern region of Switzerland, a zone with moderate-to-high CM incidence. We identified germline mutations in highly CM-associated genes (CDKN2A and CDK4) and low/medium-penetrance variants (MC1R and MITF) in patients with multiple primary CMs or individuals with one or more CM and a positive family history for CM or pancreatic cancer among first- or second-degree relatives. Healthy blood donors (n = 146) were included as a control group. From July 2010 to July 2012, 57 patients (41 pedigrees) were included. Twenty-six were melanoma-prone families (with at least two cases) and 15 had multiple CMs. Pancreatic cancer was found in six families. The CDKN2A mutation p.V126D was identified in seven patients (four families) with a founder effect, whereas CDKN2A A148T was detected in seven cases (five families) and seven healthy donors (odds ratio 2·76, 95% confidence interval 0·83-9·20). At least one MC1R melanoma-associated polymorphism was detected in 32 patients (78%) and 97 healthy donors (66%), with more than one polymorphism in 12 patients (29%) and 25 healthy donors (17%). The MITF variant p.E318K was identified in four patients from three additional pedigrees (7%) and one healthy control (0·7%). Inclusion criteria for the Ticino population for genetic assessment should follow the rule of two (two affected individuals in a family or a patient with multiple CMs), as we detected a CDKN2A mutation in almost 10% of our pedigrees (four of 41), MITF p.E318K in 7% (three of 41) and a higher number of MC1R variants than in the control population. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  12. Malignant melanoma-Risk factors and the CDKN2A mutation in relation to phenotypes and other cancers.

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Kari

    2009-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) is an increasingly common cancer in fair-skinned people. The purpose of this thesis was to study high-risk patients with multiple tumours including a CMM, high-risk families with the unique Swedish germline mutation in CDKN2A(113insArg), as well as study risk factors for CMM in women. Methods: Tumours associated with CMM, in individuals/probands with four or more primary tumours including at least one CMM were genotyped. The probands were fur...

  13. Beside P53 and PTEN: Identification of molecular alterations of the RAS/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas to determine potential novel therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuhui; Cavazza, Elisa; Barlier, Catherine; Salleron, Julia; Filhine-Tresarrieu, Pierre; Gavoilles, Céline; Merlin, Jean-Louis; Harlé, Alexandre

    2016-11-01

    Despite great histological and molecular heterogeneity, the clinical management of high-grade ovarian carcinomas remains unspecialized. As a major subgroup, high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs) require novel therapies. In addition to utilizing conventional histological prognostic markers and performing oncogenetic investigations, the molecular diagnostic method of next generation sequencing (NGS) was performed to identify 'druggable' targets that could provide access to innovative therapy. The present study was performed in 45 HGSOC patients (mean age, 59.1 years; range, 25-87 years) with histologically proven HGSOC. Breast cancer 1/2 ( BRCA1 /2) germline mutations were screened in 17 patients with a familial or personal history of cancer, which was justified by oncogenetic investigations. Tumor protein 53 (P53) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression were assessed in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues using immunohistochemistry. Somatic mutations of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog, neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog ( NRAS ), B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit α ( PIK3CA ) and MET proto-oncogene, receptor tyrosine kinase ( MET ) were screened using NGS on DNA extracts from frozen tumor specimens obtained at diagnosis. With a median follow-up of 38 months (range, 6-93 months), 20 patients are alive, 10 patients are disease-free and 14 patients progressed within 6 months following platinum-based therapy. P53 overexpression was detected in 67% of patients and PTEN loss was detected in 38% of the patients. The overexpression of mutant P53 was found to be associated with a longer progression-free and overall survival. In total, 2 NRAS (exon 3), 3 PIK3CA (exon 5 and 10) and 5 MET mutations (exons 14 and 18) were detected. In HGSOCs, in addition to P53 and PTEN alterations, somatic genetic abnormalities can be detected using NGS and provide molecular

  14. Disordered methionine metabolism in MTAP/CDKN2A-deleted cancers leads to dependence on PRMT5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavrakis, Konstantinos J.; McDonald III1, E. Robert; Schlabach, Michael R.; Billy, Eric; Hoffman, Gregory R.; deWeck, Antoine; Ruddy, David A.; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Yu, Jianjun; McAllister, Gregg; Stump, Mark; deBeaumont, Rosalie; Ho, Samuel; Yue, Yingzi; Liu, Yue; Yan-Neale, Yan; Yang, Guizhi; Lin, Fallon; Yin, Hong; Gao, Hui; Kipp, D. Randal; Zhao, Songping; McNamara, Joshua T.; Sprague, Elizabeth R.; Zheng, Bing; Lin, Ying; Cho, Young Shin; Gu, Justin; Crawford, Kenneth; Ciccone, David; Vitari, Alberto C.; Lai, Albert; Capka, Vladimir; Hurov, Kristen; Porter, Jeffery A.; Tallarico, John; Mickanin, Craig; Lees, Emma; Pagliarini, Raymond; Keen, Nicholas; Schmelzle, Tobias; Hofmann, Francesco; Stegmeier, Frank; Sellers, William R. (Novartis)

    2016-02-11

    5-Methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) is a key enzyme in the methionine salvage pathway. The MTAP gene is frequently deleted in human cancers because of its chromosomal proximity to the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2A. By interrogating data from a large-scale short hairpin RNA–mediated screen across 390 cancer cell line models, we found that the viability of MTAP-deficient cancer cells is impaired by depletion of the protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5. MTAP-deleted cells accumulate the metabolite methylthioadenosine (MTA), which we found to inhibit PRMT5 methyltransferase activity. Deletion of MTAP in MTAP-proficient cells rendered them sensitive to PRMT5 depletion. Conversely, reconstitution of MTAP in an MTAP-deficient cell line rescued PRMT5 dependence. Thus, MTA accumulation in MTAP–deleted cancers creates a hypomorphic PRMT5 state that is selectively sensitized toward further PRMT5 inhibition. Inhibitors of PRMT5 that leverage this dysregulated metabolic state merit further investigation as a potential therapy for MTAP/CDKN2A-deleted tumors.

  15. NAD+ Modulates p53 DNA Binding Specificity and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, Kevin G.; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kastan, Michael B.

    2004-01-01

    DNA damage induces p53 DNA binding activity, which affects tumorigenesis, tumor responses to therapies, and the toxicities of cancer therapies (B. Vogelstein, D. Lane, and A. J. Levine, Nature 408:307-310, 2000; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Both transcriptional and transcription-independent activities of p53 contribute to DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and aneuploidy prevention (M. B. Kastan et al., Cell 71:587-597, 1992; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Small-molecule manipulation of p53 DNA binding activity has been an elusive goal, but here we show that NAD+ binds to p53 tetramers, induces a conformational change, and modulates p53 DNA binding specificity in vitro. Niacinamide (vitamin B3) increases the rate of intracellular NAD+ synthesis, alters radiation-induced p53 DNA binding specificity, and modulates activation of a subset of p53 transcriptional targets. These effects are likely due to a direct effect of NAD+ on p53, as a molecule structurally related to part of NAD+, TDP, also inhibits p53 DNA binding, and the TDP precursor, thiamine (vitamin B1), inhibits intracellular p53 activity. Niacinamide and thiamine affect two p53-regulated cellular responses to ionizing radiation: rereplication and apoptosis. Thus, niacinamide and thiamine form a novel basis for the development of small molecules that affect p53 function in vivo, and these results suggest that changes in cellular energy metabolism may regulate p53. PMID:15509798

  16. The association between methylated CDKN2A and cervical carcinogenesis, and its diagnostic value in cervical cancer: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jinyun Li,1,2,* Chongchang Zhou,1,* Haojie Zhou,3,* Tianlian Bao,1 Tengjiao Gao,1 Xiangling Jiang,1 Meng Ye1,2 1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, 2Department of Medical Oncology, Affiliated Hospital, Ningbo University, 3Department of Molecular Diagnosis, Ningbo Diagnostic Pathology Center, Ningbo, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors are co-first authors of this work Background: Cervical cancer is the second deadliest gynecologic malignancy, characterized by apparently precancerous lesions and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN, and having a long course from the development of CIN to cervical cancer. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A is a well-documented tumor suppressor gene and is commonly methylated in cervical cancer. However, the relationship between methylated CDKN2A and carcinogenesis in cervical cancer is inconsistent, and the diagnostic accuracy of methylated CDKN2A is underinvestigated. In this study, we attempted to quantify the association between CDKN2A methylation and the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer, and its diagnostic power.Methods: We systematically reviewed four electronic databases and identified 26 studies involving 1,490 cervical cancers, 1,291 CINs, and 964 controls. A pooled odds ratio (OR with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI was calculated to evaluate the association between methylated CDKN2A and the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer. Specificity, sensitivity, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and the diagnostic odds ratio were computed to assess the effect of methylated CDKN2A in the diagnosis of cervical cancer.Results: Our results indicated an upward trend in the methylation frequency of CDKN2A in the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer (cancer vs control: OR =23.67, 95% CI =15.54–36.06; cancer vs CIN: OR =2.53, 95% CI =1.79–3.5; CIN vs control: OR =9.68, 95% CI =5.82–16.02. The

  17. Inhibition of breast cancer cell growth by the combination of clofarabine and sulforaphane involves epigenetically mediated CDKN2A upregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubecka, Katarzyna; Kaufman-Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Fabianowska-Majewska, Krystyna

    2018-04-10

    Many antineoplastic nucleoside analogue-based combinatorial strategies focused on remodelling aberrant DNA methylation patterns have been developed. The number of studies demonstrate high efficacy of bioactive phytochemicals in support of conventional chemotherapy. Our recent discoveries of the epigenetic effects of clofarabine (2'-deoxyadenosine analogue, antileukaemic drug) and clofarabine-based combinations with dietary bioactive compounds in breast cancer cells led us to look for more DNA methylation targets of these cancer-preventive agents. In the present study, using methylation-sensitive restriction analysis (MSRA) and qPCR, we showed that clofarabine in combination with sulforaphane, a phytochemical from cruciferous vegetables, significantly reactivates DNA methylation-silenced CDKN2A tumour suppressor and inhibits cancer cell growth at a non-invasive breast cancer stage.

  18. Phenolphthalein induces thymic lymphomas accompanied by loss of the p53 wild type allele in heterozygous p53-deficient (+/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnick, J K; Hardisty, J F; Herbert, R A; Seely, J C; Furedi-Machacek, E M; Foley, J F; Lacks, G D; Stasiewicz, S; French, J E

    1997-01-01

    Epidemiology studies have indicated that many human cancers are influenced by environmental factors. Genetically altered mouse model systems offer us the opportunity to study the interaction of chemicals with genetic predisposition to cancer. Using the heterozygous p53-deficient (+/-) mouse, an animal model carrying one wild type p53 gene and one p53 null allele, we studied the effects of phenolphthalein on tumor induction and p53 gene alterations. Earlier studies showed that phenolphthalein caused carcinogenic effects in Fisher 344 rats and B6C3F1 mice after a 2-yr dosing period (Dunnick and Hailey, Cancer Res. 56: 4922-4926, 1996). The p53 (+/-) mice received phenolphthalein in the feed at concentrations of 200, 375, 750, 3,000, or 12,000 ppm (approximately 43, 84, 174, 689, or 2,375 mg/kg body weight/day or 129, 252, 522, 2,867, or 7,128 mg/m2 body surface area/day) for up to 6 mo. A target organ cancer site that accumulated p53 protein in the B6C3F1 mouse (i.e., thymic lymphoma) was also a target site for cancer in the p53 (+/-) mouse. In the p53 (+/-) mouse, treatment-related atypical hyperplasia and malignant lymphoma of thymic origin were seen in the control and dosed groups at a combined incidence of 0, 5, 5, 25, 100, and 95%, respectively. Twenty-one of the thymic lymphomas were examined for p53 gene changes, and all showed loss of the p53 wild type allele. Chemical-induced ovarian tumors in the B6C3F1 mouse showed no evidence for p53 protein accumulation and did not occur in the p53 (+/-) mouse. The p53-deficient (+/-) mouse model responded to phenolphthalein treatment with a carcinogenic response in the thymus after only 4 mo of dosing. This carcinogenic response took 2 yr to develop in the conventional B6C3F1 mouse bioassay. The p53-deficient (+/-) mouse is an important model for identifying a carcinogenic response after short-term (phenolphthalein combined with a genetic predisposition to cancer can potentiate the carcinogenic process and cause p53

  19. TRIM65 negatively regulates p53 through ubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang [Department of Respiration, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Ma, Chengyuan [Department of Neurosurgery, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Zhou, Tong [Department of Endocrinology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Liu, Ying [Department of Respiration, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Sun, Luyao [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Yu, Zhenxiang, E-mail: zhenxiangyu2015@gmail.com [Department of Respiration, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China)

    2016-04-22

    Tripartite-motif protein family member 65 (TRIM65) is an important protein involved in white matter lesion. However, the role of TRIM65 in human cancer remains less understood. Through the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) gene alteration database, we found that TRIM65 is upregulated in a significant portion of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients. Our cell growth assay revealed that TRIM65 overexpression promotes cell proliferation, while knockdown of TRIM65 displays opposite effect. Mechanistically, TRIM65 binds to p53, one of the most critical tumor suppressors, and serves as an E3 ligase toward p53. Consequently, TRIM65 inactivates p53 through facilitating p53 poly-ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. Notably, chemotherapeutic reagent cisplatin induction of p53 is markedly attenuated in response to ectopic expression of TRIM65. Cell growth inhibition by TRIM65 knockdown is more significant in p53 positive H460 than p53 negative H1299 cells, and knockdown of p53 in H460 cells also shows compromised cell growth inhibition by TRIM65 knockdown, indicating that p53 is required, at least in part, for TRIM65 function. Our findings demonstrate TRIM65 as a potential oncogenic protein, highly likely through p53 inactivation, and provide insight into development of novel approaches targeting TRIM65 for NSCLC treatment, and also overcoming chemotherapy resistance. - Highlights: • TRIM65 expression is elevated in NSCLC. • TRIM65 inactivates p53 through mediating p53 ubiquitination and degradation. • TRIM65 attenuates the response of NSCLC cells to cisplatin.

  20. Familial melanoma: clinical factors associated with germline CDKN2A mutations according to the number of patients affected by melanoma in a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubec, Eve; Chaudru, Valérie; Mohamdi, Hamida; Blondel, Christophe; Margaritte-Jeannin, Patricia; Forget, Sébastien; Corda, Eve; Boitier, Françoise; Dalle, Stéphane; Vabres, Pierre; Perrot, Jean-Luc; Lyonnet, Dominique Stoppa; Zattara, Hélène; Mansard, Sandrine; Grange, Florent; Leccia, Marie-Thérèse; Vincent-Fetita, Lynda; Martin, Ludovic; Crickx, Béatrice; Joly, Pascal; Thomas, Luc; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Demenais, Florence

    2012-12-01

    Features associated with an increased frequency of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) mutations have been identified in families with 3 or more patients with cutaneous melanoma (CM). However, in families with 2 patients with CM, which represent the majority of familial melanoma, these factors have been rarely studied. We investigated association of 3 clinical features with the presence of a CDKN2A mutation in a family by extent of CM family clustering (2 vs ≥3 patients with CM among first-degree relatives in a family). We included 483 French families that comprised 387 families with 2 patients with CM (F2 families) and 96 families with 3 or more patients with CM (F3+ families). Three clinical factors were examined individually and in a joint analysis: median age at diagnosis younger than 50 years, and 1 or more patient in a family with multiple primary melanoma or with pancreatic cancer. The frequency of CDKN2A mutations was higher in F3+ families (32%) than in F2 families (13%). Although early age at melanoma diagnosis and occurrence of multiple primary melanoma in 1 or more patient were significantly associated with the risk of a CDKN2A mutation in F2 families, early age at melanoma diagnosis and occurrence of pancreatic cancer in a family were significantly associated with CDKN2A mutations in F3+ families. The study was not population based. This study shows that factors associated with CDKN2A mutations differ by extent of CM family clustering. It indicates that, in France, families with 2 patients with CM are eligible for genetic testing especially when there is an early age at CM diagnosis and/or 1 or more patients with multiple primary melanoma. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. P53 gene mutations in pituitary carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Yoshinori; Jin, Long; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Kovacs, Kalman; Roncaroli, Federico; Lloyd, Ricard V

    2007-01-01

    Although p53 overexpression detected by immunohistochemistry has been reported in pituitary adenomas and carcinomas, genetic mutations in the p53 gene have not been previously detected in these tumors. We analyzed a series of eight pituitary adenomas and six pituitary carcinomas by immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction amplification, and sequencing of p53 exon 5 through exon 8 for genetic mutations. Three carcinomas showed more than 20% expression of p53 protein in the tumor cells. One of these tumors with 60% overexpression of p53 protein had a mutation in codon 248, a common "hot spot" for p53 mutation, while the other carcinoma with 90% overexpression of p53 protein had a mutation in codon 135. All adenomas were negative for p53 mutations and had 15% of the cells expressing the p53 protein. Analysis of control tumors including four lung carcinomas with proven p53 mutations also had greater than 85% of the tumor cells overexpressing p53 protein. Two breast carcinoma cell lines with known p53 mutations, MBA-MD 231 and MBA-MD-486, also showed greater than 85% of the tumor cells overexpressing p53. These results show that p53 mutations are present in a subset of pituitary carcinomas and are usually associated with a high percentage of tumor cells overexpressing the p53 protein.

  2. Glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and insulin release in European non-diabetic carriers of a polymorphism upstream of CDKN2A and CDKN2B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hribal, M L; Presta, I; Procopio, T

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the rs10811661 polymorphism near the CDKN2B/CDKN2A genes with glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and insulin release in three samples of white people with European ancestry.......The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the rs10811661 polymorphism near the CDKN2B/CDKN2A genes with glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and insulin release in three samples of white people with European ancestry....

  3. Arginine methylation regulates the p53 response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Martin; Durant, Stephen T; Cho, Er-Chieh

    2008-01-01

    Activation of the p53 tumour suppressor protein in response to DNA damage leads to apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. Enzymatic modifications are widely believed to affect and regulate p53 activity. We describe here a level of post-translational control that has an important functional consequence...... on the p53 response. We show that the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) 5, as a co-factor in a DNA damage responsive co-activator complex that interacts with p53, is responsible for methylating p53. Arginine methylation is regulated during the p53 response and affects the target gene specificity...... of p53. Furthermore, PRMT5 depletion triggers p53-dependent apoptosis. Thus, methylation on arginine residues is an underlying mechanism of control during the p53 response....

  4. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Sara M. [Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Medical Scientist Training Program, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Quelle, Dawn E., E-mail: dawn-quelle@uiowa.edu [Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Medical Scientist Training Program, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Pathology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2014-12-23

    Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites) as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis) to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer.

  5. Skp2B overexpression alters a prohibitin-p53 axis and the transcription of PAPP-A, the protease of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Chander

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the degradation of prohibitin by the SCF(Skp2B ubiquitin ligase results in a defect in the activity of p53. We also reported that MMTV-Skp2B transgenic mice develop mammary gland tumors that are characterized by an increased proteolytic cleavage of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4, an inhibitor of IGF signaling. However, whether a link exists between a defect in p53 activity and proteolysis of IGFBP-4 was not established.We analyzed the levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A, the protease of IGFBP-4, in MMTV-Skp2B transgenic mice and found that PAPP-A levels are elevated. Further, we found a p53 binding site in intron 1 of the PAPP-A gene and that both wild type and mutant p53 bind to this site. However, binding of wild type p53 results in the transcriptional repression of PAPP-A, while binding of mutant p53 results in the transcriptional activation of PAPP-A. Since MMTV-Skp2B mice express wild type p53 and yet show elevated levels of PAPP-A, at first, these observations appeared contradictory. However, further analysis revealed that the defect in p53 activity in Skp2B overexpressing cells does not only abolish the activity of wild type of p53 but actually mimics that of mutant p53. Our results suggest that in absence of prohibitin, the half-life of p53 is increased and like mutant p53, the conformation of p53 is denatured.These observations revealed a novel function of prohibitin as a chaperone of p53. Further, they suggest that binding of denatured p53 in intron 1 causes an enhancer effect and increases the transcription of PAPP-A. Therefore, these findings indicate that the defect in p53 function and the increased proteolysis of IGFBP-4, we had observed, represent two components of the same pathway, which contributes to the oncogenic function of Skp2B.

  6. Prospective therapeutic applications of p53 inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudkov, Andrei V.; Komarova, Elena A.

    2005-01-01

    p53, in addition to being a key cancer preventive factor, is also a determinant of cancer treatment side effects causing excessive apoptotic death in several normal tissues during cancer therapy. p53 inhibitory strategy has been suggested to protect normal tissues from chemo- and radiotherapy, and to treat other pathologies associated with stress-mediated activation of p53. This strategy was validated by isolation and testing of small molecule p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α that demonstrated broad tissue protecting capacity. However, in some normal tissues and tumors p53 plays protective role by inducing growth arrest and preventing cells from premature entrance into mitosis and death from mitotic catastrophe. Inhibition of this function of p53 can sensitize tumor cells to chemo- and radiotherapy, thus opening new potential application of p53 inhibitors and justifying the need in pharmacological agents targeting specifically either pro-apoptotic or growth arrest functions of p53

  7. Capturing the biological impact of CDKN2A and MC1R genes as an early predisposing event in melanoma and non melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Escámez, María José; Garcia-Garcia, Francisco; Tell-Marti, Gemma; Fabra, Àngels; Martínez-Santamaría, Lucía; Badenas, Celia; Aguilera, Paula; Pevida, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín; del Río, Marcela; Puig, Susana

    2014-03-30

    Germline mutations in CDKN2A and/or red hair color variants in MC1R genes are associated with an increased susceptibility to develop cutaneous melanoma or non melanoma skin cancer. We studied the impact of the CDKN2A germinal mutation p.G101W and MC1R variants on gene expression and transcription profiles associated with skin cancer. To this end we set-up primary skin cell co-cultures from siblings of melanoma prone-families that were later analyzed using the expression array approach. As a result, we found that 1535 transcripts were deregulated in CDKN2A mutated cells, with over-expression of immunity-related genes (HLA-DPB1, CLEC2B, IFI44, IFI44L, IFI27, IFIT1, IFIT2, SP110 and IFNK) and down-regulation of genes playing a role in the Notch signaling pathway. 3570 transcripts were deregulated in MC1R variant carriers. In particular, genes related to oxidative stress and DNA damage pathways were up-regulated as well as genes associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer and Huntington. Finally, we observed that the expression signatures indentified in phenotypically normal cells carrying CDKN2A mutations or MC1R variants are maintained in skin cancer tumors (melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma). These results indicate that transcriptome deregulation represents an early event critical for skin cancer development.

  8. Characteristics of Familial Melanoma in Valencia, Spain, Based on the Presence of CDKN2A Mutations and MC1R Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Claudia; Garcia-Casado, Zaida; Bañuls, José; Moragon, Manuel; Oliver, Vicente; Unamuno, Blanca; Requena, Celia; Kumar, Rajiv; Nagore, Eduardo

    2018-02-06

    Melanoma results from a complex interplay between environmental factors and individual genetic susceptibility. Familial melanoma is attributable to predisposition genes with variable penetrance. The aim of this study was to identify differences between familial melanoma and sporadic cases in our population, based on the presence of CDKN2A mutations and MC1R variants. Comparing 107 patients with familial melanoma from 87 families (17% CDKN2A mutated) with 1,390 cases of sporadic melanomas, the former were younger and exhibited an increased prevalence of atypical naevi and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). CDKN2A mutation carriers presented more atypical naevi, multiple melanomas, and basal cell carcinoma, while non-carriers were more likely to have light-coloured hair, atypical naevi, and SCC. MC1R variants decreased the age at diagnosis in all groups and were associated with an increased prevalence of SCC, especially in patients with familial melanoma without CDKN2A mutations. These characteristics may help to establish prevention measures targeting patients with familial melanoma in the Mediterranean area.

  9. Telomere length and the risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma in melanoma-prone families with and without CDKN2A mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura S Burke

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Recent evidence suggests a link between constitutional telomere length (TL and cancer risk. Previous studies have suggested that longer telomeres were associated with an increased risk of melanoma and larger size and number of nevi. The goal of this study was to examine whether TL modified the risk of melanoma in melanoma-prone families with and without CDKN2A germline mutations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We measured TL in blood DNA in 119 cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM cases and 208 unaffected individuals. We also genotyped 13 tagging SNPs in TERT. RESULTS: We found that longer telomeres were associated with an increased risk of CMM (adjusted OR = 2.81, 95% CI = 1.02-7.72, P = 0.04. The association of longer TL with CMM risk was seen in CDKN2A- cases but not in CDKN2A+ cases. Among CMM cases, the presence of solar injury was associated with shorter telomeres (P = 0.002. One SNP in TERT, rs2735940, was significantly associated with TL (P = 0.002 after Bonferroni correction. DISCUSSION: Our findings suggest that TL regulation could be variable by CDKN2A mutation status, sun exposure, and pigmentation phenotype. Therefore, TL measurement alone may not be a good marker for predicting CMM risk.

  10. Capturing the biological impact of CDKN2A and MC1R genes as an early predisposing event in melanoma and non melanoma skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Escámez, María José; Garcia-Garcia, Francisco; Tell-Marti, Gemma; Fabra, Àngels; Martínez-Santamaría, Lucía; Badenas, Celia; Aguilera, Paula; Pevida, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín; del Río, Marcela; Puig, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Germline mutations in CDKN2A and/or red hair color variants in MC1R genes are associated with an increased susceptibility to develop cutaneous melanoma or non melanoma skin cancer. We studied the impact of the CDKN2A germinal mutation p.G101W and MC1R variants on gene expression and transcription profiles associated with skin cancer. To this end we set-up primary skin cell co-cultures from siblings of melanoma prone-families that were later analyzed using the expression array approach. As a result, we found that 1535 transcripts were deregulated in CDKN2A mutated cells, with over-expression of immunity-related genes (HLA-DPB1, CLEC2B, IFI44, IFI44L, IFI27, IFIT1, IFIT2, SP110 and IFNK) and down-regulation of genes playing a role in the Notch signaling pathway. 3570 transcripts were deregulated in MC1R variant carriers. In particular, genes related to oxidative stress and DNA damage pathways were up-regulated as well as genes associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer and Huntington. Finally, we observed that the expression signatures indentified in phenotypically normal cells carrying CDKN2A mutations or MC1R variants are maintained in skin cancer tumors (melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma). These results indicate that transcriptome deregulation represents an early event critical for skin cancer development. PMID:24742402

  11. P53 expression in prostatic cancer: an immunohistochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Nuaimy, W.M.; Al-Allaf, L.I.; Alnaimi, H.A.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and second leading cause of cancer death in the Western world. P53 alterations are the most frequent genetic changes in human cancers. Mutation of the p53 gene has been implicated in the development of >50% of all human cancer. The current study aims at evaluating the immuno-histochemical expression of p53 protein in patients with cancer of prostate, as prognostic parameter in correlation with other parameters including PSA receptors, and to correlate the results with those of other studies. (authors).

  12. p53 mutations promote proteasomal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Moshe; Kotler, Eran

    2016-07-27

    p53 mutations occur very frequently in human cancer. Besides abrogating the tumour suppressive functions of wild-type p53, many of those mutations also acquire oncogenic gain-of-function activities. Augmentation of proteasome activity is now reported as a common gain-of-function mechanism shared by different p53 mutants, which promotes cancer resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

  13. Cancer risks and survival in patients with multiple primary melanomas: Association with family history of melanoma and germline CDKN2A mutation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgadottir, Hildur; Tuominen, Rainer; Olsson, Håkan; Hansson, Johan; Höiom, Veronica

    2017-11-01

    Worse outcomes have been noted in patients with multiple primary melanomas (MPMs) than in patients with single primary melanomas. We investigated how family history of melanoma and germline CDKN2A mutation status of MPM patients affects risks of developing subsequent melanomas and other cancers and survival outcomes. Comprehensive data on cancer diagnoses and deaths of MPM patients, their first-degree relatives, and matched controls were obtained through Swedish national health care and population registries. Familial MPM cases with germline CDKN2A mutations were youngest at the diagnosis of their second melanoma (median age 42 years) and had among the MPM cohorts the highest relative risks (RR) compared to controls of developing >2 melanomas (RR 238.4, 95% CI 74.8-759.9). CDKN2A mutated MPM cases and their first-degree relatives were the only cohorts with increased risks of nonskin cancers compared to controls (RR 3.6, 95% CI 1.9-147.1 and RR 3.2, 95% CI 1.9-5.6, respectively). In addition, CDKN2A mutated MPM cases had worse survival compared with both cases with familial (HR 3.0, 95% CI 1.3-8.1) and sporadic wild-type MPM (HR 2.63, 95% CI 1.3-5.4). Our study examined outcomes in subgroups of MPM patients, which affected the sample size of the study groups. This study demonstrates that CDKN2A mutation status and family history of melanoma significantly affects outcomes of MPM patients. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison study of MS-HRM and pyrosequencing techniques for quantification of APC and CDKN2A gene methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Migheli

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the development of cost-effective techniques for the quantification of DNA methylation biomarkers. We analyzed 90 samples of surgically resected colorectal cancer tissues for APC and CDKN2A promoter methylation using methylation sensitive-high resolution melting (MS-HRM and pyrosequencing. MS-HRM is a less expensive technique compared with pyrosequencing but is usually more limited because it gives a range of methylation estimates rather than a single value. Here, we developed a method for deriving single estimates, rather than a range, of methylation using MS-HRM and compared the values obtained in this way with those obtained using the gold standard quantitative method of pyrosequencing. We derived an interpolation curve using standards of known methylated/unmethylated ratio (0%, 12.5%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of methylation to obtain the best estimate of the extent of methylation for each of our samples. We observed similar profiles of methylation and a high correlation coefficient between the two techniques. Overall, our new approach allows MS-HRM to be used as a quantitative assay which provides results which are comparable with those obtained by pyrosequencing.

  15. Activated MEK cooperates with Cdkn2a and Pten loss to promote the development and maintenance of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Kircher, D A; Kim, K H; Grossmann, A H; VanBrocklin, M W; Holmen, S L; Robinson, J P

    2017-07-06

    The development of targeted inhibitors, vemurafenib and dabrafenib, has led to improved clinical outcome for melanoma patients with BRAF V600E mutations. Although the initial response to these inhibitors can be dramatic, sometimes causing complete tumor regression, the majority of melanomas eventually become resistant. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) mutations are found in primary melanomas and frequently reported in BRAF melanomas that develop resistance to targeted therapy; however, melanoma is a molecularly heterogeneous cancer, and which mutations are drivers and which are passengers remains to be determined. In this study, we demonstrate that in BRAF V600E melanoma cell lines, activating MEK mutations drive resistance and contribute to suboptimal growth of melanoma cells following the withdrawal of BRAF inhibition. In this manner, the cells are drug-addicted, suggesting that melanoma cells evolve a 'just right' level of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and the additive effects of MEK and BRAF mutations are counterproductive. We also used a novel mouse model of melanoma to demonstrate that several of these MEK mutants promote the development, growth and maintenance of melanoma in vivo in the context of Cdkn2a and Pten loss. By utilizing a genetic approach to control mutant MEK expression in vivo, we were able to induce tumor regression and significantly increase survival; however, after a long latency, all tumors subsequently became resistant. These data suggest that resistance to BRAF or MEK inhibitors is probably inevitable, and novel therapeutic approaches are needed to target dormant tumors.

  16. Structure of the Tetrameric p53 Tumor Suppressor Bound to DNA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marmorstein, Ronen

    2002-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor binds DNA as a tetramer to regulate the transcription of genes involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and alterations in the DNA-binding core domain of p53 are the most...

  17. Association of MC1R variants and host phenotypes with melanoma risk in CDKN2A mutation carriers: a GenoMEL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demenais, F; Mohamdi, H; Chaudru, V; Goldstein, A M; Newton Bishop, J A; Bishop, D T; Kanetsky, P A; Hayward, N K; Gillanders, E; Elder, D E; Avril, M F; Azizi, E; van Belle, P; Bergman, W; Bianchi-Scarrà, G; Bressac-de Paillerets, B; Calista, D; Carrera, C; Hansson, J; Harland, M; Hogg, D; Höiom, V; Holland, E A; Ingvar, C; Landi, M T; Lang, J M; Mackie, R M; Mann, G J; Ming, M E; Njauw, C J; Olsson, H; Palmer, J; Pastorino, L; Puig, S; Randerson-Moor, J; Stark, M; Tsao, H; Tucker, M A; van der Velden, P; Yang, X R; Gruis, N

    2010-10-20

    Carrying the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) germline mutations is associated with a high risk for melanoma. Penetrance of CDKN2A mutations is modified by pigmentation characteristics, nevus phenotypes, and some variants of the melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R), which is known to have a role in the pigmentation process. However, investigation of the associations of both MC1R variants and host phenotypes with melanoma risk has been limited. We included 815 CDKN2A mutation carriers (473 affected, and 342 unaffected, with melanoma) from 186 families from 15 centers in Europe, North America, and Australia who participated in the Melanoma Genetics Consortium. In this family-based study, we assessed the associations of the four most frequent MC1R variants (V60L, V92M, R151C, and R160W) and the number of variants (1, ≥2 variants), alone or jointly with the host phenotypes (hair color, propensity to sunburn, and number of nevi), with melanoma risk in CDKN2A mutation carriers. These associations were estimated and tested using generalized estimating equations. All statistical tests were two-sided. Carrying any one of the four most frequent MC1R variants (V60L, V92M, R151C, R160W) in CDKN2A mutation carriers was associated with a statistically significantly increased risk for melanoma across all continents (1.24 × 10(-6) ≤ P ≤ .0007). A consistent pattern of increase in melanoma risk was also associated with increase in number of MC1R variants. The risk of melanoma associated with at least two MC1R variants was 2.6-fold higher than the risk associated with only one variant (odds ratio = 5.83 [95% confidence interval = 3.60 to 9.46] vs 2.25 [95% confidence interval = 1.44 to 3.52]; P(trend) = 1.86 × 10(-8)). The joint analysis of MC1R variants and host phenotypes showed statistically significant associations of melanoma risk, together with MC1R variants (.0001 ≤ P ≤ .04), hair color (.006 ≤ P ≤ .06), and number of nevi (6.9 × 10(-6) ≤ P

  18. The p53-dependent radioadaptive response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    We already reported that conditioning exposures at low doses, or at low dose-rates, lowered radiation-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in cultured cells in vitro and in the spleens of mice in vivo. In this study, the aim was to characterize the p53-dependent radioadaptive response at the molecular level. We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 containing cells derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53-null. Cellular radiation sensitivities were determined with a colony-forming assay. The accumulation of p53, Hdm2, and iNOS was analyzed with Western blotting. The quantification of chromosomal aberrations was estimated by scoring dicentrics per cell. In wtp53 cells, it was demonstrated that the lack of p53 accumulation was coupled with the activation of Hdm2 after low dose irradiation (0.02 Gy). Although NO radicals were only minimally induced in wtp53 cells irradiated with a challenging irradiation (6 Gy) alone, NO radicals were seen to increase about 2-4 fold after challenging irradiation following a priming irradiation (0.02 Gy). Under similar irradiation conditions with a priming and challenging irradiation in wtp53 cells, induction of radioresistance and a depression of chromosomal aberrations were observed only in the absence of Pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor), RITA or Nutlin-3 (p53-Hdm2 interaction inhibitors), aminoguanidine (an iNOS inhibitor) and c-PTIO (an NO radical scavenger). On the other hand, in p53 dysfunctional cells, a radioadaptive response was not observed in the presence or absence of those inhibitors. Moreover, radioresistance developed when wtp53 cells were treated with ISDN (an NO generating agent) alone. These findings suggest that NO radicals are an initiator of the radioadaptive response acting through the activation of Hdm2 and the depression of p53 accumulations.

  19. Association of CDKAL1, CDKN2A/B & HHEX gene polymorphisms with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the population of Hyderabad, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Jyothi Kommoju

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: A significant association was seen of all the three SNPs of CDKAL1 and CDKN2A/B genes with T2DM but none of the two SNPs of HHEX. Further studies are required to cross-validate our findings in a relatively larger sample. It is also necessary to explore other SNPs of HHEX gene to unequivocally establish the pattern of association of this gene with T2DM in this population.

  20. Effect of p53 genotype on gene expression profiles in murine liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Suzanne M.; Akerman, Gregory S.; Desai, Varsha G.; Tsai, Chen-an; Tolleson, William H.; Melchior, William B.; Lin, Chien-Ju; Fuscoe, James C.; Casciano, Daniel A.; Chen, James J.

    2008-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 is a key regulatory element in the cell and is regarded as the 'guardian of the genome'. Much of the present knowledge of p53 function has come from studies of transgenic mice in which the p53 gene has undergone a targeted deletion. In order to provide additional insight into the impact on the cellular regulatory networks associated with the loss of this gene, microarray technology was utilized to assess gene expression in tissues from both the p53 -/- and p53 +/- mice. Six male mice from each genotype (p53 +/+ , p53 +/- , and p53 -/- ) were humanely killed and the tissues processed for microarray analysis. The initial studies have been performed in the liver for which the Dunnett test revealed 1406 genes to be differentially expressed between p53 +/+ and p53 +/- or between p53 +/+ and p53 -/- at the level of p ≤ 0.05. Both genes with increased expression and decreased expression were identified in p53 +/- and in p53 -/- mice. Most notable in the gene list derived from the p53 +/- mice was the significant reduction in p53 mRNA. In the p53 -/- mice, not only was there reduced expression of the p53 genes on the array, but genes associated with DNA repair, apoptosis, and cell proliferation were differentially expressed, as expected. However, altered expression was noted for many genes in the Cdc42-GTPase pathways that influence cell proliferation. This may indicate that alternate pathways are brought into play in the unperturbed liver when loss or reduction in p53 levels occurs

  1. p53 gene analysis in childhood B non - Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudete Esteves Nogueira Pinto Klumb

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Mutations or deletions in the tumor-suppressor gene p53 are among the commonest genetic changes found in human neoplasms including breast, lung and bowel cancers. In hematological malignancies, p53 is most often mutated in Burkitt's lymphoma, with p53 mutations present in 30 to 40% of tumor samples and in 70% of cell lines. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the p53 gene alterations in child patients with B non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. DESIGN: Descriptive study. SETTING: Tertiary oncology care center. PARTICIPANTS: The study investigated 12 patients with childhood B non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Burkitt's lymphoma. Screening for p53 mutations was done by polymerase chain reaction - single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP analysis of exon 5 to 8/9 of the gene. RESULTS: Abnormal polymerase chain reaction - single strand conformational polymorphism migration pattern was observed in 4 patients (33.3%, one on exon 6 and three on exon 7. Positive cases included 2 patients who died from disease. CONCLUSION: These preliminary results suggest that p53 mutations are quite frequent in children with Burkitt's lymphoma and may play a role in lymphoma genesis or disease progression.

  2. and p53 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... cellular gene product or viral oncoprotein and wild- type p53 protein45. It has already been shown that the p53 protein can bind to cellular proteins, such as the mdm2 oncogene product and heat-shock protein. 70 and to several DNA tumor virus proteins, including SV40 T antigen and E1b protein from.

  3. R248Q mutation--Beyond p53-DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jeremy W K; Lama, Dilraj; Lukman, Suryani; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S; Sim, Adelene Y L

    2015-12-01

    R248 in the DNA binding domain (DBD) of p53 interacts directly with the minor groove of DNA. Earlier nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies indicated that the R248Q mutation resulted in conformation changes in parts of DBD far from the mutation site. However, how information propagates from the mutation site to the rest of the DBD is still not well understood. We performed a series of all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to dissect sterics and charge effects of R248 on p53-DBD conformation: (i) wild-type p53 DBD; (ii) p53 DBD with an electrically neutral arginine side-chain; (iii) p53 DBD with R248A; (iv) p53 DBD with R248W; and (v) p53 DBD with R248Q. Our results agree well with experimental observations of global conformational changes induced by the R248Q mutation. Our simulations suggest that both charge- and sterics are important in the dynamics of the loop (L3) where the mutation resides. We show that helix 2 (H2) dynamics is altered as a result of a change in the hydrogen bonding partner of D281. In turn, neighboring L1 dynamics is altered: in mutants, L1 predominantly adopts the recessed conformation and is unable to interact with the major groove of DNA. We focused our attention the R248Q mutant that is commonly found in a wide range of cancer and observed changes at the zinc-binding pocket that might account for the dominant negative effects of R248Q. Furthermore, in our simulations, the S6/S7 turn was more frequently solvent exposed in R248Q, suggesting that there is a greater tendency of R248Q to partially unfold and possibly lead to an increased aggregation propensity. Finally, based on the observations made in our simulations, we propose strategies for the rescue of R248Q mutants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Protective effect of copy number polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase T1 gene on melanoma risk in presence of CDKN2A mutations, MC1R variants and host-related phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudru, Valérie; Lo, M T; Lesueur, F; Marian, C; Mohamdi, H; Laud, K; Barrois, M; Chompret, A; Avril, M F; Demenais, F; Bressac-de Paillerets, B

    2009-01-01

    The effect of CDKN2A, the major high-risk melanoma susceptibility gene, has been shown to be modified by host-related phenotypes and variants of MC1R gene. The glutathione S-transferase (GSTs) genes, implicated in detoxification of metabolites after UV exposure, are candidates for modulating CDKN2A penetrance. Few case-control studies have investigated the effect of GSTs on melanoma risk, and have led to controversial results while these genes have not yet been studied in CDKN2A melanoma-prone families. We examined the effect of GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotypes on melanoma risk in 25 multi-generational melanoma-prone families with CDKN2A mutations, in presence of MC1R gene variants, sun exposure, and host-related phenotypes. These data included 195 genotyped subjects for all studied genes. We applied the GEE (Generalized Estimating Equations) approach to test for the effect of GSTs while adjusting for age, sex and CDKN2A mutation status and including successively MC1R, sun exposure and host factors in the model. No significant effect of null GSTM1 allele and GSTP1 variants (p.I105V, p.A114V) on melanoma risk was found. However, a significant protective effect of carrying >or=1 null GSTT1 allele was shown: OR(adjusted for age,sex,CDKN2A ) = 0.41 (0.18-0.94) and OR(adjusted for age,sex,CDKN2A,MC1R ) = 0.24 (0.15-0.58). Altogether, the factors modifying significantly the melanoma risk associated with CDKN2A mutations (stepwise procedure) were: MC1R and dysplastic nevi (increasing the risk) and GSTT1 (decreasing the risk). This study shows that even when a high-risk gene (CDKN2A) has been identified, multiple genetic modifiers influence melanoma risk.

  5. p53 expression in sweat gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernat, W; Woźniak, L

    1996-01-01

    We analyzed the expression of p53 in 74 cutaneous adnexal tumors, with enhancement of the detection by incubation of the slides in the microwave. The immunostaining in benign tumors was almost uniformly negative as we found p53-positivity only in one poroma, one nodular hidradenoma, and one case of syringocystadenoma papilliferum (amongst 13 spiradenomas, 9 cylindromas, 12 nodular hidradenomas, 7 poromas, 6 syringomas, 7 syringocystadenomas papilliferum, 2 papillary tubular adenomas and 4 chondroid syringomas). These results contrasted with the widespread p53 overexpression, which was revealed in the sweat gland carcinomas. All spiradenocarcinomas (3), malignant nodular hidradenoma (1), apocrine hidradenocarcinoma (1), and malignant syringoadenoma (1) showed a strong reaction to anti-p53 antibody. Two of three eccrine hidradenocarcinomas, and two of three porocarcinomas presented p53 overexpression, whereas in one case of malignant cylindroma and adenoid cystic carcinoma we did not find p53-positivity. The results of the study indicate an important role, that p53 protein plays in the malignant sweat gland tumors in comparison to their benign counterparts, but reveal that its overexpression may also occur in the reactive and benign neoplastic processes.

  6. p53 in differentiation of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyama, Toshio; Ito, Takashi; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Hayashi, Yuzo; Dohi, Kiyohiko.

    1993-01-01

    P53 is a tumor suppressor gene with such a recessive nature and is inactivated in many carcinomas. DNA was extracted from 10 primary papillary adenocarcinomas and eight undifferentiated carcinomas of the thyroid, using three 5 μm sliced paraffin segments, and then amplified by PCR. The products were analyzed for mutations in the p53 gene exons 5 to 8 by the direct sequencing method and for allelic deletion by the RFLP method. In five human thyroid carcinomas, DNA was extracted from each tissue and analyzed. Mutations in the p53 gene exons 5 to 8 and p53 gene deletions were not detected in the 10 papillary adenocarcinomas, mutations were detected in seven of eight cases and allelic deletions was detected in three of the five cases examined. In each of the five cases which had both differentiated and undifferentiated tissues in the same tumor, p53 gene mutations were not detected in the differentiated tissues while mutations and gene deletions were detected in the undifferentiated sections. The p53 gene was analyzed using paraffin-embedded tissues by the combined use of the direct sequencing and PCR methods and by the RFLP method. It was found that the progression of human thyroid carcinoma is closely related to the p53 genetic changes. Furthermore, the analysis of differentiated and undifferentiated tissues in the same tumor showed that human undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas develop from differentiated carcinomas. (J.P.N.)

  7. Induction of p53-dependent and p53-independent cellular responses by topoisomerase 1 inhibitors.

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, A. C.; Brown, R.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that loss of p53 function in A2780 human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells confers increased clonogenic resistance to several DNA-damaging agents, but not to taxol or camptothecin. We have now extended these studies, comparing wild-type p53-expressing A2780 cells with isogenic derivatives transfected with a dominant negative mutant (143; val to ala) p53. We show that, as well as retaining equivalent clonogenic sensitivity to camptothecin, mutant p53 transfectants of A2780 ...

  8. An adaptive molecular timer in p53-meidated cell fate decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Wang, Ping; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    The tumor suppressor p53 decides cellular outcomes in the DNA damage response. It is intriguing to explore the link between p53 dynamics and cell fates. We developed a theoretical model of p53 signaling network to clarify the mechanism of cell fate decision mediated by its dynamics. We found that the interplay between p53-Mdm2 negative feedback loop and p53-PTEN-Mdm2 positive feedback loop shapes p53 dynamics. Depending on the intensity of DNA damage, p53 shows three modes of dynamics: persistent pulses, two-phase dynamics with pulses followed by sustained high levels and straightforward high levels. Especially, p53 shows two-phase dynamics upon moderated damage and the required number of p53 pulses before apoptosis induction decreases with increasing DNA damage. Our results suggested there exists an adaptive molecular timer that determines whether and when the apoptosis switch should be triggered. We clarified the mechanism behind the switching of p53 dynamical modes by bifurcation analysis. Moreover, we reproduced the experimental results that drug additions alter p53 pulses to sustained p53 activation and leads to senescence. Our work may advance the understanding the significance of p53 dynamics in tumor suppression. This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11175084, 11204126 and 31361163003).

  9. P53 Gene Mutagenesis in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sommer, Steve S

    2005-01-01

    .... The central hypothesis of this proposal is that variability in the patterns of p53 mutagensis in breast cancer reflects differences in exposures to different amounts and/or types of diverse environmental mutagens...

  10. Distinct pattern of p53 mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spruck, C H; Rideout, W M; Olumi, A F

    1993-01-01

    A distinct mutational spectrum for the p53 tumor suppressor gene in bladder carcinomas was established in patients with known exposures to cigarette smoke. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of exons 5 through 8 of the p53 gene showed inactivating mutations in 16 of 40 (40%) bladder...... double mutations, four of which were tandem mutations on the same allele. No double mutations were found in tumors from nonsmoking patients. None of the mutations in smokers were G:C-->T:A transversions, which would be anticipated for exposure to the suspected cigarette smoke carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl....... The results suggest that, although cigarette smoke exposure may not significantly alter the kinds of mutations sustained in the p53 gene, it may act to increase the extent of DNA damage per mutagenic event....

  11. p53 regulates cytoskeleton remodeling to suppress tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Keigo; Ebata, Takahiro; Guo, Alvin Kunyao; Tobiume, Kei; Wolf, Steven John; Kawauchi, Keiko

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cells possess unique characteristics such as invasiveness, the ability to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and an inherent stemness. Cell morphology is altered during these processes and this is highly dependent on actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is, therefore, important for determination of cell fate. Mutations within the TP53 (tumor suppressor p53) gene leading to loss or gain of function (GOF) of the protein are often observed in aggressive cancer cells. Here, we highlight the roles of p53 and its GOF mutants in cancer cell invasion from the perspective of the actin cytoskeleton; in particular its reorganization and regulation by cell adhesion molecules such as integrins and cadherins. We emphasize the multiple functions of p53 in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton remodeling in response to the extracellular microenvironment, and oncogene activation. Such an approach provides a new perspective in the consideration of novel targets for anti-cancer therapy.

  12. Effects of chronic deoxynivalenol exposure on p53 heterozygous and p53 homozygous mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, G S; Coady, L; Curran, I; Caldwell, D; Armstrong, C; Aziz, S A; Nunnikhoven, A; Gannon, A M; Liston, V; Shenton, J; Mehta, R

    2016-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a secondary metabolite associated with Fusarium species pathogenic to important food crops. A two-year feeding study reported that DON was non-carcinogenic in B6C3F1 mice. The present study was conducted to further characterize the chronic effects of DON by exposing cancer-prone transgenic p53 heterozygous (p53+/-) male mice and p53 homozygous (p53+/+) male mice to 0, 1, 5, or 10 mg DON/kg in diet for 26 weeks. Gross and microscopic organ-specific neoplastic and non-neoplastic changes and expression profiles of key hepatic and renal genes were assessed. Few toxicologic differences between p53+/+ and p53+/- mice were observed, and no tumours were observed due to DON. The results indicated that DON was non-carcinogenic and that reduced expression of the p53 gene did not play a key role in responses to DON toxicity. The lack of inflammatory and proliferative lesions in mice may be attributed to the anorectic effects of DON, which resulted in dose-dependent reductions in body weight in p53+/+ and p53+/- mice. Hepatic and renal gene expression analyses confirmed that chronic exposure to DON was noninflammatory. The effects of 26-week DON exposure on p53+/+ and p53+/-mice were consistent with those previously seen in B6C3F1 mice exposed to DON for two years. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. p53-Dependent suppression of genome instability in germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otozai, Shinji [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Oda, Shoji [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Kamei, Yasuhiro [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ryo, Haruko [Nomura Project, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 565-0085 (Japan); Sato, Ayuko [Department of Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Nomura, Taisei [Nomura Project, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 565-0085 (Japan); Mitani, Hiroshi [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Tsujimura, Tohru [Department of Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Inohara, Hidenori [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Todo, Takeshi, E-mail: todo@radbio.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Radiation-induced microsatellite instability (MSI) was investigated in medaka fish. • msh2{sup −/−} fish had a high frequency of spontaneous MSI. • p53{sup −/−} fish had a high frequency of radiation-induced MSI. • p53 and msh2 suppress MSI by different pathways: mismatch removal and apoptosis. - Abstract: Radiation increases mutation frequencies at tandem repeat loci. Germline mutations in γ-ray-irradiated medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were studied, focusing on the microsatellite loci. Mismatch-repair genes suppress microsatellite mutation by directly removing altered sequences at the nucleotide level, whereas the p53 gene suppresses genetic alterations by eliminating damaged cells. The contribution of these two defense mechanisms to radiation-induced microsatellite instability was addressed. The spontaneous mutation frequency was significantly higher in msh2{sup −/−} males than in wild-type fish, whereas there was no difference in the frequency of radiation-induced mutations between msh2{sup −/−} and wild-type fish. By contrast, irradiated p53{sup −/−} fish exhibited markedly increased mutation frequencies, whereas their spontaneous mutation frequency was the same as that of wild-type fish. In the spermatogonia of the testis, radiation induced a high level of apoptosis both in wild-type and msh2{sup −/−} fish, but negligible levels in p53{sup −/−} fish. The results demonstrate that the msh2 and p53 genes protect genome integrity against spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation by two different pathways: direct removal of mismatches and elimination of damaged cells.

  14. A designed inhibitor of p53 aggregation rescues p53 tumor-suppression in ovarian carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soragni, Alice; Janzen, Deanna M.; Johnson, Lisa M.; Lindgren, Anne G.; Nguyen, Anh Thai-Quynh; Tiourin, Ekaterina; Soriaga, Angela B.; Lu, Jing; Jiang, Lin; Faull, Kym F.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Memarzadeh, Sanaz; Eisenberg, David S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Half of all human cancers lose p53 function by missense mutations, with an unknown fraction of these containing p53 in a self-aggregated, amyloid-like state. Here we show that a cell-penetrating peptide, ReACp53, designed to inhibit p53 amyloid formation, rescues p53 function in cancer cell lines and in organoids derived from high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOC), an aggressive cancer characterized by ubiquitous p53 mutations. Rescued p53 behaves similarly to its wild-type counterpart in regulating target genes, reducing cell proliferation and increasing cell death. Intraperitoneal administration decreases tumor proliferation and shrinks xenografts in vivo. Our data show the effectiveness of targeting a specific aggregation defect of p53 and its potential applicability to HGSOCs. PMID:26748848

  15. Glycerol restores the p53 function in human lingual cancer cells bearing mutant p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Ichiro; Yane, Katsunari; Yuki, Kazue; Kanata, Hirokazu; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in p53, tumor suppressor gene, have recently been shown to have an impact on the clinical course of several human tumors, including head and neck cancers. The genetic status of the p53 gene has been focused on as the most important candidate among various cancer-related genes for prognosis-predictive assays of cancer therapy. We examined the restoration of radiation- or cisplatin (CDDP)-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in human lingual cancer cells. The results suggest that glycerol is effective in inducing a conformational change of p53 and restoring normal function of mutant p53, leading to enhanced radiosensitivity or chemosensitivity through the induction of apoptosis. We have also represented the same results in vivo as in vitro. Thus, this novel tool for enhancement of radiosensitivity or chemosensitivity in cancer cells bearing m p53 may be applicable for p53-targeted cancer therapy. (author)

  16. p53 expression in biopsies from children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Micha I; Lundegaard, Pia Rengtved; Carstensen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    based on CD1a positivity. The slides were stained with p53 antibody and semiquantitatively evaluated using a grading system from 1 to 5 as an estimate for 0% to 20%, 20% to 40%, 40% to 60%, 60% to 80%, and 80% to 100% p53-positive for pathologic Langerhans cells (pLC), respectively. RESULTS: The p53...... protein was expressed in various degrees in pLC in all lesions. The degree of p53 expression could not be correlated to either clinical manifestation or outcome. CONCLUSIONS: An increased expression of p53 in pLC indicates an altered DNA repair control with or without abnormal control of apoptosis....

  17. Clinical and pathological correlations of marrow PUMA and P53 expressions in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektas, Ozlen; Uner, Aysegul; Buyukasik, Yahya; Uz, Burak; Bozkurt, Sureyya; Eliacik, Eylem; Işik, Ayse; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Goker, Hakan; Demiroglu, Haluk; Aksu, Salih; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Sayinalp, Nilgun

    2015-05-01

    p53 is a key regulator of apoptosis. p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) is a critical mediator of p53-dependent and independent apoptosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship of p53 and PUMA to the prognosis of MDS. Bone marrow biopsies of MDS patients at the time of diagnosis (n = 76) and at the time of transformation (n = 19) were included in the study group. The expression of p53 and PUMA was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. When compared to the control group, both p53 (p PUMA (p = 0.012) expression levels were significantly higher in MDS group. In MDS group, there was a moderate positive correlation between p53 and PUMA expressions. PUMA expression was not correlated with event free and overall survival. However, overall survival was significantly lower in cases with p53 expression in more than 50% of the cells. There was an increase in PUMA expression in cases that showed transformation as compared to the initial diagnostic bone marrows but was not statistically significant. The correlation that existed between p53 and PUMA was lost in transformed cases. Our results showed that PUMA and p53 expressions are increased in MDS marrows compared to normal marrows. PUMA expression increases further during transformation while the expression of p53 is not significantly altered which suggests that PUMA alterations might be a late event during the evolution of MDS. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. p53 mutations in sweat gland carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernat, W; Peraud, A; Wozniak, L; Ohgaki, H

    1998-05-04

    Sweat gland carcinomas are rare skin tumours and little is known about their etiology and molecular basis. In this study, we analyzed p53 mutations in 16 sweat gland carcinomas with different histologic types, including 2 spiradenocarcinomas, 1 composed adnexal carcinoma, 5 porocarcinomas, 2 eccrine hidradenocarcinomas, 2 syringocystadenocarcinomas, 1 sclerosing sweat gland carcinoma, 1 adenoid cystic carcinoma, 1 cylindrocarcinoma and 1 apocrine adenocarcinoma. Single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analyses followed by direct DNA sequencing revealed that 5 carcinomas (31%) contained a p53 mutation, 4 of which were G:C-->A:T transition mutations and 1 of which was a deletion. Three G:C-->A:T mutations were located at dipyrimidine sequences on the antisense strand (2 spiradenocarcinomas, 1 eccrine hidradenocarcinoma), suggesting that UV light may play a role in the development of sweat gland carcinomas. In 2 spiradenocarcinomas, p53 mutations were present in the carcinoma but not in the adenoma portions, suggesting that p53 mutations may be associated with malignant progression in these rare adnexal tumours.

  19. Critical roles of p53 in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Wang

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most malignant tumors and the biggest obstacle in curing HCC is its high metastasis potential. Alteration of p53 is the most frequent genetic change found in HCC. Although the biological function of p53 in tumor initiation and progression has been well characterized, whether or not p53 is implicated in metastasis of HCC is largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed the potential functions of p53 in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and metastasis of HCC cells. Both insulin- and TGF-β1-induced changes of critical EMT markers were greatly enhanced by p53 knockdown in HCC cells. The insulin- and TGF-β1-stimulated migration of HCC cells were enhanced by p53 knockdown. Furthermore, in vivo metastasis of HCC cells using different mouse models was robustly enhanced by p53 knockdown. In addition, we found that p53 regulation on EMT and metastasis involves β-catenin signaling. The nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity of β-catenin was modulated by p53. The enhanced EMT phenotype, cell migration and tumor metastasis of HCC cells by p53 knockdown were abrogated by inhibiting β-catenin signal pathway. In conclusion, this study reveals that p53 plays a pivotal role in EMT and metastasis of HCC cells via its regulation on β-catenin signaling.

  20. [Protein p53 in gastric carcinoma: clinical use of cancer research on neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzyńska, T

    1999-02-01

    Mutations of the tumour-suppressor p53 gene are a very frequent event in many human cancers. In normal cells and tissue, p53 protein has a very short half-life and attains such a low level that is not detectable immunohistochemically. In contrast, the altered forms, present in 30 to 80% of different neoplasms, are more stable and accumulate to concentration that can be detected by immunohistochemistry. Changes in the p53 gene product can be immunogenic. Thus a simple procedures as immunohistochemistry or Elisa test which stratifies cancer patients into those with and without p53 accumulation or p53 auto- antibodies can be analyzed for useful correlations with clinical and histopathological data. The p53 studies have demonstrated that in gastric carcinoma the expression of p53 protein can be properly assessed prior to surgery, using immunohistochemistry on a small tissue samples obtained during endoscopy. It has been shown that p53 assessment in this carcinoma can be helpful in identifying patients at high risk for metastatic spread, including regional lymph node involvement, and in the discrimination of those patients with especially poor prognosis. Furthermore it was demonstrated that in stomach p53 accumulation is a marker of malignancy. Thus, when combined with routine procedures, a simple test as p53 immunohistochemistry might allow better planing of appropriate treatment strategies and help in the pre-operative diagnosis of gastric carcinoma. Further studies are required to determine the clinical significance of p53 serum antibodies in gastric cancer.

  1. The p53-MDM2 network: from oscillations to apoptosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    2 0165–0166. Javelaud D and Besançon F 2002 Inactivation of p21WAF1 sensitizes cells to apoptosis via an increase of both p14ARF and p53 Levels and an alteration of the Bax/Bcl-2 Ratio; J. Biol. Chem. 277. 37949–37954. Knudson A G 1971 Mutation and cancer: statistical study of retinoblastoma; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.

  2. S100A4 interacts with p53 in the nucleus and promotes p53 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orre, L M; Panizza, E; Kaminskyy, V O; Vernet, E; Gräslund, T; Zhivotovsky, B; Lehtiö, J

    2013-12-05

    S100A4 is a small calcium-binding protein that is commonly overexpressed in a range of different tumor types, and it is widely accepted that S100A4 has an important role in the process of cancer metastasis. In vitro binding assays has shown that S100A4 interacts with the tumor suppressor protein p53, indicating that S100A4 may have additional roles in tumor development. In the present study, we show that endogenous S100A4 and p53 interact in complex samples, and that the interaction increases after inhibition of MDM2-dependent p53 degradation using Nutlin-3A. Further, using proximity ligation assay, we show that the interaction takes place in the cell nucleus. S100A4 knockdown experiments in two p53 wild-type cell lines, A549 and HeLa, resulted in stabilization of p53 protein, indicating that S100A4 is promoting p53 degradation. Finally, we demonstrate that S100A4 knockdown leads to p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Thus, our data add a new layer to the oncogenic properties of S100A4 through its inhibition of p53-dependent processes.

  3. The carboxy-terminal domain of connexin 43 (CT-Cx43) modulates the expression of p53 by altering miR-125b expression in low-grade human breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Raihana; Rashid, Rabiya; Ismail, Rehana; Niaz, Saif; Chowdri, Nisar Ahmad; Hussain, Mahboob Ul

    2015-12-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) is a widely expressed gap junction protein. It can also regulate various gap-junction independent processes, including cellular proliferation. The latter regulatory functions have been attributed to its carboxy-terminal domain, CT-Cx43. CT-Cx43 has been found to be expressed independent of full-length Cx43 in various cell types. Its nuclear localization has additionally raised the possibility that it may regulate the expression of particular genes, including miRNAs, known play a role in the regulation of cellular proliferation. Here, we set out to uncover the molecular mechanism(s) underlying CT-Cx43 mediated gene (de-)regulation in human breast cancer. Western blotting and quantitative real time PCR were carried to assess the expression of CT-Cx43 and miR-125b in a panel of 60 primary human breast cancer tissues and its paired normal adjacent tissues. In addition, CT-Cx43 was exogenously expressed in the breast cancer-derived cell line MCF-7 and its effect on the expression of miR-125b and its downstream target p53 were evaluated, as well as its effect on cellular proliferation and death using MTT and LDH assays, respectively. We found that CT-Cx43, but not full-length Cx43, was down-regulated in low grade human breast cancers. In addition, we found that the tumor suppressor protein p53 exhibited a decreased expression in the CT-Cx43 down-regulated samples. Interestingly, we found that miR-125b, a negative regulator of p53, exhibited an inverse expression relationship with CT-Cx43 in the breast cancer samples tested. This inverse relationship was confirmed by exogenous expression of CT-Cx43 in MCF-7 cells. In addition, we found that CT-Cx43 up-regulation and subsequent miR-125b down-regulation resulted in a decreased proliferation of MCF-7 cells. Our data suggest a mechanism by which CT-Cx43 may regulate cell proliferation. Targeting of CT-Cx43 and/or miR-125b may be instrumental for therapeutic intervention in human breast cancer.

  4. Regulation of p53 tetramerization and nuclear export by ARC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Roger S-Y; Nam, Young-Jae; Ostreicher, Marc Jason; Metzl, Mark D; Whelan, Russell S; Peng, Chang-Fu; Ashton, Anthony W; Fu, Weimin; Mani, Kartik; Chin, Suet-Feung; Provenzano, Elena; Ellis, Ian; Figg, Nichola; Pinder, Sarah; Bennett, Martin R; Caldas, Carlos; Kitsis, Richard N

    2007-12-26

    Inactivation of the transcription factor p53 is central to carcinogenesis. Yet only approximately one-half of cancers have p53 loss-of-function mutations. Here, we demonstrate a mechanism for p53 inactivation by apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), a protein induced in multiple cancer cells. The direct binding in the nucleus of ARC to the p53 tetramerization domain inhibits p53 tetramerization. This exposes a nuclear export signal in p53, triggering Crm1-dependent relocation of p53 to the cytoplasm. Knockdown of endogenous ARC in breast cancer cells results in spontaneous tetramerization of endogenous p53, accumulation of p53 in the nucleus, and activation of endogenous p53 target genes. In primary human breast cancers with nuclear ARC, p53 is almost always WT. Conversely, nearly all breast cancers with mutant p53 lack nuclear ARC. We conclude that nuclear ARC is induced in cancer cells and negatively regulates p53.

  5. P53 overexpression and outcome of radiation therapy in head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Ah; Choi, Ihl Bhong; Kang, Ki Mun; Jang, Ji Young; Kim, Kyung Mi; Park, Kyung Shin; Kim, Young Shin; Kang, Chang Suk; Cho, Seung Ho; Kim, Hyung Tae

    1999-01-01

    Experimental studies have implicated the wild type p53 in cellular response to radiation. Whether altered p53 function can lead to changes in clinical radiocurability remains an area of ongoing study. This study was performed to investigate whether any correlation between change of p53 and outcome of curative radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancers. Immunohistochemical analysis with a mouse monoclonal antibody (D0-7) specific for human p53 was used to detect to overexpression of protein in formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor sample from 55 head and neck cancer patients treated with curative radiation therapy (median dose of 7020 cGy) from February 1988 to March 1996 at St. Mary's Hospital. Overexpression of p53 was correlated with locoregional control and survival using Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression multivariate analysis was performed that included all clinical variables and status of p53 expression. Thirty-seven (67.2%) patients showed overexpression of p53 by immunohistochemical staining in their tumor. One hundred percent of oral cavity, 76% of laryngeal, 66.7% of oropharyngeal, 66.7% of hypopharyngeal cancer showed p53 overexpression (p=0.05). The status of p53 had significant relationship with stage of disease (p=0.03) and history of smoking (p=0.001). The overexpression of p53 was not predictive of response rate to radiation therapy. The locoregional control was not significantly affected by p53 status. Overexpression of p53 didn't have any prognostic implication for disease free survival and overall survival. Primary site and stage of disease were significant prognostic factors for survival. The p53 overexpression as detected by immunohistochemical staining had significant correlation with stage, primary site of disease and smoking habit of patients. The p53 overexpression didn't have any predictive value for outcome of curative radiation therapy in a group of head and neck cancers

  6. Wild-type p53 controls the level of fibronectin expression in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Daeun; Jung, Seung Pil; Jeong, Yisun; Bae, Soo Youn; Kim, Sangmin

    2017-10-01

    Aberrant fibronectin (FN) expression is associated with poor prognosis, cell adhesion, and cell motility in a variety of cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the relationship between p53 and FN expression in breast cancer cells. Basal FN expression was significantly decreased by treatment with the p53 activator III, RITA, in MCF7 breast cancer cells with wild-type p53. In addition, overexpression of wild-type p53 markedly decreased the level of FN expression in p53-mutant breast cancer cells. To examine the mechanism underlying the relationship between p53 and FN expression, we treated MCF7 breast cancer cells with the tumor promoter TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate). Our results showed that basal FN expression was increased by TPA treatment in a time-dependent manner. In contrast, the level of p53 expression was decreased by TPA treatment. However, the expression of FN and p53 was not altered by TPA in p53-mutant breast cancer cells. Furthermore, the alterations in FN and p53 expression in response to TPA were prevented by a specific MEK inhibitor, UO126. Finally, we demonstrated that TPA triggers degradation of p53 through the proteasomal pathway in MCF7 cells. TPA-induced FN expression was decreased by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Under the same condition, p53 protein expression, but not mRNA expression, was reversed by MG132. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the level of FN expression is associated with the status and expression of p53 in breast cancer cells.

  7. The p53 Isoform Δ133p53β Promotes Cancer Stem Cell Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Arsic

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSC are responsible for cancer chemoresistance and metastasis formation. Here we report that Δ133p53β, a TP53 splice variant, enhanced cancer cell stemness in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, while its depletion reduced it. Δ133p53β stimulated the expression of the key pluripotency factors SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG. Similarly, in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, aggressiveness was coupled with enhanced CSC potential and Δ133p53β expression. Like in MCF-7 cells, SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG expression were positively regulated by Δ133p53β in these cells. Finally, treatment of MCF-7 cells with etoposide, a cytotoxic anti-cancer drug, increased CSC formation and SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG expression via Δ133p53, thus potentially increasing the risk of cancer recurrence. Our findings show that Δ133p53β supports CSC potential. Moreover, they indicate that the TP53 gene, which is considered a major tumor suppressor gene, also acts as an oncogene via the Δ133p53β isoform.

  8. p53 Aggregates penetrate cells and induce the co-aggregation of intracellular p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolyn J Forget

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are unique pathologies in which the infectious particles are prions, a protein aggregate. The prion protein has many particular features, such as spontaneous aggregation, conformation transmission to other native PrP proteins and transmission from an individual to another. Protein aggregation is now frequently associated to many human diseases, for example Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or type 2 diabetes. A few proteins associated to these conformational diseases are part of a new category of proteins, called prionoids: proteins that share some, but not all, of the characteristics associated with prions. The p53 protein, a transcription factor that plays a major role in cancer, has recently been suggested to be a possible prionoid. The protein has been shown to accumulate in multiple cancer cell types, and its aggregation has also been reproduced in vitro by many independent groups. These observations suggest a role for p53 aggregates in cancer development. This study aims to test the «prion-like» features of p53. Our results show in vitro aggregation of the full length and N-terminally truncated protein (p53C, and penetration of these aggregates into cells. According to our findings, the aggregates enter cells using macropinocytosis, a non-specific pathway of entry. Lastly, we also show that once internalized by the cell, p53C aggregates can co-aggregate with endogenous p53 protein. Together, these findings suggest prion-like characteristics for p53 protein, based on the fact that p53 can spontaneously aggregate, these aggregates can penetrate cells and co-aggregate with cellular p53.

  9. IGFBP3 Promoter Methylation in Colorectal Cancer: Relationship with Microsatellite Instability, CpG Island Methylator Phenotype, p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Kawasaki

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3, which is induced by wild-type p53, regulates IGF and interacts with the TGF-β pathway. IGFBP3 promoter methylation may occur in colorectal cancer with or without the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP, which is associated with microsatellite instability (MSI and TGFBR2 mutation. We examined the relationship between IGFBP3 methylation, p53 expression, CIMP and MSI in 902 population-based colorectal cancers. Utilizing real-time PCR (MethyLight, we quantified promoter methylation in IGFBP3 and eight other CIMP-high-specific promoters (CACNA1G, CDKN2A, CRABP1, IGF2, MLH1, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1. IGFBP3 methylation was far more frequent in non-MSI-high CIMP-high tumors (85% = 35/41 than in MSI-high CIMPhigh (49% = 44/90, P < .0001, MSI-high non-CIMP-high (17% = 6/36, P < .0001, non-MSI-high non-CIMP-high tumors (22% = 152/680, P < .0001. Among CIMPhigh tumors, the inverse relationship between MSI and IGFBP3 methylation persisted in p53-negative tumors (P < .0001, but not in p53-positive tumors. IGFBP3 methylation was associated inversely with TGFBR2 mutation in MSI-high non-CIMP-high tumors (P = .02. In conclusion, IGFBP3 methylation is inversely associated with MSI in CIMP-high colorectal cancers, this relationship is limited to p53-negative tumors. Our data suggest complex relationship between global genomic/epigenomic phenomena (such as MSI/ CIMP, single molecular events (e.g., IGFBP3 methylation, TP53 mutation, TGFBR2 mutation, the related pathways.

  10. p53 Response to Ultrasound: Preliminary Observations in MCF7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Janis M.; Campbell, Paul A.

    2011-09-01

    Mutated p53 can be found in approximately half of all human cancers. Strategies which seek to restore, or at least exercise a level of external control over, p53 functionality are thus potentially useful as adjuncts to therapy. Here, we report our preliminary measurements in this area, and demonstrate that short-burst pulsed ultrasound can indeed affect p53 activity. Specifically, we have observed that expression of the p53 protein can be regulated in the period immediately following low intensity short pulse (millisecond) ultrasound exposure, and that altered activity levels return to basal levels over a 24 hour period post-insonation.

  11. Cutaneous phenotype and MC1R variants as modifying factors for the development of melanoma in CDKN2A G101W mutation carriers from 4 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Alisa M; Chaudru, Valerie; Ghiorzo, Paola; Badenas, Celia; Malvehy, Josep; Pastorino, Lorenza; Laud, Karine; Hulley, Benjamin; Avril, Marie-Francoise; Puig-Butille, Joan A; Miniere, Annie; Marti, Rosa; Chompret, Agnes; Cuellar, Francisco; Kolm, Isabel; Mila, Montserrat; Tucker, Margaret A; Demenais, Florence; Bianchi-Scarra, Giovanna; Puig, Susana; de-Paillerets, Brigitte Bressac

    2007-08-15

    The G101W founder mutation is the most common CDKN2A mutation in Italy, Spain, and France. As the background of modifying genes, environmental exposures, and sun behavior vary across countries, studying G101W carriers from distinct countries offers a unique opportunity to evaluate possible modifying factors in melanoma development. We evaluated 76 G101W cases and 59 carrier controls from France, Italy, Spain, and the United States. Hair color and dysplastic nevi distributions differed significantly in cases and controls across the 4 study groups. Cases also varied significantly for eye color, freckling, and nevi. The distribution of MC1R variants in cases differed significantly across study groups because 12% of Italian melanoma patients had > or =2 MC1R variants vs. >50% for the other case groups. Several MC1R covariates showed significant associations with melanoma risk in all groups combined and in the American, French, and Spanish samples; no significant findings were observed in the Italian sample. In multiple-case families, the number and type of MC1R variants varied significantly between multiple-primary-melanoma and single-primary-melanoma patients from the 4 groups; there was also a significant decrease in median age at melanoma diagnosis as the number or type of MC1R variants increased. The variation in the effects of the cutaneous phenotypic and MC1R factors across the study sample suggests that these factors differentially contribute to development of melanoma even on a common genetic background of a germline CDKN2A mutation. Differences in melanoma risk across geographic regions justify the need for individual studies in each country before counseling should be considered.

  12. Differential sensitivity of p53+ and p53- cells to caffeine-induced radiosensitization and override of G2 delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, S.N.; DeFrank, J.S.; Connell, P.; Eogan, M.; Preffer, F.; Dombkowski, D.; Tang, W.; Friend, S.H.

    1995-01-01

    G1/S arrest. Cell cycle checkpoint arrest in response to 4 or 8 Gy X-rays was measured without caffeine and with 0.5 and 2mM caffeine. In (+/+) cells, G1/S and G2/M arrest was seen and there was no demonstrable impact of caffeine at either dose on either checkpoint. By contrast (-/-) cells showed a clear reduction (50%) of the size of G2/M arrest at 0.5mM caffeine and complete override at 2mM caffeine. These data imply that cells which lack p53, are sensitized by low-dose caffeine and their G2/M checkpoint is altered, seen by the different effects of caffeine upon G2/M override. Tumor cells which do and do not have functional p53 have also been evaluated. Preliminary data suggest a similar conclusion can be drawn. MCF-7 cells transfected with control plasmid or plasmids containing the gene for HPV-E6 protein also show sensitization with low dose caffeine only in cells which have E6. Conclusions: The greater caffeine-induced radiosensitization in p53(-) cells suggests that p53, already shown to control the G1/S checkpoint, may also influence aspects of G2/M arrest. These data indicate an opportunity for therapeutic gain by combining DNA damaging agents with compounds that disrupt G2/M arrest in tumors lacking functional p53. The role of p53 in G2/M transition remains to be defined

  13. The Increased Level of Serum p53 in Hepatitis B-Associated Liver Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Shahnazari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ability of tumour suppressor protein p53 (P53 to regulate cell cycle processes can be modulated by hepatitis B virus (HBV. While preliminary evidences indicates the involvement of protein-x of HBV (HBx in altering p53 DNA binding, no further data have been accumulated for the significance of serum p53 in chronic hepatitis B virus infected patients. Methods: 72 non-cirrhotic and 19 cirrhotic patients infected by HBV were enrolled for the analysis in this study. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was performed to study the concentrations of serum p53 protein. The tertiary structures of HBx and P53 were docked by Z-dock and Hex servers for in-silico protein-protein interaction analysis. Results: There was a significant association between the serum p53 and cirrhosis (OR=1.81 95% CI: 1.017-3.2, P=0.044. Cirrhotic patients had higher level of serum p53 compare with chronic infection of HBV (1.98±1.22 vs. 1.29±0.72 U/ml, P=0.05. No evidence of correlation was seen between the different variables such as age, gender, log viral load, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP and alanine aminotransferase (ALT with serum p53. Tertiary model shows that the amino acid residues from Arg110 to Lys132 of the N-terminal of P53 which is critical for ubiquitination, are bonded to a region in N- terminal of HBx amino acid residues from Arg19 to Ser33. Conclusion: There is an increase in serum p53 in HBV-related cirrhosis patients. In this case, HBx might be responsible for such higher concentration of p53 through HBx-p53 protein-protein interaction, as is shown by molecular modeling approach.

  14. p53 expression in colorectal carcinoma in relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p53 expression in colorectal carcinoma in relation to histopathological features in Ugandan patients. ... Molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer commonly involves mutation in p53 gene which leads to expression of p53 protein in tumor cells. Expression of p53 protein has been associated with poor clinical outcome and ...

  15. Occupational health hazards of trichloroethylene among workers in relation to altered mRNA expression of cell cycle regulating genes (p53, p21, bax and bcl-2 and PPARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Varshney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichloroethylene (TCE is widely used as a metal degreaser in industrial processes. The present study reports on the effects of TCE exposure on workers employed in the lock industries. To ensure exposure of the workers to TCE, its toxic metabolites, trichloroacetic acid (TCA, dichloroacetic acid (DCA and trichloroethanol (TCEOH were detected in the plasma of the subjects through solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-electron capture detection. TCA, DCA and TCEOH were detected in the range of 0.004–2.494 μg/mL, 0.01–3.612 μg/mL and 0.002–0.617 μg/mL, respectively. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed up-regulated expression of p53 (2.4-fold; p < 0.05, p21 (2-fold; p < 0.01, bax (2.9-fold; p < 0.01 mRNAs and down-regulated expression of bcl-2 (67%; p < 0.05 mRNAs, indicating DNA damaging potential of these metabolites. No effects were observed on the levels of p16 and c-myc mRNAs. Further, as TCA and DCA, the ligand of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARA, are involved in the process of hepatocarcinogenesis in rodents, we examined expression of PPARA mRNA and let-7c miRNA in the workers. No statistically significant differences in expression of PPARA mRNA and let-7c miRNA in patients were observed as compared to values in controls. Dehydroepiandosterone sulfate (DHEAS is a reported endogenous ligand of PPARA so its competitive role was also studied. We observed decreased levels of DHEAS hormone in the subjects. Hence, its involvement in mediation of the observed changes in the levels of various mRNAs analyzed in this study appears unlikely.

  16. Peran p53 Sebagai Jalur Kritis pada Mekanisme Kontrol Siklus Sel Sebagai Pencegah Terjadinya Kanker Mulut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herlia Nur Istindiah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In cell cycle control, p53 acts as an emergency brake, where its important checkpoint function is to maintain the genome integrity by preventing the formation and proliferation of mutant cells. P53 activity is increased by DNA damage occurs caused by agents (such as radioation, UV light or drugs or oncogenes. Mdm2 protein can inhibit the p53 activation, but oncogenes can inhibit Mdm2 or activate p53. If DNA damage occurs, then p53 prevents the cells from replicating their DNA by arresting the cell cycle, so that the cells can repair the damage. Alternatively, p53 instructs the cells to undergo apoptosis by inducing bax gene expression, so that irregular cell growth, and cancer can be avoided. Cancer, including oral cancer, oftenthuolved cells with altered p53. Exogenous factors, such as tobacco and alcohol, presumably plays a role in triggering p53 mutations. Several techniques, such as immunohistochemistry and PCR can be used to investigation their etiology and development of oral cancer. The results hopefully be applied clinically in early detection, prevention and prediction of cancer. This paper discusses the role on p53 in preventing the occurrence and proliferation of mutated cells that lead to cancer, including oral cancer.

  17. Driving p53 Response to Bax Activation Greatly Enhances Sensitivity to Taxol by Inducing Massive Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola De Feudis

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The proapoptotic gene bax is one of the downstream effectors of p53. The p53 binding site in the bax promoter is less responsive to p53 than the one in the growth arrest mediating gene p21. We introduced the bax gene under the control of 13 copies of a strong p53 responsive element into two ovarian cancer cell lines. The clones expressing bax under the control of p53 obtained from the wild-type (wt p53-expressing cell line A2780 were much more sensitive (500- to 1000-fold to the anticancer agent taxol than the parent cell line, with a higher percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis after drug treatment that was clearly p53-dependent and bax-mediated. Xenografts established in nude mice from one selected clone (A2780/C3 were more responsive to taxol than the parental line and the apoptotic response of A2780/C3 tumors was also increased after treatment. Introduction of the same plasmid into the p53 null SKOV3 cell line did not alter the sensitivity to taxol or the induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, driving the p53 response (after taxol treatment by activating the bax gene rather than the p21 gene results in induction of massive apoptosis, in vitro and in vivo, and greatly enhances sensitivity to the drug.

  18. Mutation or Loss of p53 Differentially Modifies TGFβ Action in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ó hAinmhire, Eoghainín; Quartuccio, Suzanne M.; Cheng, Whay; Ahmed, Roshan A.; King, Shelby M.; Burdette, Joanna E.

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological disease affecting women in the US. The Cancer Genome Atlas Network identified p53 mutations in 96% of high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas, demonstrating its critical role. Additionally, the Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGFβ) pathway is dysfunctional in various malignancies, including ovarian cancer. This study investigated how expression of wild-type, mutant, or the absence of p53 alters ovarian cancer cell response to TGFβ signaling, as well as the response of the ovarian surface epithelium and the fallopian tube epithelium to TGFβ. Only ovarian cancer cells expressing wild-type p53 were growth inhibited by TGFβ, while ovarian cancer cells that were mutant or null p53 were not. TGFβ induced migration in p53 null SKOV3 cells, which was not observed in SKOV3 cells with stable expression of mutant p53 R273H. Knockdown of wild-type p53 in the OVCA 420 ovarian cancer cells enhanced cell migration in response to TGFβ. Increased protein expression of DKK1 and TMEPAI, two pro-invasive genes with enhanced expression in late stage metastatic ovarian cancer, was observed in p53 knockdown and null cells, while cells stably expressing mutant p53 demonstrated lower DKK1 and TMEPAI induction. Expression of mutant p53 or loss of p53 permit continued proliferation of ovarian cancer cell lines in the presence of TGFβ; however, cells expressing mutant p53 exhibit reduced migration and decreased protein levels of DKK1 and TMEPAI. PMID:24586866

  19. Inactivation of p53 Is Sufficient to Induce Development of Pulmonary Hypertension in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Jacquin

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PA-SMCs in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH show similarities to cancer cells. Due to the growth-suppressive and pro-apoptotic effects of p53 and its inactivation in cancer, we hypothesized that the p53 pathway could be altered in PAH. We therefore explored the involvement of p53 in the monocrotaline (MCT rat model of pulmonary hypertension (PH and the pathophysiological consequences of p53 inactivation in response to animal treatment with pifithrin-α (PFT, an inhibitor of p53 activity.PH development was assessed by pulmonary arterial pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy and arterial wall thickness. The effect of MCT and PFT on lung p53 pathway expression was evaluated by western blot. Fourteen days of daily PFT treatment (2.2 mg/kg/day, similar to a single injection of MCT (60 mg/kg, induced PH and aggravated MCT-induced PH. In the first week after MCT administration and prior to PH development, p53, p21 and MDM2 protein levels were significantly reduced; whereas PFT administration effectively altered the protein level of p53 targets. Anti-apoptotic and pro-proliferative effects of PFT were revealed by TUNEL and MTT assays on cultured human PA-SMCs treated with 50 μM PFT.Pharmacological inactivation of p53 is sufficient to induce PH with a chronic treatment by PFT, an effect related to its anti-apoptotic and pro-proliferative properties. The p53 pathway was down-regulated during the first week in the rat MCT model. These in vivo experiments implicate the p53 pathway at the initiation stages of PH pathogenesis.

  20. The p53 target Wig-1 regulates p53 mRNA stability through an AU-rich element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilborg, Anna; Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Wilhelm, Margareta T

    2009-01-01

    The p53 target gene Wig-1 encodes a double-stranded-RNA-binding zinc finger protein. We show here that Wig-1 binds to p53 mRNA and stabilizes it through an AU-rich element (ARE) in the 3' UTR of the p53 mRNA. This effect is mirrored by enhanced p53 protein levels in both unstressed cells and cells...... exposed to p53-activating stress agents. Thus, the p53 target Wig-1 is a previously undescribed ARE-regulating protein that acts as a positive feedback regulator of p53, with implications both for the steady-state levels of p53 and for the p53 stress response. Our data reveal a previously undescribed link...... between the tumor suppressor p53 and posttranscriptional gene regulation via AREs in mRNA....

  1. P53 modulation of radiation induced G1 arrests and intrinsic radiation sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Su; Pardo, F.S.

    1995-01-01

    ionizing radiation in vitro, mock-transfected untransfected, and wild type p53 transfected REC reveal a dose dependent G1 arrest. Although all cell lines demonstrate a dose dependent G2 arrest, the extent of the arrests, and the distribution of cells in particular phases of the cell cycle, are cell-type dependent, and specific to the particular transfected population of cells. REC transfected with mutant p53 show no G1 arrest, but a significant G2 arrest. Such cell cycle alterations, particularly regulation of ''checkpoints,'' are critical determinants of cell survival following exposure to ionizing radiation in vitro

  2. p53 protein aggregation promotes platinum resistance in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang-Hartwich, Y; Soteras, M G; Lin, Z P; Holmberg, J; Sumi, N; Craveiro, V; Liang, M; Romanoff, E; Bingham, J; Garofalo, F; Alvero, A; Mor, G

    2015-07-01

    High-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC), the most lethal gynecological cancer, often leads to chemoresistant diseases. The p53 protein is a key transcriptional factor regulating cellular homeostasis. A majority of HGSOCs have inactive p53 because of genetic mutations. However, genetic mutation is not the only cause of p53 inactivation. The aggregation of p53 protein has been discovered in different types of cancers and may be responsible for impairing the normal transcriptional activation and pro-apoptotic functions of p53. We demonstrated that in a unique population of HGSOC cancer cells with cancer stem cell properties, p53 protein aggregation is associated with p53 inactivation and platinum resistance. When these cancer stem cells differentiated into their chemosensitive progeny, they lost tumor-initiating capacity and p53 aggregates. In addition to the association of p53 aggregation and chemoresistance in HGSOC cells, we further demonstrated that the overexpression of a p53-positive regulator, p14ARF, inhibited MDM2-mediated p53 degradation and led to the imbalance of p53 turnover that promoted the formation of p53 aggregates. With in vitro and in vivo models, we demonstrated that the inhibition of p14ARF could suppress p53 aggregation and sensitize cancer cells to platinum treatment. Moreover, by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry we discovered that the aggregated p53 may function uniquely by interacting with proteins that are critical for cancer cell survival and tumor progression. Our findings help us understand the poor chemoresponse of a subset of HGSOC patients and suggest p53 aggregation as a new marker for chemoresistance. Our findings also suggest that inhibiting p53 aggregation can reactivate p53 pro-apoptotic function. Therefore, p53 aggregation is a potential therapeutic target for reversing chemoresistance. This is paramount for improving ovarian cancer patients' responses to chemotherapy, and thus increasing their

  3. p53 transactivation and the impact of mutations, cofactors and small molecules using a simplified yeast-based screening system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Andreotti

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor, which is altered in most cancers, is a sequence-specific transcription factor that is able to modulate the expression of many target genes and influence a variety of cellular pathways. Inactivation of the p53 pathway in cancer frequently occurs through the expression of mutant p53 protein. In tumors that retain wild type p53, the pathway can be altered by upstream modulators, particularly the p53 negative regulators MDM2 and MDM4.Given the many factors that might influence p53 function, including expression levels, mutations, cofactor proteins and small molecules, we expanded our previously described yeast-based system to provide the opportunity for efficient investigation of their individual and combined impacts in a miniaturized format. The system integrates i variable expression of p53 proteins under the finely tunable GAL1,10 promoter, ii single copy, chromosomally located p53-responsive and control luminescence reporters, iii enhanced chemical uptake using modified ABC-transporters, iv small-volume formats for treatment and dual-luciferase assays, and v opportunities to co-express p53 with other cofactor proteins. This robust system can distinguish different levels of expression of WT and mutant p53 as well as interactions with MDM2 or 53BP1.We found that the small molecules Nutlin and RITA could both relieve the MDM2-dependent inhibition of WT p53 transactivation function, while only RITA could impact p53/53BP1 functional interactions. PRIMA-1 was ineffective in modifying the transactivation capacity of WT p53 and missense p53 mutations. This dual-luciferase assay can, therefore, provide a high-throughput assessment tool for investigating a matrix of factors that can influence the p53 network, including the effectiveness of newly developed small molecules, on WT and tumor-associated p53 mutants as well as interacting proteins.

  4. Nuclear inclusion bodies of mutant and wild-type p53 in cancer: a hallmark of p53 inactivation and proteostasis remodelling by p53 aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Frederik; Saiz Rubio, Mirian; Hompes, Daphne; Naus, Evelyne; De Baets, Greet; Langenberg, Tobias; Hipp, Mark S; Houben, Bert; Claes, Filip; Charbonneau, Sarah; Delgado Blanco, Javier; Plaisance, Stephane; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Ramkissoon, Lori; Simons, Colinda; van den Brandt, Piet; Weijenberg, Matty; Van England, Manon; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Amant, Frederic; D'Hoore, André; Ligon, Keith L; Sagaert, Xavier; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2017-05-01

    Although p53 protein aggregates have been observed in cancer cell lines and tumour tissue, their impact in cancer remains largely unknown. Here, we extensively screened for p53 aggregation phenotypes in tumour biopsies, and identified nuclear inclusion bodies (nIBs) of transcriptionally inactive mutant or wild-type p53 as the most frequent aggregation-like phenotype across six different cancer types. p53-positive nIBs co-stained with nuclear aggregation markers, and shared molecular hallmarks of nIBs commonly found in neurodegenerative disorders. In cell culture, tumour-associated stress was a strong inducer of p53 aggregation and nIB formation. This was most prominent for mutant p53, but could also be observed in wild-type p53 cell lines, for which nIB formation correlated with the loss of p53's transcriptional activity. Importantly, protein aggregation also fuelled the dysregulation of the proteostasis network in the tumour cell by inducing a hyperactivated, oncogenic heat-shock response, to which tumours are commonly addicted, and by overloading the proteasomal degradation system, an observation that was most pronounced for structurally destabilized mutant p53. Patients showing tumours with p53-positive nIBs suffered from a poor clinical outcome, similar to those with loss of p53 expression, and tumour biopsies showed a differential proteostatic expression profile associated with p53-positive nIBs. p53-positive nIBs therefore highlight a malignant state of the tumour that results from the interplay between (1) the functional inactivation of p53 through mutation and/or aggregation, and (2) microenvironmental stress, a combination that catalyses proteostatic dysregulation. This study highlights several unexpected clinical, biological and therapeutically unexplored parallels between cancer and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great

  5. Studies of association of variants near the HHEX, CDKN2A/B, and IGF2BP2 genes with type 2 diabetes and impaired insulin release in 10,705 Danish subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grarup, Niels; Rose, Chrisian S; Andersson, Ehm A

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to validate the type 2 diabetes susceptibility alleles identified in six recent genome-wide association studies in the HHEX/KIF11/IDE (rs1111875), CDKN2A/B (rs10811661), and IGF2BP2 (rs4402960) loci, as well as the intergenic rs9300039 variant. Furthermore, we aimed...

  6. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  7. Mutations in p53, p53 protein overexpression and breast cancer survival

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rössner ml., Pavel; Gammon, M. D.; Zhang, Y.J.; Terry, M. B.; Hibshoosh, H.; Memeo, L.; Mansukhani, M.; Long, CH.M.; Gabrowski, G.; Agrawal, M.; Kalra, T.S.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Neugut, A. I.; Santella, R. M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 9B (2009), s. 3847-3857 ISSN 1582-1838 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Breast cancer * p53 mutations * Survival Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2009

  8. cDNA sequencing improves the detection of P53 missense mutations in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szybka, Malgorzata; Kordek, Radzislaw; Zakrzewska, Magdalena; Rieske, Piotr; Pasz-Walczak, Grazyna; Kulczycka-Wojdala, Dominika; Zawlik, Izabela; Stawski, Robert; Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Liberski, Pawel P

    2009-01-01

    Recently published data showed discrepancies beteween P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing in glioblastomas. We hypothesised that similar discrepancies may be observed in other human cancers. To this end, we analyzed 23 colorectal cancers for P53 mutations and gene expression using both DNA and cDNA sequencing, real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. We found P53 gene mutations in 16 cases (15 missense and 1 nonsense). Two of the 15 cases with missense mutations showed alterations based only on cDNA, and not DNA sequencing. Moreover, in 6 of the 15 cases with a cDNA mutation those mutations were difficult to detect in the DNA sequencing, so the results of DNA analysis alone could be misinterpreted if the cDNA sequencing results had not also been available. In all those 15 cases, we observed a higher ratio of the mutated to the wild type template by cDNA analysis, but not by the DNA analysis. Interestingly, a similar overexpression of P53 mRNA was present in samples with and without P53 mutations. In terms of colorectal cancer, those discrepancies might be explained under three conditions: 1, overexpression of mutated P53 mRNA in cancer cells as compared with normal cells; 2, a higher content of cells without P53 mutation (normal cells and cells showing K-RAS and/or APC but not P53 mutation) in samples presenting P53 mutation; 3, heterozygous or hemizygous mutations of P53 gene. Additionally, for heterozygous mutations unknown mechanism(s) causing selective overproduction of mutated allele should also be considered. Our data offer new clues for studying discrepancy in P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing analysis

  9. Immunohistochemical evaluation of p53 expression and proliferative activity in children with Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Yesim; Ozer, Erdener; Lebe, Banu; Bekem, Ozlem; Buyukgebiz, Benal

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of p53 expression and proliferative activity of glandular epithelium and intestinal metaplasia in Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis of pediatric patients. The study included endoscopic gastric biopsies of 54 children with dyspeptic complaints. Immunohistochemistry was performed for evaluation of p53 expression and Ki-67 labeling index, an indicator of proliferative activity. Grading of H. pylori density, intestinal metaplasia and inflammatory cell infiltration were performed in histologic tissue sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Giemsa and Alcian-blue. Of 54 children, 35 (64%) were infected by H. pylori. Positive immunostaining for p53 was observed in 11 of 54 cases (20.4%). H. pylori infection was found in 10 (91%) of the p53-positive patients. There was a positive correlation between H. pylori density and Ki-67 labeling index in H. pylori infected children. H. pylori density, Ki-67 labeling index and inflammatory cell infiltration in the p53-positive group were significantly higher than in the p53-negative group. Although intestinal metaplasia was more common in H. pylori infected children (n = 11; 31.4%), there was no difference in the rate of intestinal metaplasia between the p53-positive and p53-negative groups. The present study shows that p53 mutations and higher proliferative activity of glandular epithelium may be related to H. pylori associated gastritis in children. Because p53 mutation does not appear to be associated with intestinal metaplasia, a precursor for gastric cancer in adults, we think that H.pylori associated p53 alterations do not initiate and promote gastric cancer that may occur in adulthood.

  10. Interactions of chromatin context, binding site sequence content, and sequence evolution in stress-induced p53 occupancy and transactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular stresses activate the tumor suppressor p53 protein leading to selective binding to DNA response elements (REs and gene transactivation from a large pool of potential p53 REs (p53REs. To elucidate how p53RE sequences and local chromatin context interact to affect p53 binding and gene transactivation, we mapped genome-wide binding localizations of p53 and H3K4me3 in untreated and doxorubicin (DXR-treated human lymphoblastoid cells. We examined the relationships among p53 occupancy, gene expression, H3K4me3, chromatin accessibility (DNase 1 hypersensitivity, DHS, ENCODE chromatin states, p53RE sequence, and evolutionary conservation. We observed that the inducible expression of p53-regulated genes was associated with the steady-state chromatin status of the cell. Most highly inducible p53-regulated genes were suppressed at baseline and marked by repressive histone modifications or displayed CTCF binding. Comparison of p53RE sequences residing in different chromatin contexts demonstrated that weaker p53REs resided in open promoters, while stronger p53REs were located within enhancers and repressed chromatin. p53 occupancy was strongly correlated with similarity of the target DNA sequences to the p53RE consensus, but surprisingly, inversely correlated with pre-existing nucleosome accessibility (DHS and evolutionary conservation at the p53RE. Occupancy by p53 of REs that overlapped transposable element (TE repeats was significantly higher (p<10-7 and correlated with stronger p53RE sequences (p<10-110 relative to nonTE-associated p53REs, particularly for MLT1H, LTR10B, and Mer61 TEs. However, binding at these elements was generally not associated with transactivation of adjacent genes. Occupied p53REs located in L2-like TEs were unique in displaying highly negative PhyloP scores (predicted fast-evolving and being associated with altered H3K4me3 and DHS levels. These results underscore the systematic interaction between chromatin status and p53

  11. Effective molecular targeting of CDK4/6 and IGF-1R in a rare FUS-ERG fusion CDKN2A-deletion doxorubicin-resistant Ewing's sarcoma patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude-mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Singh, Arun S; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Dry, Sarah M; Li, Yunfeng; James, Aaron W; Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; DeLong, Jonathan C; Zhang, Yong; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Russell, Tara; Eckardt, Mark A; Yanagawa, Jane; Federman, Noah; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Eilber, Fritz C; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-07-26

    Ewing's sarcoma is a rare and aggressive malignancy. In the present study, tumor from a patient with a Ewing's sarcoma with cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/B (CDKN2A/B) loss and FUS-ERG fusion was implanted in the right chest wall of nude mice to establish a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. The aim of the present study was to determine efficacy of cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) inhibitors on the Ewing's sarcoma PDOX. The PDOX models were randomized into the following groups when tumor volume reached 50 mm3: G1, untreated control; G2, doxorubicin (DOX) (intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, weekly, for 2 weeks); G3, CDK4/6 inhibitor (palbociclib, PD0332991, per oral (p.o.), daily, for 14 days); G4, IGF-1R inhibitor (linsitinib, OSI-906, p.o., daily, for 14 days). Tumor growth was significantly suppressed both in G3 (palbociclib) and in G4 (linsitinib) compared to G1 (untreated control) at all measured time points. In contrast, DOX did not inhibit tumor growth at any time point, which is consistent with the failure of DOX to control tumor growth in the patient. The results of the present study demonstrate the power of the PDOX model to identify effective targeted molecular therapy of a recalcitrant DOX-resistant Ewing's sarcoma with specific genetic alterations. The results of this study suggest the potential of PDOX models for individually-tailored, effective targeted therapy for recalcitrant cancer.

  12. Effective molecular targeting of CDK4/6 and IGF-1R in a rare FUS-ERG fusion CDKN2A-deletion doxorubicin-resistant Ewing's sarcoma patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude-mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Singh, Arun S.; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Dry, Sarah M.; Li, Yunfeng; James, Aaron W.; Igarashi, Kentaro; Kawaguchi, Kei; DeLong, Jonathan C.; Zhang, Yong; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Russell, Tara; Eckardt, Mark A.; Yanagawa, Jane; Federman, Noah; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Eilber, Fritz C.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is a rare and aggressive malignancy. In the present study, tumor from a patient with a Ewing's sarcoma with cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/B (CDKN2A/B) loss and FUS-ERG fusion was implanted in the right chest wall of nude mice to establish a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. The aim of the present study was to determine efficacy of cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) inhibitors on the Ewing's sarcoma PDOX. The PDOX models were randomized into the following groups when tumor volume reached 50 mm3: G1, untreated control; G2, doxorubicin (DOX) (intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, weekly, for 2 weeks); G3, CDK4/6 inhibitor (palbociclib, PD0332991, per oral (p.o.), daily, for 14 days); G4, IGF-1R inhibitor (linsitinib, OSI-906, p.o., daily, for 14 days). Tumor growth was significantly suppressed both in G3 (palbociclib) and in G4 (linsitinib) compared to G1 (untreated control) at all measured time points. In contrast, DOX did not inhibit tumor growth at any time point, which is consistent with the failure of DOX to control tumor growth in the patient. The results of the present study demonstrate the power of the PDOX model to identify effective targeted molecular therapy of a recalcitrant DOX-resistant Ewing's sarcoma with specific genetic alterations. The results of this study suggest the potential of PDOX models for individually-tailored, effective targeted therapy for recalcitrant cancer. PMID:27286459

  13. SV40 large T-p53 complex: evidence for the presence of two immunologically distinct forms of p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milner, J.; Gamble, J.

    1985-01-01

    The transforming protein of SV40 is the large T antigen. Large T binds a cellular protein, p53, which is potentially oncogenic by virtue of its functional involvement in the control of cell proliferation. This raises the possibility that p53 may mediate, in part, the transforming function of SV40 large T. Two immunologically distinct forms of p53 have been identified in normal cells: the forms are cell-cycle dependent, one being restricted to nondividing cells (p53-Go) and the second to dividing cells (p53-G divided by). The authors have now dissociated and probed the multimeric complex of SV40 large T-p53 for the presence of immunologically distinct forms of p53. Here they present evidence for the presence of p53-Go and p53-G divided by complexed with SV40 large T

  14. Expression of TP53 isoforms p53β or p53γ enhances chemosensitivity in TP53(null cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Silden

    Full Text Available The carboxy-terminal truncated p53 alternative spliced isoforms, p53β and p53γ, are expressed at disparate levels in cancer and are suggested to influence treatment response and therapy outcome. However, their functional role in cancer remains to be elucidated. We investigated their individual functionality in the p53(null background of cell lines H1299 and SAOS-2 by stable retroviral transduction or transient transfection. Expression status of p53β and p53γ protein was found to correlate with increased response to camptothecin and doxorubicin chemotherapy. Decreased DNA synthesis and clonogenicity in p53β and p53γ congenic H1299 was accompanied by increased p21((CIP1/WAF1, Bax and Mdm2 proteins. Chemotherapy induced p53 isoform degradation, most prominent for p53γ. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib substantially increased basal p53γ protein level, while the level of p53β protein was unaffected. Treatment with dicoumarol, a putative blocker of the proteasome-related NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductase NQO1, effectively attenuated basal p53γ protein level in spite of bortezomib treatment. Although in vitro proliferation and clonogenicity assays indicated a weak suppressive effect by p53β and p53γ expression, studies of in vivo subcutaneous H1299 tumor growth demonstrated a significantly increased growth by expression of either p53 isoforms. This study suggests that p53β and p53γ share functionality in chemosensitizing and tumor growth enhancement but comprise distinct regulation at the protein level.

  15. The p53-Deficient Mouse as a Breast Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donehower, Laurence

    1998-01-01

    .... In order to better understand the role of p53 mutation and loss in breast cancer progression, we have developed a mouse model which is genetically programmed to develop mammary cancer in the presence and absence of p53...

  16. The p53-Deficient Mouse as a Breast Cancer Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donehower, Lawrence

    1997-01-01

    .... In order to better understand the role of p53 mutation and loss in breast cancer progression, we have developed a mouse model which is genetically programmed to develop mammary cancer in the presence and absence of p53...

  17. Restriction of human herpesvirus 6B replication by p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øster, Bodil; Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Bundgaard, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) induces significant accumulation of p53 in both the nucleus and cytoplasm during infection. Activation of p53 by DNA damage is known to induce either growth arrest or apoptosis; nevertheless, HHV-6B-infected cells are arrested in their cell cycle independently of p53......, and only a minor fraction of the infected cells undergoes apoptosis. Using pifithrin-alpha, a p53 inhibitor, and p53-null cells, this study showed that infected epithelial cells accumulated viral transcripts and proteins to a significantly higher degree in the absence of active p53. Moreover, HHV-6B......-induced cytopathic effects were greatly enhanced in the absence of p53. This suggests that, in epithelial cells, some of the functions of p53 leading to cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis are restrained by HHV-6B infection, whereas other cellular defences, causing inhibition of virus transcription, are partially...

  18. p53 mutation is infrequent in clear cell carcinoma of the ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, E S; Lai, C R; Hsieh, Y T; Chen, J T; Lin, A J; Hung, M H; Liu, F S

    2001-02-01

    p53 gene alteration has been extensively studied in epithelial ovarian cancer. However, its occurrence in clear cell carcinoma, an infrequent histologic subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer, is rarely reported. The aim of this study is to determine the status of p53 gene alteration in this distinct type of ovarian carcinoma. Paraffin blocks of tumors from 38 patients with primary or recurrent ovarian clear cell carcinoma were studied for p53 alteration. All these tumors were subjected to immunohistochemical and molecular analysis. Two monoclonal antibodies (DO-7 and PAb 1801) were used for immunohistochemical staining. Genomic DNAs extracted from paraffin blocks of the 38 tumors were subscribed for a nested polymerase chain reaction/single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR/SSCP) analysis. Tumors showing band shift on SSCP were further prepared for DNA sequencing to determine the site of mutation. Overexpression of p53 was observed in only one stage III clear cell carcinoma. However, focal positive p53 staining was noted in another five tumors. Of the six tumors showing positive immunohistochemistry, p53 alterations were noted in four tumors. Three tumors revealed a missense point mutation: two were in exon 7 (TCT(227) --> TTT and GGC(245) --> AGC) and one was in exon 5 (CGC(156) --> CAC). Another tumor revealed a 12-bp deletion in two possible ways: it might involve the last four codons at the 3' end of exon 4 (nucleotides 12,288-12,299) or it might cross over the splice junction between exon 4 and intron 4 (nucleotides 12,290-12,301). The former would result in a predicted protein product of 389 amino acids whereas the latter would cause a frameshift in the gene sequence and would result in a truncated protein. Mutations in p53 appear to be much less frequent in clear cell carcinoma than in other histologic types of epithelial ovarian cancer. We suggest that p53 alterations may not play an important role in the development of clear cell carcinoma.

  19. Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    bioreducible polymer-coated adenovirus (CD- PEG-RGD) The delivery method that provides the highest expression of the gene and highest cell-killing activity...difficult, due to the genel transfection inhibition by paclitaxel. In order to overcome these issues, a mitochondrially targeted p53 (p53-MTS) was used, and...p53, modified p53, tumor suppressor, high grade serous carcinoma, combination therapy, carboplatin, paclitaxel, polymeric drug delivery , polymer

  20. Mutual interactions between P53 and growth factors in cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asschert, JGW; Vellenga, E; De Jong, S; De Vries, EGE

    1998-01-01

    The function of p53 armour suppressor protein is determined by various intrinsic properties of the protein. The effect of p53 DNA-binding, and platein-protein interactions are determined by the conformation of the protein. Thus p53 fulfils its role in cell cycle control and the onset of apoptotic

  1. p53 specific (auto)immunity in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauwen, Marjolein Monique

    2008-01-01

    Self-tolerance to p53 is a major potential limitation for the activation of the endogenous T-cell repertoire. So far, p53 specific CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell immunity has been described in cancer patients and healthy individuals. However, the restrictions of tolerance on the recruitment of p53 specific T

  2. Clinical applications of detecting dysfunctional p53 tumor suppressor protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, I. O.; Hruban, R. H.; Offerhaus, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    The p53 gene encodes for a protein, p53, which plays a critical role in controlling the cell cycle, in DNA repair and in programmed cell death (apoptosis). p53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human neoplasms and a variety of techniques have been developed to detect these mutations.

  3. The role of the tumor suppressor p53 in spermatogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, T. L.; Roepers-Gajadien, H. L.; Gademan, I. S.; van Buul, P. P.; Gil-Gomez, G.; Rutgers, D. H.; de rooij, D. G.

    1998-01-01

    The p53 protein appeared to be involved in both spermatogonial cell proliferation and radiation response. During normal spermatogenesis in the mouse, spermatogonia do not express p53, as analyzed by immunohistochemistry. However, after a dose of 4 Gy of X-rays, a distinct p53 staining was present in

  4. The p53-MDM2 network: from oscillations to apoptosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    activation. These stresses promote tumour formation, often culminating in cancer. The chief role of p53 is to guard cells against malignant transformation. .... is found to be digital in the form of a discrete number of p53 and MDM2 protein pulses. As already mentioned, the p53-MDM2 network can be described in terms of a ...

  5. P53 Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer Cells to Hesperidin through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, hesperidin activates the proapoptotic (Bax) and cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor (p21) in only HCT116 p53+/+ cells. Interestingly, using p53 transcriptional inhibitor (pifithrin-), hesperidin-inducing Bax and p21 upregulation in only HCT116 p53+/+ cells was reduced by cotreatment with pifithrin- without ...

  6. The Inherited p53 Mutation in the Brazilian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achatz, Maria Isabel; Zambetti, Gerard P

    2016-12-01

    A common criticism of studying rare diseases is the often-limited relevance of the findings to human health. Here, we review ∼15 years of research into an unusual germline TP53 mutation (p.R337H) that began with its detection in children with adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC), a remarkably rare childhood cancer that is associated with poor prognosis. We have come to learn that the p.R337H mutation exists at a very high frequency in Southern and Southeastern Brazil, occurring in one of 375 individuals within a total population of ∼100 million. Moreover, it has been determined that carriers of this founder mutation display variable tumor susceptibility, ranging from isolated cases of pediatric ACC to Li-Fraumeni or Li-Fraumeni-like (LFL) syndromes, thus representing a significant medical issue for this country. Studying the biochemical and molecular consequences of this mutation on p53 tumor-suppressor activity, as well as the putative additional genetic alterations that cooperate with this mutation, is advancing our understanding of how p53 functions in tumor suppression in general. These studies, which originated with a rare childhood tumor, are providing important information for guiding genetic counselors and physicians in treating their patients and are already providing clinical benefit. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  7. Relationship of p53 Genotype to Second-look Recurrence and Survival in Ovarian Epithelial Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbour-shakir; Kounelis; Papadaki; Raptis; Edwards; Kelley; Price; Bakker; Swalsky; Przygodzki; Finkelstein

    1996-06-01

    Background: Clinical stage at presentation and tumor status at second-look laparotomy are currently the best predictors of patient survival in epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). Methods and Results: To evaluate the predictive value of genetic analysis, the presence and type of p53 mutation (p53 genotype) was determined in 76 patients treated for EOC between 1987 and 1992 and subjected to second-look laparotomy following initial treatment. Mutational analysis of p53 was performed retrospectively by means of topographic genotyping (TG), using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue of the primary and recurrent tumor. In TG, minute tissue samples were dissected from unstained histologic sections, amplified for p53 exons 5-8 with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and then direct sequenced. The p53 genotype was correlated with tumor stage, histologic grade and type, tumor status at second look, and survival at 3 and 5 years. Mutational change involving p53 exons 5-8 was found in 41 of 76 tumors (54%), consisting of 29 cases manifesting missense alterations and 12 cases having truncations (deletions, insertions, or stop codons). Tumor mutational change for each patient was strictly limited to a single type, being identical in all recurrences of an individual primary cancer. Mutations of p53 were distributed over exons 5-8, with certain "hot spots" being evident (codons 220, 245, and 273). Mutational change was present in all stages of primary EOC, but was relatively more frequent in tumors of advanced stage (III and IV). Epithelial ovarian carcinoma manifesting p53 mutational damage was significantly more likely to show recurrence at second-look laparotomy (P p53 genotype was independent of stage at presentation, histologic grade, or histopathologic type. Conclusions: Genotyping of p53 provides useful information on tumor aggressiveness and is an informative predictive marker of biologic tumor behavior, treatment response, and survival in EOC.

  8. Tobacco, alcohol, and p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, Mary Beth; Neugut, Alfred I; Mansukhani, Mahesh; Waye, Jerome; Harpaz, Noam; Hibshoosh, Hanina

    2003-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is commonly mutated in colorectal cancer. While the effect of p53 mutations on colorectal cancer prognosis has been heavily studied, less is known about how epidemiologic risk factors relate to p53 status, particularly in early colorectal neoplasia prior to clinically invasive colorectal cancer (including adenomas, carcinoma in situ (CIS), and intramucosal carcinoma). We examined p53 status, as measured by protein overexpression, in 157 cases with early colorectal neoplasia selected from three New York City colonoscopy clinics. After collecting paraffin-embedded tissue blocks, immunohistochemistry was performed using an anti-p53 monoclonal mouse IgG 2 a [BP53-12-1] antibody. We analyzed whether p53 status was different for risk factors for colorectal neoplasia relative to a polyp-free control group (n = 508). p53 overexpression was found in 10.3%, 21.7%, and 34.9%, of adenomatous polyps, CIS, and intramucosal cases, respectively. Over 90% of the tumors with p53 overexpression were located in the distal colon and rectum. Heavy cigarette smoking (30+ years) was associated with cases not overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1–2.9) but not with those cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.4–2.6). Heavy beer consumption (8+ bottles per week) was associated with cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 4.0, 95% CI = 1.3–12.0) but not with cases without p53 overexpression (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 0.7–3.7). Our findings that p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia may be positively associated with alcohol intake and inversely associated with cigarette smoking are consistent with those of several studies of p53 expression and invasive cancer, and suggest that there may be relationships of smoking and alcohol with p53 early in the adenoma to carcinoma sequence

  9. Immunohistochemical detection of p53 protein in ameloblastoma types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Sissy, N A

    1999-05-01

    Overexpression of p53 protein in unicystic ameloblastoma (uAB) is denser than in the conventional ameloblastoma (cAB) type, indicating increased wild type p53--suppressing the growth potential of uAB and denoting the early event of neoplastic transformation, probably of a previous odontogenic cyst. Overexpression of p53 in borderline cAB and malignant ameloblastoma (mAB) types might reflect a mutational p53 protein playing an oncogenic role, promoting tumour growth. Overexpression of p53 protein could be a valid screening method for predicting underlying malignant genetic changes in AB types, through increased frequency of immunoreactive cells or increased staining density.

  10. Human neuroblastoma cells with acquired resistance to the p53 activator RITA retain functional p53 and sensitivity to other p53 activating agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michaelis, M.; Rothweiler, F.; Agha, B.; Barth, S.; Voges, Y.; Loeschmann, N.; von Deimling, A.; Breitling, R.; Doerr, H. Wilhelm; Roedel, F.; Speidel, D.; Cinatl, J.; Cinatl Jr., J.; Stephanou, A.

    Adaptation of wild-type p53 expressing UKF-NB-3 cancer cells to the murine double minute 2 inhibitor nutlin-3 causes de novo p53 mutations at high frequency (13/20) and multi-drug resistance. Here, we show that the same cells respond very differently when adapted to RITA, a drug that, like nutlin-3,

  11. p53 Over-expression and p53 mutations in colon carcinomas: Relation to dietary risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuil, D.W.; Kampman, E.; Kraats, A.A. van; Balder, H.F.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, P. van 't

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that dietary factors may differently affect p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways to colon cancer. Results of such studies may depend on the method used to assess p53 status. This case-control study of 185 colon-cancer cases and 259 controls examines this

  12. A p53-bound enhancer region controls a long intergenic noncoding RNA required for p53 stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, C A; Léveillé, N; Rooijers, K; Wijchers, P J; Geeven, G; Tal, A; Melo, S A; de Laat, W; Agami, R

    2016-08-18

    Genome-wide chromatin studies identified the tumor suppressor p53 as both a promoter and an enhancer-binding transcription factor. As an enhancer factor, p53 can induce local production of enhancer RNAs, as well as transcriptional activation of distal neighboring genes. Beyond the regulation of protein-coding genes, p53 has the capacity to regulate long intergenic noncoding RNA molecules (lincRNAs); however, their importance to the p53 tumor suppressive function remains poorly characterized. Here, we identified and characterized a novel p53-bound intronic enhancer that controls the expression of its host, the lincRNA00475 (linc-475). We demonstrate the requirement of linc-475 for the proper induction of a p53-dependent cell cycle inhibitory response. We further confirm the functional importance of linc-475 in the maintenance of CDKN1A/p21 levels, a cell cycle inhibitor and a major p53 target gene, following p53 activation. Interestingly, loss of linc-475 reduced the binding of both p53 and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) to the promoter of p21, attenuating its transcription rate following p53 activation. Altogether, our data suggest a direct role of p53-bound enhancer domains in the activation of lincRNAs required for an efficient p53 transcriptional response.

  13. Chemical Variations on the p53 Reactivation Theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. A. Ribeiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Among the tumor suppressor genes, p53 is one of the most studied. It is widely regarded as the “guardian of the genome”, playing a major role in carcinogenesis. In fact, direct inactivation of the TP53 gene occurs in more than 50% of malignancies, and in tumors that retain wild-type p53 status, its function is usually inactivated by overexpression of negative regulators (e.g., MDM2 and MDMX. Hence, restoring p53 function in cancer cells represents a valuable anticancer approach. In this review, we will present an updated overview of the most relevant small molecules developed to restore p53 function in cancer cells through inhibition of the p53-MDMs interaction, or direct targeting of wild-type p53 or mutated p53. In addition, optimization approaches used for the development of small molecules that have entered clinical trials will be presented.

  14. Mutant p53 regulates ovarian cancer transformed phenotypes through autocrine matrix deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanicki, Marcin P; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Iavarone, Claudia; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Muranen, Taru; Novak, Marián; Ince, Tan A; Drapkin, Ronny; Brugge, Joan S

    2016-07-07

    High-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGS-OvCa) harbors p53 mutations and can originate from the epithelial cell compartment of the fallopian tube fimbriae. From this site, neoplastic cells detach, survive in the peritoneal cavity, and form cellular clusters that intercalate into the mesothelium to form ovarian and peritoneal masses. To examine the contribution of mutant p53 to phenotypic alterations associated with HGS-OvCA, we developed live-cell microscopy assays that recapitulate these early events in cultured fallopian tube nonciliated epithelial (FNE) cells. Expression of stabilizing mutant variants of p53, but not depletion of endogenous wild-type p53, in FNE cells promoted survival and cell-cell aggregation under conditions of cell detachment, leading to the formation of cell clusters with mesothelium-intercalation capacity. Mutant p53 R175H -induced phenotypes were dependent on fibronectin production, α5β1 fibronectin receptor engagement, and TWIST1 expression. These results indicate that FNE cells expressing stabilizing p53 mutants acquire anchorage independence and subsequent mesothelial intercalation capacity through a mechanism involving mesenchymal transition and matrix production. These findings provide important new insights into activities of mutant p53 in the cells of origin of HGS-OvCa.

  15. Immunohistochemical study of p53, pRb, p16 in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zo, Jae Ill; Zo, Kyung Ja; Park, Jong Ho; Kim, Mi Hee

    1998-01-01

    To confirm the expression of molecular genetic alterations of p53, pRb, p16 in esophageal cancer and to investigate the expression of p53, pRb, p16 in esophageal cancer according to the pathologic steps of carcinogenesis, immuno-histochemistry was performed in 15 resected esophageal cancer specimens with multiple separated lesions after pathologic mapping. The accumulation of mutant p53 was observed in 60 % of dysplasia and 47 % of invasive cancer, while pRb was not detected in 91 % of dysplasia and 72.7 % of invasive cancer. But p16 was not observed in 0 % in dysplasia and 7 % of invasive cancer. But p16 was not observed in 0 % in dysplasia and 28.6 % in invasive cancer. There was no simultaneous negative pRb and p16 expression. There was no relations between p53 and p16, pRb. As a results, the expression of p53, pRb, p16 was co-related well with molecular genetic changes and inactivation of p53, pRb, p16 was co-related well with molecular genetic changes and inactivation of p53 and pRb was common and early event in esophageal carcinogenesis in Korea, but inactivation of p16 was a infrequent change. (author). 17 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  16. The role of the 5' terminal region of p53 mRNA in the p53 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatkowska, Agata; Zydowicz, Paulina; Sroka, Joanna; Ciesiołka, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor protein is one of the major factors responsible for cell cycle regulation and protection against cancer development. This is why it is often referred to as "the guardian of the genome". On the other hand, mutations in the p53 gene are connected with more than 50% of tumours of various types. The thirty-six years of extensive research on the p53 gene and its protein products have shown how sophisticated the p53-based cell system control is. An additional level of complexity of the p53 research is connected with at least twelve p53 isoforms which have been identified in the cell. Importantly, disturbance of the p53 isoforms' expression seems to play a key role in tumorigenesis, cell differentiation and cell response to pathogenic bacteria, and RNA and DNA viruses. Expression of various p53 isoforms results from the usage of different transcription promoters, alternative splicing events and translation initiation from alternative AUG codons. The importance of the 5'-terminal regions of different p53 mRNA transcripts in the multi-level regulation of the p53 gene has recently been documented. In this review we focus on the structural features of these regions and their specific role in the p53 translation initiation process.

  17. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bressy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virus (OV therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53 or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73 were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  18. Mitofusin-2 is a novel direct target of p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Weilin; Cheng, Xiaofei; Lu, Jianju; Wei, Jianfeng [Key Lab of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Key Lab of Organ Transplantation, Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China); Fu, Guanghou [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhu, Feng; Jia, Changku; Zhou, Lin; Xie, Haiyang [Key Lab of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Key Lab of Organ Transplantation, Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China); Zheng, Shusen, E-mail: shusenzheng@zju.edu.cn [Key Lab of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Key Lab of Organ Transplantation, Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China)

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Mfn2 is a novel target gene of p53. {yields} Mfn2 mRNA and protein levels can be up-regulated in a p53-dependent manner. {yields} Mfn2 promoter activity can be elevated by the p53 protein. {yields} P53 protein binds the Mfn2 promoter directly both in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: The tumor suppressor p53 modulates transcription of a number of target genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, and other important cellular responses. Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2) is a novel suppressor of cell proliferation that may also exert apoptotic effects via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Through bioinformatics analysis, we identified a p53 binding site in the Mfn2 promoter. Consistent with this, we showed that the p53 protein binds the Mfn2 promoter directly both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, we found that Mfn2 mRNA and protein levels are up-regulated in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, luciferase assays revealed that the activity of the wild-type Mfn2 promoter, but not a mutated version of the promoter, was up-regulated by p53. These results indicate that Mfn2 is a novel p53-inducible target gene, which provides insight into the regulation of Mfn2 and its associated activities in the inhibition of cell proliferation, promotion of apoptosis, and modulation of tumor suppression.

  19. Targeting the p53 Pathway in Ewing Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilsen, Paul M.; Pishas, Kathleen I.; Callen, David F.; Thomas, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor plays a pivotal role in the prevention of oncogenic transformation. Cancers frequently evade the potent antitumour surveillance mechanisms of p53 through mutation of the TP53 gene, with approximately 50% of all human malignancies expressing dysfunctional, mutated p53 proteins. Interestingly, genetic lesions in the TP53 gene are only observed in 10% of Ewing Sarcomas, with the majority of these sarcomas expressing a functional wild-type p53. In addition, the p53 downstream signaling pathways and DNA-damage cell cycle checkpoints remain functionally intact in these sarcomas. This paper summarizes recent insights into the functional capabilities and regulation of p53 in Ewing Sarcoma, with a particular focus on the cross-talk between p53 and the EWS-FLI1 gene rearrangement frequently associated with this disease. The development of several activators of p53 is discussed, with recent evidence demonstrating the potential of small molecule p53 activators as a promising systemic therapeutic approach for the treatment of Ewing Sarcomas with wild-type p53. PMID:21197471

  20. p53 at the endoplasmic reticulum regulates apoptosis in a Ca2+-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Carlotta; Bonora, Massimo; Sorrentino, Giovanni; Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Suski, Jan M.; Galindo Ramirez, Fabian; Rizzuto, Rosario; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Zito, Ester; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Wieckowski, Mariusz R.; Mammano, Fabio; Del Sal, Giannino; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a key protein in preventing cell transformation and tumor progression. Activated by a variety of stimuli, p53 regulates cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Along with its well-documented transcriptional control over cell-death programs within the nucleus, p53 exerts crucial although still poorly understood functions in the cytoplasm, directly modulating the apoptotic response at the mitochondrial level. Calcium (Ca2+) transfer between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria represents a critical signal in the induction of apoptosis. However, the mechanism controlling this flux in response to stress stimuli remains largely unknown. Here we show that, in the cytoplasm, WT p53 localizes at the ER and at specialized contact domains between the ER and mitochondria (mitochondria-associated membranes). We demonstrate that, upon stress stimuli, WT p53 accumulates at these sites and modulates Ca2+ homeostasis. Mechanistically, upon activation, WT p53 directly binds to the sarco/ER Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) pump at the ER, changing its oxidative state and thus leading to an increased Ca2+ load, followed by an enhanced transfer to mitochondria. The consequent mitochondrial Ca2+ overload causes in turn alterations in the morphology of this organelle and induction of apoptosis. Pharmacological inactivation of WT p53 or naturally occurring p53 missense mutants inhibits SERCA pump activity at the ER, leading to a reduction of the Ca2+ signaling from the ER to mitochondria. These findings define a critical nonnuclear function of p53 in regulating Ca2+ signal-dependent apoptosis. PMID:25624484

  1. Prima-1 induces apoptosis in bladder cancer cell lines by activating p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila B. Piantino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Bladder cancer represents 3% of all carcinomas in the Brazilian population and ranks second in incidence among urological tumors, after prostate cancer. The loss of p53 function is the main genetic alteration related to the development of high-grade muscle-invasive disease. Prima-1 is a small molecule that restores tumor suppressor function to mutant p53 and induces cancer cell death in various cancer types. Our aim was to investigate the ability of Prima-1 to induce apoptosis after DNA damage in bladder cancer cell lines. METHOD: The therapeutic effect of Prima-1 was studied in two bladder cancer cell lines: T24, which is characterized by a p53 mutation, and RT4, which is the wild-type for the p53 gene. Morphological features of apoptosis induced by p53, including mitochondrial membrane potential changes and the expression of thirteen genes involved in apoptosis, were assessed by microscopic observation and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. RESULTS: Prima-1 was able to reactivate p53 function in the T24 (p53 mt bladder cancer cell line and promote apoptosis via the induction of Bax and Puma expression, activation of the caspase cascade and disruption of the mitochondrial membrane in a BAK-independent manner. CONCLUSION: Prima-1 is able to restore the transcriptional activity of p53. Experimental studies in vivo may be conducted to test this molecule as a new therapeutic agent for urothelial carcinomas of the bladder, which characteristically harbor p53 mutations.

  2. Induction of ovarian leiomyosarcomas in mice by conditional inactivation of Brca1 and p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget A Quinn

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately one out of every ten cases of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC is inherited. The majority of inherited cases of EOC result from mutations in the breast cancer associated gene 1 (BRCA1. In addition to mutation of BRCA1, mutation of the p53 gene is often found in patients with inherited breast and ovarian cancer syndrome.We investigated the role of loss of function of BRCA1 and p53 in ovarian cancer development using mouse models with conditionally expressed alleles of Brca1 and/or p53. Our results show that ovary-specific Cre-recombinase-mediated conditional inactivation of both Brca1(LoxP/LoxP and p53(LoxP/LoxP resulted in ovarian or reproductive tract tumor formation in 54% of mice, whereas conditional inactivation of either allele alone infrequently resulted in tumors (< or =5% of mice. In mice with conditionally inactivated Brca1(LoxP/LoxP and p53(LoxP/LoxP, ovarian tumors arose after long latency with the majority exhibiting histological features consistent with high grade leiomyosarcomas lacking expression of epithelial, follicular or lymphocyte markers. In addition, tumors with conditional inactivation of both Brca1(LoxP/LoxP and p53(LoxP/LoxP exhibited greater genomic instability compared to an ovarian tumor with inactivation of only p53(LoxP/LoxP.Although conditional inactivation of both Brca1 and p53 results in ovarian tumorigenesis, our results suggest that additional genetic alterations or alternative methods for targeting epithelial cells of the ovary or fallopian tube for conditional inactivation of Brca1 and p53 are required for the development of a mouse model of Brca1-associated inherited EOC.

  3. P53 family members modulate the expression of PRODH, but not PRODH2, via intronic p53 response elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Raimondi

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p53 was previously shown to markedly up-regulate the expression of the PRODH gene, encoding the proline dehydrogenase (PRODH enzyme, which catalyzes the first step in proline degradation. Also PRODH2, which degrades 4-hydroxy-L-proline, a product of protein (e.g. collagen catabolism, was recently described as a p53 target. Here, we confirmed p53-dependent induction of endogenous PRODH in response to genotoxic damage in cell lines of different histological origin. We established that over-expression of TAp73β or TAp63β is sufficient to induce PRODH expression in p53-null cells and that PRODH expression parallels the modulation of endogenous p73 by genotoxic drugs in several cell lines. The p53, p63, and p73-dependent transcriptional activation was linked to specific intronic response elements (REs, among those predicted by bioinformatics tools and experimentally validated by a yeast-based transactivation assay. p53 occupancy measurements were validated in HCT116 and MCF7 human cell lines. Conversely, PRODH2 was not responsive to p63 nor p73 and, at best, could be considered a weak p53 target. In fact, minimal levels of PRODH2 transcript induction by genotoxic stress was observed exclusively in one of four p53 wild-type cell lines tested. Consistently, all predicted p53 REs in PRODH2 were poor matches to the p53 RE consensus and showed very weak responsiveness, only to p53, in the functional assay. Taken together, our results highlight that PRODH, but not PRODH2, expression is under the control of p53 family members, specifically p53 and p73. This supports a deeper link between proteins of the p53-family and metabolic pathways, as PRODH modulates the balance of proline and glutamate levels and those of their derivative alpha-keto-glutarate (α-KG under normal and pathological (tumor conditions.

  4. Epigenetic changes in the CDKN2A locus are associated with differential expression of P16INK4A and P14ARF in HPV-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlecht, Nicolas F; Ben-Dayan, Miriam; Anayannis, Nicole; Lleras, Roberto A; Thomas, Carlos; Wang, Yanhua; Smith, Richard V; Burk, Robert D; Harris, Thomas M; Childs, Geoffrey; Ow, Thomas J; Prystowsky, Michael B; Belbin, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is recognized as a distinct disease entity associated with improved survival. DNA hypermethylation profiles differ significantly by HPV status suggesting that a specific subset of methylated CpG loci could give mechanistic insight into HPV-driven OPSCC. We analyzed genome-wide DNA methylation of primary tumor samples and adjacent normal mucosa from 46 OPSCC patients undergoing treatment at Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY using the Illumina HumanMethylation27 beadchip. For each matched tissue set, we measured differentially methylated CpG loci using a change in methylation level (M value). From these analyses, we identified a 22 CpG loci panel for HPV+ OPSCC that included four CDKN2A loci downstream of the p16(INK4A) and p14(ARF) transcription start sites. This panel was significantly associated with overall HPV detection (P < 0.05; ROC area under the curve = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.91–1.0) similar to the subset of four CDKN2A-specific CpG loci (0.90, 95% CI: 0.82–0.99) with equivalence to the full 22 CpG panel. DNA hypermethylation correlated with a significant increase in alternative open reading frame (ARF) expression in HPV+ OPSCC primary tumors, but not to the other transcript variant encoded by the CDKN2A locus. Overall, this study provides evidence of epigenetic changes to the downstream region of the CDKN2A locus in HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer that are associated with changes in expression of the coded protein products

  5. Multiplex PCR screening detects small p53 deletions and insertions in human ovarian cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnebaum, I B; Tong, X W; Moebus, V; Heilmann, V; Kieback, D G; Kreienberg, R

    1994-06-01

    Mutations at the p53 tumor suppressor gene locus are a frequent genetic alteration associated with human ovarian carcinoma. Little information exists regarding whether mutational events occur other than point mutations and large deletions, causing loss of heterozygosity. Small intragenic deletions and insertions in the p53 gene have been observed in various human neoplasias. We developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (MPCR) screening assay to amplify the complete p53 coding region from genomic DNA in a single step. Deletions and/or insertions were found in six out of 11 newly established ovarian carcinoma cell lines. MPCR detected deletions as small as 2 bp, as confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis. Most of the observed alterations (6/7) were homozygous or hemizygous. Structural aberrations of the p53 gene possibly leading to loss of p53 cell cycle control may be a consequence of a slipped-mispairing mechanism in rapid DNA replication during repetitious ovulation and wound repair of ovarian epithelial cells. MPCR may be a valuable tool for screening for possible p53 deletion and insertion mutations not only in ovarian cancer but also in other malignancies.

  6. Senescence and aging: the critical roles of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufini, A; Tucci, P; Celardo, I; Melino, G

    2013-10-24

    p53 functions as a transcription factor involved in cell-cycle control, DNA repair, apoptosis and cellular stress responses. However, besides inducing cell growth arrest and apoptosis, p53 activation also modulates cellular senescence and organismal aging. Senescence is an irreversible cell-cycle arrest that has a crucial role both in aging and as a robust physiological antitumor response, which counteracts oncogenic insults. Therefore, via the regulation of senescence, p53 contributes to tumor growth suppression, in a manner strictly dependent by its expression and cellular context. In this review, we focus on the recent advances on the contribution of p53 to cellular senescence and its implication for cancer therapy, and we will discuss p53's impact on animal lifespan. Moreover, we describe p53-mediated regulation of several physiological pathways that could mediate its role in both senescence and aging.

  7. Expression of p53 protein and prognosis in gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürel, S; Dolar, E; Yerci, O; Samli, B; Oztürk, H; Nak, S G; Gülten, M; Memik, F

    1999-01-01

    A study was carried out to assess whether p53 expression is related to tumour type, grade or pathological characteristics, or to prognosis, in gastric cancer. Immunohistochemical studies were performed to detect p53 protein in sections from 55 consecutive gastrectomy or partial gastrectomy specimens. Tumours were classified for T-stage, histopathological grade and pathological characteristics. Immunohistochemical staining detected p53 protein in 11 (19%) of the 55 specimens. There was no statistically significant difference between patients with p53 positively staining tumours and patients with p53 negatively staining tumours with regard to tumour grade, stage or pathological characteristics (lymph-node infiltration, depth of invasion, necrosis, or necrosis of vessels). Survival time was statistically significantly lower in patients with positively staining tumours (mean survival times 12.0 and 23.4 months, respectively). These results suggest that expression of p53 protein is related to poor prognosis in gastric carcinoma.

  8. "Super p53" mice display retinal astroglial changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J Salazar

    Full Text Available Tumour-suppressor genes, such as the p53 gene, produce proteins that inhibit cell division under adverse conditions, as in the case of DNA damage, radiation, hypoxia, or oxidative stress (OS. The p53 gene can arrest proliferation and trigger death by apoptosis subsequent to several factors. In astrocytes, p53 promotes cell-cycle arrest and is involved in oxidative stress-mediated astrocyte cell death. Increasingly, astrocytic p53 is proving fundamental in orchestrating neurodegenerative disease pathogenesis. In terms of ocular disease, p53 may play a role in hypoxia due to ischaemia and may be involved in the retinal response to oxidative stress (OS. We studied the influence of the p53 gene in the structural and quantitative characteristics of astrocytes in the retina. Adult mice of the C57BL/6 strain (12 months old were distributed into two groups: 1 mice with two extra copies of p53 ("super p53"; n = 6 and 2 wild-type p53 age-matched control, as the control group (WT; n = 6. Retinas from each group were immunohistochemically processed to locate the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. GFAP+ astrocytes were manually counted and the mean area occupied for one astrocyte was quantified. Retinal-astrocyte distribution followed established patterns; however, morphological changes were seen through the retinas in relation to p53 availability. The mean GFAP+ area occupied by one astrocyte in "super p53" eyes was significantly higher (p<0.05; Student's t-test than in the WT. In addition, astroglial density was significantly higher in the "super p53" retinas than in the WT ones, both in the whole-retina (p<0,01 Student's t-test and in the intermediate and peripheral concentric areas of the retina (p<0.05 Student's t-test. This fact might improve the resistance of the retinal cells against OS and its downstream signalling pathways.

  9. Regulation of MCP-1 chemokine transcription by p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacke, Katrin; Rincon-Orozco, Bladimiro; Buchwalter, Gilles; Siehler, Simone Y; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Rösl, Frank

    2010-04-20

    Our previous studies showed that the expression of the monocyte-chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, a chemokine, which triggers the infiltration and activation of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, is abrogated in human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive premalignant and malignant cells. In silico analysis of the MCP-1 upstream region proposed a putative p53 binding side about 2.5 kb upstream of the transcriptional start. The aim of this study is to monitor a physiological role of p53 in this process. The proposed p53 binding side could be confirmed in vitro by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays and in vivo by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Moreover, the availability of p53 is apparently important for chemokine regulation, since TNF-alpha can induce MCP-1 only in human keratinocytes expressing the viral oncoprotein E7, but not in HPV16 E6 positive cells, where p53 becomes degraded. A general physiological role of p53 in MCP-1 regulation was further substantiated in HPV-negative cells harboring a temperature-sensitive mutant of p53 and in Li-Fraumeni cells, carrying a germ-line mutation of p53. In both cases, non-functional p53 leads to diminished MCP-1 transcription upon TNF-alpha treatment. In addition, siRNA directed against p53 decreased MCP-1 transcription after TNF-alpha addition, directly confirming a crosstalk between p53 and MCP-1. These data support the concept that p53 inactivation during carcinogenesis also affects immune surveillance by interfering with chemokine expression and in turn communication with cells of the immunological compartment.

  10. Analysis of p53- immunoreactivity in astrocytic brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinkarenko T.V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available P53 is an antioncogene with the frequently occured mutations in human tumor cells, leading to corresponding protein overexpression which can be detected by immunohistochemistry. Researches dedicated to the investigation of possibilities of using this technique gave controversial results. The authors investigated features of p53 protein expression in astrocytic brain tumors with different degrees of malignancy. Analyzed the relationship of the expression level of p53 by tumor cells with clinical parameters and Ki-67 proliferation index (PI as well. Tissues were collected from 52 cases with diagnosed astrocytic brain tumors. The sections were immunohistochemically stained with p53 and Ki-67. For each marker, 1000 tumor cells were counted and the ratio of positive tumor cells was calculated using software package ImageJ 1,47v. In normal brain tissue p53- expression was not identified. p53-immunoreactive tumor cells were detected in 25% (1/4 pilocytic astrocytomas, 33.3% (2/6 of diffuse astrocytomas, 53.8% (7/13 anaplastic astrocytomas, 58.6% (17/29 glioblastomas. A high proportion of p53-immunoreactive cells (> 30% was observed only in glioblastomas. The level of p53-imunoreactivity was not related to the age, gender and Grade WHO (p> 0,05. Spearman correlation coefficient between the relative quantity of ki-67- and p53-immunoreactive nuclei showed weak direct correlation (0.023, but the one was not statistically significant (p> 0,05. The level of p53-imunoreactivity is not dependent from age and sex of patients, Grade (WHO and proliferative activity (p>0,05 but the high level of p53-immunoreactive cells (>30% is found in glioblastoma specimens only, that may be due to the accumulation of mutations in DNA of tumor cells. There is insignificant weak relationship between relative quantities of ki-67- and p53-immunoreactive tumor cells (p>0,05.

  11. Battle Against Cancer: An Everlasting Saga of p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Hao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the most life-threatening diseases characterized by uncontrolled growth and spread of malignant cells. The tumor suppressor p53 is the master regulator of tumor cell growth and proliferation. In response to various stress signals, p53 can be activated and transcriptionally induces a myriad of target genes, including both protein-encoding and non-coding genes, controlling cell cycle progression, DNA repair, senescence, apoptosis, autophagy and metabolism of tumor cells. However, around 50% of human cancers harbor mutant p53 and, in the majority of the remaining cancers, p53 is inactivated through multiple mechanisms. Herein, we review the recent progress in understanding the molecular basis of p53 signaling, particularly the newly identified ribosomal stress—p53 pathway, and the development of chemotherapeutics via activating wild-type p53 or restoring mutant p53 functions in cancer. A full understanding of p53 regulation will aid the development of effective cancer treatments.

  12. Targeting p53 by small molecules in hematological malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Manujendra N; Qiu, Lugui; Chang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    p53 is a powerful tumor suppressor and is an attractive cancer therapeutic target. A breakthrough in cancer research came from the discovery of the drugs which are capable of reactivating p53 function. Most anti-cancer agents, from traditional chemo- and radiation therapies to more recently developed non-peptide small molecules exert their effects by enhancing the anti-proliferative activities of p53. Small molecules such as nutlin, RITA, and PRIMA-1 that can activate p53 have shown their ant...

  13. The role of p53 protein and MMP-2 tumor/stromal cells expression on progressive growth of ovarian neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grelewski, Piotr Grzegorz; Bar, Julia Krystyna

    2013-08-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate p53 gene/protein status and MMP-2 expression in respect to ovarian tumors progress to define the role of these markers in the metastasis of ovarian carcinomas. MMP-2 and p53 alterations were evaluated on 80 malignant, 30 benign ovarian tumors, and 62 metastatic lesions by using HRM method for mutations in p53 gene and by using RT-PCR for mRNA MMP-2 level. Our data indicate that parallel expression of MMP-2 epithelial/stromal cells and p53 may enhance cells invasion and metastasis in ovarian carcinoma.

  14. The Proteasome Activator PA28γ, a Negative Regulator of p53, Is Transcriptionally Up-Regulated by p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Xing Wan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available PA28γ (also called REGγ, 11Sγ or PSME3 negatively regulates p53 activity by promoting its nuclear export and/or degradation. Here, using the RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE method, we identified the transcription start site of the PA28γ gene. Assessment with the luciferase assay demonstrated that the sequence −193 to +16 is the basal promoter. Three p53 binding sites were found within the PA28γ promoter utilizing a bioinformatics approach and were confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation and biotinylated DNA affinity precipitation experiments. The p53 protein promotes PA28γ transcription, and p53-stimulated transcription of PA28γ can be inhibited by PA28γ itself. Our results suggest that PA28γ and p53 form a negative feedback loop, which maintains the balance of p53 and PA28γ in cells.

  15. CD8 T-cell responses against cyclin B1 in breast cancer patients with tumors overexpressing p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Baek; Andersen, Rikke Sick; Svane, Inge Marie

    2009-01-01

    CD8 T-cell response against at least one of the peptides; strongest reactivity was detected against the CB9L2 peptide. Because the level of cyclin B1 has been shown to be influenced by the level of p53, which in turn is elevated in cancer cells because of point mutation, we analyzed the level of p53...... protein in biopsies from the patients by immune histochemistry. Combined data showed that anti-cyclin B1 reactivity was predominantly detected in patients with tumors characterized by elevated expression of p53. Interestingly, no reactivity was detected against six peptides derived from the p53 protein....... CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the notion of cyclin B1 as a prominent target for immunologic recognition in cancer patients harboring p53-mutated cancer cells. Because mutation of p53 is one of the most frequent genetic alterations in human cancers, this suggests that immunotherapy based on targeting of cyclin...

  16. A Cohort Study of p53 Mutations and Protein Accumulation in Benign Breast Tissue and Subsequent Breast Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C. Kabat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene and accumulation of its protein in breast tissue are thought to play a role in breast carcinogenesis. However, few studies have prospectively investigated the association of p53 immunopositivity and/or p53 alterations in women with benign breast disease in relation to the subsequent risk of invasive breast cancer. We carried out a case-control study nested within a large cohort of women biopsied for benign breast disease in order to address this question. After exclusions, 491 breast cancer cases and 471 controls were available for analysis. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Neither p53 immunopositivity nor genetic alterations in p53 (either missense mutations or polymorphisms was associated with altered risk of subsequent breast cancer. However, the combination of both p53 immunopositivity and any p53 nucleotide change was associated with an approximate 5-fold nonsignificant increase in risk (adjusted OR 4.79, 95% CI 0.28–82.31 but the confidence intervals were extremely wide. Our findings raise the possibility that the combination of p53 protein accumulation and the presence of genetic alterations may identify a group at increased risk of breast cancer.

  17. p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression and the p53/MDM2 feedback loop in gastric carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craanen, M. E.; Blok, P.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Meijer, G. A.; Dekker, W.; Kuipers, E. J.; Meuwissen, S. G.

    1999-01-01

    Data are non-existent regarding coincidental alterations in the expression of p53 and its downstream target genes MDM2 and p21(Waf1/Cip1) in gastric carcinogenesis. An immunohistochemical study was therefore performed to examine the interrelationships of p53, MDM2, and p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression in a

  18. Tobacco, alcohol, and p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansukhani Mahesh

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p53 tumor suppressor gene is commonly mutated in colorectal cancer. While the effect of p53 mutations on colorectal cancer prognosis has been heavily studied, less is known about how epidemiologic risk factors relate to p53 status, particularly in early colorectal neoplasia prior to clinically invasive colorectal cancer (including adenomas, carcinoma in situ (CIS, and intramucosal carcinoma. Methods We examined p53 status, as measured by protein overexpression, in 157 cases with early colorectal neoplasia selected from three New York City colonoscopy clinics. After collecting paraffin-embedded tissue blocks, immunohistochemistry was performed using an anti-p53 monoclonal mouse IgG2a [BP53-12-1] antibody. We analyzed whether p53 status was different for risk factors for colorectal neoplasia relative to a polyp-free control group (n = 508. Results p53 overexpression was found in 10.3%, 21.7%, and 34.9%, of adenomatous polyps, CIS, and intramucosal cases, respectively. Over 90% of the tumors with p53 overexpression were located in the distal colon and rectum. Heavy cigarette smoking (30+ years was associated with cases not overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1–2.9 but not with those cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.4–2.6. Heavy beer consumption (8+ bottles per week was associated with cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 4.0, 95% CI = 1.3–12.0 but not with cases without p53 overexpression (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 0.7–3.7. Conclusion Our findings that p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia may be positively associated with alcohol intake and inversely associated with cigarette smoking are consistent with those of several studies of p53 expression and invasive cancer, and suggest that there may be relationships of smoking and alcohol with p53 early in the adenoma to carcinoma sequence.

  19. p53 autoantibodies, cytokine levels and ovarian carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai-Turton, Miyun; Santillan, Antonio; Lu, Dan; Bristow, Robert E; Chan, Kwun C; Shih, Ie-Ming; Roden, Richard B S

    2009-07-01

    To address the hypothesis that type II ovarian carcinoma, mutation of p53 and plasma levels of particular cytokines are associated with the generation of p53-specific serum autoantibody (AAb) responses in patients. Levels of CA125, 17 cytokines and AAbs to tumor-associated antigens including p53 were measured in plasma of 130 gynecologic tumor patients and 84 healthy controls. TP53 exons 4-9 were sequenced in tumor specimens. p53 AAbs are associated with high grade, but not low grade ovarian carcinoma. Seropositivity for p53 AAb occurred only in those ovarian carcinoma patients whose tumors contained mutated TP53, regardless of the exon targeted. Higher p53 AAb levels were detected in ovarian carcinoma patients who had higher stage disease, but p53 AAb levels were not correlated with CA125 levels. Among high-grade carcinoma patients, there was no relationship between p53 AAb seropositivity and seropositivity to other tumor-associated antigens tested, CA125 level or survival outcome. Both high and low grade ovarian carcinoma patients exhibited elevated levels of IL6, IL8 and IL10 as compared to healthy volunteers, although increased levels of IL5, MCP1, MIP1 and TNFalpha were associated only with high grade and advanced disease. Higher levels of p53AAb responses were correlated with elevated circulating IL4 and IL12, but reduced IL8 levels. Type II, but not type I, ovarian carcinoma patients had elevated serum levels of p53 AAb. P53 AAb is associated with mutation of TP53, higher plasma IL4 and IL12 but lower plasma IL8 levels and no survival advantage.

  20. Δ133p53 is an independent prognostic marker in p53 mutant advanced serous ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, G; Berger, A; Schuster, E; Wolf, A; Hager, G; Vergote, I; Cadron, I; Sehouli, J; Braicu, E I; Mahner, S; Speiser, P; Marth, C; Zeimet, A G; Ulmer, H; Zeillinger, R; Concin, N

    2011-01-01

    Background: We aimed to evaluate the clinical relevance of p53 and p73 isoforms that modulate the function of p53. Methods: This prospective multicentre study included 154 patients with stage III and IV serous ovarian cancer. A functional yeast-based assay and subsequent sequencing were performed to analyse the p53 mutational status. Expression of p53 and p73 isoforms was determined using RT–qPCR. Results: Δ133p53 expression constituted an independent prognostic marker for recurrence-free (hazard ratio=0.571, P=0.016, 95% CI: 0.362–0.899) and overall survival (hazard ratio=0.365, P=0.004, 95% CI: 0.182–0.731) in patients with p53 mutant ovarian cancer (n=121). High Δ40p53 expression was associated with favourable tumour grading (P=0.037) and improved recurrence-free survival (33.4 vs 19.6 months, P=0.029), but not overall survival (43.1 vs 33.6 months, P=0.139), in patients with p53 wild-type cancer (n=33). Neither the p53 mutational status nor p73 isoform expression possessed prognostic significance in the examined ovarian cancer cases. Conclusion: Δ133p53 expression was associated with prognosis in the vast majority of ovarian cancer cases, that is, patients with p53 mutant advanced serous carcinomas. Thus, our findings underline the importance of considering the complex p53 regulatory network. PMID:22009029

  1. Characterization of the p53 cistrome--DNA binding cooperativity dissects p53's tumor suppressor functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Schlereth

    Full Text Available p53 protects us from cancer by transcriptionally regulating tumor suppressive programs designed to either prevent the development or clonal expansion of malignant cells. How p53 selects target genes in the genome in a context- and tissue-specific manner remains largely obscure. There is growing evidence that the ability of p53 to bind DNA in a cooperative manner prominently influences target gene selection with activation of the apoptosis program being completely dependent on DNA binding cooperativity. Here, we used ChIP-seq to comprehensively profile the cistrome of p53 mutants with reduced or increased cooperativity. The analysis highlighted a particular relevance of cooperativity for extending the p53 cistrome to non-canonical binding sequences characterized by deletions, spacer insertions and base mismatches. Furthermore, it revealed a striking functional separation of the cistrome on the basis of cooperativity; with low cooperativity genes being significantly enriched for cell cycle and high cooperativity genes for apoptotic functions. Importantly, expression of high but not low cooperativity genes was correlated with superior survival in breast cancer patients. Interestingly, in contrast to most p53-activated genes, p53-repressed genes did not commonly contain p53 binding elements. Nevertheless, both the degree of gene activation and repression were cooperativity-dependent, suggesting that p53-mediated gene repression is largely indirect and mediated by cooperativity-dependently transactivated gene products such as CDKN1A, E2F7 and non-coding RNAs. Since both activation of apoptosis genes with non-canonical response elements and repression of pro-survival genes are crucial for p53's apoptotic activity, the cistrome analysis comprehensively explains why p53-induced apoptosis, but not cell cycle arrest, strongly depends on the intermolecular cooperation of p53 molecules as a possible safeguard mechanism protecting from accidental cell

  2. Decreased Mdm2 expression inhibits tumor development and extends survival independent of Arf and dependent on p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Eischen

    Full Text Available Inactivation of the Arf-Mdm2-p53 tumor suppressor pathway is a necessary event for tumorigenesis. Arf controls Mdm2, which in turn regulates p53, but Arf and Mdm2 also have p53-independent functions that affect tumor development. Moreover, inhibition of oncogene-induced tumorigenesis relies on Arf and p53, but the requirements of Arf and p53 in tumor development initiated in the absence of overt oncogene overexpression and the role of Mdm2 in this process remain unclear. In a series of genetic experiments in mice with defined deficiencies in Arf, Mdm2 and/or p53, we show Mdm2 haploinsufficiency significantly delayed tumorigenesis in mice deficient in Arf and p53. Mdm2 heterozygosity significantly inhibited tumor development in the absence of Arf, and in contrast to Myc oncogene-driven cancer, this delay in tumorigenesis could not be rescued with the presence of one allele of Arf. Notably, Mdm2 haploinsufficieny blocked the accelerated tumor development in Arf deficient mice caused by p53 heterozygosity. However, tumorigenesis was not inhibited in Mdm2 heterozygous mice lacking both alleles of p53 regardless of Arf status. Surprisingly, loss of Arf accelerated tumor development in p53-null mice. Tumor spectrum was largely dictated by Arf and p53 status with Mdm2 haploinsufficiency only modestly altering the tumor type in some of the genotypes and not the number of primary tumors that arose. Therefore, the significant effects of Mdm2 haploinsufficiency on tumor latency were independent of Arf and required at least one allele of p53, and an Mdm2 deficiency had minor effects on the types of tumors that developed. These data also demonstrate that decreased levels of Mdm2 are protective in the presence of multiple genetic events in Arf and p53 genes that normally accelerate tumorigenesis.

  3. Enhancement of radiosensitivity of recombinant Ad-p53 gene on human lung adenocarcinoma cell with different p53 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang Dequan; Wang Peiguo; Wang Ping; Zhang Weiming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the enhancement of radiosensitivity of recombinant Ad-p53 gene on human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines(A549 and GLC-82) with different p53 status in vitro. Methods: Two human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines of A549 and GLC-82 were examined on their difference in p53 status with immunohistochemistry stain and PCR-SSCP technique. Expand Ad-wtp53 was transfected into tumor cells. Clonogenic assays were performed to evaluate the inhibition effect on cell growth and the degree of sensitization to irradiation. Apoptosis and cell cycle changes were determined using the flow cytometry assay. Results: The A549 cell line presented positive P53 expression while GLC-82 negative. GLC-82 bore mutant p53 on the exon 7. The wtp53 gene could be efficiently expressed in the two cell lines and greatly inhibit the cell growth. Its efficiency didn't depend on the intrinsic p53 genetic status. After irradiation, its function of inducing G 1 arrest and apoptosis on GLC-82 cell line was much stronger than the A549 cell line. In both the A549 and GLC-82 cell lines, the combination of Ad-p53 plus radiation resulted in more apoptosis than the others. There was no significant difference between two groups. Conclusions: Ad-p53 can depress the tumor growth and enhance the radiosensitivity of human lung adenocarcinoma cells. And this effect is independent of endogenous p53 status. (authors)

  4. p53, p21, Rb, and MDM2 proteins in tongue carcinoma from patients 75 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Dekker, N P; McMillan, A; Ramirez-Amador, V; Meneses-Garcia, A; Ruiz-Godoy Rivera, L M; Chrysomali, E; Ng, I O

    1999-07-01

    Relatively rare squamous cell carcinomas of the tongue in young patients may be associated with different etiologic factors and pathogenetic mechanisms than carcinomas from the same site in older patients. Alterations in cell cycle proteins likely contribute to the biologic behavior of these neoplasms. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate cell cycle proteins (p53, p21, Rb, MDM2) in lateral tongue cancers from patients at the two ends of the age spectrum. All available archived lateral tongue carcinomas from patients 75 years (23 males and 13 females) were stained and compared. Positive p53 staining was seen in 18/36 of the 75-year group (p = 0.149). Increased p21 staining (both percent of positive cells and intensity) was evident in 25/32 of the 75-year group (p = 1.0). Increased p21 expression was seen in both p53-positive and -negative cases in both age groups. Rb protein was increased in 16/29 of the 75-year group (p = 0.58). Fourteen cases (4/35 vs 10/36, p = 0.135) showed positive MDM2 staining; MDM2-positive cases were also p53 positive in 4/4 younger and 8/10 older patients. We conclude that p53, p21, Rb, and MDM2 are over-expressed in lateral tongue cancers, and that immunohistochemical profiles are heterogeneous. A p53-independent pathway of p21 induction is supported by the results; p53 suppression may be associated with MDM2 protein expression in a subset of cancers. Significant differences in the expression of p53, p21, Rb, and MDM2 proteins are not evident in lateral tongue carcinomas from patients 75 years.

  5. Rb and p53 Liver Functions Are Essential for Xenobiotic Metabolism and Tumor Suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathidpak Nantasanti

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressors Retinoblastoma (Rb and p53 are frequently inactivated in liver diseases, such as hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC or infections with Hepatitis B or C viruses. Here, we discovered a novel role for Rb and p53 in xenobiotic metabolism, which represent a key function of the liver for metabolizing therapeutic drugs or toxins. We demonstrate that Rb and p53 cooperate to metabolize the xenobiotic 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC. DDC is metabolized mainly by cytochrome P450 (Cyp3a enzymes resulting in inhibition of heme synthesis and accumulation of protoporphyrin, an intermediate of heme pathway. Protoporphyrin accumulation causes bile injury and ductular reaction. We show that loss of Rb and p53 resulted in reduced Cyp3a expression decreased accumulation of protoporphyrin and consequently less ductular reaction in livers of mice fed with DDC for 3 weeks. These findings provide strong evidence that synergistic functions of Rb and p53 are essential for metabolism of DDC. Because Rb and p53 functions are frequently disabled in liver diseases, our results suggest that liver patients might have altered ability to remove toxins or properly metabolize therapeutic drugs. Strikingly the reduced biliary injury towards the oxidative stress inducer DCC was accompanied by enhanced hepatocellular injury and formation of HCCs in Rb and p53 deficient livers. The increase in hepatocellular injury might be related to reduce protoporphyrin accumulation, because protoporphrin is well known for its anti-oxidative activity. Furthermore our results indicate that Rb and p53 not only function as tumor suppressors in response to carcinogenic injury, but also in response to non-carcinogenic injury such as DDC.

  6. Vaccines to Breast Cancer Based on p53 Mutants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ertl, Hildegund

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this proposal is to test vaccines expressing mouse mutant or wild-type p53 for induction of protective immunity against challenge with tumor cell lines expressing either mutant or high levels of wild-type p53...

  7. Cellular inactivation of nitric oxide induces p53-dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To examine the role of endogenous nitric oxide (NO•) and influence of p53 status during apoptosis induced by a ... endogenous NO•, based on p53 status, and indicate manipulation of iNOS may offer exciting opportunities to improve the ..... agents, further research will be required to define more specifically the ...

  8. Chronology of p53 protein accumulation in gastric carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craanen, M. E.; Blok, P.; Dekker, W.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1995-01-01

    p53 Protein accumulation in early gastric carcinoma was studied in relation to the histological type (Lauren classification) and the type of growth pattern, including the chronology of p53 protein accumulation during carcinogenesis. Forty five, paraffin embedded gastrectomy specimens from early

  9. Involvement of p53-EGFR-ERK pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The tumour suppressor gene p53 is mutated in approximately 50% of the human cancers. p53 is involved in genotoxicstress-induced cellular responses. The role of EGFR and ERK in DNA-damage-induced apoptosis is well known. Weinvestigated the involvement of activation of ERK signalling as a consequence of ...

  10. Expression of P53 protein after exposure to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, A. M.; Salvador, C.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Ostrosky, P.; Brandan, M. E.

    2001-10-01

    One of the most important tumor suppressor genes is p53 gene, which is involved in apoptotic cell death, cell differentiation and cell cycle arrest. The expression of p53 gene can be evaluated by determining the presence of P53 protein in cells using Western Blot assay with a chemiluminescent method. This technique has shown variabilities that are due to biological factors. Film developing process can influence the quality of the p53 bands obtained. We irradiated tumor cell lines and human peripheral lymphocytes with 137Cs and 60Co gamma rays to standardize irradiation conditions, to compare ionizing radiation with actinomycin D and to reduce the observed variability of P53 protein induction levels. We found that increasing radiation doses increase P53 protein induction while it decreases viability. We also conclude that ionizing radiation could serve as a positive control for Western Blot analysis of protein P53. In addition, our results show that the developing process may play an important role in the quality of P53 protein bands and data interpretation.

  11. p53 tumor suppressor gene: significance in neoplasia - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor gene located on chromosome 17p13.1. Its function includes cell cycle control and apoptosis. Loss of p53 function, either due to decreased level or genetic transformation, is associated with loss of cell cycle control, decrease, apoptosis and genomic modification, such mutation of p53 gene is now assessed and the indicator of neoplasia of cancer of several organs and cell types, p53 has demonstrated to have critical role in defining various progressive stages of neoplasia, therapeutic strategies and clinical application. The present review briefly describes function of p53 in addition to its diagnostic and prognostic significance in detecting several types of neoplasia. (author)

  12. p53-dependent and p53-independent anticancer activity of a new indole derivative in human osteosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappadone, C.; Stefanelli, C.; Malucelli, E.; Zini, M.; Onofrillo, C.; Locatelli, A.; Rambaldi, M.; Sargenti, A.; Merolle, L.; Farruggia, G.; Graziadio, A.; Montanaro, L.; Iotti, S.

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone, occurring most frequently in children and adolescents. The mechanism of formation and development of OS have been studied for a long time. Tumor suppressor pathway governed by p53 gene are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. Moreover, loss of wild-type p53 activity is thought to be a major predictor of failure to respond to chemotherapy in various human cancers. In previous studies, we described the activity of a new indole derivative, NSC743420, belonging to the tubulin inhibitors family, capable to induce apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle in the G2/M phase of various cancer cell lines. However, this molecule has never been tested on OS cell line. Here we address the activity of NSC743420 by examine whether differences in the p53 status could influence its effects on cell proliferation and death of OS cells. In particular, we compared the effect of the tested molecule on p53-wild type and p53-silenced U2OS cells, and on SaOS2 cell line, which is null for p53. Our results demonstrated that NSC743420 reduces OS cell proliferation by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. In particular, the molecule induces proliferative arrest that culminate to apoptosis in SaOS2 p53-null cells, while it brings a cytostatic and differentiating effect in U2OS cells, characterized by the cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and increased alkaline phosphatase activity. - Highlights: • The indole derivative NSC743420 induces antitumor effects on osteosarcoma cells. • p53 status could drive the activity of antitumor agents on osteosarcoma cells. • NSC743420 induces cytostatic and differentiating effects on U2OS cells. • NSC743420 causes apoptosis on p53-null SaOS2 cells.

  13. p53-dependent and p53-independent anticancer activity of a new indole derivative in human osteosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappadone, C., E-mail: concettina.cappadone@unibo.it [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Stefanelli, C. [Department for Life Quality Studies, University of Bologna, Rimini Campus, Rimini (Italy); Malucelli, E. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Zini, M. [Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Onofrillo, C. [Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Locatelli, A.; Rambaldi, M.; Sargenti, A. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Merolle, L. [ELETTRA–Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy); Farruggia, G. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems, Roma (Italy); Graziadio, A. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Montanaro, L. [Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Iotti, S. [Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); National Institute of Biostructures and Biosystems, Roma (Italy)

    2015-11-13

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone, occurring most frequently in children and adolescents. The mechanism of formation and development of OS have been studied for a long time. Tumor suppressor pathway governed by p53 gene are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. Moreover, loss of wild-type p53 activity is thought to be a major predictor of failure to respond to chemotherapy in various human cancers. In previous studies, we described the activity of a new indole derivative, NSC743420, belonging to the tubulin inhibitors family, capable to induce apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle in the G2/M phase of various cancer cell lines. However, this molecule has never been tested on OS cell line. Here we address the activity of NSC743420 by examine whether differences in the p53 status could influence its effects on cell proliferation and death of OS cells. In particular, we compared the effect of the tested molecule on p53-wild type and p53-silenced U2OS cells, and on SaOS2 cell line, which is null for p53. Our results demonstrated that NSC743420 reduces OS cell proliferation by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. In particular, the molecule induces proliferative arrest that culminate to apoptosis in SaOS2 p53-null cells, while it brings a cytostatic and differentiating effect in U2OS cells, characterized by the cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and increased alkaline phosphatase activity. - Highlights: • The indole derivative NSC743420 induces antitumor effects on osteosarcoma cells. • p53 status could drive the activity of antitumor agents on osteosarcoma cells. • NSC743420 induces cytostatic and differentiating effects on U2OS cells. • NSC743420 causes apoptosis on p53-null SaOS2 cells.

  14. The association between the p53/topoisomerase I and p53/ topoisomerase IIalpha immunophenotypes and the progression of ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Julia K; Grelewski, Piotr; Noga, Leszek; Rabczyński, Jerzy; Gryboś, Marian; Jeleń, Michał

    2012-01-01

    In in vitro studies it has been revealed that p53 protein expression might regulate topoisomerase I (topo I) and topoisomerase IIalpha (topo IIalpha) levels in tumor cells. So far, the association between the p53 protein and topo I and topo IIalpha expression and its impact on ovarian carcinoma progression has not been analyzed. The aim of the study was to examine the association between topo I and topo IIalpha expression and p53 protein overexpression with respect to the morphological features and progressive growth of ovarian tumors. The expression of the studied biomarkers was estimated by immunohistochemical staining in tumor sections from 136 malignant and 30 benign ovarian neoplasms. Significant differences for topo I, topo IIalpha and p53 expression between malignant and benign tumors were observed (p p53 protein was associated with advanced stages of ovarian carcinomas (p ovarian carcinomas, positive correlations between topo I and topo IIalpha, topo I and p53 and topo Ilalpha and p53 protein expression were revealed (p = 0.001). No relationship between the studied biomarkers was found in benign ovarian tumors (p > 0.05). p53/topo I and p53/topo IIalpha immunophenotypes were associated with advanced stages of ovarian carcinoma (p = 0.045 and p = 0.009, respectively), p53/topo IIalpha positive ovarian carcinomas were more frequently observed in high than in low tumor grades and the differences were only of borderline significance (p = 0.07). Current findings suggest that on the one hand, cooperation between topo I, topo IIalpha and p53 protein participates in the progressive growth of ovarian tumors. On the other hand, simultaneous expression of the studied proteins identifies the subgroup of ovarian cancers with aggressive biological features which might be considered in therapy.

  15. P53 and bcl-2 assessment in serous ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, J E; Sant Cassia, L J; Irwin, C J; Morris, A G; Rollason, T P

    2008-01-01

    The study objective was to determine the prognostic value of assessment of staining of p53 and bcl-2 in a well-selected group of serous ovarian carcinomas. Immunohistochemical detection was used to identify both p53 and bcl-2 positive tumors. One hundred thirty-two tumors were analyzed for positivity of staining, grade of staining intensity, and for p53 alone, percent expression rates. These were analyzed alongside traditional clinicopathologic parameters for their ability to predict overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and response to chemotherapy (CR). Univariate COX analysis revealed percent p53 expression (P = 0.012) and p53 grade (P = 0.01) to be significant predictors of DFS. Neither the p53 nor bcl-2 measurement parameters were found significant for OS or prediction of CR. On multivariate analysis, incorporating clinicopathologic parameters, p53 parameters did not retain independent significance for any outcome measure. As in primary reported studies, bcl-2 was not found to be of clear independent prognostic value in this group of ovarian tumors. If mutation of p53 and its consequent overexpression is an early event in ovarian tumorigenesis, then p53 assessment may prove useful prognostically in the assessment of either low-grade ovarian carcinomas, as a possible indicator for progression, or in early-stage ovarian tumors, as a marker of tumor aggression or likelihood of recurrence. p53 analysis of a larger group of stage I ovarian tumors would be desirable to further explain the potential association with DFS.

  16. p53 selectively regulates developmental apoptosis of rod photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Vuong

    Full Text Available Retinal cells become post-mitotic early during post-natal development. It is likely that p53, a well-known cell cycle regulator, is involved in regulating the genesis, differentiation and death of retinal cells. Furthermore, retinal cells are under constant oxidative stress that can result in DNA damage, due to the extremely high level of metabolic activity associated with phototransduction. If not repaired, this damage may result in p53-dependent cell death and ensuing vision loss. In this study, the role of p53 during retinal development and in the post-mitotic retina is investigated. A previously described super p53 transgenic mouse that expresses an extra copy of the mouse p53 gene driven by its endogenous promoter is utilized. Another transgenic mouse (HIP that expresses the p53 gene in rod and cone photoreceptors driven by the human interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein promoter was generated. The electroretinogram (ERG of the super p53 mouse exhibited reduced rod-driven scotopic a and b wave and cone-driven photopic b wave responses. This deficit resulted from a reduced number of rod photoreceptors and inner nuclear layer cells. However, the reduced photopic signal arose only from lost inner retinal neurons, as cone numbers did not change. Furthermore, cell loss was non-progressive and resulted from increased apoptosis during retinal developmental as determined by TUNEL staining. In contrast, the continuous and specific expression of p53 in rod and cone photoreceptors in the mature retinas of HIP mice led to the selective loss of both rods and cones. These findings strongly support a role for p53 in regulating developmental apoptosis in the retina and suggest a potential role, either direct or indirect, for p53 in the degenerative photoreceptor loss associated with human blinding disorders.

  17. Proteic expression of p53 and cellular proliferation in oral leukoplakias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-García, Antonio; Abad-Hernández, M Mar; Fonseca-Sánchez, Emilio; Cruz-Hernández, Juan Jesús; Bullón-Sopelana, Agustín

    2005-01-01

    We intend to know the protein expression of genetic alterations that take place in the early stages in the field cancerization of oral cavity in our means as well as to study the cellular proliferation by means of Ki-67 and the protein product expression of p53 to value if the alterations in the protein products expression of these markers happen in a sequential pathway through the different stages in the field cancerization of oral cavity. A study was made by immunohistochemistry on 53 patients that presented lesions of oral leukoplaquia, assisted by the ENT service at University Hospital of Salamanca, from 1.990 up to 2000. 11 samples of normal epithelium, 15 mild to moderate dysplasias, 15 in situ carcinomas and 12 microinvasive carcinomas are included in the study. we find an increased cellular proliferation and p53 over-expression as we advance in the grade of severity histopathologic of these lesions. The most early alterations are a significant increase of cell proliferation in mild and moderate dysplasias and an increased p53 over-expression. Oral leukoplaquia is a precancerous stage that constitutes a cancerisable lesion due to the genetic alterations that mediate in the evolution of lesion. Routine Immunohistochemical and molecular study of these lesions allow us to know the protein expression of genetic alterations that can help in the early diagnosis and treatment of this pathology, having special relevance the study of Ki-67 in early stages and p53 in advanced lesions.

  18. THE EXON 5, 6, 7, 8 OF P53 MUTATIONS IN ORAL SQUAMOUS CELLS CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno P Rahayu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic instability may underlie the etiology of multistep carcinogenesis. The altered p53 gene observed in tumors may represent the expression of such instability and may allow the accumulation of other gene alterations caused by multiple mechanism. p53 gene is the guardian of the genome, that is why we pay more attention to this gene. In this study, we evaluated the significance of p53 mutation in 55 patient with oral squamous carcinoma. Thirty among them underwent well-differentiated carcinoma, while the remaining 25 patients underwent poorly differentiated carcinoma. The mutations were detected by PCR-SSCP (Single strand Conformational Polymorphism analysis in the region between exon 5 and exon 8. The results indicated that the p53 mutation in exon 5 (40%, exon 6 (28%, exon 7 (24% and exon 8 (8% were associated with poorly differentiated carcinoma, whereas mutation in exon 5 (10%, exon 6 (30%, exon 7 (40% and exon 8 (20% were associated with well-differentiated carcinoma. These observations suggest that p53 mutation in exon 5, 6, and 7 have strong correlation with poorly differentiated in oral squamous carcinoma while well-differentiated level was related with mutation in exon 6,7 and 8.

  19. Expression of Egr1 and p53 in human carotid plaques and apoptosis induced by 7-oxysterol or p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Sayem; Zadeh, Shahram Nour Mohammad; Yuan, Xi-Ming; Li, Wei

    2013-07-01

    Egr-1 and p53 are involved in pathology of both atherosclerosis and cancer. However, it is unknown whether p53 and Egr1 are interactively involved in apoptosis in atherosclerosis. We found that in human carotid plaques, the expression of p53 was inversely correlated with Egr1. In U937 cells, 7β-hydroxycholesterol and 7-ketocholesterol induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), transient up-regulation of Egr1 followed by late induction of p53 and apoptosis. Cells with nuclear fragmentation induced by 7-oxysterol or p53 showed increased levels of p53, but decreased levels of Egr1. In conclusion, ROS induced by 7-oxysterols may function as an early initiator of Egr1 expression. The late induced p53 by 7-oxysterols contributes to apoptotic cell death and is linked to the reduction of Egr1 levels, which resembles the differential expression of p53 and Egr1 in human atheroma progression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. A p53-bound enhancer region controls a long intergenic noncoding RNA required for p53 stress response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, C A; Léveillé, N; Rooijers, K; Wijchers, P J; Geeven, G; Tal, A; Melo, S A; de Laat, W; Agami, R

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide chromatin studies identified the tumor suppressor p53 as both a promoter and an enhancer-binding transcription factor. As an enhancer factor, p53 can induce local production of enhancer RNAs, as well as transcriptional activation of distal neighboring genes. Beyond the regulation of

  1. Energetic Landscape of MDM2-p53 Interactions by Computational Mutagenesis of the MDM2-p53 Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M Thayer

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin ligase MDM2, a principle regulator of the tumor suppressor p53, plays an integral role in regulating cellular levels of p53 and thus a prominent role in current cancer research. Computational analysis used MUMBO to rotamerize the MDM2-p53 crystal structure 1YCR to obtain an exhaustive search of point mutations, resulting in the calculation of the ΔΔG comprehensive energy landscape for the p53-bound regulator. The results herein have revealed a set of residues R65-E69 on MDM2 proximal to the p53 hydrophobic binding pocket that exhibited an energetic profile deviating significantly from similar residues elsewhere in the protein. In light of the continued search for novel competitive inhibitors for MDM2, we discuss possible implications of our findings on the drug discovery field.

  2. A synthetic interaction screen identifies factors selectively required for proliferation and TERT transcription in p53-deficient human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xie

    Full Text Available Numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations render cancer cells selectively dependent on specific genes and regulatory pathways, and represent potential vulnerabilities that can be therapeutically exploited. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi-based synthetic interaction screen to identify genes preferentially required for proliferation of p53-deficient (p53- human cancer cells. We find that compared to p53-competent (p53+ human cancer cell lines, diverse p53- human cancer cell lines are preferentially sensitive to loss of the transcription factor ETV1 and the DNA damage kinase ATR. In p53- cells, RNAi-mediated knockdown of ETV1 or ATR results in decreased expression of the telomerase catalytic subunit TERT leading to growth arrest, which can be reversed by ectopic TERT expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis reveals that ETV1 binds to a region downstream of the TERT transcriptional start-site in p53- but not p53+ cells. We find that the role of ATR is to phosphorylate and thereby stabilize ETV1. Our collective results identify a regulatory pathway involving ETV1, ATR, and TERT that is preferentially important for proliferation of diverse p53- cancer cells.

  3. Residues in the alternative reading frame tumor suppressor that influence its stability and p53-independent activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tommaso, Anne di [Pole Biologie Sante, UMR 6187 CNRS, Pathologies Moleculaire de l' Adressage et de la Signalisation, Universite de Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Hagen, Jussara; Tompkins, Van [Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa, College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Muniz, Viviane [Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, The University of Iowa, College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Dudakovic, Amel [Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa, College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Kitzis, Alain [Pole Biologie Sante, UMR 6187 CNRS, Pathologies Moleculaire de l' Adressage et de la Signalisation, Universite de Poitiers, Poitiers (France); CHU de Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Ladeveze, Veronique [Pole Biologie Sante, UMR 6187 CNRS, Pathologies Moleculaire de l' Adressage et de la Signalisation, Universite de Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Quelle, Dawn E., E-mail: dawn-quelle@uiowa.edu [Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa, College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, The University of Iowa, College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2009-04-15

    The Alternative Reading Frame (ARF) protein suppresses tumorigenesis through p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways. Most of ARF's anti-proliferative activity is conferred by sequences in its first exon. Previous work showed specific amino acid changes occurred in that region during primate evolution, so we programmed those changes into human p14ARF to assay their functional impact. Two human p14ARF residues (Ala{sup 14} and Thr{sup 31}) were found to destabilize the protein while two others (Val{sup 24} and Ala{sup 41}) promoted more efficient p53 stabilization and activation. Despite those effects, all modified p14ARF forms displayed robust p53-dependent anti-proliferative activity demonstrating there are no significant biological differences in p53-mediated growth suppression associated with simian versus human p14ARF residues. In contrast, p53-independent p14ARF function was considerably altered by several residue changes. Val{sup 24} was required for p53-independent growth suppression whereas multiple residues (Val{sup 24}, Thr{sup 31}, Ala{sup 41} and His{sup 60}) enabled p14ARF to block or reverse the inherent chromosomal instability of p53-null MEFs. Together, these data pinpoint specific residues outside of established p14ARF functional domains that influence its expression and signaling activities. Most intriguingly, this work reveals a novel and direct role for p14ARF in the p53-independent maintenance of genomic stability.

  4. Distribution of p53 expression in tissue from 774 Danish ovarian tumour patients and its prognostic significance in ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgdall, Estrid V S; Christensen, Lise; Høgdall, Claus K; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Gayther, Simon; Blaakaer, Jan; Jacobs, Ian J; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2008-05-01

    The clinical roles played by normal and altered p53 in cancer are under intensive investigation, but larger studies describing the pattern as well as the prognostic value are still needed. The aim of this study was, using tissue array (TA), to examine the overexpression of p53 protein in 774 epithelial ovarian tumour tissues from Danish women and to evaluate whether p53 tissue expression levels correlate with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis. The distribution of p53 expression levels at different stages of disease, in different histological subtypes, and the prognostic value of p53 tissue expression were examined. Overall, p53 was expressed in 24/189 (13%) low malignant potential ovarian tumours (LMP) and in 278/585 (48%) ovarian cancers (OC). No significant difference in frequency of p53 tissue expression in LMP tissue was noted with increasing tumour stage (p=0.98). By contrast, there was a significant increase in the frequency of p53 tissue expression in OC with increasing FIGO stage (pp53 was associated with longer OC disease-specific survival. Tissue p53 expression may be of prognostic value in women with OC.

  5. Residues in the alternative reading frame tumor suppressor that influence its stability and p53-independent activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tommaso, Anne di; Hagen, Jussara; Tompkins, Van; Muniz, Viviane; Dudakovic, Amel; Kitzis, Alain; Ladeveze, Veronique; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2009-01-01

    The Alternative Reading Frame (ARF) protein suppresses tumorigenesis through p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways. Most of ARF's anti-proliferative activity is conferred by sequences in its first exon. Previous work showed specific amino acid changes occurred in that region during primate evolution, so we programmed those changes into human p14ARF to assay their functional impact. Two human p14ARF residues (Ala 14 and Thr 31 ) were found to destabilize the protein while two others (Val 24 and Ala 41 ) promoted more efficient p53 stabilization and activation. Despite those effects, all modified p14ARF forms displayed robust p53-dependent anti-proliferative activity demonstrating there are no significant biological differences in p53-mediated growth suppression associated with simian versus human p14ARF residues. In contrast, p53-independent p14ARF function was considerably altered by several residue changes. Val 24 was required for p53-independent growth suppression whereas multiple residues (Val 24 , Thr 31 , Ala 41 and His 60 ) enabled p14ARF to block or reverse the inherent chromosomal instability of p53-null MEFs. Together, these data pinpoint specific residues outside of established p14ARF functional domains that influence its expression and signaling activities. Most intriguingly, this work reveals a novel and direct role for p14ARF in the p53-independent maintenance of genomic stability.

  6. Relationship of p53 Mutations to Epidermal Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis in Human UV-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine G. Einspahr

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is continually subjected to UV-irradiation with the p53 gene playing a pivotal role in repair of UV-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Consequently, p53 alterations are early events in human UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. We studied 13 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC, 16 actinic keratoses (AK, 13 samples adjacent to an AK (chronically sun-damaged, and 14 normal-appearing skin samples for p53 mutation, p53 immunostaining (IHC, apoptosis (in situ TUNEL and morphology, and proliferation (PCNA. The frequency of p53 mutation increased from 14% in normal skin, to 38.5% in sun-damaged skin, 63% in AK, and 54% in SCC. p53 IHC increased similarly. Apoptosis (TUNEL increased from 0.06 ± 0.02%, to 0.1 ± 0.2, 0.3 ± 0.3, and 0.4 ± 0.3 in normal skin, sun-damaged skin, AK, and SCC, respectively. Apoptosis was strongly correlated with proliferation (i.e., TUNEL and PCNA, r = 0.7, P < 0.0001, and proliferation was significantly increased in the progression from normal skin to SCC. Bax was significantly increased in SCC compared to AK. These data imply that apoptosis in samples with a high frequency of p53 mutation may not necessarily be p53-dependent. We suggest that there is a mechanism for apoptosis in response to increased cellular proliferation that is p53-independent.

  7. ZNF509S1 downregulates PUMA by inhibiting p53K382 acetylation and p53-DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Han, Dohyun; Kim, Min-Kyeong; Kim, Youngsoo; Choi, Seo-Hyun; Song, Jiyang; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Kim, Kunhong; Hur, Man-Wook

    2017-09-01

    Expression of the POK family protein ZNF509L, and -its S1 isoform, is induced by p53 upon exposure to genotoxic stress. Due to alternative splicing of the ZNF509 primary transcript, ZNF509S1 lacks the 6 zinc-fingers and C-terminus of ZNF509L, resulting in only one zinc-finger. ZNF509L and -S1 inhibit cell proliferation by activating p21/CDKN1A and RB transcription, respectively. When cells are exposed to severe DNA damage, p53 activates PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis) transcription. Interestingly, apoptosis due to transcriptional activation of PUMA by p53 is attenuated by ZNF509S1. Thus we investigated the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the transcriptional attenuation and anti-apoptotic effects of ZNF509S1. We show that ZNF509S1 modulation of p53 activity is important in PUMA gene transcription by modulating post-translational modification of p53 by p300. ZNF509S1 directly interacts with p53 and inhibits p300-mediated acetylation of p53 lysine K382, with deacetylation of p53 K382 leading to decreased DNA binding at the p53 response element 1 of the PUMA promoter. ZNF509S1 may play a role not only in cell cycle arrest, by activating RB expression, but also in rescuing cells from apoptotic death by repressing PUMA expression in cells exposed to severe DNA damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional interaction between DP-1 and p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, T S; Girling, R; Lee, C W; Gannon, J; Bandara, L R; La Thangue, N B

    1996-10-01

    The cellular transcription factor DRTF1/E2F and the tumor suppressor protein p53 play important roles in controlling early cell cycle events. DRTF1/E2F is believed to coordinate and integrate the transcription of cell cycle-regulating genes, for example, those involved in DNA synthesis, with the activity of regulatory proteins, such as the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene product (pRb), which modulate its transcriptional activity. In contrast, p53 is thought to monitor the integrity of chromosomal DNA and when appropriate interfere with cell cycle progression, for example, in response to DNA damage. Generic DRTF1/E2F DNA binding activity and transcriptional activation arise when members of two distinct families of proteins, such as DP-1 and E2F-1, interact as DP/E2F heterodimers. In many cell types, DP-1 is a widespread component of DRTF1/E2F DNA binding activity which when expressed at high levels oncogenically transforms embryonic fibroblasts. Here, we document an association between DP-1 and p53 and demonstrate its presence in mammalian cell extracts. In vitro p53 interacts with an immunochemically distinct form of DP-1 and in vivo can regulate transcription driven by the DP-1/E2F-1 heterodimer. At the biochemical level, p53 competes with E2F-1 for DP-1, with a consequent reduction in DNA binding activity. Mutational analysis defines within DP-1 a C-terminal region required for the interaction with p53 and within p53 an N-terminal region distinct from that required to bind to MDM2. Our results establish DRTF1/E2F as a common cellular target in growth control mediated through the activities of pRb and p53 and suggest an alternative mechanism through which p53 may regulate cellular proliferation.

  9. POSTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATIONS OF P53: UPSTREAM SIGNALING PATHWAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2003-10-23

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is posttranslational modified at >20 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the upstream signaling pathways whose activation in response to various genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses result in p53 posttranslational modifications.

  10. p53 and survival in early onset breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentile, M; Bergman Jungeström, M; Olsen, K E

    1999-01-01

    The p53 protein has proven to be central in tumorigenesis by its cell cycle regulatory properties and both gene mutations and protein accumulation have been associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. The present study was undertaken to investigate the prognostic significance of gene mutations......, p53 protein accumulation and of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the TP53 locus in young (age ... (46%). Log rank analysis revealed no significant association between survival and TP53 mutations (in general), p53 protein accumulation or LOH. However, missense mutations localised to the zinc binding domain were significantly (P = 0.0007) associated with poorer prognosis. As indicated...

  11. Expression de ;'anti-oncogene p53 dans les carcinomes mammaires ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tumor suppressor gene TP53 has been localized to the short arm of chromosome 17. It is frequently the site of point mutations in different human tumors (colon, lung, breast, liver). The frequency of this mutation is between 14 and 60%.The mutation leads to the accumulation of an altered form of p53 protein, detectable ...

  12. p53 mutations and codon 213 polymorphism of p53 in lung cancers of former uranium miners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, W; Vahrenholz, C; Schuster, H; Wiesner, B; Bauer, P; Täuscher, F; Plogmann, H; Morgenroth, K; Konietzko, N; Norpoth, K

    1999-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of G-->T transversions of p53 in lung cancers of smokers. One study has reported a special "hotspot" mutation at codon 249 of p53 in lung cancers of former uranium miners. The aim of our study was to look for mutational spectra of p53 in former German uranium miners with lung cancers. We investigated 16 patients with lung cancer who had worked as uranium miners in Germany and 13 lung cancer patients without a mining history of the same region. By means of the polymerase chain reaction and sequencing we looked for mutations in exons 5 7 of the p53 gene. We could not find any suggestion of hotspot mutations. The only G-->T mutation in former uranium miners was detected in the only nonsmoker. In 3 patients (19% of the total) we found a codon 213/3 polymorphism. The results indicate that G-->T transversions do not seem to be very common mutations in p53 in lung cancers probably caused by radiation. Therefore, p53 may be mutated early in lung cancer development if radiation exposure is a critical factor in carcinogenesis. In accordance with studies of thyroid cancer patients in the Chernobyl region, our results may indicate an overrepresentation of codon 213/3 polymorphism in p53 in radiation-caused cancers.

  13. A dynamic P53-MDM2 model with time delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalas, Gh.I. [Department of Biophysics and Medical Informatics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Piata Eftimie Murgu, nr. 3, 300041 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: mihalas@medinfo.umft.ro; Neamtu, M. [Department of Forecasting, Economic Analysis, Mathematics and Statistics, West University of Timisoara, Str. Pestalozzi, nr. 14A, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: mihaela.neamtu@fse.uvt.ro; Opris, D. [Department of Applied Mathematics, West University of Timisoara, Bd. V. Parvan, nr. 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: opris@math.uvt.ro; Horhat, R.F. [Department of Biophysics and Medical Informatics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Piata Eftimie Murgu, nr. 3, 300041 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: rhorhat@yahoo.com

    2006-11-15

    Specific activator and repressor transcription factors which bind to specific regulator DNA sequences, play an important role in gene activity control. Interactions between genes coding such transcription factors should explain the different stable or sometimes oscillatory gene activities characteristic for different tissues. Starting with the model P53-MDM2 described into [Mihalas GI, Simon Z, Balea G, Popa E. Possible oscillatory behaviour in P53-MDM2 interaction computer simulation. J Biol Syst 2000;8(1):21-9] and the process described into [Kohn KW, Pommier Y. Molecular interaction map of P53 and MDM2 logic elements, which control the off-on switch of P53 in response to DNA damage. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2005;331:816-27] we enveloped a new model of this interaction. Choosing the delay as a bifurcation parameter we study the direction and stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions. Some numerical examples are finally given for justifying the theoretical results.

  14. p53 and disease: when the guardian angel fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royds, J A; Iacopetta, B

    2006-06-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene (TP53) is mutated more often in human cancers than any other gene yet reported. Of importance, it is mutated frequently in the common human malignancies of the breast and colorectum and also, but less frequently, in other significant human cancers such as glioblastomas. There is also one inherited cancer predisposing syndrome called Li-Fraumeni that is caused by TP53 mutations. In this review, we discuss the significance of p53 mutations in some of the above tumors with a view to outlining how p53 contributes to malignant progression. We also discuss the usefulness of TP53 status as a prognostic marker and its role as a predictor of response to therapy. Finally, we outline some evidence that abnormalities in p53 function contribute to the etiology of other non-neoplastic diseases.

  15. p53 immunostaining pattern in Brazilian patients with hepatocellular carcinoma Expressão imunohistoquímica do p53 carcinoma hepatocelular de pacientes brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venâncio Avancini Ferreira Alves

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is an important type of cancer etiologically related to some viruses, chemical carcinogens and other host or environmental factors associated to chronic liver injury in humans. The tumor suppressor gene p53 is mutated in highly variable levels (0-52% of HCC in different countries. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to compare the frequency of aberrant immunohistochemical expression of p53 in HCC occurring in cirrhotic or in non-cirrhotic patients as well as in liver cell dysplasia and in adenomatous hyperplasia. We studied 84 patients with HCC or cirrhosis. RESULTS: We detected p53 altered immuno-expression in 58.3% of patients in Grade III-IV contrasting to 22.2% of patients in Grade I-II (p = 0.02. Nontumorous areas either in the vicinity of HCC or in the 30 purely cirrhotic cases showed no nuclear p53 altered expression, even in foci of dysplasia or adenomatous hyperplasia. No significant difference was found among cases related to HBV, HCV or alcohol. CONCLUSION: The high frequency of p53 immunoexpression in this population is closer to those reported in China and Africa, demanding further studies to explain the differences with European and North American reports.O carcinoma hepatocelular (CHC é um importante tipo de câncer relacionado etiologicamente a alguns vírus, carcinógenos químicos e outros fatores ambientais que causam danos crônicos ao fígado em humanos. A freqüência de mutação do gene p53 em CHC é altamente heterogênea (0-52% nos diversos países. OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar, imuno-histologicamente, a freqüência da expressão anômala de p53 em CHCs em pacientes cirróticos versus não-cirróticos, bem como em displasia hepática e hiperplasia adenomatosa. Para isso, foram estudados 84 pacientes com carcinoma hepatocelular ou cirrose. RESULTADOS: Foram detectadas expressões do p53 alterado em 58,3% dos pacientes com CHC graus III-IV, contrastando com

  16. p53-dependent delayed effects of radiation vary according to time of irradiation of p53 + / - mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that in p53 (+ / -) mice that had been given a whole-body dose of 3 Gy at 8 weeks of age, p53-dependent delayed effects of radiation, as manifested in T-cell receptor (TCR) variant fractions (VF) instability in mouse splenocytes, were biphasic, namely, induction of TCR-VF mutation reappeared at 44 weeks. The manifestation of the delayed effects and the measures of biological markers varied according to the timing of irradiation. We also reported that the decrease in function of the p53 gene was related to the effects of a delayed mutation. In the present study, we investigated the functions and mutations of the p53 gene in old age for p53 (+ / -) mice following irradiation at various ages. p53 (+ / -) mice were given a whole-body dose of 3 Gy at 8, 28 or 40 weeks of age. There were significant differences for all variables tested at 8 weeks of age. This was similarly the case for mice irradiated at 28 weeks of age, in which there were also significant differences in TCR VF and the percentage of apoptosis. In mice irradiated at 40 weeks of age, there were significant differences for all considered variables except for the p53 allele. We demonstrated that the different patterns of delayed mutation of the p53 gene at 56 weeks of age depended on the age at which mice had undergone 3-Gy whole-body irradiation. Our conclusions are limited to variation in p53-dependent delayed effects according to the time of irradiation.

  17. Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    killing ovarian cancer cells in vitro. This is unreported, novel finding paves the way for using super p53 for ovarian cancer treatment. Main...This is unreported, novel finding paves the way for using super p53 for ovarian cancer treatment. Main activities and objectives completed to date...What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals?  Now that the basic groundwork for the experimental assays has

  18. Biologic effect of exogenous wild p53 combined with irradiation on human melanoma cell lines with different p53 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Fengling; Zhang Hong; Li Wenjian; Liu Bing; Zhou Qingming; Duan Xin; Gao Qingxiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of low dose irradiation on gene transfer efficiency and the effect of adenoviral-mediated exogenous P53 overexpression on apoptosis and radiosensitivity of radioresistant human melanoma cell lines A375(wild type p53)and WM983a(mutant type p53). Methods: Control vector, a replication deficient recombinant adenoviral vector containing a CMV promoter and green fluorescent protein (AdCMV-GFP), was used to transfect A375 cells and WM983a cells preirradiated with or without 1 Gy X-ray. The transduction efficiency of GFP gene was determined with fluorescence microscope directly. These two types of cells irradiated by 1 Gy X-ray were transfected with a replication deficient recombinant adenoviral vector carrying human wild p53 (AdCMV-p53), and mRNA level was detected by RT-PCR. The cell cycle delay and the expression of exogenous P53 were detected using flow cytometry (FCM) at different times after transfection. Tunel technique was used to detect cell apoptosis. The radiosensivity of A375 and WM983a cells after p53 transduction was analyzed by colony formation. Results: It is found that 1 Gy irradiation increased the gene transfection efficiency of A375 and WM983a cells. The expression of exogenous P53 was found to range from 60% to 80% among transfected cells during the first three days after transduction and then declined continuously down to the control level on day 10. G 1 cell cycle arrest was also observed after p53 gene transduction. WM983a cells transfected with p53 showed higher sensitivity to X-ray-induced cell killing than A375 cells. Conclusions: It is indicated that low dose of ionizing radiation can improve gene transfection efficiency of A375 and WM983a cells mediated by adenovirus vector. Althrough the overexpresion of exogenous p53 may not inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis of melanoma cell line A375 and WM983a irt vitro, the two cell lines are much more sensitive to cell death induced by irradiation. It is

  19. HPV and p53 expression in epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuscu, E; Ozdemir, B H; Erkanli, S; Haberal, A

    2005-01-01

    Human papillomavirus is the causal factor for cervical cancer. However, the role of HPV infection in ovarian cancer is unclear. This study aimed to determine the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in ovarian cancer tissues along with the expression of tumor suppressor gene p53. We also investigated any possible association of HPV with p53 gene mutations in ovarian carcinoma. Archived human ovarian cancer tissues (n = 40 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer) embedded in paraffin blocks were used. Controls were 32 non-malignant ovarian tumor tissue blocks. In situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to detect the presence of HPV and p53 expression, respectively. Of the total, 37.5% (n = 15) of malignant and 28.1% (n = 9) of benign ovarian tumors were positive for HPV (OR: 1.5 CI: 0.5-4.1, p = 0.4). The difference was not statistically significant. However, p53 was detected in 72.5% (n = 29) of malignant cases compared to 37.5% (n = 12) of benign cases (OR: 4.3 CI: 1.6-11.9, p = 0.003). Furthermore, a positive correlation between HPV and p53 expressions in ovarian cancer tissue samples was detected (r = 0.47, p = 0.001). HPV does not seem to be a major component in the development of ovarian carcinoma, nevertheless HPV positivity seems to contribute to the pathogenesis in at least some ovarian carcinoma cases by way of interaction with tumor suppressor p53.

  20. The p53 Transcriptional Network Influences Microglia Behavior and Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloi, Macarena S; Su, Wei; Garden, Gwenn A

    2015-01-01

    The tumor-suppressor protein p53 belongs to a family of proteins that play pivotal roles in multiple cellular functions including cell proliferation, cell death, genome stability, and regulation of inflammation. Neuroinflammation is a common feature of central nervous system (CNS) pathology, and microglia are the specialized resident population of CNS myeloid cells that initiate innate immune responses. Microglia maintain CNS homeostasis through pathogen containment, phagocytosis of debris, and initiation of tissue-repair cascades. However, an unregulated pro-inflammatory response can lead to tissue injury and dysfunction in both acute and chronic inflammatory states. Therefore, regulation of the molecular signals that control the induction, magnitude, and resolution of inflammation are necessary for optimal CNS health. We and others have described a novel mechanism by which p53 transcriptional activity modulates microglia behaviors in vitro and in vivo. Activation of p53 induces expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) that support microglia pro-inflammatory functions and suppress anti-inflammatory and tissue repair behaviors. In this review, we introduce the previously described roles of the p53 signaling network and discuss novel functions of p53 in the microglia-mediated inflammatory response in CNS health and disease. Ultimately, improved understanding of the molecular regulators modulated by p53 transcriptional activity in microglia will enhance the development of rational therapeutic strategies to harness the homeostatic and tissue repair functions of microglia.

  1. Thymocyte apoptosis induced by p53-dependent and independent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, A.R.; Purdie, C.A.; Harrison, D.J.; Morris, R.G.; Bird, C.C.; Hooper, M.L.; Wyllie, A.H. (Edinburgh Univ. Medical School (United Kingdom). Dept. of Pathology)

    1993-04-29

    The authors studied the dependence of apoptosis on p53 expression in cells from the thymus cortex. Short-term thymocyte cultures were prepared from mice constitutively heterozygous or homozygous for a deletion in the p53 gene introduced into the germ line after gene targeting. Wild-type thymocytes readily undergo apoptosis after treatment with ionizing radiation, the glucocorticoid methylprednisolone, or etoposide (an inhibitor of topoisomerase II), or after Ca[sup 2+]-dependent activation by phorbol ester and a calcium ionophore. In contrast, homozygous null p53 thymocytes are resistant to induction of apoptosis by radiation or etoposide, but retain normal sensitivity to glucocorticoid and calcium. The time- dependent apoptosis that occurs in untreated cultures is unaffected by p53 status. Cells heterozygous for p53 deletion are partially resistant to radiation and etoposide. Results show that p53 exerts a significant and dose-dependent effect in the initiation of apoptosis, but only when it is induced by agents that cause DNA-strand breakage. (Author).

  2. p53 and Ceramide as Collaborators in the Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan Dbaibo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The sphingolipid ceramide mediates various cellular processes in response to several extracellular stimuli. Some genotoxic stresses are able to induce p53-dependent ceramide accumulation leading to cell death. However, in other cases, in the absence of the tumor suppressor protein p53, apoptosis proceeds partly due to the activity of this “tumor suppressor lipid”, ceramide. In the current review, we describe ceramide and its roles in signaling pathways such as cell cycle arrest, hypoxia, hyperoxia, cell death, and cancer. In a specific manner, we are elaborating on the role of ceramide in mitochondrial apoptotic cell death signaling. Furthermore, after highlighting the role and mechanism of action of p53 in apoptosis, we review the association of ceramide and p53 with respect to apoptosis. Strikingly, the hypothesis for a direct interaction between ceramide and p53 is less favored. Recent data suggest that ceramide can act either upstream or downstream of p53 protein through posttranscriptional regulation or through many potential mediators, respectively.

  3. UHRF2, another E3 ubiquitin ligase for p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Lu; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Fangmin; Yang, Yan; Qian, Guanhua [Department of Cell Biology and Medical Genetics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Duan, Changzhu, E-mail: duanchzhu@cqmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics of Ministry of Education, Faculty of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Cell Biology and Medical Genetics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 associates with p53 in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 interacts with p53 through its SRA/YDG domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 ubiquitinates p53 in vivo and in vitro. -- Abstract: UHRF2, ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 2, is a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is involved in cell cycle and epigenetic regulation. UHRF2 interacts with multiple cell cycle proteins, including cyclins (A2, B1, D1, and E1), CDK2, and pRb; moreover, UHRF2 could ubiquitinate cyclin D1 and cyclin E1. Also, UHRF2 has been shown to be implicated in epigenetic regulation by associating with DNMTs, G9a, HDAC1, H3K9me2/3 and hemi-methylated DNA. We found that UHRF2 associates with tumor suppressor protein p53, and p53 is ubiquitinated by UHRF2 in vivo and in vitro. Given that both UHRF2 and p53 are involved in cell cycle regulation, this study may suggest a novel signaling pathway on cell proliferation.

  4. Mutant p53 shapes the enhancer landscape of cancer cells in response to chronic immune signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnamoun, Homa; Lu, Hanbin; Duttke, Sascha H; Benner, Christopher; Glass, Christopher K; Lauberth, Shannon M

    2017-09-29

    Inflammation influences cancer development, progression, and the efficacy of cancer treatments, yet the mechanisms by which immune signaling drives alterations in the cancer cell transcriptome remain unclear. Using ChIP-seq, RNA-seq, and GRO-seq, here we demonstrate a global overlap in the binding of tumor-promoting p53 mutants and the master proinflammatory regulator NFκB that drives alterations in enhancer and gene activation in response to chronic TNF-α signaling. We show that p53 mutants interact directly with NFκB and that both factors impact the other's binding at diverse sets of active enhancers. In turn, the simultaneous and cooperative binding of these factors is required to regulate RNAPII recruitment, the synthesis of enhancer RNAs, and the activation of tumor-promoting genes. Collectively, these findings establish a mechanism by which chronic TNF-α signaling orchestrates a functional interplay between mutant p53 and NFκB that underlies altered patterns of cancer-promoting gene expression.Inflammation is known to affect cancer development, yet the mechanisms by which immune signaling drives transformation remain unclear. Here, the authors provide evidence that chronic TNF-α signaling promotes the enhancer binding and transcriptional interplay between mutant p53 and NFκB.

  5. Apoptotic cell death in erythrocytes of p53-deficient medaka (Oryzias latipes) after γ-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Alaa El-Din Hamid; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have examined the effects of γ-irradiation (γ-IR) on wild-type and p53 mutant Medaka (Oryzias latipes) 24 hours after irradiation and in the present work, apoptosis and alterations in erythrocytes of 4, 8 and 24 h and 14 days after gamma-ray irradiation were reported as genotoxic biomarkers of γ-irradiation. Sexually mature wild-type, WT (Hd-rR) and p53(-/-) adult female medaka (O. latipes) were exposed to 4 Gy dose of γ-IR and sampling were collected after 4, 8 and 24 h and 14 days. Apoptosis and morphological alterations were observed from 4 h after irradiation and remarkably increased 8 h after irradiation in the wild-type. Apoptotic cell death has been observed 8 h after irradiation most prominently but subtle in p53 mutant medaka. All these phenotypes were recovered 14 days after irradiation in both strains. Although no micronuclei were seen in any group, nuclear abnormalities were observed in red blood cells. Both apoptosis and morphological alterations in erythrocytes were decreased after 24 and 14 days after γ-irradiation. We conclude that apoptosis and malformations caused by 4 Gy γ-irradiation in the erythrocytes of medaka fish occurs from 4-24 h and the initial response until 8 h was p53-dependent.

  6. Hepatitis C Virus Indirectly Disrupts DNA Damage-Induced p53 Responses by Activating Protein Kinase R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan K. Mitchell

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Many DNA tumor viruses promote cellular transformation by inactivating the critically important tumor suppressor protein p53. In contrast, it is not known whether p53 function is disrupted by hepatitis C virus (HCV, a unique, oncogenic RNA virus that is the leading infectious cause of liver cancer in many regions of the world. Here we show that HCV-permissive, liver-derived HepG2 cells engineered to constitutively express microRNA-122 (HepG2/miR-122 cells have normal p53-mediated responses to DNA damage and that HCV replication in these cells potently suppresses p53 responses to etoposide, an inducer of DNA damage, or nutlin-3, an inhibitor of p53 degradation pathways. Upregulation of p53-dependent targets is consequently repressed within HCV-infected cells, with potential consequences for cell survival. Despite this, p53 function is not disrupted by overexpression of the complete HCV polyprotein, suggesting that altered p53 function may result from the host response to viral RNA replication intermediates. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9-mediated ablation of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-activated protein kinase R (PKR restored p53 responses while boosting HCV replication, showing that p53 inhibition results directly from viral activation of PKR. The hepatocellular abundance of phosphorylated PKR is elevated in HCV-infected chimpanzees, suggesting that PKR activation and consequent p53 inhibition accompany HCV infection in vivo. These findings reveal a feature of the host response to HCV infection that may contribute to hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

  7. Susceptibility to Radiation Induced Apoptosis and Senescence in p53 Wild Type and p53 Mutant Breast Tumor Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeMasters, Gerald

    2006-01-01

    .... The current studies address the basis for this interaction by evaluating DNA damage and repair, the impact of interference with reactive oxygen generation, the involvement of p53 and caspase 3...

  8. A surrogate p53 reporter in Drosophila reveals the interaction of eIF4E and p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corujo, G.; Campagno, R.; Rivera Pomar, R.; Ferrero, P.; Lu, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    eIF4E promotes translation upon binding the mRNA 5'cap and it is required for cell proliferation. p53 is a proapoptotic protein which is activated in response to DNA damage. There is evidence that suggests that eIF4E and p53 are connected in a mechanism that regulates their function. We propose a model for that such a mechanism to explain the equilibrium between apoptosis and cell proliferation. Our data shows a correlation between the overexpression of eIF4E and the suppression of apoptosis triggered by the overexpression of p53 in Drosophila imaginal discs. We also studied a reporter transgene which expresses GFP in response to p53 activation by gamma radiation. We could confirm that this p53 surrogate works in imaginal discs as well as in embryos. This provided us a tool to quantify the effect on the GFP signal by overexpression of eIF4E to confirm how these two proteins could interact in vivo. Our results suggest that p53 and eIF4E are indeed in an equilibrium that decides if a cell shall proliferate or die. (authors)

  9. Restoration of mp53 to wtp53 by chemical chaperones restores p53-dependent apoptosis after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, T.; Asakawa, I.; Tamamoto, T.; Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.

    2003-01-01

    The mutations of many kinds of cancer related genes have been investigated for the predictive assay against cancer therapy by the application of molecular biology. A tumor suppressor gene product of wtp53 plays important roles in cancer suppression through the induction of cell growth arrest, DNA repair or apoptosis. The p53 exerts its function by induction of downstream genes and/or interaction to various proteins. Mutations in the p53 gene (mp53) cause conformational alterations in the p53 protein, the majority of which can no longer induce expression of the downstream genes. The genetic status of p53 gene has been focused as the most important candidate among them for cancer therapy. The gene therapy of p53 has been already applied. We reported that the transfection of mp53 gene increased the radio-, thermo- and chemo-resistance, and depressed apoptosis introduced with them through bax-induction and proteolysis of PARP and caspase-3. From these results, we propose that the gene therapy of wtp53 to p53-deleted cancer cells may be very useful for cancer therapy by the combination with radiotherapy. Even in the case of mp53 cancer cells, we succeeded the restoration of mp53 to wtp53 by glycerol or C-terminal peptide of p53 as chemical chaperones. These experimental progresses might support effective cancer therapy against individual patients bearing with different p53 gene status by the use of the most suitable treatment to them in the near future

  10. Mdm2 is a novel activator of ApoCIII promoter which is antagonized by p53 and SHP inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yuxia [Departments of Medicine and Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Wang, Li, E-mail: l.wang@hsc.utah.edu [Departments of Medicine and Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mdm2 enhances HNF4{alpha} activation of the ApoCIII promoter via interaction with HNF4{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53 antagonizes the effect of Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SHP strengthens p53 inhibition but abolishes Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mdm2 alters the enrichment of HNF4{alpha}, p53 and SHP to the ApoCIII promoter. -- Abstract: We examined the effect of Mdm2 on regulation of the ApoCIII promoter and its cross-talk with p53 and nuclear receptor SHP. Overexpression of Mdm2 markedly enhanced ApoCIII promoter activity by HNF4{alpha}. A direct association of Mdm2 protein with the HNF4{alpha} protein was observed by co-immunoprecipitation. Ectopic expression of p53 decreased HNF4{alpha} activation of the ApoCIII promoter and antagonized the effect of Mdm2. Co-expression of SHP further strengthened p53 inhibition and abolished Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Mdm2 inhibited p53-mediated enrichment of HNF4{alpha} to the ApoCIII promoter while simultaneously reducing p53 binding and increasing recruitment of SHP to the ApoCIII promoter. The results from this study implicate a potentially important function of Mdm2 in regulation of lipoprotein metabolism.

  11. Conversion of Fibroblasts to Neural Cells by p53 Depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Zhou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Conversion from fibroblasts to neurons has recently been successfully induced. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we find that depletion of p53 alone converts fibroblasts into all three major neural lineages. The induced neuronal cells express multiple neuron-specific proteins and generate action potentials and transmitter-receptor-mediated currents. Surprisingly, depletion does not affect the well-known tumorigenic p53 target, p21. Instead, knockdown of p53 upregulates neurogenic transcription factors, which in turn boosts fibroblast-neuron conversion. p53 binds the promoter of the neurogenic transcription factor Neurod2 and regulates its expression during fibroblast-neuron conversion. Furthermore, our method provides a high efficiency of conversion in late-passage fibroblasts. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis shows that the p53-deficiency-induced neurons exhibit an expression profile different from parental fibroblasts and similar to control-induced neurons. The results may help to understand and improve neural conversion mechanisms to develop robust neuron-replacement therapy strategies.

  12. SCGB3A2 Inhibits Acrolein-Induced Apoptosis through Decreased p53 Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurotani, Reiko; Shima, Reika; Miyano, Yuki; Sakahara, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Yoshie; Shibata, Yoko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Shioko

    2015-04-28

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a major global health problem with increasing morbidity and mortality rates, is anticipated to become the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020. COPD arises from exposure to cigarette smoke. Acrolein, which is contained in cigarette smoke, is the most important risk factor for COPD. It causes lung injury through altering apoptosis and causes inflammation by augmenting p53 phosphorylation and producing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Secretoglobin (SCGB) 3A2, a secretory protein predominantly present in the epithelial cells of the lungs and trachea, is a cytokine-like small molecule having anti-inflammatory, antifibrotic, and growth factor activities. In this study, the effect of SCGB3A2 on acrolein-related apoptosis was investigated using the mouse fibroblast cell line MLg as the first step in determining the possible therapeutic value of SCGB3A2 in COPD. Acrolein increased the production of ROS and phosphorylation of p53 and induced apoptosis in MLg cells. While the extent of ROS production induced by acrolein was not affected by SCGB3A2, p53 phosphorylation was significantly decreased by SCGB3A2. These results demonstrate that SCGB3A2 inhibited acrolein-induced apoptosis through decreased p53 phosphorylation, not altered ROS levels.

  13. SCGB3A2 Inhibits Acrolein-Induced Apoptosis through Decreased p53 Phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurotani, Reiko; Shima, Reika; Miyano, Yuki; Sakahara, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Yoshie; Shibata, Yoko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Shioko

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a major global health problem with increasing morbidity and mortality rates, is anticipated to become the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020. COPD arises from exposure to cigarette smoke. Acrolein, which is contained in cigarette smoke, is the most important risk factor for COPD. It causes lung injury through altering apoptosis and causes inflammation by augmenting p53 phosphorylation and producing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Secretoglobin (SCGB) 3A2, a secretory protein predominantly present in the epithelial cells of the lungs and trachea, is a cytokine-like small molecule having anti-inflammatory, antifibrotic, and growth factor activities. In this study, the effect of SCGB3A2 on acrolein-related apoptosis was investigated using the mouse fibroblast cell line MLg as the first step in determining the possible therapeutic value of SCGB3A2 in COPD. Acrolein increased the production of ROS and phosphorylation of p53 and induced apoptosis in MLg cells. While the extent of ROS production induced by acrolein was not affected by SCGB3A2, p53 phosphorylation was significantly decreased by SCGB3A2. These results demonstrate that SCGB3A2 inhibited acrolein-induced apoptosis through decreased p53 phosphorylation, not altered ROS levels

  14. Evaluation of K-ras and p53 expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma using the cancer genome atlas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Lu

    Full Text Available Genetic alterations in K-ras and p53 are thought to be critical in pancreatic cancer development and progression. However, K-ras and p53 expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma have not been systematically examined in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA Data Portal. Information regarding K-ras and p53 alterations, mRNA expression data, and protein/protein phosphorylation abundance was retrieved from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA databases, and analyses were performed by the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics. The mutual exclusivity analysis showed that events in K-ras and p53 were likely to co-occur in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (Log odds ratio = 1.599, P = 0.006. The graphical summary of the mutations showed that there were hotspots for protein activation. In the network analysis, no solid association between K-ras and p53 was observed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In the survival analysis, neither K-ras nor p53 were associated with both survival events. As in the data mining study in the TCGA databases, our study provides a new perspective to understand the genetic features of K-ras and p53 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  15. p53-Mediated Molecular Control of Autophagy in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mrakovcic

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an indispensable mechanism of the eukaryotic cell, facilitating the removal and renewal of cellular components and thereby balancing the cell’s energy consumption and homeostasis. Deregulation of autophagy is now regarded as one of the characteristic key features contributing to the development of tumors. In recent years, the suppression of autophagy in combination with chemotherapeutic treatment has been approached as a novel therapy in cancer treatment. However, depending on the type of cancer and context, interference with the autophagic machinery can either promote or disrupt tumorigenesis. Therefore, disclosure of the major signaling pathways that regulate autophagy and control tumorigenesis is crucial. To date, several tumor suppressor proteins and oncogenes have emerged as eminent regulators of autophagy whose depletion or mutation favor tumor formation. The mammalian cell “janitor” p53 belongs to one of these tumor suppressors that are most commonly mutated in human tumors. Experimental evidence over the last decade convincingly reports that p53 can act as either an activator or an inhibitor of autophagy depending on its subcellular localization and its mode of action. This finding gains particular significance as p53 deficiency or mutant variants of p53 that accumulate in the cytoplasm of tumor cells enable activation of autophagy. Accordingly, we recently identified p53 as a molecular hub that regulates autophagy and apoptosis in histone deacetylase inhibitor-treated uterine sarcoma cells. In light of this novel experimental evidence, in this review, we focus on p53 signaling as a mediator of the autophagic pathway in tumor cells.

  16. COX-2 and p53 in human sinonasal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmila, Reetta; Cyr, Diane; Luce, Danièle

    2008-01-01

    to development of cancer. Many signals that activate COX-2 also induce tumor suppressor p53, a transcription factor central in cellular stress response. We investigated COX-2 and p53 expressions by immunohistochemistry in 50 SNCs (23 adenocarcinomas, and 27 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC); 48 analyzed for COX-2......The causal role of wood-dust exposure in sinonasal cancer (SNC) has been established in epidemiological studies, but the mechanisms of SNC carcinogenesis are still largely unknown. Increased amounts of COX-2 are found in both premalignant and malignant tissues, and experimental evidence link COX-2...

  17. P53 Suppression of Homologous Recombination and Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    401]. The more aggressive p53R172H point mutation is a dominant allele that results in a p53 protein product with a substantially misfolded DNA...MRE11 and NBS1 proteins to multiple DNA damage sites, J. Biol. Chem. 283 (2008) 1197–1208. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18025084 [34] J.-F...15,16], have an increased risk of developing MDS. CREB binding protein (CREBBP) interacts with DNA damage response/repair proteins , such as TP53 [17,18

  18. A study on the effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on p53 expression in gastric cancer and gastritis tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Barik A; Gucin, Zuhal; Bayyurt, Nizamettin

    2013-09-16

    Helicobacter pylori cause damage to gastric epithelial cells and alterations in the p53 gene that lead to cancer development. This study aimed to determine the correlation of p53 expression with H. pylori using immunohistochemistry, RFLP-PCR, and histopathology. Gastric biopsy samples from gastric cancer (GC) (n = 54) and gastritis (n = 31) patients were examined for histopathological changes and expression of p53 protein by immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemical analysis of p53 protein expression in H. pylori-positive GC sections showed an average of 44.3% positive cells in tumors and 6.9% in normal tissues, as compared to 16.4% and 4.4% in H. pylori-negative sections. P53 expression showed significant association with H. pylori (P = 0.005), invasion depth (P = 0.029) and inflammation reaction (P = 0.008). In gastritis sections, no difference in the average p53 staining in H. pylori-positive or -negative sections was seen. PCR-RFLP results also showed no difference in genotype frequencies of p53 in H. pylori-positive or -negative gastritis sections. Histopathology study of H. pylori-positive GC sections showed that 97.2% were the intestinal type and 2.8% the diffuse type, while in H. pylori-negative sections 35.2% were the intestinal type and 64.8% the diffuse type. Biopsy sections from H. pylori-positive gastritis patients revealed more severe inflammation than those of H. pylori-negative patients. Our results show that H. pylori infection affects p53 expression in GC. The average p53 expression was significantly higher in tumor than in normal tissues. In gastritis sections p53 expression was significantly associated with H. pylori.

  19. STICS, SCOUTs and p53 signatures; a new language for pelvic serous carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Karishma; Mehrad, Mitra; Ning, Geng; Drapkin, Ronny; McKeon, Frank D; Xian, Wa; Crum, Christopher P

    2011-01-01

    The events leading to the most common and most lethal ovarian carcinoma - high grade serous carcinoma - have been poorly understood. However, the detailed pathologic study of asymptomatic women with germ-line BRCA 1 or BRCA2 (BCRA+) mutations has unearthed an early malignancy, serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STIC), which has linked many peritoneal and ovarian serous carcinomas to the fimbria. The distinction between high-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas continues to narrow, with shared alterations in expression of pTEN, PAX2 and p53. Moreover, the discovery of clonal alterations in p53 in benign tubal epithelium, - p53 signatures - has established a foundation for a serous cancer precursor in the fimbria. We have expanded this concept to include a generic secretory cell outgrowth (SCOUT) in the fallopian tube that is associated with altered PAX2 expression. As the repertoire of gene alterations is expanded and its link to serous carcinogenesis clarified, a cogent pathway to high-grade Mullerian carcinomas will emerge. This will challenge conventional thinking about ovarian carcinogenesis but will provide a new template for studies of ovarian cancer prevention.

  20. Cadherin-6 type 2, K-cadherin (CDH6) is regulated by mutant p53 in the fallopian tube but is not expressed in the ovarian surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Subbulakshmi; Lantvit, Daniel D; Chae, Dam Hee; Burdette, Joanna E

    2016-10-25

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy and may arise in either the fallopian tube epithelium (FTE) or ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). A mutation in p53 is reported in 96% of HGSOC, most frequently at R273 and R248. The goal of this study was to identify specific gene targets in the FTE that are altered by mutant p53, but not in the OSE. Gene analysis revealed that both R273 and R248 mutant p53 reduces CDH6 expression in the oviduct, but CDH6 was not detected in murine OSE cells. p53R273H induced SLUG and FOXM1 while p53R248W did not induce SLUG and only modestly increased FOXM1, which correlated with less migration as compared to p53R273H. An oviduct specific PAX8Cre/+/p53R270H/+ mouse model was created and confirmed that in vivo mutant p53 repressed CDH6 but was not sufficient to stabilize p53 expression alone. Overexpression of mutant p53 in the p53 null OVCAR5 cells decreased CDH6 levels indicating this was a gain-of-function. SLUG knockdown in murine oviductal cells with p53R273H restored CDH6 repression and a ChIP analysis revealed direct binding of mutant p53 on the CDH6 promoter. NSC59984, a small molecule that degrades mutant p53R273H, rescued CDH6 expression. In summary, CDH6 is expressed in the oviduct, but not the ovary, and is repressed by mutant p53. CDH6 expression with further validations may aide in establishing markers that inform upon the cell of origin of high grade serous tumors.

  1. 1800MHz Microwave Induces p53 and p53-Mediated Caspase-3 Activation Leading to Cell Apoptosis In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiang Xing

    Full Text Available Recent studies have reported that exposure of mammalian cells to microwave radiation may have adverse effects such as induction of cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying microwave induced mammalian cell apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism: exposure to 1800MHz microwave radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis through cytochrome c-mediated caspase-3 activation pathway. We first measured intensity of microwave radiation from several electronic devices with an irradiation detector. Mouse NIH/3T3 and human U-87 MG cells were then used as receivers of 1800MHz electromagnetic radiation (EMR at a power density of 1209 mW/m2. Following EMR exposure, cells were analyzed for viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, DNA damage, p53 expression, and caspase-3 activity. Our analysis revealed that EMR exposure significantly decreased viability of NIH/3T3 and U-87 MG cells, and increased caspase-3 activity. ROS burst was observed at 6 h and 48 h in NIH/3T3 cells, while at 3 h in U-87 MG cells. Hoechst 33258 staining and in situ TUNEL assay detected that EMR exposure increased DNA damage, which was significantly restrained in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant. Moreover, EMR exposure increased the levels of p53 protein and p53 target gene expression, promoted cytochrome c release from mitochondrion, and increased caspase-3 activity. These events were inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor and caspase inhibitor. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that 1800MHz EMR induces apoptosis-related events such as ROS burst and more oxidative DNA damage, which in turn promote p53-dependent caspase-3 activation through release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion. These findings thus provide new insights into physiological mechanisms underlying microwave-induced cell apoptosis.

  2. 1800MHz Microwave Induces p53 and p53-Mediated Caspase-3 Activation Leading to Cell Apoptosis In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fuqiang; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Yiduo; Cui, Jiesheng; He, Sailing; Wang, Guanyu

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that exposure of mammalian cells to microwave radiation may have adverse effects such as induction of cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying microwave induced mammalian cell apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism: exposure to 1800MHz microwave radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis through cytochrome c-mediated caspase-3 activation pathway. We first measured intensity of microwave radiation from several electronic devices with an irradiation detector. Mouse NIH/3T3 and human U-87 MG cells were then used as receivers of 1800MHz electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at a power density of 1209 mW/m2. Following EMR exposure, cells were analyzed for viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage, p53 expression, and caspase-3 activity. Our analysis revealed that EMR exposure significantly decreased viability of NIH/3T3 and U-87 MG cells, and increased caspase-3 activity. ROS burst was observed at 6 h and 48 h in NIH/3T3 cells, while at 3 h in U-87 MG cells. Hoechst 33258 staining and in situ TUNEL assay detected that EMR exposure increased DNA damage, which was significantly restrained in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant). Moreover, EMR exposure increased the levels of p53 protein and p53 target gene expression, promoted cytochrome c release from mitochondrion, and increased caspase-3 activity. These events were inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor) and caspase inhibitor. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that 1800MHz EMR induces apoptosis-related events such as ROS burst and more oxidative DNA damage, which in turn promote p53-dependent caspase-3 activation through release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion. These findings thus provide new insights into physiological mechanisms underlying microwave-induced cell apoptosis. PMID:27689798

  3. Implication of genetic variants near SLC30A8, HHEX, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/B, IGF2BP2, FTO, TCF2, KCNQ1, and WFS1 in Type 2 Diabetes in a Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xianghai

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, several genome-wide and candidate gene association studies have identified many novel genetic loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D; among these genes, CDKAL1, IGF2BP2, SLC30A8, CDKN2A/B, HHEX, FTO, TCF2, KCNQ1, and WFS1 are the most important. We aimed to determine the effects of these genetic loci associated with T2D in the Chinese Han population of China. Methods Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in or near CDKAL1, IGF2BP2, SLC30A8, CDKN2A/B, HHEX, FTO, TCF2, KCNQ1, and WFS1 genes were genotyped in a case-control Chinese Han sample living in Beijing, China involving 1024 patients with T2D and 1005 control subjects. Results In Chinese Han, we replicated the associations between 7 genetic loci and T2D, with risk allele-specific odds ratios (ORs as follows: 1.27 (95% CI, 1.11-1.45; p = 0.0008 for CDKAL1-rs10946398, 1.26 (95% CI, 1.08-1.47; p = 0.003 for IGF2BP2-rs4402960, 1.19 (95% CI, 1.04-1.37; p = 0.009 for SLC30A8-rs13266634, 1.22 (95% CI, 1.06-1.41; p = 0.005 for CDKN2A/B-rs10811661, 1.20 (95% CI, 1.01-1.42; p = 0.03 for HHEX-rs5015480, 1.37 (95% CI, 1.19-1.69; p = 1.0 × 10-4 for KCNQ1-rs2237892, and 1.24 (95% CI, 1.01-1.52; p = 0.046 for FTO-rs8050136 after adjustment for age, gender, and body mass index. Not only did an association between WFS1-rs6446482 and early-onset T2D exist in the subgroup analysis, but TCF2-rs7501939 and WFS1-rs6446482 were also confirmed to confer risk for T2D in this meta-analysis. Moreover, the relationship between FTO-rs8050136 and body mass index, together with the effect of CDKAL1-rs10946398 on beta cell function, was also observed in the control individuals. Conclusions Our findings support the important contribution of these genetic loci to susceptibility for T2D in the Chinese Han population in Beijing of China.

  4. The p53-Deficient Mouse as a Breast Cancer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Vogelstein, B. and Fornace, A.J., Jr. (1992). Cell 71:587-597. (6) Yonish-Rouach, E., Resnitsky, D., Lotem, J., Sachs, L., Kimchi , A., and Oren, M. (1991...Cell 70: 937-948. Yonish-Rouach, E., D. Resnitzky, J. Lotem, L. Sachs, A. Kimchi , and M. Oren. 1991. Wild-type p53 induces apoptosis of my- eloid

  5. p53 mutation in carcinomas arising in ovarian cystic teratomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, T; Oguni, S; Kikuchi, M; Kanai, N; Saito, K

    1995-09-01

    Carcinomas arising in mature cystic teratomas of the ovaries from nine women were examined for the presence of p53 mutations. The nine tumors comprised six squamous cell carcinomas, one squamous cell carcinoma in situ, one undifferentiated small cell carcinoma, and one mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Abnormal nuclear accumulation of the p53 protein was observed in four of the tumors. Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks and subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for specific amplification of the p53 gene exons 5-8, followed by direct chemiluminescence sequencing analysis. A frameshift mutation in exon 8 (codon 278, CCT > del T; stop at codon 344) was detected in one poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The samples were also evaluated for the possible association of 'benign' and 'malignant' types of human papillomavirus (HPV) by PCR using universal primer sets. None of the samples contained detectable HPV genome. These data suggest that p53 mutations are relatively uncommon in secondary carcinomas developing in ovarian dermoid cysts, although the number of samples studied was admittedly small.

  6. Overexpression of p53 in Nigerian breast cancers and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to determine the expression of p53 protein as well as the relationship with oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) proteins. Methodology: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples of diagnosed invasive breast cancer were obtained from the Department of Anatomic and ...

  7. Systematic and comprehensive analysis of mutant p53 proteins in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The gene p53 is a well-known tumour suppressor gene that prevents cancer formation. It is the most commonly mutated gene among individuals with a diagnosis of cancer. Through recent advances in DNA sequencing abilities, researchers are now in a position to take a patient's tumour and identify the exact mutation in ...

  8. Functional Significance of Mutant p53 in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Lear, Renee

    2001-01-01

    ... in those cells with irreparable damage. In human tumors, many hot-spot mutations are found within the DNA-binding domain of p53, rendering it incapable of sequence-specific transactivation of target genes such as p21, bax, and mdm2...

  9. Functional Significance of Mutant p53 in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Lear, Rene

    2002-01-01

    ... in those cells with irreparable damage. In human tumors, many hot-spot mutations are found within the DNA-binding domain of p53, rendering it incapable of sequence-specific transactivation of target genes such as p2l, bax, and mdm2...

  10. Cellular inactivation of nitric oxide induces p53-dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The data obtained provide insight into the mechanism of cell proliferation action of endogenous NO•, based on p53 status, and indicate manipulation of iNOS may offer exciting opportunities to improve the effectiveness of melanoma treatment. Keywords: Apoptosis, Human melanoma cells, Inducible nitric oxide ...

  11. Immunohistochemical detection of P53 and Mdm2 in vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola A Bakry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitiligo is a common depigmented skin disorder that is caused by selective destruction of melanocytes. It is generally accepted that the main function of melanin resides in the protection of skin cells against the deleterious effect of ultraviolet rays (UVRs. Association of vitiligo and skin cancer has been a subject of controversy. Occurrence of skin cancer in long-lasting vitiligo is rare despite multiple evidences of DNA damage in vitiliginous skin. Aim: To detect the expression of P53 and Mdm2 proteins in both depigmented and normally pigmented skin of vitiligo patients and to compare it to control subjects suffering from nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC. Materials and Methods: Thirty-four patients with vitiligo and 30 age and sex-matched patients with nodulo-ulcerative basal cell carcinoma (BCC as a control group were selected. Both patients and control subjects had outdoor occupations. Skin biopsies were taken from each case and control subjects. Histopathological examination of Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections was done. Expression of P53 and Mdm2 proteins were examined immunohistochemically. Results: Both P53 and Mdm2 were strongly expressed in depigmented as well as normally pigmented skin of vitiligo patients. This expression involved the epidermis, skin adnexa and blood vessels with significant differences between cases and controls. Conclusions: The overexpression of P53 and Mdm2 proteins in both normally pigmented and depigmented skin of patients with vitiligo could contribute to the decreased occurrence of actinic damage and NMSC in these patients.

  12. Polymorphisms of the p53 gene in women with ovarian or endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, S; Halperin, R; Schneider, D; Kopilova, Y; Rotter, V

    1999-01-01

    The p53 gene is frequently mutated in various human tumors. Polymorphism is an additional genetic alteration observed in exons and introns of the p53 gene of normal tissues and tumors. Distributions of alleles of three common polymorphisms of the p53 gene; a 16 bp duplication in intron 3, codon 72 of exon 4 and a sequence in intron 6, were studied in peripheral white blood cells (WBC) of patients with ovarian or endometrial carcinomas. The analysis was performed by PCR and direct sequencing. The 100% linkage observed between the most common haplotypes of each polymorphism in healthy subjects was lower in the patients. A significant difference was observed between frequencies of genotype and haplotype combinations in patients with ovarian carcinoma and endometrial carcinoma. The incidence of heterozygosity was increased in ovarian carcinoma and decreased in endometrial carcinoma. Our results suggest that the p53 gene may be involved in susceptibility and predisposition to various cancers not only by mutations but also by preferential presentation of polymorphic alleles.

  13. Small Molecule Modulator of p53 Signaling Pathway: Application for Radiosensitizing or Radioprotection Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sang Taek; Cho, Mun Ju; Gwak, Jung Sug; Ryu, Min Jung; Song, Jie Young; Yun, Yeon Sook

    2009-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is key molecule to protect the cell against genotoxic stress and..the most frequently mutated..protein..in cancer cells. Lack of functional p53..is accompanied by high rate of genomic instability, rapid tumor progression, resistance to anticancer therapy, and increased angiogenesis. In response to DNA damage, p53 protein rapidly accumulated through attenuated proteolysis and is also activated as transcription factor. Activated p53 up-regulates target genes involved in cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis and then lead to suppression of malignant transformation and the maintenance of genomic integrity. Chemical genetics is a new technology to uncover the signaling networks that regulated biological phenotype using exogenous reagents such as small molecules. Analogous to classical forward genetic screens in model organism, this approach makes use of high throughput, phenotypic assay to identify small molecules that disrupt gene product function in a way that alters a phenotype of interest. Recently, interesting small molecules were identified from cell based high throughput screening and its target protein or mechanism of action were identified by various methods including affinity chromatography, protein array profiling, mRNA or phage display, transcription profiling, and RNA interference

  14. Extracellular adenosine sensing-a metabolic cell death priming mechanism downstream of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jaclyn S; Crighton, Diane; O'Prey, James; Mackay, Gillian; Zheng, Liang; Palmer, Timothy M; Gottlieb, Eyal; Ryan, Kevin M

    2013-05-09

    Tumor cells undergo changes in metabolism to meet their energetic and anabolic needs. It is conceivable that mechanisms exist to sense these changes and link them to pathways that eradicate cells primed for cancer development. We report that the tumor suppressor p53 activates a cell death priming mechanism that senses extracellular adenosine. Adenosine, the backbone of ATP, accumulates under conditions of cellular stress or altered metabolism. We show that its receptor, A2B, is upregulated by p53. A2B expression has little effect on cell viability, but ligand engagement activates a caspase- and Puma-dependent apoptotic response involving downregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Stimulation of A2B also significantly enhances cell death mediated by p53 and upon accumulation of endogenous adenosine following chemotherapeutic drug treatment and exposure to hypoxia. Since extracellular adenosine also accumulates within many solid tumors, this distinct p53 function links programmed cell death to both a cancer- and therapy-associated metabolic change. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Haploinsufficiency for Core Exon Junction Complex Components Disrupts Embryonic Neurogenesis and Causes p53-Mediated Microcephaly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanqian Mao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The exon junction complex (EJC is an RNA binding complex comprised of the core components Magoh, Rbm8a, and Eif4a3. Human mutations in EJC components cause neurodevelopmental pathologies. Further, mice heterozygous for either Magoh or Rbm8a exhibit aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly. Yet despite the requirement of these genes for neurodevelopment, the pathogenic mechanisms linking EJC dysfunction to microcephaly remain poorly understood. Here we employ mouse genetics, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses to demonstrate that haploinsufficiency for each of the 3 core EJC components causes microcephaly via converging regulation of p53 signaling. Using a new conditional allele, we first show that Eif4a3 haploinsufficiency phenocopies aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly of Magoh and Rbm8a mutant mice. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of embryonic brains at the onset of neurogenesis identifies common pathways altered in each of the 3 EJC mutants, including ribosome, proteasome, and p53 signaling components. We further demonstrate all 3 mutants exhibit defective splicing of RNA regulatory proteins, implying an EJC dependent RNA regulatory network that fine-tunes gene expression. Finally, we show that genetic ablation of one downstream pathway, p53, significantly rescues microcephaly of all 3 EJC mutants. This implicates p53 activation as a major node of neurodevelopmental pathogenesis following EJC impairment. Altogether our study reveals new mechanisms to help explain how EJC mutations influence neurogenesis and underlie neurodevelopmental disease.

  16. Transfection of rat embryo cells with mutant p53 increases the intrinsic radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, F.S.; Su, M.; Gerweck, L.; Schmidt, E.V.; Borek, C.; Preffer, F.; Dombkowski, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dominant oncogenic sequences have been shown to modulate the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of cells of both human and murine tumor cell lines. Whether transfection with candidate tumor-suppressor genes can modulate intrinsic radiation sensitivity is unknown. The data presented here demonstrate that transfection of rat embryo cells with a mutant p53 allele can increase the intrinsic radiation resistance of cells in vitro. First, transfection with mutant p53 resulted in transformed cellular morphology. Second, the transfected clone and the corresponding pooled population of transfected clones were more resistant to ionizing radiation in vitro. Last, analyses of the parameters of cell kinetics suggested that the radiobiological effects were unlikely to be due to altered parameters of cell kinetics at the time of irradiation, suggesting that mutant p53 altered the intrinsic radiation resistance of transfected cells by a more direct mechanism. Further experimentation will be necessary to develop a mechanistic approach for the study of these alterations. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  17. P53-specific T cell responses in patients with malignant and benign ovarian tumors : Implications for p53 based immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, Annechien; Leffers, Ninke; Hoogeboom, Baukje-Nynke; Sluiter, Wim; Hamming, Ineke; Klip, Harry; ten Hoor, Klaske; Esajas, Martha; van Oven, Magda; Drijfhout, Jan-Wouter; Platteel, Inge; Offringa, Rienk; Hollema, Harry; Melief, Kees; van der Burg, Sjoerd; van der Zee, Ate; Daemen, Toos; Nijman, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Despite intensive treatment, 70% of the ovarian cancer patients will develop recurrent disease, emphasizing the need for new approaches such as immunotherapy. A promising antigenic target for immunotherapy in ovarian cancer is the frequently overexpressed p53 protein. The aim of the study was to

  18. P53 mutation analysis of colorectal liver metastases : Relation to actual survival, angiogenic status, and p53 overexpression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, KP; Gouw, ASH; Peeters, PMJG; Bulthuis, M; Menkema, L; Porte, RJ; Slooff, MJH; van Goor, H; van den Berg, Anke

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate TP53 mutations with angiogenic status of the tumor and prognosis after liver surgery in patients with colorectal liver metastases and to correlate immunohistochemical staining of p53 protein with TP53 gene mutations. Experimental Design: Tumors of 44 patients with surgically

  19. The structure formed by inverted repeats in p53 response elements determines the transactivation activity of p53 protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázda, Václav; Čechová, Jana; Battistin, M.; Coufal, Jan; Jagelská, Eva; Raimondi, I.; Inga, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 483, č. 1 (2017), s. 516-521 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-21855S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : tumor-suppressor p53 * cruciform structures * dna-conformation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.466, year: 2016

  20. IGF-I enhances cellular senescence via the reactive oxygen species-p53 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handayaningsih, Anastasia-Evi; Takahashi, Michiko; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Iguchi, Genzo; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Suda, Kentaro [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Takahashi, Yutaka, E-mail: takahash@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular senescence plays an important role in tumorigenesis and aging process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrated IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in primary confluent cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These results may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging. -- Abstract: Cellular senescence is characterized by growth arrest, enlarged and flattened cell morphology, the expression of senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal), and by activation of tumor suppressor networks. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a critical role in cellular growth, proliferation, tumorigenesis, and regulation of aging. In the present study, we show that IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in mouse, rat, and human primary cells in the confluent state. IGF-I induced expression of a DNA damage marker, {gamma}H2AX, the increased levels of p53 and p21 proteins, and activated SA-{beta}-gal. In the confluent state, an altered downstream signaling of IGF-I receptor was observed. Treatment with a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, N-acetylcystein (NAC) significantly suppressed induction of these markers, indicating that ROS are involved in the induction of cellular senescence by IGF-I. In p53-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts, the IGF-I-induced augmentation of SA-{beta}-gal and p21 was inhibited, demonstrating that p53 is required for cellular senescence induced by IGF-I. Thus, these data reveal a novel pathway whereby IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner and may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging.

  1. A p53-regulated apoptotic gene signature predicts treatment response and outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainer, Russell O; Trendowski, Matthew R; Cheng, Cheng; Pei, Deqing; Yang, Wenjian; Paugh, Steven W; Goss, Kathleen H; Skol, Andrew D; Pavlidis, Paul; Pui, Ching-Hon; Gilliam, T Conrad; Evans, William E; Onel, Kenan

    2017-01-01

    Gene signatures have been associated with outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and other malignancies. However, determining the molecular drivers of these expression changes remains challenging. In ALL blasts, the p53 tumor suppressor is the primary regulator of the apoptotic response to genotoxic chemotherapy, which is predictive of outcome. Consequently, we hypothesized that the normal p53-regulated apoptotic response to DNA damage would be altered in ALL and that this alteration would influence drug response and treatment outcome. To test this, we first used global expression profiling in related human B-lineage lymphoblastoid cell lines with either wild type or mutant TP53 to characterize the normal p53-mediated transcriptional response to ionizing radiation (IR) and identified 747 p53-regulated apoptotic target genes. We then sorted these genes into six temporal expression clusters (TECs) based upon differences over time in their IR-induced p53-regulated gene expression patterns, and found that one cluster (TEC1) was associated with multidrug resistance in leukemic blasts in one cohort of children with ALL and was an independent predictor of survival in two others. Therefore, by investigating p53-mediated apoptosis in vitro, we identified a gene signature significantly associated with drug resistance and treatment outcome in ALL. These results suggest that intersecting pathway-derived and clinically derived expression data may be a powerful method to discover driver gene signatures with functional and clinical implications in pediatric ALL and perhaps other cancers as well.

  2. Differential effects of garcinol and curcumin on histone and p53 modifications in tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Hilary M; Kundu, Tapas K; Heery, David M; Abdelghany, Magdy K; Messmer, Marie; Yue, Baigong; Deeves, Sian E; Kindle, Karin B; Mantelingu, Kempegowda; Aslam, Akhmed; Winkler, G Sebastiaan

    2013-01-01

    summary, although garcinol and curcumin can both inhibit histone acetyltransferase activities, our results show that these compounds have differential effects on cancer cells in culture. Garcinol treatment alters expression of chromatin modifying enzymes in MCF7 cells, resulting in reprogramming of key histone and p53 PTMs and growth arrest, underscoring its potential as a cancer chemopreventive agent

  3. Expression and mutation of p53 in tumor effusion cells of patients with ovarian carcinoma: response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, J K; Harłozińska, A; Popiela, A; Noga, L

    2001-01-01

    p53 alterations are considered as one of the most important factors responsible for drug resistance in ovarian carcinomas, although the relationship between p53 gene status and response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in ovarian cancer patients remains unclear. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between p53 protein accumulation, p53 gene mutation and response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with ovarian carcinoma considering conventional clinicopathological parameters. Tissue sections and corresponding cyst and/or ascitic fluid cells from 79 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer were analyzed immunohistochemically for p53 expression. The PCR-SSCP analysis was performed in 25 cases and the results were compared with immunohistochemical data. It was demonstrated that p53 expression reaching approximately 50% of positive cells in immunostaining was usually associated with PCR-amplified exons showing abnormal migration and suspected for mutation. p53 gene changes were not correlated with histological structure, grade of differentiation or residual tumor after cytoreductive surgery, despite being detected more frequently in III/IV than in II FIGO stages and in patients with residual disease above 2 cm. A significant correlation between p53 accumulation and p53 gene alteration and poor response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy was shown. The overall survival time of patients decreased with an increase in p53 protein expression. A strong p53 expression especially accompanied by p53 changes detectable by PCR-SSCP analysis appears to be a good indicator of the resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The association between strong p53 overexpression and shorter overall survival time was also revealed. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Distinct pattern of p53 mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spruck, C H; Rideout, W M; Olumi, A F

    1993-01-01

    A distinct mutational spectrum for the p53 tumor suppressor gene in bladder carcinomas was established in patients with known exposures to cigarette smoke. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of exons 5 through 8 of the p53 gene showed inactivating mutations in 16 of 40 (40%) bladder...... tumors from smokers and 13 of 40 (33%) tumors from lifetime nonsmokers. Overall, 13 of the 50 (26%) total point mutations discovered in this and previous work were G:C-->C:G transversions, a relatively rare mutational type in human tumors. In six tumors, identical AGA (Arg)-->ACA (Thr) point mutations...... double mutations, four of which were tandem mutations on the same allele. No double mutations were found in tumors from nonsmoking patients. None of the mutations in smokers were G:C-->T:A transversions, which would be anticipated for exposure to the suspected cigarette smoke carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl...

  5. Electrophoretic detection of protein p53 in human leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paponov, V.D.; Kupsik, E.G.; Shcheglova, E.G.; Yarullin, N.N.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have found an acid-soluble protein with mol. wt. of about 53 kD in peripheral blood leukocytes of persons with Down's syndrome. It was present in different quantities in all 20 patients tested, but was virtually not discovered in 12 healthy blood donors. This paper determines the possible identity of this protein with protein p53 from mouse ascites carcinoma by comparing their electrophoretic mobilities, because the accuracy of electrophoretic determination of the molecular weight of proteins is not sufficient to identify them. The paper also describes experiments to detect a protein with electrophoretic mobility identical with that of a protein in the leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome in leukocytes of patients with leukemia. To discover if protein p53 is involved in cell proliferation, the protein composition of leukocytes from healthy blood donors, cultured in the presence and absence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA), was compared. Increased incorporation of H 3-thymidine by leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome is explained by the presence of a population of immature leukocytes actively synthesizing DNA in the peripheral blood of these patients, and this can also explain the presence of protein p53 in the leukocytes of these patients

  6. Maintaining appearances-The role of p53 in adult neurogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medrano, Silvia; Scrable, Heidi

    2005-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, neuronal turnover continues to replenish cells in existing neuronal circuits, such as those involved either in odor discrimination or in learning and memory, throughout life. With age, however, the capacity for neurogenesis diminishes and these functions become impaired. Neuronal turnover is a two-step process, which first generates excess neuronal progenitors and then eliminates all but the few that differentiate into fully functional neurons. This process requires a fine balance between cell proliferation and cell death. Altered activity of the tumor suppressor p53 can upset this balance by affecting the rate of cell proliferation, but not the rate of cell death, in neurogenic regions of the adult brain. Genetically engineered mice in which p53 activity is increased demonstrate that premature loss of neurogenic capacity is linked to accelerated organismal aging

  7. E2F1 and p53 Transcription Factors as Accessory Factors for Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Johnson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of the biochemical details of nucleotide excision repair (NER have been established using purified proteins and DNA substrates. In cells however, DNA is tightly packaged around histones and other chromatin-associated proteins, which can be an obstacle to efficient repair. Several cooperating mechanisms enhance the efficiency of NER by altering chromatin structure. Interestingly, many of the players involved in modifying chromatin at sites of DNA damage were originally identified as regulators of transcription. These include ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, histone modifying enzymes and several transcription factors. The p53 and E2F1 transcription factors are well known for their abilities to regulate gene expression in response to DNA damage. This review will highlight the underappreciated, transcription-independent functions of p53 and E2F1 in modifying chromatin structure in response to DNA damage to promote global NER.

  8. Suicide genes or p53 gene and p53 target genes as targets for cancer gene therapy by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bing; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhang Hong

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy has some disadvantages due to the severe side-effect on the normal tissues at a curative dose of ionizing radiation (IR). Similarly, as a new developing approach, gene therapy also has some disadvantages, such as lack of specificity for tumors, limited expression of therapeutic gene, potential biological risk. To certain extent, above problems would be solved by the suicide genes or p53 gene and its target genes therapies targeted by ionizing radiation. This strategy not only makes up the disadvantage from radiotherapy or gene therapy alone, but also promotes success rate on the base of lower dose. By present, there have been several vectors measuring up to be reaching clinical trials. This review focused on the development of the cancer gene therapy through suicide genes or p53 and its target genes mediated by IR. (authors)

  9. Expressions of p53 and PUMA in fibroblasts of systemic sclerosis patients are normal at transcription level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Mohammad Bagher; Abed Khojasteh, Majid; Alsahebfosoul, Fereshteh; Gharibdoost, Farhad; Mostafaei, Shayan; Ganjalikhani-Hakemi, Mazdak; Mahmoudi, Mahdi

    2017-09-14

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) fibroblasts show resistance apoptosis mechanisms, which enhances the fibrosis stage of the disease. Impaired function of p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) has been related to deficits in p53-dependant apoptosis pathway. This study aimed to evaluate the transcriptional levels of p53 and PUMA mRNAs in fibroblasts from SSc patients and compare it with healthy individuals. In this case-control study, skin biopsy samples were obtained from 19 patients with diffuse cutaneous SSc (DcSSc) and 16 healthy controls. Afterward, dermal fibroblasts were isolated and cultured. After extraction of total RNA from cultured fibroblasts, complementary DNA (cDNA) was synthesized. mRNA quantification was carried out using real-time PCR, SYBR Green PCR master mix, and specific primers for p53 and PUMA. No significant alteration was observed in mRNA expression levels of p53 and PUMA (P = .99 and .23, respectively) in fibroblasts from SSc patients compared with controls. Apoptosis pathways are impaired in fibroblasts from patients with SSc, leading to chronic fibrosis. Nonetheless, PUMA/p53 pathway may not be involved in dysfunction of apoptosis mechanisms in fibroblasts of patients with SSc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Activation of endogenous p53 by combined p19Arf gene transfer and nutlin-3 drug treatment modalities in the murine cell lines B16 and C6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanatta Daniela B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactivation of p53 by either gene transfer or pharmacologic approaches may compensate for loss of p19Arf or excess mdm2 expression, common events in melanoma and glioma. In our previous work, we constructed the pCLPG retroviral vector where transgene expression is controlled by p53 through a p53-responsive promoter. The use of this vector to introduce p19Arf into tumor cells that harbor p53wt should yield viral expression of p19Arf which, in turn, would activate the endogenous p53 and result in enhanced vector expression and tumor suppression. Since nutlin-3 can activate p53 by blocking its interaction with mdm2, we explored the possibility that the combination of p19Arf gene transfer and nutlin-3 drug treatment may provide an additive benefit in stimulating p53 function. Methods B16 (mouse melanoma and C6 (rat glioma cell lines, which harbor p53wt, were transduced with pCLPGp19 and these were additionally treated with nutlin-3 or the DNA damaging agent, doxorubicin. Viral expression was confirmed by Western, Northern and immunofluorescence assays. p53 function was assessed by reporter gene activity provided by a p53-responsive construct. Alterations in proliferation and viability were measured by colony formation, growth curve, cell cycle and MTT assays. In an animal model, B16 cells were treated with the pCLPGp19 virus and/or drugs before subcutaneous injection in C57BL/6 mice, observation of tumor progression and histopathologic analyses. Results Here we show that the functional activation of endogenous p53wt in B16 was particularly challenging, but accomplished when combined gene transfer and drug treatments were applied, resulting in increased transactivation by p53, marked cell cycle alteration and reduced viability in culture. In an animal model, B16 cells treated with both p19Arf and nutlin-3 yielded increased necrosis and decreased BrdU marking. In comparison, C6 cells were quite susceptible to either treatment, yet

  11. Effect of p53 activation on cell growth, thymidine kinase-1 activity, and 3'-deoxy-3'fluorothymidine uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Tamura, Yasuko; Jordan, Robert; Grierson, John R.; Krohn, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    The use of thymidine (TdR) and thymidine analogs such as 3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine (FLT) as positron emission tomography (PET)-based tracers of tumor proliferation rate is based on the hypothesis that measurement of uptake of these nucleosides, a function primarily of thymidine kinase-1 (TK 1 ) activity, provides an accurate measure of cell proliferation in tumors. Tumor growth is influenced by many factors including the oxygen concentration within tumors and whether tumor cells have been exposed to cytotoxic therapies. The p53 gene plays an important role in regulating growth under both of these conditions. The goal of this study was to investigate the influence of p53 activation on cell growth, TK 1 activity, and FLT uptake. To accomplish this, TK 1 activity, S phase fraction, and the uptake of FLT were determined in plateau-phase and exponentially growing cultures of an isogenic pair of human tumor cell lines in which p53 expression was normal or inactivated by human papilloma virus type 16 E6 expression. Ionizing radiation exposure was used to stimulate p53 activity and to induce alterations in cell cycle progression. We found that exposure of cells to ionizing radiation induced dose-dependent changes in cell cycle progression in both cell lines. The relationship between S phase percentage, TK 1 activity, and FLT uptake were essentially unchanged in the p53-normal cell line. In contrast, TK 1 activity and FLT uptake remained high in the p53-deficient variant even when S phase percentage was low due to a p53-dependent G2 arrest. We conclude that a functional p53 response is required to maintain the normal relationship between TK1 activity and S phase percentage following radiation exposure

  12. Paracrine Apoptotic Effect of p53 Mediated by Tumor Suppressor Par-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravshan Burikhanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The guardian of the genome, p53, is often mutated in cancer and may contribute to therapeutic resistance. Given that p53 is intact and functional in normal tissues, we harnessed its potential to inhibit the growth of p53-deficient cancer cells. Specific activation of p53 in normal fibroblasts selectively induced apoptosis in p53-deficient cancer cells. This paracrine effect was mediated by p53-dependent secretion of the tumor suppressor Par-4. Accordingly, the activation of p53 in normal mice, but not p53−/− or Par-4−/− mice, caused systemic elevation of Par-4, which induced apoptosis of p53-deficient tumor cells. Mechanistically, p53 induced Par-4 secretion by suppressing the expression of its binding partner, UACA, which sequesters Par-4. Thus, normal cells can be empowered by p53 activation to induce Par-4 secretion for the inhibition of therapy-resistant tumors.

  13. Tumour suppression in skin and other tissues via cross-talk between vitamin D- and p53-signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg eReichrath

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available P53 and its family members have been implicated in the direct regulation of the vitamin D receptor (VDR. Vitamin D- and p53-signaling pathways have a significant impact on spontaneous or carcinogen-induced malignant transformation of cells, with VDR and p53 representing important tumour suppressors. VDR and the p53/p63/p73 proteins all function typically as receptors or sensors that turn into transcriptional regulators upon stimulus, with the main difference being that the nuclear VDR is activated as a transcription factor after binding its naturally occurring ligand 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D with high affinity while the p53 family of transcription factors, mostly in the nucleoplasm, responds to a large number of alterations in cell homeostasis commonly referred to as stress. An increasing body of evidence now convincingly demonstrates a cross-talk between vitamin D- and p53-signaling that occurs at different levels, has genome-wide implications and that should be of high importance for many malignancies, including non-melanoma skin cancer. One interaction involves the ability of p53 to increase skin pigmentation via POMC derivatives including alpha-MSH and ACTH. Pigmentation protects the skin against UV-induced DNA damage and skin carcinogenesis, yet on the other hand reduces cutaneous synthesis of vitamin D. A second level of interaction may be through the ability of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to increase the survival of skin cells after UV irradiation. UV irradiation-surviving cells show significant reductions in thymine dimers in the presence of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D that are associated with increased nuclear p53 protein expression, and significantly reduced NO products. A third level of interaction is documented by the ability of vitamin D compounds to regulate the expression of the murine double minute 2 (MDM2 gene in dependence of the presence of wild-type p53. MDM2 has a well established role as a key negative regulator of p53 activity

  14. Ki67 and p53 in gastrointestinal stromal tumors - GIST Ki67 and p53 em tumores estromais gastrointestinais - GIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Roberto de Oliveira das Neves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST is the most common mesenchymal tumor. Cellular proliferation and apoptosis is gaining importance for predicting prognosis in several cancers. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the Ki67 and p53 immunostaining in GISTs. METHODS: Specimens from 40 patients with GIST were assessed for immunohistochemical expression of Ki67 and p53. The tumors were divided according the risk of recurrence in two groups: I with high or intermediate risk and; II with low or very low risk. RESULTS: Among the 40 patients, 21 were men, the mean age was 56 years, 16 occurred in the small intestine and 13 in the stomach, 5 in the retroperitonium, 4 in the colon or rectum and 2 in the mesenterium. Thirty two tumors were from group I and 8 from group II. Half of the patients developed recurrence, being 90% of the group I (P = 0.114. The tumor Ki67 labelling index ranged from 0.02 to 0.35 (mean level 0.12. This index was marginally higher in the group I patients with recurrence (P = 0.09 compared to the patients of the same group without recurrence. p53 staining was expressed in 65% of the GISTs. A higher frequency of p53 and Ki67 had been found in the group I tumors when compared to the other group (P = 0.022; OR = 8.00 - IC 95%: 1.32-48.65. CONCLUSION: The most common site was the small intestine and 80% had a malignant potential justifying the high recurrence observed. No significant correlation was found between p53 and overall outcome of the patients. In group I patients, the evaluation Ki67LI may be a marker of prognosis. The positivity of both markers is higher among the patients with worst prognosis than in the others.CONTEXTO: Os tumores estromais gastrointestinais (GIST são os tumores mesenquimais mais frequentes. A proliferação intestinal e a apoptose são cada vez mais importantes na avaliação do prognóstico de diversos cânceres. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a imunoexpressão de Ki67 e p53 em GIST. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados a

  15. p53 gene targeting by homologous recombination in fish ES cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene targeting (GT provides a powerful tool for the generation of precise genetic alterations in embryonic stem (ES cells to elucidate gene function and create animal models for human diseases. This technology has, however, been limited to mouse and rat. We have previously established ES cell lines and procedures for gene transfer and selection for homologous recombination (HR events in the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report HR-mediated GT in this organism. We designed a GT vector to disrupt the tumor suppressor gene p53 (also known as tp53. We show that all the three medaka ES cell lines, MES1∼MES3, are highly proficient for HR, as they produced detectable HR without drug selection. Furthermore, the positive-negative selection (PNS procedure enhanced HR by ∼12 folds. Out of 39 PNS-resistant colonies analyzed, 19 (48.7% were positive for GT by PCR genotyping. When 11 of the PCR-positive colonies were further analyzed, 6 (54.5% were found to be bona fide homologous recombinants by Southern blot analysis, sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization. This produces a high efficiency of up to 26.6% for p53 GT under PNS conditions. We show that p53 disruption and long-term propagation under drug selection conditions do not compromise the pluripotency, as p53-targeted ES cells retained stable growth, undifferentiated phenotype, pluripotency gene expression profile and differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that medaka ES cells are proficient for HR-mediated GT, offering a first model organism of lower vertebrates towards the development of full ES cell-based GT technology.

  16. Influence of p53 and bcl-2 on chemosensitivity in benign and malignant prostatic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Antonio M; Bohm, Lothar

    2005-01-01

    The administration of cancer chemotherapeutic agents results in an increase in the apoptotic cells in the tumor: therefore, it has been assumed that anticancer drugs exhibit their cytotoxic effects via apoptotic signaling pathways. Characteristics that confer sensitivity to drug-induced apoptosis are, a functional p53 protein and expression of the apoptosis-promoting protein, bax. The role of p53 and bax/bcl-2 in drug-induced apoptosis was assessed in six prostate cell lines, 1532T, 1535T, 1542T, 1542N, BPH-1 and LNCaP using TD(50) concentrations of etoposide, vinblastine and estramustine. Cell death was monitored morphologically by fluorescent microscopy, and by flow cytometry (Annexin-V assay). Apoptotic morphology was rather low and ranged from 0.1% to 12.1%, 3.0% to 6.0% and 0.1% to 8.5% for etoposide, estramustine and vinblastine, respectively. Annexin-V binding and flow cytometry indicated apoptotic propensities of 0% to 4%, 0% to 3% and 0% to 5%, respectively. The percentage of cells responding to drug-induced apoptosis was, on average, higher in the tumor cell lines than in the normal cell lines, but showed no correlation with p53 status. The percentage of cells showing necrosis, assessed by Annexin binding and Propidium Iodide permeability in aqueous medium, tended to be much higher, and was found to be at the level of 5% to 30%. Immunoblotting demonstrated that bax and bcl-2 proteins were expressed at a basal level in all cell lines, but did not increase after exposure to TD(50) doses of the three drugs. The ratio of bax and bcl-2, measured by laser scanning densitometry, was not altered by the drug-induced DNA damage. The results suggest that apoptosis is not a major mechanism of drug-induced cell death in prostate cell lines and appears to be independent of p53 status and bax/bcl-2 expression.

  17. Polymorphisms in promoter sequences of MDM2, p53, and p16INK4a genes in normal Japanese individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito Ohsaka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has been conducted to identify sequence polymorphisms of gene promoter regions in patients and control subjects, including normal individuals, and to determine the influence of these polymorphisms on transcriptional regulation in cells that express wild-type or mutant p53. In this study we isolated genomic DNA from whole blood of healthy Japanese individuals and sequenced the promoter regions of the MDM2, p53, and p16INK4a genes. We identified polymorphisms comprising 3 nucleotide substitutions at exon 1 and intron 1 regions of the MDM2 gene and 1 nucleotide insertion at a poly(C nucleotide position in the p53 gene. The Japanese individuals also exhibited p16INK4a polymorphisms at several positions, including position -191. Reporter gene analysis by using luciferase revealed that the polymorphisms of MDM2, p53, and p16INK4a differentially altered luciferase activities in several cell lines, including the Colo320DM, U251, and T98G cell lines expressing mutant p53. Our results indicate that the promoter sequences of these genes differ among normal Japanese individuals and that polymorphisms can alter gene transcription activity.

  18. Phenotype specific analyses reveal distinct regulatory mechanism for chronically activated p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Kirschner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The downstream functions of the DNA binding tumor suppressor p53 vary depending on the cellular context, and persistent p53 activation has recently been implicated in tumor suppression and senescence. However, genome-wide information about p53-target gene regulation has been derived mostly from acute genotoxic conditions. Using ChIP-seq and expression data, we have found distinct p53 binding profiles between acutely activated (through DNA damage and chronically activated (in senescent or pro-apoptotic conditions p53. Compared to the classical 'acute' p53 binding profile, 'chronic' p53 peaks were closely associated with CpG-islands. Furthermore, the chronic CpG-island binding of p53 conferred distinct expression patterns between senescent and pro-apoptotic conditions. Using the p53 targets seen in the chronic conditions together with external high-throughput datasets, we have built p53 networks that revealed extensive self-regulatory 'p53 hubs' where p53 and many p53 targets can physically interact with each other. Integrating these results with public clinical datasets identified the cancer-associated lipogenic enzyme, SCD, which we found to be directly repressed by p53 through the CpG-island promoter, providing a mechanistic link between p53 and the 'lipogenic phenotype', a hallmark of cancer. Our data reveal distinct phenotype associations of chronic p53 targets that underlie specific gene regulatory mechanisms.

  19. Release of targeted p53 from the mitochondrion as an early signal during mitochondrial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased accumulation of p53 tumor suppressor protein is an early response to low-level stressors. To investigate the fate of mitochondrial-sequestered p53, mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) on a p53-deficient genetic background were transfected with p53-EGFP fusion protei...

  20. p53-dependent non-coding RNA networks in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blume, C. J.; Hotz-Wagenblatt, A.; Hüllein, J.; Sellner, L.; Jethwa, A.; Stolz, T.; Slabicki, M.; Lee, K.; Sharathchandra, A.; Benner, A.; Dietrich, S.; Oakes, C. C.; Dreger, P.; te Raa, D.; Kater, A. P.; Jauch, A.; Merkel, O.; Oren, M.; Hielscher, T.; Zenz, T.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of the tumor suppressor p53 lead to chemotherapy resistance and a dismal prognosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Whereas p53 targets are used to identify patient subgroups with impaired p53 function, a comprehensive assessment of non-coding RNA targets of p53 in CLL is missing. We

  1. Regulation of Mdmx and its role in the p53 pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulmeester, Erik

    2006-01-01

    The p53 protein is an important tumor suppressor that acts as a key regulator of the integrity of the genome. Two essential regulators of the p53 protein are Mdm2 and its homologue Mdmx. Like Mdm2, Mdmx represses p53-induced transcription. However, Mdmx cannot ubiquitinate or degrade p53 opposed to

  2. Immunological and Clinical Effects of Vaccines Targeting p53-Overexpressing Malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, R.; Leffers, N.; van der Burg, S. H.; Melief, C. J.; Daemen, T.; Nijman, H. W.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 50% of human malignancies carry p53 mutations, which makes it a potential antigenic target for cancer immunotherapy. Adoptive transfer with p53-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) and CD4(+) T-helper cells eradicates p53-overexpressing tumors in mice. Furthermore, p53 antibodies and

  3. Mutant Mice Lacking the p53 C-Terminal Domain Model Telomere Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simeonova, I.; Jaber, S.; Draskovic, I.; Bardot, B.; Fang, M.; Bouarich-Bourimi, R.; Lejour, V.; Charbonnier, L.; Soudais, C.; Bourdon, J.C.; Huerre, M.; Londono-Vallejo, A.; Toledo, F.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in p53, although frequent in human cancers, have not been implicated in telomere-related syndromes. Here, we show that homozygous mutant mice expressing p53(Delta31), a p53 lacking the C-terminal domain, exhibit increased p53 activity and suffer from aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis,

  4. Lack of mutations in the P53 gene exons 5 to 8 in ataxia-telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonveaux, P; Berger, R

    1993-04-01

    Alterations of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene are present in various human malignancies and in the dominantly inherited Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Recently, a cell cycle checkpoint pathway involving p53 and GADD45 has been identified as defective in ataxia-telangiectasia. Using single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of PCR products, we looked for TP53 mutations in DNA of patients with AT. We did not find any mutation in 6 patients, suggesting that TP53 mutations are not directly involved in the cancer susceptibility observed in AT.

  5. Construction and Characterization of Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Lines Containing Mutations in the p53 or BRCAl Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    White, Raymond

    1997-01-01

    ...) that become deficient in normal p53 and BRCA1 gene functions. Our work during the third year of the funding period has produced good progress establishing new systems to create and characterize HMEC with an altered tumor suppressor gene activity...

  6. Gene expression profiles resulting from stable loss of p53 mirrors its role in tissue differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Couture

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene p53 is involved in a variety of cellular activities such as cellular stress responses, cell cycle regulation and differentiation. In our previous studies we have shown p53's transcription activating role to be important in osteoblast differentiation. There is still a debate in the literature as to whether p53 inhibits or promotes differentiation. We have found p53 heterozygous mice to show a p53 dependency on some bone marker gene expression that is absent in knockout mice. Mice heterozygous for p53 also show a higher incidence of osteosarcomas than p53 knockout mice. This suggests that p53 is able to modify the environment within osteoblasts. In this study we compare changes in gene expression resulting after either a transient or stable reduction in p53. Accordingly we reduced p53 levels transiently and stably in C2C12 cells, which are capable of both myoblast and osteoblast differentiation, and compared the changes in gene expression of candidate genes regulated by the p53 pathway. Using a PCR array to assay for p53 target genes, we have found different expression profiles when comparing stable versus transient knockdown of p53. As expected, several genes with profound changes after transient p53 loss were related to apoptosis and cell cycle regulation. In contrast, stable p53 loss produced a greater change in MyoD and other transcription factors with tissue specific roles, suggesting that long term loss of p53 affects tissue homeostasis to a greater degree than changes resulting from acute loss of p53. These differences in gene expression were validated by measuring promoter activity of different pathway specific genes involved in differentiation. These studies suggest that an important role for p53 is context dependent, with a stable reduction in p53 expression affecting normal tissue physiology more than acute loss of p53.

  7. Cystatin C as a p53?inducible apoptotic mediator that regulates cathepsin L activity

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Jinichi; Tanikawa, Chizu; Funauchi, Yuki; Lo, Paulisally Hau Yi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsuda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    In response to various cellular stresses, p53 is activated and inhibits malignant transformation through the transcriptional regulation of its target genes. However, the full picture of the p53 downstream pathway still remains to be elucidated. Here we identified cystatin C, a major inhibitor of cathepsins, as a novel p53 target. In response to DNA damage, activated p53 induced cystatin C expression through p53 binding sequence in the first intron. We showed that cathepsin L activity was decr...

  8. p53 gene mutations and expression of p53 and mdm2 proteins in invasive breast carcinoma. A comparative analysis with clinico-pathological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, T; Schneider-Stock, R; Rys, J; Niezabitowski, A; Roessner, A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze p53 gene mutations and the expression of p53 and mdm2 proteins in 31 randomly selected invasive breast carcinomas. The results were then correlated with tumor grade, stage, estrogen receptor status, nodal status, and DNA ploidy. The expression of the proteins p53 and mdm2 was determined immunohistochemically using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material. Screening for p53 mutation involved analysis of the highly conserved regions of the p53 gene (exons 5-9) by the polymerase chain reaction/ single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique. PCR products with band shifts were directly sequenced. Immunohistochemical staining of p53 was positive in 9 cases (29.0%), only 2 of which showed a p53 gene mutation. These were identified as a C-->G transversion at the second position of codon 278 in exon 8 and an A-->G transition at the second position of codon 205 in exon 6. A third case with a mutation was observed (C-->T transition, position 1 of codon 250 in exon 7) that did not show p53 immunohistochemically. Of the 9 p53-positive tumors, 2 were moderately differentiated (grade II). The remaining tumors were poorly differentiated (7/9). By contrast, p53-negative carcinomas were well differentiated (grade I) in most cases (P = 0.02). DNA cytometry in 8 of the 9 p53-positive carcinomas revealed an aneuploid stem line. The majority of the p53-negative tumors were diploid (P = 0.01). Mdm2 oncoprotein was detected in 10 tumors (32.2%), 4 of which were p53-positive, including the 3 with mutations. The grading of the mdm2-positive tumors was moderate or poor, G1 carcinomas were always noted to be mdm2-negative (P = 0.04). Overexpression of p53 protein is a complex mechanism and does not merely indicate the detection of mutations in the p53 gene. This study has shown that p53 expression correlates with tumor grade and DNA ploidy. Mdm2 expression was also associated with the tumor grade. Immunohistological demonstration of the p53

  9. Characterization of Two Novel Oncogenic Pathways Collaborating With Loss of P53 or Activated Neu in Mouse Models of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Jianrong; Leder, Philip

    2005-01-01

    Cancer develops through accumulation of multiple genetic mutations. Loss of tumor suppressor gene p53 and activation of oncogene Neu/ErbB2 are among the most frequent genetic alterations in human breast cancer...

  10. Radiosensitivity in lung cancer with focus on p53

    CERN Document Server

    Bergqvist, M

    2002-01-01

    In Sweden approximately 2800 new lung cancer patients are diagnosed every year. Radiotherapy is used with curative intention in certain groups of patients. The aim of this thesis is to study the basis of differences in radioresistance and the possibility to predict response to radiotherapy. In the first study we investigated, using the comet assay, four lung cancer cell lines with different sensitivity towards radiation. A clear dose-response relationship for radiation-induced DNA single strand and double strand breaks were found. All cell lines showed a remarkably efficient repair of both the DNA single strand and double strand breaks one hour after irradiation. However, further studies in one radioresistant and one radiosensitive cell line demonstrated that repair during the first 15 min had the best accordance with radiosensitivity measured as surviving fraction. In the second and third study, sequencing studies of the p53 gene were performed on cell lines as well as on tumour material. Cell lines that wer...

  11. A nanobody modulates the p53 transcriptional program without perturbing its functional architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethuyne, Jonas; De Gieter, Steven; Zwaenepoel, Olivier; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Durinck, Kaat; Verhelle, Adriaan; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Speleman, Frank; Loris, Remy; Gettemans, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The p53 transcription factor plays an important role in genome integrity. To perform this task, p53 regulates the transcription of genes promoting various cellular outcomes including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or senescence. The precise regulation of this activity remains elusive as numerous mechanisms, e.g. posttranslational modifications of p53 and (non-)covalent p53 binding partners, influence the p53 transcriptional program. We developed a novel, non-invasive tool to manipulate endogenous p53. Nanobodies (Nb), raised against the DNA-binding domain of p53, allow us to distinctively target both wild type and mutant p53 with great specificity. Nb3 preferentially binds ‘structural’ mutant p53, i.e. R175H and R282W, while a second but distinct nanobody, Nb139, binds both mutant and wild type p53. The co-crystal structure of the p53 DNA-binding domain in complex with Nb139 (1.9 Å resolution) reveals that Nb139 binds opposite the DNA-binding surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nb139 does not disturb the functional architecture of the p53 DNA-binding domain using conformation-specific p53 antibody immunoprecipitations, glutaraldehyde crosslinking assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Functionally, the binding of Nb139 to p53 allows us to perturb the transactivation of p53 target genes. We propose that reduced recruitment of transcriptional co-activators or modulation of selected post-transcriptional modifications account for these observations. PMID:25324313

  12. p53 mutation status is a primary determinant of placenta-specific protein 1 expression in serous ovarian cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devor, Eric J; Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus; Warrier, Akshaya; Reyes, Henry D; Ibik, Nonye V; Schickling, Brandon M; Newtson, Andreea; Goodheart, Michael J; Leslie, Kimberly K

    2017-05-01

    Placenta-specific protein 1 (PLAC1) expression is co-opted in numerous human cancers. As a consequence of PLAC1 expression, tumor cells exhibit enhanced proliferation and invasiveness. This characteristic is associated with increased aggressiveness and worse patient outcomes. Recently, the presence of the tumor suppressor p53 was shown in vitro to inhibit PLAC1 transcription by compromising the P1, or distal/cancer, promoter. We sought to determine if this phenomenon occurs in primary patient tumors as well. Furthermore, we wanted to know if p53 mutation influenced PLAC1 expression as compared with wild-type. We chose to study serous ovarian tumors as they are well known to have a high rate of p53 mutation. We report herein that the phenomenon of PLAC1 transcription repression does occur in serous ovarian carcinomas but only when TP53 is wild-type. We find that mutant or absent p53 protein de-represses PLAC1 transcription. We further propose that the inability of mutant p53 to repress PLAC1 transcription is due to the fact that the altered TP53 protein is unable to occupy a putative p53 binding site in the PLAC1 P1 promoter thus allowing transcription to occur. Finally, we show that PLAC1 transcript number is significantly negatively correlated with patient survival in our samples. Thus, we suggest that characterizing tumors for TP53 mutation status, p53 protein status and PLAC1 transcription could be used to predict likely prognosis and inform treatment options in patients diagnosed with serous ovarian cancer.

  13. Caudal regression in adrenocortical dysplasia (acd) mice is caused by telomere dysfunction with subsequent p53-dependent apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlangos, Christopher N; O'Connor, Bridget C; Morley, Madeleine J; Krause, Andrea S; Osawa, Gail A; Keegan, Catherine E

    2009-10-15

    Adrenocortical dysplasia (acd) is a spontaneous autosomal recessive mouse mutation that exhibits a pleiotropic phenotype with perinatal lethality. Mutant acd embryos have caudal truncation, vertebral segmentation defects, hydronephrosis, and limb hypoplasia, resembling humans with Caudal Regression syndrome. Acd encodes Tpp1, a component of the shelterin complex that maintains telomere integrity, and consequently acd mutant mice have telomere dysfunction and genomic instability. While the association between genomic instability and cancer is well documented, the association between genomic instability and birth defects is unexplored. To determine the relationship between telomere dysfunction and embryonic malformations, we investigated mechanisms leading to the caudal dysgenesis phenotype of acd mutant embryos. We report that the caudal truncation is caused primarily by apoptosis, not altered cell proliferation. We show that the apoptosis and consequent skeletal malformations in acd mutants are dependent upon the p53 pathway by genetic rescue of the limb hypoplasia and vertebral anomalies with p53 null mice. Furthermore, rescue of the acd phenotype by p53 deficiency is a dosage-sensitive process, as acd/acd, p53(-/-) double mutants exhibit preaxial polydactyly. These findings demonstrate that caudal dysgenesis in acd embryos is secondary to p53-dependent apoptosis. Importantly, this study reinforces a significant link between genomic instability and birth defects.

  14. Investigation of p53 codon72 polymorphism in oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC specimens and normal population by PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyhimi P.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: A single nucleotide polymorphism at codon 72 of the p53 gene alters the p53 protein structure and affects its activity. This polymorphism depends on geographic regions and race. Also its association with some cancers has been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate this polymorphism in well differentiated oral SCC and normal population in the city of Isfahan. "nMaterials and Methods: In this case-control study, 20 paraffin blocks of non metastatic and well differentiated oral SCC were selected from the archive of oral pathology department of dental school between 2001 and 2005. 20 whole blood samples from normal people were considered as control group. After DNA extraction, p53 codon 72 polymorphism was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR technique using specific primers of Arg and Pro and agarose gel electrophoresis. Data were analyzed by Fisher's exact test with p<0.05 as the level of significance. "nResults: The prevalence of Arg/Arg , Arg/Pro and Pro/Pro genotypes in case group were 45%,45% and 10% respectively compared to 45%,50% and 5% in controls. There was no statistical significant difference in p53 codon 72 genotypes distribution between case and control groups. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, p53 polymorphism could not be considered as a genetic predisposing factor for oral SCC development in Isfahan.

  15. Mutational myriad of tumor suppressor p53 in Filipino breast cancer: results and perspectives in molecular pathology and epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deocaris, Custer C.

    2000-04-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is by far the most widely mutated gene in human cancers. p53 encodes a 53-kDa phosphoprotein, transcription-activator whose targets include genes and gene products that orchestrate genomic stability, cellular response to DNA damage, cell cycle progression apoptosis and aging (senescence). Analysis of the p53 gene profile has previously resulted in identifying several cancer-causative factors in the human setting, as well as, in creating a unique molecular profile of a tumor useful in the design of tailored-therapies for individual cancer patients. Our results in screening for p53 abnormalities in 140 Filipino patients with primary breast lesions confined from 1997-1998 in 5 major hospitals in Manila reveal that p53 plays an important role in the development and progression of breast cancer in at least 48% of all cases. Two methods of p53 analysis are employed, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction-temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (PCR-TTGE). Inter-comparisons of method exhibit 63.3% concordance in 21 fresh breast carcinoma samples, with ELISA demonstrating 14% false-positives and 10% false-negatives. Only mutations in exon 7 (p=0.063) in the tumor samples how significant correlation with abnormal cellular elevation of p53. PCR-TTGE screening in a large series of 140 patients show that most genetic lesions are localized in exons 5 (41% of the total cases) and 6 (27% of the total cases). No mutations are, however, detected in the transactivation (exons 2-4) and oligomerization (exons 10-11) domains. Invasive carcinomas (stages II and III) are characterized with more frequent and diverse genetic alterations compared with benign tumors, most significantly at exon 5B (p=0.066) and at independently multiple sites (p=0.066). Earlier-onset cases (age of diagnosis < 50 yrs), known to be more clinico-pathologically aggressive, are diagnosed harboring more frequent p53 mutations centered at exon 7 (p=0

  16. p53 modulates the AMPK inhibitor compound C induced apoptosis in human skin cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shi-Wei [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chun-Ying [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Yen-Ting [Department of Medical Research and Education, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kao, Jun-Kai [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chia-Che; Mu, Szu-Wei; Chen, Yu-Yu [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Husan-Wen [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chuan-Hsun [Department of Surgical Oncology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Nutrition Therapy, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liang, Shu-Mei [Institute of Biotechnology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Ju [Department of Dermatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Jau-Ling [Department of Bioscience Technology, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Shieh, Jeng-Jer, E-mail: shiehjj@vghtc.gov.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Education and Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-15

    Compound C, a well-known inhibitor of the intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), has been reported to cause apoptotic cell death in myeloma, breast cancer cells and glioma cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that compound C not only induced autophagy in all tested skin cancer cell lines but also caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype skin cancer cells than in p53-mutant skin cancer cells. Compound C can induce upregulation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocalization of the p53 protein and upregulate expression of p53 target genes in wildtype p53-expressing skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells. The changes of p53 status were dependent on DNA damage which was caused by compound C induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and associated with activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Using the wildtype p53-expressing BCC cells versus stable p53-knockdown BCC sublines, we present evidence that p53-knockdown cancer cells were much less sensitive to compound C treatment with significant G2/M cell cycle arrest and attenuated the compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. The compound C induced G2/M arrest in p53-knockdown BCC cells was associated with the sustained inactive Tyr15 phosphor-Cdc2 expression. Overall, our results established that compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on the cell's p53 status. - Highlights: ► Compound C caused more apoptosis in p53 wildtype than p53-mutant skin cancer cells. ► Compound C can upregulate p53 expression and induce p53 activation. ► Compound C induced p53 effects were dependent on ROS induced DNA damage pathway. ► p53-knockdown attenuated compound C-induced apoptosis but not autophagy. ► Compound C-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells was dependent on p53 status.

  17. The antagonism between MCT-1 and p53 affects the tumorigenic outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Tai-Du

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MCT-1 oncoprotein accelerates p53 protein degradation via a proteosome pathway. Synergistic promotion of the xenograft tumorigenicity has been demonstrated in circumstance of p53 loss alongside MCT-1 overexpression. However, the molecular regulation between MCT-1 and p53 in tumor development remains ambiguous. We speculate that MCT-1 may counteract p53 through the diverse mechanisms that determine the tumorigenic outcomes. Results MCT-1 has now identified as a novel target gene of p53 transcriptional regulation. MCT-1 promoter region contains the response elements reactive with wild-type p53 but not mutant p53. Functional p53 suppresses MCT-1 promoter activity and MCT-1 mRNA stability. In a negative feedback regulation, constitutively expressed MCT-1 decreases p53 promoter function and p53 mRNA stability. The apoptotic events are also significantly prevented by oncogenic MCT-1 in a p53-dependent or a p53-independent fashion, according to the genotoxic mechanism. Moreover, oncogenic MCT-1 promotes the tumorigenicity in mice xenografts of p53-null and p53-positive lung cancer cells. In support of the tumor growth are irrepressible by p53 reactivation in vivo, the inhibitors of p53 (MDM2, Pirh2, and Cop1 are constantly stimulated by MCT-1 oncoprotein. Conclusions The oppositions between MCT-1 and p53 are firstly confirmed at multistage processes that include transcription control, mRNA metabolism, and protein expression. MCT-1 oncogenicity can overcome p53 function that persistently advances the tumor development.

  18. Both p53-PUMA/NOXA-Bax-mitochondrion and p53-p21cip1 pathways are involved in the CDglyTK-mediated tumor cell suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Zhendong; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Libin; Tang, Aifa; Zhai, Qinna; Wen, Jianxiang; Yao, Li; Li, Pengfei

    2009-01-01

    CDglyTK fusion suicide gene has been well characterized to effectively kill tumor cells. However, the exact mechanism and downstream target genes are not fully understood. In our study, we found that CDglyTK/prodrug treatment works more efficiently in p53 wild-type (HONE1) cells than in p53 mutant (CNE1) cells. We then used adenovirus-mediated gene delivery system to either knockdown or overexpress p53 and its target genes in these cells. Consistent results showed that both p53-PUMA/NOXA/Bcl2-Bax and p53-p21 pathways contribute to the CDglyTK induced tumor cell suppression. Our work for the first time addressed the role of p53 related genes in the CDglyTK/prodrug system.

  19. Changes in O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) Homeostasis Activate the p53 Pathway in Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Rafaela Muniz; Madan, Rashna; Chien, Jeremy; Dias, Wagner Barbosa; Slawson, Chad

    2016-09-02

    O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic post-translational modification consisting of the addition of a single N-acetylglucosamine sugar to serine and threonine residues in proteins by the enzyme O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT), whereas the enzyme O-GlcNAcase (OGA) removes the modification. In cancer, tumor samples present with altered O-GlcNAcylation; however, changes in O-GlcNAcylation are not consistent between tumor types. Interestingly, the tumor suppressor p53 is modified by O-GlcNAc, and most solid tumors contain mutations in p53 leading to the loss of p53 function. Because ovarian cancer has a high frequency of p53 mutation rates, we decided to investigate the relationship between O-GlcNAcylation and p53 function in ovarian cancer. We measured a significant decrease in O-GlcNAcylation of tumor tissue in an ovarian tumor microarray. Furthermore, O-GlcNAcylation was increased, and OGA protein and mRNA levels were decreased in ovarian tumor cell lines not expressing the protein p53. Treatment with the OGA inhibitor Thiamet-G (TMG), silencing of OGA, or overexpression of OGA and OGT led to p53 stabilization, increased nuclear localization, and increased protein and mRNA levels of p53 target genes. These data suggest that changes in O-GlcNAc homeostasis activate the p53 pathway. Combination treatment of the chemotherapeutic cisplatin with TMG decreased tumor cell growth and enhanced cell cycle arrest without impairing cytotoxicity. The effects of TMG on tumor cell growth were partially dependent on wild type p53 activation. In conclusion, changes in O-GlcNAc homeostasis activate the wild type p53 pathway in ovarian cancer cells, and OGA inhibition has the potential as an adjuvant treatment for ovarian carcinoma. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Changes in O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) Homeostasis Activate the p53 Pathway in Ovarian Cancer Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Rafaela Muniz; Madan, Rashna; Chien, Jeremy; Dias, Wagner Barbosa; Slawson, Chad

    2016-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic post-translational modification consisting of the addition of a single N-acetylglucosamine sugar to serine and threonine residues in proteins by the enzyme O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT), whereas the enzyme O-GlcNAcase (OGA) removes the modification. In cancer, tumor samples present with altered O-GlcNAcylation; however, changes in O-GlcNAcylation are not consistent between tumor types. Interestingly, the tumor suppressor p53 is modified by O-GlcNAc, and most solid tumors contain mutations in p53 leading to the loss of p53 function. Because ovarian cancer has a high frequency of p53 mutation rates, we decided to investigate the relationship between O-GlcNAcylation and p53 function in ovarian cancer. We measured a significant decrease in O-GlcNAcylation of tumor tissue in an ovarian tumor microarray. Furthermore, O-GlcNAcylation was increased, and OGA protein and mRNA levels were decreased in ovarian tumor cell lines not expressing the protein p53. Treatment with the OGA inhibitor Thiamet-G (TMG), silencing of OGA, or overexpression of OGA and OGT led to p53 stabilization, increased nuclear localization, and increased protein and mRNA levels of p53 target genes. These data suggest that changes in O-GlcNAc homeostasis activate the p53 pathway. Combination treatment of the chemotherapeutic cisplatin with TMG decreased tumor cell growth and enhanced cell cycle arrest without impairing cytotoxicity. The effects of TMG on tumor cell growth were partially dependent on wild type p53 activation. In conclusion, changes in O-GlcNAc homeostasis activate the wild type p53 pathway in ovarian cancer cells, and OGA inhibition has the potential as an adjuvant treatment for ovarian carcinoma. PMID:27402830

  1. DNA polymerase eta, the product of the xeroderma pigmentosum variant gene and a target of p53, modulates the DNA damage checkpoint and p53 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Chen, Xinbin

    2006-02-01

    DNA polymerase eta (PolH) is the product of the xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) gene and a well-characterized Y-family DNA polymerase for translesion synthesis. Cells derived from XPV patients are unable to faithfully bypass UV photoproducts and DNA adducts and thus acquire genetic mutations. Here, we found that PolH can be up-regulated by DNA breaks induced by ionizing radiation or chemotherapeutic agents, and knockdown of PolH gives cells resistance to apoptosis induced by DNA breaks in multiple cell lines and cell types in a p53-dependent manner. To explore the underlying mechanism, we examined p53 activation upon DNA breaks and found that p53 activation is impaired in PolH knockdown cells and PolH-null primary fibroblasts. Importantly, reconstitution of PolH into PolH knockdown cells restores p53 activation. Moreover, we provide evidence that, upon DNA breaks, PolH is partially colocalized with phosphorylated ATM at gamma-H2AX foci and knockdown of PolH impairs ATM to phosphorylate Chk2 and p53. However, upon DNA damage by UV, PolH knockdown cells exhibit two opposing temporal responses: at the early stage, knockdown of PolH suppresses p53 activation and gives cells resistance to UV-induced apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner; at the late stage, knockdown of PolH suppresses DNA repair, leading to sustained activation of p53 and increased susceptibility to apoptosis in both a p53-dependent and a p53-independent manner. Taken together, we found that PolH has a novel role in the DNA damage checkpoint and that a p53 target can modulate the DNA damage response and subsequently regulate p53 activation.

  2. DNA Polymerase η, the Product of the Xeroderma Pigmentosum Variant Gene and a Target of p53, Modulates the DNA Damage Checkpoint and p53 Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Chen, Xinbin

    2006-01-01

    DNA polymerase η (PolH) is the product of the xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XPV) gene and a well-characterized Y-family DNA polymerase for translesion synthesis. Cells derived from XPV patients are unable to faithfully bypass UV photoproducts and DNA adducts and thus acquire genetic mutations. Here, we found that PolH can be up-regulated by DNA breaks induced by ionizing radiation or chemotherapeutic agents, and knockdown of PolH gives cells resistance to apoptosis induced by DNA breaks in multiple cell lines and cell types in a p53-dependent manner. To explore the underlying mechanism, we examined p53 activation upon DNA breaks and found that p53 activation is impaired in PolH knockdown cells and PolH-null primary fibroblasts. Importantly, reconstitution of PolH into PolH knockdown cells restores p53 activation. Moreover, we provide evidence that, upon DNA breaks, PolH is partially colocalized with phosphorylated ATM at γ-H2AX foci and knockdown of PolH impairs ATM to phosphorylate Chk2 and p53. However, upon DNA damage by UV, PolH knockdown cells exhibit two opposing temporal responses: at the early stage, knockdown of PolH suppresses p53 activation and gives cells resistance to UV-induced apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner; at the late stage, knockdown of PolH suppresses DNA repair, leading to sustained activation of p53 and increased susceptibility to apoptosis in both a p53-dependent and a p53-independent manner. Taken together, we found that PolH has a novel role in the DNA damage checkpoint and that a p53 target can modulate the DNA damage response and subsequently regulate p53 activation. PMID:16449651

  3. Effect of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on the growth and radiotherapeutic sensitivity of human lymphoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zeyang; Fan Wo; Li Dongqing; Zhu Ran; Wang Yongqing; Wu Jinchang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the inhibitory effect and radiation sensitization of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) on human lymphoma cell lines. Methods: Human lymphoma cell lines Raji and Daudi were treated with rAd-p53, radiation therapy and combined treatment, respectively. The cell growth inhibition was assessed by MTT. The p53 protein expression was detected by Western blotting, and p53 mRNA was detected by BT-PCB. Results: The MTT results showed that the inhibitory effect and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 on human lymphoma cell lines were not obvious [Raji: (27.5±4.1)%; Daudi: (28.1±1.6)%]. The results of Western blotting and BT-PCB showed that extrinsic p53 protein and p53 mRNA were expressed to some degree, but not at high-level. In addition, the results didn't demonstrate obvious radiosensitivity enhancement. Conclusions: The role of inhibition and radiosensitivity enhancement of rAd-p53 was not significant on human lymphoma cell lines. (authors)

  4. Distinguishing Low-Risk Luminal A Breast Cancer Subtypes with Ki-67 and p53 Is More Predictive of Long-Term Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Kyung Lee

    Full Text Available Overexpression of p53 is the most frequent genetic alteration in breast cancer. Recently, many studies have shown that the expression of mutant p53 differs for each subtype of breast cancer and is associated with different prognoses. In this study, we aimed to determine the suitable cut-off value to predict the clinical outcome of p53 overexpression and its usefulness as a prognostic factor in each subtype of breast cancer, especially in luminal A breast cancer. Approval was granted by the Institutional Review Board of Samsung Medical Center. We analyzed a total of 7,739 patients who were surgically treated for invasive breast cancer at Samsung Medical Center between Dec 1995 and Apr 2013. Luminal A subtype was defined as ER&PR + and HER2- and was further subclassified according to Ki-67 and p53 expression as follows: luminal A (Ki-67-,p53-, luminal A (Ki-67+, p53-, luminal A (Ki-67 -, p53+ and luminal A (Ki-67+, p53+. Low-risk luminal A subtype was defined as negative for both Ki-67 and p53 (luminal A [ki-67-, p53-], and others subtypes were considered to be high-risk luminal A breast cancer. A cut-off value of 10% for p53 was a good predictor of clinical outcome in all patients and luminal A breast cancer patients. The prognostic role of p53 overexpression for OS and DFS was only significant in luminal A subtype. The combination of p53 and Ki-67 has been shown to have the best predictive power as calculated by the area under curve (AUC, especially for long-term overall survival. In this study, we have shown that overexpression of p53 and Ki-67 could be used to discriminate low-risk luminal A subtype in breast cancer. Therefore, using the combination of p53 and Ki-67 expression in discriminating low-risk luminal A breast cancer may improve the prognostic power and provide the greatest clinical utility.

  5. The critical role of catalase in prooxidant and antioxidant function of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M Y; Kim, H-B; Piao, C; Lee, K H; Hyun, J W; Chang, I-Y; You, H J

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is an important regulator of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, although downstream mediators of p53 remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that p53 and its downstream targets, p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase (p53R2) and p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3), physically and functionally interact with catalase for efficient regulation of intracellular ROS, depending on stress intensity. Under physiological conditions, the antioxidant functions of p53 are mediated by p53R2, which maintains increased catalase activity and thereby protects against endogenous ROS. After genotoxic stress, high levels of p53 and PIG3 cooperate to inhibit catalase activity, leading to a shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance toward an oxidative status, which could augment apoptotic cell death. These results highlight the essential role of catalase in p53-mediated ROS regulation and suggest that the p53/p53R2–catalase and p53/PIG3–catalase pathways are critically involved in intracellular ROS regulation under physiological conditions and during the response to DNA damage, respectively. PMID:22918438

  6. eRNAs are required for p53-dependent enhancer activity and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Carlos A; Drost, Jarno; Wijchers, Patrick J; van de Werken, Harmen; de Wit, Elzo; Oude Vrielink, Joachim A F; Elkon, Ran; Melo, Sónia A; Léveillé, Nicolas; Kalluri, Raghu; de Laat, Wouter; Agami, Reuven

    2013-02-07

    Binding within or nearby target genes involved in cell proliferation and survival enables the p53 tumor suppressor gene to regulate their transcription and cell-cycle progression. Using genome-wide chromatin-binding profiles, we describe binding of p53 also to regions located distantly from any known p53 target gene. Interestingly, many of these regions possess conserved p53-binding sites and all known hallmarks of enhancer regions. We demonstrate that these p53-bound enhancer regions (p53BERs) indeed contain enhancer activity and interact intrachromosomally with multiple neighboring genes to convey long-distance p53-dependent transcription regulation. Furthermore, p53BERs produce, in a p53-dependent manner, enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) that are required for efficient transcriptional enhancement of interacting target genes and induction of a p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest. Thus, our results ascribe transcription enhancement activity to p53 with the capacity to regulate multiple genes from a single genomic binding site. Moreover, eRNA production from p53BERs is required for efficient p53 transcription enhancement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Knockdown of p53 suppresses Nanog expression in embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelalim, Essam Mohamed, E-mail: emohamed@qf.org.qa [Qatar Biomedical Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, Doha 5825 (Qatar); Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Department of Cytology and Histology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Tooyama, Ikuo [Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We investigate the role of p53 in ESCs in the absence of DNA damage. •p53 knockdown suppresses ESC proliferation. •p53 knockdown downregulates Nanog expression. •p53 is essential for mouse ESC self-renewal. -- Abstract: Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) express high levels of cytoplasmic p53. Exposure of mouse ESCs to DNA damage leads to activation of p53, inducing Nanog suppression. In contrast to earlier studies, we recently reported that chemical inhibition of p53 suppresses ESC proliferation. Here, we confirm that p53 signaling is involved in the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of p53 induced downregulation of p21 and defects in ESC proliferation. Furthermore, p53 knockdown resulted in a significant downregulation in Nanog expression at 24 and 48 h post-transfection. p53 knockdown also caused a reduction in Oct4 expression at 48 h post-transfection. Conversely, exposure of ESCs to DNA damage caused a higher reduction of Nanog expression in control siRNA-treated cells than in p53 siRNA-treated cells. These data show that in the absence of DNA damage, p53 is required for the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal by regulating Nanog expression.

  8. [Effects of p53 gene on drug resistance in human lung cancer cell lines.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hong; Zhu, Yunzhong; Wang, Hui; Lai, Baitang; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhan, Xiuping; Wang, Yue; Yang, Xuehui; Yue, Wentao; Zhang, Hongtao

    2008-04-20

    Drug resistance of lung cancer cells is one of main factors which affect the outcome of chemotherapy. It has been reported that abnormal p53 gene is well assosiated with chemotherapy resistance of tumor cells. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of p53 gene on drug resistance in human lung cancer cell lines, so as to provide foundation of choosing individual chemotherapy drugs in clinical treatment. The expression vectors which contain p53cDNA and p53 antisense cDNA respectively were constructed and were confirmed by sequencing. Transfected the 801D, a human lung cancer cell line with recombined plasmids by lipofectin mediating. Several kinds of monoclone cell lines, pEGFP-801D,pEGFP-sense p53-801D(including sense p53,pEGFP-p53(RS)-801D),pEGFP-antisense p53-801D(including antisense p53,pEGFP-p53(AS)-801D),which contained p53 of different status were obtained. Green fluorescence was observed through fluorescence microscopy. The extraneous gene was detected by PCR. MTT assay was taken to determine the drug resistance of each cell line to chemotherapy agents. Cell cycle and apoptosis induced by antitumor drugs were examined by flow cytometer. Extraneous sense p53 and antisense p53 were proved to be linked to plasmid respectively by sequencing.Green fluorescence was found in transfected cell lines. The IC50 of pEGFP-p53(AS)-801D cell line(0.26+/-0.09 mug/mL) to Cisplatin(DDP) decreased markedly compared with 801D(0.55+/-0.19 mug/mL,Phigher than that of pEGFP-p53(AS)-801D(P TAX) than 801D(8.40+/-1.50 ng/mL, P TAX induced G2 phase arrest in pEGFP-p53(RS)-801D. A increased S phase proportion was induced by 5FU in pEGFP-p53(RS)-801D. The cell lines experienced apoptosis and necrosis when they were treated with either DDP or TAX. p53 gene of different status have different effects on resistance of chemotherapy agents in lung cancer cell lines. p53 mutation and deletion are related to drug resistance of DDP. p53 deletion connects with chemoresistance of TAX and

  9. Analysis of the K-ras and p53 pathways in x-ray-induced lung tumors in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinsky, S.A.; Middleton, S.K.; Hahn, F.F.; Nikula, K.J. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Picksley, S.M. [Medical Sciences Inst., Dundee (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    The risk from exposure to low-dose radiation in conjunction with cigarette smoking has not been estimated due in part to lmited knowledge surrounding the molecular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced cancers. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the frequency for alterations in genes within the K-ras and p53 signal and cell cycle regulatory pathways, respectively, in X-ray-induced lung tumors in the F344/N rat. These tumors were examined for genetic alterations in the K-ras, c-raf-1, p53, mdm2 and cip1 genes. No K-ras mutations were detected by sequencing in 18 squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) or 17 adenocarcinomas. However, using a K-ras codon 12 mutation selection assay, a codon 12 GGT {r_arrow} GAT mutation was detected in one SCC, suggesting that activation of the K-ras proto-oncogene is both a rare and late event. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the kinase-binding domain of the c-raf-1 gene did not detect any polymorphisms. Three of 18 SCCs but none of the adenocarcinomas showed p53 nuclear immunoreactivity. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of exons 4-9 of the p53 gene detected only an exon 9 mutation in one SCC. Mutations were not detected in the three SCCs with immunoreactive p53 protein. No amplification of the mdm2 gene was detected; however, nuclear mdm2 immunoreactivity was present in one of the three SCCs that stained positive for the p53 protein. The complete cDNA of the rat cip1 gene comprising 810 bases was cloned and sequenced. The frequency of somatic mutations in exon 2 of the cip1 gene was determined by SSCP analysis. No alterations in electrophoretic mobility were detected. The results of this investigation indicate that alterations in the K-ras and p53 pathways do not play a major role in the genesis of X-ray-induced lung tumors in the rat. 49 refs., 5 figs.

  10. The chemoadjuvant potential of grape seed procyanidins on p53-related cell death in oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Chen, Su-Feng; Liu, Chia-Lin; Nieh, Shin

    2012-04-01

    To clarify the efficacy of grape seed procyanidin (GSP) on antiproliferative effects related to p53 functional status of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) for its chemoadjuvant potential. We used GSP to investigate SCC-25 cells with wild-type p53 gene and OEC-M1 cells with mutant p53 gene for the assessment of antiproliferative effects including cell viability, cell cycle, apoptosis, migration and invasion potential, and alterations of associated oncoproteins involved in cellular and molecular events. The findings suggest that GSP on OEC-M1 cells leads to cell cycle arrest by increasing the expression of p21(Cip1) /p27(Kip1) protein without functioning mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, whereas GSP on SCC-25 cells inhibits cell proliferation via both G1-phase arrest and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner as a result of alterations of Bcl-2. GSP also inhibits the migration and invasion of both cells, which are associated with the suppression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and MMP-9. Antiproliferative effectiveness of GSP is closely associated with the p53 status of OSCC cells. GSP displays chemoadjuvant potential via cell cycle blockage and apoptotic induction. Our findings clearly suggest that GSP may play a role as a novel chemopreventive or therapeutic agent for OSCC. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Mitochondrial localization of the low level p53 protein in proliferative cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferecatu, Ioana; Bergeaud, Marie; Rodriguez-Enfedaque, Aida; Le Floch, Nathalie [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Oliver, Lisa [INSERM U601, Universite de Nantes, Faculte de Medecine, Nantes Cedex (France); Rincheval, Vincent; Renaud, Flore [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Vallette, Francois M. [INSERM U601, Universite de Nantes, Faculte de Medecine, Nantes Cedex (France); Mignotte, Bernard [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France); Vayssiere, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jean-luc.vayssiere@uvsq.fr [Laboratoire de Genetique et Biologie Cellulaire - CNRS UMR 8159, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Versailles, France and Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire et Physiologique, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Versailles (France)

    2009-10-02

    p53 protein plays a central role in suppressing tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis through transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Emerging publications suggest that following stress, a fraction of p53 translocates to mitochondria to induce cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, the localization of p53 under unstressed conditions remains largely unexplored. Here we show that p53 is localized at mitochondria in absence of apoptotic stimuli, when cells are proliferating, localization observed in various cell types (rodent and human). This is also supported by acellular assays in which p53 bind strongly to mitochondria isolated from rat liver. Furthermore, the mitochondria subfractionation study and the alkaline treatment of the mitochondrial p53 revealed that the majority of mitochondrial p53 is present in the membranous compartments. Finally, we identified VDAC, a protein of the mitochondrial outer-membrane, as a putative partner of p53 in unstressed/proliferative cells.

  12. The tissue dependent interactions between p53 and Bcl-2 in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Miao, Xiao; Wang, Hongshen; Xu, Zhixiang; Li, Bin

    2015-11-03

    To further investigate the role of p53 in apoptosis in vivo and the interaction between p53 and Bcl-2 in the regulation of cellular apoptosis in vivo, we depleted p53 in Bcl-2-null mice. We found that the interaction between p53 and Bcl-2 are tissue dependent. Specifically, loss of p53 in Bcl-2-/- mice inhibits apoptotic induction in spleen and subsequently inhibits the Bcl-2-null-induced spleen atrophy. Furthermore, p53 deficiency overcomes loss of melanocyte stem cell (MSC)-induced apoptosis and subsequently prevents hair graying in Bcl-2- null mice. In addition, p53 deletion partly inhibits apoptosis in hair follicle keratinocytes, leading to the alleviation of hair growth delay in Bcl-2-null mice. However, p53 absence in Bcl-2-null mice cannot restore other defects in Bcl-2-null mice, including retardation of growth, short ears and polycystic kidney disease.

  13. The Tumor Suppressor, P53, Decreases the Metal Transporter, ZIP14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningning Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Loss of p53’s proper function accounts for over half of identified human cancers. We identified the metal transporter ZIP14 (Zinc-regulated transporter (ZRT and Iron-regulated transporter (IRT-like Protein 14 as a p53-regulated protein. ZIP14 protein levels were upregulated by lack of p53 and downregulated by increased p53 expression. This regulation did not fully depend on the changes in ZIP14’s mRNA expression. Co-precipitation studies indicated that p53 interacts with ZIP14 and increases its ubiquitination and degradation. Moreover, knockdown of p53 resulted in higher non-transferrin-bound iron uptake, which was mediated by increased ZIP14 levels. Our study highlights a role for p53 in regulating nutrient metabolism and provides insight into how iron and possibly other metals such as zinc and manganese could be regulated in p53-inactivated tumor cells.

  14. Binding of Amphipathic Cell Penetrating Peptide p28 to Wild Type and Mutated p53 as studied by Raman, Atomic Force and Surface Plasmon Resonance spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Sara; Santini, Simona; Yamada, Tohru; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Beattie, Craig W; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2017-04-01

    Mutations within the DNA binding domain (DBD) of the tumor suppressor p53 are found in >50% of human cancers and may significantly modify p53 secondary structure impairing its function. p28, an amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide, binds to the DBD through hydrophobic interaction and induces a posttranslational increase in wildtype and mutant p53 restoring functionality. We use mutation analyses to explore which elements of secondary structure may be critical to p28 binding. Molecular modeling, Raman spectroscopy, Atomic Force Spectroscopy (AFS) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) were used to identify which secondary structure of site-directed and naturally occurring mutant DBDs are potentially altered by discrete changes in hydrophobicity and the molecular interaction with p28. We show that specific point mutations that alter hydrophobicity within non-mutable and mutable regions of the p53 DBD alter specific secondary structures. The affinity of p28 was positively correlated with the β-sheet content of a mutant DBD, and reduced by an increase in unstructured or random coil that resulted from a loss in hydrophobicity and redistribution of surface charge. These results help refine our knowledge of how mutations within p53-DBD alter secondary structure and provide insight on how potential structural alterations in p28 or similar molecules improve their ability to restore p53 function. Raman spectroscopy, AFS, SPR and computational modeling are useful approaches to characterize how mutations within the p53DBD potentially affect secondary structure and identify those structural elements prone to influence the binding affinity of agents designed to increase the functionality of p53. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. MDM2 but not MDM4 promotes retinoblastoma cell proliferation through p53-independent regulation of MYCN translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, D-L; Cobrinik, D

    2017-03-30

    Retinoblastomas can arise from cone photoreceptor precursors in response to the loss of pRB function. Cone precursor-specific circuitry cooperates with pRB loss to initiate this process and subsequently contributes to the malignancy. Intrinsic high-level MDM2 expression is a key component of the cone precursor circuitry and is thought to inactivate p53-mediated tumor surveillance, which could otherwise be induced in response to pRB loss. However, the MDM2-related MDM4 has also been proposed to abrogate p53-mediated tumor surveillance in the absence of detectable MDM2 in retinoblastoma cells, bringing into question the importance of high-level MDM2 versus MDM4 expression. Here we report that high-level MDM2 but not MDM4 has a consistent critical role in retinoblastoma cell proliferation in vitro, as well as in orthotopic xenografts. Reduction of either MDM2 or MDM4 weakly induced p53, yet reduction of MDM2 but not MDM4 severely impaired proliferation and survival through a p53-independent mechanism. Specifically, MDM2 upregulated the mRNA expression and translation of another component of the cone circuitry, MYCN, in retinoblastoma cells. Moreover, MYCN was essential to retinoblastoma cell growth and tumor formation, and ectopic MYCN partially reversed the effects of MDM2 depletion, indicating that MYCN is an important MDM2 target. These findings indicate that high-level MDM2 expression is needed in order to perform a critical p53-independent function and may obviate the need for genomic alterations to the p53 pathway during retinoblastoma tumorigenesis.

  16. MDM2 but not MDM4 promotes retinoblastoma cell proliferation through p53-independent regulation of MYCN translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dong-Lai; Cobrinik, David

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastomas can arise from cone photoreceptor precursors in response to the loss of pRB function. Cone precursor-specific circuitry cooperates with pRB loss to initiate this process and subsequently contributes to the malignancy. Intrinsic high level MDM2 expression is a key component of the cone precursor circuitry and is thought to inactivate p53-mediated tumor surveillance that could otherwise be induced in response to pRB loss. However, the MDM2-related MDM4 has also been proposed to abrogate p53-mediated tumor surveillance in the absence of detectable MDM2 in retinoblastoma cells, bringing into question the importance of high-level MDM2 versus MDM4 expression. Here we report that high-level MDM2 but not MDM4 has a consistent critical role in retinoblastoma cell proliferation in vitro as well as in orthotopic xenografts. Reduction of either MDM2 or MDM4 weakly induced p53, yet reduction of MDM2 but not MDM4 severely impaired proliferation and survival through a p53-independent mechanism. Specifically, MDM2 up-regulated the mRNA expression and translation of another component of the cone circuitry, MYCN, in retinoblastoma cells. Moreover, MYCN was essential to retinoblastoma cell growth and tumor formation, and ectopic MYCN partially reversed the effects of MDM2 depletion, indicating that MYCN is an important MDM2 target. These findings indicate that high-level MDM2 expression is needed in order to perform a critical p53-independent function and may obviate the need for genomic alterations to the p53 pathway during retinoblastoma tumorigenesis. PMID:27748758

  17. The wild type p53 gene radiosensitizes malignant cells and tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo, David; McBride, William

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To investigate the use of the wild-type p53 gene as a radiosensitizer of human malignant cells and tumors. Materials and Methods: An ovarian carcinoma cell line (SKOV) lacking the p53 gene was transfected in vitro with E1 deleted adenovirus containing the wild type p53 gene (Ad/p53). SKOV cells expressing the p53 protein were tested for intrinsic radiosensitivity with clonogenic survival assays. SKOV tumors growing in the flanks of SCID mice were injected with 1x10(9) PFU of Ad/p53 or Ad/luciferase. Injected tumors were either irradiated to 24 Gy in 4 Gy fractions or not irradiated. Tumor diameters were then monitored. Results: Cells expressing the p53 gene product were more sensitive to radiation than control cells expressing the luciferase gene in in vitro clonogenic survival assays. SKOV tumors injected with the Ad/p53 virus expressed the p53 protein as demonstrated through immunohistochemical analysis. Tumors injected with Ad/p53 grew more slowly than tumors injected with Ad/luciferase or saline. After irradiation with 24Gy, tumors injected with Ad/p53 were controlled while those injected with Ad/luciferase were not. Conclusions: Our results formally demonstrate that transfer of the wild-type p53 gene can increase the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of a malignant cell line lacking the p53 gene. We also demonstrate that intra-tumoral injection of an adenoviral vector containing the wild type p53 gene increases the radiation responsiveness of established tumors, consistent with the radiosensitizing activity of the wild type p53 gene demonstrated in vitro. These studies support clinical trials using p53 gene transfer to potentially improve the efficacy of radiation therapy in human malignancies

  18. p53 protein expression in sequential biopsies of oral dysplasias and in situ carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Zarbo, R J; Regev, E; Pisanty, S; Silverman, S; Gazit, D

    1995-01-01

    Immunohistochemically detectable levels of p53 may be seen early in the malignant transformation of some neoplasms. To determine if p53 is immunocytochemically detectable, and therefore presumptively abnormal, in oral dysplasias and in situ carcinomas, and to explore the natural history of p53 protein expression in these lesions, sequential biopsies from patients with lesions occurring in the same anatomic site were examined. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections from 19 patients were evaluated immunohistochemically for p53 protein using antibody clones Pab1801 and BP53-12. With two exceptions, comparable results were observed with these antibodies. p53 protein was detected immunocytochemically in 6 of 13 patients with dysplasias; 3 of these progressed to p53-positive invasive carcinoma, one advanced to a more severe grade of p53-positive dysplasia, one developed into a p53-negative verrucous carcinoma, and one represented a p53-positive dysplasia developing five years after treatment of a p53-positive carcinoma. The p53-positive dysplasias, which were found in all subtypes (mild, moderate, severe), preceded histologic malignant change by months to years. p53 detection was evident in 4 of 6 patients with in situ lesions. Sequential biopsies of three of these lesions showed no change in lesion histology or p53 staining, and one lesion advanced to a p53-positive carcinoma. It is concluded that p53 protein may be detected early in the development of a subset of p53-positive oral squamous cell carcinomas. This phenomenon may be seen in dysplasias and in situ lesions, and it may have prognostic implications.

  19. Wild-type p53 gene transfer into mutated p53 HT29 cells improves sensitivity to photodynamic therapy via induction of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberi-Heyob, Muriel; Védrine, Pierre-Olivier; Merlin, Jean-Louis; Millon, Régine; Abecassis, Joseph; Poupon, Marie-France; Guillemin, François

    2004-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective local cancer treatment that induces cytotoxicity through the intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species. It is generally thought that p53 regulates chemotherapy and radiation therapy responsiveness via apoptosis induction control. The current study investigated whether cellular sensitivity to PDT is increased when a wild-type (wt) p53 status is restored by gene transfer in the established HT9blk Ala273-mutant p53 human colon cancer cell line. The photosensitizer accumulation was similar in both cell lines, and survival measurements using MTT test and clonogenic assays demonstrated that wt p53 transfected cells (HT29A4) were significantly more sensitive to chlorin e6-mediated PDT. P53 protein expression and its functionality as a transcription factor demonstrated through the induction of mdm2 transactivation, were not found to be directly involved in this differential photosensitivity. However, induction of caspase 3 activation (2.6-fold), leading to significant apoptosis induction 24-h after PDT was observed in HT29A4 cells. These results suggest that the introduction of wt p53 in HT29A4 potentiates the cell sensitivity to PDT through the induction of apoptosis in relation to p53 mutational status, but independently of p53 expression level and transcriptional activity.

  20. Specific killing of P53 mutated tumor cell lines by a cross-reactive human HLA-A2-restricted P53-specific CTL line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, P A; Pedersen, L O; Poulsen, H S

    2001-01-01

    p53 is upregulated in the majority of spontaneous tumors and the HLA class I molecule HLA-A2 is expressed by approximately 50% of the caucasians. Potentially, these facts make HLA-A2-binding p53 peptides for CTL-inducing immunotherapy applicable to a broad range of cancer patients. In our study, ...

  1. Analysis of p53 Transactivation Domain Mutants Reveals Acad11 as a Metabolic Target Important for p53 Pro-Survival Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadi Jiang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor plays a key role in maintaining cellular integrity. In response to diverse stress signals, p53 can trigger apoptosis to eliminate damaged cells or cell-cycle arrest to enable cells to cope with stress and survive. However, the transcriptional networks underlying p53 pro-survival function are incompletely understood. Here, we show that in oncogenic-Ras-expressing cells, p53 promotes oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS and cell survival upon glucose starvation. Analysis of p53 transcriptional activation domain mutants reveals that these responses depend on p53 transactivation function. Using gene expression profiling and ChIP-seq analysis, we identify several p53-inducible fatty acid metabolism-related genes. One such gene, Acad11, encoding a protein involved in fatty acid oxidation, is required for efficient OXPHOS and cell survival upon glucose starvation. This study provides new mechanistic insight into the pro-survival function of p53 and suggests that targeting this pathway may provide a strategy for therapeutic intervention based on metabolic perturbation.

  2. Phosphorylation and nuclear accumulation are distinct events contributing to the activation of p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hagan, Heather M.; Ljungman, Mats

    2004-01-01

    It has been recently shown that ionizing radiation (IR) and the mRNA synthesis inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) act in synergy to induce p53-mediated transactivation of reporter plasmids in human cells [Oncogene 19 (2000) 3829]. We have extended these studies and show that ionizing radiation and DRB also act in synergy to induce ATM-mediated phosphorylation of the ser15 site of p53 and enhance the expression of endogenous p21 protein. Examination of the localization of p53 revealed that while DRB did not induce phosphorylation of the ser15 site of p53 but efficiently accumulated p53 in the nucleus, ionizing radiation induced phosphorylation of the ser15 site of p53 without prolonged nuclear accumulation. Importantly, the combination of DRB and IR resulted in a strong accumulation of phosphorylated p53 in the nucleus that was more persistent then p53 accumulation after IR alone. Furthermore, the nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B showed a similar synergy with IR as did DRB regarding ser15 phosphorylation of p53 and p21 induction. These results suggest that the synergistic activation of the p53 response by the combination treatment is due to the activation of two distinct pathways where DRB causes the prolonged nuclear accumulation of p53 while ionizing radiation activates p53 by ATM-mediated phosphorylation

  3. Doxycyclin induces p53 expression in SaOs (osteosarcoma) cell line ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The p53 tumour suppressor gene plays an important role in preventing cancer development. This study determined if p53 can be induced in osteosarcoma cell line upon treatment ... represent an important component of the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. Keywords: Tumor suppressor, oncogene, mdm2, cyclinE, apoptosis ...

  4. Loss of p53 Ser18 and Atm results in embryonic lethality without cooperation in tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Armata

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation at murine Serine 18 (human Serine 15 is a critical regulatory process for the tumor suppressor function of p53. p53Ser18 residue is a substrate for ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM and ATM-related (ATR protein kinases. Studies of mice with a germ-line mutation that replaces Ser18 with Ala (p53(S18A mice have demonstrated that loss of phosphorylation of p53Ser18 leads to the development of tumors, including lymphomas, fibrosarcomas, leukemia and leiomyosarcomas. The predominant lymphoma is B-cell lymphoma, which is in contrast to the lymphomas observed in Atm(-/- animals. This observation and the fact that multiple kinases phosphorylate p53Ser18 suggest Atm-independent tumor suppressive functions of p53Ser18. Therefore, in order to examine p53Ser18 function in relationship to ATM, we analyzed the lifespan and tumorigenesis of mice with combined mutations in p53Ser18 and Atm. Surprisingly, we observed no cooperation in survival and tumorigenesis in compound p53(S18A and Atm(-/- animals. However, we observed embryonic lethality in the compound mutant animals. In addition, the homozygous p53Ser18 mutant allele impacted the weight of Atm(-/- animals. These studies examine the genetic interaction of p53Ser18 and Atm in vivo. Furthermore, these studies demonstrate a role of p53Ser18 in regulating embryonic survival and motor coordination.

  5. Chronic p53-independent p21 expression causes genomic instability by deregulating replication licensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galanos, Panagiotis; Vougas, Konstantinos; Walter, David

    2016-01-01

    cells strongly expressing p21 showed proliferation features. This occurred predominantly in p53-mutant human cancers, suggesting p53-independent upregulation of p21 selectively in more aggressive tumour cells. Multifaceted phenotypic and genomic analyses of p21-inducible, p53-null, cancerous and near...

  6. APELA promotes tumour growth and cell migration in ovarian cancer in a p53-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yuyin; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Wang, Evan Y; Anglesio, Michael S; Cochrane, Dawn R; Fuller, Megan; Gibb, Ewan A; Wei, Wei; Huntsman, David G; Karsan, Aly; Hoodless, Pamela A

    2017-12-01

    APELA is a small, secreted peptide that can function as a ligand for the G-protein coupled receptor, Apelin Receptor (APLNR, APJ). APELA plays an essential role in endoderm differentiation and cardiac development during embryogenesis. We investigated whether APELA exerts any functions in cancer progression. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) RNA sequencing datasets, microarray from an OCCC mouse model, and RNA isolated from fresh frozen and FFPE patient tissue were used to assess APELA expression. APELA knockout ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC) cell lines were generated using CRISPR/Cas9. APELA was expressed in various ovarian cancer histotypes and was especially elevated in OCCC. Disruption of APELA expression in OCCC cell lines suppressed cell growth and migration, and altered cell-cycle progression. Moreover, addition of human recombinant APELA peptide to the OCCC cell line OVISE promoted cell growth and migration. Interestingly, OVISE cells do not express APLNR, suggesting that APELA can function through an APLNR-independent pathway. Furthermore, APELA affected cell growth and cell cycle progression in a p53-dependent manner. In addition, APELA knockdown induced p53 expression in cancer cell lines. Our findings uncover a potential oncogenic role for APELA in promoting ovarian tumour progression and provide a possible therapeutic strategy in ovarian cancer by targeting APELA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Specific killing of P53 mutated tumor cell lines by a cross-reactive human HLA-A2-restricted P53-specific CTL line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, P A; Pedersen, L O; Poulsen, H S

    2001-01-01

    p53 is upregulated in the majority of spontaneous tumors and the HLA class I molecule HLA-A2 is expressed by approximately 50% of the caucasians. Potentially, these facts make HLA-A2-binding p53 peptides for CTL-inducing immunotherapy applicable to a broad range of cancer patients. In our study, we...... cancer cell lines. In addition, the recognition of 2 different p53 peptides by the same CTL clone suggests a promiscuous peptide recognition by the TCR involved. Taken together, these in vitro results suggest that vaccination with autologous DC pulsed with multiple p53 epitopes may induce an effective...... tumor-specific CTL response in vivo with the potential to eradicate p53-upregulated spontaneously occurring tumors....

  8. Infection with E1B-mutant adenovirus stabilizes p53 but blocks p53 acetylation and activity through E1A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savelyeva, I.; Dobbelstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    accumulation of p53, without obvious defects in p53 localization, phosphorylation, conformation and oligomerization. Nonetheless, p53 completely failed to induce its target genes in this scenario, for example, p21/CDKN1A, Mdm2 and PUMA. Two regions of the E1A gene products independently contributed......Wild-type adenovirus type 5 eliminates p53 through the E1B-55 kDa and E4-34 kDa gene products. Deletion or mutation of E1B-55 kDa has long been thought to confer p53-selective replication of oncolytic viruses. We show here that infection with E1B-defective adenovirus mutants induces massive...

  9. N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase inhibits p53-mediated cell cycle arrest and coordinates with p53 to determine sensitivity to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shanshan; Xing, Guichun; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Shan; Yin, Yuxin; Tian, Chunyan; He, Fuchu; Zhang, Lingqiang

    2012-08-01

    Alkylating agents induce genome-wide base damage, which is repaired mainly by N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG). An elevated expression of MPG in certain types of tumor cells confers higher sensitivity to alkylation agents because MPG-induced apurinic/apyrimidic (AP) sites trigger more strand breaks. However, the determinant of drug sensitivity or insensitivity still remains unclear. Here, we report that the p53 status coordinates with MPG to play a pivotal role in such process. MPG expression is positive in breast, lung and colon cancers (38.7%, 43.4% and 25.3%, respectively) but negative in all adjacent normal tissues. MPG directly binds to the tumor suppressor p53 and represses p53 activity in unstressed cells. The overexpression of MPG reduced, whereas depletion of MPG increased, the expression levels of pro-arrest gene downstream of p53 including p21, 14-3-3σ and Gadd45 but not proapoptotic ones. The N-terminal region of MPG was specifically required for the interaction with the DNA binding domain of p53. Upon DNA alkylation stress, in p53 wild-type tumor cells, p53 dissociated from MPG and induced cell growth arrest. Then, AP sites were repaired efficiently, which led to insensitivity to alkylating agents. By contrast, in p53-mutated cells, the AP sites were repaired with low efficacy. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence to show that a DNA repair enzyme functions as a selective regulator of p53, and these findings provide new insights into the functional linkage between MPG and p53 in cancer therapy.

  10. Lack of Immunomodulatory Interleukin-27 Enhances Oncogenic Properties of Mutant p53 In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibra, Denada; Mitra, Abhisek; Newman, Melisa; Xia, Xueqing; Cutrera, Jeffry J; Gagea, Mihai; Kleinerman, Eugenie S; Lozano, Guillermina; Li, Shulin

    2016-08-01

    p53 is mutated in about 50% of human cancers, mostly through missense mutations. Expression of mutant p53 is associated with poor clinical outcomes or metastasis. Although mutant p53 is inherently instable, various stressors such as DNA damage or expression of the oncogenic Kras or c-myc affect the oncogenic properties of mutant p53. However, the effects of inflammation on mutant p53 are largely unknown. IL27 is an important immunomodulatory cytokine, but its impact on mutant p53-driven tumorigenesis has not been reported. IL27RA(-/-) mice were bred with mutant p53 heterozygous (p53(R172H/+)) mice to obtain IL27RA(-/-)p53(H/+) and IL27RA(-/-)p53(H/H) mice. Mouse survival and tumor spectra for the cohort were analyzed. Stability of p53 protein was analyzed via IHC and Western blot analysis. This study unraveled that lack of IL27 signaling significantly shortened the survival duration of mice with tumors expressing both copies of the mutant p53 gene (Li-Fraumeni mouse model). Interestingly, in mice that were heterozygous for mutant p53, lack of IL27 signaling not only significantly shortened survival time but also doubled the incidence of osteosarcomas. Furthermore, lack of IL27 signaling is closely associated with increased mutant p53 stability in vivo from early age. These results suggest that IL27 signaling modulates the oncogenic properties of mutant p53 in vivo Clin Cancer Res; 22(15); 3876-83. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Immunohistochemical expression of p53, p16 and hTERT in oral squamous cell carcinoma and potentially malignant disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahao, Aline Correa; Bonelli, Beatriz Venturi; Nunes, Fábio Daumas; Dias, Eliane Pedra; Cabral, Márcia Grillo

    2011-01-01

    Oral carcinogenesis is a multi-step process. One possible step is the development of potentially malignant disorders known as leukoplakia and erytroplakia. The objective of this study was to use immunohistochemistry to analyze the patterns of expression of the cell-cycle regulatory proteins p53 and p16(INK4a) in potentially malignant disorders (PMD) of the oral mucosa (with varying degrees of dysplasia) and in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to correlate them with the expression of telomerase (hTERT). Fifteen PMD and 30 OSCC tissue samples were analyzed. Additionally, 5 cases of oral epithelial hyperplasia (OEH) were added to analyze clinically altered mucosa presenting as histological hyperplasia without dysplasia. p53 positivity was observed in 93.3% of PMD, in 63.3% of OSCC and in 80% of OEH. Although there was no correlation between p53 expression and the grade of dysplasia, all cases with severe dysplasia presented p53 suprabasal immunoexpression. p16(INK4a) expression was observed in 26.7% of PMD, in 43.3% of OSCC and in 2 cases of OEH. The p16(INK4a) expression in OEH, PMD and OSCC was unable to differentiate non-dysplastic from dysplastic oral epithelium. hTERT positivity was observed in all samples of OEH and PMD and in 90% of OSCC. The high hTERT immunoexpression in all three lesions indicates that telomerase is present in clinically altered oral mucosa but does not differentiate hyperplastic from dysplastic oral epithelium. In PMD of the oral mucosa, the p53 immunoexpression changes according to the degree of dysplasia by mechanisms independent of p16(INK4a) and hTERT.

  12. Immunohistochemical expression of p53, p16 and hTERT in oral squamous cell carcinoma and potentially malignant disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Correa Abrahao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Oral carcinogenesis is a multi-step process. One possible step is the development of potentially malignant disorders known as leukoplakia and erytroplakia. The objective of this study was to use immunohistochemistry to analyze the patterns of expression of the cell-cycle regulatory proteins p53 and p16INK4a in potentially malignant disorders (PMD of the oral mucosa (with varying degrees of dysplasia and in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC to correlate them with the expression of telomerase (hTERT. Fifteen PMD and 30 OSCC tissue samples were analyzed. Additionally, 5 cases of oral epithelial hyperplasia (OEH were added to analyze clinically altered mucosa presenting as histological hyperplasia without dysplasia. p53 positivity was observed in 93.3% of PMD, in 63.3% of OSCC and in 80% of OEH. Although there was no correlation between p53 expression and the grade of dysplasia, all cases with severe dysplasia presented p53 suprabasal immunoexpression. p16INK4a expression was observed in 26.7% of PMD, in 43.3% of OSCC and in 2 cases of OEH. The p16INK4a expression in OEH, PMD and OSCC was unable to differentiate non-dysplastic from dysplastic oral epithelium. hTERT positivity was observed in all samples of OEH and PMD and in 90% of OSCC. The high hTERT immunoexpression in all three lesions indicates that telomerase is present in clinically altered oral mucosa but does not differentiate hyperplastic from dysplastic oral epithelium. In PMD of the oral mucosa, the p53 immunoexpression changes according to the degree of dysplasia by mechanisms independent of p16INK4a and hTERT.

  13. Transcriptional repressor NIR interacts with the p53-inhibiting ubiquitin ligase MDM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyne, Kristina; Förster, Juliane; Schüle, Roland; Roemer, Klaus

    2014-04-01

    NIR (novel INHAT repressor) can bind to p53 at promoters and inhibit p53-mediated gene transactivation by blocking histone acetylation carried out by p300/CBP. Like NIR, the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 can also bind and inhibit p53 at promoters. Here, we present data indicating that NIR, which shuttles between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, not only binds to p53 but also directly to MDM2, in part via the central acidic and zinc finger domain of MDM2 that is also contacted by several other nucleolus-based MDM2/p53-regulating proteins. Like some of these, NIR was able to inhibit the ubiquitination of MDM2 and stabilize MDM2; however, unlike these nucleolus-based MDM2 regulators, NIR did not inhibit MDM2 to activate p53. Rather, NIR cooperated with MDM2 to repress p53-induced transactivation. This cooperative repression may at least in part involve p300/CBP. We show that NIR can block the acetylation of p53 and MDM2. Non-acetylated p53 has been documented previously to more readily associate with inhibitory MDM2. NIR may thus help to sustain the inhibitory p53:MDM2 complex, and we present evidence suggesting that all three proteins can indeed form a ternary complex. In sum, our findings suggest that NIR can support MDM2 to suppress p53 as a transcriptional activator.

  14. The DEAD box protein p68: a novel transcriptional coactivator of the p53 tumour suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Gaynor J; Nicol, Samantha M; Wilson, Brian J; Jacobs, Anne-Marie F; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe; Wardrop, Julie; Gregory, David J; Lane, David P; Perkins, Neil D; Fuller-Pace, Frances V

    2005-01-01

    The DEAD box RNA helicase, p68, has been implicated in various cellular processes and has been shown to possess transcriptional coactivator function. Here, we show that p68 potently synergises with the p53 tumour suppressor protein to stimulate transcription from p53-dependent promoters and that endogenous p68 and p53 co-immunoprecipitate from nuclear extracts. Strikingly, RNAi suppression of p68 inhibits p53 target gene expression in response to DNA damage, as well as p53-dependent apoptosis, but does not influence p53 stabilisation or expression of non-p53-responsive genes. We also show, by chromatin immunoprecipitation, that p68 is recruited to the p21 promoter in a p53-dependent manner, consistent with a role in promoting transcriptional initiation. Interestingly, p68 knock-down does not significantly affect NF-κB activation, suggesting that the stimulation of p53 transcriptional activity is not due to a general transcription effect. This study represents the first report of the involvement of an RNA helicase in the p53 response, and highlights a novel mechanism by which p68 may act as a tumour cosuppressor in governing p53 transcriptional activity. PMID:15660129

  15. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Matthias R; Joerger, Andreas C; Fersht, Alan R

    2016-09-06

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53's oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1(MET)(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells.

  16. Modeling the role of p53 pulses in DNA damage- induced cell death decision

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    Cui Jun

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor suppressor p53 plays pivotal roles in tumorigenesis suppression. Although oscillations of p53 have been extensively studied, the mechanism of p53 pulses and their physiological roles in DNA damage response remain unclear. Results To address these questions we presented an integrated model in which Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM activation and p53 oscillation were incorporated with downstream apoptotic events, particularly the interplays between Bcl-2 family proteins. We first reproduced digital oscillation of p53 as the response of normal cells to DNA damage. Subsequent modeling in mutant cells showed that high basal DNA damage is a plausible cause for sustained p53 pulses observed in tumor cells. Further computational analyses indicated that p53-dependent PUMA accumulation and the PUMA-controlled Bax activation switch might play pivotal roles to count p53 pulses and thus decide the cell fate. Conclusion The high levels of basal DNA damage are responsible for generating sustained pulses of p53 in the tumor cells. Meanwhile, the Bax activation switch can count p53 pulses through PUMA accumulation and transfer it into death signal. Our modeling provides a plausible mechanism about how cells generate and orchestrate p53 pulses to tip the balance between survival and death.

  17. The role of p53 molecule in radiation and hyperthermic therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumoto, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Ken; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, cancer-related genes have been analyzed at the molecular level as predictive indicators for cancer therapy. Among those genes, the tumor suppressor gene p53 is worthy of notice in cancer therapy, because the p53 molecule prevents the malignant degeneration of non-cancer cells by regulating cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis, and DNA repair. An abnormality of the p53 gene introduces a genetic instability and increases the incidence of carcinogenesis and teratogenesis. Therefore, p53 is called a guardian of the genome. Mutations of p53 are observed at a high frequency in human tumors, and are recognized in about half of all malignant tumors in human head and neck cancers. We previously reported that radio- and heat-sensitivities of human cultured tongue squamous cell carcinoma cells are p53-dependent, and are closely correlated with the induction of apoptosis. In a human cell culture system, the interactive hyperthermic enhancement of radiosensitivity was observed in wild-type p53 cells, but not in mutated p53 cells. In a transplanted tumor system, the combination therapies of radiation and hyperthermia induced efficient tumor growth depression and apoptosis in the wild-type p53 tumors. In this review, we discuss the p53 activation signaling pathways through the modification of p53 molecules, such as phosphorylation after radiation and hyperthermia treatments. (author)

  18. Association of p53 protein expression with clinical outcome in advanced supraglottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jin Oh; Hong, Seong Eon

    1998-01-01

    To determine the incidence and prognostic effect of p53 expression in patients with advanced supraglottic cancer. Twenty-one cases of total 48 advanced supraglottic cancer patients who received postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining employing p53 monoclonal antibody. Three out of six stage III patients and four out of fifteen stage IV patients showed p53 expression without statistically significant difference (p=0.608). Five year survival rates are 93% in p53 negative, 86% in p53 positive patients and there was no significant difference(p=0.776). p53 expression does not show statistically significant correlation with primary tumor status(p=0.877), lymph node status(p=0.874) and age(p=0.64). There was no statistically significant correlation between traditionally known risk factors and p53 expression

  19. Inhibition of Endothelial p53 Improves Metabolic Abnormalities Related to Dietary Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Yokoyama

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has suggested a role for p53 activation in various age-associated conditions. Here, we identified a crucial role of endothelial p53 activation in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Endothelial expression of p53 was markedly upregulated when mice were fed a high-calorie diet. Disruption of endothelial p53 activation improved dietary inactivation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase that upregulated the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α in skeletal muscle, thereby increasing mitochondrial biogenesis and oxygen consumption. Mice with endothelial cell-specific p53 deficiency fed a high-calorie diet showed improvement of insulin sensitivity and less fat accumulation, compared with control littermates. Conversely, upregulation of endothelial p53 caused metabolic abnormalities. These results indicate that inhibition of endothelial p53 could be a novel therapeutic target to block the vicious cycle of cardiovascular and metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity.

  20. Human herpesvirus 6B inhibits cell proliferation by a p53-independent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øster, Bodil; Kaspersen, M.D.; Kofod-Olsen, Emil

    2006-01-01

    inhibitor, did not reverse the HHV-6B-induced cell cycle block. In support of this, HHV-6B infection of p53(-/-) cells induced a cell cycle block before S-phase with kinetics similar to or faster than that observed by infection in wt cells. CONCLUSIONS: HHV-6B infection inhibited host cell proliferation......BACKGROUND: Various forms of cellular stress can activate the tumour suppressor protein p53, an important regulator of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Cells infected by human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) accumulate aberrant amounts of p53. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study...... was to investigate the role of p53 accumulation in the HHV-6B-induced cell cycle arrest. STUDY DESIGN: The role of p53 was studied using the p53 inhibitor pifithrin-a, and cells genetically deficient in functional p53 by homologous recombination. RESULTS: In response to HHV-6B infection, epithelial cells were...

  1. P53 and p73 differ in their ability to inhibit glucocorticoid receptor (GR transcriptional activity

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    Nie Linghu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 is a tumor suppressor and potent inhibitor of cell growth. P73 is highly similar to p53 at both the amino acid sequence and structural levels. Given their similarities, it is important to determine whether p53 and p73 function in similar or distinct pathways. There is abundant evidence for negative cross-talk between glucocorticoid receptor (GR and p53. Neither physical nor functional interactions between GR and p73 have been reported. In this study, we examined the ability of p53 and p73 to interact with and inhibit GR transcriptional activity. Results We show that both p53 and p73 can bind GR, and that p53 and p73-mediated transcriptional activity is inhibited by GR co-expression. Wild-type p53 efficiently inhibited GR transcriptional activity in cells expressing both proteins. Surprisingly, however, p73 was either unable to efficiently inhibit GR, or increased GR activity slightly. To examine the basis for this difference, a series of p53:p73 chimeric proteins were generated in which corresponding regions of either protein have been swapped. Replacing N- and C-terminal sequences in p53 with the corresponding sequences from p73 prevented it from inhibiting GR. In contrast, replacing p73 N- and C-terminal sequences with the corresponding sequences from p53 allowed it to efficiently inhibit GR. Differences in GR inhibition were not related to differences in transcriptional activity of the p53:p73 chimeras or their ability to bind GR. Conclusion Our results indicate that both N- and C-terminal regions of p53 and p73 contribute to their regulation of GR. The differential ability of p53 and p73 to inhibit GR is due, in part, to differences in their N-terminal and C-terminal sequences.

  2. Tumor suppressor gene p16/INK4A/CDKN2A-dependent regulation into and out of the cell cycle in a spontaneous canine model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Payal; Sandey, Maninder; DeInnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R Curtis

    2013-06-01

    p16/INK4A/CDKN2A is an important tumor suppressor gene that arrests cell cycle in G1 phase inhibiting binding of CDK4/6 with cyclin D1, leaving the Rb tumor suppressor protein unphosphorylated and E2F bound and inactive. We hypothesized that p16 has a role in exit from cell cycle that becomes defective in cancer cells. Well characterized p16-defective canine mammary cancer cell lines (CMT28, CMT27, and CMT12), derived stably p16-transfected CMT cell clones (CMT27A, CMT27H, CMT28A, and CMT28F), and normal canine fibroblasts (NCF), were used to investigate expression of p16 after serum starvation into quiescence followed by re-feeding to induce cell cycle re-entry. The parental CMT cell lines used lack p16 expression either at the mRNA or protein expression levels, while p27 and other p16-associated proteins, including CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D1, and Rb, were expressed. We have successfully demonstrated cell cycle arrest and relatively synchronous cell cycle re-entry in parental CMT12, CMT28 and NCF cells as well as p16 transfected CMT27A, CMT27H, CMT28A, and CMT28F cells and confirmed this by (3)H-thymidine incorporation and flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle phase distribution. p16-transfected CMT27A and CMT27H cells exited cell cycle post-serum-starvation in contrast to parental CMT27 cells. NCF, CMT27A, and CMT28F cells expressed upregulated levels of p27 and p16 mRNA, post-serum starvation, as cells exited cell cycle and entered quiescence. Because quiescence and differentiation are associated with increased levels of p27, our data demonstrating that p16 was upregulated along with p27 during quiescence, suggests a potential role for p16 in maintaining these non-proliferative states. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. p53, cathepsin D, Bcl-2 are joint prognostic indicators of breast cancer metastatic spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Emanuela; Cimadamore, Alessia; Simeone, Pasquale; Vacca, Giovanna; Lattanzio, Rossano; Botti, Gerardo; Gatta, Valentina; D'Aurora, Marco; Simionati, Barbara; Piantelli, Mauro; Alberti, Saverio

    2016-08-18

    Traditional prognostic indicators of breast cancer, i.e. lymph node diffusion, tumor size, grading and estrogen receptor expression, are inadequate predictors of metastatic relapse. Thus, additional prognostic parameters appear urgently needed. Individual oncogenic determinants have largely failed in this endeavour. Only a few individual tumor growth drivers, e.g. mutated p53, Her-2, E-cadherin, Trops, did reach some prognostic/predictive power in clinical settings. As multiple factors are required to drive solid tumor progression, clusters of such determinants were expected to become stronger indicators of tumor aggressiveness and malignant progression than individual parameters. To identify such prognostic clusters, we went on to coordinately analyse molecular and histopathological determinants of tumor progression of post-menopausal breast cancers in the framework of a multi-institutional case series/case-control study. A multi-institutional series of 217 breast cancer cases was analyzed. Twenty six cases (12 %) showed disease relapse during follow-up. Relapsed cases were matched with a set of control patients by tumor diameter, pathological stage, tumor histotype, age, hormone receptors and grading. Histopathological and molecular determinants of tumor development and aggressiveness were then analyzed in relapsed versus non-relapsed cases. Stepwise analyses and model structure fitness assessments were carried out to identify clusters of molecular alterations with differential impact on metastatic relapse. p53, Bcl-2 and cathepsin D were shown to be coordinately associated with unique levels of relative risk for disease relapse. As many Ras downstream targets, among them matrix metalloproteases, are synergistically upregulated by mutated p53, whole-exon sequence analyses were performed for TP53, Ki-RAS and Ha-RAS, and findings were correlated with clinical phenotypes. Notably, TP53 insertion/deletion mutations were only detected in relapsed cases

  4. Role of p53 in Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    distribution among E.coli strains and other enteric bacteria . J. Bacteriol. 174: 4583-4593. 7. Dimri, G. P. and J. Campisi (1994) Altered profile of...J. and K. Y. Chen (1996) Regulation of dihydrofolate reductase and E2F genes in human diploid fibroblasts during senescence in culture. J. Cell...Premature Senescence in Normal Human Diploid Fibroblasts To understand the role of Bmi-1–related PcG proteins in cellular senescence and proliferation, we

  5. p53 and cyclin G cooperate in mediating genome stability in somatic cells of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Fabienne E; Zimmermann, Mirjam; Fischer, Patrick; Gromoll, Christian; Preiss, Anette; Nagel, Anja C

    2017-12-20

    One of the key players in genome surveillance is the tumour suppressor p53 mediating the adaptive response to a multitude of stress signals. Here we identify Cyclin G (CycG) as co-factor of p53-mediated genome stability. CycG has been shown before to be involved in double-strand break repair during meiosis. Moreover, it is also important for mediating DNA damage response in somatic tissue. Here we find it in protein complexes together with p53, and show that the two proteins interact physically in vitro and in vivo in response to ionizing irradiation. In contrast to mammals, Drosophila Cyclin G is no transcriptional target of p53. Genetic interaction data reveal that p53 activity during DNA damage response requires the presence of CycG. Morphological defects caused by overexpression of p53 are ameliorated in cycG null mutants. Moreover, using a p53 biosensor we show that p53 activity is impeded in cycG mutants. As both p53 and CycG are likewise required for DNA damage repair and longevity we propose that CycG plays a positive role in mediating p53 function in genome surveillance of Drosophila.

  6. p53 Gene status and response to topotecan-containing chemotherapy in advanced ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oggionni, M; Pilotti, S; Suardi, S; Ditto, A; Luoni, C; Mariani, L; Scambia, G; Fanfani, F; Zunino, F

    2005-01-01

    Since the p53 gene has been identified as a determinant of response to chemotherapy in ovarian carcinoma in previous studies, we investigated the significance of the p53 status in response to topotecan as second-line therapy. Twenty-eight patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma, pretreated with standard platinum/paclitaxel chemotherapy, received topotecan as single-agent second-line therapy. Tumors were investigated by molecular analysis for p53 mutations in tumor samples obtained at primary surgery (i.e. before first-line therapy). Wild-type p53 tumors responsive to first-line therapy maintained substantial responsiveness to topotecan. In contrast, p53 mutation was associated with a low responsiveness to second-line therapy. The better outcome in relapsed patients with wild-type p53 suggests that the presence of a functional wild-type p53 confers stability of the drug-sensitive phenotype. This outcome is consistent with the clinical observation that the efficacy of topotecan in the treatment of relapsed ovarian carcinoma patients is dependent on platinum sensitivity, because platinum-sensitive tumors are expected to carry wild-type p53. Although untreated mutant p53 tumors may be responsive to first-line paclitaxel-containing therapy, it is likely that loss of p53 leads to genomic instability resulting in rapid progression to drug resistance.

  7. Global analysis of p53-regulated transcription identifies its direct targets and unexpected regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mary Ann; Andrysik, Zdenek; Dengler, Veronica L; Mellert, Hestia S; Guarnieri, Anna; Freeman, Justin A; Sullivan, Kelly D; Galbraith, Matthew D; Luo, Xin; Kraus, W Lee; Dowell, Robin D; Espinosa, Joaquin M

    2014-05-27

    The p53 transcription factor is a potent suppressor of tumor growth. We report here an analysis of its direct transcriptional program using Global Run-On sequencing (GRO-seq). Shortly after MDM2 inhibition by Nutlin-3, low levels of p53 rapidly activate ∼200 genes, most of them not previously established as direct targets. This immediate response involves all canonical p53 effector pathways, including apoptosis. Comparative global analysis of RNA synthesis vs steady state levels revealed that microarray profiling fails to identify low abundance transcripts directly activated by p53. Interestingly, p53 represses a subset of its activation targets before MDM2 inhibition. GRO-seq uncovered a plethora of gene-specific regulatory features affecting key survival and apoptotic genes within the p53 network. p53 regulates hundreds of enhancer-derived RNAs. Strikingly, direct p53 targets harbor pre-activated enhancers highly transcribed in p53 null cells. Altogether, these results enable the study of many uncharacterized p53 target genes and unexpected regulatory mechanisms.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02200.001. Copyright © 2014, Allen et al.

  8. [An experimental study on recombinant adenovirus p53 transfected in oral dysplastic epithelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bo; Zhang, Song-Tao; Li, Long-Jiang; Han, Bo; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Pan, Jian

    2009-04-01

    To investigate and evaluate the appropriate virus titer and transfection efficiency of recombinant adenovirus p53 into the oral dysplastic epithelial cells (POE-9n) and provide reference for oral precancerosis research. The transfection sensitivity of adenovirus into oral dysplastic epithelial cells was evaluated by the recombinant adenovirus p53 containing green fluorescent protein (rAd-GFP). Different titre rAd -p53 was transfected into oral dysplastic epithelial cells to evaluate the effects of rAd-p53 on cell proliferation inhibition by MIT assay. The expression of exogenous p53 gene in POE-9n cells was detected by immunocytochemistry. More than 95% POE-9n cells were transfected by rAd-GFP with MOI from 100 to 500 and there was no statistical difference between different MOI values (r=-0.124, P>0.05). It was found that rAd-p53 had significant inhibition effects on POE-9n cell proliferation with MOI from 100 to 500, and there were no significant differences at 96 h and 120 h after the transfection on cell proliferation inhibition (P>0.05). P53 protein was well expressed in rAd-p53 transfected POE-9n cells. Exogenous p53 can be successfully transfected into POE-9n cells by rAd-p53 and the virus titer of MOI 100 was high enough to ensure efficient transfection.

  9. NGF-mediated transcriptional targets of p53 in PC12 neuronal differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labhart Paul

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background p53 is recognized as a critical regulator of the cell cycle and apoptosis. Mounting evidence also suggests a role for p53 in differentiation of cells including neuronal precursors. We studied the transcriptional role of p53 during nerve growth factor-induced differentiation of the PC12 line into neuron-like cells. We hypothesized that p53 contributed to PC12 differentiation through the regulation of gene targets distinct from its known transcriptional targets for apoptosis or DNA repair. Results Using a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation cloning technique, we identified and validated 14 novel p53-regulated genes following NGF treatment. The data show p53 protein was transcriptionally activated and contributed to NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth during differentiation of PC12 cells. Furthermore, we describe stimulus-specific regulation of a subset of these target genes by p53. The most salient differentiation-relevant target genes included wnt7b involved in dendritic extension and the tfcp2l4/grhl3 grainyhead homolog implicated in ectodermal development. Additional targets included brk, sdk2, sesn3, txnl2, dusp5, pon3, lect1, pkcbpb15 and other genes. Conclusion Within the PC12 neuronal context, putative p53-occupied genomic loci spanned the entire Rattus norvegicus genome upon NGF treatment. We conclude that receptor-mediated p53 transcriptional activity is involved in PC12 differentiation and may suggest a contributory role for p53 in neuronal development.

  10. p53-Induced Apoptosis Occurs in the Absence of p14ARF in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Hopkins-Donaldson

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPMs are usually wild type for the p53 gene but contain homozygous deletions in the INK4A locus that encodes p14ARF, an inhibitor of p53-MDM2 interaction. Previous findings suggest that lack of p14ARF expression and the presence of SV40 large T antigen (L-Tag result in p53 inactivation in MPM. We did not detect SV40 L-Tag mRNA in either MPM cell lines or primary cultures, treatment of p14ARF-deficient cells with cisplatin (CDDP increased both total and phosphorylated p53 and enhanced p53 DNA-binding activity. On incubation with CDDP, levels of positively regulated p53 transcriptional targets p21WAF, PIG3, MDM2, Bax, PUMA increased in p14ARF-deficient cells, whereas negatively regulated survivin decreased. Significantly, p53-induced apoptosis was activated by CDDP in p14ARF-deficient cells, treatment with p53-specific siRNA rendered them more CDDP-resistant. p53 was also activated by: 1 inhibition of MDM2 (using nutlin-3; 2 transient overexpression of p14ARF; and 3 targeting of survivin using antisense oligonucleotides. However, it is noteworthy that only survivin downregulation sensitized cells to CDDP-induced apoptosis. These results suggest that p53 is functional in the absence of p14ARF in MPM and that targeting of the downstream apoptosis inhibitor survivin can sensitize to CDDP-induced apoptosis.

  11. An N-terminal Region of Mot-2 Binds to p53 In Vitro

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    Sunil C. Kaul

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The mouse mot-2 protein was earlier shown to bind to the tumor suppressor protein, p53. The mot-2 binding site of p53 was mapped to C-terminal amino acid residues 312–352, which includes the cytoplasmic sequestration domain. In the present study, we have found that both mot-1 and mot-2 bind to p53 in vitro. By using His-tagged deletion mutant proteins, the p53-binding domain of mot-2 was mapped to its Nterminal amino acid residues 253–282, which are identical in mot-1 and mot-2 proteins. Some peptides containing the p53-binding region of mot-2 were able to compete with the full-length protein for p53 binding. The data provided rationale for in vitro binding of mot-1 and mot-2 proteins to p53 and supported the conclusion that inability of mot-1 protein to bind p53 in vivo depends on secondary structure or its binding to other cellular factors. Most interestingly, the p53-binding region of mot-2 was common to its MKT-077, a cationic dye that exhibits antitumor activity, binding region. Therefore it is most likely that MKT-077-induced nuclear translocation and restoration of wild-type p53 function in transformed cells takes place by a competitional mechanism.

  12. Oxidative stress activates a specific p53 transcriptional response that regulates cellular senescence and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambino, Valentina; De Michele, Giulia; Venezia, Oriella; Migliaccio, Pierluigi; Dall'Olio, Valentina; Bernard, Loris; Minardi, Simone Paolo; Della Fazia, Maria Agnese; Bartoli, Daniela; Servillo, Giuseppe; Alcalay, Myriam; Luzi, Lucilla; Giorgio, Marco; Scrable, Heidi; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Migliaccio, Enrica

    2013-06-01

    Oxidative stress is a determining factor of cellular senescence and aging and a potent inducer of the tumour-suppressor p53. Resistance to oxidative stress correlates with delayed aging in mammals, in the absence of accelerated tumorigenesis, suggesting inactivation of selected p53-downstream pathways. We investigated p53 regulation in mice carrying deletion of p66, a mutation that retards aging and confers cellular resistance and systemic resistance to oxidative stress. We identified a transcriptional network of ~200 genes that are repressed by p53 and encode for determinants of progression through mitosis or suppression of senescence. They are selectively down-regulated in cultured fibroblasts after oxidative stress, and, in vivo, in proliferating tissues and during physiological aging. Selectivity is imposed by p66 expression and activation of p44/p53 (also named Delta40p53), a p53 isoform that accelerates aging and prevents mitosis after protein damage. p66 deletion retards aging and increases longevity of p44/p53 transgenic mice. Thus, oxidative stress activates a specific p53 transcriptional response, mediated by p44/p53 and p66, which regulates cellular senescence and aging. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and the Anatomical Society.

  13. Reciprocal regulation of p53 and malic enzymes modulates metabolism and senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Du, Wenjing; Mancuso, Anthony; Wellen, Kathryn E; Yang, Xiaolu

    2013-01-31

    Cellular senescence both protects multicellular organisms from cancer and contributes to their ageing. The pre-eminent tumour suppressor p53 has an important role in the induction and maintenance of senescence, but how it carries out this function remains poorly understood. In addition, although increasing evidence supports the idea that metabolic changes underlie many cell-fate decisions and p53-mediated tumour suppression, few connections between metabolic enzymes and senescence have been established. Here we describe a new mechanism by which p53 links these functions. We show that p53 represses the expression of the tricarboxylic-acid-cycle-associated malic enzymes ME1 and ME2 in human and mouse cells. Both malic enzymes are important for NADPH production, lipogenesis and glutamine metabolism, but ME2 has a more profound effect. Through the inhibition of malic enzymes, p53 regulates cell metabolism and proliferation. Downregulation of ME1 and ME2 reciprocally activates p53 through distinct MDM2- and AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated mechanisms in a feed-forward manner, bolstering this pathway and enhancing p53 activation. Downregulation of ME1 and ME2 also modulates the outcome of p53 activation, leading to strong induction of senescence, but not apoptosis, whereas enforced expression of either malic enzyme suppresses senescence. Our findings define physiological functions of malic enzymes, demonstrate a positive-feedback mechanism that sustains p53 activation, and reveal a connection between metabolism and senescence mediated by p53.

  14. Corellation of p53 expressions and histopathological grading in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvi Kintawati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Squamous cell carcinoma is a malignancy of oral cavity mostly occurred and can also metastasize. p53 gene is a tumor suppressor gene that plays an important role in carcinogenesis. The role of wild-type p53 is very important in suppressing the formation of a malignancy. p53 also has many other important functions. p53 is a suppressor of tumor/ cancer progression through the response of cell cycle to DNA damage and by giving time to repair DNA prior to replication of genes. p53 mutation, mostly occurs in a malignancy, so earlier histopathological transformation can be detected by observing p53 mutation. The prognosis of squamous cell carcinoma in oral cavity, therefore, depends on histopathological grading and clinical staging of the tumor. To enforce the histopathological grading, in addition based on histopathology differentiation, the earlier histopathological transformation can also be assessed. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the correlation of p53 expressions and histopathological grading in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Method: This study was a retrospective study on 20 cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma examined at Department of Pathology Anatomy in Hasan Sadikin Hospital in Bandung. Immunohistochemical examination was then performed using p53 antibodies to determine the correlation of p53 expression and histopathological grading in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma to predict prognosis. Result: The overall results showed that there was no correlation between p53 expression and histopathological grading in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity although there was a very strong correlation between p53 expression and histopathological grading I (p<0.01. Conclusion: It can be concluded that there was no correlation between p53 expression and histopathological grading in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Thus, p53 expression cannot be used to predict a prognosis.

  15. Sulforaphane increases the efficacy of doxorubicin in mouse fibroblasts characterized by p53 mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fimognari, Carmela [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)]. E-mail: carmela.fimognari@unibo.it; Nuesse, Michael [GSF-Flow Cytometry Group, Neuherberg (Germany); Lenzi, Monia [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Sciuscio, Davide [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Hrelia, Patrizia [Department of Pharmacology, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2006-10-10

    One novel strategy for increasing cancer chemotherapy efficacy and reversing chemoresistance involves co-administration of natural chemopreventive compounds alongside standard chemotherapeutic protocols. Sulforaphane is a particularly promising chemopreventive agent, which has been shown to exert proapoptotic effects on tumor cells containing p53 mutations. The p53{sup Ser220} mutation has been implicated in reduced efficacy and drug resistance in the context of osteosarcomas and breast tumors treated with doxorubicin-based protocols. We investigated the effects of a combination of doxorubicin and sulforaphane on cell viability and apoptosis induction in fibroblasts characterized by different p53 status (p53 wild-type, p53 knock-out, and p53{sup Ser220} mutation), and identified some of the molecular pathways triggered by the drug combination. Very high concentrations of doxorubicin were necessary to decrease the viability of p53{sup Ser220} and p53 knock-out (but not wild-type) cells. Treatment of p53{sup Ser220} and p53 knock-out cells with doxorubicin did not induce apoptosis, also at very high concentrations (10 {mu}M). Sulforaphane restored chemosensitivity and induced apoptosis in doxorubicin-resistant p53{sup Ser220} and p53 knock-out cells, irrespective of p53 status. The induction of apoptosis was caspase-3 dependent and caspase-8 independent. Bongkrekic acid, a mitochondrial membrane stabilizer, partially prevented the effects of doxorubicin plus sulforaphane on mitochondrial permeability but was unable to prevent the induction of apoptosis. N-acetyl-cysteine, a glutathione precursor, blocked the induction of apoptosis by doxorubicin plus sulforaphane. Considering the negligible safety profile of sulforaphane, our findings could prompt innovative clinical studies designed to investigate whether its coadministration can enhance the efficacy of doxorubicin-based regimens.

  16. APAF1 is a key transcriptional target for p53 in the regulation of neuronal cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fortin, A; Cregan, S P; MacLaurin, J G

    2001-01-01

    obtained from neurons undergoing p53-induced cell death, but not in healthy control cultures or when p53 or the p53 binding sites were inactivated by mutation. In transient transfections in a neuronal cell line with p53 and Apaf1 promoter-luciferase constructs, p53 directly activated the Apaf1 promoter via...

  17. Lack of Constitutively Active DNA Repair Sensitizes Glioblastomas to Akt Inhibition and Induces Synthetic Lethality with Radiation Treatment in a p53-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanichamy, Kamalakannan; Patel, Disha; Jacob, John R; Litzenberg, Kevin T; Gordon, Nicolaus; Acus, Kirstin; Noda, Shin-Ei; Chakravarti, Arnab

    2018-02-01

    Treatment refractory glioblastoma (GBM) remains a major clinical problem globally, and targeted therapies in GBM have not been promising to date. The Cancer Genome Atlas integrative analysis of GBM reported the striking finding of genetic alterations in the p53 and PI3K pathways in more than 80% of GBMs. Given the role of these pathways in making cell-fate decisions and responding to genotoxic stress, we investigated the reliance of these two pathways in mediating radiation resistance. We selected a panel of GBM cell lines and glioma stem cells (GSC) with wild-type TP53 (p53-wt) and mutant TP53 , mutations known to interfere with p53 functionality (p53-mt). Cell lines were treated with a brain permeable inhibitor of P-Akt (ser473), phosphatidylinositol ether lipid analogue (PIA), with and without radiation treatment. Sensitivity to treatment was measured using Annexin-V/PI flow cytometry and Western blot analysis for the markers of apoptotic signaling, alkaline COMET assay. All results were verified in p53 isogenic cell lines. p53-mt cell lines were selectively radiosensitized by PIA. This radiosensitization effect corresponded with an increase in DNA damage and a decrease in DNA-PKcs levels. TP53 silencing in p53-wt cells showed a similar response as the p53-mt cells. In addition, the radiosensitization effects of Akt inhibition were not observed in normal human astrocytes, suggesting that this treatment strategy could have limited off-target effects. We demonstrate that the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway by PIA radiosensitizes p53-mt cells by antagonizing DNA repair. In principle, this strategy could provide a large therapeutic window for the treatment of TP53 -mutant tumors. Mol Cancer Ther; 17(2); 336-46. ©2017 AACR See all articles in this MCT Focus section, "Developmental Therapeutics in Radiation Oncology." ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. The Histone Lysine Demethylase JMJD3/KDM6B Is Recruited to p53 Bound Promoters and Enhancer Elements in a p53 Dependent Manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Rappsilber, Juri

    2014-01-01

    linked to the regulation of different biological processes such as differentiation of embryonic stem cells, inflammatory responses in macrophages, and induction of cellular senescence via regulation of the INK4A-ARF locus. Here we show here that JMJD3 interacts with the tumour suppressor protein p53. We...... find that the interaction is dependent on the p53 tetramerization domain. Following DNA damage, JMJD3 is transcriptionally upregulated and by performing genome-wide mapping of JMJD3, we demonstrate that it binds genes involved in basic cellular processes, as well as genes regulating cell cycle......, response to stress and apoptosis. Moreover, we find that JMJD3 binding sites show significant overlap with p53 bound promoters and enhancer elements. The binding of JMJD3 to p53 target sites is increased in response to DNA damage, and we demonstrate that the recruitment of JMJD3 to these sites is dependent...

  19. Clinical relevance of gain-of-function mutations of p53 in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyo Jeong; Chun, Sung-Min; Kim, Kyu-Rae; Sohn, Insuk; Sung, Chang Ohk

    2013-01-01

    Inactivation of TP53, which occurs predominantly by missense mutations in exons 4-9, is a major genetic alteration in a subset of human cancer. In spite of growing evidence that gain-of-function (GOF) mutations of p53 also have oncogenic activity, little is known about the clinical relevance of these mutations. The clinicopathological features of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGS-OvCa) patients with GOF p53 mutations were evaluated according to a comprehensive somatic mutation profile comprised of whole exome sequencing, mRNA expression, and protein expression profiles obtained from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Patients with a mutant p53 protein (mutp53) with a GOF mutation showed higher p53 mRNA and protein expression levels than patients with p53 mutation with no evidence of GOF (NE-GOF). GOF mutations were more likely to occur within mutational hotspots, and at CpG sites, and resulted in mutp53 with higher functional severity (FS) scores. Clinically, patients with GOF mutations showed a higher frequency of platinum resistance (22/58, 37.9%) than patients with NE-GOF mutations (12/56, 21.4%) (p=0.054). Furthermore, patients with GOF mutations were more likely to develop distant metastasis (36/55, 65.5%) than local recurrence (19/55, 34.5%), whereas patients with NE-GOF mutations showed a higher frequency of locoregional recurrence (26/47, 55.3%) than distant metastasis (21/47, 44.7%) (p=0.035). There were no differences in overall or progression-free survival between patients with GOF or NE-GOF mutp53. This study demonstrates that patient with GOF mutp53 is characterized by a greater likelihood of platinum treatment resistance and distant metastatic properties in HGS-OvCa.

  20. Clinical relevance of gain-of-function mutations of p53 in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Jeong Kang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Inactivation of TP53, which occurs predominantly by missense mutations in exons 4-9, is a major genetic alteration in a subset of human cancer. In spite of growing evidence that gain-of-function (GOF mutations of p53 also have oncogenic activity, little is known about the clinical relevance of these mutations. METHODS: The clinicopathological features of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGS-OvCa patients with GOF p53 mutations were evaluated according to a comprehensive somatic mutation profile comprised of whole exome sequencing, mRNA expression, and protein expression profiles obtained from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. RESULTS: Patients with a mutant p53 protein (mutp53 with a GOF mutation showed higher p53 mRNA and protein expression levels than patients with p53 mutation with no evidence of GOF (NE-GOF. GOF mutations were more likely to occur within mutational hotspots, and at CpG sites, and resulted in mutp53 with higher functional severity (FS scores. Clinically, patients with GOF mutations showed a higher frequency of platinum resistance (22/58, 37.9% than patients with NE-GOF mutations (12/56, 21.4% (p=0.054. Furthermore, patients with GOF mutations were more likely to develop distant metastasis (36/55, 65.5% than local recurrence (19/55, 34.5%, whereas patients with NE-GOF mutations showed a higher frequency of locoregional recurrence (26/47, 55.3% than distant metastasis (21/47, 44.7% (p=0.035. There were no differences in overall or progression-free survival between patients with GOF or NE-GOF mutp53. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that patient with GOF mutp53 is characterized by a greater likelihood of platinum treatment resistance and distant metastatic properties in HGS-OvCa.

  1. Heterogeneity of p53 dependent genomic responses following ethanol exposure in a developmental mouse model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Sandra M.; Middleton, Frank A.

    2017-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure can produce structural and functional deficits in the brain and result in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). In rodent models acute exposure to a high concentration of alcohol causes increased apoptosis in the developing brain. A single causal molecular switch that signals for this increase in apoptosis has yet to be identified. The protein p53 has been suggested to play a pivotal role in enabling cells to engage in pro-apoptotic processes, and thus figures prominently as a hub molecule in the intracellular cascade of responses elicited by alcohol exposure. In the present study we examined the effect of ethanol-induced cellular and molecular responses in primary somatosensory cortex (SI) and hippocampus of 7-day-old wild-type (WT) and p53-knockout (KO) mice. We quantified apoptosis by active caspase-3 immunohistochemistry and ApopTag™ labeling, then determined total RNA expression levels in laminae of SI and hippocampal subregions. Immunohistochemical results confirmed increased incidence of apoptotic cells in both regions in WT and KO mice following ethanol exposure. The lack of p53 was not protective in these brain regions. Molecular analyses revealed a heterogeneous response to ethanol exposure that varied depending on the subregion, and which may go undetected using a global approach. Gene network analyses suggest that the presence or absence of p53 alters neuronal function and synaptic modifications following ethanol exposure, in addition to playing a classic role in cell cycle signaling. Thus, p53 may function in a way that underlies the intellectual and behavioral deficits observed in FASD. PMID:28723918

  2. Modulation of p53 expression using antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA in vitro and in the living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Gorska

    Full Text Available The p53 protein is a key player in cell response to stress events and cancer prevention. However, up-regulation of p53 that occurs during radiotherapy of some tumours results in radio-resistance of targeted cells. Recently, antisense oligonucleotides have been used to reduce the p53 level in tumour cells which facilitates their radiation-induced apoptosis. Here we describe the rational design of antisense oligomers directed against the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA aimed to inhibit the synthesis of p53 protein and its ΔNp53 isoform. A comprehensive analysis of the sites accessible to oligomer hybridization in this mRNA region was performed. Subsequently, translation efficiency from the initiation codons for both proteins in the presence of selected oligomers was determined in rabbit reticulocyte lysate and in MCF-7 cells. The antisense oligomers with 2'-OMe and LNA modifications were used to study the mechanism of their impact on translation. It turned out that the remaining RNase H activity of the lysate contributed to modulation of protein synthesis efficiency which was observed in the presence of antisense oligomers. A possibility of changing the ratio of the newly synthetized p53 and ΔNp53 in a controlled manner was revealed which is potentially very attractive considering the relationship between the functioning of these two proteins. Selected antisense oligonucleotides which were designed based on accessibility mapping of the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA were able to significantly reduce the level of p53 protein in MCF-7 cells. One of these oligomers might be used in the future as a support treatment in anticancer therapy.

  3. miR-34 and p53: New Insights into a Complex Functional Relationship.

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    Francisco Navarro

    Full Text Available miR-34, a tumor suppressor miRNA family transcriptionally activated by p53, is considered a critical mediator of p53 function. However, knockout of the mouse miR-34 family has little or no effect on the p53 response. The relative contribution of different miR-34 family members to p53 function or how much p53 relies on miR-34 in human cells is unclear. Here we show that miR-34a has a complex effect on the p53 response in human cells. In HCT116 cells miR-34a overexpression enhances p53 transcriptional activity, but the closely related family members, miR-34b and miR-34c, even when over-expressed, have little effect. Both TP53 itself and MDM4, a strong p53 transactivation inhibitor, are direct targets of miR-34a. The genes regulated by miR-34a also include four other post-translational inhibitors of p53. miR-34a overexpression leads to variable effects on p53 levels in p53-sufficient human cancer cell lines. In HCT116, miR-34a overexpression increases p53 protein levels and stability. About a quarter of all mRNAs that participate in the human p53 network bind to biotinylated miR-34a, suggesting that many are direct miR-34a targets. However, only about a fifth of the mRNAs that bind to miR-34a also bind to miR-34b or miR-34c. Two human cell lines knocked out for miR-34a have unimpaired p53-mediated responses to genotoxic stress, like mouse cells. The complex positive and negative effects of miR-34 on the p53 network suggest that rather than simply promoting the p53 response, miR-34a might act at a systems level to stabilize the robustness of the p53 response to genotoxic stress.

  4. Tumor Suppressor p53 Stimulates the Expression of Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianli; Lingel, Amy; Geiser, Vicki; Kwapnoski, Zachary; Zhang, Luwen

    2017-10-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple human malignancies. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is required for the efficient transformation of primary B lymphocytes in vitro and possibly in vivo The tumor suppressor p53 plays a seminal role in cancer development. In some EBV-associated cancers, p53 tends to be wild type and overly expressed; however, the effects of p53 on LMP1 expression is not clear. We find LMP1 expression to be associated with p53 expression in EBV-transformed cells under physiological and DNA damaging conditions. DNA damage stimulates LMP1 expression, and p53 is required for the stimulation. Ectopic p53 stimulates endogenous LMP1 expression. Moreover, endogenous LMP1 blocks DNA damage-mediated apoptosis. Regarding the mechanism of p53-mediated LMP1 expression, we find that interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), a direct target of p53, is associated with both p53 and LMP1. IRF5 binds to and activates a LMP1 promoter reporter construct. Ectopic IRF5 increases the expression of LMP1, while knockdown of IRF5 leads to reduction of LMP1. Furthermore, LMP1 blocks IRF5-mediated apoptosis in EBV-infected cells. All of the data suggest that cellular p53 stimulates viral LMP1 expression, and IRF5 may be one of the factors for p53-mediated LMP1 stimulation. LMP1 may subsequently block DNA damage- and IRF5-mediated apoptosis for the benefits of EBV. The mutual regulation between p53 and LMP1 may play an important role in EBV infection and latency and its related cancers. IMPORTANCE The tumor suppressor p53 is a critical cellular protein in response to various stresses and dictates cells for various responses, including apoptosis. This work suggests that an Epstein-Bar virus (EBV) principal viral oncogene is activated by cellular p53. The viral oncogene blocks p53-mediated adverse effects during viral infection and transformation. Therefore, the induction of the viral oncogene by p53 provides a means for the virus to cope with infection and

  5. DNA double strand break repair is enhanced by P53 following induction by DNA damage and is dependent on the C-terminal domain of P53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Tang; Powell, Simon N.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor suppressor gene p53 can mediate cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in response to DNA damage. Accumulating evidence suggests that it may also directly or indirectly influence the DNA repair machinery. In the present study, we investigated whether p53, induced by DNA damage, could enhance the rejoining of double-strand DNA breaks. Materials and Methods: DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) were made by restriction enzyme digestion of a plasmid, between a promoter and a 'reporter' gene: luciferase (LUC) or chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT). Linear or circular plasmid DNA (LUC or CAT) was co-transfected with circular β-Gal plasmid (to normalize for uptake) into mouse embryonic fibroblasts genetically matched to be (+/+) or (-/-) for p53. Their ability to rejoin linearized plasmid was measured by the luciferase or CAT activity detected in rescued plasmids. The activity detected in cells transfected with linear plasmid was scored relative to the activity detected in cells transfected with circular plasmid. Results: Ionizing radiation (IR, 2 Gy) enhanced the dsb repair activity in wild type p53 cells; however, p53 null cells lose this effect, indicating that the enhancement of dsb repair was p53-dependent. REF cells with dominant-negative mutant p53 showed a similar induction compared with the parental REF cells with wild-type p53. This ala-143 mutant p53 prevents cell cycle arrest and transactivation of p21 WAF1/cip1) following IR, indicating that the p53-dependent enhancement of DNA repair is distinct from transactivation. Immortalized murine embryonic fibroblasts, 10(1)VasK1 cells, which express p53 cDNA encoding a temperature-sensitive mutant in the DNA sequence specific binding domain (ala135 to val135) with an alternatively spliced C-terminal domain (ASp53: amino-acids 360-381) and, 10(1)Val5 cells, which express the normal spliced p53 (NSp53) with the same temperature-sensitive mutant were compared. It was found that 10(1)VasK1 cells showed no DNA

  6. Immunoexpression and prognostic role of p53 in different subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihong; Li, Lianxiang; Chen, Feng; He, Dalin

    2012-07-01

    We sought to investigate the significance of p53 expression for epithelial ovarian carcinoma. In this study, we used immunohistochemical method to investigate the expression patterns of p53 in different subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. We found that the expressions of p53 protein in epithelial ovarian cancer (pituita, serosity and intima) were 88.9%, 75% and 100%, respectively, while the recurrence rates among three cancer subtypes were significantly different (33.3%, 12.5% and 0%, respectively; P p53 in patients with lymph node metastasis was significantly strong (68.75% and 100%, respectively; P p53 protein in ovarian cancer between I-II (25%) stage and II-IV stage (100%) were significantly different (P p53 protein has an intimate relationship with the malignant degree and the prognosis of ovarian cancer.

  7. Clinical Significance of Autoantibodies to P53 Protein in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Himoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the p53 gene leading to conformational changes in the p53 protein have been well established in many human cancers. Conformational changes and/or cellular accumulation of the protein may induce an immune response, resulting in circulating autoantibodies to p53, which have been documented in several types of cancers. Although rarely associated with autoimmune disease, a few reports have documented titres of anti-p53 autoantibodies in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. The clinical relevance of circulating autoantibodies to p53, therefore, remains unclear. Accordingly, this study aimed to examine the prevalence and clinical relevance of anti-p53 autoantibodies in patients with selected autoimmune liver diseases.

  8. The pro-survival function of p53 in HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Mi Young; Jang, Eun Yeong; Kim, Jin Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The rate of apoptosis and autophagy was variable with different p53 status after IR treatment of cells. The influence of p53 status on cell fate suggests a role of p53 in two fundamentally important cell biological pathways: autophagy and apoptosis. p53 coordinates cell cycle arrest and apoptosis to govern cell fate. This study was done to identify p53-mediated regulation of cell's fate. Autophagy induced by IR may prevent cells from undergoing apoptosis, implying an interlink modulation between autophagy and apoptosis. The rate of apoptosis and autophagy was determined with different p53 status after IR treatment of HeLa cells in this study. Our research on IR-induced cellular responses may provide new information about fate decision between the processes of apoptosis and autophagy.

  9. Isolation and characterization of DUSP11, a novel p53 target gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caprara, Greta; Zamponi, Raffaella; Melixetian, Marina

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT p53 regulates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle control, apoptosis and DNA damage repair. Here we demonstrate that DUSP11 (Dual Specificity Phosphatase 11), a member of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase family that binds to RNA-RNP complexes and RNA splicing factors, is a p53...... target gene. Consistent with this, the expression of DUSP11 is induced in a p53-dependent manner after treatment with DNA damaging agents. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that p53 binds to 2 putative p53 DNA binding sites in the promoter region of DUSP11. Colony formation and proliferation...... (Src-Associated protein in Mitotic cells) binds to DUSP11 in vitro and in vivo. Taken together these results suggest that DUSP11 contributes to p53-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation and that it might be involved in regulating RNA splicing through SAM68....

  10. Changes in protein expression in p53 deleted spontaneous thymic lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, Bent; Vorum, Henrik; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2004-01-01

    By the use of high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and computerized image analysis we investigated and compared the expression of cellular proteins from p53 positive (+/+) mouse thymocytes, p53-/- thymocytes before neoplastic transformation, and from cell lines derived from two...... spontaneous p53-/- thymic lymphomas, SM5 and SM7. A total of around 1500 proteins were detected on individual gels. Only changes in protein expression by a factor of 2 or more were considered. In the thymic lymphoma cells 3-5% of the proteins were found to be differentially regulated when compared...... with the protein expression in p53+/+ and p53-/- thymocytes. Only a minority (13 proteins) of the quantitatively changed proteins were common for the two thymic lymphoma cell lines, suggesting that the p53 deficiency mainly results in genetic dysfunctions which are individual for a given tumor. Two of the detected...

  11. p53 increases caspase-6 expression and activation in muscle tissue expressing mutant huntingtin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E; Skotte, Niels H; Ladha, Safia

    2014-01-01

    as in muscle tissues from two different HD mouse models. p53, a transcriptional activator of caspase-6, is upregulated in neuronal cells and tissues expressing mutant huntingtin. Activation of p53 leads to a dramatic increase in levels of caspase-6 mRNA, caspase-6 activity and cleavage of lamin A. Using mouse...... embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from YAC128 mice, we show that this increase in caspase-6 activity can be mitigated by pifithrin-α (pifα), an inhibitor of p53 transcriptional activity, but not through the inhibition of p53's mitochondrial pro-apoptotic function. Remarkably, the p53-mediated increase in caspase......-6 expression and activation is exacerbated in cells and tissues of both neuronal and peripheral origin expressing mutant huntingtin (Htt). These findings suggest that the presence of the mutant Htt protein enhances p53 activity and lowers the apoptotic threshold, which activates caspase-6...

  12. Immunoexpression and prognostic role of p53 in different subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lihong; Li, Lianxiang; Chen, Feng; He, Dalin

    2012-01-01

    We sought to investigate the significance of p53 expression for epithelial ovarian carcinoma. In this study, we used immunohistochemical method to investigate the expression patterns of p53 in different subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. We found that the expressions of p53 protein in epithelial ovarian cancer (pituita, serosity and intima) were 88.9%, 75% and 100%, respectively, while the recurrence rates among three cancer subtypes were significantly different (33.3%, 12.5% and 0%, r...

  13. p53 null mutations are associated with a telomerase negative phenotype in ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Anil K; Coffin, Jeremy; Jabbari, Sarvenaz; Buller, Richard E; Hendrix, Mary J C; Klingelhutz, Al

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase activation and p53 dysfunction are important events in the development and progression of most cancers including ovarian cancer. However, many cancer cell lines and human tumors have been shown to lack telomerase, and maintain telomerase through the ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres). It is not known whether specific types of p53 mutations are correlated with telomerase activity in human tumors. Invasive ovarian cancers (109) were analyzed for telomerase by ELISA and its subunits human telomerase RNA (hTR), and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) by RT-PCR. p53 protein was analyzed in the same samples using immunohistochemistry, and p53 exons 2-11 were analyzed using SSCP and sequence analysis. Telomerase activity was detected in 80 (74%) of 109 tumors. The subunit hTR was consistently present in all ovarian cancer samples, and hTERT was expressed in 96 (88%) tumors. Thirteen (16%) tumors were negative for hTERT and none of these expressed telomerase. Fifty-seven (52%) tumors stained positive for p53, and there was no correlation with telomerase activity based on p53 staining (p = 0.08). Eighty-two (75%) tumors were found to have a p53 mutation, and 40 (36%) tumors contained a null mutation. Only 14% of the tumors with wild type or missense p53 were negative for telomerase activity. In contrast, 19 (48%) of 40 tumors with a p53 null mutation were negative for telomerase activity (p p53 mutations. Seventy-five percent of the tumors with a p53 mutation in the central region were telomerase positive. In contrast, only 47% of the tumors with a mutation in either the amino- or carboxy-terminus were telomerase positive (p = 0.03). Ovarian cancers with a p53 null mutation are more likely to lack telomerase activity. This may have implications for therapeutic approaches based on telomerase.

  14. A novel mechanism for p53 to regulate its target gene ECK in signaling apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y Jenny; Wang, Jianli; Qiao, Changhong; Hei, Tom K; Brandt-Rauf, Paul W; Yin, Yuxin

    2006-10-01

    Transcription factor p53 regulates its target genes through binding to DNA consensus sequence and activating the promoters of its downstream genes. The conventional p53 consensus binding sequence was defined as two copies of the 10-bp motif 5'-PuPuPuC(A/T)(T/A)GPyPyPy-3' with a spacer of 0 to 13 bp, which exists in the regulatory regions of some p53 target genes. However, there is no such p53 consensus sequence in the promoters of a number of p53-responsive genes, suggesting that there might be other mechanisms whereby p53 transactivates the promoters of its target genes. We report here that p53 uses a novel binding mechanism to regulate the transcription of epithelial cell kinase (ECK), a receptor protein-tyrosine kinase implicated in signal transduction. We show that p53 binds to a 10-bp perfect palindromic decanucleotide (GTGACGTCAC) in the ECK promoter, activates the ECK promoter, and increases the transcription of ECK. This palindrome is required for p53-mediated transactivation of the ECK promoter. ECK is highly responsive to oxidative damage that leads to cell death. Ectopic expression of ECK causes spontaneous apoptosis in breast cancer cells. We found that ectopic expression of a mutant ECK fails to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Our findings show that p53 is a transcriptional regulator of ECK in mediating apoptosis. The discovery of the novel p53-binding motif in the promoter may lead to the identification of a new class of p53 target genes.

  15. p53 requires the stress sensor USF1 to direct appropriate cell fate decision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Bouafia

    Full Text Available Genomic instability is a major hallmark of cancer. To maintain genomic integrity, cells are equipped with dedicated sensors to monitor DNA repair or to force damaged cells into death programs. The tumor suppressor p53 is central in this process. Here, we report that the ubiquitous transcription factor Upstream Stimulatory factor 1 (USF1 coordinates p53 function in making proper cell fate decisions. USF1 stabilizes the p53 protein and promotes a transient cell cycle arrest, in the presence of DNA damage. Thus, cell proliferation is maintained inappropriately in Usf1 KO mice and in USF1-deficient melanoma cells challenged by genotoxic stress. We further demonstrate that the loss of USF1 compromises p53 stability by enhancing p53-MDM2 complex formation and MDM2-mediated degradation of p53. In USF1-deficient cells, the level of p53 can be restored by the re-expression of full-length USF1 protein similarly to what is observed using Nutlin-3, a specific inhibitor that prevents p53-MDM2 interaction. Consistent with a new function for USF1, a USF1 truncated protein lacking its DNA-binding and transactivation domains can also restore the induction and activity of p53. These findings establish that p53 function requires the ubiquitous stress sensor USF1 for appropriate cell fate decisions in response to DNA-damage. They underscore the new role of USF1 and give new clues of how p53 loss of function can occur in any cell type. Finally, these findings are of clinical relevance because they provide new therapeutic prospects in stabilizing and reactivating the p53 pathway.

  16. The p53 tumour suppressor gene and the tobacco industry: research, debate, and conflict of interest

    OpenAIRE

    Bitton, A; Neuman, M D; Barnoya, J; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumour suppressor gene lead to uncontrolled cell division and are found in over 50% of all human tumours, including 60% of lung cancers. Research published in 1996 by Denissenko and colleagues demonstrated patterned in-vitro mutagenic effects on p53 of benzo[a]pyrene, a carcinogen present in tobacco smoke. We investigated the tobacco industry's response to p53 research linking smoking to cancer. We searched online tobacco document archives, including the Legacy Tobacco Do...

  17. Integral analysis of p53 and its value as prognostic factor in sporadic colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fariña Sarasqueta, Arantza; Morreau, Hans; Forte, Giusi; Corver, Wim E; Miranda, Noel F de; Ruano, Dina; Eijk, Ronald van; Oosting, Jan; Tollenaar, Rob AEM; Wezel, Tom van

    2013-01-01

    p53 (encoded by TP53) is involved in DNA damage repair, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, aging and cellular senescence. TP53 is mutated in around 50% of human cancers. Nevertheless, the consequences of p53 inactivation in colon cancer outcome remain unclear. Recently, a new role of p53 together with CSNK1A1 in colon cancer invasiveness has been described in mice. By combining data on different levels of p53 inactivation, we aimed to predict p53 functionality and to determine its effects on colon cancer outcome. Moreover, survival effects of CSNK1A1 together with p53 were also studied. Eighty-three formalin fixed paraffin embedded colon tumors were enriched for tumor cells using flow sorting, the extracted DNA was used in a custom SNP array to determine chr17p13-11 allelic state; p53 immunostaining, TP53 exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 mutations were determined in combination with mRNA expression analysis on frozen tissue. Patients with a predicted functional p53 had a better prognosis than patients with non functional p53 (Log Rank p=0.009). Expression of CSNK1A1 modified p53 survival effects. Patients with low CSNK1A1 expression and non-functional p53 had a very poor survival both in the univariate (Log Rank p<0.001) and in the multivariate survival analysis (HR=4.74 95% CI 1.45 – 15.3 p=0.009). The combination of mutational, genomic, protein and downstream transcriptional activity data predicted p53 functionality which is shown to have a prognostic effect on colon cancer patients. This effect was specifically modified by CSKN1A1 expression

  18. The prognostic value of p53 positive in colorectal cancer: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Liang, Jianwei; Wang, Zheng; Hou, Huirong; Shi, Lei; Zhou, Zhixiang

    2017-05-01

    This retrospective cohort study aimed to discuss the prognostic value of p53 positive in colorectal cancer. A total of 124 consecutive patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer were evaluated at the National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010. The expression of p53 in colorectal cancer was examined by immunohistochemistry. Based on the expression levels of p53, the 124 patients were divided into a p53 positive group and a p53 negative group. In this study, 72 patients were in the p53 positive group and 52 in the p53 negative group. The two groups were well balanced in gender, age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists scores, and number of lymph nodes harvested. p53 positive was associated with carcinoembryonic antigen ≥5 ng/mL ( p = 0.036), gross type ( p = 0.037), degree of tumor differentiation ( p = 0.026), pathological tumor stage ( p = 0.019), pathological node stage ( p = 0.004), pathological tumor-node-metastasis stage ( p = 0.017), nerve invasion ( p = 0.008), and vessel invasion ( p = 0.018). Tumor site, tumor size, and pathological pattern were not significantly different between these two groups. Disease-free survival and overall survival in the p53 positive group were significantly shorter than the p53 negative group ( p = 0.021 and 0.025, respectively). Colorectal cancer patients with p53 positive tended to be related to a higher degree of malignancy, advanced tumor-node-metastasis stage, and shorter disease-free survival and overall survival. p53 positive was independently an unfavorable prognostic marker for colorectal cancer patients.

  19. The expression and significance of p53 protein and Ki-67 protein in pterygium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubojević Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Pterygium is considered to be a degenerative disease of the conjunctiva, however, the presence of tumor markers in pterygium reinforces the hypothesis that this lesion is similar to tumor. Inactivation of p53 function removes an obstacle to increased proliferation. Factors affecting the prevalence of p53 expression in pterygium deserve investigation. The aim of the study was to investigate the expression of p53 and Ki-67 proteins in pterygium and normal conjunctiva, the effects of gender and age on p53 expression, and the relationship between the expression of p53 and Ki-67 proteins. Methods. A total of 34 samples of pterygium and 34 samples of the normal conjunctiva were analyzed. The samples were studied by immunohistochemistry using antibodies against p53 and Ki-67. Results. Totally 15 (44% samples of pterygia were p53 positive. Correlations between the expression of p53 protein and sex, and age were not established. The number of Ki-67 positive cells in pterygium (9.74% was significantly higher than the number of Ki-67 positive cells in the normal conjunctiva (1.74%, (p = 0.001. Between the expression of p53 protein and Ki-67 protein in pterygium there was a significant positive correlation (p = 0.000. Conclusion. The prevalence of p53 positive samples of pterygium was 44%. The influence of sex and age on p53 protein expression in pterygium was not found. The increased proliferative acivity was present in the epithelium of pterygium. The expression of Ki-67 protein is associated with the expression of p53 protein in pterygium. The findings of our study support the thesis of pterygium as tissue growth disorder.

  20. Noncanonical DNA motifs as transactivation targets by wild type and mutant p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J Jordan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Sequence-specific binding by the human p53 master regulator is critical to its tumor suppressor activity in response to environmental stresses. p53 binds as a tetramer to two decameric half-sites separated by 0-13 nucleotides (nt, originally defined by the consensus RRRCWWGYYY (n = 0-13 RRRCWWGYYY. To better understand the role of sequence, organization, and level of p53 on transactivation at target response elements (REs by wild type (WT and mutant p53, we deconstructed the functional p53 canonical consensus sequence using budding yeast and human cell systems. Contrary to early reports on binding in vitro, small increases in distance between decamer half-sites greatly reduces p53 transactivation, as demonstrated for the natural TIGER RE. This was confirmed with human cell extracts using a newly developed, semi-in vitro microsphere binding assay. These results contrast with the synergistic increase in transactivation from a pair of weak, full-site REs in the MDM2 promoter that are separated by an evolutionary conserved 17 bp spacer. Surprisingly, there can be substantial transactivation at noncanonical (1/2-(a single decamer and (3/4-sites, some of which were originally classified as biologically relevant canonical consensus sequences including PIDD and Apaf-1. p53 family members p63 and p73 yielded similar results. Efficient transactivation from noncanonical elements requires tetrameric p53, and the presence of the carboxy terminal, non-specific DNA binding domain enhanced transactivation from noncanonical sequences. Our findings demonstrate that RE sequence, organization, and level of p53 can strongly impact p53-mediated transactivation, thereby changing the view of what constitutes a functional p53 target. Importantly, inclusion of (1/2- and (3/4-site REs greatly expands the p53 master regulatory network.

  1. Reciprocal regulation of p53 and malic enzymes modulates metabolism and senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Peng; Du, Wenjing; Mancuso, Anthony; Wellen, Kathryn E.; Yang, Xiaolu

    2013-01-01

    Cellular senescence both protects multicellular organisms from cancer and contributes to their aging 1 . The preeminent tumor suppressor p53 plays an important role in the induction and maintenance of senescence, but how p53 carries out this function remains poorly understood 1?3 . Additionally, while increasing evidence supports the notion that metabolic changes underlie many cell fate decisions and p53-mediated tumor suppression, few connections between metabolic enzymes and senescence have...

  2. Uncovering the role of p53 splice variants in human malignancy: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surget S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sylvanie Surget,1,2 Marie P Khoury,1,2 Jean-Christophe Bourdon1,21Dundee Cancer Centre, 2Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Ninewells Hospital, University of Dundee, Dundee, UKAbstract: Thirty-five years of research on