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Sample records for altered neurogenesis neuritogenesis

  1. Alteration of forebrain neurogenesis after cervical spinal cord injury in the adult rat.

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    Marie-Solenne eFELIX

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI triggers a complex cellular response at the injury site, leading to the formation of a dense scar tissue. Despite this local tissue remodeling, the consequences of SCI at the cellular level in distant rostral sites (i.e. brain, remain unknown. In this study, we asked whether cervical SCI could alter cell dynamics in neurogenic areas of the adult rat forebrain. To this aim, we quantified BrdU incorporation and determined the phenotypes of newly generated cells (neurons, astrocytes, or microglia during the subchronic and chronic phases of injury. We find that subchronic SCI leads to a reduction of BrdU incorporation and neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb and in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. By contrast, subchronic SCI triggers an increased BrdU incorporation in the dorsal vagal complex of the hindbrain, where most of the newly generated cells are identified as microglia. In chronic condition 90 days after SCI, BrdU incorporation returns to control levels in all regions examined, except in the hippocampus, where SCI produces a long-term reduction of neurogenesis, indicating that this structure is particularly sensitive to SCI. Finally, we observe that SCI triggers an acute inflammatory response in all brain regions examined, as well as a hippocampal-specific decline in BDNF levels, which could explain the SCI-mediated distant effects on forebrain neurogenesis. This study provides the first demonstration that forebrain neurogenesis is vulnerable to a distal SCI.

  2. Chemosensory cues affect amygdaloid neurogenesis and alter behaviors in the socially monogamous prairie vole.

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    Liu, Y; Lieberwirth, C; Jia, X; Curtis, J T; Meredith, M; Wang, Z X

    2014-05-01

    The current study examined the effects of pheromonal exposure on adult neurogenesis and revealed the role of the olfactory pathways on adult neurogenesis and behavior in the socially monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). Subjects were injected with a cell proliferation marker [5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)] and then exposed to their own soiled bedding or bedding soiled by a same- or opposite-sex conspecific. Exposure to opposite-sex bedding increased BrdU labeling in the amygdala (AMY), but not the dentate gyrus (DG), of female, but not male, voles, indicating a sex-, stimulus-, and brain region-specific effect. The removal of the main olfactory bulbs or lesioning of the vomeronasal organ (VNOX) in females reduced BrdU labeling in the AMY and DG, and inhibited the male bedding-induced BrdU labeling in the AMY, revealing the importance of an intact olfactory pathway for amygdaloid neurogenesis. VNOX increased anxiety-like behavior and altered social preference, but it did not affect social recognition memory in female voles. VNOX also reduced the percentage of BrdU-labeled cells that co-expressed the neuronal marker TuJ1 in the AMY, but not the DG. Together, our data indicate the importance of the olfactory pathway in mediating brain plasticity in the limbic system as well as its role in behavior. PMID:24641515

  3. Effects of Altered Levels of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase and Irradiation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Female Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Altered levels of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) and cranial irradiation have been shown to affect hippocampal neurogenesis. However, previous studies were only conducted in male mice, and it was not clear if there was a difference between males and females. Therefore, female mice were studied and the results compared with those generated in male mice from an earlier study. Methods and Materials: Female wild-type, EC-SOD-null (KO), and EC-SOD bigenic mice with neuronal-specific expression of EC-SOD (OE) were subjected to a single dose of 5-Gy gamma rays to the head at 8 weeks of age. Progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation, and long-term survival of newborn neurons were determined. Results: Similar to results from male mice, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation both resulted in significant reductions in mature newborn neurons in female mice. EC-SOD deficiency reduced long-term survival of newborn neurons whereas irradiation reduced progenitor cell proliferation. Overexpression of EC-SOD corrected the negative impacts from EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation and normalized the production of newborn neurons in OE mice. Expression of neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 were significantly reduced by irradiation in wild-type mice, but the levels were not changed in KO and OE mice even though both cohorts started out with a lower baseline level. Conclusion: In terms of hippocampal neurogenesis, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation have the same overall effects in males and females at the age the studies were conducted

  4. Effects of Altered Levels of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase and Irradiation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Female Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Yani [Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Leu, David [Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Palo Alto Institute of Research and Education, Palo Alto, California (United States); Chui, Jennifer [Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Fike, John R. [Departments of Neurosurgery and Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Huang, Ting-Ting, E-mail: tthuang@stanford.edu [Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Altered levels of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) and cranial irradiation have been shown to affect hippocampal neurogenesis. However, previous studies were only conducted in male mice, and it was not clear if there was a difference between males and females. Therefore, female mice were studied and the results compared with those generated in male mice from an earlier study. Methods and Materials: Female wild-type, EC-SOD-null (KO), and EC-SOD bigenic mice with neuronal-specific expression of EC-SOD (OE) were subjected to a single dose of 5-Gy gamma rays to the head at 8 weeks of age. Progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation, and long-term survival of newborn neurons were determined. Results: Similar to results from male mice, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation both resulted in significant reductions in mature newborn neurons in female mice. EC-SOD deficiency reduced long-term survival of newborn neurons whereas irradiation reduced progenitor cell proliferation. Overexpression of EC-SOD corrected the negative impacts from EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation and normalized the production of newborn neurons in OE mice. Expression of neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 were significantly reduced by irradiation in wild-type mice, but the levels were not changed in KO and OE mice even though both cohorts started out with a lower baseline level. Conclusion: In terms of hippocampal neurogenesis, EC-SOD deficiency and irradiation have the same overall effects in males and females at the age the studies were conducted.

  5. Are Molecules Involved in Neuritogenesis and Axon Guidance Related to Autism Pathogenesis?

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    Bakos, Jan; Bacova, Zuzana; Grant, Stephen G; Castejon, Ana M; Ostatnikova, Daniela

    2015-09-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a heterogeneous disease, and numerous alterations of gene expression come into play to attempt to explain potential molecular and pathophysiological causes. Abnormalities of brain development and connectivity associated with alterations in cytoskeletal rearrangement, neuritogenesis and elongation of axons and dendrites might represent or contribute to the structural basis of autism pathology. Slit/Robo signaling regulates cytoskeletal remodeling related to axonal and dendritic branching. Components of its signaling pathway (ABL and Cdc42) are suspected to be molecular bases of alterations of normal development. The present review describes the most important mechanisms underlying neuritogenesis, axon pathfinding and the role of GTPases in neurite outgrowth, with special emphasis on alterations associated with autism spectrum disorders. On the basis of analysis of publicly available microarray data, potential biomarkers of autism are discussed. PMID:25989848

  6. Hippocampal Injury Induced Cognitive and Mood Dysfunction, Altered Neurogenesis and Epilepsy: Can Early Neural Stem Cell Grafting Intervention Provide Protection?

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    Damage to hippocampus can occur through many causes including head trauma, ischemia, stroke, status epilepticus and Alzheimer’s disease. Certain changes such as increased levels of neurogenesis and elevated concentrations of multiple neurotrophic factors that ensue in the acute phase after injury seem beneficial for restraining hippocampal dysfunction. However, many alterations that arise in the intermediate to chronic phase after injury such as abnormal migration of newly born neurons, aberr...

  7. Altered cholesterol biosynthesis causes precocious neurogenesis in the developing mouse forebrain.

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    Driver, Ashley M; Kratz, Lisa E; Kelley, Richard I; Stottmann, Rolf W

    2016-07-01

    We previously reported a mutation in the cholesterol biosynthesis gene, hydroxysteroid (17-beta) dehydrogenase 7 (Hsd17b7(rudolph)), that results in striking embryonic forebrain dysgenesis. Here we describe abnormal patterns of neuroprogenitor proliferation in the mutant forebrain, namely, a decrease in mitotic cells within the ventricular zone (VZ) and an increase through the remainder of the cortex by E11.5. Further evidence suggests mutant cells undergo abnormal interkinetic nuclear migration (IKNM). Furthermore, intermediate progenitors are increased at the expense of apical progenitors by E12.5, and post-mitotic neurons are expanded by E14.5. In vitro primary neuron culture further supports our model of accelerated cortical differentiation in the mutant. Combined administration of a statin and dietary cholesterol in utero achieved partial reversal of multiple developmental abnormalities in the Hsd17b7(rudolph) embryo, including the forebrain. These results suggest that abnormally increased levels of specific cholesterol precursors in the Hsd17b7(rudolph) embryo cause cortical dysgenesis by altering patterns of neurogenesis. PMID:26921468

  8. Alterations in Postnatal Neurogenesis and Dopamine Dysregulation in Schizophrenia: A Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Inta, Dragos; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Gass, Peter

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of studies demonstrate the important role of several susceptibility genes for schizophrenia, such as neuregulin-1 and DISC1, in early postnatal and adult neurogenesis. Its significance for the pathophysiology of the disease, including its relation to neurotransmitter systems implicated in schizophrenia (like the dopamine system), remains, however, unknown. Here, we review molecular and cellular components of the dopamine system associated with postnatal neurogenesis and p...

  9. Abrogation of Early Apoptosis Does Not Alter Late Inhibition of Hippocampal Neurogenesis After Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Irradiation of the adult brain results in acute apoptosis of neural progenitors and vascular endothelial cells, as well as late dysfunction of neural progenitors and inhibition of neurogenesis. We sought to determine whether the early apoptotic response has a causative role in late inhibition of neurogenesis after cranial irradiation. Methods and Materials: Using a genetic approach with p53 and smpd1 transgenic mice and a pharmacologic approach with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to abrogate the early apoptotic response, we evaluated the late inhibition of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus after cranial irradiation. Results: In dentate gyrus, subgranular neural progenitors underwent p53-dependent apoptosis within 24 h after irradiation. Despite a near abrogation of neural progenitor apoptosis in p53-/- mice, the reduction in newborn neurons in dentate gyrus at 9 weeks after irradiation in p53-/- mice was not different from that observed in wildtype controls. Endothelial cell apoptosis after radiation is mediated by membrane damage initiated by activation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase). Deletion of the smpd1 gene (which encodes ASMase) attenuated the apoptotic response of endothelial cells. At 9 weeks after irradiation, the inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis was not rescued by ASMase deficiency. Intravenous administration of bFGF protected both endothelial cells and neural progenitors against radiation-induced apoptosis. There was no protection against inhibition of neurogenesis at 9 weeks after irradiation in bFGF-treated mice. Conclusion: Early apoptotic death of neural progenitors, endothelial cells, or both does not have a causative association with late inhibition of neurogenesis after irradiation.

  10. Ablation of mouse adult neurogenesis alters olfactory bulb structure and olfactory fear conditioning

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    Matthew Valley

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis replenishes olfactory bulb (OB interneurons throughout the life of most mammals, yet during this constant fl ux it remains unclear how the OB maintains a constant structure and function. In the mouse OB, we investigated the dynamics of turnover and its impact on olfactory function by ablating adult neurogenesis with an x-ray lesion to the subventricular zone (SVZ. Regardless of the magnitude of the lesion to the SVZ, we found no change in the survival of young adult born granule cells (GCs born after the lesion, and a gradual decrease in the population of GCs born before the lesion. After a lesion producing a 96% reduction of incoming adult born GCs to the OB, we found a diminished behavioral fear response to conditioned odor cues but not to audio cues. Interestingly, despite this behavioral defi cit and gradual anatomical changes, we found no electrophysiological changes in the GC population assayed in vivo through dendro-dendritic synaptic plasticity and odor-evoked local fi eld potential oscillations. These data indicate that turnover in the granule cell layer is generally decoupled from the rate of adult neurogenesis, and that OB adult neurogenesis plays a role in a wide behavioral system extending beyond the OB.

  11. Daidzein induces neuritogenesis in DRG neuronal cultures

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    Yang Shih-Hung

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Absract Background Daidzein, a phytoestrogen found in isoflavone, is known to exert neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects on the nervous system. Using primary rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neuronal cultures, we have examined the potential neurite outgrowth effect of daidzein. Methods Dissociated dorsal root ganglia (DRG cultures were used to study the signaling mechanism of daidzein-induced neuritogenesis by immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. Results In response to daidzein treatment, DRG neurons showed a significant increase in total neurite length and in tip number per neuron. The neuritogenic effect of daidzein was significantly hampered by specific blockers for Src, protein kinase C delta (PKCδ and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinases (MEK/ERK, but not by those for estrogen receptor (ER. Moreover, daidzein induced phosphorylation of Src, PKCδ and ERK. The activation of PKCδ by daidzein was attenuated in the presence of a Src kinase inhibitor, and that of ERK by daidzein was diminished in the presence of either a Src or PKCδ inhibitor. Conclusion Daidzein may stimulate neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons depending on Src kinase, PKCδ and ERK signaling pathway.

  12. Deletion of RIC8A in neural precursor cells leads to altered neurogenesis and neonatal lethality of mouse.

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    Kask, Keiu; Ruisu, Katrin; Tikker, Laura; Karis, Kirstin; Saare, Merly; Meier, Riho; Karis, Alar; Tõnissoo, Tambet; Pooga, Margus

    2015-09-01

    RIC8A is a noncanonical guanine nucleotide exchange factor for a subset of Gα subunits. RIC8A has been reported in different model organisms to participate in the control of mitotic cell division, cell signalling, development and cell migration. Still, the function of RIC8A in the mammalian nervous system has not been sufficiently analysed yet. Adult mice express RIC8A in the brain regions involved in the regulation of memory and emotional behaviour. To elucidate the role of RIC8A in mammalian neurogenesis we have inactivated Ric8a in neural precursor cells using Cre/Lox system. As a result, the conditional knockout mice were born at expected Mendelian ratio, but died or were cannibalized by their mother within 12 h after birth. The cerebral cortex of the newborn Nes;Ric8a(CKO) mice was thinner compared to littermates and the basement membrane was discontinuous, enabling migrating neurons to invade to the marginal zone. In addition, the balance between the planar and oblique cell divisions was altered, influencing the neuron production. Taken together, RIC8A has an essential role in the development of mammalian nervous system by maintaining the integrity of pial basement membrane and modulating cell division. PMID:25641781

  13. Alteration of Forebrain Neurogenesis after Cervical Spinal Cord Injury in the Adult Rat

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    ValeryAMatarazzo; PatrickGauthier

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) triggers a complex cellular response at the injury site, leading to the formation of a dense scar tissue. Despite this local tissue remodeling, the consequences of SCI at the cellular level in distant rostral sites (i.e. brain), remain unknown. In this study, we asked whether cervical SCI could alter cell dynamics in neurogenic areas of the adult rat forebrain. To this aim, we quantified BrdU incorporation and determined the phenotypes of newly generated cells (neuron...

  14. Patterns of olfactory bulb neurogenesis in the adult zebrafish are altered following reversible deafferentation.

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    Trimpe, Darcy M; Byrd-Jacobs, Christine A

    2016-09-01

    Adult brain plasticity can be investigated using reversible methods that remove afferent innervation but allow return of sensory input. Repeated intranasal irrigation with Triton X-100 in adult zebrafish diminishes innervation to the olfactory bulb, resulting in a number of alterations in bulb structure and function, and cessation of the treatment allows for reinnervation and recovery. Using bromodeoxyuridine, Hu, and caspase-3 immunoreactivity we examined cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival under conditions of acute and chronic deafferentation and reafferentation. Cell proliferation within the olfactory bulb was not influenced by acute or chronic deafferentation or reafferentation, but cell fate (including differentiation, migration, and/or survival of newly formed cells) was affected. We found that chronic deafferentation caused a bilateral increase in the number of newly formed cells that migrated into the bulb, although the amount of cell death of these new cells was significantly increased compared to untreated fish. Reafferentation also increased the number of newly formed cells migrating into both bulbs, suggesting that the deafferentation effect on cell fate was maintained. Reafferentation resulted in a decrease in newly formed cells that became neurons and, although death of newly formed cells was not altered from control levels, survival was reduced in relation to that seen in chronically deafferented fish. The potential effect of age on cell genesis was also examined. While the amount of cell migration into the olfactory bulbs was not affected by fish age, more of the newly formed cells became neurons in older fish. Younger fish displayed more cell death under conditions of chronic deafferentation. In sum, our results show that reversible deafferentation affects several aspects of cell fate, including cell differentiation, migration, and survival, and age of the fish influences the response to deafferentation. PMID:27343831

  15. Oestradiol synthesized by female neurons generates sex differences in neuritogenesis

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    Ruiz-Palmero, Isabel; Ortiz-Rodriguez, Ana; Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo; Caruso, Donatella; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Rune, Gabriele M.; Arevalo, Maria-Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone produced by the foetal testis is converted by male neurons to oestradiol, which masculinizes neuronal morphology. Female neurons are known to synthesize oestradiol in absence of exogenous testosterone. However, the role of neuronal oestradiol on the differentiation of foetal female neurons is unknown. Here we show that, due to endogenous neuronal oestradiol synthesis, female hippocampal neurons have higher expression of the neuritogenic protein Neurogenin 3 and enhanced neuritogenesis than males. Exogenous application of testosterone or its metabolite dihydrotestosterone increases Neurogenin 3 expression and promotes neuritogenesis in males, but reduces these parameters in females. Together our data indicate that gonadal-independent oestradiol synthesis by female neurons participates in the generation of sex differences in hippocampal neuronal development. PMID:27553191

  16. Prolonged running, not fluoxetine treatment, increases neurogenesis, but does not alter neuropathology, in the 3xTg mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

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    Marlatt, Michael W; Potter, Michelle C; Bayer, Thomas A; van Praag, Henriette; Lucassen, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Reductions in adult neurogenesis have been documented in the original 3xTg mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), notably occurring at the same age when spatial memory deficits and amyloid plaque pathology appeared. As this suggested reduced neurogenesis was associated with behavioral deficits, we tested whether activity and pharmacological stimulation could prevent memory deficits and modify neurogenesis and/or neuropathology in the 3xTg model backcrossed to the C57Bl/6 strain. We chronically administered the antidepressant fluoxetine to one group of mice, allowed access to a running wheel in another, and combined both treatments in a third cohort. All treatments lasted for 11 months. The female 3xTg mice failed to exhibit any deficits in spatial learning and memory as measured in the Morris water maze, indicating that when backcrossed to the C57Bl/6 strain, the 3xTg mice lost the behavioral phenotype that was present in the original 3xTg mouse maintained on a hybrid background. Despite this, the backcrossed 3xTg mice expressed prominent intraneuronal amyloid beta (Aβ) levels in the cortex and amygdala, with lower levels in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. In the combined cohort, fluoxetine treatment interfered with exercise and reduced the total distance run. The extent of Aβ neuropathology, the tau accumulations, or BDNF levels, were not altered by prolonged exercise. Thus, neuropathology was present but not paralleled by spatial memory deficits in the backcrossed 3xTg mouse model of AD. Prolonged exercise for 11 months did improve the long-term survival of newborn neurons generated during middle-age, whereas fluoxetine had no effect. We further review and discuss the relevant literature in this respect. PMID:23670818

  17. Depression, Antidepressants, and Neurogenesis: A Critical Reappraisal

    OpenAIRE

    Hanson, Nicola D; Owens, Michael J.; Nemeroff, Charles B.

    2011-01-01

    The neurogenesis hypothesis of depression posits (1) that neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus is regulated negatively by stressful experiences and positively by treatment with antidepressant drugs and (2) that alterations in the rate of neurogenesis play a fundamental role in the pathology and treatment of major depression. This hypothesis is supported by important experimental observations, but is challenged by equally compelling contradictory reports. This review summa...

  18. Early postnatal respiratory viral infection alters hippocampal neurogenesis, cell fate, and neuron morphology in the neonatal piglet.

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    Conrad, Matthew S; Harasim, Samantha; Rhodes, Justin S; Van Alstine, William G; Johnson, Rodney W

    2015-02-01

    Respiratory viral infections are common during the neonatal period in humans, but little is known about how early-life infection impacts brain development. The current study used a neonatal piglet model as piglets have a gyrencephalic brain with growth and development similar to human infants. Piglets were inoculated with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) to evaluate how chronic neuroinflammation affects hippocampal neurogenesis and neuron morphology. Piglets in the neurogenesis study received one bromodeoxyuridine injection on postnatal day (PD) 7 and then were inoculated with PRRSV. Piglets were sacrificed at PD 28 and the number of BrdU+ cells and cell fate were quantified in the dentate gyrus. PRRSV piglets showed a 24% reduction in the number of newly divided cells forming neurons. Approximately 15% of newly divided cells formed microglia, but this was not affected by sex or PRRSV. Additionally, there was a sexual dimorphism of new cell survival in the dentate gyrus where males had more cells than females, and PRRSV infection caused a decreased survival in males only. Golgi impregnation was used to characterize dentate granule cell morphology. Sholl analysis revealed that PRRSV caused a change in inner granule cell morphology where the first branch point was extended further from the cell body. Males had more complex dendritic arbors than females in the outer granule cell layer, but this was not affected by PRRSV. There were no changes to dendritic spine density or morphology distribution. These findings suggest that early-life viral infection can impact brain development. PMID:25176574

  19. Neuron differentiation and neuritogenesis stimulated by N-acetylcysteine(NAC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao-ran QIAN; Yi YANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC),a potent antioxidant,on neuron differentiation of cultured mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) induced by retinoic acid (RA) in vitro.Superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons were used to study the effect of NAC on neuritogenesis.Methods:Immunoblotting was performed to detect the expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2).MTT assays were used to determine cell viability.Cell death was estimated with trypan blue exclusion and Hoechst 33342 staining.Immunocytochemical analysis was carried out to identify neurons.Results:We obtained a high percentage of MAP2-positive neurons derived from embryoid bodies (EBs) induced by RA by administering 1 mmol/L NAC at differentiation day O.On differentiation day 8,the expression of MAP2 protein was strongly upregulated in the presence of NAC.NAC promoted neuron differentiation of ES cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner.Notably,NAC suppressed cell death caused/Jy RA during neuron differentiation.In addition,neurite extension of SCG neurons was greatly stimulated in the presence of NAC.Conclusion:These results show that NAC enhanced both neuron differentiation and neuritogenesis,suggesting that it may be used in the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting neuron loss and neurite dystrophy in neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Cytoskeletal Regulation by AUTS2 in Neuronal Migration and Neuritogenesis

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    Kei Hori

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the Autism susceptibility candidate 2 gene (AUTS2, whose protein is believed to act in neuronal cell nuclei, have been associated with multiple psychiatric illnesses, including autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability, and schizophrenia. Here we show that cytoplasmic AUTS2 is involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton and neural development. Immunohistochemistry and fractionation studies show that AUTS2 localizes not only in nuclei, but also in the cytoplasm, including in the growth cones in the developing brain. AUTS2 activates Rac1 to induce lamellipodia but downregulates Cdc42 to suppress filopodia. Our loss-of-function and rescue experiments show that a cytoplasmic AUTS2-Rac1 pathway is involved in cortical neuronal migration and neuritogenesis in the developing brain. These findings suggest that cytoplasmic AUTS2 acts as a regulator of Rho family GTPases to contribute to brain development and give insight into the pathology of human psychiatric disorders with AUTS2 mutations.

  1. Prolonged Running, not Fluoxetine Treatment, Increases Neurogenesis, but does not Alter Neuropathology, in the 3xTg Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Marlatt; M.C. Potter; T.A. Bayer; H. van Praag; P.J. Lucassen

    2013-01-01

    Reductions in adult neurogenesis have been documented in the original 3xTg mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), notably occurring at the same age when spatial memory deficits and amyloid plaque pathology appeared. As this suggested reduced neurogenesis was associated with behavioral deficits, we

  2. Adult Neurogenesis in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Fernández-Hernández; Christa Rhiner; Eduardo Moreno

    2013-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been linked to several cognitive functions and neurological disorders. Description of adult neurogenesis in a model organism like Drosophila could facilitate the genetic study of normal and abnormal neurogenesis in the adult brain. So far, formation of new neurons has not been detected in adult fly brains and hence has been thought to be absent in Drosophila. Here, we used an improved lineage-labeling method to show that, surprisingly, adult neurogenesis occurs in the m...

  3. Impaired Memory in OT-II Transgenic Mice Is Associated with Decreased Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis Possibly Induced by Alteration in Th2 Cytokine Levels.

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    Jeon, Seong Gak; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Chung, Hyunju; Choi, Junghyun; Song, Eun Ji; Han, Seung-Yun; Oh, Myung Sook; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Jin-Il; Moon, Minho

    2016-08-31

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have focused on the effects of CD4+ T cell on cognitive function. However, the changes of Th2 cytokines in restricted CD4+ T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire model and their effects on the adult hippocampal neurogenesis and memory are not fully understood. Here, we investigated whether and how the mice with restricted CD4+ repertoire TCR exhibit learning and memory impairment by using OT-II mice. OT-II mice showed decreased adult neurogenesis in hippocampus and short- and long- term memory impairment. Moreover, Th2 cytokines in OT-II mice are significantly increased in peripheral organs and IL-4 is significantly increased in brain. Finally, IL-4 treatment significantly inhibited the proliferation of cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells. Taken together, abnormal level of Th2 cytokines can lead memory dysfunction via impaired adult neurogenesis in OT-II transgenic. PMID:27432189

  4. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its role in Alzheimer's disease

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    Mu Yangling

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hippocampus, a brain area critical for learning and memory, is especially vulnerable to damage at early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Emerging evidence has indicated that altered neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus represents an early critical event in the course of AD. Although causal links have not been established, a variety of key molecules involved in AD pathogenesis have been shown to impact new neuron generation, either positively or negatively. From a functional point of view, hippocampal neurogenesis plays an important role in structural plasticity and network maintenance. Therefore, dysfunctional neurogenesis resulting from early subtle disease manifestations may in turn exacerbate neuronal vulnerability to AD and contribute to memory impairment, whereas enhanced neurogenesis may be a compensatory response and represent an endogenous brain repair mechanism. Here we review recent findings on alterations of neurogenesis associated with pathogenesis of AD, and we discuss the potential of neurogenesis-based diagnostics and therapeutic strategies for AD.

  5. Modeling Impaired Hippocampal Neurogenesis after Radiation Exposure.

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    Cacao, Eliedonna; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2016-03-01

    Radiation impairment of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of several factors associated with cognitive detriments after treatment of brain cancers in children and adults with radiation therapy. Mouse models have been used to study radiation-induced changes in neurogenesis, however the models are limited in the number of doses, dose fractions, age and time after exposure conditions that have been studied. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel predictive mathematical model of radiation-induced changes to neurogenesis using a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to represent the time, age and dose-dependent changes to several cell populations participating in neurogenesis as reported in mouse experiments exposed to low-LET radiation. We considered four compartments to model hippocampal neurogenesis and, consequently, the effects of radiation treatment in altering neurogenesis: (1) neural stem cells (NSCs), (2) neuronal progenitor cells or neuroblasts (NB), (3) immature neurons (ImN) and (4) glioblasts (GB). Because neurogenesis is decreasing with increasing mouse age, a description of the age-related dynamics of hippocampal neurogenesis is considered in the model, which is shown to be an important factor in comparisons to experimental data. A key feature of the model is the description of negative feedback regulation on early and late neuronal proliferation after radiation exposure. The model is augmented with parametric descriptions of the dose and time after irradiation dependences of activation of microglial cells and a possible shift of NSC proliferation from neurogenesis to gliogenesis reported at higher doses (∼10 Gy). Predictions for dose-fractionation regimes and for different mouse ages, and prospects for future work are then discussed. PMID:26943452

  6. Alzheimer's Disease and Hippocampal Adult Neurogenesis; Exploring Shared Mechanisms

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    Hollands, Carolyn; Bartolotti, Nancy; Lazarov, Orly

    2016-01-01

    New neurons incorporate into the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus throughout life. Neurogenesis is modulated by behavior and plays a major role in hippocampal plasticity. Along with older mature neurons, new neurons structure the dentate gyrus, and determine its function. Recent data suggest that the level of hippocampal neurogenesis is substantial in the human brain, suggesting that neurogenesis may have important implications for human cognition. In support of that, impaired neurogenesis compromises hippocampal function and plays a role in cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease mouse models. We review current work suggesting that neuronal differentiation is defective in Alzheimer's disease, leading to dysfunction of the dentate gyrus. Additionally, alterations in critical signals regulating neurogenesis, such as presenilin-1, Notch 1, soluble amyloid precursor protein, CREB, and β-catenin underlie dysfunctional neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease. Lastly, we discuss the detectability of neurogenesis in the live mouse and human brain, as well as the therapeutic implications of enhancing neurogenesis for the treatment of cognitive deficits and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27199641

  7. Spatially regulated adult neurogenesis

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    Rikani, Azadeh A.; Choudhry, Zia; Choudhry, Adnan M.; Zenonos, Georgios; Tariq, Sadaf; Mobassarah, Nusrat J

    2013-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been the center of attention for decades. Neuroscientists hope to understand the mechanism underlying this phenomenon that might provide a unique perception of brain repair in future. Neurogenesis is referred to the process in which neuronal stem cells and progenitors generate new neurons in non-pathologic setting. Although there are some similarities between two neurogenetic regions including hippocampus and olfactory bulb, however there are some important differences....

  8. Double-Edge Sword of Sustained ROCK Activation in Prion Diseases through Neuritogenesis Defects and Prion Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleaume-Butaux, Aurélie; Nicot, Simon; Pietri, Mathéa; Baudry, Anne; Dakowski, Caroline; Tixador, Philippe; Ardila-Osorio, Hector; Haeberlé, Anne-Marie; Bailly, Yannick; Peyrin, Jean-Michel; Launay, Jean-Marie; Kellermann, Odile; Schneider, Benoit

    2015-08-01

    In prion diseases, synapse dysfunction, axon retraction and loss of neuronal polarity precede neuronal death. The mechanisms driving such polarization defects, however, remain unclear. Here, we examined the contribution of RhoA-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCK), key players in neuritogenesis, to prion diseases. We found that overactivation of ROCK signaling occurred in neuronal stem cells infected by pathogenic prions (PrPSc) and impaired the sprouting of neurites. In reconstructed networks of mature neurons, PrPSc-induced ROCK overactivation provoked synapse disconnection and dendrite/axon degeneration. This overactivation of ROCK also disturbed overall neurotransmitter-associated functions. Importantly, we demonstrated that beyond its impact on neuronal polarity ROCK overactivity favored the production of PrPSc through a ROCK-dependent control of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) activity. In non-infectious conditions, ROCK and PDK1 associated within a complex and ROCK phosphorylated PDK1, conferring basal activity to PDK1. In prion-infected neurons, exacerbated ROCK activity increased the pool of PDK1 molecules physically interacting with and phosphorylated by ROCK. ROCK-induced PDK1 overstimulation then canceled the neuroprotective α-cleavage of normal cellular prion protein PrPC by TACE α-secretase, which physiologically precludes PrPSc production. In prion-infected cells, inhibition of ROCK rescued neurite sprouting, preserved neuronal architecture, restored neuronal functions and reduced the amount of PrPSc. In mice challenged with prions, inhibition of ROCK also lowered brain PrPSc accumulation, reduced motor impairment and extended survival. We conclude that ROCK overactivation exerts a double detrimental effect in prion diseases by altering neuronal polarity and triggering PrPSc accumulation. Eventually ROCK emerges as therapeutic target to combat prion diseases. PMID:26241960

  9. Adult Neurogenesis: An Evolutionary Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempermann, Gerd

    2016-02-01

    When adult neurogenesis was discovered in the mammalian brain it was often considered an atavism and, even today, many people are convinced that there has been a "phylogenetic reduction" away from lifelong neurogenesis, favoring stability for complex brains. Adult neurogenesis is found throughout the animal kingdom but varies to a large extent. Mammals might have fewer neurogenic zones than, for example, fish, but within their remaining neurogenic zones, the new neurons are highly functional. Especially, humans have very substantial quantities of neurogenesis in their hippocampus. At least for the mammalian dentate gyrus, one can thus argue that there has been evolution toward neurogenesis-based plasticity rather than away from it. PMID:26684183

  10. Molecular regulators of neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, Leslie Anne

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is characterized by cognitive impairment, progressive neurodegeneration, and formation of amyloid-[Beta] (A[Beta])-containing plaques. These neuropathological features are accompanied by deregulation of signaling cascades such as the cyclin-dependent kinase- 5 (CDK5) pathway. Recent studies have revealed that neurodegeneration in AD is also associated with alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis, which may play a critical role in cognitive impairments and memory loss....

  11. Interleukin-17 inhibits Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang LIU; Xin, Wei; He, Ping; Turner, Dharshaun; Yin, Junxiang; Gan, Yan; Shi, Fu-Dong; Wu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 17(A) (IL-17) is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine that acts as a central regulator of inflammatory response within the brain, but its physiological roles under non-inflammatory conditions remain elusive. Here we report that endogenous IL-17 ablates neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus (DG) of hippocampus. Genetic deletion of IL-17 increased the number of adult-born neurons in the DG. Further, we found that IL-17 deletion altered cytokine network, facilitated basal excitatory ...

  12. Neuritogenesis: A model for space radiation effects on the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, M. E.; Broglio, T. M.; Worgul, B. V.; Benton, E. V.

    1994-10-01

    Pivotal to the astronauts' functional integrity and survival during long space flights are the strategies to deal with space radiations. The majority of the cellular studies in this area emphasize simple endpoints such as growth related events which, although useful to understand the nature of primary cell injury, have poor predictive value for extrapolation to more complex tissues such as the central nervous system (CNS). In order to assess the radiation damage on neural cell populations, we developed an in vitro model in which neuronal differentiation, neurite extension, and synaptogenesis occur under controlled conditions. The model exploits chick embryo neural explants to study the effects of radiations on neuritogenesis. In addition, neurobiological problems associated with long-term space flights are discussed.

  13. Adult Neurogenesis and Gliogenesis: Possible Mechanisms for Neurorestoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusznák, Zoltán; Henskens, Willem; Schofield, Emma; Kim, Woojin S; Fu, YuHong

    2016-06-01

    The subgranular zone (SGZ) and subventricular zone (SVZ) are developmental remnants of the germinal regions of the brain, hence they retain the ability to generate neuronal progenitor cells in adult life. Neurogenesis in adult brain has an adaptive function because newly produced neurons can integrate into and modify existing neuronal circuits. In contrast to the SGZ and SVZ, other brain regions have a lower capacity to produce new neurons, and this usually occurs via parenchymal and periventricular cell genesis. Compared to neurogenesis, gliogenesis occurs more prevalently in the adult mammalian brain. Under certain circumstances, interaction occurs between neurogenesis and gliogenesis, facilitating glial cells to transform into neuronal lineage. Therefore, modulating the balance between neurogenesis and gliogenesis may present a new perspective for neurorestoration, especially in diseases associated with altered neurogenesis and/or gliogenesis, cell loss, or disturbed homeostasis of cellular constitution. The present review discusses important neuroanatomical features of adult neurogenesis and gliogenesis, aiming to explore how these processes could be modulated toward functional repair of the adult brain. PMID:27358578

  14. Initial neurogenesis in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Hartenstein, Volker; Wodarz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Early neurogenesis comprises the phase of nervous system development during which neural progenitor cells are born. In early development, the embryonic ectoderm is subdivided by a conserved signaling mechanism into two main domains, the epidermal ectoderm and the neurectoderm. Subsequently, cells of the neurectoderm are internalized and form a cell layer of proliferating neural progenitors. In vertebrates, the entire neurectoderm folds into the embryo to give rise to the neural tube. In Droso...

  15. Neurogenesis and Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe Taupin

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease, characterized in the brain by amyloid plaque deposits and neurofibrillary tangles. It is the most common form of dementia among older people. There is at present no cure for AD, and current treatments consist mainly in drug therapy. Potential therapies for AD involve gene and cellular therapy. The recent confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain and neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS)...

  16. Genetic control of hippocampal neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Pozniak, Christine D.; Pleasure, Samuel J.

    2006-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is under complex genetic control. A recent comparative study of two inbred mouse strains using quantitative trait locus analysis has revealed that cell survival is most highly correlated with neurogenesis and identified candidate genes for further investigation.

  17. Hippocampal neurogenesis is not required for behavioral effects of environmental enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshi, Dar; Drew, Michael R; Saxe, Michael; Ansorge, Mark S; David, Denis; Santarelli, Luca; Malapani, Chariklia; Moore, Holly; Hen, René

    2006-06-01

    Environmental enrichment increases adult hippocampal neurogenesis and alters hippocampal-dependent behavior in rodents. To investigate a causal link between these two observations, we analyzed the effect of enrichment on spatial learning and anxiety-like behavior while blocking adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We report that environmental enrichment alters behavior in mice regardless of their hippocampal neurogenic capability, providing evidence that the newborn cells do not mediate these effects of enrichment. PMID:16648847

  18. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Román Darío Moreno Fernández

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a normal developmental process associated with neurobiological changes leading to cognitive alterations with preserved, impaired, and enhanced functions. Evidence from animal and human studies is reviewed to explore the potential role of hippocampal plasticity on age-related cognitive changes with special attention to adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Results from lesion and stimulation strategies, as well as correlation data, support either a direct or modulatory role for adult newborn neurons in cognition at advanced ages. Further research on this topic may help to develop new treatments and to improve the quality of life of older people.

  19. Regulation of neurogenesis by neurotrophins during adulthood: expected and unexpected roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marçal eVilar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The subventricular zone (SVZ of the anterolateral ventricle and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus are the two main regions of the adult mammalian brain in which neurogenesis is maintained throughout life. Because alterations in adult neurogenesis appear to be a common hallmark of different neurodegenerative diseases, understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling adult neurogenesis is a focus of active research. Neurotrophic factors are a family of molecules that play critical roles in the survival and differentiation of neurons during development and in the control of neural plasticity in the adult. Several neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors have been implicated in the regulation of adult neurogenesis at different levels. Here we review the current understanding of neurotrophin modulation of adult neurogenesis in both the SVZ and SGZ. We compile data supporting a variety of roles for neurotrophins/neurotrophin receptors in different scenarios, including both expected and unexpected functions.

  20. Regulation of Neurogenesis by Neurotrophins during Adulthood: Expected and Unexpected Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Marçal; Mira, Helena

    2016-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) of the anterolateral ventricle and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus are the two main regions of the adult mammalian brain in which neurogenesis is maintained throughout life. Because alterations in adult neurogenesis appear to be a common hallmark of different neurodegenerative diseases, understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling adult neurogenesis is a focus of active research. Neurotrophic factors are a family of molecules that play critical roles in the survival and differentiation of neurons during development and in the control of neural plasticity in the adult. Several neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors have been implicated in the regulation of adult neurogenesis at different levels. Here, we review the current understanding of neurotrophin modulation of adult neurogenesis in both the SVZ and SGZ. We compile data supporting a variety of roles for neurotrophins/neurotrophin receptors in different scenarios, including both expected and unexpected functions. PMID:26903794

  1. Physical Exercise-Induced Adult Neurogenesis: A Good Strategy to Prevent Cognitive Decline in Neurodegenerative Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk-yu Yau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cumulative evidence has indicated that there is an important role for adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cognitive function. With the increasing prevalence of cognitive decline associated with neurodegenerative diseases among the ageing population, physical exercise, a potent enhancer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, has emerged as a potential preventative strategy/treatment to reduce cognitive decline. Here we review the functional role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in learning and memory, and how this form of structural plasticity is altered in neurodegenerative diseases known to involve cognitive impairment. We further discuss how physical exercise may contribute to cognitive improvement in the ageing brain by preserving adult neurogenesis, and review the recent approaches for measuring changes in neurogenesis in the live human brain.

  2. Reparative neurogenesis after cerebral ischemia: Clinical application prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    At the present time two main approaches are in the focus of neurobiological studies of brain recovery after a stroke. One of them is concerned with the infusion of stem cells in damaged brain. The second approach is directed at the stimulation of endogenous reparative processes, in particular, adult neurogenesis. This review considers alterations of adult neurogenesis caused by cerebral ischemia and possible pathways of its regulation. Multiple studies on animal models have shown that adult neurogenesis is mostly increased by cerebral ischemia. In spite of increasing proliferation and moving neural progenitors to infarct zone, most newborn neurons die before reaching maturity. Besides, an increase of neurogenesis in pathological conditions is mainly due to recruitment of new stem cells, but not due to an additional precursor-cells division that results in an overall decline of the regeneration capacity. Thus, the endogenous reparative mechanisms are not sufficient, and the search for new targets to promote proliferation, survival, and maturation of new neurons after a stroke is needed. Neurotransmitter systems and anti-inflammatory drugs are considered as potential regulators of post-ischemic neurogenesis growth factors.

  3. Reparative neurogenesis after cerebral ischemia: Clinical application prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu., E-mail: khodanovich@mail.tsu.ru [Tomsk State University, Research Institute of Biology and Biophysics, Laboratory of Neurobiology (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    At the present time two main approaches are in the focus of neurobiological studies of brain recovery after a stroke. One of them is concerned with the infusion of stem cells in damaged brain. The second approach is directed at the stimulation of endogenous reparative processes, in particular, adult neurogenesis. This review considers alterations of adult neurogenesis caused by cerebral ischemia and possible pathways of its regulation. Multiple studies on animal models have shown that adult neurogenesis is mostly increased by cerebral ischemia. In spite of increasing proliferation and moving neural progenitors to infarct zone, most newborn neurons die before reaching maturity. Besides, an increase of neurogenesis in pathological conditions is mainly due to recruitment of new stem cells, but not due to an additional precursor-cells division that results in an overall decline of the regeneration capacity. Thus, the endogenous reparative mechanisms are not sufficient, and the search for new targets to promote proliferation, survival, and maturation of new neurons after a stroke is needed. Neurotransmitter systems and anti-inflammatory drugs are considered as potential regulators of post-ischemic neurogenesis growth factors.

  4. Reparative neurogenesis after cerebral ischemia: Clinical application prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time two main approaches are in the focus of neurobiological studies of brain recovery after a stroke. One of them is concerned with the infusion of stem cells in damaged brain. The second approach is directed at the stimulation of endogenous reparative processes, in particular, adult neurogenesis. This review considers alterations of adult neurogenesis caused by cerebral ischemia and possible pathways of its regulation. Multiple studies on animal models have shown that adult neurogenesis is mostly increased by cerebral ischemia. In spite of increasing proliferation and moving neural progenitors to infarct zone, most newborn neurons die before reaching maturity. Besides, an increase of neurogenesis in pathological conditions is mainly due to recruitment of new stem cells, but not due to an additional precursor-cells division that results in an overall decline of the regeneration capacity. Thus, the endogenous reparative mechanisms are not sufficient, and the search for new targets to promote proliferation, survival, and maturation of new neurons after a stroke is needed. Neurotransmitter systems and anti-inflammatory drugs are considered as potential regulators of post-ischemic neurogenesis growth factors

  5. Alzheimer’s disease and Hippocampal Adult Neurogenesis; Exploring Shared Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orly eLazarov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available New neurons incorporate into the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus throughout life. Neurogenesis is modulated by behavior and plays a major role in hippocampal plasticity. Along with older mature neurons, new neurons structure the dentate gyrus and determine its function. Recent data suggest that the level of hippocampal neurogenesis is substantial in the human brain, suggesting that neurogenesis may have important implications for human cognition. In support of that, impaired neurogenesis compromises hippocampal function and plays a role in cognitive deficits in Alzheimer’s disease mouse models. We review current work suggesting that neuronal differentiation is defective in Alzheimer’s disease, leading to dysfunction of the dentate gyrus. Additionally, alterations in critical signals regulating neurogenesis, such as presenilin-1, Notch 1, soluble amyloid precursor protein, CREB, and β-catenin underlie dysfunctional neurogenesis in Alzheimer’s disease. Lastly, we discuss the detectability of neurogenesis in the live mouse and human brain, as well as the therapeutic implications of enhancing neurogenesis for the treatment of cognitive deficits and Alzheimer’s disease.

  6. Adult Olfactory Bulb Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Valley, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Most organisms use their olfactory system to detect and analyze chemical cues from the external world to guide essential behaviors. From worms to vertebrates, chemicals are detected by odorant receptors expressed by olfactory sensory neurons, which in vertebrates send an axon to the primary processing center called the olfactory bulb (OB). Within the OB, sensory neurons form excitatory synapses with projection neurons and with inhibitory interneurons. Thus, because of complex synaptic interactions, the output of a given projection neuron is determined not only by the sensory input, but also by the activity of local inhibitory interneurons that are regenerated throughout life in the process of adult neurogenesis. Herein, we discuss how it is optimized and why. PMID:27235474

  7. Neurogenesis in the aging brain

    OpenAIRE

    Veronica Galvan; Kunlin Jin

    2007-01-01

    Veronica Galvan, Kunlin JinBuck Institute for Age Research, 8001 Redwood Blvd. Novato, CA, USAAbstract: Neurogenesis, or the birth of new neural cells, was thought to occur only in the developing nervous system and a fixed neuronal population in the adult brain was believed to be necessary to maintain the functional stability of adult brain circuitry. However, recent studies have demonstrated that neurogenesis does indeed continue into and throughout adult life in discrete regions of the cent...

  8. Type I vs type II spiral ganglion neurons exhibit differential survival and neuritogenesis during cochlear development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Housley Gary D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms that consolidate neural circuitry are a major focus of neuroscience. In the mammalian cochlea, the refinement of spiral ganglion neuron (SGN innervation to the inner hair cells (by type I SGNs and the outer hair cells (by type II SGNs is accompanied by a 25% loss of SGNs. Results We investigated the segregation of neuronal loss in the mouse cochlea using β-tubulin and peripherin antisera to immunolabel all SGNs and selectively type II SGNs, respectively, and discovered that it is the type II SGN population that is predominately lost within the first postnatal week. Developmental neuronal loss has been attributed to the decline in neurotrophin expression by the target hair cells during this period, so we next examined survival of SGN sub-populations using tissue culture of the mid apex-mid turn region of neonatal mouse cochleae. In organotypic culture for 48 hours from postnatal day 1, endogenous trophic support from the organ of Corti proved sufficient to maintain all type II SGNs; however, a large proportion of type I SGNs were lost. Culture of the spiral ganglion as an explant, with removal of the organ of Corti, led to loss of the majority of both SGN sub-types. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF added as a supplement to the media rescued a significant proportion of the SGNs, particularly the type II SGNs, which also showed increased neuritogenesis. The known decline in BDNF production by the rodent sensory epithelium after birth is therefore a likely mediator of type II neuron apoptosis. Conclusion Our study thus indicates that BDNF supply from the organ of Corti supports consolidation of type II innervation in the neonatal mouse cochlea. In contrast, type I SGNs likely rely on additional sources for trophic support.

  9. Lactation-induced reduction in hippocampal neurogenesis is reversed by chronic stress exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Hillerer, Katharina M; Neumann, Inga D.; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Aigner, Ludwig; Slattery, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The peripartum period is a time of high susceptibility for mood and anxiety disorders, some of which have recently been associated with alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis. Several factors including stress, aging, and, perhaps unexpectedly, lactation have been shown to decrease hippocampal neurogenesis. Intriguingly, lactation is also a time of reduced stress responsivity suggesting that the effect of stress on neurogenic processes may differ during this period. Therefore, the aim of the ...

  10. Cyclooxygenase-1 is involved in the inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis after lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Isabella; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Weigert, Roberto; Barlati, Sergio; Bosetti, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that neuroinflammation can alter adult neurogenesis by mechanisms as yet unclear. We have previously demonstrated that the neuroinflammatory response and neuronal damage after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection is reduced in cyclooxygenase-1 deficient (COX-1-/-) mice. In this study, we investigated the role of CoX-1 on hippocampal neurogenesis during LPS-induced neuroinflammation, using COX-1-/- and wild-type (WT) mice. We found that LPS-induced neuroinflammation re...

  11. Initial neurogenesis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartenstein, Volker; Wodarz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Early neurogenesis comprises the phase of nervous system development during which neural progenitor cells are born. In early development, the embryonic ectoderm is subdivided by a conserved signaling mechanism into two main domains, the epidermal ectoderm and the neurectoderm. Subsequently, cells of the neurectoderm are internalized and form a cell layer of proliferating neural progenitors. In vertebrates, the entire neurectoderm folds into the embryo to give rise to the neural tube. In Drosophila and many other invertebrates, a subset of neurectodermal cells, called neuroblasts (NBs), delaminates and forms the neural primordium inside the embryo where they divide in an asymmetric, stem cell-like mode. The remainder of the neurectodermal cells that stay behind at the surface loose their neurogenic potential and later give rise to the ventral part of the epidermis. The genetic and molecular analysis of the mechanisms controlling specification and proliferation of NBs in the Drosophila embryo, which played a significant part in pioneering the field of modern developmental neurobiology, represents the topic of this review. PMID:24014455

  12. Neurogenesis and neuronal regeneration in status epilepticus

    OpenAIRE

    Rotheneichner, Peter; Marschallinger, Julia; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Aigner, Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system has been well documented in several mammals including humans. By now, a plethora of data has been generated with the aim of understanding the molecular and cellular events governing neurogenesis. This growing comprehension will provide the basis for modulation of neurogenesis for therapeutic purposes, in particular in neurodegenerative diseases. Herein, we review the current knowledge on neurogenesis, in particular in the frame of epilepsy, sin...

  13. Neurogenesis in zebrafish - from embryo to adult

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, R.; Strähle, U.; Scholpp, S.

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the developing central nervous system consists of the induction and proliferation of neural progenitor cells and their subsequent differentiation into mature neurons. External as well as internal cues orchestrate neurogenesis in a precise temporal and spatial way. In the last 20 years, the zebrafish has proven to be an excellent model organism to study neurogenesis in the embryo. Recently, this vertebrate has also become a model for the investigation of adult neurogenesis and ...

  14. Increased hippocampal neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Kunlin; Peel, Alyson L.; Mao, Xiao Ou; Xie, Lin; Cottrell, Barbara A.; Henshall, David C.; Greenberg, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Neurogenesis, which persists in the adult mammalian brain, may provide a basis for neuronal replacement therapy in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Neurogenesis is increased in certain acute neurological disorders, such as ischemia and epilepsy, but the effect of more chronic neurodegenerations is uncertain, and some animal models of AD show impaired neurogenesis. To determine how neurogenesis is affected in the brains of patients with AD, we investigated the expressi...

  15. Neurogenesis in the aging brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Galvan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Veronica Galvan, Kunlin JinBuck Institute for Age Research, 8001 Redwood Blvd. Novato, CA, USAAbstract: Neurogenesis, or the birth of new neural cells, was thought to occur only in the developing nervous system and a fixed neuronal population in the adult brain was believed to be necessary to maintain the functional stability of adult brain circuitry. However, recent studies have demonstrated that neurogenesis does indeed continue into and throughout adult life in discrete regions of the central nervous systems (CNS of all mammals, including humans. Although neurogenesis may contribute to the ability of the adult brain to function normally and be induced in response to cerebral diseases for self-repair, this nevertheless declines with advancing age. Understanding the basic biology of neural stem cells and the molecular and cellular regulation mechanisms of neurogenesis in young and aged brain will allow us to modulate cell replacement processes in the adult brain for the maintenance of healthy brain tissues and for repair of disease states in the elderly.Keywords: neurogenesis, aging, brain, neural stem cells, subgranular zone, subventricular zone

  16. Computational models of adult neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2005-10-01

    Experimental results in recent years have shown that adult neurogenesis is a significant phenomenon in the mammalian brain. Little is known, however, about the functional role played by the generation and destruction of neurons in the context of an adult brain. Here, we propose two models where new projection neurons are incorporated. We show that in both models, using incorporation and removal of neurons as a computational tool, it is possible to achieve a higher computational efficiency that in purely static, synapse-learning-driven networks. We also discuss the implication for understanding the role of adult neurogenesis in specific brain areas like the olfactory bulb and the dentate gyrus.

  17. Adult Neurogenesis and Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunchai; Wen, Zhexing; Song, Hongjun; Christian, Kimberly M; Ming, Guo-Li

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders continue to be among the most challenging disorders to diagnose and treat because there is no single genetic or anatomical locus that is causative for the disease. Current treatments are often blunt tools used to ameliorate the most severe symptoms, at the risk of disrupting functional neural systems. There is a critical need to develop new therapeutic strategies that can target circumscribed functional or anatomical domains of pathology. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be one such domain. Here, we review the evidence suggesting that adult hippocampal neurogenesis plays a role in emotional regulation and forms of learning and memory that include temporal and spatial memory encoding and context discrimination, and that its dysregulation is associated with psychiatric disorders, such as affective disorders, schizophrenia, and drug addiction. Further, adult neurogenesis has proven to be an effective model to investigate basic processes of neuronal development and converging evidence suggests that aberrant neural development may be an etiological factor, even in late-onset diseases. Constitutive neurogenesis in the hippocampus of the mature brain reflects large-scale plasticity unique to this region and could be a potential hub for modulation of a subset of cognitive and affective behaviors that are affected by multiple psychiatric disorders. PMID:26801682

  18. The prostaglandin E2/EP4 receptor/cyclic AMP/T-type Ca(2+) channel pathway mediates neuritogenesis in sensory neuron-like ND7/23 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Kenji; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Maeda, Takashi; Tanaka, Yukari; Yoshida, Shigeru; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-03-01

    We investigated mechanisms for the neuritogenesis caused by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) in sensory neuron-like ND7/23 cells. PGE2 caused neuritogenesis, an effect abolished by an EP4 receptor antagonist or inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase (AC) or protein kinase A (PKA) and mimicked by the AC activator forskolin, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), and selective activators of PKA or Epac. ND7/23 cells expressed both Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels (T-channels). The neuritogenesis induced by db-cAMP or PGE2 was abolished by T-channel blockers. T-channels were functionally upregulated by db-cAMP. The PGE2/EP4/cAMP/T-channel pathway thus appears to mediate neuritogenesis in sensory neurons. PMID:27032908

  19. Taurine increases hippocampal neurogenesis in aging mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Gebara

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with increased inflammation and reduced hippocampal neurogenesis, which may in turn contribute to cognitive impairment. Taurine is a free amino acid found in numerous diets, with anti-inflammatory properties. Although abundant in the young brain, the decrease in taurine concentration with age may underlie reduced neurogenesis. Here, we assessed the effect of taurine on hippocampal neurogenesis in middle-aged mice. We found that taurine increased cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus through the activation of quiescent stem cells, resulting in increased number of stem cells and intermediate neural progenitors. Taurine had a direct effect on stem/progenitor cells proliferation, as observed in vitro, and also reduced activated microglia. Furthermore, taurine increased the survival of newborn neurons, resulting in a net increase in adult neurogenesis. Together, these results show that taurine increases several steps of adult neurogenesis and support a beneficial role of taurine on hippocampal neurogenesis in the context of brain aging.

  20. Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Depressive Disorders, and Antidepressant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Paizanis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence that neural stem cells reside in the adult central nervous system where neurogenesis occurs throughout lifespan. Neurogenesis concerns mainly two areas in the brain: the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, where it is controlled by several trophic factors and neuroactive molecules. Neurogenesis is involved in processes such as learning and memory and accumulating evidence implicates hippocampal neurogenesis in the physiopathology of depression. We herein review experimental and clinical data demonstrating that stress and antidepressant treatments affect neurogenesis in opposite direction in rodents. In particular, the stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis by all types of antidepressant drugs supports the view that neuroplastic phenomena are involved in the physiopathology of depression and underlie—at least partly—antidepressant therapy.

  1. Apical versus Basal Neurogenesis Directs Cortical Interneuron Subclass Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Petros

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fate determination in the mammalian telencephalon, with its diversity of neuronal subtypes and relevance to neuropsychiatric disease, remains a critical area of study in neuroscience. Most studies investigating this topic focus on the diversity of neural progenitors within spatial and temporal domains along the lateral ventricles. Often overlooked is whether the location of neurogenesis within a fate-restricted domain is associated with, or instructive for, distinct neuronal fates. Here, we use in vivo fate mapping and the manipulation of neurogenic location to demonstrate that apical versus basal neurogenesis influences the fate determination of major subgroups of cortical interneurons derived from the subcortical telencephalon. Somatostatin-expressing interneurons arise mainly from apical divisions along the ventricular surface, whereas parvalbumin-expressing interneurons originate predominantly from basal divisions in the subventricular zone. As manipulations that shift neurogenic location alter interneuron subclass fate, these results add an additional dimension to the spatial-temporal determinants of neuronal fate determination.

  2. Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Depressive Disorders, and Antidepressant Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence Lanfumey; Michel Hamon; Eleni Paizanis

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that neural stem cells reside in the adult central nervous system where neurogenesis occurs throughout lifespan. Neurogenesis concerns mainly two areas in the brain: the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, where it is controlled by several trophic factors and neuroactive molecules. Neurogenesis is involved in processes such as learning and memory and accumulating evidence implicates hippocampal neurogen...

  3. Taurine increases hippocampal neurogenesis in aging mice

    OpenAIRE

    Elias Gebara; Florian Udry; Sébastien Sultan; Nicolas Toni

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with increased inflammation and reduced hippocampal neurogenesis, which may in turn contribute to cognitive impairment. Taurine is a free amino acid found in numerous diets, with anti-inflammatory properties. Although abundant in the young brain, the decrease in taurine concentration with age may underlie reduced neurogenesis. Here, we assessed the effect of taurine on hippocampal neurogenesis in middle-aged mice. We found that taurine increased cell proliferation in the d...

  4. Computational Modeling of Adult Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimone, James B

    2016-01-01

    The restriction of adult neurogenesis to only a handful of regions of the brain is suggestive of some shared requirement for this dramatic form of structural plasticity. However, a common driver across neurogenic regions has not yet been identified. Computational studies have been invaluable in providing insight into the functional role of new neurons; however, researchers have typically focused on specific scales ranging from abstract neural networks to specific neural systems, most commonly the dentate gyrus area of the hippocampus. These studies have yielded a number of diverse potential functions for new neurons, ranging from an impact on pattern separation to the incorporation of time into episodic memories to enabling the forgetting of old information. This review will summarize these past computational efforts and discuss whether these proposed theoretical functions can be unified into a common rationale for why neurogenesis is required in these unique neural circuits. PMID:26933191

  5. Comparative neuroscience of stimulant-induced memory dysfunction: role for neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Juan J

    2010-09-01

    The discovery that the addictive drugs impair neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus has prompted the elaboration of new biological hypotheses to explain addiction and drug-induced cognitive dysfunction. Considerable evidence now implicates the process of adult neurogenesis in at least some critical components of hippocampal-dependent memory function. In experimental models, psychomotor stimulant drugs produce alterations in the rate of birth, survival, maturation and functional integration of adult-born hippocampal neurons. Thus some of the deleterious consequences of drug abuse on memory could result from the neurotoxic actions of drugs on adult hippocampal neurogenesis. In this review, we will first summarize preclinical and clinical literature on the disruptive effects of drugs such as cocaine and ecstasy in the areas of learning, memory and attention. We will also summarize data that document the widespread effects of stimulant drugs on progenitor activity and precursor incorporation in the adult dentate gyrus. Finally, we will examine evidence that supports the involvement of hippocampal neurogenesis in specific aspects of learning and memory function and we will consider critically the hypothesis that some of the negative consequences of drug abuse on cognition might be ascribed to deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Evidence suggests that stimulant abuse impacts negatively on at least four areas of memory/cognitive function that may be influenced by adult hippocampal neurogenesis: contextual memory, spatial memory, working memory and cognitive flexibility. PMID:20700045

  6. The transcription factors CREB and c-Fos play key roles in NCAM-mediated neuritogenesis in PC12-E2 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, U; Novitskaya, V; Pedersen, N;

    2001-01-01

    -Fos could compensate for the inactivation of the other, indicating that both factors are important in NCAM-mediated neuritogenesis. Treatment of primary hippocampal neurons with a synthetic NCAM peptide ligand known to stimulate neurite outgrowth induced phosphorylation of CREB and expression of c-fos. We...... thus present evidence that NCAM-mediated neurite outgrowth involves a series of signal transduction pathways, including the cAMP/PKA pathway, targeting c-Fos and CREB....

  7. NF-κB Mediated Regulation of Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis: Relevance to Mood Disorders and Antidepressant Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Valeria Bortolotto; Bruna Cuccurazzu; Pier Luigi Canonico; Mariagrazia Grilli

    2014-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is a peculiar form of process of neuroplasticity that in recent years has gained great attention for its potential implication in cognition and in emotional behavior in physiological conditions. Moreover, a vast array of experimental studies suggested that adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be altered in various neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depression, where its disregulation may contribute to cognitive impairment and/or emotional aspects associat...

  8. From network structure to network reorganization: implications for adult neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Mizell, Casey M.; Parent, Jack M.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Zochowski, Michal R.; Sander, Leonard M.

    2010-12-01

    Networks can be dynamical systems that undergo functional and structural reorganization. One example of such a process is adult hippocampal neurogenesis, in which new cells are continuously born and incorporate into the existing network of the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus. Many of these introduced cells mature and become indistinguishable from established neurons, joining the existing network. Activity in the network environment is known to promote birth, survival and incorporation of new cells. However, after epileptogenic injury, changes to the connectivity structure around the neurogenic niche are known to correlate with aberrant neurogenesis. The possible role of network-level changes in the development of epilepsy is not well understood. In this paper, we use a computational model to investigate how the structural and functional outcomes of network reorganization, driven by addition of new cells during neurogenesis, depend on the original network structure. We find that there is a stable network topology that allows the network to incorporate new neurons in a manner that enhances activity of the persistently active region, but maintains global network properties. In networks having other connectivity structures, new cells can greatly alter the distribution of firing activity and destroy the initial activity patterns. We thus find that new cells are able to provide focused enhancement of network only for small-world networks with sufficient inhibition. Network-level deviations from this topology, such as those caused by epileptogenic injury, can set the network down a path that develops toward pathological dynamics and aberrant structural integration of new cells.

  9. From network structure to network reorganization: implications for adult neurogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Networks can be dynamical systems that undergo functional and structural reorganization. One example of such a process is adult hippocampal neurogenesis, in which new cells are continuously born and incorporate into the existing network of the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus. Many of these introduced cells mature and become indistinguishable from established neurons, joining the existing network. Activity in the network environment is known to promote birth, survival and incorporation of new cells. However, after epileptogenic injury, changes to the connectivity structure around the neurogenic niche are known to correlate with aberrant neurogenesis. The possible role of network-level changes in the development of epilepsy is not well understood. In this paper, we use a computational model to investigate how the structural and functional outcomes of network reorganization, driven by addition of new cells during neurogenesis, depend on the original network structure. We find that there is a stable network topology that allows the network to incorporate new neurons in a manner that enhances activity of the persistently active region, but maintains global network properties. In networks having other connectivity structures, new cells can greatly alter the distribution of firing activity and destroy the initial activity patterns. We thus find that new cells are able to provide focused enhancement of network only for small-world networks with sufficient inhibition. Network-level deviations from this topology, such as those caused by epileptogenic injury, can set the network down a path that develops toward pathological dynamics and aberrant structural integration of new cells

  10. Adult neurogenesis: VCAM stems the tide

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtinen, Maria K.

    2012-01-01

    In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Kokovay et al., uncover that VCAM1 expression in neural stem cells regulates adult neurogenesis. Cerebrospinal fluid-borne IL-1β upregulates VCAM1 expression, which in turn regulates the architecture of the stem cell niche, redox homeostasis, and neurogenesis.

  11. Neurogenesis and The Effect of Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Taupin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent evidence that neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood and neural stem cells (NSCs reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS suggests that the CNS has the potential for self-repair. Beside this potential, the function of newly generated neuronal cells in the adult brain remains the focus of intense research. The hippocampus of patients with depression show signs of atrophy and neuronal loss. This suggests that adult neurogenesis may contribute to the biology of depression. The observations that antidepressants, like fluoxetine, increase neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG and neurogenesis is required for the behavioral effect of antidepressants, lead to a new theory for depression and the design of new strategies and drugs for the treatment of depression. However, the role of adult neurogenesis in the etiology of depression remains the source of controversies and debates.

  12. Neurogenesis in the adult olfactory bulb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Angela Pignatelli; Cristina Gambardella; Ottorino Belluzzi

    2011-01-01

    Neurogenesis is the process by which cells divide, migrate, and subsequently differentiate into a neuronal phenotype. Significant rates of neurogenesis persist into adulthood in two brain regions, the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Cells of the subventricular zone divide and migrate via the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb where they differentiate into granule and periglomerular cells. With the discovery of large-scale neurogenesis in the adult brain, there have been significant efforts to identify the mechanisms that control this process as well as the role of these cells in neuronal functioning. Although many questions remain unanswered, new insights appear daily about adult neurogenesis, regulatory mechanisms, and the fates of the progeny. In this review we highlight the main studies investigating factors that regulate neurogenesis in the subventricular zone, neuronal migration to the olfactory bulb, neuronal integration into the existing bulbar network and shortly discuss the functional meaning of this process.

  13. Allergy Enhances Neurogenesis and Modulates Microglial Activation in the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Barbara; Mrowetz, Heike; Thalhamer, Josef; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Weiss, Richard; Aigner, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Allergies and their characteristic TH2-polarized inflammatory reactions affect a substantial part of the population. Since there is increasing evidence that the immune system modulates plasticity and function of the central nervous system (CNS), we investigated the effects of allergic lung inflammation on the hippocampus—a region of cellular plasticity in the adult brain. The focus of the present study was on microglia, the resident immune cells of the CNS, and on hippocampal neurogenesis, i.e., the generation of new neurons. C57BL/6 mice were sensitized with a clinically relevant allergen derived from timothy grass pollen (Phl p 5). As expected, allergic sensitization induced high serum levels of allergen-specific immunoglobulins (IgG1 and IgE) and of TH2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13). Surprisingly, fewer Iba1+ microglia were found in the granular layer (GL) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and also the number of Iba1+MHCII+ cells was lower, indicating a reduced microglial surveillance and activation in the hippocampus of allergic mice. Neurogenesis was analyzed by labeling of proliferating cells with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and determining their fate 4 weeks later, and by quantitative analysis of young immature neurons, i.e., cells expressing doublecortin (DCX). The number of DCX+ cells was clearly increased in the allergy animals. Moreover, there were more BrdU+ cells present in the hippocampus of allergic mice, and these newly born cells had differentiated into neurons as indicated by a higher number of BrdU+NeuN+ cells. In summary, allergy led to a reduced microglia presence and activity and to an elevated level of neurogenesis in the hippocampus. This effect was apparently specific to the hippocampus, as we did not observe these alterations in the subventricular zone (SVZ)/olfactory bulb (OB) system, also a region of high cellular plasticity and adult neurogenesis.

  14. The evolution of early neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartenstein, Volker; Stollewerk, Angelika

    2015-02-23

    The foundation of the diverse metazoan nervous systems is laid by embryonic patterning mechanisms, involving the generation and movement of neural progenitors and their progeny. Here we divide early neurogenesis into discrete elements, including origin, pattern, proliferation, and movement of neuronal progenitors, which are controlled by conserved gene cassettes. We review these neurogenetic mechanisms in representatives of the different metazoan clades, with the goal to build a conceptual framework in which one can ask specific questions, such as which of these mechanisms potentially formed part of the developmental "toolkit" of the bilaterian ancestor and which evolved later. PMID:25710527

  15. Neurogenesis dan Faktor-Faktor yang Berpengaruh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Puspitawati

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of nerve tissue is known as neurogenesis. Vertebrate neve system has various functional capabilities from sensory perception, motor coordination, to the ability in producing motivation, spatial abilities, learning and memorizing due to various cell types that accurately connected and interact to each other. The connections between various nerve cells are continuously developed from the embryonic time until the early period of life. Recent studies have showed that neurogenesis in certain regions of nerve tissue can still be found in adults. This article reviews the cellular mechanism of neurogenesis and conditions that have role in the process.

  16. miR-17-92 Cluster Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Anxiety, and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghee Jin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence has shown that noncoding RNAs, particularly microRNAs (miRNAs, contribute to the pathogenesis of mood and anxiety disorders, although the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that altered levels of miR-17-92 in adult hippocampal neural progenitors have a significant impact on neurogenesis and anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in mice. miR-17-92 deletion in adult neural progenitors decreases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, while its overexpression increases neurogenesis. miR-17-92 affects neurogenesis by regulating genes in the glucocorticoid pathway, especially serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase-1 (Sgk1. miR-17-92 knockout mice show anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, whereas miR-17-92 overexpressing mice exhibit anxiolytic and antidepression-like behaviors. Furthermore, we show that miR-17-92 expression in the adult mouse hippocampus responds to chronic stress, and miR-17-92 rescues proliferation defects induced by corticosterone in hippocampal neural progenitors. Our study uncovers a crucial role for miR-17-92 in adult neural progenitors through regulation of neurogenesis and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors.

  17. miR-17-92 Cluster Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Anxiety, and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Junghee; Kim, Seung-Nam; Liu, Xuqing; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Chao; Seo, Ji-Seon; Kim, Yong; Sun, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that noncoding RNAs, particularly microRNAs (miRNAs), contribute to the pathogenesis of mood and anxiety disorders, although the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that altered levels of miR-17-92 in adult hippocampal neural progenitors have a significant impact on neurogenesis and anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in mice. miR-17-92 deletion in adult neural progenitors decreases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, while its overexpression increases neurogenesis. miR-17-92 affects neurogenesis by regulating genes in the glucocorticoid pathway, especially serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase-1 (Sgk1). miR-17-92 knockout mice show anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, whereas miR-17-92 overexpressing mice exhibit anxiolytic and antidepression-like behaviors. Furthermore, we show that miR-17-92 expression in the adult mouse hippocampus responds to chronic stress, and miR-17-92 rescues proliferation defects induced by corticosterone in hippocampal neural progenitors. Our study uncovers a crucial role for miR-17-92 in adult neural progenitors through regulation of neurogenesis and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. PMID:27477270

  18. Loss of STOP protein impairs peripheral olfactory neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karelle Benardais

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: STOP (Stable Tubulin-Only Polypeptide null mice show behavioral deficits, impaired synaptic plasticity, decrease in synaptic vesicular pools and disturbances in dopaminergic transmission, and are considered a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. Olfactory neurons highly express STOP protein and are continually generated throughout life. Experimentally-induced loss of olfactory neurons leads to epithelial regeneration within two months, providing a useful model to evaluate the role played by STOP protein in adult olfactory neurogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy were used to study the structure of the glomerulus in the main olfactory bulb and neurogenesis in the neurosensorial epithelia. In STOP null mice, olfactory neurons showed presynaptic swellings with tubulovesicular profiles and autophagic-like structures. In olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia, there was an increase in neurons turnover, as shown by the increase in number of proliferating, apoptotic and immature cells with no changes in the number of mature neurons. Similar alterations in peripheral olfactory neurogenesis have been previously described in schizophrenia patients. In STOP null mice, regeneration of the olfactory epithelium did not modify these anomalies; moreover, regeneration resulted in abnormal organisation of olfactory terminals within the olfactory glomeruli in STOP null mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, STOP protein seems to be involved in the establishment of synapses in the olfactory glomerulus. Our results indicate that the olfactory system of STOP null mice is a well-suited experimental model (1 for the study of the mechanism of action of STOP protein in synaptic function/plasticity and (2 for pathophysiological studies of the mechanisms of altered neuronal connections in schizophrenia.

  19. Vitamin A status regulates glucocorticoid availability in Wistar rats: consequences on cognitive functions and hippocampal neurogenesis?

    OpenAIRE

    Damien eBonhomme; Amandine Marie Minni; Serge eAlfos; Pascale eRoux; Emmanuel eRichard; Paul eHigueret; Marie-Pierre eMoisan; Véronique ePallet; Katia eTouyarot

    2014-01-01

    A disruption of the vitamin A signaling pathway has been involved in age-related memory decline and hippocampal plasticity alterations. Using vitamin A deficiency (VAD), a nutritional model leading to a hyposignaling of the retinoid pathway, we have recently demonstrated that retinoic acid (RA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, is efficient to reverse VAD-induced spatial memory deficits and adult hippocampal neurogenesis alterations. Besides, excess of glucocorticoids (GCs) occurring with ...

  20. Cholinergic Circuit Control of Postnatal Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrican, Brent; Paez-Gonzalez, Patricia; Erb, Joshua; Kuo, Chay T.

    2016-01-01

    New neuron addition via continued neurogenesis in the postnatal/adult mammalian brain presents a distinct form of nervous system plasticity. During embryonic development, precise temporal and spatial patterns of neurogenesis are necessary to create the nervous system architecture. Similar between embryonic and postnatal stages, neurogenic proliferation is regulated by neural stem cell (NSC)-intrinsic mechanisms layered upon cues from their local microenvironmental niche. Following developmental assembly, it remains relatively unclear what may be the key driving forces that sustain continued production of neurons in the postnatal/adult brain. Recent experimental evidence suggests that patterned activity from specific neural circuits can also directly govern postnatal/adult neurogenesis. Here, we review experimental findings that revealed cholinergic modulation, and how patterns of neuronal activity and acetylcholine release may differentially or synergistically activate downstream signaling in NSCs. Higher-order excitatory and inhibitory inputs regulating cholinergic neuron firing, and their implications in neurogenesis control are also considered.

  1. Impact of diet on adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Stangl, Doris; Thuret, Sandrine

    2009-01-01

    Research over the last 5 years has firmly established that learning and memory abilities, as well as mood, can be influenced by diet, although the mechanisms by which diet modulates mental health are not well understood. One of the brain structures associated with learning and memory, as well as mood, is the hippocampus. Interestingly, the hippocampus is one of the two structures in the adult brain where the formation of newborn neurons, or neurogenesis, persists. The level of neurogenesis in...

  2. Neurogenesis in the adult peripheral nervous system.

    OpenAIRE

    Czaja, Krzysztof; Fornaro, Michele; Geuna, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Most researchers believe that neurogenesis in mature mammals is restricted only to the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle in the central nervous system. In the peripheral nervous system, neurogenesis is thought to be active only during prenatal development, with the exception of the olfactory neuroepithelium. However, sensory ganglia in the adult peripheral nervous system have been reported to contain precursor cells that can proliferate...

  3. Functional importance of adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill Petrov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is crucial for memory formation and spatial processing. It is no surprise that the discovery of postnatal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus has inspired an extensive amount of research on its functional contribution to the adult brain. Correlational evidence reveals that neurogenesis is a dynamic process subject to modulation by a variety of factors, such as environmental enrichment and learning. Electrophysiological experiments show that young neurons constitute a distinct neuronal population within the dentate gyrus. Unlike mature neurons, they are not inhibited by gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA and require less stimulation to induce long-term potentiation. Furthermore, there is now strong evidence that new neurons can be functionally integrated into memory networks. However, significant debate still persists about the functional necessity of neurogenesis. To resolve this issue, several techniques have been used to ablate neurogenesis, such as X-ray irradiation, administration of anti-proliferative drugs and genetic knockdowns. Unfortunately, these methods are not equally effective, are invasive and can cause adverse physiological effects. This article offers an overview of the functional significance of hippocampal neurogenesis and presents a critical review of current research methodology. Methods of improving traditional techniques of neurogenesis ablation are also explored.

  4. Andrographolide Stimulates Neurogenesis in the Adult Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Varela-Nallar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (ANDRO is a labdane diterpenoid component of Andrographis paniculata widely used for its anti-inflammatory properties. We have recently determined that ANDRO is a competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β, a key enzyme of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade. Since this signaling pathway regulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, we evaluated whether ANDRO stimulates this process. Treatment with ANDRO increased neural progenitor cell proliferation and the number of immature neurons in the hippocampus of 2- and 10-month-old mice compared to age-matched control mice. Moreover, ANDRO stimulated neurogenesis increasing the number of newborn dentate granule neurons. Also, the effect of ANDRO was evaluated in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. In these mice, ANDRO increased cell proliferation and the density of immature neurons in the dentate gyrus. Concomitantly with the increase in neurogenesis, ANDRO induced the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in the hippocampus of wild-type and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice determined by increased levels of β-catenin, the inactive form of GSK-3β, and NeuroD1, a Wnt target gene involved in neurogenesis. Our findings indicate that ANDRO stimulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus suggesting that this drug could be used as a therapy in diseases in which neurogenesis is affected.

  5. Andrographolide Stimulates Neurogenesis in the Adult Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Arredondo, Sebastian B.; Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Hancke, Juan; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2015-01-01

    Andrographolide (ANDRO) is a labdane diterpenoid component of Andrographis paniculata widely used for its anti-inflammatory properties. We have recently determined that ANDRO is a competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a key enzyme of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade. Since this signaling pathway regulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, we evaluated whether ANDRO stimulates this process. Treatment with ANDRO increased neural progenitor cell proliferation and the number of immature neurons in the hippocampus of 2- and 10-month-old mice compared to age-matched control mice. Moreover, ANDRO stimulated neurogenesis increasing the number of newborn dentate granule neurons. Also, the effect of ANDRO was evaluated in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. In these mice, ANDRO increased cell proliferation and the density of immature neurons in the dentate gyrus. Concomitantly with the increase in neurogenesis, ANDRO induced the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in the hippocampus of wild-type and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice determined by increased levels of β-catenin, the inactive form of GSK-3β, and NeuroD1, a Wnt target gene involved in neurogenesis. Our findings indicate that ANDRO stimulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus suggesting that this drug could be used as a therapy in diseases in which neurogenesis is affected. PMID:26798521

  6. The role of cannabinoids in adult neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenderville, Jack A; Kelly, Áine M; Downer, Eric J

    2015-08-01

    The processes underpinning post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain continue to be defined. Such processes involve the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells (NPCs), neuronal migration, differentiation and integration into a network of functional synapses within the brain. Both intrinsic (cell signalling cascades) and extrinsic (neurotrophins, neurotransmitters, cytokines, hormones) signalling molecules are intimately associated with adult neurogenesis and largely dictate the proliferative activity and differentiation capacity of neural cells. Cannabinoids are a unique class of chemical compounds incorporating plant-derived cannabinoids (the active components of Cannabis sativa), the endogenous cannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoid ligands, and these compounds are becoming increasingly recognized for their roles in neural developmental processes. Indeed, cannabinoids have clear modulatory roles in adult neurogenesis, probably through activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors. In recent years, a large body of literature has deciphered the signalling networks involved in cannabinoid-mediated regulation of neurogenesis. This timely review summarizes the evidence that the cannabinoid system is intricately associated with neuronal differentiation and maturation of NPCs and highlights intrinsic/extrinsic signalling mechanisms that are cannabinoid targets. Overall, these findings identify the central role of the cannabinoid system in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and the lateral ventricles and hence provide insight into the processes underlying post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. PMID:25951750

  7. Neurogenesis in the adult peripheral nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krzysztof Czaja; Michele Fornaro; Stefano Geuna

    2012-01-01

    Most researchers believe that neurogenesis in mature mammals is restricted only to the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle in the central nervous system. In the peripheral nervous system, neurogenesis is thought to be active only during prenatal development, with the exception of the olfactory neuroepithelium. However, sensory ganglia in the adult peripheral nervous system have been reported to contain precursor cells that can proliferate in vitro and be induced to differentiate into neurons. The occurrence of insult-induced neurogenesis, which has been reported by several investigators in the brain, is limited to a few recent reports for the peripheral nervous system. These reports suggest that damage to the adult nervous system induces mechanisms similar to those that control the generation of new neurons during prenatal development. Understanding conditions under which neurogenesis can be induced in physiologically non-neurogenic regions in adults is one of the major challenges for developing therapeutic strategies to repair neurological damage. However, the induced neurogenesis in the peripheral nervous system is still largely unexplored. This review presents the history of research on adult neurogenesis in the peripheral nervous system, which dates back more than 100 years and reveals the evidence on the under estimated potential for generation of new neurons in the adult peripheral nervous system.

  8. Radiation-induced reductions in neurogenesis are ameliorated in mice deficient in CuZnSOD or MnSOD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Kelly; Baure, Jennifer; Zou, Yani; Huang, Ting-Ting; Andres-Mach, Marta; Rola, Radoslaw; Suarez, Tatiana; Acharya, Munjal; Limoli, Charles L; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Fike, John R

    2009-11-15

    Ionizing irradiation significantly affects hippocampal neurogenesis and is associated with cognitive impairments; these effects may be influenced by an altered microenvironment. Oxidative stress is a factor that has been shown to affect neurogenesis, and one of the protective pathways that deal with such stress involves the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD). This study addressed what impact a deficiency in cytoplasmic (SOD1) or mitochondrial (SOD2) SOD has on radiation effects on hippocampal neurogenesis. Wild-type (WT) and SOD1 and SOD2 knockout (KO) mice received a single X-ray dose of 5 Gy, and quantification of the survival and phenotypic fate of newly generated cells in the dentate subgranular zone was performed 2 months later. Radiation exposure reduced neurogenesis in WT mice but had no apparent effect in KO mice, although baseline levels of neurogenesis were reduced in both SOD KO strains before irradiation. Additionally, there were marked and significant differences between WT and both KO strains in how irradiation affected newly generated astrocytes and activated microglia. The mechanism(s) responsible for these effects is not yet known, but a pilot in vitro study suggests a "protective" effect of elevated levels of superoxide. Overall, these data suggest that under conditions of SOD deficiency, there is a common pathway dictating how neurogenesis is affected by ionizing irradiation. PMID:19703553

  9. Experimental 'jet lag' inhibits adult neurogenesis and produces long-term cognitive deficits in female hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Gibson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian disruptions through frequent transmeridian travel, rotating shift work, and poor sleep hygiene are associated with an array of physical and mental health maladies, including marked deficits in human cognitive function. Despite anecdotal and correlational reports suggesting a negative impact of circadian disruptions on brain function, this possibility has not been experimentally examined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we investigated whether experimental 'jet lag' (i.e., phase advances of the light:dark cycle negatively impacts learning and memory and whether any deficits observed are associated with reductions in hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Because insults to circadian timing alter circulating glucocorticoid and sex steroid concentrations, both of which influence neurogenesis and learning/memory, we assessed the contribution of these endocrine factors to any observed alterations. Circadian disruption resulted in pronounced deficits in learning and memory paralleled by marked reductions in hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Significantly, deficits in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory were not only seen during the period of the circadian disruption, but also persisted well after the cessation of jet lag, suggesting long-lasting negative consequences on brain function. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these findings support the view that circadian disruptions suppress hippocampal neurogenesis via a glucocorticoid-independent mechanism, imposing pronounced and persistent impairments on learning and memory.

  10. Contribution of constitutively proliferating precursor cell subtypes to dentate neurogenesis after cortical infarcts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberland Julia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that focal ischemia increases neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation but the cellular mechanisms underlying this proliferative response are only poorly understood. We here investigated whether precursor cells which constitutively proliferate before the ischemic infarct contribute to post-ischemic neurogenesis. To this purpose, transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the control of the nestin promoter received repetitive injections of the proliferation marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU prior to induction of cortical infarcts. We then immunocytochemically analyzed the fate of these BrdU-positive precursor cell subtypes from day 4 to day 28 after the lesion. Results Quantification of BrdU-expressing precursor cell populations revealed no alteration in number of radial glia-like type 1 cells but a sequential increase of later precursor cell subtypes in lesioned animals (type 2a cells at day 7, type 3 cells/immature neurons at day 14. These alterations result in an enhanced survival of mature neurons 4 weeks postinfarct. Conclusions Focal cortical infarcts recruit dentate precursor cells generated already before the infarct and significantly contribute to an enhanced neurogenesis. Our findings thereby increase our understanding of the complex cellular mechanisms of postlesional neurogenesis.

  11. Impact of neonatal anoxia on adult rat hippocampal volume, neurogenesis and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Silvia Honda; Motta-Teixeira, Lívia Clemente; Machado-Nils, Aline Vilar; Lee, Vitor Yonamine; Sampaio, Carlos Alberto; Polli, Roberson Saraiva; Malheiros, Jackeline Moraes; Takase, Luiz Fernando; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Covolan, Luciene; Xavier, Gilberto Fernando; Nogueira, Maria Inês

    2016-01-01

    Neonates that suffer oxygen deprivation during birth can have long lasting cognitive deficits, such as memory and learning impairments. Hippocampus, one of the main structures that participate in memory and learning processes, is a plastic and dynamic structure that conserves during life span the property of generating new cells which can become neurons, the so-called neurogenesis. The present study investigated whether a model of rat neonatal anoxia, that causes only respiratory distress, is able to alter the hippocampal volume, the neurogenesis rate and has functional implications in adult life. MRI analysis revealed significant hippocampal volume decrease in adult rats who had experienced neonatal anoxia compared to control animals for rostral, caudal and total hippocampus. In addition, these animals also had 55.7% decrease of double-labelled cells to BrdU and NeuN, reflecting a decrease in neurogenesis rate. Finally, behavioral analysis indicated that neonatal anoxia resulted in disruption of spatial working memory, similar to human condition, accompanied by an anxiogenic effect. The observed behavioral alterations caused by oxygen deprivation at birth might represent an outcome of the decreased hippocampal neurogenesis and volume, evidenced by immunohistochemistry and MRI analysis. Therefore, based on current findings we propose this model as suitable to explore new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26416672

  12. DISC1-mediated dysregulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heekyung; Kang, Eunchai; GoodSmith, Douglas; Yoon, Do Yeon; Song, Hongjun; Knierim, James J; Ming, Guo-Li; Christian, Kimberly M

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis, the constitutive generation of new granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the mature brain, is a robust model of neural development and its dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Previous studies in mice have shown that altered expression of Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (Disc1), the mouse homolog of a risk gene for major psychiatric disorders, results in several distinct morphological phenotypes during neuronal development. Although there are advantages to using rats over mice for neurophysiological studies, genetic manipulations have not been widely utilized in rat models. Here, we used a retroviral-mediated approach to knockdown DISC1 expression in dividing cells in the rat dentate gyrus and characterized the morphological development of adult-born granule neurons. Consistent with earlier findings in mice, we show that DISC1 knockdown in adult-born dentate granule cells in rats resulted in accelerated dendritic growth, soma hypertrophy, ectopic dendrites, and mispositioning of new granule cells due to overextended migration. Our study thus demonstrates that the Disc1 genetic manipulation approach used in prior mouse studies is feasible in rats and that there is a conserved biological function of this gene across species. Extending gene-based studies of adult hippocampal neurogenesis from mice to rats will allow for the development of additional models that may be more amenable to behavioral and in vivo electrophysiological investigations. These models, in turn, can generate additional insight into the systems-level mechanisms of how risk genes for complex psychiatric disorders may impact adult neurogenesis and hippocampal function. PMID:26161071

  13. DISC1-mediated dysregulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heekyung Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis, the constitutive generation of new granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the mature brain, is a robust model of neural development and its dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Previous studies in mice have shown that altered expression of Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (Disc1, the mouse homolog of a risk gene for major psychiatric disorders, results in several distinct morphological phenotypes during neuronal development. Although there are advantages to using rats over mice for neurophysiological studies, genetic manipulations have not been widely utilized in rat models. Here, we used a retroviral-mediated approach to knockdown DISC1 expression in dividing cells in the rat dentate gyrus and characterized the morphological development of adult-born granule neurons. Consistent with earlier findings in mice, we show that DISC1 knockdown in adult-born dentate granule cells in rats resulted in accelerated dendritic growth, somatic hypertrophy, ectopic dendrites, and mispositioning of new granule cells due to overextended migration. Our study thus demonstrates that the Disc1 genetic manipulation approach used in prior mouse studies is feasible in rats and that there is a conserved biological function of this gene across species. Extending gene-based studies of adult hippocampal neurogenesis from mice to rats will allow for the development of additional models that may be more amenable to behavioral and in vivo electrophysiological investigations. These models, in turn, can generate additional insight into the systems-level mechanisms of how risk genes for complex psychiatric disorders may impact adult neurogenesis and hippocampal function.

  14. Linking adult olfactory neurogenesis to social behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia E Feierstein

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the adult brain, new neurons are added to two brain areas: the olfactory bulb and the hippocampus. Newly-generated neurons integrate into the preexisting circuits, bringing a set of unique properties, such as increased plasticity and responsiveness to stimuli. However, the functional implications of the constant addition of these neurons remain unclear, although they are believed to be important for learning and memory. The levels of neurogenesis are regulated by a variety of environmental factors, as well as during learning, suggesting that new neurons could be important for coping with changing environmental demands. Notably, neurogenesis has been shown to be physiologically regulated in relation to reproductive behavior: neurogenesis increases in female mice upon exposure to cues of the mating partners, during pregnancy and lactation, and in male mice upon exposure to their offspring. In this scenario, and because of the key contribution of olfaction to maternal behavior, we sought to investigate the contribution of adult-generated neurons in the olfactory system to maternal behavior and offspring recognition. To do so, we selectively disrupted neurogenesis in the olfactory pathway of female mice using focal irradiation. Disruption of adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb did not affect maternal behavior, or the ability of female mice to discriminate familiar from unfamiliar pups. However, reduction of olfactory neurogenesis resulted in abnormal social interaction of female mice, specifically with male conspecifics. Because the olfactory system is crucial for sex recognition, we suggest that the abnormal interaction with males could result from the inability to detect or discriminate male-specific odors and could therefore have implications for the recognition of potential mating partners. Here, I review the results of this and other studies, and discuss their implications for our understanding of the function of adult neurogenesis.

  15. Opiates inhibit neurogenesis in the adult rat hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Eisch, Amelia J.; Barrot, Michel; Schad, Christina A.; Self, David W; Nestler, Eric J.

    2000-01-01

    Recent work implicates regulation of neurogenesis as a form of plasticity in the adult rat hippocampus. Given the known effects of opiates such as morphine and heroin on hippocampal function, we examined opiate regulation of neurogenesis in this brain region. Chronic administration of morphine decreased neurogenesis by 42% in the adult rat hippocampal granule cell layer. A similar effect was seen in rats after chronic self-administration of heroin. Opiate regulation of neurogenesis was not me...

  16. Doxycycline increases neurogenesis and reduces microglia in the adult hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    NicolasToni

    2013-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis results in the continuous formation of new neurons and is a process of brain plasticity involved in learning and memory. Although inducible-reversible transgenic mouse models are increasingly being used to investigate adult neurogenesis, transgene control requires the administration of an activator, doxycycline, with unknown effects on adult neurogenesis. Here, we tested the effect of doxycycline administration on adult neurogenesis in vivo. We found that 4 week...

  17. Decreased adult neurogenesis in hibernating Syrian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Espinosa, Gonzalo; García, Esther; Gómez-Pinedo, Ulises; Hernández, Félix; DeFelipe, Javier; Ávila, Jesús

    2016-10-01

    Generation of new neurons from adult neural stem cells occurs in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the lateral walls of the lateral ventricles. In this article, we study the neurogenesis that takes place during the hibernation of the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). Using a variety of standard neurogenesis markers and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, we describe a preferential decrease in the proliferation of newborn neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the hibernating hamsters (torpor) rather than in the hippocampus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the proliferative capacity is recovered after 3-4days of torpor when arousal is triggered under natural conditions (i.e., not artificially provoked). In addition, we show that tau3R, a tau isoform with three microtubule-binding domains, is a suitable marker to study neurogenesis both in the SVZ and subgranular zone (SGZ) of the Syrian hamster brain. PMID:27436535

  18. Proteomic analysis of astrocytic secretion that regulates neurogenesis using quantitative amine-specific isobaric tagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrocytes are essential components of neurogenic niches that affect neurogenesis through membrane association and/or the release of soluble factors. To identify factors released from astrocytes that could regulate neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation, we used mild oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) to inhibit the secretory capacity of astrocytes. Using the Transwell co-culture system, we found that OGD-treated astrocytes could not promote neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation. Next, isobaric tagging for the relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) proteomics techniques was performed to identify the proteins in the supernatants of astrocytes (with or without OGD). Through a multi-step analysis and gene ontology classification, 130 extracellular proteins were identified, most of which were involved in neuronal development, the inflammatory response, extracellular matrix composition and supportive functions. Of these proteins, 44 had never been reported to be produced by astrocytes. Using ProteinPilot software analysis, we found that 60 extracellular proteins were significantly altered (27 upregulated and 33 downregulated) in the supernatant of OGD-treated astrocytes. Among these proteins, 7 have been reported to be able to regulate neurogenesis, while others may have the potential to regulate neurogenesis. This study profiles the major proteins released by astrocytes, which play important roles in the modulation of neurogenesis.

  19. Proteomic analysis of astrocytic secretion that regulates neurogenesis using quantitative amine-specific isobaric tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Hu; Zhou, Wenhao [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, 399 Wanyuan Road, Shanghai 201102 (China); Wei, Liming; Zhong, Fan [Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, 138 Yixueyuan Roda, Shanghai 200032 (China); Yang, Yi, E-mail: yyang@shmu.edu.cn [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, 399 Wanyuan Road, Shanghai 201102 (China)

    2010-01-08

    Astrocytes are essential components of neurogenic niches that affect neurogenesis through membrane association and/or the release of soluble factors. To identify factors released from astrocytes that could regulate neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation, we used mild oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) to inhibit the secretory capacity of astrocytes. Using the Transwell co-culture system, we found that OGD-treated astrocytes could not promote neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation. Next, isobaric tagging for the relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) proteomics techniques was performed to identify the proteins in the supernatants of astrocytes (with or without OGD). Through a multi-step analysis and gene ontology classification, 130 extracellular proteins were identified, most of which were involved in neuronal development, the inflammatory response, extracellular matrix composition and supportive functions. Of these proteins, 44 had never been reported to be produced by astrocytes. Using ProteinPilot software analysis, we found that 60 extracellular proteins were significantly altered (27 upregulated and 33 downregulated) in the supernatant of OGD-treated astrocytes. Among these proteins, 7 have been reported to be able to regulate neurogenesis, while others may have the potential to regulate neurogenesis. This study profiles the major proteins released by astrocytes, which play important roles in the modulation of neurogenesis.

  20. Actions of Prolactin in the Brain: From Physiological Adaptations to Stress and Neurogenesis to Psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torner, Luz

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is one of the most versatile hormones known. It is considered an adaptive hormone due to the key roles it plays in the modulation of the stress response and during pregnancy and lactation. Within the brain, PRL acts as a neuropeptide to promote physiological responses related to reproduction, stress adaptation, neurogenesis, and neuroprotection. The action of PRL on the nervous system contributes to the wide array of changes that occur in the female brain during pregnancy and result in the attenuation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Together, all these changes promote behavioral and physiological adaptations of the new mother to enable reproductive success. Brain adaptations driven by PRL are also important for the regulation of maternal emotionality and well-being. PRL also affects the male brain during the stress response, but its effects have been less studied. PRL regulates neurogenesis both in the subventricular zone and in the hippocampus. Therefore, alterations in the PRL system due to stress or exposure to substances that reduce neurogenesis or other conditions, could contribute to maladaptive responses and pathological behavioral outcomes. Here, we review the PRL system and the role it plays in the modulation of stress response and emotion regulation. We discuss the effects of PRL on neurogenesis and neuroprotection, the putative neuronal mechanisms underlying these effects, and their contribution to the onset of psychopathological states such as depression. PMID:27065946

  1. Haploinsufficiency for Core Exon Junction Complex Components Disrupts Embryonic Neurogenesis and Causes p53-Mediated Microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hanqian; McMahon, John J; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Zefeng; Silver, Debra L

    2016-09-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is an RNA binding complex comprised of the core components Magoh, Rbm8a, and Eif4a3. Human mutations in EJC components cause neurodevelopmental pathologies. Further, mice heterozygous for either Magoh or Rbm8a exhibit aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly. Yet despite the requirement of these genes for neurodevelopment, the pathogenic mechanisms linking EJC dysfunction to microcephaly remain poorly understood. Here we employ mouse genetics, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses to demonstrate that haploinsufficiency for each of the 3 core EJC components causes microcephaly via converging regulation of p53 signaling. Using a new conditional allele, we first show that Eif4a3 haploinsufficiency phenocopies aberrant neurogenesis and microcephaly of Magoh and Rbm8a mutant mice. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of embryonic brains at the onset of neurogenesis identifies common pathways altered in each of the 3 EJC mutants, including ribosome, proteasome, and p53 signaling components. We further demonstrate all 3 mutants exhibit defective splicing of RNA regulatory proteins, implying an EJC dependent RNA regulatory network that fine-tunes gene expression. Finally, we show that genetic ablation of one downstream pathway, p53, significantly rescues microcephaly of all 3 EJC mutants. This implicates p53 activation as a major node of neurodevelopmental pathogenesis following EJC impairment. Altogether our study reveals new mechanisms to help explain how EJC mutations influence neurogenesis and underlie neurodevelopmental disease. PMID:27618312

  2. Actions of Prolactin in the Brain: From Physiological Adaptations to Stress and Neurogenesis to Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torner, Luz

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is one of the most versatile hormones known. It is considered an adaptive hormone due to the key roles it plays in the modulation of the stress response and during pregnancy and lactation. Within the brain, PRL acts as a neuropeptide to promote physiological responses related to reproduction, stress adaptation, neurogenesis, and neuroprotection. The action of PRL on the nervous system contributes to the wide array of changes that occur in the female brain during pregnancy and result in the attenuation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. Together, all these changes promote behavioral and physiological adaptations of the new mother to enable reproductive success. Brain adaptations driven by PRL are also important for the regulation of maternal emotionality and well-being. PRL also affects the male brain during the stress response, but its effects have been less studied. PRL regulates neurogenesis both in the subventricular zone and in the hippocampus. Therefore, alterations in the PRL system due to stress or exposure to substances that reduce neurogenesis or other conditions, could contribute to maladaptive responses and pathological behavioral outcomes. Here, we review the PRL system and the role it plays in the modulation of stress response and emotion regulation. We discuss the effects of PRL on neurogenesis and neuroprotection, the putative neuronal mechanisms underlying these effects, and their contribution to the onset of psychopathological states such as depression. PMID:27065946

  3. Voluntary exercise attenuates LPS-induced reductions in neurogenesis and increases microglia expression of a proneurogenic phenotype in aged mice

    OpenAIRE

    Littlefield, Alyssa M.; Setti, Sharay E.; Priester, Carolina; Kohman, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Microglia can acquire various phenotypes of activation that mediate their inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. Aging causes microglia to become partially activated towards an inflammatory phenotype. As a result, aged animals display a prolonged neuroinflammatory response following an immune challenge. Currently unknown is whether this persistent neuroinflammation leads to greater reductions in hippocampal neurogenesis. Exercise has been shown to alter microglia activation in a...

  4. 3,6′-Dithiothalidomide, a new TNF-α synthesis inhibitor, attenuates the effect of Aβ1-42 intracerebroventricular injection on hippocampal neurogenesis and memory deficit

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Isabella; Caracciolo, Luca; Tweedie, David; Choi, Sang-Ho; Greig, Nigel H.; BARLATI, SERGIO; Bosetti, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Evidence indicates altered neurogenesis in neurodegenerative diseases associated with inflammation, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Neuroinflammation and its propagation have a critical role in the degeneration of hippocampal neurons, cognitive impairment and altered neurogenesis. Particularly, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α plays a central role in initiating and regulating the cytokine cascade during an inflammatory response and is up-regulated in brain of AD patients. In this study, we i...

  5. Neurogenesis and generalization: a new approach to stratify and treat anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Mazen A Kheirbek; Klemenhagen, Kristen C; Sahay, Amar; Hen, René

    2012-01-01

    Although an influence of adult neurogenesis in mediating some of the effects of antidepressants has received considerable attention in recent years, much less is known about how alterations in this form of plasticity may contribute to psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. One way to begin to address this question is to link the functions of adult-born hippocampal neurons with specific endophenotypes of these disorders. Recent studies have implicated adult-born hippocampal neur...

  6. Effect of Opioid on Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Loh, Horace H.; Law, Ping-Yee

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, the study of the mechanisms and functional implications of adult neurogenesis has significantly progressed. Many studies focus on the factors that regulate proliferation and fate determination of adult neural stem/progenitor cells, including addictive drugs such as opioid. Here, we review the most recent works on opiate drugs' effect on different developmental stages of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as well as the possible underlying mechanisms. We conclude that opiate drugs in general cause a loss of newly born neural progenitors in the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus, by either modulating proliferation or interfering with differentiation and maturation. We also discuss the consequent impact of regulation of adult neurogenesis in animal's opioid addiction behavior. We further look into the future directions in studying the convergence between the adult neurogenesis field and opioid addiction field, since the adult-born granular cells were shown to play a role in neuroplasticity and may help to reduce the vulnerability to drug craving and relapse. PMID:27127799

  7. Effect of Opioid on Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Loh, Horace H; Law, Ping-Yee

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, the study of the mechanisms and functional implications of adult neurogenesis has significantly progressed. Many studies focus on the factors that regulate proliferation and fate determination of adult neural stem/progenitor cells, including addictive drugs such as opioid. Here, we review the most recent works on opiate drugs' effect on different developmental stages of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as well as the possible underlying mechanisms. We conclude that opiate drugs in general cause a loss of newly born neural progenitors in the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus, by either modulating proliferation or interfering with differentiation and maturation. We also discuss the consequent impact of regulation of adult neurogenesis in animal's opioid addiction behavior. We further look into the future directions in studying the convergence between the adult neurogenesis field and opioid addiction field, since the adult-born granular cells were shown to play a role in neuroplasticity and may help to reduce the vulnerability to drug craving and relapse. PMID:27127799

  8. D-serine increases adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien eSultan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis results in the continuous formation of new neurons and is a process of brain plasticity involved in learning and memory. The neurogenic niche regulates the stem cell proliferation and the differentiation and survival of new neurons and a major contributor to the neurogenic niche are astrocytes. Among the molecules secreted by astrocytes, D-serine is an important gliotransmitter and is a co-agonist of the glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor. D-serine has been shown to enhance the proliferation of neural stem cells in vitro, but its effect on adult neurogenesis in vivo is unknown. Here, we tested the effect of exogenous administration of D-serine on adult neurogenesis in the mouse dentate gyrus. We found that 1 week of treatment with D-serine increased cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro and increased the density of neural stem cells and transit amplifying progenitors. Furthermore, D-serine increased the survival of newborn neurons. Together, these results indicate that D-serine treatment resulted in the improvement of several steps of adult neurogenesis in vivo.

  9. Early development and neurogenesis of Temnopleurus reevesii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguchi, Shunsuke; Yamazaki, Atsuko; Wada, Wakana; Tsuchiya, Yasutaka; Sato, Toshihiko; Shinagawa, Hideo; Yamada, Yutaro; Yaguchi, Junko

    2015-04-01

    Sea urchins are model non-chordate deuterostomes, and studying the nervous system of their embryos can aid in the understanding of the universal mechanisms of neurogenesis. However, despite the long history of sea urchin embryology research, the molecular mechanisms of their neurogenesis have not been well investigated, in part because neurons appear relatively late during embryogenesis. In this study, we used the species Temnopleurus reevesii as a new sea urchin model and investigated the detail of its development and neurogenesis during early embryogenesis. We found that the embryos of T. reevesii were tolerant of high temperatures and could be cultured successfully at 15-30°C during early embryogenesis. At 30°C, the embryos developed rapidly enough that the neurons appeared at just after 24 h. This is faster than the development of other model urchins, such as Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus or Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. In addition, the body of the embryo was highly transparent, allowing the details of the neural network to be easily captured by ordinary epifluorescent and confocal microscopy without any additional treatments. Because of its rapid development and high transparency during embryogenesis, T. reevesii may be a suitable sea urchin model for studying neurogenesis. Moreover, the males and females are easily distinguishable, and the style of early cleavages is intriguingly unusual, suggesting that this sea urchin might be a good candidate for addressing not only neurology but also cell and developmental biology. PMID:25754419

  10. Adult Neurogenesis, Chronic Stress and Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Lucassen; C.A. Oomen; M. Schouten; J.M. Encinas; C.P. Fitzsimons

    2016-01-01

    A major risk factor for depression in vulnerable individuals is exposure to stress during critical periods. Stress affects mood and cognition and is also one of the best known inhibitors of adult neurogenesis that has been associated with hippocampal changes and atrophy, common findings in major dep

  11. Perlecan controls neurogenesis in the developing telencephalon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairén Alfonso

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perlecan is a proteoglycan expressed in the basal lamina of the neuroepithelium during development. Perlecan absence does not impair basal lamina assembly, although in the 55% of the mutants early disruptions of this lamina conducts to exencephaly, impairing brain development. The rest of perlecan-null brains complete its prenatal development, maintain basal lamina continuity interrupted by some isolated ectopias, and are microcephalic. Microcephaly consists of thinner cerebral walls and underdeveloped ganglionic eminences. We have studied the mechanisms that generate brain atrophy in telencephalic areas where basal lamina is intact. Results Brain atrophy in the absence of perlecan started in the ventral forebrain and extended to lateral and dorsal parts of the cortex in the following stages. First, the subpallial forebrain developed poorly in early perlecan-null embryos, because of a reduced cell proliferation: the number of cells in mitosis decreased since the early stages of development. This reduction resulted in a decreased tangential migration of interneurons to the cerebral cortex. Concomitant with the early hypoplasia observed in the medial ganglionic eminences, Sonic Hedgehog signal decreased in the perlecan-null floor plate basal lamina at E12.5. Second, neurogenesis in the pallial neuroepithelium was affected in perlecan deficient embryos. We found reductions of nearly 50% in the number of cells exiting the cell cycle at E12–E13. The labeling index, which was normal at this age, significantly decreased with advancing corticogenesis. Moreover, nestin+ or PCNA+ progenitors increased since E14.5, reaching up to about 150% of the proportion of PCNA+ cells in the wild-type at E17.5. Thus, labeling index reduction together with increased progenitor population, suggests that atrophy is the result of altered cell cycle progression in the cortical progenitors. Accordingly, less neurons populated the cortical plate and

  12. Opposite effects of early maternal deprivation on neurogenesis in male versus female rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte A Oomen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Major depression is more prevalent in women than in men. The underlying neurobiological mechanisms are not well understood, but recent data shows that hippocampal volume reductions in depressed women occur only when depression is preceded by an early life stressor. This underlines the potential importance of early life stress, at least in women, for the vulnerability to develop depression. Perinatal stress exposure in rodents affects critical periods of brain development that persistently alter structural, emotional and neuroendocrine parameters in adult offspring. Moreover, stress inhibits adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a form of structural plasticity that has been implicated a.o. in antidepressant action and is highly abundant early postnatally. We here tested the hypothesis that early life stress differentially affects hippocampal structural plasticity in female versus male offspring. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that 24 h of maternal deprivation (MD at PND3 affects hippocampal structural plasticity at PND21 in a sex-dependent manner. Neurogenesis was significantly increased in male but decreased in female offspring after MD. Since no other structural changes were found in granule cell layer volume, newborn cell survival or proliferation rate, astrocyte number or gliogenesis, this indicates that MD elicits specific changes in subsets of differentiating cells and differentially affects immature neurons. The MD induced sex-specific effects on neurogenesis cannot be explained by differences in maternal care. CONCLUSIONS: Our data shows that early environment has a critical influence on establishing sex differences in neural plasticity and supports the concept that the setpoint for neurogenesis may be determined during perinatal life. It is tempting to speculate that a reduced level of neurogenesis, secondary to early stress exposure, may contribute to maladaptation of the HPA axis and possibly to the increased vulnerability of women

  13. Investigations of methylmercury-induced alterations in neurogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Faustman, Elaine M.; Ponce, Rafael A; Ou, Ying C; Mendoza, Ma Aileen C; Lewandowski, Thomas; Kavanagh, Terrance

    2002-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) has been an environmental concern to public health and regulatory agencies for over 50 years because of its toxicity to the human nervous system. Its association with nervous system toxicity in adults and infants near Minamata Bay, Japan, in the 1950s initiated environmental health research inquiries that continue to this day. Observations of greater neurotoxicity with gestational compared with adult exposure suggest a unique susceptibility of the developing nervous syste...

  14. The interplay between the hippocampus and the amygdala in regulating aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis during protracted abstinence from alcohol dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra D Mandyam

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of alcohol dependence involves elevated anxiety, low mood, and increased sensitivity to stress, collectively labeled negative affect. Particularly interesting is the recent accumulating evidence that sensitized extrahypothalamic stress systems (e.g., hyperglutamatergic activity, blunted hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [HPA] hormonal levels, altered corticotropin-releasing factor signaling, and altered glucocorticoid receptor signaling in the extended amygdala are evident in withdrawn dependent rats, supporting the hypothesis that pathological neuroadaptations in the extended amygdala contribute to the negative affective state. Notably, hippocampal neurotoxicity observed as aberrant dentate gyrus (DG neurogenesis (neurogenesis is a process where neural stem cells in the adult hippocampal subgranular zone generate DG granule cell neurons and DG neurodegeneration are observed in withdrawn dependent rats. These correlations between withdrawal and aberrant neurogenesis in dependent rats suggest that alterations in the DG could be hypothesized to be due to compromised HPA axis activity and associated hyperglutamatergic activity originating from the basolateral amygdala in withdrawn dependent rats. This review discusses a possible link between the neuroadaptations in the extended amygdala stress systems and the resulting pathological plasticity that could facilitate recruitment of new emotional memory circuits in the hippocampus as a function of aberrant DG neurogenesis.

  15. Natural variation and genetic covariance in adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempermann, Gerd [Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Lu, Lu [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Williams, Robert [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Gage, Fred [Salk Institute for Biological Studies, The, San Diego, CA

    2006-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is highly variable and heritable among laboratory strains of mice. Adult neurogenesis is also remarkably plastic and can be modulated by environment and activity. Here, we provide a systematic quantitative analysis of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in two large genetic reference panels of recombinant inbred strains (BXD and AXB?BXA, n ? 52 strains). We combined data on variation in neurogenesis with a new transcriptome database to extract a set of 190 genes with expression patterns that are also highly variable and that covary with rates of (i) cell proliferation, (ii) cell survival, or the numbers of surviving (iii) new neurons, and (iv) astrocytes. Expression of a subset of these neurogenesis-associated transcripts was controlled in cis across the BXD set. These self-modulating genes are particularly interesting candidates to control neurogenesis. Among these were musashi (Msi1h) and prominin1?CD133 (Prom1), both of which are linked to stem-cell maintenance and division. Twelve neurogenesis-associated transcripts had significant cis-acting quantitative trait loci, and, of these, six had plausible biological association with adult neurogenesis (Prom1, Ssbp2, Kcnq2, Ndufs2, Camk4, and Kcnj9). Only one cis- cting candidate was linked to both neurogenesis and gliogenesis, Rapgef6, a downstream target of ras signaling. The use of genetic reference panels coupled with phenotyping and global transcriptome profiling thus allowed insight into the complexity of the genetic control of adult neurogenesis.

  16. Detrimental role of prolonged sleep deprivation on adult neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina eFernandes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Adult mammalian brains continuously generate new neurons, a phenomenon called neurogenesis. Both environmental stimuli and endogenous factors are important regulators of neurogenesis. Sleep has an important role in normal brain physiology and its disturbance causes very stressful conditions, which disrupt normal brain physiology. Recently, an influence of sleep in adult neurogenesis has been established, mainly based on sleep deprivation studies. This review provides an overview on how rhythms and sleep cycles regulate hippocampal and subventricular zone neurogenesis, discussing some potential underlying mechanisms. In addition, our review highlights some interacting points between sleep and neurogenesis in brain function, such as learning, memory and mood states, and provides some insights on the effects of antidepressants and hypnotic drugs on neurogenesis.

  17. Material and mechanical factors:new strategy in cellular neurogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hillary Stoll; Il Keun Kwon; Jung Yul Lim

    2014-01-01

    Since damaged neural circuits are not generally self-recovered, developing methods to stimulate neurogenesis is critically required. Most studies have examined the effects of soluble pharma-cological factors on the cellular neurogenesis. On the other hand, it is now recognized that the other extracellular factors, including material and mechanical cues, also have a strong potential to induce cellular neurogenesis. This article will review recent data on the material (chemical patterning, micro/nano-topography, carbon nanotube, graphene) and mechanical (static cue from substrate stiffness, dynamic cue from stretch and lfow shear) stimulations of cellular neuro-genesis. These approaches may provide new neural regenerative medicine protocols. Scaffolding material templates capable of triggering cellular neurogenesis can be explored in the presence of neurogenesis-stimulatory mechanical environments, and also with conventional soluble factors, to enhance axonal growth and neural network formation in neural tissue engineering.

  18. Electroconvulsive therapy induces neurogenesis in frontal rat brain areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos Inta

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is an effective therapy for several psychiatric disorders, including severe major depression, mania and certain forms of schizophrenia. It had been proposed that ECT acts by modulating local plasticity via the stimulation of neurogenesis. In fact, among antidepressant therapies, ECT is the most robust enhancer of neurogenesis in the hippocampus of rodents and non-human primates. The existence of ECT-triggered neurogenesis in other brain areas, particularly in those adjacent to the other main locus of neurogenesis, the subventricular zone (SVZ, had so far remained unknown. Here we show that ECT also strongly enhances neurogenesis in frontal brain areas, especially in the rostro-medial striatum, generating specific, small-size calretinin-positive interneurons. We provide here the first evidence that ECT stimulates neurogenesis in areas outside the hippocampus. Our data may open research possibilities that focus on the plastic changes induced by ECT in frontal limbic circuitry.

  19. Borna disease virus phosphoprotein impairs the developmental program controlling neurogenesis and reduces human GABAergic neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloé Scordel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that persistent viral infection may impair cellular function of specialized cells without overt damage. This concept, when applied to neurotropic viruses, may help to understand certain neurologic and neuropsychiatric diseases. Borna disease virus (BDV is an excellent example of a persistent virus that targets the brain, impairs neural functions without cell lysis, and ultimately results in neurobehavioral disturbances. Recently, we have shown that BDV infects human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs and impairs neurogenesis, revealing a new mechanism by which BDV may interfere with brain function. Here, we sought to identify the viral proteins and molecular pathways that are involved. Using lentiviral vectors for expression of the bdv-p and bdv-x viral genes, we demonstrate that the phosphoprotein P, but not the X protein, diminishes human neurogenesis and, more particularly, GABAergic neurogenesis. We further reveal a decrease in pro-neuronal factors known to be involved in neuronal differentiation (ApoE, Noggin, TH and Scg10/Stathmin2, demonstrating that cellular dysfunction is associated with impairment of specific components of the molecular program that controls neurogenesis. Our findings thus provide the first evidence that a viral protein impairs GABAergic human neurogenesis, a process that is dysregulated in several neuropsychiatric disorders. They improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which a persistent virus may interfere with brain development and function in the adult.

  20. Sleep and circadian organization as regulators of adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Anka

    2012-01-01

    The functions of sleep and hippocampal neurogenesis are topics of current research and remain unresolved. Both are suggested to play a role in hippocampus-dependent memory processes and in the development and symptoms of stress and depression. Total sleep deprivation, sleep fragmentation and rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation (RSD) have been shown to reduce hippocampal neurogenesis, suggesting a functional link between sleep and neurogenesis, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. To...

  1. Enhanced Post-Ischemic Neurogenesis in Aging Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Yao-Fang; Preston, Edward; Wojtowicz, J. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis persists in adult mammals, but its rate declines dramatically with age. Evidence indicates that experimentally-reduced levels of neurogenesis (e.g., by irradiation) in young rats has profound influence on cognition as determined by learning and memory tests. In the present study we asked whether in middle-aged, 10- to 13-months-old rats, cell production can be restored toward the level present in young rats. To manipulate neurogenesis we induced bilateral carotid occl...

  2. Review on Adult Neurogenesis in Humans and Other Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Tesfamichael Berhe

    2015-01-01

    Research in the field of adult neurogenesis has recently indicated significant progress.The objective of this paper is to review the basic concepts, new findings and clinical implications of neurogenesis making emphasis on the significance, especially in humans. Although scientists still debate the extent and purpose of neurogenesis in the adult brain, research has identified certain areas of the brain where it is most evident. These areas include the hippocampus, caudate nucleus, and olfacto...

  3. Predictable Chronic Mild Stress Improves Mood, Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Parihar, Vipan K; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Kuruba, Ramkumar; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2009-01-01

    Maintenance of neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus is important for functions such as mood and memory. As exposure to unpredictable chronic stress (UCS) results in decreased hippocampal neurogenesis, enhanced depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors and memory dysfunction, it is believed that declined hippocampal neurogenesis mainly underlies the behavioral and cognitive abnormalities after UCS. However, the effects of predictable chronic mild stress (PCMS) such as the routine stress experien...

  4. Detrimental role of prolonged sleep deprivation on adult neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Carina; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa F.; Rocha, Susana; Herrera-Solís, Andrea; Salas-Pacheco, José; García-García, Fabio; Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian brains continuously generate new neurons, a phenomenon called adult neurogenesis. Both environmental stimuli and endogenous factors are important regulators of adult neurogenesis. Sleep has an important role in normal brain physiology and its disturbance causes very stressful conditions, which disrupt normal brain physiology. Recently, an influence of sleep in adult neurogenesis has been established, mainly based on sleep deprivation studies. This review provides an overview o...

  5. Detrimental role of prolonged sleep deprivation on adult neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Carina Fernandes; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa F.; Susana Rocha; José M Salas-Pacheco; Fabio Garcia-Garcia; Eric Murillo-Rodriguez; Ti-Fei Yuan; Sergio Machado; Oscar Arias-Carrión

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian brains continuously generate new neurons, a phenomenon called neurogenesis. Both environmental stimuli and endogenous factors are important regulators of neurogenesis. Sleep has an important role in normal brain physiology and its disturbance causes very stressful conditions, which disrupt normal brain physiology. Recently, an influence of sleep in adult neurogenesis has been established, mainly based on sleep deprivation studies. This review provides an overview on how rhythm...

  6. GSK-3 and Wnt signaling in neurogenesis and bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Valvezan, Alexander J.; Klein, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    The canonical Wnt signaling pathway is critical for development of the mammalian central nervous system and regulates diverse processes throughout adulthood, including adult neurogenesis. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) antagonizes the canonical Wnt pathway and therefore also plays a central role in neural development and adult neurogenesis. Lithium, the first line of therapy for bipolar disorder, inhibits GSK-3, activates Wnt signaling and stimulates adult neurogenesis, which may be impor...

  7. Glucocorticoids orchestrate divergent effects on mood through adult neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann, Michael L.; Brachman, Rebecca A.; Martinowich, Keri; Schloesser, Robert J.; Herkenham, Miles

    2013-01-01

    Both social defeat stress and environmental enrichment stimulate adrenal glucocorticoid secretion, but they have opposing effects on hippocampal neurogenesis and mood. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation and decreased neurogenesis are consequences of social defeat. These outcomes are correlated with depressive states, but a causal role in the etiology of depression remains elusive. The antidepressant actions of environmental enrichment are neurogenesis-dependent, but the c...

  8. Electroconvulsive Therapy Induces Neurogenesis in Frontal Rat Brain Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Dragos Inta; Juan M Lima-Ojeda; Thorsten Lau; Wannan Tang; Christof Dormann; Rolf Sprengel; Patrick Schloss; Alexander Sartorius; Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg; Peter Gass

    2013-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective therapy for several psychiatric disorders, including severe major depression, mania and certain forms of schizophrenia. It had been proposed that ECT acts by modulating local plasticity via the stimulation of neurogenesis. In fact, among antidepressant therapies, ECT is the most robust enhancer of neurogenesis in the hippocampus of rodents and non-human primates. The existence of ECT-triggered neurogenesis in other brain areas, particularly in t...

  9. The neuroprotection of cannabidiol against MPP⁺-induced toxicity in PC12 cells involves trkA receptors, upregulation of axonal and synaptic proteins, neuritogenesis, and might be relevant to Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Neife Aparecida Guinaim; Martins, Nádia Maria; Sisti, Flávia Malvestio; Fernandes, Laís Silva; Ferreira, Rafaela Scalco; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Santos, Antônio Cardozo

    2015-12-25

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa with potential to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Its neuroprotection has been mainly associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant events; however, other mechanisms might be involved. We investigated the involvement of neuritogenesis, NGF receptors (trkA), NGF, and neuronal proteins in the mechanism of neuroprotection of CBD against MPP(+) toxicity in PC12 cells. CBD increased cell viability, differentiation, and the expression of axonal (GAP-43) and synaptic (synaptophysin and synapsin I) proteins. Its neuritogenic effect was not dependent or additive to NGF, but it was inhibited by K252a (trkA inhibitor). CBD did not increase the expression of NGF, but protected against its decrease induced by MPP(+), probably by an indirect mechanism. We also evaluated the neuritogenesis in SH-SY5Y cells, which do not express trkA receptors. CBD did not induce neuritogenesis in this cellular model, which supports the involvement of trkA receptors. This is the first study to report the involvement of neuronal proteins and trkA in the neuroprotection of CBD. Our findings suggest that CBD has a neurorestorative potential independent of NGF that might contribute to its neuroprotection against MPP(+), a neurotoxin relevant to Parkinson's disease. PMID:26556726

  10. Spatial relational memory requires hippocampal adult neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dupret

    Full Text Available The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few regions of the mammalian brain where new neurons are generated throughout adulthood. This adult neurogenesis has been proposed as a novel mechanism that mediates spatial memory. However, data showing a causal relationship between neurogenesis and spatial memory are controversial. Here, we developed an inducible transgenic strategy allowing specific ablation of adult-born hippocampal neurons. This resulted in an impairment of spatial relational memory, which supports a capacity for flexible, inferential memory expression. In contrast, less complex forms of spatial knowledge were unaltered. These findings demonstrate that adult-born neurons are necessary for complex forms of hippocampus-mediated learning.

  11. Delayed behavioral dysfunctions following exposure to ionising radiation: role of neurogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Being a terminally differentiated organ, the brain has been considered to be a radioresistant one. Traditionally, delayed radiation-induced CNS damage was hypothesized as chiefly attributable to impaired vascular endothelial system and neuroinflammatory glial cell populations. In the recent decades, preclinical studies have focused on the hippocampal dentate gyrus, one of two discrete sites of the brain where adult neurogenesis takes place. Neurogenesis, in such area of the brain takes place throughout the adulthood and makes the brain highly vulnerable to the radiation. Recent investigations, including our own reports indicated that radiation ablates hippocampal neurogenesis, alters neuronal function, and induces neuroinflammation. Since the hippocampus is involved in learning and memory, behavioral adaptation and HPA axis regulation, damage by radiation leads to severe behavioral and cognitive dysfunctions. The present study aimed at evaluating the delayed effects of gamma-irradiation on the cognitive and affective functions, which were further corroborated to changes in neurogenesis. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to whole body irradiation as well as cranial irradiation by gamma-rays at different sub-lethal doses. The behavioral tests, consisting spontaneous motor activity, open field test, novel object recognition test, forced swim test and Morris water maze were performed at 1 month and 5 months post-exposure. Neurogenic potential was evaluated using flow-cytometry (FC) and immuno-histo-chemistry (IHC). The results indicated the significant changes in the affective and cognitive functions at delayed time points of radiation exposure. Profound alteration in the anxiety and depressive phenotype was observed following irradiation. Additionally, both long term and short term memory functions were disrupted, which were attributable to changes in the neurogenic potential as reported in the terms of BrdU positive cells using FC and IHC. Present investigation clearly

  12. The how and why of adult neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Perez, Inmaculada; Murray, Kerren; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2007-12-01

    Brain plasticity refers to the brain's ability to change structure and/or function during maturation, learning, environmental challenges, or disease. Multiple and dissociable plastic changes in the adult brain involve many different levels of organization, ranging from molecules to systems, with changes in neural elements occurring hand-in-hand with changes in supportive tissue elements, such as glia cells and blood vessels. There is now substantial evidence indicating that new functional neurons are constitutively generated from endogenous pools of neural stem cells in restricted areas of the mammalian brain, throughout life. So, in addition to all the other known structural changes, entire new neurons can be added to the existing network circuitry. This addition of newborn neurons provides the brain with another tool for tinkering with the morphology of its own functional circuitry. Although the ongoing neurogenesis and migration have been extensively documented in non-mammalian species, its characteristics in mammals have just been revealed and thus several questions remain yet unanswered. "Is adult neurogenesis an atavism, an empty-running leftover from evolution? What is adult neurogenesis good for and how does the brain 'know' that more neurons are needed? How is this functional demand translated into signals a precursor cell can detect? "[corrected].Adult neurogenesis may represent an adaptive response to challenges imposed by an environment and/or internal state of the animal. To ensure this function, the production, migration, and survival of newborn neurons must be tightly controlled. We attempt to address some of these questions here, using the olfactory bulb as a model system. PMID:17605077

  13. Engineering of Adult Neurogenesis and Gliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berninger, Benedikt; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) retain their ability to generate newborn neurons throughout life in the mammalian brain. Here, we describe how recently developed virus- and transgenesis-based techniques will help us (1) to understand the functional effects of neurogenesis in health and disease, (2) to design novel approaches to harness the potential for NSPC-associated endogenous repair, and (3) to induce the generation of neurons outside the main neurogenic niches in the adult brain. PMID:27091941

  14. Andrographolide Stimulates Neurogenesis in the Adult Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Lorena Varela-Nallar; Arredondo, Sebastian B.; Cheril Tapia-Rojas; Juan Hancke; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-01-01

    Andrographolide (ANDRO) is a labdane diterpenoid component of Andrographis paniculata widely used for its anti-inflammatory properties. We have recently determined that ANDRO is a competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a key enzyme of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade. Since this signaling pathway regulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, we evaluated whether ANDRO stimulates this process. Treatment with ANDRO increased neural progenitor cell proliferation and...

  15. Inflammation is detrimental for neurogenesis in adult brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekdahl, Christine T.; Claasen, Jan-Hendrik; Bonde, Sara; Kokaia, Zaal; Lindvall, Olle

    2003-11-01

    New hippocampal neurons are continuously generated in the adult brain. Here, we demonstrate that lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, which gives rise to microglia activation in the area where the new neurons are born, strongly impairs basal hippocampal neurogenesis in rats. The increased neurogenesis triggered by a brain insult is also attenuated if it is associated with microglia activation caused by tissue damage or lipopolysaccharide infusion. The impaired neurogenesis in inflammation is restored by systemic administration of minocycline, which inhibits microglia activation. Our data raise the possibility that suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis by activated microglia contributes to cognitive dysfunction in aging, dementia, epilepsy, and other conditions leading to brain inflammation.

  16. Noggin and BMP4 co-modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to the subventricular zone, the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few brain regions in which neurogenesis continues into adulthood. Perturbation of neurogenesis can alter hippocampal function, and previous studies have shown that neurogenesis is dysregulated in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) and its antagonist Noggin have been shown to play important roles both in embryonic development and in the adult nervous system, and may regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous data indicated that increased expression of BMP4 mRNA within the dentate gyrus might contribute to decreased hippocampal cell proliferation in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse AD model. However, it is not known whether the BMP antagonist Noggin contributes to the regulation of neurogenesis. We therefore studied the relative expression levels and localization of BMP4 and its antagonist Noggin in the dentate gyrus and whether these correlated with changes in neurogenesis in 6-12 mo old APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label proliferative cells. We report that decreased neurogenesis in the APP/PS1 transgenic mice was accompanied by increased expression of BMP4 and decreased expression of Noggin at both the mRNA and protein levels; statistical analysis showed that the number of proliferative cells at different ages correlated positively with Noggin expression and negatively with BMP4 expression. Intraventricular administration of a chimeric Noggin/Fc protein was used to block the action of endogenous BMP4; this resulted in a significant increase in the number of BrdU-labeled cells in dentate gyrus subgranular zone and hilus in APP/PS1 mice. These results suggest that BMP4 and Noggin co-modulate neurogenesis.

  17. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  18. Cellular prion protein is required for neuritogenesis: fine-tuning of multiple signaling pathways involved in focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alleaume-Butaux A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aurélie Alleaume-Butaux,1,2 Caroline Dakowski,1,2 Mathéa Pietri,1,2 Sophie Mouillet-Richard,1,2 Jean-Marie Launay,3,4 Odile Kellermann,1,2 Benoit Schneider1,2 1INSERM, UMR-S 747, 2Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 747, 3Public Hospital of Paris, Department of Biochemistry, INSERM UMR-S 942, Lariboisière Hospital, Paris, France; 4Pharma Research Department, Hoffmann La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland Abstract: Neuritogenesis is a dynamic phenomenon associated with neuronal differentiation that allows a rather spherical neuronal stem cell to develop dendrites and axon, a prerequisite for the integration and transmission of signals. The acquisition of neuronal polarity occurs in three steps: (1 neurite sprouting, which consists of the formation of buds emerging from the postmitotic neuronal soma; (2 neurite outgrowth, which represents the conversion of buds into neurites, their elongation and evolution into axon or dendrites; and (3 the stability and plasticity of neuronal polarity. In neuronal stem cells, remodeling and activation of focal adhesions (FAs associated with deep modifications of the actin cytoskeleton is a prerequisite for neurite sprouting and subsequent neurite outgrowth. A multiple set of growth factors and interactors located in the extracellular matrix and the plasma membrane orchestrate neuritogenesis by acting on intracellular signaling effectors, notably small G proteins such as RhoA, Rac, and Cdc42, which are involved in actin turnover and the dynamics of FAs. The cellular prion protein (PrPC, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored membrane protein mainly known for its role in a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases, has emerged as a central player in neuritogenesis. Here, we review the contribution of PrPC to neuronal polarization and detail the current knowledge on the signaling pathways fine-tuned by PrPC to promote neurite sprouting, outgrowth, and maintenance. We emphasize that Pr

  19. Impairments in neurogenesis are not tightly linked to depressive behavior in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Iascone

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, the most common cause of dementia, is also associated with depression. Although the precise mechanisms that lead to depression in AD are unknown, the impairments in adult hippocampal neurogenesis observed in AD may play a role. Adult-born neurons play a critical role in regulating both cognition and mood, and reduced hippocampal neurogenesis is associated with depression in other neurological disorders. To assess the relationship between Alzheimer's disease, neurogenesis, and depression, we studied human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP transgenic mice, a well-characterized model of AD. We report that reductions in hippocampal neurogenesis are evident early in disease progression in hAPP mice, but a mild depressive phenotype manifests only in later stages of disease. We found that hAPP mice exhibited a reduction in BrdU-positive cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus, as well as a reduction in doublecortin-expressing cells, relative to nontransgenic controls at 5-7 months of age. These alterations in neurogenesis appeared to worsen with age, as the magnitude of reduction in doublecortin-expressing cells was greater in hAPP mice at 13-15 months of age. Only 13-15 month old hAPP mice exhibited depressive behavior in the tail suspension test. However, mice at both age groups exhibited deficits in spatial memory, which was observed in the Morris water maze test for hippocampus-dependent memory. These findings indicate that neurogenesis impairments are accompanied by cognitive deficits, but are not tightly linked to depressive behavior in hAPP mice.

  20. Neurogenesis in neurological and psychiatric diseases and brain injury: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Linhui; Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Wang, Jixian; Huang, Lijie; Zhuge, Qichuan; Wang, Brian; Jin, Kunlin; So, Kwok-Fai

    2014-04-01

    Researchers who have uncovered the presence of stem cells in an adult's central nervous system have not only challenged the dogma that new neurons cannot be generated during adulthood, but also shed light on the etiology and disease mechanisms underlying many neurological and psychiatric disorders. Brain trauma, neurodegenerative diseases, and psychiatric disorders pose enormous burdens at both personal and societal levels. Although medications for these disorders are widely used, the treatment mechanisms underlying the illnesses remain largely elusive. In the past decade, an increasing amount of evidence indicate that adult neurogenesis (i.e. generating new CNS neurons during adulthood) may be involved in the pathology of different CNS disorders, and thus neurogenesis may be a potential target area for treatments. Although new neurons were shown to be a major player in mediating treatment efficacy of neurological and psychotropic drugs on cognitive functions, it is still debatable if the altered production of new neurons can cause the disorders. This review hence seeks to discuss pre and current clinical studies that demonstrate the functional impact adult neurogenesis have on neurological and psychiatric illnesses while examining the related underlying disease mechanisms. PMID:24384539

  1. Neurogenesis and brain injury: managing a renewable resource for repair

    OpenAIRE

    Hallbergson, Anna F.; Gnatenco, Carmen; Peterson, Daniel A.

    2003-01-01

    The brain shows limited ability to repair itself, but neurogenesis in certain areas of the adult brain suggests that neural stem cells may be used for structural brain repair. It will be necessary to understand how neurogenesis in the adult brain is regulated to develop strategies that harness neural stem cells for therapeutic use.

  2. The medial migratory stream: A new turn in postnatal neurogenesis!

    OpenAIRE

    Vilmint, Anaïs Grangeray; Lelievre, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Adult subventricular zone neurogenesis is an important process in most mammals. However, whether it persists in humans is highly debated. Recent work by Sanai and colleagues provides a major step in settling this debate. Using histological approaches, they demonstrated an active subventricular zone with limited neurogenesis in humans as well as discovered a new migratory route.

  3. Cranial Radiation Therapy and Damage to Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy is associated with a progressive decline in cognitive function, prominently memory function. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be an important mechanism underlying this cognitive decline. Recent work has elucidated the mechanisms of radiation-induced failure of neurogenesis. Potential therapeutic…

  4. Human Adult Olfactory Bulb Neurogenesis? Novelty Is the Best Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Macklis, Jeffrey Daniel

    2012-01-01

    There is ongoing controversy as to whether the understanding of adult mammalian neurogenesis gained from rodent studies is applicable to humans. In this issue of Neuron, Bergmann et al. (2012) propose that adult human olfactory bulb neurogenesis with long-term neuronal survival is extremely limited.

  5. Inflammation, Mitochondria and the Inhibition of Adult Neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Voloboueva, Ludmila A.; Giffard, Rona G.

    2011-01-01

    The process of neurogenesis continues throughout life, with thousands of new neurons generated every day in the mammalian brain. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis has been suggested to be involved in neurodegenerative conditions including the cognitive decline associated with aging, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and ionizing radiation. These neurodegenerative conditions are all characterized by proinflammatory changes and increased numbers of activated microglia. Activated mi...

  6. Dopaminergic lesioning impairs adult hippocampal neurogenesis by distinct modification of α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Grimm, Thomas; Schlachetzki, Zinayida; Ben Abdallah, Nada M B; Ettle, Benjamin; Vöhringer, Patrizia; Ferger, Boris; Winner, Beate; Nuber, Silke; Winkler, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Nonmotor symptoms of cognitive and affective nature are present in premotor and motor stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). Neurogenesis, the generation of new neurons, persists throughout the mammalian life span in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be severely affected in the course of PD, accounting for some of the neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression and cognitive impairment. Two important PD-related pathogenic factors have separately been attributed to contribute to both PD and adult hippocampal neurogenesis: dopamine depletion and accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn). In the acute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine model, altered neurogenesis has been linked merely to a reduced dopamine level. Here, we seek to determine whether a distinct endogenous α-syn expression pattern is associated, possibly contributing to the hippocampal neurogenic deficit. We observed a persistent reduction of striatal dopamine and a loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta in contrast to a complete recovery of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive dopaminergic fibers within the striatum. However, dopamine levels in the hippocampus were significantly decreased. Survival of newly generated neurons was significantly reduced and paralleled by an accumulation of truncated, membrane-associated, insoluble α-syn within the hippocampus. Specifically, the presence of truncated α-syn species was accompanied by increased activity of calpain-1, a calcium-dependent protease. Our results further substantiate the broad effects of dopamine loss in PD-susceptible brain nuclei, gradually involved in the PD course. Our findings also indicate a detrimental synergistic interplay between dopamine depletion and posttranslational modification of α-syn, contributing to impaired hippocampal plasticity in PD. PMID:26451750

  7. Microglial activation - tuning and pruning adult neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine TEkdahl

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Adult born neurons are encountering numerous choices during their development from neural stem cells to mature functionally integrated neurons in the brain. Microglia are part of the microenvironment within the neurogenic niches and possibly involved during the entire decision process. Mounting evidence suggest that microglia act as local equalizers capable of amplifying as well as filtering homeostatic signals. Depending on their state of activation, they may induce or facilitate different fundamental decisions in neurogenesis, such as proliferation or quiescence, cell survival or death, migration or establishment, growth or retraction of dendrites and axons, synaptic assembly or pruning, or tuning of synaptic transmission. Microglia are activated as a first line of defence against infections and participate in transforming the innate immunity into an adaptive immune response by recruiting systemic immune cells. So far, most studies have reported an acute decrease in the survival of new neurons following this classically activated microglial reaction. However, the long-term effects are more complex. In several neurodegenerative diseases the microglial activation is also evident, including a heterogeneous population of microglial phenotypes and a plethora of immune mediators, where the initiating agent may be protein deposits or cell debris. The transformation from a pro- to an anti-inflammatory cytokine profile and the de-activation of microglia is not clearly defined, or even dysregulated, and the adaptive response is often sparse. The diverse role of microglial activation in neurodegenerative diseases is reflected by the numerous studies reporting both beneficial and detrimental effects on the different steps of neurogenesis. This review will highlight the most recent findings on how microglial activation modulates adult neurogenesis, and specifically discuss the role of microglia in synaptic integration, currently a fast expanding research

  8. Caspase 3 involves in neuroplasticity, microglial activation and neurogenesis in the mice hippocampus after intracerebral injection of kainic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Tzeng, Tsai-Teng; Tsay, Huey-Jen; Chang, Luping; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Lai, Tzu-Hsuan; Huang, Fong-Lee; Shiao, Young-Ji

    2013-01-01

    Background The roles of caspase 3 on the kainic acid-mediated neurodegeneration, dendritic plasticity alteration, neurogenesis, microglial activation and gliosis are not fully understood. Here, we investigate hippocampal changes using a mouse model that receive a single kainic acid-intracerebral ventricle injection. The effects of caspase 3 inhibition on these changes were detected during a period of 1 to 7 days post kainic acid injection. Result Neurodegeneration was assessed by Fluoro-Jade ...

  9. Resveratrol Prevents Age-Related Memory and Mood Dysfunction with Increased Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Microvasculature, and Reduced Glial Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Kodali, Maheedhar; Parihar, Vipan K; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Mishra, Vikas; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2015-01-01

    Greatly waned neurogenesis, diminished microvasculature, astrocyte hypertrophy and activated microglia are among the most conspicuous structural changes in the aged hippocampus. Because these alterations can contribute to age-related memory and mood impairments, strategies efficacious for mitigating these changes may preserve cognitive and mood function in old age. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in the skin of red grapes having angiogenic and antiinflammatory properties, appears ideal for e...

  10. Adult neurogenesis and reproductive functions in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migaud, Martine; Butruille, Lucile; Duittoz, Anne; Pillon, Delphine; Batailler, Martine

    2016-07-01

    During adulthood, the mammalian brain retains the capacity to generate new cells and new neurons in particular. It is now well established that the birth of these new neurons occurs in well-described sites: the hippocampus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle, as well as in other brain regions including the hypothalamus. In this review, we describe the canonical neurogenic niches and illustrate the functional relevance of adult-born neurons of each neurogenic niche in the reproductive physiology. More specifically, we highlight the effect of reproductive social stimuli on the neurogenic processes and conversely, the contributions of adult-born neurons to the reproductive physiology and behavior. We next review the recent discovery of a novel neurogenic niche located in the hypothalamus and the median eminence and the compelling evidence of the link existing between the new-born hypothalamic neurons and the regulation of metabolism. In addition, new perspectives on the possible involvement of hypothalamic neurogenesis in the control of photoperiodic reproductive physiology in seasonal mammals are discussed. Altogether, the studies highlighted in this review demonstrate the potential role of neurogenesis in reproductive function and emphasize the importance of increasing our knowledge on the regulation processes and the physiological relevance of these adult-born neurons. This constitutes a necessary step toward a potential manipulation of these plasticity mechanisms. PMID:27177964

  11. Neocortical neurogenesis and the etiology of autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Alan

    2016-05-01

    Researchers have now identified many highly penetrant genetic risk factors for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Some of these genes encode synaptic proteins, lending support to the hypothesis that ASD is a disorder of synaptic homeostasis. Less attention, however, has been paid to the genetic risk factors that converge on events that precede synaptogenesis, including the proliferation of neural progenitor cells and the migration of neurons to the appropriate layers of the developing neocortex. Here I review this evidence, focusing on studies of mutant mouse phenotypes, human postmortem data, systems biological analyses, and non-genetic risk factors. These findings highlight embryonic neurogenesis as a potentially important locus of pathology in ASD. In some instances, this pathology may be driven by alterations in chromatin biology and canonical Wnt signaling, which in turn affect fundamental cellular processes such as cell-cycle length and cell migration. This view of ASD suggests the need for a better understanding of the relationship between variation in neuron number, laminar composition, and the neural circuitry most relevant to the disorder. PMID:26949225

  12. Neurogenesis in the adult brain: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Veronica; Bredesen, Dale E

    2007-10-01

    The function of neurogenesis in the adult brain is still unknown. Interventions such as environmental enrichment and exercise impinge on neurogenesis, suggesting that the process is regulated by experience. Conversely, a role for neurogenesis in learning has been proposed through 'cellular plasticity', a process akin to synaptic plasticity but operating at the network level. Although neurogenesis is stimulated by acute injury, and possibly by neurodegenerative processes such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), it does not suffice to restore function. While the role and direction of change in the neurogenic response at different stages of AD is still a matter of debate, it is possible that a deficit in neurogenesis may contribute to AD pathogenesis since at least one of the two regions ostensibly neurogenic in the adult human brain (the subgranular zone of the dentage gyrus and the ventriculo-olfactory neurogenic system) support high-level functions affected in early AD (associative memory and olfaction respectively). The age of onset and the rate of progression of sporadic forms of AD are highly variable. Sporadic AD may have a component of insufficient neurogenic replacement or insufficient neurogenic stimulation that is correlated with traits of personal history; the rate of neurogenesis and the survival of replicating progenitors is strongly modified by behavioral interventions known to impinge on the rate of neurogenesis and the probability of survival of newly born neurons--exercise, enriched experience, and learning. This view is consistent with epidemiological data suggesting that higher education and increased participation in intellectual, social and physical aspects of daily life are associated with slower cognitive decline in healthy elderly ("cognitive reserve") and may reduce the risk of AD. Although neurogenesis can be modulated exogenously by growth factors, stimulation of neurogenesis as a mean to treat neurodegeneration is still for the most part

  13. Vascular regulation of adult neurogenesis under physiological and pathological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato eSawada

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells in the mammalian adult brain continuously produce new neurons throughout life. Accumulating evidence in rodents suggests that various aspects of adult neurogenesis, including the genesis, migration, and maturation of new neurons, are regulated by factors derived from blood vessels and their microenvironment. Brain injury enhances both neurogenesis and angiogenesis, thereby promoting the cooperative regeneration of neurons and blood vessels. In this paper, we briefly review the mechanisms for the vascular regulation of adult neurogenesis in the ventricular-subventricular zone under physiological and pathological conditions, and discuss their clinical potential for brain regeneration strategies.

  14. Molecular mechanisms in the regulation of adult neurogenesis during stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Martin; Zunszain, Patricia A; Pariante, Carmine M

    2015-04-01

    Coping with stress is fundamental for mental health, but understanding of the molecular neurobiology of stress is still in its infancy. Adult neurogenesis is well known to be regulated by stress, and conversely adult neurogenesis regulates stress responses. Recent studies in neurogenic cells indicate that molecular pathways activated by glucocorticoids, the main stress hormones, are modulated by crosstalk with other stress-relevant mechanisms, including inflammatory mediators, neurotrophic factors and morphogen signalling pathways. This Review discusses the pathways that are involved in this crosstalk and thus regulate this complex relationship between adult neurogenesis and stress. PMID:25790864

  15. Distinct Effects of Chronic Dopaminergic Stimulation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Striatal Doublecortin Expression in Adult Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Rachele; Steigleder, Tobias; Schlachetzki, Johannes C. M.; Waldmann, Elisabeth; Schwab, Stefan; Winner, Beate; Winkler, Jürgen; Kohl, Zacharias

    2016-01-01

    While adult neurogenesis is considered to be restricted to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ), recent studies in humans and rodents provide evidence for newly generated neurons in regions generally considered as non-neurogenic, e.g., the striatum. Stimulating dopaminergic neurotransmission has the potential to enhance adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and the DG most likely via D2/D3 dopamine (DA) receptors. Here, we investigated the effect of two distinct preferential D2/D3 DA agonists, Pramipexole (PPX), and Ropinirole (ROP), on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and striatum of adult naïve mice. To determine newly generated cells in the DG incorporating 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) a proliferation paradigm was performed in which two BrdU injections (100 mg/kg) were applied intraperitoneally within 12 h after a 14-days-DA agonist treatment. Interestingly, PPX, but not ROP significantly enhanced the proliferation in the DG by 42% compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-injected control mice. To analyze the proportion of newly generated cells differentiating into mature neurons, we quantified cells co-expressing BrdU and Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN) 32 days after the last of five BrdU injections (50 mg/kg) applied at the beginning of 14-days DA agonist or PBS administration. Again, PPX only enhanced neurogenesis in the DG significantly compared to ROP- and PBS-injected mice. Moreover, we explored the pro-neurogenic effect of both DA agonists in the striatum by quantifying neuroblasts expressing doublecortin (DCX) in the entire striatum, as well as in the dorsal and ventral sub-regions separately. We observed a significantly higher number of DCX+ neuroblasts in the dorsal compared to the ventral sub-region of the striatum in PPX-injected mice. These results suggest that the stimulation of hippocampal and dorsal striatal neurogenesis may be up-regulated by PPX. The increased generation of neural cells, both in constitutively active

  16. Distinct effects of chronic dopaminergic stimulation on hippocampal neurogenesis and striatal doublecortin expression in adult mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachele eSalvi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available While adult neurogenesis is considered to be restricted to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG and the subventricular zone (SVZ, recent studies in humans and rodents provide evidence for newly generated neurons in regions generally considered as non-neurogenic, e.g. the striatum. Stimulating dopaminergic neurotransmission has the potential to enhance adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and the DG most likely via D2/D3 dopamine (DA receptors. Here, we investigated the effect of two distinct preferential D2/D3 DA agonists, Pramipexole (PPX and Ropinirole (ROP, on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and striatum of adult naïve mice. To determine newly generated cells in the DG incorporating 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU a proliferation paradigm was performed in which two BrdU injections (100 mg/kg were applied intraperitoneally within 12 hours after a 14-day-DA agonist treatment. Interestingly, PPX, but not ROP significantly enhanced the proliferation in the DG by 42% compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS-injected control mice. To analyze the proportion of newly generated cells differentiating into mature neurons, we quantified cells co-expressing BrdU and NeuN 32 days after the last of five BrdU injections (50 mg/kg applied at the beginning of 14-day DA agonist or PBS administration. Again, PPX only enhanced neurogenesis in the DG significantly compared to ROP- and PBS-injected mice. Moreover, we explored the pro-neurogenic effect of both DA agonists in the striatum by quantifying neuroblasts expressing doublecortin (DCX in the entire striatum, as well as in the dorsal and ventral sub-regions separately. We observed a significantly higher number of DCX+ neuroblasts in the dorsal compared to the ventral sub-region of the striatum in PPX-injected mice. These results suggest that the stimulation of hippocampal and dorsal striatal neurogenesis may be up-regulated by PPX. The increased generation of neural cells, both in constitutively active and

  17. Distinct Effects of Chronic Dopaminergic Stimulation on Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Striatal Doublecortin Expression in Adult Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Rachele; Steigleder, Tobias; Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Waldmann, Elisabeth; Schwab, Stefan; Winner, Beate; Winkler, Jürgen; Kohl, Zacharias

    2016-01-01

    While adult neurogenesis is considered to be restricted to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ), recent studies in humans and rodents provide evidence for newly generated neurons in regions generally considered as non-neurogenic, e.g., the striatum. Stimulating dopaminergic neurotransmission has the potential to enhance adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and the DG most likely via D2/D3 dopamine (DA) receptors. Here, we investigated the effect of two distinct preferential D2/D3 DA agonists, Pramipexole (PPX), and Ropinirole (ROP), on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and striatum of adult naïve mice. To determine newly generated cells in the DG incorporating 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) a proliferation paradigm was performed in which two BrdU injections (100 mg/kg) were applied intraperitoneally within 12 h after a 14-days-DA agonist treatment. Interestingly, PPX, but not ROP significantly enhanced the proliferation in the DG by 42% compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-injected control mice. To analyze the proportion of newly generated cells differentiating into mature neurons, we quantified cells co-expressing BrdU and Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN) 32 days after the last of five BrdU injections (50 mg/kg) applied at the beginning of 14-days DA agonist or PBS administration. Again, PPX only enhanced neurogenesis in the DG significantly compared to ROP- and PBS-injected mice. Moreover, we explored the pro-neurogenic effect of both DA agonists in the striatum by quantifying neuroblasts expressing doublecortin (DCX) in the entire striatum, as well as in the dorsal and ventral sub-regions separately. We observed a significantly higher number of DCX(+) neuroblasts in the dorsal compared to the ventral sub-region of the striatum in PPX-injected mice. These results suggest that the stimulation of hippocampal and dorsal striatal neurogenesis may be up-regulated by PPX. The increased generation of neural cells, both in constitutively active

  18. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astha Malik

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ. Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte

  19. Melatonin attenuates methamphetamine-induced inhibition of neurogenesis in the adult mouse hippocampus: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhakumar, Rachen; Boontem, Parichart; Ekthuwapranee, Kasima; Sotthibundhu, Areechun; Mukda, Sujira; Chetsawang, Banthit; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2015-10-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), a highly addictive psychostimulant drug, is known to exert neurotoxic effects to the dopaminergic neural system. Long-term METH administration impairs brain functions such as cognition, learning and memory. Newly born neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus play an important role in spatial learning and memory. Previous in vitro studies have shown that METH inhibits cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. On the other hand, melatonin, a major indole secreted by the pineal gland, enhances neurogenesis in both the subventricular zone and dentate gyrus. In this study, adult C57BL/6 mice were used to study the beneficial effects of melatonin on METH-induced alterations in neurogenesis and post-synaptic proteins related to learning and memory functions in the hippocampus. The results showed that METH caused a decrease in neuronal phenotypes as determined by the expressions of nestin, doublecortin (DCX) and beta-III tubulin while causing an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. Moreover, METH inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling activity and altered expression of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B as well as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). These effects could be attenuated by melatonin pretreatment. In conclusion, melatonin prevented the METH-induced reduction in neurogenesis, increase in astrogliogenesis and alteration of NMDA receptor subunit expression. These findings may indicate the beneficial effects of melatonin on the impairment of learning and memory caused by METH. PMID:26366944

  20. Enhanced de novo neurogenesis and dopaminergic neurogenesis in the substantia nigra of MPTP-induced Parkinson’s disease-like mice

    OpenAIRE

    Shan, Xiaoyang; Chi, Liying; Bishop, Michael; Luo, Chun; Lien, Lindsey; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Rugao

    2006-01-01

    Research reports on de novo neurogenesis, particularly dopaminergic (DA) neurogenesis in the adult mammalian substantia nigra (SN) remain very controversial. For this reason, we utilized the nestin second-intron enhancer controlled LacZ reporter (pNes-LacZ) transgenic mouse model coupled with MPTP lesion system to investigate whether there are neurogenesis and DA neurogenesis in the SN of the adult normal and Parkinson’s disease (PD)–like mice. First, we demonstrated the presence of neural pr...

  1. Functional neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Praag, Henriette; Schinder, Alejandro F.; Christie, Brian R.; Toni, Nicolas; Palmer, Theo D.; Gage, Fred H.

    2002-02-01

    There is extensive evidence indicating that new neurons are generated in the dentate gyrus of the adult mammalian hippocampus, a region of the brain that is important for learning and memory. However, it is not known whether these new neurons become functional, as the methods used to study adult neurogenesis are limited to fixed tissue. We use here a retroviral vector expressing green fluorescent protein that only labels dividing cells, and that can be visualized in live hippocampal slices. We report that newly generated cells in the adult mouse hippocampus have neuronal morphology and can display passive membrane properties, action potentials and functional synaptic inputs similar to those found in mature dentate granule cells. Our findings demonstrate that newly generated cells mature into functional neurons in the adult mammalian brain.

  2. Role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in persistent pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apkarian, A. Vania; Mutso, Amelia A.; Centeno, Maria V.; Kan, Lixin; Wu, Melody; Levinstein, Marjorie; Banisadr, Ghazal; Gobeske, Kevin T.; Miller, Richard J.; Radulovic, Jelena; Hen, René; Kessler, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The full role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) remains to be determined, yet it is implicated in learning and emotional functions, and is disrupted in negative mood disorders. Recent evidence indicates that AHN is decreased in persistent pain consistent with the idea that chronic pain is a major stressor, associated with negative moods and abnormal memories. Yet, the role of AHN in development of persistent pain has remained unexplored. In this study, we test the influence of AHN in postinjury inflammatory and neuropathic persistent pain-like behaviors by manipulating neurogenesis: pharmacologically through intracerebroventricular infusion of the antimitotic AraC; ablation of AHN by x-irradiation; and using transgenic mice with increased or decreased AHN. Downregulating neurogenesis reversibly diminished or blocked persistent pain; oppositely, upregulating neurogenesis led to prolonged persistent pain. Moreover, we could dissociate negative mood from persistent pain. These results suggest that AHN-mediated hippocampal learning mechanisms are involved in the emergence of persistent pain. PMID:26313405

  3. THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT AND NEUROGENESIS IN THE ADULT MAMMALIAN BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eLieberwirth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis—the formation of new neurons in adulthood—has been shown to be modulated by a variety of endogenous (e.g., trophic factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones as well as exogenous (e.g., physical activity and environmental complexity factors. Research on exogenous regulators of adult neurogenesis has focused primarily on the non-social environment. Most recently, however, evidence has emerged suggesting that the social environment can also affect adult neurogenesis. The present review details the effects of adult-adult (e.g., mating, conspecific, and chemosensory signal exposure and adult-offspring (e.g., gestation, parenthood, and exposure to offspring interactions on adult neurogenesis. In addition, the effects of a stressful social environment (e.g., lack of social support and dominant-subordinate interactions on adult neurogenesis are reviewed. The underlying hormonal mechanisms and potential functional significance of adult-generated neurons in mediating social behaviors are also discussed.

  4. Biologic effect of neurogenesis in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dandan; Manzoni, Adriana; Florentin, Diego; Fisher, William; Ding, Yi; Lee, MinJae; Ayala, Gustavo

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PaCA) is a deadly disease with few systemic therapeutic options. The head of the pancreas is the most innervated part and most common location of cancer. However, little is known about the contribution of the nerve-cancer interaction to facilitate pancreatic progression. To quantify PaCA axonogenesis, we used a 3-dimensional in vitro neurogenesis model. In addition, neurogenesis in human PaCA was analyzed using PGP9.5 immunohistochemistry, deconvolution imaging, and image segmentation and analysis. There was a significant increase of the total area of neurites in the in vitro coculture with dorsal root ganglia group than control. The nerve density in PaCA tissue was significantly higher than normal pancreatic tissue. To study the functional role of nerves in PaCA, male athymic nude (Nu-Nu) mice were divided into 3 groups: (A) animals were coinjected with MIA PaCa-2 cells and 20U/kg weight units of Botulinum toxin (Botox) (n=10); (B) first injected with Botox and 6weeks later MIA PaCa-2 cancer cells (n=4); and (C) control animals were injected with equivalent amounts of saline fluid (n=9). Animals were sacrificed 6weeks later. Tumor size and apoptotic count (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling) were measured. Tumor size was decreased and apoptotic rate increased in Botox-treated PaCA. Our data indicate that neural microenvironment may play an important role in the progression of PaCA. It may lead to novel nerve-targeted coadjuvant therapies for PaCA. PMID:26980040

  5. Depression and Hippocampal Neurogenesis: A Road to Remission?

    OpenAIRE

    Eisch, Amelia J.; Petrik, David

    2012-01-01

    Adult-generated hippocampal neurons are required for mood control and antidepressant efficacy, raising hopes that someday we can harness the power of new neurons to treat mood disorders such as depression. However, conflicting findings from preclinical research – involving stress, depression, and neurogenesis – highlight the complexity of considering neurogenesis as a “road to remission” from depression. To reconcile differences in the literature, we introduce the “neurogenic interactome”, a ...

  6. The role of microglia in adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Carmelina Gemma; Bachstetter, Adam D.

    2013-01-01

    Our view of microglia has dramatically changed in the last decade. From cells being “silent” in the healthy brain, microglia have emerged to be actively involved in several brain physiological functions, including adult hippocampal neurogenesis, cognitive and behavioral function. In light of recent discoveries revealing a role of microglia as important effectors of neuronal circuit reorganization, considerable attention has been focused on how microglia and hippocampal neurogenesis could be...

  7. Adult neurogenesis in the four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio)

    OpenAIRE

    Olaleye, Olatunbosun O.; Ihunwo, Amadi O.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated non-captive four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio) for evidence that adult neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain of animal models in natural environment. Ki-67 (a marker for cell proliferation) and doublecortin (a marker for immature neurons) immunostaining confirmed that adult neurogenesis occurs in the active sites of subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle with the migratory stream to the olfactory bulb, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of t...

  8. Paradoxical influence of hippocampal neurogenesis on working memory

    OpenAIRE

    Saxe, Michael D.; Malleret, Gaël; Vronskaya, Svetlana; Mendez, Indira; Garcia, A. Denise; Sofroniew, Michael V.; Kandel, Eric R.; Hen, René

    2007-01-01

    To explore the function of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, we ablated cell proliferation by using two independent and complementary methods: (i) a focal hippocampal irradiation and (ii) an inducible and reversible genetic elimination of neural progenitor cells. Previous studies using these methods found a weakening of contextual fear conditioning but no change in spatial reference memory, suggesting a supportive role for neurogenesis in some, but not all, hippocampal-dependent memory tasks. I...

  9. Phagocytic activity of neuronal progenitors regulates adult neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zhenjie; Elliott, Michael R.; Chen, Yubo; Walsh, James T.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Ravichandran, Kodi S.; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Whereas thousands of new neurons are generated daily during adult life, only a fraction of them survive and become part of neural circuits; the rest die, and their corpses are presumably cleared by resident phagocytes. How the dying neurons are removed and how such clearance influences neurogenesis are not well understood. Here, we identify an unexpected phagocytic role for the doublecortin (DCX)-positive neuronal progenitor cells during adult neurogenesis. Our in vivo and ex vivo studies dem...

  10. Photoperiod mediated changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Walton

    Full Text Available Brain plasticity, in relation to new adult mammalian neurons generated in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus, has been well described. However, the functional outcome of new adult olfactory neurons born in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles is not clearly defined, as manipulating neurogenesis through various methods has given inconsistent and conflicting results in lab mice. Several small rodent species, including Peromyscus leucopus, display seasonal (photoperiodic brain plasticity in brain volume, hippocampal function, and hippocampus-dependent behaviors; plasticity in the olfactory system of photoperiodic rodents remains largely uninvestigated. We exposed adult male P. leucopus to long day lengths (LD and short day lengths (SD for 10 to 15 weeks and then examined olfactory bulb cell proliferation and survival using the thymidine analog BrdU, olfactory bulb granule cell morphology using Golgi-Cox staining, and behavioral investigation of same-sex conspecific urine. SD mice did not differ from LD counterparts in granular cell morphology of the dendrites or in dendritic spine density. Although there were no differences due to photoperiod in habituation to water odor, SD mice rapidly habituated to male urine, whereas LD mice did not. In addition, short day induced changes in olfactory behavior were associated with increased neurogenesis in the caudal plexiform and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb, an area known to preferentially respond to water-soluble odorants. Taken together, these data demonstrate that photoperiod, without altering olfactory bulb neuronal morphology, alters olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in Peromyscus leucopus.

  11. Cuprizone decreases intermediate and late-stage progenitor cells in hippocampal neurogenesis of rats in a framework of 28-day oral dose toxicity study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developmental exposure to cuprizone (CPZ), a demyelinating agent, impairs intermediate-stage neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat offspring. To investigate the possibility of alterations in adult neurogenesis following postpubertal exposure to CPZ in a framework of general toxicity studies, CPZ was orally administered to 5-week-old male rats at 0, 120, or 600 mg/kg body weight/day for 28 days. In the subgranular zone (SGZ), 600 mg/kg CPZ increased the number of cleaved caspase-3+ apoptotic cells. At ≥ 120 mg/kg, the number of SGZ cells immunoreactive for TBR2, doublecortin, or PCNA was decreased, while that for SOX2 was increased. In the granule cell layer, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased the number of postmitotic granule cells immunoreactive for NEUN, CHRNA7, ARC or FOS. In the dentate hilus, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased phosphorylated TRKB+ interneurons, although the number of reelin+ interneurons was unchanged. At 600 mg/kg, mRNA levels of Bdnf and Chrna7 were decreased, while those of Casp4, Casp12 and Trib3 were increased in the dentate gyrus. These data suggest that CPZ in a scheme of 28-day toxicity study causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of granule cell lineages, resulting in aberrations of intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis and following suppression of immediate early gene-mediated neuronal plasticity. Suppression of BDNF signals to interneurons caused by decreased cholinergic signaling may play a role in these effects of CPZ. The effects of postpubertal CPZ on neurogenesis were similar to those observed with developmental exposure, except for the lack of reelin response, which may contribute to a greater decrease in SGZ cells. - Highlights: • Effect of 28-day CPZ exposure on hippocampal neurogenesis was examined in rats. • CPZ suppressed intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. • CPZ suppressed BDNF signals to interneurons by decrease of cholinergic

  12. Cuprizone decreases intermediate and late-stage progenitor cells in hippocampal neurogenesis of rats in a framework of 28-day oral dose toxicity study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hajime; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Pathogenetic Veterinary Science, United Graduate School of Veterinary Sciences, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Saito, Fumiyo; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Akahori, Yumi [Chemicals Evaluation and Research Institute, Japan, 1-4-25 Koraku, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-0004 (Japan); Yoshida, Toshinori [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Shibutani, Makoto, E-mail: mshibuta@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Developmental exposure to cuprizone (CPZ), a demyelinating agent, impairs intermediate-stage neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat offspring. To investigate the possibility of alterations in adult neurogenesis following postpubertal exposure to CPZ in a framework of general toxicity studies, CPZ was orally administered to 5-week-old male rats at 0, 120, or 600 mg/kg body weight/day for 28 days. In the subgranular zone (SGZ), 600 mg/kg CPZ increased the number of cleaved caspase-3{sup +} apoptotic cells. At ≥ 120 mg/kg, the number of SGZ cells immunoreactive for TBR2, doublecortin, or PCNA was decreased, while that for SOX2 was increased. In the granule cell layer, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased the number of postmitotic granule cells immunoreactive for NEUN, CHRNA7, ARC or FOS. In the dentate hilus, CPZ at ≥ 120 mg/kg decreased phosphorylated TRKB{sup +} interneurons, although the number of reelin{sup +} interneurons was unchanged. At 600 mg/kg, mRNA levels of Bdnf and Chrna7 were decreased, while those of Casp4, Casp12 and Trib3 were increased in the dentate gyrus. These data suggest that CPZ in a scheme of 28-day toxicity study causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of granule cell lineages, resulting in aberrations of intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis and following suppression of immediate early gene-mediated neuronal plasticity. Suppression of BDNF signals to interneurons caused by decreased cholinergic signaling may play a role in these effects of CPZ. The effects of postpubertal CPZ on neurogenesis were similar to those observed with developmental exposure, except for the lack of reelin response, which may contribute to a greater decrease in SGZ cells. - Highlights: • Effect of 28-day CPZ exposure on hippocampal neurogenesis was examined in rats. • CPZ suppressed intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. • CPZ suppressed BDNF signals to interneurons by decrease of

  13. Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Parkinson’s Disease: Impact on Neuronal Survival and Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Regensburger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson’s disease (PD and other synucleinopathies, chronic neurodegeneration occurs within different areas of the central nervous system leading to progressive motor and nonmotor symptoms. The symptomatic treatment options that are currently available do not slow or halt disease progression. This highlights the need of a better understanding of disease mechanisms and disease models. The generation of newborn neurons in the adult hippocampus and in the subventricular zone/olfactory bulb system is affected by many different regulators and possibly involved in memory processing, depression, and olfaction, symptoms which commonly occur in PD. The pathology of the adult neurogenic niches in human PD patients is still mostly elusive, but different preclinical models have shown profound alterations of adult neurogenesis. Alterations in stem cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival as well as neurite outgrowth and spine formation have been related to different aspects in PD pathogenesis. Therefore, neurogenesis in the adult brain provides an ideal model to study disease mechanisms and compounds. In addition, adult newborn neurons have been proposed as a source of endogenous repair. Herein, we review current knowledge about the adult neurogenic niches in PD and highlight areas of future research.

  14. Perinatal Exposure to Glufosinate Ammonium Herbicide Impairs Neurogenesis and Neuroblast Migration through Cytoskeleton Destabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzine, Ameziane; Laugeray, Anthony; Feat, Justyne; Menuet, Arnaud; Quesniaux, Valérie; Richard, Olivier; Pichon, Jacques; Montécot-Dubourg, Céline; Perche, Olivier; Mortaud, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis, a process of generating functional neurons from neural precursors, occurs throughout life in restricted brain regions such as the subventricular zone (SVZ). During this process, newly generated neurons migrate along the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb to replace granule cells and periglomerular neurons. This neuronal migration is pivotal not only for neuronal plasticity but also for adapted olfactory based behaviors. Perturbation of this highly controlled system by exogenous chemicals has been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. We reported recently that perinatal exposure to low dose herbicide glufosinate ammonium (GLA), leads to long lasting behavioral defects reminiscent of Autism Spectrum Disorder-like phenotype in the offspring (Laugeray et al., 2014). Herein, we demonstrate that perinatal exposure to low dose GLA induces alterations in neuroblast proliferation within the SVZ and abnormal migration from the SVZ to the olfactory bulbs. These disturbances are not only concomitant to changes in cell morphology, proliferation and apoptosis, but are also associated with transcriptomic changes. Therefore, we demonstrate for the first time that perinatal exposure to low dose GLA alters SVZ neurogenesis. Jointly with our previous work, the present results provide new evidence on the link between molecular and cellular consequences of early life exposure to the herbicide GLA and the onset of ASD-like phenotype later in life.

  15. Adult Human Neurogenesis: from Microscopy to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AmandaSierra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells reside in well-defined areas of the adult human brain and are capable of gene-rating new neurons throughout the life span. In rodents, it is well established that the new born neurons are involved in olfaction as well as in certain forms of memory and learning. In humans, the functional relevance of adult human neurogenesis is being investigated, in particular its implication in the etiopathology of a variety of brain disorders. Adult neurogenesis in the human brain was discovered by utilizing methodologies directly imported from the rodent research, such as immunohistological detection of proliferation and cell-type specific biomarkers in postmortem or biopsy tissue. However, in the vast majority of cases, these methods do not support longitudinal studies; thus, the capacity of the putative stem cells to form new neurons under different disease conditions cannot be tested. More recently, new technologies have been specifically developed for the detection and quantification of neural stem cells in the living human brain. These technologies rely on the use of magnetic resonance imaging, available in hospitals worldwide. Although they require further validation in rodents and primates, these new methods hold the potential to test the contribution of adult human neurogenesis to brain function in both health and disease. This review reports on the current knowledge on adult human neurogenesis. We first review the different methods available to assess human neurogenesis, both ex vivo and in vivo and then appraise the changes of adult neurogenesis in human diseases.

  16. Enhanced post-ischemic neurogenesis in aging rats

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    EdwardPreston

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurogenesis persists in adult mammals, but its rate declines dramatically with age. Evidence indicates that experimentally-reduced levels of neurogenesis (e.g. by irradiation in young rats has profound influence on cognition as determined by learning and memory tests. In the present study we asked whether in middle-aged, 10-13 months old rats, cell production can be restored towards the level present in young rats. To manipulate neurogenesis we induced bilateral carotid occlusion with hypotension. This procedure is known to increase neurogenesis in young rats, presumably in a compensatory manner, but until now, has never been tested in aging rats. Cell production was measured at 10, 35 and 90 days after ischemia. The results indicate that neuronal proliferation and differentiation can be transiently restored in middle-aged rats. Furthermore, the effects are more pronounced in the dorsal as opposed to ventral hippocampus thus restoring the dorso-ventral gradient seen in younger rats. Our results support previous findings showing that some of the essential features of the age-dependent decline in neurogenesis are reversible. Thus, it may be possible to manipulate neurogenesis and improve learning and memory in old age.

  17. Prenatal activation of toll-like receptor-4 dampens adult hippocampal neurogenesis in an IL-6 dependent manner

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    Abdeslam eMouihate

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal immune challenge has been associated with alteration in brain development and plasticity that last into adulthood. We have previously shown that prenatal activation of toll-like receptor 4 by LPS induces IL-6-dependent STAT-3 signaling pathway in the fetal brain. Whether this IL-6-dependent activation of fetal brain results in long lasting impact in brain plasticity is still unknown. Furthermore, it has been shown that prenatal LPS heightens the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA response in adulthood. In the present study we tested whether LPS administration during pregnancy affects neurogenesis in adult male offspring. Because corticosterone, the end-product of HPA axis activity in rats, alters neurogenesis we tested whether this enhanced HPA axis responsiveness in adult male offspring played a role in the long lasting impact of LPS on neurogenesis during adulthood. Pregnant rats were given either LPS, or LPS and an IL-6 neutralizing antibody (IL-6Ab. The newly born neurons were monitored in the subventricular zone (SVZ and the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus of adult male offspring by monitoring doublecortin and T-box brain protein 2 expression: two well-established markers of newly born neurons. Prenatal LPS decreased the number of newly born neurons in the DG, but not in the SVZ of adult offspring. This decreased number of newly born neurons in the DG was absent when IL-6Ab was co-injected with LPS during pregnancy. Furthermore, administration of a corticosterone receptor blocker, RU-486, to adult offspring blunted the prenatal LPS induced decrease in newly born neurons in the DG.These data suggest that maternally triggered IL-6 plays a crucial role in the long lasting impact of LPS on adult neurogenesis.

  18. Noggin and BMP4 co-modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jun [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Department of Physiology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Song, Min; Wang, Yanyan [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Fan, Xiaotang [Department of Histology and Embryology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Xu, Haiwei, E-mail: haiweixu2001@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Physiology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Bai, Yun, E-mail: baiyungene@gmail.com [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2009-07-31

    In addition to the subventricular zone, the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few brain regions in which neurogenesis continues into adulthood. Perturbation of neurogenesis can alter hippocampal function, and previous studies have shown that neurogenesis is dysregulated in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) and its antagonist Noggin have been shown to play important roles both in embryonic development and in the adult nervous system, and may regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous data indicated that increased expression of BMP4 mRNA within the dentate gyrus might contribute to decreased hippocampal cell proliferation in the APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} mouse AD model. However, it is not known whether the BMP antagonist Noggin contributes to the regulation of neurogenesis. We therefore studied the relative expression levels and localization of BMP4 and its antagonist Noggin in the dentate gyrus and whether these correlated with changes in neurogenesis in 6-12 mo old APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} transgenic mice. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label proliferative cells. We report that decreased neurogenesis in the APP/PS1 transgenic mice was accompanied by increased expression of BMP4 and decreased expression of Noggin at both the mRNA and protein levels; statistical analysis showed that the number of proliferative cells at different ages correlated positively with Noggin expression and negatively with BMP4 expression. Intraventricular administration of a chimeric Noggin/Fc protein was used to block the action of endogenous BMP4; this resulted in a significant increase in the number of BrdU-labeled cells in dentate gyrus subgranular zone and hilus in APP/PS1 mice. These results suggest that BMP4 and Noggin co-modulate neurogenesis.

  19. Sleep and adult neurogenesis: implications for cognition and mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Anka D; Meerlo, Peter; McGinty, Dennis; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal dentate gyrus plays a critical role in learning and memory throughout life, in part by the integration of adult-born neurons into existing circuits. Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus is regulated by numerous environmental, physiological, and behavioral factors known to affect learning and memory. Sleep is also important for learning and memory. Here we critically examine evidence from correlation, deprivation, and stimulation studies that sleep may be among those factors that regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. There is mixed evidence for correlations between sleep variables and rates of hippocampal cell proliferation across the day, the year, and the lifespan. There is modest evidence that periods of increased sleep are associated with increased cell proliferation or survival. There is strong evidence that disruptions of sleep exceeding 24 h, by total deprivation, selective REM sleep deprivation, and chronic restriction or fragmentation, significantly inhibit cell proliferation and in some cases neurogenesis. The mechanisms by which sleep disruption inhibits neurogenesis are not fully understood. Although sleep disruption procedures are typically at least mildly stressful, elevated adrenal corticosterone secretion is not necessary for this effect. However, procedures that prevent both elevated corticosterone and interleukin 1β signaling have been found to block the effect of sleep deprivation on cell proliferation. This result suggests that sleep loss impairs hippocampal neurogenesis by the presence of wake-dependent factors, rather than by the absence of sleep-specific processes. This would weigh against a hypothesis that regulation of neurogenesis is a function of sleep. Nonetheless, impaired neurogenesis may underlie some of the memory and mood effects associated with acute and chronic sleep disruptions. PMID:24218292

  20. Chronic treatment with fluoxetine for more than 6 weeks decreases neurogenesis in the subventricular zone of adult mice

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    Ohira Koji

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies indicate that chronic treatment with serotonergic antidepressants upregulates adult neurogenesis of the dentate gyrus (DG. In contrast, some studies claimed that there was very little alteration of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ by the antidepressants. Since almost all of those studies treated animals with drugs for 2 to 4 weeks as chronic treatment models of antidepressants, it is possible that antidepressant treatments for longer periods would affect adult neurogenesis in the SVZ. Results In the present study, we examined the effects of long-term (up to 9 weeks administration of fluoxetine (FLX, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on cell proliferation and survival in the DG and the SVZ of adult mice. As reported previously, in the DG of mice treated with FLX for 3, 6, or 9 weeks that were also injected with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU in the last 3 days before perfusion, the numbers of Ki67- and BrdU-positive cells, which are cell proliferation markers, were significantly upregulated even at 3 weeks after the onset of the FLX treatments, and these increases were sustained in mice treated with FLX for 9 weeks. On the other hand, in the SVZ, we found a small, insignificant decrease in the numbers of Ki67- and BrdU-positive cells at 3 weeks, followed by highly significant decreases in the numbers of Ki67- and BrdU-positive cells at both 6 and 9 weeks. Furthermore, among olfactory newly generated cells that survived for 3 weeks after BrdU injection, the number of new cells was decreased at 9 weeks of FLX treatment. Conclusions These results demonstrate that long-term (more than 6 weeks treatment with FLX has the opposite effect on neurogenesis in the SVZ than it does in the DG. The results also suggest that the decrease in neurogenesis in the SVZ might be involved in some aspects of the drugs' therapeutic effects on depression. In addition, our findings raise the possibility that some of the

  1. Regeneration of Zebrafish CNS: Adult Neurogenesis

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    Sukla Ghosh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration in the animal kingdom is one of the most fascinating problems that have allowed scientists to address many issues of fundamental importance in basic biology. However, we came to know that the regenerative capability may vary across different species. Among vertebrates, fish and amphibians are capable of regenerating a variety of complex organs through epimorphosis. Zebrafish is an excellent animal model, which can repair several organs like damaged retina, severed spinal cord, injured brain and heart, and amputated fins. The focus of the present paper is on spinal cord regeneration in adult zebrafish. We intend to discuss our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism(s that allows formation of proliferating progenitors and controls neurogenesis, which involve changes in epigenetic and transcription programs. Unlike mammals, zebrafish retains radial glia, a nonneuronal cell type in their adult central nervous system. Injury induced proliferation involves radial glia which proliferate, transcribe embryonic genes, and can give rise to new neurons. Recent technological development of exquisite molecular tools in zebrafish, such as cell ablation, lineage analysis, and novel and substantial microarray, together with advancement in stem cell biology, allowed us to investigate how progenitor cells contribute to the generation of appropriate structures and various underlying mechanisms like reprogramming.

  2. Regeneration of Zebrafish CNS: Adult Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sukla; Hui, Subhra Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration in the animal kingdom is one of the most fascinating problems that have allowed scientists to address many issues of fundamental importance in basic biology. However, we came to know that the regenerative capability may vary across different species. Among vertebrates, fish and amphibians are capable of regenerating a variety of complex organs through epimorphosis. Zebrafish is an excellent animal model, which can repair several organs like damaged retina, severed spinal cord, injured brain and heart, and amputated fins. The focus of the present paper is on spinal cord regeneration in adult zebrafish. We intend to discuss our current understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) that allows formation of proliferating progenitors and controls neurogenesis, which involve changes in epigenetic and transcription programs. Unlike mammals, zebrafish retains radial glia, a nonneuronal cell type in their adult central nervous system. Injury induced proliferation involves radial glia which proliferate, transcribe embryonic genes, and can give rise to new neurons. Recent technological development of exquisite molecular tools in zebrafish, such as cell ablation, lineage analysis, and novel and substantial microarray, together with advancement in stem cell biology, allowed us to investigate how progenitor cells contribute to the generation of appropriate structures and various underlying mechanisms like reprogramming. PMID:27382491

  3. Aging increases microglial proliferation, delays cell migration, and decreases cortical neurogenesis after focal cerebral ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Moraga, Ana; Pradillo, Jesús M; García-Culebras, Alicia; Palma-Tortosa, Sara; Ballesteros, Ivan; Hernández-Jiménez, Macarena; Moro, María A.; Lizasoain, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Background Aging is not just a risk factor of stroke, but it has also been associated with poor recovery. It is known that stroke-induced neurogenesis is reduced but maintained in the aged brain. However, there is no consensus on how neurogenesis is affected after stroke in aged animals. Our objective is to determine the role of aging on the process of neurogenesis after stroke. Methods We have studied neurogenesis by analyzing proliferation, migration, and formation of new neurons, as well a...

  4. Inflammasome-IL-1β Signaling Mediates Ethanol Inhibition of Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    FultonCrews

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis is poorly understood, but appears to contribute to mood and cognition. Ethanol and neuroinflammation are known to reduce neurogenesis. We have found that ethanol induces neuroinflammation supporting the hypothesis that ethanol induction of neuroinflammation contributes to ethanol inhibition of neurogenesis. To identify the key proinflammatory molecule that may be responsible for ethanol-impaired neurogenesis we used an ex vivo model of org...

  5. Suppression of Adult Neurogenesis Leads to an Increased HPA Axis Response

    OpenAIRE

    Schloesser, Robert J.; Manji, Husseini K.; Martinowich, Keri

    2009-01-01

    Stress and glucocorticoids are among the strongest inhibitors of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Despite the known role of the hippocampus in negative feedback regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal axis, whether loss of hippocampal neurogenesis affects this inhibition has not been examined. Here we tested whether suppression of adult neurogenesis affected the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis response. Our results show that suppression of neurogenesis leads to a potentiated hypotha...

  6. Molecular Mechanism of Adult Neurogenesis and its Association with Human Brain Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Song, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience challenge the old dogma that neurogenesis occurs only during embryonic development. Mounting evidence suggests that functional neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood. This review article discusses molecular factors that affect adult neurogenesis, including morphogens, growth factors, neurotransmitters, transcription factors, and epigenetic factors. Furthermore, we summarize and compare current evidence of associations between adult neurogenesis and human brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and brain tumors. PMID:27375363

  7. Cannabinoids promote embryonic and adult hippocampus neurogenesis and produce anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Yun; Xiao, Lan; Van Cleemput, Jamie; Ji, Shao-Ping; Bai, Guang; Zhang, Xia

    2005-01-01

    The hippocampal dentate gyrus in the adult mammalian brain contains neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) capable of generating new neurons, i.e., neurogenesis. Most drugs of abuse examined to date decrease adult hippocampal neurogenesis, but the effects of cannabis (marijuana or cannabinoids) on hippocampal neurogenesis remain unknown. This study aimed at investigating the potential regulatory capacity of the potent synthetic cannabinoid HU210 on hippocampal neurogenesis and its possible cor...

  8. Wnt signaling in the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis

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    Lorena eVarela-Nallar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the adult brain new neurons are continuously generated mainly in two regions, the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the SGZ, radial neural stem cells give rise to granule cells that integrate into the hippocampal circuitry and are relevant for the plasticity of the hippocampus. Loss of neurogenesis impairs learning and memory, suggesting that this process is important for adult hippocampal function. Adult neurogenesis is tightly regulated by multiple signaling pathways, including the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. This pathway plays important roles during the development of neuronal circuits and in the adult brain it modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity. Here, we review current knowledge on the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling cascade and the potential mechanisms involved in this regulation. Also we discuss the evidence supporting that the canonical Wnt pathway is part of the signaling mechanisms involved in the regulation of neurogenesis in different physiological conditions. Finally, some unsolved questions regarding the Wnt-mediated regulation of neurogenesis are discussed.

  9. Neurogenesis-based epigenetic therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueyuan; Bao, Xinjie; Wang, Renzhi

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a worldwide health problem with multiple pathogenic causes including aging, and genetic and environmental factors. As the interfaces between genes and the environment, epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNAs, are also involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Neurogenesis occurs throughout life in the normal adult brain of mammals. The neurogenic process, consisting of the proliferation, differentiation and maturation of neural stem cells (NSC), is regulated via epigenetic mechanisms by controlling the expression of specific sets of genes. In the pathology of AD, due to impairments in epigenetic mechanisms, the generation of neurons from NSCs is damaged, which exacerbates the loss of neurons and the deficits in learning and memory function associated with AD. Based on neurogenesis, a number of therapeutic strategies have shown capability in promoting neuronal generation to compensate for the neurons lost in AD, thereby improving cognitive function through epigenetic modifications. This provides potential for the treatment of AD by stimulating neurogenesis using epigenetic strategies. The present review discusses the epigenetics of AD and adult neurogenesis, and summarizes the neurogenesis-based epigenetic therapies targeted at AD. Such a review may offer information for the guidance of future developments of therapeutic strategies for AD. PMID:27314984

  10. Neurogenesis drives stimulus decorrelation in a model of the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Siu-Fai; Wick, Stuart D; Riecke, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    The reshaping and decorrelation of similar activity patterns by neuronal networks can enhance their discriminability, storage, and retrieval. How can such networks learn to decorrelate new complex patterns, as they arise in the olfactory system? Using a computational network model for the dominant neural populations of the olfactory bulb we show that fundamental aspects of the adult neurogenesis observed in the olfactory bulb--the persistent addition of new inhibitory granule cells to the network, their activity-dependent survival, and the reciprocal character of their synapses with the principal mitral cells--are sufficient to restructure the network and to alter its encoding of odor stimuli adaptively so as to reduce the correlations between the bulbar representations of similar stimuli. The decorrelation is quite robust with respect to various types of perturbations of the reciprocity. The model parsimoniously captures the experimentally observed role of neurogenesis in perceptual learning and the enhanced response of young granule cells to novel stimuli. Moreover, it makes specific predictions for the type of odor enrichment that should be effective in enhancing the ability of animals to discriminate similar odor mixtures. PMID:22442645

  11. Neurogenesis drives stimulus decorrelation in a model of the olfactory bulb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu-Fai Chow

    Full Text Available The reshaping and decorrelation of similar activity patterns by neuronal networks can enhance their discriminability, storage, and retrieval. How can such networks learn to decorrelate new complex patterns, as they arise in the olfactory system? Using a computational network model for the dominant neural populations of the olfactory bulb we show that fundamental aspects of the adult neurogenesis observed in the olfactory bulb--the persistent addition of new inhibitory granule cells to the network, their activity-dependent survival, and the reciprocal character of their synapses with the principal mitral cells--are sufficient to restructure the network and to alter its encoding of odor stimuli adaptively so as to reduce the correlations between the bulbar representations of similar stimuli. The decorrelation is quite robust with respect to various types of perturbations of the reciprocity. The model parsimoniously captures the experimentally observed role of neurogenesis in perceptual learning and the enhanced response of young granule cells to novel stimuli. Moreover, it makes specific predictions for the type of odor enrichment that should be effective in enhancing the ability of animals to discriminate similar odor mixtures.

  12. Role of the Retinoblastoma protein, Rb, during adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser, Rayan; Vandenbosch, Renaud; Omais, Saad; Hayek, Dayana; Jaafar, Carine; Al Lafi, Sawsan; Saliba, Afaf; Baghdadi, Maarouf; Skaf, Larissa; Ghanem, Noël

    2016-01-01

    Adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) are relatively quiescent populations that give rise to distinct neuronal subtypes throughout life, yet, at a very low rate and restricted differentiation potential. Thus, identifying the molecular mechanisms that control their cellular expansion is critical for regeneration after brain injury. Loss of the Retinoblastoma protein, Rb, leads to several defects in cell cycle as well as neuronal differentiation and migration during brain development. Here, we investigated the role of Rb during adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb (OB) by inducing its temporal deletion in aNSCs and progenitors. Loss of Rb was associated with increased proliferation of adult progenitors in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the rostral migratory stream (RMS) but did not alter self-renewal of aNSCs or neuroblasts subsequent migration and terminal differentiation. Hence, one month after their birth, Rb-null neuroblasts were able to differentiate into distinct subtypes of GABAergic OB interneurons but were gradually lost after 3 months. Similarly, Rb controlled aNSCs/progenitors proliferation in vitro without affecting their differentiation capacity. This enhanced SVZ/OB neurogenesis associated with loss of Rb was only transient and negatively affected by increased apoptosis indicating a critical requirement for Rb in the long-term survival of adult-born OB interneurons. PMID:26847607

  13. Social isolation disrupts hippocampal neurogenesis in young non-human primates

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    Simone M Cinini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Social relationships are crucial for the development and maintenance of normal behavior in non-human primates. Animals that are raised in isolation develop abnormal patterns of behavior that persist even when they are later reunited with their parents. In rodents, social isolation is a stressful event and is associated with a decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis but considerably less is known about the effects of social isolation in non-human primates during the transition from adolescence to adulthood. To investigate how social isolation affects young marmosets, these were isolated from other members of the colony for one or three weeks and evaluated for alterations in their behavior and hippocampal cell proliferation. We found that anxiety-related behaviors like scent-marking and locomotor activity increased after social isolation when compared to baseline levels. In agreement, grooming - an indicative of attenuation of tension - was reduced among isolated marmosets. These results were consistent with increased cortisol levels after one and three weeks of isolation. After social isolation (one or three weeks, reduced proliferation of neural cells in the subgranular zone of dentate granule cell layer was identified and a smaller proportion of BrdU-positive cells underwent neuronal fate (doublecortin labeling. Our data is consistent with the notion that social deprivation during the transition from adolescence to adulthood leads to stress and produces anxiety-like behaviors that in turn might affect neurogenesis and contribute to the deleterious consequences of prolonged stressful conditions.

  14. 3,6'-Dithiothalidomide, a new TNF-α synthesis inhibitor, attenuates the effect of Aβ1-42 intracerebroventricular injection on hippocampal neurogenesis and memory deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Isabella; Caracciolo, Luca; Tweedie, David; Choi, Sang-Ho; Greig, Nigel H; Barlati, Sergio; Bosetti, Francesca

    2012-09-01

    Evidence indicates altered neurogenesis in neurodegenerative diseases associated with inflammation, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Neuroinflammation and its propagation have a critical role in the degeneration of hippocampal neurons, cognitive impairment, and altered neurogenesis. Particularly, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α plays a central role in initiating and regulating the cytokine cascade during an inflammatory response and is up-regulated in brain of AD patients. In this study, we investigated the effects of a novel thalidomide-based TNF-α lowering drug, 3,6'-dithiothalidomide, on hippocampal progenitor cell proliferation, neurogenesis and, memory tasks after intracerebroventricular injection of β-amyloid (Aß)(1-42) peptide. Seven days after Aβ(1-42) injection, a significant proliferation of hippocampal progenitor cells and memory impairment were evident. Four weeks after Aβ(1-42) peptide injection, elevated numbers of surviving 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine cells and newly formed neurons were detected. Treatment with 3,6'-dithiothalidomide attenuated these Aβ(1-42) provoked effects. Our data indicate that although treatment with 3,6'-dithiothalidomide in part attenuated the increase in hippocampal neurogenesis caused by Aβ(1-42) -induced neuroinflammation, the drug prevented memory deficits associated with increased numbers of activated microglial cells and inflammatory response. Therefore, 3,6'-dithiothalidomide treatment likely reduced neuronal tissue damage induced by neuroinflammation following Aβ(1-42) injection. Understanding the modulation of neurogenesis, and its relationship with memory function could open new therapeutic interventions for AD and other neurodegenerative disorders with an inflammatory component. PMID:22731394

  15. Hippocampal neurogenesis in the new model of global cerebral ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisel, A. A.; Chernysheva, G. A.; Smol'yakova, V. I.; Savchenko, R. R.; Plotnikov, M. B.; Khodanovich, M. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the changes of hippocampal neurogenesis in a new model of global transient cerebral ischemia which was performed by the occlusion of the three main vessels (tr. brachiocephalicus, a. subclavia sinistra, and a. carotis communis sinistra) branching from the aortic arch and supplying the brain. Global transitory cerebral ischemia was modeled on male rats (weight = 250-300 g) under chloral hydrate with artificial lung ventilation. Animals after the same surgical operation without vessel occlusion served as sham-operated controls. The number of DCX-positive (doublecortin, the marker of immature neurons) cells in dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1-CA3 fields of hippocampus was counted at the 31st day after ischemia modeling. It was revealed that global cerebral ischemia decreased neurogenesis in dentate gyrus in comparison with the sham-operated group (P<0.05) while neurogenesis in CA1-CA3 fields was increased as compared to the control (P<0.05).

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy promotes neurogenesis: where do we stand?

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    Mu Jun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neurogenesis in adults, initiated by injury to the central nervous system (CNS presents an autologous repair mechanism. It has been suggested that hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT enhances neurogenesis which accordingly may improve functional outcome after CNS injury. In this present article we aim to review experimental as well as clinical studies on the subject of HBOT and neurogenesis. We demonstrate hypothetical mechanism of HBOT on cellular transcription factors including hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs and cAMP response element binding (CREB. We furthermore reveal the discrepancy between experimental findings and clinical trials in regards of HBOT. Further translational preclinical studies followed by improved clinical trials are needed to elucidate potential benefits of HBOT.

  17. Neuropeptide y promotes neurogenesis in murine subventricular zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agasse, Fabienne; Bernardino, Liliana; Christiansen, Søren H; Ferreira, Raquel; Silva, Bruno; Grade, Sofia; Woldbye, David P D; Malva, João O; Kristiansen, Heidi

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells of the subventricular zone (SVZ) represent a reliable source of neurons for cell replacement. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) promotes neurogenesis in the hippocampal subgranular layer and the olfactory epithelium and may be useful for the stimulation of SVZ dynamic in brain repair purposes. We...... describe that NPY promotes SVZ neurogenesis. NPY (1 microM) treatments increased proliferation at 48 hours and neuronal differentiation at 7 days in SVZ cell cultures. NPY proneurogenic properties are mediated via the Y1 receptor. Accordingly, Y1 receptor is a major active NPY receptor in the mouse SVZ, as......-Jun-NH(2)-terminal kinase signal in growing axons, consistent with axonogenesis. NPY, as a promoter of SVZ neurogenesis, is a crucial factor for future development of cell-based brain therapy. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article....

  18. Wnt Signaling in Neurogenesis during Aging and Physical Activity

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    Michael Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, much progress has been made regarding our understanding of neurogenesis in both young and old animals and where it occurs throughout the lifespan, although the growth of new neurons declines with increasing age. In addition, physical activity can reverse this age-dependent decline in neurogenesis. Highly correlated with this decline is the degree of inter and intracellular Wnt signaling, the molecular mechanisms of which have only recently started to be elucidated. So far, most of what we know about intracellular signaling during/following exercise centers around the CREB/CRE initiated transcriptional events. Relatively little is known, however, about how aging and physical activity affect the Wnt signaling pathway. Herein, we briefly review the salient features of neurogenesis in young and then in old adult animals. Then, we discuss Wnt signaling and review the very few in vitro and in vivo studies that have examined the Wnt signaling pathways in aging and physical activity.

  19. GSK-3 and Wnt signaling in neurogenesis and bipolar disorder

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    Alexander J Valvezan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt signaling pathway is critical for development of the mammalian central nervous system and regulates diverse processes throughout adulthood, including adult neurogenesis. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3 antagonizes the Wnt pathway and therefore also plays a central role in neural development and adult neurogenesis. As lithium, the first line of therapy for bipolar disorder (BPD, activates Wnt signaling by inhibiting GSK-3, much attention has focused on GSK-3 and Wnt signaling in the therapeutic response to lithium. However, GSK-3 also regulates other critical signaling pathways, including growth factor/neurotrophin signaling downstream of Akt. Here we will review the roles of GSK-3 in CNS development and adult neurogenesis, with a focus on the Wnt pathway. We will also discuss the validation of GSK-3 as the relevant target of lithium and the mechanisms downstream of GSK-3 that influence mammalian behavior.

  20. Neurogenesis in a young dog with epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borschensky, C M; Woolley, J S; Kipar, A; Herden, C

    2012-09-01

    Epileptic seizures can lead to various reactions in the brain, ranging from neuronal necrosis and glial cell activation to focal structural disorganization. Furthermore, increased hippocampal neurogenesis has been documented in rodent models of acute convulsions. This is a report of hippocampal neurogenesis in a dog with spontaneous epileptic seizures. A 16-week-old epileptic German Shepherd Dog had marked neuronal cell proliferation (up to 5 mitotic figures per high-power field and increased immunohistochemical expression of proliferative cell nuclear antigen) in the dentate gyrus accompanied by microglial and astroglial activation. Some granule cells expressed doublecortin, a marker of immature neurons; mitotically active cells expressed neuronal nuclear antigen. No mitotic figures were found in the brain of age-matched control dogs. Whether increased neurogenesis represents a general reaction pattern of young epileptic dogs should be investigated. PMID:22194355

  1. Vitamin A status regulates glucocorticoid availability in Wistar rats: consequences on cognitive functions and hippocampal neurogenesis ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien eBonhomme

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A disruption of the vitamin A signaling pathway has been involved in age-related memory decline and hippocampal plasticity alterations. Using vitamin A deficiency (VAD, a nutritional model leading to a hyposignaling of the retinoid pathway, we have recently demonstrated that retinoic acid (RA, the active metabolite of vitamin A, is efficient to reverse VAD-induced spatial memory deficits and adult hippocampal neurogenesis alterations. Besides, excess of glucocorticoids (GCs occurring with aging is known to strongly inhibit hippocampal plasticity and functions and few studies report on the counteracting effects of RA signaling pathway on GCs action. Here, we have addressed whether the modulation of brain GCs availability could be one of the biological mechanisms involved in the effects of vitamin A status on hippocampal plasticity and functions. Thus, we have studied the effects of a vitamin A-free diet for 14 weeks and a 4-week vitamin A supplementation on plasma and hippocampal corticosterone (CORT levels in Wistar rats. We have also investigated corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG binding capacity and 11beta-Hydrosteroid Dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1 activity, both important modulators of CORT availability at the peripheral and hippocampal levels respectively. Interestingly, we show that the vitamin A status regulates levels of free plasma CORT and hippocampal CORT levels, by acting through a regulation of CBG binding capacity and 11β-HSD1 activity. Moreover, our results suggest that increased CORT levels in VAD rats could have some deleterious consequences on spatial memory, anxiety-like behavior and adult hippocampal neurogenesis whereas these effects could be corrected by a vitamin A supplementation. Thus, the modulation of GCs availability by vitamin A status is an important biological mechanism that should be taken into account in order to prevent age-related cognitive decline and hippocampal plasticity alterations.

  2. Neurodegenerative diseases: exercising towards neurogenesis and neuroregeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng-Tat Ang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is still no effective therapy for neurodegenerative diseases (NDD such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and Parkinson’s disease (PD despite intensive research and on-going clinical trials. Collectively, these diseases account for the bulk of health care burden associated with age-related neurodegenerative disorders. There is therefore an urgent need to further research into the molecular pathogenesis, histological differentiation, and clinical management of NDD. Importantly, there is also an urgency to understand the similarities and differences between these two diseases so as to identify the common or different upstream and downstream signaling pathways. In this review, the role iron play in NDD will be highlighted, as iron is key to a common underlying pathway in the production of oxidative stress. There is increasing evidence to suggest that oxidative stress predisposed cells to undergo damage to DNA, protein and lipid, and as such a common factor involved in the pathogenesis of AD and PD. The challenge then is to minimize elevated and uncontrolled oxidative stress levels while not affecting basal iron metabolism, as iron plays vital roles in sustaining cellular function. However, overload of iron results in increased oxidative stress due to the Fenton reaction. We discuss evidence to suggest that sustained exercise and diet restriction may be ways to slow the rate of neurodegeneration, by perhaps promoting neurogenesis or antioxidant-related pathways. It is also our intention to cover NDD in a broad sense, in the context of basic and clinical sciences to cater for both clinician’s and the scientist’s needs, and to highlight current research investigating exercise as a therapeutic or preventive measure.

  3. Age-related neurogenesis decline in the subventricular zone is associated with specific cell cycle regulation changes in activated neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daynac, Mathieu; Morizur, Lise; Chicheportiche, Alexandra; Mouthon, Marc-André; Boussin, François D

    2016-01-01

    Although neural stem cells (NSCs) sustain continuous neurogenesis throughout the adult lifespan of mammals, they progressively exhibit proliferation defects that contribute to a sharp reduction in subventricular neurogenesis during aging. However, little is known regarding the early age-related events in neurogenic niches. Using a fluorescence-activated cell sorting technique that allows for the prospective purification of the main neurogenic populations from the subventricular zone (SVZ), we demonstrated an early decline in adult neurogenesis with a dramatic loss of progenitor cells in 4 month-old young adult mice. Whereas the activated and quiescent NSC pools remained stable up to 12 months, the proliferative status of activated NSCs was already altered by 6 months, with an overall extension of the cell cycle resulting from a specific lengthening of G1. Whole genome analysis of activated NSCs from 2- and 6-month-old mice further revealed distinct transcriptomic and molecular signatures, as well as a modulation of the TGFβ signalling pathway. Our microarray study constitutes a cogent identification of new molecular players and signalling pathways regulating adult neurogenesis and its early modifications. PMID:26893147

  4. Maintaining appearances-The role of p53 in adult neurogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the adult mammalian brain, neuronal turnover continues to replenish cells in existing neuronal circuits, such as those involved either in odor discrimination or in learning and memory, throughout life. With age, however, the capacity for neurogenesis diminishes and these functions become impaired. Neuronal turnover is a two-step process, which first generates excess neuronal progenitors and then eliminates all but the few that differentiate into fully functional neurons. This process requires a fine balance between cell proliferation and cell death. Altered activity of the tumor suppressor p53 can upset this balance by affecting the rate of cell proliferation, but not the rate of cell death, in neurogenic regions of the adult brain. Genetically engineered mice in which p53 activity is increased demonstrate that premature loss of neurogenic capacity is linked to accelerated organismal aging

  5. CHRONIC DEVELOPMENTAL LEAD EXPOSURE REDUCES NEUROGENESIS IN ADULT HIPPOCAMPUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHRONIC DEVELOPMENTAL LEAD EXPOSURE REDUCES NEUROGENESIS IN ADULT HIPPOCAMPUS. ME Gilbert1, ME Kelly2, S. Salant3, T Shafer1, J Goodman3 1Neurotoxicology Div, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711, 2Children's Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, 3Helen Hayes Hospital, Haverstraw, NY, 10993. ...

  6. Adult Neurogenesis, Mental Health, and Mental Illness: Hope or Hype?

    OpenAIRE

    Eisch, Amelia J.; Cameron, Heather A.; Encinas, Juan M.; Meltzer, Leslie A.; Ming, Guo-li; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda S.

    2008-01-01

    Psychiatric and neurologic disorders take an enormous toll on society. Alleviating the devastating symptoms and consequences of neuropsychiatric disorders such as addiction, depression, epilepsy and schizophrenia is a main force driving clinical and basic researchers alike. By elucidating these disease neuromechanisms, researchers hope to better define treatments and preventive therapies. Research suggests that regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis represents a promising approach to tr...

  7. Phagocytic activity of neuronal progenitors regulates adult neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenjie; Elliott, Michael R; Chen, Yubo; Walsh, James T; Klibanov, Alexander L; Ravichandran, Kodi S; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    Whereas thousands of new neurons are generated daily during adult life, only a fraction of them survive and become part of neural circuits; the rest die, and their corpses are presumably cleared by resident phagocytes. How the dying neurons are removed and how such clearance influences neurogenesis are not well understood. Here, we identify an unexpected phagocytic role for the doublecortin (DCX)-positive neuronal progenitor cells during adult neurogenesis. Our in vivo and ex vivo studies demonstrate that DCX(+) cells comprise a significant phagocytic population within the neurogenic zones. Intracellular engulfment protein ELMO1, which promotes Rac activation downstream of phagocytic receptors, was required for phagocytosis by DCX(+) cells. Disruption of engulfment in vivo genetically (in Elmo1-null mice) or pharmacologically (in wild-type mice) led to reduced uptake by DCX(+) cells, accumulation of apoptotic nuclei in the neurogenic niches and impaired neurogenesis. Collectively, these findings indicate a paradigm wherein DCX(+) neuronal precursors also serve as phagocytes, and that their phagocytic activity critically contributes to neurogenesis in the adult brain. PMID:21804544

  8. Endurance Factors Improve Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Spatial Memory in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobilo, Tali; Yuan, Chunyan; van Praag, Henriette

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity improves learning and hippocampal neurogenesis. It is unknown whether compounds that increase endurance in muscle also enhance cognition. We investigated the effects of endurance factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor [delta] agonist GW501516 and AICAR, activator of AMP-activated protein kinase on memory and…

  9. Neurogenesis suggests independent evolution of opercula in serpulid polychaetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Nora; Wanninger, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The internal phylogenetic relationships of Annelida, one of the key lophotrochozoan lineages, are still heavily debated. Recent molecular analyses suggest that morphologically distinct groups, such as the polychaetes, are paraphyletic assemblages, thus questioning the homology of a nu...... neurogenesis provide a novel set of characters that highlight the developmental plasticity of the segmented annelid nervous system....

  10. Lifestyle Shapes the Dialogue between Environment, Microglia, and Adult Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Jorge; Paris, Iñaki; Sierra, Amanda

    2016-04-20

    Lifestyle modulates brain function. Diet, stress levels, and physical exercise among other factors influence the "brain cognitive reserve", that is, the capacity of the brain to maintain a normal function when confronting neurodegenerative diseases, injury, and/or aging. This cognitive reserve relays on several cellular and molecular elements that contribute to brain plasticity allowing adaptive responses to cognitive demands, and one of its key components is the hippocampal neurogenic reserve. Hippocampal neural stem cells give rise to new neurons that integrate into the local circuitry and contribute to hippocampal functions such as memory and learning. Importantly, adult hippocampal neurogenesis is well-known to be modulated by the demands of the environment and lifestyle factors. Diet, stress, and physical exercise directly act on neural stem cells and/or their progeny, but, in addition, they may also indirectly affect neurogenesis by acting on microglia. Microglia, the guardians of the brain, rapidly sense changes in the brain milieu, and it has been recently shown that their function is affected by lifestyle factors. However, few studies have analyzed the modulatory effect of microglia on adult neurogenesis in these conditions. Here, we review the current knowledge about the dialogue maintained between microglia and the hippocampal neurogenic cascade. Understanding how the communication between microglia and hippocampal neurogenesis is affected by lifestyle choices is crucial to maintain the brain cognitive reserve and prevent the maladaptive responses that emerge during disease or injury through adulthood and aging. PMID:26971802

  11. Neurogenesis and gliogenesis in brain injury and learning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimonová, Zuzana; Náměstková, Kateřina; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva

    Fyziologický ústav AV ČR, v. v. i.. s. 37 ISSN 0862-8408. [Fyziologické dny /80./. 03.02.2004-05.02.2004, Praha] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065; GA ČR GA304/03/1189 Keywords : neurogenesis * gliogenesis * brain injury Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  12. Hypocellularity in the Murine Model for Down Syndrome Ts65Dn Is Not Affected by Adult Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Hidalgo, Rosa; Ballestín, Raul; Vega, Jessica; Blasco-Ibáñez, José M; Crespo, Carlos; Gilabert-Juan, Javier; Nácher, Juan; Varea, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused by the presence of an extra copy of the chromosome 21 and it is the most common aneuploidy producing intellectual disability. Neural mechanisms underlying this alteration may include defects in the formation of neuronal networks, information processing and brain plasticity. The murine model for DS, Ts65Dn, presents reduced adult neurogenesis. This reduction has been suggested to underlie the hypocellularity of the hippocampus as well as the deficit in olfactory learning in the Ts65Dn mice. Similar alterations have also been observed in individuals with DS. To determine whether the impairment in adult neurogenesis is, in fact, responsible for the hypocellularity in the hippocampus and physiology of the olfactory bulb, we have analyzed cell proliferation and neuronal maturation in the two major adult neurogenic niches in the Ts656Dn mice: the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Additionally, we carried out a study to determine the survival rate and phenotypic fate of newly generated cells in both regions, injecting 5'BrdU and sacrificing the mice 21 days later, and analyzing the number and phenotype of the remaining 5'BrdU-positive cells. We observed a reduction in the number of proliferating (Ki67 positive) cells and immature (doublecortin positive) neurons in the subgranular and SVZ of Ts65Dn mice, but we did not observe changes in the number of surviving cells or in their phenotype. These data correlated with a lower number of apoptotic cells (cleaved caspase 3 positive) in Ts65Dn. We conclude that although adult Ts65Dn mice have a lower number of proliferating cells, it is compensated by a lower level of cell death. This higher survival rate in Ts65Dn produces a final number of mature cells similar to controls. Therefore, the reduction of adult neurogenesis cannot be held responsible for the neuronal hypocellularity in the hippocampus or for the olfactory learning deficit of Ts65Dn mice. PMID

  13. Hypocellularity in the murine model for Down Syndrome Ts65Dn is not affected by adult neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa eLópez-Hidalgo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is caused by the presence of an extra copy of the chromosome 21 and it is the most common aneuploidy producing intellectual disability. Neural mechanisms underlying this alteration may include defects in the formation of neuronal networks, information processing and brain plasticity. The murine model for DS, Ts65Dn, presents reduced adult neurogenesis. This reduction has been suggested to underlie the hypocellularity of the hippocampus as well as the deficit in olfactory learning in the Ts65Dn mice. Similar alterations have also been observed in individuals with DS. To determine whether the impairment in adult neurogenesis is, in fact, responsible for the hypocellularity in the hippocampus and physiology of the olfactory bulb, we have analyzed cell proliferation and neuronal maturation in the two major adult neurogenic niches in the Ts656Dn mice: the subgranular zone of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone. Additionally, we carried out a study to determine the survival rate and phenotypic fate of newly generated cells in both regions, injecting 5'BrdU and sacrificing the mice 21 days later, and analyzing the number and phenotype of the remaining 5'BrdU-positive cells. We observed a reduction in the number of proliferating (Ki67 positive cells and immature (doublecortin positive neurons in the subgranular and subventricular zones of Ts65Dn mice, but we did not observe changes in the number of surviving cells or in their phenotype. These data correlated with a lower number of apoptotic cells (cleaved caspase 3 positive in Ts65Dn. We conclude that although adult Ts65Dn mice have a lower number of proliferating cells, it is compensated by a lower level of cell death. This higher survival rate in Ts65Dn produces a final number of mature cells similar to controls. Therefore, the reduction of adult neurogenesis cannot be held responsible for the neuronal hypocellularity in the hippocampus or for the olfactory learning deficit

  14. Reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis confers vulnerability in an animal model of cocaine addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Noonan, Michele A.; Bulin, Sarah; Fuller, Dwain C.; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2010-01-01

    Drugs of abuse dynamically regulate adult neurogenesis, which appears important for some types of learning and memory. Interestingly, a major site of adult neurogenesis - the hippocampus - is important in the formation of drug-context associations and in the mediation of drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors in animal models of addiction. Correlative evidence suggests an inverse relationship between hippocampal neurogenesis and drug-taking or drug-seeking behaviors, but the lack of a causati...

  15. Neural Mechanisms of Exercise: Anti-Depression, Neurogenesis, and Serotonin Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Paes, Flávia; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; de Sá Filho, Alberto Souza; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Depression is associated with decreased serotonin metabolism and functioning in the central nervous system, evidenced by both animal models of depression and clinical patient studies. Depression is also accompanied by decreased hippocampal neurogenesis in diverse animal models. Neurogenesis is mainly defined in dentate gyrus of hippocampus as well as subventricular zone. Moreover, hypothalamus, amygdala, olfactory tubercle, and piriform cortex are reported with evidences of adult neurogenesis...

  16. Genetic influences on exercise-induced adult hippocampal neurogenesis across 12 divergent mouse strains

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Peter J.; Kohman, Rachel A.; Miller, Daniel S.; Bhattacharya, Tushar K.; Brzezinska, Weronika J.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2011-01-01

    New neurons are continuously born in the hippocampus of several mammalian species throughout adulthood. Adult neurogenesis represents a natural model for understanding how to grow and incorporate new nerve cells into pre-existing circuits in the brain. Finding molecules or biological pathways that increase neurogenesis has broad potential for regenerative medicine. One strategy is to identify mouse strains that display large versus small increases in neurogenesis in response to wheel running ...

  17. JAGGED1 IS NECESSARY FOR POSTNATAL AND ADULT NEUROGENESIS IN THE DENTATE GYRUS

    OpenAIRE

    Lavado, Alfonso; Oliver, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control the maintenance of neural stem cells is crucial for the study of neurogenesis. In the brain, granule cell neurogenesis occurs during development and adulthood, and the generation of new neurons in the adult subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus contributes to learning. Notch signaling plays an important role during postnatal and adult subgranular zone neurogenesis, and it has been suggested as a potential candidate to couple cell proliferation with st...

  18. Neurogenesis in the embryonic and adult brain: same regulators, different roles

    OpenAIRE

    Urbán, Noelia; Guillemot, François

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis persists in adult mammals in specific brain areas, known as neurogenic niches. Adult neurogenesis is highly dynamic and is modulated by multiple physiological stimuli and pathological states. There is a strong interest in understanding how this process is regulated, particularly since active neuronal production has been demonstrated in both the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult humans. The molecular mechanisms that control neurogenesis have been extensively s...

  19. Neurogenesis in the embryonic and adult brain: same regulators, different roles.

    OpenAIRE

    Noelia eUrban; François eGuillemot

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis persists in adult mammals in specific brain areas, known as neurogenic niches. Adult neurogenesis is highly dynamic and is modulated by multiple physiological stimuli and pathological states. There is a strong interest in understanding how this process is regulated, particularly since active neuronal production has been demonstrated in both the hippocampus and the subventricular zone of adult humans.The molecular mechanisms that control neurogenesis have been extensively studied ...

  20. Hippocampal Neurogenesis Levels Predict WATERMAZE Search Strategies in the Aging Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Joana Gil-Mohapel; Brocardo, Patricia S.; Will Choquette; Russ Gothard; Simpson, Jessica M.; Christie, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus plays a crucial role in the formation of spatial memories, and it is thought that adult hippocampal neurogenesis may participate in this form of learning. To better elucidate the relationship between neurogenesis and spatial learning, we examined both across the entire life span of mice. We found that cell proliferation, neuronal differentiation, and neurogenesis significantly decrease with age, and that there is an abrupt reduction in these processes early on, between 1.5-3 m...

  1. Prozac during puberty: Distinctive effects on neurogenesis as a function of age and sex

    OpenAIRE

    Hodes, Georgia E.; Yang, Lillian; VanKooy, Jay; Santollo, Jessica; Shors, Tracey J.

    2009-01-01

    Neurogenesis is a possible substrate through which antidepressants alleviate symptoms of depression. In adult male rodents and primates, chronic treatment with fluoxetine increases neurogenesis in the hippocampal formation. Little is known about the effects of the antidepressant on neurogenesis during puberty or in female animals at any age. Therefore we examined the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on cell proliferation and survival in male and female rats during puberty and adulthood.

  2. Adult neurogenesis in the four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olatunbosun O Olaleye; Amadi O Ihunwo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated non-captive four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio) for evidence that adult neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain of animal models in natural environment. Ki-67 (a marker for cell proliferation) and doublecortin (a marker for immature neurons) immunos-taining conifrmed that adult neurogenesis occurs in the active sites of subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle with the migratory stream to the olfactory bulb, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. No Ki-67 proliferating cells were observed in the striatum substantia nigra, amygdala, cerebral cortex or dorsal vagal complex. Doublecortin-immunore-active cells were observed in the striatum, third ventricle, cerebral cortex, amygdala, olfactory bulb and along the rostral migratory stream but absent in the substantia nigra and dorsal vagal complex. The potential neurogenic sites in the four-striped mouse species could invariably lead to increased neural plasticity.

  3. Regulation and function of neurogenesis in the adult vertebrate brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendez-Otero R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Most adult tissues retain a reservoir of self-renewing, multipotent stem cells that can generate differentiated tissue components. Until recently, the brain was thought to be an exception to this rule and for many years the pervasive dogma of neurobiology relegated neurogenesis to the embryonic and earlier postnatal stages of development. The discovery of constant neuronal replacement in the adult brain has changed the way we think about neurological diseases and about the exploration of new strategies for brain repair. In this review we will explore the potential of adult neural stem cells and we will present some of our own work on this subject. We will also discuss the possibility that adult neurogenesis and neuronal replacement may also play a role in therapies aimed at restoring impaired brain function. A better understanding of the various aspects of spontaneous neuronal replacement may also be used to increase the success of procedures with cell therapies.

  4. Adult neurogenesis in the four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaleye, Olatunbosun O; Ihunwo, Amadi O

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we investigated non-captive four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio) for evidence that adult neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain of animal models in natural environment. Ki-67 (a marker for cell proliferation) and doublecortin (a marker for immature neurons) immunostaining confirmed that adult neurogenesis occurs in the active sites of subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle with the migratory stream to the olfactory bulb, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. No Ki-67 proliferating cells were observed in the striatum substantia nigra, amygdala, cerebral cortex or dorsal vagal complex. Doublecortin-immunoreactive cells were observed in the striatum, third ventricle, cerebral cortex, amygdala, olfactory bulb and along the rostral migratory stream but absent in the substantia nigra and dorsal vagal complex. The potential neurogenic sites in the four-striped mouse species could invariably lead to increased neural plasticity. PMID:25558241

  5. [Cellular replacement strategies and adult neurogenesis in idiopathic Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marxreiter, F; Storch, A; Winkler, J

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common age-related movement disorder and characterized by slowly progressive neurodegeneration resulting in motor symptoms, such as bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor and postural instability. Moreover, non-motor symptoms, such as hyposmia, anxiety and depression reduce the quality of life in PD. Motor symptoms are associated with a distinct striatal dopaminergic deficit resulting from axonal dysfunction and neuronal loss in the substantia nigra (SN). Recent progress in stem cell technology allows the optimization of cellular transplantation strategies in order to alleviate the motor deficit, which potentially leads to a reactivation of this therapeutic strategy. Besides neurodegenerative processes impaired adult neurogenesis and consequentially reduced endogenous cellular plasticity may play an important role in PD. This article discusses the notion that non-motor symptoms in PD may partly be explained by reduced adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus. PMID:27389601

  6. Selective gene expression by postnatal electroporation during olfactory interneuron neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander T Chesler

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis persists in the olfactory system throughout life. The mechanisms of how new neurons are generated, how they integrate into circuits, and their role in coding remain mysteries. Here we report a technique that will greatly facilitate research into these questions. We found that electroporation can be used to robustly and selectively label progenitors in the Subventicular Zone. The approach was performed postnatally, without surgery, and with near 100% success rates. Labeling was found in all classes of interneurons in the olfactory bulb, persisted to adulthood and had no adverse effects. The broad utility of electroporation was demonstrated by encoding a calcium sensor and markers of intracellular organelles. The approach was found to be effective in wildtype and transgenic mice as well as rats. Given its versatility, robustness, and both time and cost effectiveness, this method offers a powerful new way to use genetic manipulation to understand adult neurogenesis.

  7. Nitric Oxide Regulates Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus following Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno P. Carreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurogenesis is changed by brain injury. When neuroinflammation accompanies injury, activation of resident microglial cells promotes the release of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species like nitric oxide (NO. In these conditions, NO promotes proliferation of neural stem cells (NSC in the hippocampus. However, little is known about the role of NO in the survival and differentiation of newborn cells in the injured dentate gyrus. Here we investigated the role of NO following seizures in the regulation of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival of NSC in the hippocampus using the kainic acid (KA induced seizure mouse model. We show that NO increased the proliferation of NSC and the number of neuroblasts following seizures but was detrimental to the survival of newborn neurons. NO was also required for the maintenance of long-term neuroinflammation. Taken together, our data show that NO positively contributes to the initial stages of neurogenesis following seizures but compromises survival of newborn neurons.

  8. Retinoic acid-treated pluripotent stem cells undergoing neurogenesis present increased aneuploidy and micronuclei formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela C Sartore

    Full Text Available The existence of loss and gain of chromosomes, known as aneuploidy, has been previously described within the central nervous system. During development, at least one-third of neural progenitor cells (NPCs are aneuploid. Notably, aneuploid NPCs may survive and functionally integrate into the mature neural circuitry. Given the unanswered significance of this phenomenon, we tested the hypothesis that neural differentiation induced by all-trans retinoic acid (RA in pluripotent stem cells is accompanied by increased levels of aneuploidy, as previously described for cortical NPCs in vivo. In this work we used embryonal carcinoma (EC cells, embryonic stem (ES cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells undergoing differentiation into NPCs. Ploidy analysis revealed a 2-fold increase in the rate of aneuploidy, with the prevalence of chromosome loss in RA primed stem cells when compared to naïve cells. In an attempt to understand the basis of neurogenic aneuploidy, micronuclei formation and survivin expression was assessed in pluripotent stem cells exposed to RA. RA increased micronuclei occurrence by almost 2-fold while decreased survivin expression by 50%, indicating possible mechanisms by which stem cells lose their chromosomes during neural differentiation. DNA fragmentation analysis demonstrated no increase in apoptosis on embryoid bodies treated with RA, indicating that cell death is not the mandatory fate of aneuploid NPCs derived from pluripotent cells. In order to exclude that the increase in aneuploidy was a spurious consequence of RA treatment, not related to neurogenesis, mouse embryonic fibroblasts were treated with RA under the same conditions and no alterations in chromosome gain or loss were observed. These findings indicate a correlation amongst neural differentiation, aneuploidy, micronuclei formation and survivin downregulation in pluripotent stem cells exposed to RA, providing evidence that somatically generated chromosomal

  9. Exercise Enhances Learning and Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Aged Mice

    OpenAIRE

    van Praag, Henriette; Shubert, Tiffany; Zhao, Chunmei; GAGE, FRED H.

    2005-01-01

    Aging causes changes in the hippocampus that may lead to cognitive decline in older adults. In young animals, exercise increases hippocampal neurogenesis and improves learning. We investigated whether voluntary wheel running would benefit mice that were sedentary until 19 months of age. Specifically, young and aged mice were housed with or without a running wheel and injected with bromodeoxyuridine or retrovirus to label newborn cells. After 1 month, learning was tested in the Morris water ma...

  10. Dynamic learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis: an update

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stuchlík, Aleš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, APR 1 (2014), s. 106. ISSN 1662-5153 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03627S Grant ostatní: Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M200111204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : learning * memory * synaptic plasticity * neurogenesis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.270, year: 2014

  11. A scale-free neural network for modelling neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Juan I.; Tamarit, Francisco A.; Cannas, Sergio A.

    2006-11-01

    In this work we introduce a neural network model for associative memory based on a diluted Hopfield model, which grows through a neurogenesis algorithm that guarantees that the final network is a small-world and scale-free one. We also analyze the storage capacity of the network and prove that its performance is larger than that measured in a randomly dilute network with the same connectivity.

  12. Affiliative behavior requires juvenile, but not adult neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Lan; Meaney, Michael J.; Duman, Ronald S.; Kaffman, Arie

    2011-01-01

    The capacity to interact with conspecifics is essential for stable social networks, reproduction, and survival in mammals. In rodents, social exploration and play behavior increase during the juvenile period suggesting that this timeframe represents an important window for socialization. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms necessary to support this developmental process have not been elucidated. Neurogenesis during the juvenile period, like that in adults, is mainly confined to the...

  13. All in the Family: How the APPs Regulate Neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    OrlyLazarov

    2012-01-01

    Recent intriguing evidence suggests that metabolites of amyloid precursor protein (APP), mutated in familial forms of Alzheimer’s disease, play critical roles in developmental and post-natal neurogenesis. Of note is soluble APPα (sAPPα) that regulates neural progenitor cell proliferation. The APP family encompasses a group of ubiquitously expressed and evolutionarily conserved, type I tansmembrane glycoproteins, whose functions have yet to be fully elucidated. APP can undergo proteolytic cle...

  14. Functional Interrogation of Adult Hypothalamic Neurogenesis with Focal Radiological Inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Daniel A.; Salvatierra, Juan; Velarde, Esteban; Wong, John; Ford, Eric C.; Blackshaw, Seth

    2013-01-01

    The functional characterization of adult-born neurons remains a significant challenge. Approaches to inhibit adult neurogenesis via invasive viral delivery or transgenic animals have potential confounds that make interpretation of results from these studies difficult. New radiological tools are emerging, however, that allow one to noninvasively investigate the function of select groups of adult-born neurons through accurate and precise anatomical targeting in small animals. Focal ionizing rad...

  15. Adult neurogenesis in a giant otter shrew (Potamogale velox).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzke, N; Kaswera, C; Gilissen, E; Ihunwo, A O; Manger, P R

    2013-05-15

    Adult neurogenesis in mammals is typically observed in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone. We investigated adult neurogenesis in the brain of a giant otter shrew (Potamogale velox), a semi-aquatic, central African rainforest mammal of the family Tenrecidae that belongs to the superorder Afrotheria. We examined neurogenesis immunohistochemically, using the endogenous marker doublecortin (DCX), which stains neuronal precursor cells and immature neurons. Our results revealed densely packed DCX-positive cells in the entire extent of the subventricular zone from where cells migrated along the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb. In the olfactory bulb, DCX-expressing cells were primarily present in the granular cell layer with radially orientated dendrites and in the glomerular layer representing periglomerular cells. In the hippocampus, DCX-positive cells were identified in the subgranular and granular layers of the dentate gyrus and strongly labelled DCX-positive processes, presumably dendrites and axons of the newly generated granular cells, were observed in the CA3 regions. In addition, DCX immunoreactive cells were present in the olfactory tubercle, the piriform cortex and the endopiriform nucleus. While DCX-positive fibres have been previously observed in the anterior commissure of the hedgehog and mole, we were able to demonstrate the presence of DCX-positive cells presumably migrating across the anterior commissure. Taken together, the giant otter shrew reveals patterns of neurogenesis similar to that seen in other mammals; however, the appearance of possible neuronal precursor cells in the anterior commissure is a novel observation. PMID:23485806

  16. Hypothalamic Subependymal Niche: A Novel Site of the Adult Neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Rojczyk-Gołębiewska, Ewa; Pałasz, Artur; Wiaderkiewicz, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of undifferentiated, actively proliferating neural stem cells (NSCs) in the mature brain opened a brand new chapter in the contemporary neuroscience. Adult neurogenesis appears to occur in specific brain regions (including hypothalamus) throughout vertebrates’ life, being considered an important player in the processes of memory, learning, and neural plasticity. In the adult mammalian brain, NSCs are located mainly in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus a...

  17. Hippocampal neurogenesis, neurotrophic factors and depression: possible therapeutic targets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Gianluca; Hayley, Shawn; Pompili, Maurizio; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Brahmachari, Goutam; Girardi, Paolo; Amore, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Major depression is one of the leading causes of disability and psychosocial impairment worldwide. Although many advances have been made in the neurobiology of this complex disorder, the pathophysiological mechanisms are still unclear. Among the proposed theories, impaired neuroplasticity and hippocampal neurogenesis have received considerable attention. The possible association between hippocampal neurogenesis, neurotrophic factors, major depression, and antidepressant responses was critically analyzed using a comprehensive search of articles/book chapters in English language between 1980 and 2014. One common emerging theme was that chronic stress and major depression are associated with structural brain changes such as a loss of dendritic spines and synapses, as well as reduced dendritic arborisation, together with diminished glial cells in the hippocampus. Both central monoamines and neurotrophic factors were associated with a modulation of hippocampal progenitor proliferation and cell survival. Accordingly, antidepressants are generally suggested to reverse stress-induced structural changes augmenting dendritic arborisation and synaptogenesis. Such antidepressant consequences are supposed to stem from their stimulatory effects on neurotrophic factors, and possibly modulation of glial cells. Of course, accumulating evidence also suggested that glutamatergic systems are implicated in not only basic neuroplastic processes, but also in the core features of depression. Hence, it is critical that antidepressant strategies focus on links between the various neurotransmitter systems, neurotrophic processes of hippocampal neurogenesis, and neurotrophic factors with regards to depressive symptomology. The identification of novel alternative antidepressant medications that target these systems is discussed in this review. PMID:25470403

  18. All in the Family: How the APPs Regulate Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OrlyLazarov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent intriguing evidence suggests that metabolites of amyloid precursor protein (APP, mutated in familial forms of Alzheimer’s disease, play critical roles in developmental and post-natal neurogenesis. Of note is soluble APPα (sAPPα that regulates neural progenitor cell proliferation. The APP family encompasses a group of ubiquitously expressed and evolutionarily conserved, type I tansmembrane glycoproteins, whose functions have yet to be fully elucidated. APP can undergo proteolytic cleavage by mutually exclusive pathways. The subtle structural differences between metabolites generated in the different pathways, as well as their equilibrium, may be crucial for neuronal function. The implications of this new body of evidence are significant. Miscleavage of APP would readily impact developmental and post-natal neurogenesis, which might contribute to cognitive deficits characterizing Alzheimer's disease. This review will discuss the implications of the role of the APP family in neurogenesis for neuronal development, cognitive function and brain disorders that compromise learning and memory, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

  19. Noncanonical Sites of Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, David M; Bordey, Angélique; Bonfanti, Luca

    2015-10-01

    Two decades after the discovery that neural stem cells (NSCs) populate some regions of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), deep knowledge has been accumulated on their capacity to generate new neurons in the adult brain. This constitutive adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life primarily within remnants of the embryonic germinal layers known as "neurogenic sites." Nevertheless, some processes of neurogliogenesis also occur in the CNS parenchyma commonly considered as "nonneurogenic." This "noncanonical" cell genesis has been the object of many claims, some of which turned out to be not true. Indeed, it is often an "incomplete" process as to its final outcome, heterogeneous by several measures, including regional location, progenitor identity, and fate of the progeny. These aspects also strictly depend on the animal species, suggesting that persistent neurogenic processes have uniquely adapted to the brain anatomy of different mammals. Whereas some examples of noncanonical neurogenesis are strictly parenchymal, others also show stem cell niche-like features and a strong link with the ventricular cavities. This work will review results obtained in a research field that expanded from classic neurogenesis studies involving a variety of areas of the CNS outside of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ). It will be highlighted how knowledge concerning noncanonical neurogenic areas is still incomplete owing to its regional and species-specific heterogeneity, and to objective difficulties still hampering its full identification and characterization. PMID:26384869

  20. Pbx1 is required for adult subventricular zone neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebbin, Britta Moyo; Hau, Ann-Christin; Groß, Anja; Anders-Maurer, Marie; Schramm, Jasmine; Koss, Matthew; Wille, Christoph; Mittelbronn, Michel; Selleri, Licia; Schulte, Dorothea

    2016-07-01

    TALE-homeodomain proteins function as components of heteromeric complexes that contain one member each of the PBC and MEIS/PREP subclasses. We recently showed that MEIS2 cooperates with the neurogenic transcription factor PAX6 in the control of adult subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenesis in rodents. Expression of the PBC protein PBX1 in the SVZ has been reported, but its functional role(s) has not been investigated. Using a genetic loss-of-function mouse model, we now show that Pbx1 is an early regulator of SVZ neurogenesis. Targeted deletion of Pbx1 by retroviral transduction of Cre recombinase into Pbx2-deficient SVZ stem and progenitor cells carrying floxed alleles of Pbx1 significantly reduced the production of neurons and increased the generation of oligodendrocytes. Loss of Pbx1 expression in neuronally committed neuroblasts in the rostral migratory stream in a Pbx2 null background, by contrast, severely compromised cell survival. By chromatin immunoprecipitation from endogenous tissues or isolated cells, we further detected PBX1 binding to known regulatory regions of the neuron-specific genes Dcx and Th days or even weeks before the respective genes are expressed during the normal program of SVZ neurogenesis, suggesting that PBX1 might act as a priming factor to mark these genes for subsequent activation. Collectively, our results establish that PBX1 regulates adult neural cell fate determination in a manner beyond that of its heterodimerization partner MEIS2. PMID:27226325

  1. Thyroid hormone signalling and adult neurogenesis in mammals

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    Sylvie eRemaud

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The vital roles of thyroid hormone in multiple aspects of perinatal brain development have been known for over a century. In the last decades, the molecular mechanisms underlying effects of thyroid hormone on proliferation, differentiation, migration, synaptogenesis and myelination in the developing nervous system have been gradually dissected. However, recent data reveal that thyroid signalling influences neuronal development throughout life, from early embryogenesis to the neurogenesis in the adult brain. This review deals with the latter phase and analyses current knowledge on the role of T3, the active form of thyroid hormone, and its receptors in regulating neural stem cell function in the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, the two principal sites harbouring neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain. In particular, we discuss the critical roles of T3 and TRα1 in commitment to a neuronal phenotype, a process that entails the repression of a number of genes, notably that encoding the pluripotency factor, Sox2. Furthermore, the question of the relevance of thyroid hormone control of adult neurogenesis is considered in the context of brain aging, cognitive decline and neurodegenerative disease.

  2. A lifetime of neurogenesis in the olfactory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brann, Jessica H; Firestein, Stuart J

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis continues well beyond embryonic and early postnatal ages in three areas of the nervous system. The subgranular zone supplies new neurons to the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The subventricular zone supplies new interneurons to the olfactory bulb, and the olfactory neuroepithelia generate new excitatory sensory neurons that send their axons to the olfactory bulb. The latter two areas are of particular interest as they contribute new neurons to both ends of a first-level circuit governing olfactory perception. The vomeronasal organ and the main olfactory epithelium comprise the primary peripheral olfactory epithelia. These anatomically distinct areas share common features, as each exhibits extensive neurogenesis well beyond the juvenile phase of development. Here we will discuss the effect of age on the structural and functional significance of neurogenesis in the vomeronasal and olfactory epithelia, from juvenile to advanced adult ages, in several common model systems. We will next discuss how age affects the regenerative capacity of these neural stem cells in response to injury. Finally, we will consider the integration of newborn neurons into an existing circuit as it is modified by the age of the animal. PMID:25018692

  3. A lifetime of neurogenesis in the olfactory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica H. Brann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis continues well beyond embryonic and early postnatal ages in three areas of the nervous system. The subgranular zone supplies new neurons to the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The subventricular zone supplies new interneurons to the olfactory bulb, and the olfactory neuroepithelia generates new excitatory sensory neurons that send their axons to the olfactory bulb. The latter two areas are of particular interest as they contribute new neurons to both ends of a first-level circuit governing olfactory perception. The vomeronasal organ and the main olfactory epithelium comprise the primary peripheral olfactory epithelia. These anatomically distinct areas share common features, as each exhibits extensive neurogenesis well beyond the juvenile phase of development. Here we will discuss the effect of age on the structural and functional significance of neurogenesis in the vomeronasal and olfactory epithelia, from juvenile to advanced adult ages, in several common model systems. We will next discuss how age affects the regenerative capacity of these neural stem cells in response to injury. Finally, we will consider the integration of newborn neurons into an existing circuit as it is modified by the age of the animal.

  4. Chronic hypoxia induces the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in wild-type and APPswe-PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Rojas-Abalos, Macarena; Abbott, Ana C.; Moya, Esteban A.; Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia modulates proliferation and differentiation of cultured embryonic and adult stem cells, an effect that includes β-catenin, a key component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Here we studied the effect of mild hypoxia on the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in the hippocampus of adult mice in vivo. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α) was analyzed as a molecular control of the physiological hypoxic response. Exposure to chronic hypoxia (10% oxygen for 6–72 h) stimulated the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Because the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a positive modulator of adult neurogenesis, we evaluated whether chronic hypoxia was able to stimulate neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Results indicate that hypoxia increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult wild-type mice as determined by Ki67 staining, Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and double labeling with doublecortin (DCX). Chronic hypoxia also induced neurogenesis in a double transgenic APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which shows decreased levels of neurogenesis in the SGZ. Our results show for the first time that exposure to hypoxia in vivo can induce the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade in the hippocampus, suggesting that mild hypoxia may have a therapeutic value in neurodegenerative disorders associated with altered Wnt signaling in the brain and also in pathological conditions in which hippocampal neurogenesis is impaired. PMID:24574965

  5. Ethosuximide Induces Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Reverses Cognitive Deficits in an Amyloid-β Toxin-induced Alzheimer Rat Model via the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Akt/Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Seth, Brashket; Agarwal, Swati; Yadav, Anuradha; Karmakar, Madhumita; Gupta, Shailendra Kumar; Choubey, Vinay; Sharma, Abhay; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar

    2015-11-20

    Neurogenesis involves generation of new neurons through finely tuned multistep processes, such as neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, migration, differentiation, and integration into existing neuronal circuitry in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and subventricular zone. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is involved in cognitive functions and altered in various neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease (AD). Ethosuximide (ETH), an anticonvulsant drug is used for the treatment of epileptic seizures. However, the effects of ETH on adult hippocampal neurogenesis and the underlying cellular and molecular mechanism(s) are yet unexplored. Herein, we studied the effects of ETH on rat multipotent NSC proliferation and neuronal differentiation and adult hippocampal neurogenesis in an amyloid β (Aβ) toxin-induced rat model of AD-like phenotypes. ETH potently induced NSC proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the hippocampus-derived NSC in vitro. ETH enhanced NSC proliferation and neuronal differentiation and reduced Aβ toxin-mediated toxicity and neurodegeneration, leading to behavioral recovery in the rat AD model. ETH inhibited Aβ-mediated suppression of neurogenic and Akt/Wnt/β-catenin pathway gene expression in the hippocampus. ETH activated the PI3K·Akt and Wnt·β-catenin transduction pathways that are known to be involved in the regulation of neurogenesis. Inhibition of the PI3K·Akt and Wnt·β-catenin pathways effectively blocked the mitogenic and neurogenic effects of ETH. In silico molecular target prediction docking studies suggest that ETH interacts with Akt, Dkk-1, and GSK-3β. Our findings suggest that ETH stimulates NSC proliferation and differentiation in vitro and adult hippocampal neurogenesis via the PI3K·Akt and Wnt·β-catenin signaling. PMID:26420483

  6. The mammalian adult neurogenesis gene ontology (MANGO provides a structural framework for published information on genes regulating adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert W Overall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is not a single phenotype, but consists of a number of sub-processes, each of which is under complex genetic control. Interpretation of gene expression studies using existing resources often does not lead to results that address the interrelatedness of these processes. Formal structure, such as provided by ontologies, is essential in any field for comprehensive interpretation of existing knowledge but, until now, such a structure has been lacking for adult neurogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have created a resource with three components 1. A structured ontology describing the key stages in the development of adult hippocampal neural stem cells into functional granule cell neurons. 2. A comprehensive survey of the literature to annotate the results of all published reports on gene function in adult hippocampal neurogenesis (257 manuscripts covering 228 genes to the appropriate terms in our ontology. 3. An easy-to-use searchable interface to the resulting database made freely available online. The manuscript presents an overview of the database highlighting global trends such as the current bias towards research on early proliferative stages, and an example gene set enrichment analysis. A limitation of the resource is the current scope of the literature which, however, is growing by around 100 publications per year. With the ontology and database in place, new findings can be rapidly annotated and regular updates of the database will be made publicly available. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The resource we present allows relevant interpretation of gene expression screens in terms of defined stages of postnatal neuronal development. Annotation of genes by hand from the adult neurogenesis literature ensures the data are directly applicable to the system under study. We believe this approach could also serve as an example to other fields in a 'bottom-up' community effort complementing the already

  7. Ethanol elevates physiological all-trans-retinoic acid levels in select loci through altering retinoid metabolism in multiple loci: a potential mechanism of ethanol toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, Maureen A.; Folias, Alexandra E.; Wang, Chao; Napoli, Joseph L.

    2010-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) supports embryonic development, central nervous system function, and the immune response. atRA initiates neurogenesis and dendritic growth in the hippocampus and is required for spatial memory; superphysiological atRA inhibits neurogenesis, causes teratology and/or embryo toxicity, and alters cognitive function and behavior. Because abnormal atRA shares pathological conditions with alcoholism, inhibition of retinol (vitamin A) activation into atRA has been credi...

  8. Large-scale phenotyping links adult hippocampal neurogenesis to the reaction to novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, R Maarten; Lazic, Stanley E; Slomianka, Lutz; Wolfer, David P; Amrein, Irmgard

    2016-05-01

    The discovery of adult-born neurons in the hippocampus has triggered a wide range of studies that link the new neurons to various behavioral functions. However, the role of new neurons in behavior is still equivocal. Conflicting results may be due to the difficulty in manipulating neurogenesis without off-target effects as well as the statistical approach used, which fail to account for neurogenesis-independent effects of experimental manipulations on behavior. In this study, we apply a more comprehensive statistical and conceptual approach. Instead of between-group analyses, we consider the within-group relationships between neurogenesis and behavior (ANCOVA and mediation analysis) in a large-scale experiment, in which distinct age- (3 and 5 months) and strain- (DBA and C57) related differences in basal levels of neurogenesis in mice are compared with a large number (∼1,500) of behavioral read outs. The analysis failed to detect any association between anxiety and motor impulsivity with neurogenesis. However, within-group adult hippocampal neurogenesis is associated with the reaction to novelty. Specifically, more neurogenesis is associated with a longer latency to explore and a lower frequency of exploratory actions, overall indicative of a phenotype where animals with more neurogenesis were slower to explore a novel environment. This effect is observed in 5-months-old, but not in 3-months-old mice of both strains. An association between the reaction to novelty and adult neurogenesis can have a major impact on results from previous studies using classical behavioral experiments, in which animals are tested in a-for the animal-novel experimental set-up. The neurogenesis-novelty association found here is also a necessary link in the relation that has been suggested to exist between neurogenesis and psychiatric disorders marked by a failure to cope with novelty. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26540138

  9. A dynamical systems approach to characterizing the contribution of neurogenesis to neural coding

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    Merav Stern

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the mammalian brain new neurons are being born throughout adult life in two specific regions: the dentate gyrus (Eriksson et al., 1998 and the olfactory bulb (Lazarini and Lledo, 2011. The neurogenesis process has been shown to play an important role in a number of memory tasks and learning behaviors (Aimone et al., 2011; Deng et al., 2010; Ming and Song, 2011; Sahay et al., 2011. In the olfactory bulb, impaired adult neurogenesis can also lead to a number of deficits in odor-guided behaviors (Lazarini and Lledo, 2011. Importantly, from a clinical standpoint, altered neurogenesis has been implicated in a number of cognitive disorders including early onset Alzheimer’s disease (Mu and Gage, 2011, in the regulation of emotion, and in mediating of some of the behavioral effects of antidepressants (Sahay et al., 2007; Sahay and Hen, 2007. However, despite the clinical importance and fundamental biological questions that neurogenesis embodies, the specific mechanisms of how adult-born neurons contribute to memory and cognitive function remain a matter of intense debate (Aimone et al., 2011; Lazarini and Lledo, 2011; Ming and Song, 2011; Sahay et al., 2011. In fact, a recent study pointed out that young neurons might not have a pre-determined function and acquire distinct responses depending on prior sensory experience and its behavioral context (Livneh et al., 2014. Here we use computational analyses to demonstrate how the relatively small number of newly added neurons can place a network in the regime where its ability to reproduce desired output signals, for example as part of pattern completion, is substantially enhanced. Specifically, we consider a recurrent firing rate network model with balanced excitation and inhibition and study how the addition of neurons changes its computational capacity. The simulation results (Figure 1 yielded estimates of the optimal number of young neurons and their hyperexcitatbility relatively to mature neurons

  10. Parity modifies the effects of fluoxetine and corticosterone on behavior, stress reactivity, and hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Joanna L; Gobinath, Aarthi R; Kitay, Nicole F; Chow, Carmen; Brummelte, Susanne; Galea, Liisa A M

    2016-06-01

    The postpartum confers considerable risk for developing depression. Depressed patients have elevated cortisol concentrations and impaired hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis negative feedback. Chronic stress or corticosterone (CORT) induces a depressive-like phenotype in rodents, including during the postpartum. The present study examined whether nulliparous and postpartum rats were differentially vulnerable to chronic high CORT and whether fluoxetine (FLX) would differentially alter the brain, behavior, and neuroendocrine function depending on reproductive experience. Nulliparous and postpartum female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups that received 21 d of injections of CORT or oil plus FLX or saline. CORT reduced maternal behaviors whereas FLX reversed CORT-induced decreases in maternal care. CORT increased immobility in the forced swim test (FST), but FLX did not significantly alter immobility in either nulliparous or postpartum rats. Dams spent less time immobile and had lower CORT concentrations after the FST compared with nulliparae, indicating that aspects of the postpartum period may provide resilience against a depressive-like phenotype. Both CORT and parity reduced neurogenesis (doublecortin expression) in the dentate gyrus. FLX-treated rats had lower CORT concentrations following the FST and more immature neurons, but only in the nulliparous, and not postpartum, groups. These data suggest that the postpartum may inherently protect against some deleterious effects of high CORT but also confer resistance to the neurogenic and endocrine effects of FLX. Our findings are important for understanding how females in different reproductive states respond to glucocorticoids and antidepressants. PMID:26808316

  11. Vascular-derived TGF-β increases in the stem cell niche and perturbs neuro-genesis during aging and following irradiation in the adult mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuro-genesis decreases during aging and following cranial radiotherapy, causing a progressive cognitive decline that is currently untreatable. However, functional neural stem cells remained present in the sub-ventricular zone of high dose irradiated and aged mouse brains. We therefore investigated whether alterations in the neurogenic niches are perhaps responsible for the neuro-genesis decline. This hypothesis was supported by the absence of proliferation of neural stem cells that were engrafted into the vascular niches of irradiated host brains. Moreover, we observed a marked increase in TGF-β1 production by endothelial cells in the stem cell niche in both middle-aged and irradiated mice. In co-cultures, irradiated brain endothelial cells induced the apoptosis of neural stem/progenitor cells via TGF-β/Smad3 signalling. Strikingly, the blockade of TGF-β signalling in vivo using a neutralizing antibody or the selective inhibitor SB-505124 significantly improved neuro-genesis in aged and irradiated mice, prevented apoptosis and increased the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells. These findings suggest that anti-TGF-β-based therapy may be used for future interventions to prevent neurogenic collapse following radiotherapy or during aging. (authors)

  12. MODULATION OF HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS AND COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE IN THE AGED RAT: THE BLUEBERRY EFFECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The decline of memory with age is associated with a reduction in hippocampal neurogenesis, suggesting that this process may be an important factor in memory modulation. Thus, factors such as head injury, depression and stress that lead to decreases in neurogenesis are all associated with greater rat...

  13. Neurogenesis Interferes with the Retrieval of Remote Memories: Forgetting in Neurocomputational Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Victoria I.; Argibay, Pablo F.

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to models and theories that relate adult neurogenesis with the processes of learning and memory, almost no solid hypotheses have been formulated that involve a possible neurocomputational influence of adult neurogenesis on forgetting. Based on data from a previous study that implemented a simple but complete model of the main…

  14. The Young and the Restless: Regulation of Adult Neurogenesis by Wnt Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Melody V; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays a critical role in developmental and adult neurogenesis. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Jang et al. (2013) and Seib et al. (2013) show how age and neuronal activity regulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis by respectively inhibiting or activating distinct components of the Wnt signaling machinery.

  15. NT-3 Facilitates Hippocampal Plasticity and Learning and Memory by Regulating Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Kazuko; Akbarian, Schahram; Bates, Brian; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Lu, Bai; Shimazu, Kazuhiro; Zhao, Mingrui

    2006-01-01

    In the adult brain, the expression of NT-3 is largely confined to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), an area exhibiting significant neurogenesis. Using a conditional mutant line in which the "NT-3" gene is deleted in the brain, we investigated the role of NT-3 in adult neurogenesis, hippocampal plasticity, and memory. Bromodeoxyuridine…

  16. Variability of doublecortin-associated dendrite maturation in adult hippocampal neurogenesis is independent of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation

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    Jessberger Sebastian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis most regulation takes place during the phase of doublecortin (DCX expression, either as pro-proliferative effect on precursor cells or as survival-promoting effect on postmitotic cells. We here obtained quantitative data about the proliferative population and the dynamics of postmitotic dendrite development during the period of DCX expression. The question was, whether any indication could be obtained that the initiation of dendrite development is timely bound to the exit from the cell cycle. Alternatively, the temporal course of morphological maturation might be subject to additional regulatory events. Results We found that (1 20% of the DCX population were precursor cells in cell cycle, whereas more than 70% were postmitotic, (2 the time span until newborn cells had reached the most mature stage associated with DCX expression varied between 3 days and several weeks, (3 positive or negative regulation of precursor cell proliferation did not alter the pattern and dynamics of dendrite development. Dendrite maturation was largely independent of close contacts to astrocytes. Conclusion These data imply that dendrite maturation of immature neurons is initiated at varying times after cell cycle exit, is variable in duration, and is controlled independently of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation. We conclude that in addition to the major regulatory events in cell proliferation and selective survival, additional micro-regulatory events influence the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

  17. Huntingtin acts non cell-autonomously on hippocampal neurogenesis and controls anxiety-related behaviors in adult mouse.

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    Patrick Pla

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a fatal neurodegenerative disease, characterized by motor defects and psychiatric symptoms, including mood disorders such as anxiety and depression. HD is caused by an abnormal polyglutamine (polyQ expansion in the huntingtin (HTT protein. The development and analysis of various mouse models that express pathogenic polyQ-HTT revealed a link between mutant HTT and the development of anxio-depressive behaviors and various hippocampal neurogenesis defects. However, it is unclear whether such phenotype is linked to alteration of HTT wild-type function in adults. Here, we report the analysis of a new mouse model in which HTT is inducibly deleted from adult mature cortical and hippocampal neurons using the CreER(T2/Lox system. These mice present defects in both the survival and the dendritic arborization of hippocampal newborn neurons. Our data suggest that these non-cell autonomous effects are linked to defects in both BDNF transport and release upon HTT silencing in hippocampal neurons, and in BDNF/TrkB signaling. The controlled deletion of HTT also had anxiogenic-like effects. Our results implicate endogenous wild-type HTT in adult hippocampal neurogenesis and in the control of mood disorders.

  18. [Sleep, stress, neurogenesis and driving performance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino, S

    2012-01-01

    The enormous number of traffic accidents, implying a firm place in the top three death-rate causation in most industrialised countries, has inspired the development of studies of its major cause, i.e. human behaviour. Many traffic accidents are caused by, or at least related to, inadequate mental workload and, when it is either too low (vigilance, sleepiness) or too high (stress). Poor or inadequate sleep is a frequent result of being "stressed out." Professional and commuter drivers suffering from both daytime sleepiness and stress, two main factors impairment road safety mediated by behaviours including cognitive lapses, errors, and intentional traffic violations. Previous research has shown the association between stress or excessive daytime sleepiness and crash involvement but they never considered their linkage and their similar brain action: the hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex undergo stress or poor or inadequate sleep induced structural remodelling (neuroplasticity and neurogenensis), which alters behavioral and physiological responses which can be either adaptive or damaging. PMID:23213813

  19. Of Mice and Men: Neurogenesis, Cognition and Alzheimer’s disease

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    Orly eLazarov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells are maintained in the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus and in the subventricular zone in the adult mammalian brain throughout life. Neurogenesis is continuous, but its extent is tightly regulated by environmental factors, behavior, hormonal state, age and brain health. Increasing evidence supports a role for new neurons in cognitive function in rodents. Recent evidence delineates potential significant differences between adult neurogenesis in rodents and humans. Being context-dependent, neurogenesis in the human brain might be manifested differently than in the rodent brain. Decline in neurogenesis may play a role in cognitive deterioration, leading to the development of progressive learning and memory disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease. This review discusses the different observations concerning neurogenesis in the rodent and human brain, and their functional implications for the healthy and diseased brain.

  20. Adult neurogenesis modifies excitability of the dentate gyrus

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    Taruna eIkrar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adult-born dentate granule neurons contribute to memory encoding functions of the dentate gyrus (DG such as pattern separation. However, local circuit-mechanisms by which adult-born neurons partake in this process are poorly understood. Computational, neuroanatomical and electrophysiological studies suggest that sparseness of activation in the granule cell layer (GCL is conducive for pattern separation. A sparse coding scheme is thought to facilitate the distribution of similar entorhinal inputs across the GCL to decorrelate overlapping representations and minimize interference. Here we used fast voltage-sensitive dye (VSD imaging combined with laser photostimulation and electrical stimulation to examine how selectively increasing adult DG neurogenesis influences local circuit activity and excitability. We show that DG of mice with more adult-born neurons exhibits decreased strength of neuronal activation and more restricted excitation spread in GCL while maintaining effective output to CA3c. Conversely, blockade of adult hippocampal neurogenesis changed excitability of the DG in the opposite direction. Analysis of GABAergic inhibition onto mature dentate granule neurons in the DG of mice with more adult-born neurons shows a modest readjustment of perisomatic inhibitory synaptic gain without changes in overall inhibitory tone, presynaptic properties or GABAergic innervation pattern. Retroviral labeling of connectivity in mice with more adult-born neurons showed increased number of excitatory synaptic contacts of adult-born neurons onto hilar interneurons. Together, these studies demonstrate that adult hippocampal neurogenesis modifies excitability of mature dentate granule neurons and that this non-cell autonomous effect may be mediated by local circuit mechanisms such as excitatory drive onto hilar interneurons. Modulation of DG excitability by adult-born dentate granule neurons may enhance sparse coding in the GCL to influence pattern

  1. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 as Predictor of Body Mass Index and Dentate Gyrus Neurogenesis: Neuroplasticity and the Metabolic Milieu

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    Jeremy D. Coplan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 regulates carbohydrate metabolism and promotes neurogenesis. We reported an inverse correlation between adult body mass and neurogenesis in nonhuman primates. Here we examine relationships between physiological levels of the neurotrophic incretin, plasma GLP-1 (pGLP-1, and body mass index (BMI in adolescence to adult neurogenesis and associations with a diabesity diathesis and infant stress. Morphometry, fasting pGLP-1, insulin resistance, and lipid profiles were measured in early adolescence in 10 stressed and 4 unstressed male bonnet macaques. As adults, dentate gyrus neurogenesis was assessed by doublecortin staining. High pGLP-1, low body weight, and low central adiposity, yet peripheral insulin resistance and high plasma lipids, during adolescence were associated with relatively high adult neurogenesis rates. High pGLP-1 also predicted low body weight with, paradoxically, insulin resistance and high plasma lipids. No rearing effects for neurogenesis rates were observed. We replicated an inverse relationship between BMI and neurogenesis. Adolescent pGLP-1 directly predicted adult neurogenesis. Two divergent processes relevant to human diabesity emerge—high BMI, low pGLP-1, and low neurogenesis and low BMI, high pGLP-1, high neurogenesis, insulin resistance, and lipid elevations. Diabesity markers putatively reflect high nutrient levels necessary for neurogenesis at the expense of peripheral tissues.

  2. Neurogenesis in Aplysia californica resembles nervous system formation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pattern of neurogenesis of the central nervous system of Aplysia californica was investigated by [3H]thymidine autoradiography. Large numbers of animals at a series of early developmental stages were labeled with [3H]thymidine for 24 or 48 hr and were subsequently sampled at specific intervals throughout the life cycle. I found that proliferative zones, consisting of columnar and placodal ectodermal cells, are established in regions of the body wall adjacent to underlying mesodermal cells. Mitosis in the proliferative zones generates a population of cells which leave the surface and migrate inward to join the nearby forming ganglia. Tracing specific [3H]thymidine-labeled cells from the body wall to a particular ganglion and within the ganglion over time suggests that the final genomic replication of the neuronal precursors occurs before the cells join the ganglion while glial cell precursors and differentiating glial cells continue to divide within the ganglion for some time. Ultrastructural examination of the morphological features of the few mitosing cells observed within the Aplysia central nervous system supports this interpretation. The pattern of neurogenesis in the Aplysia central nervous system resembles the proliferation of cells in the neural tube and the migration of neural crest and ectodermal placode cells in the vertebrate nervous system but differs from the pattern described for other invertebrates

  3. Cadmium inhibits neurogenesis in zebrafish embryonic brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Elly Suk Hen [Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, 1200 California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hui, Michelle Nga Yu; Lin Chunchi [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Cheng Shukhan [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: bhcheng@cityu.edu.hk

    2008-05-01

    Cadmium is a non-essential heavy metal found abundantly in the environment. Children of women exposed to cadmium during pregnancy display lower motor and perceptual abilities. High cadmium body burden in children is also related to impaired intelligence and lowered school achievement. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular basis of developmental neurotoxicity in the sensitive early life stages of animals. In this study, we explore neurological deficits caused by cadmium during early embryonic stages in zebrafish by examining regionalization of the neural tube, pattern formation and cell fate determination, commitment of proneural genes and induction of neurogenesis. We show that cadmium-treated embryos developed a smaller head with unclear boundaries between the brain subdivisions, particularly in the mid-hindbrain region. Embryos display normal anterior to posterior regionalization; however, the commitment of neural progenitor cells was affected by cadmium. We observe prominent reductions in the expression of several proneuronal genes including ngn1 in cell clusters, zash1a in the developing optic tectum, and zash1b in the telencephalon and tectum. Cadmium-treated embryos also have fewer differentiated neurons and glia in the facial sensory ganglia as indicated by decreased zn-12 expression. Also, a lower transcription level of neurogenic genes, ngn1 and neuroD, is observed in neurons. Our data suggest that cadmium-induced neurotoxicity can be caused by impaired neurogenesis, resulting in markedly reduced neuronal differentiation and axonogenesis.

  4. Functional interrogation of adult hypothalamic neurogenesis with focal radiological inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daniel A; Salvatierra, Juan; Velarde, Esteban; Wong, John; Ford, Eric C; Blackshaw, Seth

    2013-01-01

    The functional characterization of adult-born neurons remains a significant challenge. Approaches to inhibit adult neurogenesis via invasive viral delivery or transgenic animals have potential confounds that make interpretation of results from these studies difficult. New radiological tools are emerging, however, that allow one to noninvasively investigate the function of select groups of adult-born neurons through accurate and precise anatomical targeting in small animals. Focal ionizing radiation inhibits the birth and differentiation of new neurons, and allows targeting of specific neural progenitor regions. In order to illuminate the potential functional role that adult hypothalamic neurogenesis plays in the regulation of physiological processes, we developed a noninvasive focal irradiation technique to selectively inhibit the birth of adult-born neurons in the hypothalamic median eminence. We describe a method for Computer tomography-guided focal irradiation (CFIR) delivery to enable precise and accurate anatomical targeting in small animals. CFIR uses three-dimensional volumetric image guidance for localization and targeting of the radiation dose, minimizes radiation exposure to nontargeted brain regions, and allows for conformal dose distribution with sharp beam boundaries. This protocol allows one to ask questions regarding the function of adult-born neurons, but also opens areas to questions in areas of radiobiology, tumor biology, and immunology. These radiological tools will facilitate the translation of discoveries at the bench to the bedside. PMID:24300415

  5. Neural stem cells and the regulation of adult neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conover Joanne C

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presumably, the 'hard-wired' neuronal circuitry of the adult brain dissuades addition of new neurons, which could potentially disrupt existing circuits. This is borne out by the fact that, in general, new neurons are not produced in the mature brain. However, recent studies have established that the adult brain does maintain discrete regions of neurogenesis from which new neurons migrate and become incorporated into the functional circuitry of the brain. These neurogenic zones appear to be vestiges of the original developmental program that initiates brain formation. The largest of these germinal regions in the adult brain is the subventricular zone (SVZ, which lines the lateral walls of the lateral ventricles. Neural stem cells produce neuroblasts that migrate from the SVZ along a discrete pathway, the rostral migratory stream, into the olfactory bulb where they form mature neurons involved in the sense of smell. The subgranular layer (SGL of the hippocampal dentate gyrus is another neurogenic region; new SGL neurons migrate only a short distance and differentiate into hippocampal granule cells. Here, we discuss the surprising finding of neural stem cells in the adult brain and the molecular mechanisms that regulate adult neurogenesis.

  6. Cadmium inhibits neurogenesis in zebrafish embryonic brain development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium is a non-essential heavy metal found abundantly in the environment. Children of women exposed to cadmium during pregnancy display lower motor and perceptual abilities. High cadmium body burden in children is also related to impaired intelligence and lowered school achievement. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular basis of developmental neurotoxicity in the sensitive early life stages of animals. In this study, we explore neurological deficits caused by cadmium during early embryonic stages in zebrafish by examining regionalization of the neural tube, pattern formation and cell fate determination, commitment of proneural genes and induction of neurogenesis. We show that cadmium-treated embryos developed a smaller head with unclear boundaries between the brain subdivisions, particularly in the mid-hindbrain region. Embryos display normal anterior to posterior regionalization; however, the commitment of neural progenitor cells was affected by cadmium. We observe prominent reductions in the expression of several proneuronal genes including ngn1 in cell clusters, zash1a in the developing optic tectum, and zash1b in the telencephalon and tectum. Cadmium-treated embryos also have fewer differentiated neurons and glia in the facial sensory ganglia as indicated by decreased zn-12 expression. Also, a lower transcription level of neurogenic genes, ngn1 and neuroD, is observed in neurons. Our data suggest that cadmium-induced neurotoxicity can be caused by impaired neurogenesis, resulting in markedly reduced neuronal differentiation and axonogenesis

  7. Steroid modulation of neurogenesis: Focus on radial glial cells in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Diotel, Nicolas; Vaillant-Capitaine, Colette; Pérez Maria, Rita; Gueguen, Marie-Madeleine; Nasri, Ahmed; Cano Nicolau, Joel; Kah, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Estrogens are known as steroid hormones affecting the brain in many different ways and a wealth of data now document effects on neurogenesis. Estrogens are provided by the periphery but can also be locally produced within the brain itself due to local aromatization of circulating androgens. Adult neurogenesis is described in all vertebrate species examined so far, but comparative investigations have brought to light differences between vertebrate groups. In teleost fishes, the neurogenic activity is spectacular and adult stem cells maintain their mitogenic activity in many proliferative areas within the brain. Fish are also quite unique because brain aromatase expression is limited to radial glia cells, the progenitor cells of adult fish brain. The zebrafish has emerged as an interesting vertebrate model to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of adult neurogenesis, and notably its modulation by steroids. The main objective of this review is to summarize data related to the functional link between estrogens production in the brain and neurogenesis in fish. First, we will demonstrate that the brain of zebrafish is an endogenous source of steroids and is directly targeted by local and/or peripheral steroids. Then, we will present data demonstrating the progenitor nature of radial glial cells in the brain of adult fish. Next, we will emphasize the role of estrogens in constitutive neurogenesis and its potential contribution to the regenerative neurogenesis. Finally, the negative impacts on neurogenesis of synthetic hormones used in contraceptive pills production and released in the aquatic environment will be discussed. PMID:26151741

  8. Trading new neurons for status: Adult hippocampal neurogenesis in eusocial Damaraland mole-rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosthuizen, M K; Amrein, I

    2016-06-01

    Diversity in social structures, from solitary to eusocial, is a prominent feature of subterranean African mole-rat species. Damaraland mole-rats are eusocial, they live in colonies that are characterized by a reproductive division of labor and a subdivision into castes based on physiology and behavior. Damaraland mole-rats are exceptionally long lived and reproductive animals show delayed aging compared to non-reproductive animals. In the present study, we described the hippocampal architecture and the rate of hippocampal neurogenesis of wild-derived, adult Damaraland mole-rats in relation to sex, relative age and social status or caste. Overall, Damaraland mole-rats were found to have a small hippocampus and low rates of neurogenesis. We found no correlation between neurogenesis and sex or relative age. Social status or caste was the most prominent modulator of neurogenesis. An inverse relationship between neurogenesis and social status was apparent, with queens displaying the lowest neurogenesis while the worker mole-rats had the most. As there is no natural progression from one caste to another, social status within a colony was relatively stable and is reflected in the level of neurogenesis. Our results correspond to those found in the naked mole-rat, and may reflect an evolutionary and environmentally conserved trait within social mole-rat species. PMID:26979050

  9. Hypocellularity in the Murine Model for Down Syndrome Ts65Dn Is Not Affected by Adult Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Hidalgo, Rosa; Ballestín, Raul; Vega, Jessica; Blasco-Ibáñez, José M.; Crespo, Carlos; Gilabert-Juan, Javier; Nácher, Juan; Varea, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused by the presence of an extra copy of the chromosome 21 and it is the most common aneuploidy producing intellectual disability. Neural mechanisms underlying this alteration may include defects in the formation of neuronal networks, information processing and brain plasticity. The murine model for DS, Ts65Dn, presents reduced adult neurogenesis. This reduction has been suggested to underlie the hypocellularity of the hippocampus as well as the deficit in olfactory learning in the Ts65Dn mice. Similar alterations have also been observed in individuals with DS. To determine whether the impairment in adult neurogenesis is, in fact, responsible for the hypocellularity in the hippocampus and physiology of the olfactory bulb, we have analyzed cell proliferation and neuronal maturation in the two major adult neurogenic niches in the Ts656Dn mice: the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Additionally, we carried out a study to determine the survival rate and phenotypic fate of newly generated cells in both regions, injecting 5′BrdU and sacrificing the mice 21 days later, and analyzing the number and phenotype of the remaining 5′BrdU-positive cells. We observed a reduction in the number of proliferating (Ki67 positive) cells and immature (doublecortin positive) neurons in the subgranular and SVZ of Ts65Dn mice, but we did not observe changes in the number of surviving cells or in their phenotype. These data correlated with a lower number of apoptotic cells (cleaved caspase 3 positive) in Ts65Dn. We conclude that although adult Ts65Dn mice have a lower number of proliferating cells, it is compensated by a lower level of cell death. This higher survival rate in Ts65Dn produces a final number of mature cells similar to controls. Therefore, the reduction of adult neurogenesis cannot be held responsible for the neuronal hypocellularity in the hippocampus or for the olfactory learning deficit of Ts65Dn mice

  10. A place for the hippocampus in the cocaine addiction circuit: Potential roles for adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Serrano, Antonia; Blanco, Eduardo; Araos, Pedro; Suárez, Juan; Pavón, Francisco J; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Santín, Luis J

    2016-07-01

    Cocaine addiction is a chronic brain disease in which the drug seeking habits and profound cognitive, emotional and motivational alterations emerge from drug-induced neuroadaptations on a vulnerable brain. Therefore, a 'cocaine addiction brain circuit' has been described to explain this disorder. Studies in both cocaine patients and rodents reveal the hippocampus as a main node in the cocaine addiction circuit. The contribution of the hippocampus to cocaine craving and the associated memories is essential to understand the chronic relapsing nature of addiction, which is the main obstacle for the recovery. Interestingly, the hippocampus holds a particular form of plasticity that is rare in the adult brain: the ability to generate new functional neurons. There is an active scientific debate on the contributions of these new neurons to the addicted brain. This review focuses on the potential role(s) of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) in cocaine addiction. Although the current evidence primarily originates from animal research, these preclinical studies support AHN as a relevant component for the hippocampal effects of cocaine. PMID:27118134

  11. Increase in neurogenesis and behavioural benefit after chronic fluoxetine treatment in Wistar rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders Bue; Flagstad, P; Kristjansen, P E G;

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances in hippocampal neurogenesis may be involved in the pathophysiology of depression and it has been argued that an increase in the generation of new nerve cells in the hippocampus is involved in the mechanism of action of antidepressants....

  12. Functions for adult neurogenesis in memory: an introduction to the neurocomputational approach and to its contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguès, X; Corsini, M M; Marighetto, A; Abrous, D N

    2012-02-14

    Until recently, it was believed that the introduction of new neurons in neuronal networks was incompatible with memory function. Since the rediscovery of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, behavioral data demonstrate that adult neurogenesis is required for memory processing. We examine neurocomputational studies to identify which basic mechanisms involved in memory might be mediated by adult neurogenesis. Mainly, adult neurogenesis might be involved in the reduction of catastrophic interference and in a time-related pattern separation function. Artificial neuronal networks suggest that the selective recruitment of new-born or old neurons is not stochastic, but depends on environmental requirements. This leads us to propose the novel concept of "soft-supervision". Soft-supervision would be a biologically plausible process, by which the environment is able to influence activation and learning rules of neurons differentially. PMID:21856335

  13. Molecular Beacon-Based MicroRNA Imaging During Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Soonhag

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescence monitoring system for examining endogenous microRNA (miRNA) activity in cellular level provides crucial information on not only understanding a critical role of miRNA involving a variety of biological processes, but also evaluating miRNA expression patterns in a noninvasive manner. In this protocol, we report the details of a new procedure for a molecular beacon-based miRNA monitoring system, which includes the illustration scheme for miRNA detection strategy, exogenous miRNA detection, and measurement of endogenous miRNA expression level during neurogenesis. The fluorescence signal of miR-124a beacon quenched by BHQ2 was gradually recovered as increasing concentration of the miR-124a in tube. The functional work of miR-124a beacon was examined in intracellular environment, allowing for the internalization of the miR-124a beacon by lipofectamine, which resulted in activated fluorescent signals of the miR-124a beacon in the HeLa cells after the addition of synthetic miR-124a. The endogenous miR-124a expression level was detected by miR-124a beacon system during neurogenesis, showing brighter fluorescence intensity in cytoplasmic area of P19 cells after induction of neuronal differentiation by retinoic acid. The molecular beacon based-miRNA detection technique could be applicable to the simultaneous visualization of a variety of miRNA expression patterns using different fluorescence dyes. For the study of examining endogenous miRNA expression level using miRNA-beacon system, if cellular differentiation step is already prepared, transfection step of miR-124a beacon into P19 cells, and acquisition of activated fluorescence signal measured by confocal microscope can be conducted approximately within 6 h. PMID:26530921

  14. Modeling physiological and pathological human neurogenesis in the dish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VaniaBroccoli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available New advances in directing the neuronal differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs, abbreviation intended to convey both categories of pluripotent stem cells have promoted the development of culture systems capable of modeling early neurogenesis and neural specification at some of their critical milestones. The hPSC-derived neural rosette can be considered the in vitro counterpart of the developing neural tube, since both structures share a virtually equivalent architecture and related functional properties. Epigenetic stimulation methods can modulate the identity of the rosette neural progenitors in order to generate authentic neuronal subtypes, as well as a full spectrum of neural crest derivatives. The intrinsic capacity of induced pluripotent cell-derived neural tissue to self-organize has become fully apparent with the emergence of innovative in vitro systems that are able to shape the neuronal differentiation of hPSCs into organized tissues that develop in three dimensions. However, significant hurdles remain that must be completely solved in order to facilitate the use of hPSCs in modeling (e.g., late-onset disorders or in building therapeutic strategies for cell replacement. In this direction, new procedures have been established to promote the maturation and functionality of hPSC-derived neurons. Meanwhile, new methods to accelerate the aging of in vitro differentiating cells are still in development. hPSC-based technology has matured enough to offer a significant and reliable model system for early and late neurogenesis that could be extremely informative for the study of the physiological and pathological events that occur during this process. Thus, full exploitation of this cellular system can provide a better understanding of the physiological events that shape human brain structures, as well as a solid platform to investigate the pathological mechanisms at the root of human diseases.

  15. Phosphatase WIP1 regulates adult neurogenesis and WNT signaling during aging

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yunhua; Demidov, Oleg N.; Goh, Amanda M; Virshup, David M.; Lane, David P; Bulavin, Dmitry V.

    2014-01-01

    The number of newly formed neurons declines rapidly during aging, and this decrease in neurogenesis is associated with decreased function of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs). Here, we determined that a WIP1-dependent pathway regulates NPC differentiation and contributes to the age-associated decline of neurogenesis. Specifically, we found that WIP1 is expressed in NPCs of the mouse subventricular zone (SVZ) and aged animals with genetically enhanced WIP1 expression exhibited higher NPC num...

  16. Reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis confers vulnerability in an animal model of cocaine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, Michele A; Bulin, Sarah E; Fuller, Dwain C; Eisch, Amelia J

    2010-01-01

    Drugs of abuse dynamically regulate adult neurogenesis, which appears important for some types of learning and memory. Interestingly, a major site of adult neurogenesis, the hippocampus, is important in the formation of drug-context associations and in the mediation of drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors in animal models of addiction. Correlative evidence suggests an inverse relationship between hippocampal neurogenesis and drug-taking or drug-seeking behaviors, but the lack of a causative link has made the relationship between adult-generated neurons and addiction unclear. We used rat intravenous cocaine self-administration in rodents, a clinically relevant animal model of addiction, to test the hypothesis that suppression of adult hippocampal neurogenesis enhances vulnerability to addiction and relapse. Suppression of adult hippocampal neurogenesis via cranial irradiation before drug-taking significantly increased cocaine self-administration on both fixed-ratio and progressive-ratio schedules, as well as induced a vertical shift in the dose-response curve. This was not a general enhancement of learning, motivation, or locomotion, because sucrose self-administration and locomotor activity were unchanged in irradiated rats. Suppression of adult hippocampal neurogenesis after drug-taking significantly enhanced resistance to extinction of drug-seeking behavior. These studies identify reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis as a novel risk factor for addiction-related behaviors in an animal model of cocaine addiction. Furthermore, they suggest that therapeutics to specifically increase or stabilize adult hippocampal neurogenesis could aid in preventing initial addiction as well as future relapse. PMID:20053911

  17. TAM receptors affect adult brain neurogenesis by negative regulation of microglial cell activation1

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Rui; Tian, Shifu; Lu, Helen J.; LU, QINGJUN; Yan ZHENG; Wang, Xiaomin; Ding, Jixiang; Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian

    2013-01-01

    TAM tyrosine kinases play multiple functional roles including regulation of the target genes important in homeostatic regulation of cytokine receptors or Toll-like receptor-mediated signal transduction pathways. Here, we show that TAM receptors affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis and loss of TAM receptors impair hippocampal neurogenesis, largely attributed to exaggerated inflammatory responses by microglia characterized by increased MAP kinase and NF-κB activation and elevated production of...

  18. Toll-like receptors as developmental tools that regulate neurogenesis during development: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Barak, Boaz; Feldman, Noa; Okun, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the process of generating new neurons in the brain, fascinates researchers for its promise to affect multiple cognitive and functional processes in both health and disease. Many cellular pathways are involved in the regulation of neurogenesis, a complexity exemplified by the extensive regulation of this process during brain development. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), hallmarks of innate immunity, are increasingly implemented in various central nervous system plasticity-related proc...

  19. Characterization of the role of adult neurogenesis in touch-screen discrimination learning

    OpenAIRE

    Swan, Alicia A.; Clutton, Jonathan Edward; Chary, Priyanka Kesavan; Cook, Sarah G.; Liu, Grace G.; Drew, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent theories posit that adult neurogenesis supports dentate gyrus (DG) pattern separation and is thereby necessary for some types of discrimination learning. Using an inducible transgenic mouse model, we investigated the contribution of adult-born neurons to spatial and nonspatial touch-screen discriminations of varying levels of difficulty. Arresting neurogenesis caused a modest but statistically significant impairment in a position discrimination task. However, the effect was present onl...

  20. Using causal models to distinguish between neurogenesis-dependent and -independent effects on behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Lazic, Stanley E

    2011-01-01

    There has been a substantial amount of research on the relationship between hippocampal neurogenesis and behaviour over the past fifteen years, but the causal role that new neurons have on cognitive and affective behavioural tasks is still far from clear. This is partly due to the difficulty of manipulating levels of neurogenesis without inducing off-target effects, which might also influence behaviour. In addition, the analytical methods typically used do not directly test whether neurogenes...

  1. Toll-like receptors as developmental tools that regulate neurogenesis during development: an update

    OpenAIRE

    EitanOkun; BoazBarak

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the process of generating new neurons in the brain, fascinates researchers for its promise to affect multiple cognitive and functional processes in both health and disease. Many cellular pathways are involved in the regulation of neurogenesis, a complexity exemplified by the extensive regulation of this process during brain development. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), hallmarks of innate immunity are increasingly implemented in various central nervous system plasticity-related proce...

  2. Of mice and men: neurogenesis, cognition and Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Marr

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells are maintained in the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus and in the subventricular zone in the adult mammalian brain throughout life. Neurogenesis is continuous, but its extent is tightly regulated by environmental factors, behavior, hormonal state, age, and brain health. Increasing evidence supports a role for new neurons in cognitive function in rodents. Recent evidence delineates significant similarities and differences between adult neurogenesis in rodents and humans...

  3. Neural Stem Cell Grafting Counteracts Hippocampal Injury-Mediated Impairments in Mood, Memory, and Neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampal injury typically leads to mood and memory impairments associated with reduced and aberrant neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. This study examined whether subventricular zone-neural stem cell (SVZ-NSC) grafting after hippocampal injury would counteract impairments in mood, memory, and neurogenesis. Analyses through forced swim, water maze, and novel object recognition tests revealed significant impairments in mood and memory function in animals that underwent injury and sham-grafti...

  4. Endogenous CNTF mediates stroke-induced adult CNS neurogenesis in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Seong Su; Keasey, Matthew P.; Arnold, Sheila A.; Reid, Rollie; Geralds, Justin; Hagg, Theo

    2012-01-01

    Focal brain ischemia in adult rats rapidly and robustly induces neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) but there are few and inconsistent reports in mice, presenting a hurdle to genetically investigate the endogenous neurogenic regulators such as ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). Here, we first provide a platform for further studies by showing that middle cerebral artery occlusion in adult male C57BL/6 mice robustly enhances neurogenesis in the SVZ only under very specific conditions...

  5. Histone deacetylases control neurogenesis in embryonic brain by inhibition of BMP2/4 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Shakèd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histone-modifying enzymes are essential for a wide variety of cellular processes dependent upon changes in gene expression. Histone deacetylases (HDACs lead to the compaction of chromatin and subsequent silencing of gene transcription, and they have recently been implicated in a diversity of functions and dysfunctions in the postnatal and adult brain including ocular dominance plasticity, memory consolidation, drug addiction, and depression. Here we investigate the role of HDACs in the generation of neurons and astrocytes in the embryonic brain. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As a variety of HDACs are expressed in differentiating neural progenitor cells, we have taken a pharmacological approach to inhibit multiple family members. Inhibition of class I and II HDACs in developing mouse embryos with trichostatin A resulted in a dramatic reduction in neurogenesis in the ganglionic eminences and a modest increase in neurogenesis in the cortex. An identical effect was observed upon pharmacological inhibition of HDACs in in vitro-differentiating neural precursors derived from the same brain regions. A reduction in neurogenesis in ganglionic eminence-derived neural precursors was accompanied by an increase in the production of immature astrocytes. We show that HDACs control neurogenesis by inhibition of the bone morphogenetic protein BMP2/4 signaling pathway in radial glial cells. HDACs function at the transcriptional level by inhibiting and promoting, respectively, the expression of Bmp2 and Smad7, an intracellular inhibitor of BMP signaling. Inhibition of the BMP2/4 signaling pathway restored normal levels of neurogenesis and astrogliogenesis to both ganglionic eminence- and cortex-derived cultures in which HDACs were inhibited. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate a transcriptionally-based regulation of BMP2/4 signaling by HDACs both in vivo and in vitro that is critical for neurogenesis in the ganglionic eminences and that modulates cortical

  6. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is functionally important for stress-induced social avoidance

    OpenAIRE

    Lagace, Diane C.; Donovan, Michael H.; DeCarolis, Nathan A.; Farnbauch, Laure A.; Malhotra, Shveta; Berton, Olivier; Nestler, Eric J.; Krishnan, Vaishnav; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2010-01-01

    The long-term response to chronic stress is variable, with some individuals developing maladaptive functioning, although other “resilient” individuals do not. Stress reduces neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus subgranular zone (SGZ), but it is unknown if stress-induced changes in neurogenesis contribute to individual vulnerability. Using a chronic social defeat stress model, we explored whether the susceptibility to stress-induced social avoidance was related to changes in SGZ proliferation and...

  7. Reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis confers vulnerability in an animal model of cocaine addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, Michele A.; Bulin, Sarah; Fuller, Dwain C.; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2010-01-01

    Drugs of abuse dynamically regulate adult neurogenesis, which appears important for some types of learning and memory. Interestingly, a major site of adult neurogenesis - the hippocampus - is important in the formation of drug-context associations and in the mediation of drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors in animal models of addiction. Correlative evidence suggests an inverse relationship between hippocampal neurogenesis and drug-taking or drug-seeking behaviors, but the lack of a causative link has made the relationship between adult-generated neurons and addiction unclear. We used rat i.v. cocaine self-administration in rodents, a clinicall-relevant animal model of addiction, to test the hypothesis that suppression of adult hippocampal neurogenesis enhances vulnerability to addiction and relapse. Suppression of adult hippocampal neurogenesis via cranial irradiation before drug-taking significantly increased cocaine self-administration on both fixed-ratio and progressive-ratio schedules, as well as induced a vertical shift in the dose-response curve. This was not a general enhancement of learning, motivation or locomotion, as sucrose self-administration and locomotor activity were unchanged in irradiated rats. Suppression of adult hippocampal neurogenesis after drug-taking significantly enhanced resistance to extinction of drug-seeking behavior. These studies identify reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis as a novel risk factor for addiction-related behaviors in an animal model of cocaine addiction. Further, they suggest that therapeutics to specifically increase or stabilize adult hippocampal neurogenesis could aid in preventing initial addiction as well as future relapse. PMID:20053911

  8. Ablation of hippocampal neurogenesis impairs contextual fear conditioning and synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Saxe, Michael D.; Battaglia, Fortunato; Wang, Jing-wen; Malleret, Gael; David, Denis J.; Monckton, James E.; Garcia, A. Denise R.; Sofroniew, Michael V.; Kandel, Eric R.; Santarelli, Luca; Hen, René; Drew, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    Although hippocampal neurogenesis has been described in many adult mammals, the functional impact of this process on physiology and behavior remains unclear. In the present study, we used two independent methods to ablate hippocampal neurogenesis and found that each procedure caused a limited behavioral deficit and a loss of synaptic plasticity within the dentate gyrus. Specifically, focal X irradiation of the hippocampus or genetic ablation of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive neural ...

  9. Neurogenesis in the brain auditory pathway of a marsupial, the northern native cat (Dasyurus hallucatus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurogenesis in the auditory pathway of the marsupial Dasyurus hallucatus was studied. Intraperitoneal injections of tritiated thymidine (20-40 microCi) were made into pouch-young varying from 1 to 56 days pouch-life. Animals were killed as adults and brain sections were prepared for autoradiography and counterstained with a Nissl stain. Neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus were generated prior to 3 days pouch-life, in the superior olive at 5-7 days, and in the dorsal cochlear nucleus over a prolonged period. Inferior collicular neurogenesis lagged behind that in the medial geniculate, the latter taking place between days 3 and 9 and the former between days 7 and 22. Neurogenesis began in the auditory cortex on day 9 and was completed by about day 42. Thus neurogenesis was complete in the medullary auditory nuclei before that in the midbrain commenced, and in the medial geniculate before that in the auditory cortex commenced. The time course of neurogenesis in the auditory pathway of the native cat was very similar to that in another marsupial, the brushtail possum. For both, neurogenesis occurred earlier than in eutherian mammals of a similar size but was more protracted

  10. Neurogenesis in the brain auditory pathway of a marsupial, the northern native cat (Dasyurus hallucatus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitkin, L.; Nelson, J.; Farrington, M.; Swann, S. (Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia))

    1991-07-08

    Neurogenesis in the auditory pathway of the marsupial Dasyurus hallucatus was studied. Intraperitoneal injections of tritiated thymidine (20-40 microCi) were made into pouch-young varying from 1 to 56 days pouch-life. Animals were killed as adults and brain sections were prepared for autoradiography and counterstained with a Nissl stain. Neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus were generated prior to 3 days pouch-life, in the superior olive at 5-7 days, and in the dorsal cochlear nucleus over a prolonged period. Inferior collicular neurogenesis lagged behind that in the medial geniculate, the latter taking place between days 3 and 9 and the former between days 7 and 22. Neurogenesis began in the auditory cortex on day 9 and was completed by about day 42. Thus neurogenesis was complete in the medullary auditory nuclei before that in the midbrain commenced, and in the medial geniculate before that in the auditory cortex commenced. The time course of neurogenesis in the auditory pathway of the native cat was very similar to that in another marsupial, the brushtail possum. For both, neurogenesis occurred earlier than in eutherian mammals of a similar size but was more protracted.

  11. BMP signaling mediates effects of exercise on hippocampal neurogenesis and cognition in mice.

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    Kevin T Gobeske

    Full Text Available Exposure to exercise or to environmental enrichment increases the generation of new neurons in the adult hippocampus and promotes certain kinds of learning and memory. While the precise role of neurogenesis in cognition has been debated intensely, comparatively few studies have addressed the mechanisms linking environmental exposures to cellular and behavioral outcomes. Here we show that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signaling mediates the effects of exercise on neurogenesis and cognition in the adult hippocampus. Elective exercise reduces levels of hippocampal BMP signaling before and during its promotion of neurogenesis and learning. Transgenic mice with decreased BMP signaling or wild type mice infused with a BMP inhibitor both exhibit remarkable gains in hippocampal cognitive performance and neurogenesis, mirroring the effects of exercise. Conversely, transgenic mice with increased BMP signaling have diminished hippocampal neurogenesis and impaired cognition. Exercise exposure does not rescue these deficits, suggesting that reduced BMP signaling is required for environmental effects on neurogenesis and learning. Together, these observations show that BMP signaling is a fundamental mechanism linking environmental exposure with changes in cognitive function and cellular properties in the hippocampus.

  12. Neurogenesis in the embryonic and adult brain: same regulators, different roles.

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    Noelia eUrban

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis persists in adult mammals in specific brain areas, known as neurogenic niches. Adult neurogenesis is highly dynamic and is modulated by multiple physiological stimuli and pathological states. There is a strong interest in understanding how this process is regulated, particularly since active neuronal production has been demonstrated in both the hippocampus and the subventricular zone of adult humans.The molecular mechanisms that control neurogenesis have been extensively studied during embryonic development. Therefore, we have a broad knowledge of the intrinsic factors and extracellular signalling pathways driving proliferation and differentiation of embryonic neural precursors. Many of these factors also play important roles during adult neurogenesis, but essential differences exist in the biological responses of neural precursors in the embryonic and adult contexts. Because adult neural stem cells are normally found in a quiescent state, regulatory pathways can affect adult neurogenesis in ways that have no clear counterpart during embryogenesis. BMP signalling, for instance, regulates neural stem cell behaviour both during embryonic and adult neurogenesis. However, this pathway maintains stem cell proliferation in the embryo, while it promotes quiescence to prevent stem cell exhaustion in the adult brain. In this review, we will compare and contrast the functions of transcription factors and other regulatory molecules in the embryonic brain and in adult neurogenic regions of the adult brain in the mouse, with a special focus on the hippocampal niche and on the regulation of the balance between quiescence and activation of adult neural stem cells in this region.

  13. Neuroinflammation negatively affects adult hippocampal neurogenesis and cognition: can exercise compensate?

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    Ryan, Sinéad M; Nolan, Yvonne M

    2016-02-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is believed to be integral for certain forms of learning and memory. Dysregulation of hippocampal neurogenesis has been shown to be an important mechanism underlying the cognitive impairment associated with normal aging, as well as the cognitive deficits evident in preclinical models of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. Neuroinflammation is a significant pathological feature of these conditions; it contributes to the observed cognitive decline, and recent evidence demonstrates that it also negatively affects hippocampal neurogenesis. Conversely, during the past twenty years, it has been robustly shown that exercise is a potent inducer of hippocampal neurogenesis, and it is believed that the positive beneficial effect of exercise on cognitive function is likely due to its pro-neurogenic effects. However, the interplay between exercise- and neuroinflammatory-induced changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and associated cognitive function has only recently begun to receive attention. Here we review the current literature on exercise-induced effects on hippocampal neurogenesis, cognitive function and neuroinflammation, and consider exercise as a potential pro-neurogenic and anti-inflammatory intervention for cognition. PMID:26695382

  14. Hippocampal neurogenesis dysfunction linked to depressive-like behaviors in a neuroinflammation induced model of depression.

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    Tang, Ming-Ming; Lin, Wen-Juan; Pan, Yu-Qin; Guan, Xi-Ting; Li, Ying-Cong

    2016-07-01

    Our previous work found that triple central lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration could induce depressive-like behaviors and increased central pro-inflammatory cytokines mRNA, hippocampal cytokine mRNA in particular. Since several neuroinflammation-associated conditions have been reported to impair neurogenesis, in this study, we further investigated whether the neuroinflammation induced depression would be associated with hippocampal neurogenesis dysfunction. An animal model of depression induced by triple central lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration was used. In the hippocampus, the neuroinflammatory state evoked by LPS was marked by an increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α. It was found that rats in the neuroinflammatory state exhibited depressive-like behaviors, including reduced saccharin preference and locomotor activity as well as increased immobility time in the tail suspension test and latency to feed in the novelty suppressed feeding test. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis was concomitantly inhibited, including decreased cell proliferation and newborn cell survival. We also demonstrated that the decreased hippocampal neurogenesis in cell proliferation was significantly correlated with the depressive-like phenotypes of decreased saccharine preference and distance travelled, the core and characteristic symptoms of depression, under neuro inflammation state. These findings provide the first evidence that hippocampal neurogenesis dysfunction is correlated with neuroinflammation-induced depression, which suggests that hippocampal neurogenesis might be one of biological mechanisms underlying depression induced by neruoinflammation. PMID:27106565

  15. Targeting Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase as a Potential Therapeutic Strategy to Restore Adult Neurogenesis.

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    Wang, Shu-Na; Xu, Tian-Ying; Li, Wen-Lin; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Adult neurogenesis is the process of generating new neurons throughout life in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus of most mammalian species, which is closely related to aging and disease. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), also an adipokine known as visfatin, is the rate-limiting enzyme for mammalian nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) salvage synthesis by generating nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide. Recent findings from our laboratory and other laboratories have provided much evidence that NAMPT might serve as a therapeutic target to restore adult neurogenesis. NAMPT-mediated NAD biosynthesis in neural stem/progenitor cells is important for their proliferation, self-renewal, and formation of oligodendrocytes in vivo and in vitro. Therapeutic interventions by the administration of NMN, NAD, or recombinant NAMPT are effective for restoring adult neurogenesis in several neurological diseases. We summarize adult neurogenesis in aging, ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegenerative disease and review the advances of targeting NAMPT in restoring neurogenesis. Specifically, we provide emphasis on the P7C3 family, a class of proneurogenic compounds that are potential NAMPT activators, which might shed light on future drug development in neurogenesis restoration. PMID:27018006

  16. Ly6Chi Monocytes Provide a Link between Antibiotic-Induced Changes in Gut Microbiota and Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

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    Luisa Möhle

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics, though remarkably useful, can also cause certain adverse effects. We detected that treatment of adult mice with antibiotics decreases hippocampal neurogenesis and memory retention. Reconstitution with normal gut flora (SPF did not completely reverse the deficits in neurogenesis unless the mice also had access to a running wheel or received probiotics. In parallel to an increase in neurogenesis and memory retention, both SPF-reconstituted mice that ran and mice supplemented with probiotics exhibited higher numbers of Ly6Chi monocytes in the brain than antibiotic-treated mice. Elimination of Ly6Chi monocytes by antibody depletion or the use of knockout mice resulted in decreased neurogenesis, whereas adoptive transfer of Ly6Chi monocytes rescued neurogenesis after antibiotic treatment. We propose that the rescue of neurogenesis and behavior deficits in antibiotic-treated mice by exercise and probiotics is partially mediated by Ly6Chi monocytes.

  17. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 as Predictor of Body Mass Index and Dentate Gyrus Neurogenesis: Neuroplasticity and the Metabolic Milieu

    OpenAIRE

    Coplan, Jeremy D.; Shariful Syed; Perera, Tarique D.; Sasha L Fulton; Mary Ann Banerji; Dwork, Andrew J.; Kral, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) regulates carbohydrate metabolism and promotes neurogenesis. We reported an inverse correlation between adult body mass and neurogenesis in nonhuman primates. Here we examine relationships between physiological levels of the neurotrophic incretin, plasma GLP-1 (pGLP-1), and body mass index (BMI) in adolescence to adult neurogenesis and associations with a diabesity diathesis and infant stress. Morphometry, fasting pGLP-1, insulin resistance, and lipid profiles ...

  18. Suppression of IGF-I signals in neural stem cells enhances neurogenesis and olfactory function during aging.

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    Chaker, Zayna; Aïd, Saba; Berry, Hugues; Holzenberger, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Downregulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathways prolongs lifespan in various species, including mammals. Still, the cellular mechanisms by which IGF signaling controls the aging trajectory of individual organs are largely unknown. Here, we asked whether suppression of IGF-I receptor (IGF-1R) in adult stem cells preserves long-term cell replacement, and whether this may prevent age-related functional decline in a regenerating tissue. Using neurogenesis as a paradigm, we showed that conditional knockout of IGF-1R specifically in adult neural stem cells (NSC) maintained youthful characteristics of olfactory bulb neurogenesis within an aging brain. We found that blocking IGF-I signaling in neural precursors increased cumulative neuroblast production and enhanced neuronal integration into the olfactory bulb. This in turn resulted in neuro-anatomical changes that improved olfactory function. Interestingly, mutants also displayed long-term alterations in energy metabolism, possibly related to IGF-1R deletion in NSCs throughout lifespan. We explored Akt and ERK signaling cascades and revealed differential regulation downstream of IGF-1R, with Akt phosphorylation preferentially decreased in IGF-1R(-/-) NSCs within the niche, and ERK pathway downregulated in differentiated neurons of the OB. These challenging experimental results were sustained by data from mathematical modeling, predicting that diminished stimulation of growth is indeed optimal for tissue aging. Thus, inhibiting growth and longevity gene IGF-1R in adult NSCs induced a gain-of-function phenotype during aging, marked by optimized management of cell renewal, and enhanced olfactory sensory function. PMID:26219530

  19. Antidepressants stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis by inhibiting p21 expression in the subgranular zone of the hipppocampus.

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    Robert N Pechnick

    Full Text Available The relationships among hippocampal neurogenesis, depression and the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs have generated a considerable amount of controversy. The cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk inhibitor p21(Cip1 (p21 plays a crucial role in restraining cellular proliferation and maintaining cellular quiescence. Using in vivo and in vitro approaches the present study shows that p21 is expressed in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in early neuronal progenitors and in immature neurons, but not in mature neurons or astroglia. In vitro, proliferation is higher in neuronal progenitor cells derived from p21-/- mice compared to cells derived from wild-type mice. Proliferation is increased in neuronal progenitor cells after suppression of p21 using lentivirus expressing short hairpin RNA against p21. In vivo, chronic treatment with the non-selective antidepressant imipramine as well as the norepinephrine-selective reuptake inhibitor desipramine or the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine all decrease p21 expression, and this was associated with increased neurogenesis. Chronic antidepressant treatment did not affect the expression of other Cdk inhibitors. Untreated p21-/- mice exhibit a higher degree of baseline neurogenesis and decreased immobility in the forced swim test. Although chronic imipramine treatment increased neurogenesis and reduced immobility in the forced swim test in wild-type mice, it reduced neurogenesis and increased immobility in p21-/- mice. These results demonstrate the unique role of p21 in the control of neurogenesis, and support the hypothesis that different classes of reuptake inhibitor-type antidepressant drugs all stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis by inhibiting p21 expression.

  20. Additive effects of physical exercise and environmental enrichment on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice

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    Klaus Fabel

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary physical exercise (wheel running, RUN and environmental enrichment (ENR both stimulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis but do so by different mechanisms. RUN induces precursor cell proliferation, whereas ENR exerts a survival-promoting effect on newborn cells. In addition, continued RUN prevented the physiologically occurring age-related decline in precursor cell in the dentate gyrus but did not lead to a corresponding increase in net neurogenesis. We hypothesized that in the absence of appropriate cognitive stimuli the potential for neurogenesis could not be realized but that an increased potential by proliferating precursor cells due to RUN could actually lead to more adult neurogenesis if an appropriate survival-promoting stimulus follows the exercise. We thus asked whether a sequential combination of RUN and ENR (RUNENR would show additive effects that are distinct from the application of either paradigm alone. We found that the effects of 10 days of RUN followed by 35 days of ENR were additive in that the combined stimulation yielded an approximately 30% greater increase in new neurons than either stimulus alone, which also increased neurogenesis. Surprisingly, this result indicates that although overall the amount of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus is poorly predictive of net adult neurogenesis, an increased neurogenic potential nevertheless provides the basis for a greater efficiency of the same survival-promoting stimulus. We thus propose that physical activity can “prime” the neurogenic region of the dentate gyrus for increased neurogenesis in the case the animal is exposed to an additional cognitive stimulus, here represented by the enrichment paradigm.

  1. Progressive effects of N-myc deficiency on proliferation, neurogenesis, and morphogenesis in the olfactory epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Walter; Schimmang, Thomas; Gunhaga, Lena

    2014-06-01

    N-myc belongs to the myc proto-oncogene family, which is involved in numerous cellular processes such as proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and differentiation. Conditional deletion of N-myc in the mouse nervous system disrupted brain development, indicating that N-myc plays an essential role during neural development. How the development of the olfactory epithelium and neurogenesis within are affected by the loss of N-myc has, however, not been determined. To address these issues, we examined an N-myc(Foxg1Cre) conditional mouse line, in which N-myc is depleted in the olfactory epithelium. First changes in N-myc mutants were detected at E11.5, with reduced proliferation and neurogenesis in a slightly smaller olfactory epithelium. The phenotype was more pronounced at E13.5, with a complete lack of Hes5-positive progenitor cells, decreased proliferation, and neurogenesis. In addition, stereological analyses revealed reduced cell size of post-mitotic neurons in the olfactory epithelium, which contributed to a smaller olfactory pit. Furthermore, we observed diminished proliferation and neurogenesis also in the vomeronasal organ, which likewise was reduced in size. In addition, the generation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons was severely reduced in N-myc mutants. Thus, diminished neurogenesis and proliferation in combination with smaller neurons might explain the morphological defects in the N-myc depleted olfactory structures. Moreover, our results suggest an important role for N-myc in regulating ongoing neurogenesis, in part by maintaining the Hes5-positive progenitor pool. In summary, our results provide evidence that N-myc deficiency in the olfactory epithelium progressively diminishes proliferation and neurogenesis with negative consequences at structural and cellular levels. PMID:24376126

  2. Lithium improves hippocampal neurogenesis, neuropathology and cognitive functions in APP mutant mice.

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    Anna Fiorentini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive deterioration of cognitive functions, extracellular β-amyloid (Aβ plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles within neocortex and hippocampus. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis plays an important role in learning and memory processes and its abnormal regulation might account for cognitive impairments associated with AD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The double transgenic (Tg CRND8 mice (overexpressing the Swedish and Indiana mutations in the human amyloid precursor protein, aged 2 and 6 months, were used to examine in vivo the effects of 5 weeks lithium treatment. BrdU labelling showed a decreased neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of Tg mice compared to non-Tg mice. The decrease of hippocampal neurogenesis was accompanied by behavioural deficits and worsened with age and pathology severity. The differentiation into neurons and maturation of the proliferating cells were also markedly impaired in the Tg mice. Lithium treatment to 2-month-old Tg mice significantly stimulated the proliferation and neuron fate specification of newborn cells and fully counteracted the transgene-induced impairments of cognitive functions. The drug, by the inhibition of GSK-3β and subsequent activation of Wnt/ß-catenin signalling promoted hippocampal neurogenesis. Finally, the data show that the lithium's ability to stimulate neurogenesis and cognitive functions was lost in the aged Tg mice, thus indicating that the lithium-induced facilitation of neurogenesis and cognitive functions declines as brain Aβ deposition and pathology increases. CONCLUSIONS: Lithium, when given on time, stimulates neurogenesis and counteracts AD-like pathology.

  3. Neurogenesis in spinal cord of mouse: an autoradiographic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An autoradiographic analysis of the time and sites of origin, and the migration and setting patterns of neurons was made in the spinal cord of the mouse. The neurons originated on days 10-15 of gestation with temporal gradients along the ventrodorsal and rostrocaudal axes. The motor neurons originated on days 10-11 of gestation; the neurons in the intermediate gray region originated on days 11-14 of gestation; the neurons of the head of the dorsal horn originated on days 12-14 of gestation. The neurons that originated on days 10 and 11 originated and migrated primarily from the basal plate, and they settled in the adjacent regions of the intermediate zone; those neurons formed on days 12-14 originated and migrated primarily from the alar plate, and it was concluded that these neuroblasts similarly settled in the adjacent regions of the intermediate zone. Extraventricular proliferation, which presumably signaled the initial stages of gliogenesis, was first observed on day 12 of gestation. This study supports the classical idea of the mosaic pattern of neurogenesis in the embryonic spinal cord. (Auth.)

  4. Protracted postnatal neurogenesis and radiosensitivity in the rabbit's dentate gyrus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the hippocampal formation of a 3-month-old rabbit submitted to a 4.5 Gy gamma irradiation a cytologic study with light and electron microscopy allowed us to make clear the dentate gyrus particular radiosensitivity as soon as the first hours after irradiation. The pycnosis lesion observed in the subgranular zone has drawn our attention in particular. We apply ourselves to describe and precise the lesion and its evolution; thanks to an autoradiographic study, we have shown its link with late postnatal neurogenesis which goes on in this zone and at last we have used the subgranular cells 'radiosensitivity as a biological test allowing to compare the various rays' effects (gamma and neutron rays). In the brain of a one-month-old monkey submitted to a 4 Gy total irradiation the same pycnotic lesion is observed: 1) in the dentate gyrus's subgranular zone and 2) in the cerebellum's outer granular layer. These two postnatal proliferative zones remain particularly sensitive to ionizing radiations. (orig.)

  5. Development of circadian oscillators in neurosphere cultures during adult neurogenesis.

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    Astha Malik

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are common in many cell types but are reported to be lacking in embryonic stem cells. Recent studies have described possible interactions between the molecular mechanism of circadian clocks and the signaling pathways that regulate stem cell differentiation. Circadian rhythms have not been examined well in neural stem cells and progenitor cells that produce new neurons and glial cells during adult neurogenesis. To evaluate circadian timing abilities of cells undergoing neural differentiation, neurospheres were prepared from the mouse subventricular zone (SVZ, a rich source of adult neural stem cells. Circadian rhythms in mPer1 gene expression were recorded in individual spheres, and cell types were characterized by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy at early and late developmental stages in vitro. Circadian rhythms were observed in neurospheres induced to differentiate into neurons or glia, and rhythms emerged within 3-4 days as differentiation proceeded, suggesting that the neural stem cell state suppresses the functioning of the circadian clock. Evidence was also provided that neural stem progenitor cells derived from the SVZ of adult mice are self-sufficient clock cells capable of producing a circadian rhythm without input from known circadian pacemakers of the organism. Expression of mPer1 occurred in high frequency oscillations before circadian rhythms were detected, which may represent a role for this circadian clock gene in the fast cycling of gene expression responsible for early cell differentiation.

  6. Mouse embryonic retina delivers information controlling cortical neurogenesis.

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    Ciro Bonetti

    Full Text Available The relative contribution of extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms to cortical development is an intensely debated issue and an outstanding question in neurobiology. Currently, the emerging view is that interplay between intrinsic genetic mechanisms and extrinsic information shape different stages of cortical development. Yet, whereas the intrinsic program of early neocortical developmental events has been at least in part decoded, the exact nature and impact of extrinsic signaling are still elusive and controversial. We found that in the mouse developing visual system, acute pharmacological inhibition of spontaneous retinal activity (retinal waves-RWs during embryonic stages increase the rate of corticogenesis (cell cycle withdrawal. Furthermore, early perturbation of retinal spontaneous activity leads to changes of cortical layer structure at a later time point. These data suggest that mouse embryonic retina delivers long-distance information capable of modulating cell genesis in the developing visual cortex and that spontaneous activity is the candidate long-distance acting extrinsic cue mediating this process. In addition, these data may support spontaneous activity to be a general signal coordinating neurogenesis in other developing sensory pathways or areas of the central nervous system.

  7. Fermented Sipjeondaebo-tang Alleviates Memory Deficits and Loss of Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Scopolamine-induced Amnesia in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Heeeun; Park, Hwayong; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the anti-amnesic effects of SJ and fermented SJ (FSJ) on scopolamine (SCO)-induced amnesia mouse model. Mice were orally co-treated with SJ or FSJ (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) and SCO (1 mg/kg), which was injected intraperitoneally for 14 days. SCO decreased the step-through latency and prolonged latency time to find the hidden platform in the passive avoidance test and Morris water maze test, respectively, and both SCO effects were ameliorated by FSJ treatment. FSJ was discovered to promote hippocampal neurogenesis during SCO treatment by increasing proliferation and survival of BrdU-positive cells, immature/mature neurons. In the hippocampus of SCO, oxidative stress and the activity of acetylcholinesterase were elevated, whereas the levels of acetylcholine and choline acetyltransferase were diminished; however, all of these alterations were attenuated by FSJ-treatment. The alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein, and phosphorylated Akt that occurred following SCO treatment were protected by FSJ administration. Therefore, our findings are the first to suggest that FSJ may be a promising therapeutic drug for the treatment of amnesia and aging-related or neurodegenerative disease-related memory impairment. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism by which FSJ exerts its effects may involve modulation of the cholinergic system and BDNF/CREB/Akt pathway. PMID:26939918

  8. APC/C-Cdh1 coordinates neurogenesis and cortical size during development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Esteban, Maria; García-Higuera, Irene; Maestre, Carolina; Moreno, Sergio; Almeida, Angeles

    2013-12-01

    The morphology of the adult brain is the result of a delicate balance between neural progenitor proliferation and the initiation of neurogenesis in the embryonic period. Here we assessed whether the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) cofactor, Cdh1—which regulates mitosis exit and G1-phase length in dividing cells—regulates neurogenesis in vivo. We use an embryo-restricted Cdh1 knockout mouse model and show that functional APC/C-Cdh1 ubiquitin ligase activity is required for both terminal differentiation of cortical neurons in vitro and neurogenesis in vivo. Further, genetic ablation of Cdh1 impairs the ability of APC/C to promote neurogenesis by delaying the exit of the progenitor cells from the cell cycle. This causes replicative stress and p53-mediated apoptotic death resulting in decreased number of cortical neurons and cortex size. These results demonstrate that APC/C-Cdh1 coordinates cortical neurogenesis and size, thus posing Cdh1 in the molecular pathogenesis of congenital neurodevelopmental disorders, such as microcephaly.

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid control of neurogenesis induced by retinoic acid during early brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, M I; Martín, C; Carnicero, E; Bueno, D; Gato, A

    2011-07-01

    Embryonic-cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) plays crucial roles in early brain development including the control of neurogenesis. Although FGF2 and lipoproteins present in the E-CSF have previously been shown to be involved in neurogenesis, the main factor triggering this process remains unknown. E-CSF contains all-trans-retinol and retinol-binding protein involved in the synthesis of retinoic acid (RA), a neurogenesis inducer. In early chick embryo brain, only the mesencephalic-rombencephalic isthmus (IsO) is able to synthesize RA. Here we show that in chick embryo brain development: (1) E-CSF helps to control RA synthesis in the IsO by means of the RBP and all-trans-retinol it contains; (2) E-CSF has retinoic acid activity, which suggests it may act as a diffusion pathway for RA; and (3) the influence of E-CSF on embryonic brain neurogenesis is to a large extent due to its involvement in RA synthesis. These data help to understand neurogenesis from neural progenitor cells. PMID:21594951

  10. Deficient plasticity in the hippocampus and the spiral of addiction: focus on adult neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Juan J

    2013-01-01

    Addiction is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder which causes disruption at multiple levels, including cognitive, emotional, and behavioral domains. Traditional biological theories of addiction have focused on the mesolimbic dopamine pathway and the nucleus accumbens as anatomical substrates mediating addictive-like behaviors. More recently, we have begun to recognize the engagement and dynamic influence of a much broader circuitry which encompasses the frontal cortex, the amygdala, and the hippocampus. In particular, neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus has become a major focus of attention due to its ability to influence memory, motivation, and affect, all of which are disrupted in addiction. First, I summarize toxicological data that reveal strongly suppressive effects of drug exposure on adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Then, I discuss the impact of deficient neurogenesis on learning and memory function, stress responsiveness and affective behavior, as they relate to addiction. Finally, I examine recent behavioral observations that implicate neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus in the emergence and maintenance of addictive behavior. The evidence reviewed here suggests that deficient neurogenesis is associated with several components of the downward spiraling loop that characterizes addiction, including elevated sensitivity to drug-induced reward and reinforcement, enhanced neurohormonal responsiveness, emergence of a negative affective state, memory impairment, and inflexible behavior. PMID:22976276

  11. EVA1A/TMEM166 Regulates Embryonic Neurogenesis by Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengtao; Lu, Guang; Hu, Jia; Shen, Xue; Ju, Jiabao; Gao, Yuanxu; Qu, Liujing; Xia, Yan; Chen, Yingyu; Bai, Yun

    2016-03-01

    Self-renewal and differentiation of neural stem cells is essential for embryonic neurogenesis, which is associated with cell autophagy. However, the mechanism by which autophagy regulates neurogenesis remains undefined. Here, we show that Eva1a/Tmem166, an autophagy-related gene, regulates neural stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Eva1a depletion impaired the generation of newborn neurons, both in vivo and in vitro. Conversely, overexpression of EVA1A enhanced newborn neuron generation and maturation. Moreover, Eva1a depletion activated the PIK3CA-AKT axis, leading to the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin and the subsequent inhibition of autophagy. Furthermore, addition of methylpyruvate to the culture during neural stem cell differentiation rescued the defective embryonic neurogenesis induced by Eva1a depletion, suggesting that energy availability is a significant factor in embryonic neurogenesis. Collectively, these data demonstrated that EVA1A regulates embryonic neurogenesis by modulating autophagy. Our results have potential implications for understanding the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders caused by autophagy dysregulation. PMID:26905199

  12. EVA1A/TMEM166 Regulates Embryonic Neurogenesis by Autophagy

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    Mengtao Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-renewal and differentiation of neural stem cells is essential for embryonic neurogenesis, which is associated with cell autophagy. However, the mechanism by which autophagy regulates neurogenesis remains undefined. Here, we show that Eva1a/Tmem166, an autophagy-related gene, regulates neural stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Eva1a depletion impaired the generation of newborn neurons, both in vivo and in vitro. Conversely, overexpression of EVA1A enhanced newborn neuron generation and maturation. Moreover, Eva1a depletion activated the PIK3CA-AKT axis, leading to the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin and the subsequent inhibition of autophagy. Furthermore, addition of methylpyruvate to the culture during neural stem cell differentiation rescued the defective embryonic neurogenesis induced by Eva1a depletion, suggesting that energy availability is a significant factor in embryonic neurogenesis. Collectively, these data demonstrated that EVA1A regulates embryonic neurogenesis by modulating autophagy. Our results have potential implications for understanding the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders caused by autophagy dysregulation.

  13. Hippocampal neurogenesis levels predict WATERMAZE search strategies in the aging brain.

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    Joana Gil-Mohapel

    Full Text Available The hippocampus plays a crucial role in the formation of spatial memories, and it is thought that adult hippocampal neurogenesis may participate in this form of learning. To better elucidate the relationship between neurogenesis and spatial learning, we examined both across the entire life span of mice. We found that cell proliferation, neuronal differentiation, and neurogenesis significantly decrease with age, and that there is an abrupt reduction in these processes early on, between 1.5-3 months of age. After this, the neurogenic capacity continues to decline steadily. The initial abrupt decline in adult neurogenesis was paralleled by a significant reduction in Morris Water Maze performance, however overall learning and memory remained constant thereafter. Further analysis of the search strategies employed revealed that reductions in neurogenesis in the aging brain were strongly correlated with the adoption of spatially imprecise search strategies. Overall, performance measures of learning and memory in the Morris Water Maze were maintained at relatively constant levels in aging animals due to an increase in the use of spatially imprecise search strategies.

  14. The 5-HT3 receptor is essential for exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, M; Nakamura, Y; Ishida, Y; Shimada, S

    2015-11-01

    Exercise has a variety of beneficial effects on brain structure and function, such as hippocampal neurogenesis, mood and memory. Previous studies have shown that exercise enhances hippocampal neurogenesis, induces antidepressant effects and improves learning behavior. Brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) levels increase following exercise, and the 5-HT system has been suggested to have an important role in these exercise-induced neuronal effects. However, the precise mechanism remains unclear. In this study, analysis of the 5-HT type 3A receptor subunit-deficient (htr3a(-/-)) mice revealed that lack of the 5-HT type 3 (5-HT3) receptor resulted in loss of exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects, but not of learning enhancement. Furthermore, stimulation of the 5-HT3 receptor promoted neurogenesis. These findings demonstrate that the 5-HT3 receptor is the critical target of 5-HT action in the brain following exercise, and is indispensable for hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects induced by exercise. This is the first report of a pivotal 5-HT receptor subtype that has a fundamental role in exercise-induced morphological changes and psychological effects. PMID:25403840

  15. Functional Role of Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis as a Therapeutic Strategy for Mental Disorders

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    Heechul Jun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis, the process of generating new neurons from neural stem cells, plays significant roles in synaptic plasticity, memory, and mood regulation. In the mammalian brain, it continues to occur well into adulthood in discrete regions, namely, the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. During the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms regulating adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its role in the etiology of mental disorders. In addition, adult hippocampal neurogenesis is highly correlated with the remission of the antidepressant effect. In this paper, we discuss three major psychiatric disorders, depression, schizophrenia, and drug addiction, in light of preclinical evidence used in establishing the neurobiological significance of adult neurogenesis. We interpret the significance of these results and pose questions that remain unanswered. Potential treatments which include electroconvulsive therapy, deep brain stimulation, chemical antidepressants, and exercise therapy are discussed. While consensus lacks on specific mechanisms, we highlight evidence which indicates that these treatments may function via an increase in neural progenitor proliferation and changes to the hippocampal circuitry. Establishing a significant role of adult neurogenesis in the pathogenicity of psychiatric disorders may hold the key to potential strategies toward effective treatment.

  16. Age- and sex-dependent effects of early life stress on hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manila eLoi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Early life stress is a well-documented risk factor for the development of psychopathology in genetically predisposed individuals. As it is hard to study how early life stress impacts human brain structure and function, various animal models have been developed to address this issue. The models discussed here reveal that perinatal stress in rodents exerts lasting effects on the stress system as well as on the structure and function of the brain. One of the structural parameters strongly affected by perinatal stress is adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Based on compiled literature data, we report that postnatal stress slightly enhances neurogenesis until the onset of puberty in male rats; when animals reach adulthood, neurogenesis is reduced as a consequence of perinatal stress. By contrast, female rats showed a prominent reduction in neurogenesis prior to the onset of puberty, but this effect subsides when animals reach young adulthood. We further present preliminary data that transient treatment with a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist can normalize cell proliferation in maternally deprived female rats, while the compound had no effect in non-deprived rats. Taken together, the data show that neurogenesis is affected by early life stress in an age-and sex-dependent manner and that normalization may be possible during critical stages of brain development.

  17. Maturin is a novel protein required for differentiation during primary neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-De Luna, Reyna I.; Ku, Ray Yueh; Lyou, Yung; Zuber, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation are tightly controlled during neural development. In the embryonic neural plate, primary neurogenesis is driven by the proneural pathway. Here we report the characterization of Maturin, a novel, evolutionarily conserved protein that is required for normal primary neurogenesis. Maturin is detected throughout the early nervous system, yet it is most strongly expressed in differentiating neurons of the embryonic fish, frog and mouse nervous systems. Maturin expression can be induced by the proneural transcription factors Neurog2, Neurod1, and Ebf3. Maturin overexpression promotes neurogenesis, while loss-of-function inhibits the differentiation of neuronal progenitors, resulting in neural plate expansion. Maturin knockdown blocks the ability of Neurog2, Neurod1, and Ebf3 to drive ectopic neurogenesis. Maturin and Pak3, are both required for, and can synergize to promote differentiation of the primary neurons in vivo. Together, our results suggest that Maturin functions during primary neurogenesis and is required for the proneural pathway to regulate neural differentiation. PMID:24095902

  18. Disruption of adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb affects social interaction but not maternal behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia E Feierstein

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Adult-born neurons arrive to the olfactory bulb and integrate into the existing circuit throughout life. Despite the prevalence of this phenomenon, its functional impact is still poorly understood. Recent studies point to the importance of newly generated neurons to olfactory learning and memory. Adult neurogenesis is regulated by a variety of factors, notably by instances related to reproductive behavior, such as exposure to mating partners, pregnancy and lactation, and exposure to offspring. To study the contribution of olfactory neurogenesis to maternal behavior and social recognition, here we selectively disrupted olfactory bulb neurogenesis using focal irradiation of the subventricular zone in adult female mice. We show that reduction of olfactory neurogenesis results in an abnormal social interaction pattern with male, but not female, conspecifics; we suggest that this effect could result from inability to detect or discriminate male odors and could therefore have implications for the recognition of potential mating partners. Disruption of olfactory bulb neurogenesis, however, neither impaired maternal-related behaviors, nor did it affect the ability of mothers to discriminate their own progeny from others.

  19. Exercise prevents high-fat diet-induced impairment of flexible memory expression in the water maze and modulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, C; Jonas, W; Iggena, D; Empl, L; Rivalan, M; Wiedmer, P; Spranger, J; Hellweg, R; Winter, Y; Steiner, B

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is currently one of the most serious threats to human health in the western civilization. A growing body of evidence suggests that obesity is associated with cognitive dysfunction. Physical exercise not only improves fitness but it has also been shown in human and animal studies to increase hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and physical exercise both modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis has been demonstrated to play a role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory, particularly flexible memory expression. Here, we investigated the effects of twelve weeks of HFD vs. control diet (CD) and voluntary physical activity (wheel running; -R) vs. inactivity (sedentary; -S) on hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial learning and flexible memory function in female C57Bl/6 mice assessed in the Morris water maze. HFD was initiated either in adolescent mice combined with long-term concurrent exercise (preventive approach) or in young adult mice with 14days of subsequent exercise (therapeutic approach). HFD resulted in impaired flexible memory expression only when initiated in adolescent (HFD-S) but not in young adult mice, which was successfully prevented by concurrent exercise (HFD-R). Histological analysis revealed a reduction of immature neurons in the hippocampus of the memory-impaired HFD-S mice of the preventive approach. Long-term physical exercise also led to accelerated spatial learning during the acquisition period, which was accompanied by increased numbers of newborn mature neurons (HFD-R and CD-R). Short-term exercise of 14days in the therapeutic group was not effective in improving spatial learning or memory. We show that (1) alterations in learning and flexible memory expression are accompanied by changes in the number of neuronal cells at different maturation stages; (2) these neuronal cells are in turn differently affected by HFD; (3) adolescent mice are specifically susceptible to the

  20. Maternal exposure to hexachlorophene targets intermediate-stage progenitor cells of the hippocampal neurogenesis in rat offspring via dysfunction of cholinergic inputs by myelin vacuolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The effect of maternal exposure to HCP on rat hippocampal neurogenesis was examined. • HCP induces myelin vacuolation of nerve tracts in the septal–hippocampal pathway. • Myelin changes suppress Chrnb2-mediated cholinergic inputs to the dentate gyrus. • SGZ apoptosis occurs via the mitochondrial pathway and targets type-2b cells. • Dysfunction of cholinergic inputs is related to type-2b SGZ cell apoptosis. - Abstract: Hexachlorophene (HCP) is known to induce myelin vacuolation corresponding to intramyelinic edema of nerve fibers in the central and peripheral nervous system in animals. This study investigated the effect of maternal exposure to HCP on hippocampal neurogenesis in rat offspring using pregnant rats supplemented with 0 (controls), 100, or 300 ppm HCP in the diet from gestational day 6 to day 21 after delivery. On postnatal day (PND) 21, the numbers of T box brain 2+ progenitor cells and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling+ apoptotic cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) decreased in female offspring at 300 ppm, which was accompanied by myelin vacuolation and punctate tubulin beta-3 chain staining of nerve fibers in the hippocampal fimbria. In addition, transcript levels of the cholinergic receptor, nicotinic beta 2 (Chrnb2) and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) decreased in the dentate gyrus. HCP-exposure did not alter the numbers of SGZ proliferating cells and reelin- or calcium-binding protein-expressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneuron subpopulations in the dentate hilus on PND 21 and PND 77. Although some myelin vacuolation remained, all other changes observed in HCP-exposed offspring on PND 21 disappeared on PND 77. These results suggest that maternal HCP exposure reversibly decreases type-2b intermediate-stage progenitor cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in offspring hippocampal neurogenesis at 300 ppm HCP. Neurogenesis may be affected by dysfunction of

  1. Anxiety- and Depression-Like States Lead to Pronounced Olfactory Deficits and Impaired Adult Neurogenesis in Mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Siopi, Eleni; Denizet, Marie; Gabellec, Marie-Madeleine; De Chaumont, Fabrice; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Guilloux, Jean-Philippe; Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Lazarini, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    International audience Numerous clinical reports underscore the frequency of olfactory impairments in patients suffering from major depressive disorders (MDDs), yet the underlying physiopathological mechanisms remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that one key link between olfactory deficits and MDD lies in hypercortisolemia, a cardinal symptom of MDD. Corticosterone (CORT) is known to negatively correlate with hippocampal neurogenesis, yet its effects on olfactory neurogenesis and olf...

  2. Fat cell-secreted adiponectin mediates physical exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis: an alternative anti-depressive treatment?

    OpenAIRE

    Suk Yu Yau; Ang Li; Aimin Xu; Kwok-fai So

    2015-01-01

    Psychological depression is drawing accumulating attention nowadays, due to the skyrocketing incidence worldwide and the enormous burdens it incurs. Physical exercise has been long recognized for its therapeutic effects on depressive disorders, although knowledge of the underlying mechanisms remains limited. Suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis in adult brains has been regarded, at least partly, contributive to depression, whereas physical exercise that restores neurogenesis accordingly exerts...

  3. The microtubule destabilizing protein stathmin controls the transition from dividing neuronal precursors to postmitotic neurons during adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Boekhoorn; V. van Dis; E. Goedknegt; A. Sobel; P.J. Lucassen; C.C. Hoogenraad

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus is one of the two areas in the mammalian brain where adult neurogenesis occurs. Adult neurogenesis is well known to be involved in hippocampal physiological functions as well as pathophysiological conditions. Microtubules (MTs), providing intracellular transport, stability, and trans

  4. Effectiveness of Neurogenesis in treating Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan AMIRSALARI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Amirsalary S, Dehghan L, Dalvand H, Haghgoo H. Effectiveness of Neurogenesis in treating children with Cerebral Palsy. Iran J Child Neurol 2012;6(2:1-8. objectiveTissue-specific stem cells divide to generate different cell types for the purpose oftissue repair in the adult. The aim of this study was to detect the significance ofneurogenesis in the central nervous system in patients with cerebral palsy (CP.Materials & MethodsA search was made in Medline, CINAHL, PubMed, ISI Web of Science andGoogle Scholar from 1995 to February 2011. The outcomes measured in thereview were classified to origins, proliferation, and migration of new neurons,and neurogenesis in CP.ResultsAccording to the review of articles, neurogenesis persists in specific brainregions throughout lifetime and can be enhanced from endogenous progenitorcells residing in the subventricular zone by growth factors or neurotrophicfactors and rehabilitation program.ConclusionMost of the studies have been conducted in the laboratory and on animals,more work is required at the basic level of stem cell biology, in the developmentof human models, and finally in well-conceived clinical trials. References1. Buonomano DV, Merzenich MM. Cortical plasticity: from synapses to maps. Annu Rev Neurosci 1998; 21:149-86.2. Haghgoo H. Fundemental of neurosciences. 1st ed. Tehran; USWR Press; 2011.3. Payne BR, Lomber SG. Reconstructing functional systems after lesions of cerebral cortex. Nat Rev Neurosci 2001 Dec;2(12:911-9.4. Bax M, Goldstein M, Rosenbaum P, Leviton A, Paneth N, Dan B, et al. Proposed definition and classification of cerebral palsy. Dev Med Child Neurol 2005 Apr;47(8:571-6.5. Joghataei M, Kazem M. Barresi sathe niazhaie jamee be khadamate behzisti colle keshvar [persian].Tehran: University of. Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences; 1990.6. Johnson A. Prevalence and characteristics of children with cerebral palsy in Europe. Dev Med Child Neurol

  5. Temporal features of adult neurogenesis: differences and similarities across mammalian species

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    Frederic eLevy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Production of new neurons continues throughout life in most invertebrates and vertebrates like crustaceans, fishes, reptiles, birds, and mammals including humans. Most studies have been carried out on rodent models and demonstrated that adult neurogenesis is located mainly in two structures, the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ. If adult neurogenesis is well preserved throughout evolution, yet there are however some features which differ between species. The present review proposes to target similarities and differences in the mechanism of mammalian adult neurogenesis by comparing selected species including humans. We will highlight the cellular composition and morphological organization of the SVZ in primates which differs from that of rodents and may be of functional relevance. We will particularly focus on the dynamic of neuronal maturation in rodents, primates and humans but also in sheep which appears to be an interesting model due to its similarities with the primate brain.

  6. Organotypic Cultures as a Model to Study Adult Neurogenesis in CNS Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Fabio; Benito-Muñoz, Monica; Matute, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neural regeneration resides in certain specific regions of adult CNS. Adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life, especially from the subgranular zone of hippocampus and the subventricular zone, and can be modulated in physiological and pathological conditions. Numerous techniques and animal models have been developed to demonstrate and observe neural regeneration but, in order to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms and to characterize multiple types of cell populations involved in the activation of neurogenesis and gliogenesis, investigators have to turn to in vitro models. Organotypic cultures best recapitulate the 3D organization of the CNS and can be explored taking advantage of many techniques. Here, we review the use of organotypic cultures as a reliable and well defined method to study the mechanisms of neurogenesis under normal and pathological conditions. As an example, we will focus on the possibilities these cultures offer to study the pathophysiology of diseases like Alzheimer disease, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral ischemia. PMID:27127518

  7. Organotypic Cultures as a Model to Study Adult Neurogenesis in CNS Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Cavaliere

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural regeneration resides in certain specific regions of adult CNS. Adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life, especially from the subgranular zone of hippocampus and the subventricular zone, and can be modulated in physiological and pathological conditions. Numerous techniques and animal models have been developed to demonstrate and observe neural regeneration but, in order to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms and to characterize multiple types of cell populations involved in the activation of neurogenesis and gliogenesis, investigators have to turn to in vitro models. Organotypic cultures best recapitulate the 3D organization of the CNS and can be explored taking advantage of many techniques. Here, we review the use of organotypic cultures as a reliable and well defined method to study the mechanisms of neurogenesis under normal and pathological conditions. As an example, we will focus on the possibilities these cultures offer to study the pathophysiology of diseases like Alzheimer disease, Parkinson’s disease, and cerebral ischemia.

  8. Chronic oleoylethanolamide treatment improves spatial cognitive deficits through enhancing hippocampal neurogenesis after transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Chao; Guo, Han; Zhou, Hao; Suo, Da-Qin; Li, Wen-Jun; Zhou, Yu; Zhao, Yun; Yang, Wu-Shuang; Jin, Xin

    2015-04-15

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) has been shown to have neuroprotective effects after acute cerebral ischemic injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic OEA treatment on ischemia-induced spatial cognitive impairments, electrophysiology behavior and hippocampal neurogenesis. Daily treatments of 30 mg/kg OEA significantly ameliorated spatial cognitive deficits and attenuated the inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rat model. Moreover, OEA administration improved cognitive function in a manner associated with enhanced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Further study demonstrated that treatment with OEA markedly increased the expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α (PPARα). Our data suggest that chronic OEA treatment can exert functional recovery of cognitive impairments and neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemic insult in rats via triggering of neurogenesis in the hippocampus, which supports the therapeutic use of OEA for cerebral ischemia. PMID:25748831

  9. Organotypic Cultures as a Model to Study Adult Neurogenesis in CNS Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Fabio; Benito-Muñoz, Monica; Matute, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neural regeneration resides in certain specific regions of adult CNS. Adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life, especially from the subgranular zone of hippocampus and the subventricular zone, and can be modulated in physiological and pathological conditions. Numerous techniques and animal models have been developed to demonstrate and observe neural regeneration but, in order to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms and to characterize multiple types of cell populations involved in the activation of neurogenesis and gliogenesis, investigators have to turn to in vitro models. Organotypic cultures best recapitulate the 3D organization of the CNS and can be explored taking advantage of many techniques. Here, we review the use of organotypic cultures as a reliable and well defined method to study the mechanisms of neurogenesis under normal and pathological conditions. As an example, we will focus on the possibilities these cultures offer to study the pathophysiology of diseases like Alzheimer disease, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral ischemia. PMID:27127518

  10. The temporal expression pattern of alpha-synuclein modulates olfactory neurogenesis in transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian R Schreglmann

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis mirrors the brain´s endogenous capacity to generate new neurons throughout life. In the subventricular zone/ olfactory bulb system adult neurogenesis is linked to physiological olfactory function and has been shown to be impaired in murine models of neuronal alpha-Synuclein overexpression. We analyzed the degree and temporo-spatial dynamics of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis in transgenic mice expressing human wild-type alpha-Synuclein (WTS under the murine Thy1 (mThy1 promoter, a model known to have a particularly high tg expression associated with impaired olfaction.Survival of newly generated neurons (NeuN-positive in the olfactory bulb was unchanged in mThy1 transgenic animals. Due to decreased dopaminergic differentiation a reduction in new dopaminergic neurons within the olfactory bulb glomerular layer was present. This is in contrast to our previously published data on transgenic animals that express WTS under the control of the human platelet-derived growth factor β (PDGF promoter, that display a widespread decrease in survival of newly generated neurons in regions of adult neurogenesis, resulting in a much more pronounced neurogenesis deficit. Temporal and quantitative expression analysis using immunofluorescence co-localization analysis and Western blots revealed that in comparison to PDGF transgenic animals, in mThy1 transgenic animals WTS is expressed from later stages of neuronal maturation only but at significantly higher levels both in the olfactory bulb and cortex.The dissociation between higher absolute expression levels of alpha-Synuclein but less severe impact on adult olfactory neurogenesis in mThy1 transgenic mice highlights the importance of temporal expression characteristics of alpha-Synuclein on the maturation of newborn neurons.

  11. Bisphenol-A Mediated Inhibition of Hippocampal Neurogenesis Attenuated by Curcumin via Canonical Wnt Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Agarwal, Swati; Tripathi, Anurag; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an environmental xenoestrogenic endocrine disruptor, utilized for production of consumer products, and exerts adverse effects on the developing nervous system. Recently, we found that BPA impairs the finely tuned dynamic processes of neurogenesis (generation of new neurons) in the hippocampus of the developing rat brain. Curcumin is a natural polyphenolic compound, which provides neuroprotection against various environmental neurotoxicants and in the cellular and animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we have assessed the neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin against BPA-mediated reduced neurogenesis and the underlying cellular and molecular mechanism(s). Both in vitro and in vivo studies showed that curcumin protects against BPA-induced hippocampal neurotoxicity. Curcumin protects against BPA-mediated reduced neural stem cells (NSC) proliferation and neuronal differentiation and enhanced neurodegeneration. Curcumin also enhances the expression/levels of neurogenic and the Wnt pathway genes/proteins, which were reduced due to BPA exposure in the hippocampus. Curcumin-mediated neuroprotection against BPA-induced neurotoxicity involved activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which was confirmed by the use of Wnt specific activators (LiCl and GSK-3β siRNA) and inhibitor (Dkk-1). BPA-mediated increased β-catenin phosphorylation, decreased GSK-3β levels, and β-catenin nuclear translocation were significantly reversed by curcumin, leading to enhanced neurogenesis. Curcumin-induced protective effects on neurogenesis were blocked by Dkk-1 in NSC culture treated with BPA. Curcumin-mediated enhanced neurogenesis was correlated well with improved learning and memory in BPA-treated rats. Overall, our results conclude that curcumin provides neuroprotection against BPA-mediated impaired neurogenesis via activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:25963729

  12. Music facilitate the neurogenesis, regeneration and repair of neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Hajime; Toyoshima, Kumiko

    2008-11-01

    Experience has shown that therapy using music for therapeutic purposes has certain effects on neuropsychiatric disorders (both functional and organic disorders). However, the mechanisms of action underlying music therapy remain unknown, and scientific clarification has not advanced. While that study disproved the Mozart effect, the effects of music on the human body and mind were not disproved. In fact, more scientific studies on music have been conducted in recent years, mainly in the field of neuroscience, and the level of interest among researchers is increasing. The results of past studies have clarified that music influences and affects cranial nerves in humans from fetus to adult. The effects of music at a cellular level have not been clarified, and the mechanisms of action for the effects of music on the brain have not been elucidated. We propose that listening to music facilitates the neurogenesis, the regeneration and repair of cerebral nerves by adjusting the secretion of steroid hormones, ultimately leading to cerebral plasticity. Music affects levels of such steroids as cortisol (C), testosterone (T) and estrogen (E), and we believe that music also affects the receptor genes related to these substances, and related proteins. In the prevention of Alzheimer's disease and dementia, hormone replacement therapy has been shown to be effective, but at the same time, side effects have been documented, and the clinical application of hormone replacement therapy is facing a serious challenge. Conversely, music is noninvasive, and its existence is universal and mundane. Thus, if music can be used in medical care, the application of such a safe and inexpensive therapeutic option is limitless. PMID:18692321

  13. Larval neurogenesis in Sabellaria alveolata reveals plasticity in polychaete neural patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Nora; Wanninger, Andreas

    The investigation of neurogenesis in polychaetes not only facilitates insights into the developmental biology of this group, but also provides new data for phylogenetic analyses. This should eventually lead toward a better understanding of metazoan evolution including key issues such as the...... reconstruction software. The overall pattern of neurogenesis in S. alveolata resembles the condition found in other planktonic polychaete trochophores where the larval neural body plan including a serotonergic prototroch nerve ring is directly followed by adult features of the nervous system such as...

  14. Hippocampal adult neurogenesis: Its regulation and potential role in spatial learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Pan, Yongliang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zhibin; Wang, Zuoxin

    2016-08-01

    Adult neurogenesis, defined here as progenitor cell division generating functionally integrated neurons in the adult brain, occurs within the hippocampus of numerous mammalian species including humans. The present review details various endogenous (e.g., neurotransmitters) and environmental (e.g., physical exercise) factors that have been shown to influence hippocampal adult neurogenesis. In addition, the potential involvement of adult-generated neurons in naturally-occurring spatial learning behavior is discussed by summarizing the literature focusing on traditional animal models (e.g., rats and mice), non-traditional animal models (e.g., tree shrews), as well as natural populations (e.g., chickadees and Siberian chipmunk). PMID:27174001

  15. Habenular Neurogenesis in Zebrafish Is Regulated by a Hedgehog, Pax6 Proneural Gene Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naye, François; Peers, Bernard; Roussigné, Myriam; Blader, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The habenulae are highly conserved nuclei in the dorsal diencephalon that connect the forebrain to the midbrain and hindbrain. These nuclei have been implicated in a broad variety of behaviours in humans, primates, rodents and zebrafish. Despite this, the molecular mechanisms that control the genesis and differentiation of neural progenitors in the habenulae remain relatively unknown. We have previously shown that, in zebrafish, the timing of habenular neurogenesis is left-right asymmetric and that in the absence of Nodal signalling this asymmetry is lost. Here, we show that habenular neurogenesis requires the homeobox transcription factor Pax6a and the redundant action of two proneural bHLH factors, Neurog1 and Neurod4. We present evidence that Hedgehog signalling is required for the expression of pax6a, which is in turn necessary for the expression of neurog1 and neurod4. Finally, we demonstrate by pharmacological inhibition that Hedgehog signalling is required continuously during habenular neurogenesis and by cell transplantation experiments that pathway activation is required cell autonomously. Our data sheds light on the mechanism underlying habenular development that may provide insights into how Nodal signalling imposes asymmetry on the timing of habenular neurogenesis. PMID:27387288

  16. Neurogenesis and the Spacing Effect: Learning over Time Enhances Memory and the Survival of New Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisti, Helene M.; Glass, Arnold L.; Shors, Tracey J.

    2007-01-01

    Information that is spaced over time is better remembered than the same amount of information massed together. This phenomenon, known as the spacing effect, was explored with respect to its effect on learning and neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation. Because the cells are generated over time and because learning…

  17. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis inversely correlates with microglia in conditions of voluntary running and aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Georges Gebara

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis results in the formation of new neurons and is a process of brain plasticity involved in learning and memory. The proliferation of adult neural stem or progenitor cells is regulated by several extrinsic factors such as experience, disease or aging and intrinsic factors originating from the neurogenic niche. Microglia is very abundant in the dentate gyrus and increasing evidence indicates that these cells mediate the inflammation-induced reduction in neurogenesis. However, the role of microglia in neurogenesis in physiological conditions remains poorly understood. In this study, we monitored microglia and the proliferation of adult hippocampal stem/progenitor cells in physiological conditions known to increase or decrease adult neurogenesis, voluntary running and aging respectively. We found that the number of microglia in the dentate gyrus was strongly inversely correlated with the number of stem/progenitor cells and cell proliferation in the granule cell layer. Accordingly, co-cultures of decreasing neural progenitor/glia ratio showed that microglia but not astroglia reduced the number of progenitor cells. Together, these results suggest that microglia inhibits the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells despite the absence of inflammatory stimulus.

  18. PMC-12, a traditional herbal medicine, enhances learning memory and hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Ra; Kim, Ju Yeon; Lee, Yujeong; Chun, Hye Jeong; Choi, Young Whan; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Choi, Byung Tae; Kim, Cheol Min; Lee, Jaewon

    2016-03-23

    The beneficial effects of traditional Korean medicine are recognized during the treatment of neurodegenerative conditions, such as, Alzheimer's disease and neurocognitive dysfunction, and recently, hippocampal neurogenesis has been reported to be associated with memory function. In this study, the authors investigated the beneficial effects of polygonum multiflorum Thunberg complex composition-12 (PMC-12), which is a mixture of four medicinal herbs, that is, Polygonum multiflorum, Polygala tenuifolia, Rehmannia glutinosa, and Acorus gramineus, on hippocampal neurogenesis, learning, and memory in mice. PMC-12 was orally administered to male C57BL/6 mice (5 weeks old) at 100 or 500 mg/kg daily for 2 weeks. PMC-12 administration significantly was found to increase the proliferation of neural progenitor cells and the survival of newly-generated cells in the dentate gyrus. In the Morris water maze test, the latency times of PMC-12 treated mice (100 or 500 mg/kg) were shorter than those of vehicle-control mice. In addition, PMC-12 increased the levels of BDNF, p-CREB, and synaptophysin, which are known to be associated with neural plasticity and hippocampal neurogenesis. These findings suggest PMC-12 enhances hippocampal neurogenesis and neurocognitive function and imply that PMC-12 ameliorates memory impairment and cognitive deficits. PMID:26917101

  19. A Common Language: How Neuroimmunological Cross Talk Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odette Leiter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune regulation of the brain is generally studied in the context of injury or disease. Less is known about how the immune system regulates the brain during normal brain function. Recent work has redefined the field of neuroimmunology and, as long as their recruitment and activation are well regulated, immune cells are now known to have protective properties within the central nervous system in maintaining brain health. Adult neurogenesis, the process of new neuron generation in the adult brain, is highly plastic and regulated by diverse extrinsic and intrinsic cues. Emerging research has shown that immune cells and their secreted factors can influence adult neurogenesis, both under baseline conditions and during conditions known to change neurogenesis levels, such as aging and learning in an enriched environment. This review will discuss how, under nonpathological conditions, the immune system can interact with the neural stem cells to regulate adult neurogenesis with particular focus on the hippocampus—a region crucial for learning and memory.

  20. Role of neuronal Ras activity in adult hippocampal neurogenesis and cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eManns

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain is modulated by various signals like growth factors, hormones, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters. All of these factors can (but not necessarily do converge on the activation of the G protein p21Ras. We used a transgenic mouse model (synRas mice expressing constitutively activated G12V-Harvey Ras selectively in differentiated neurons to investigate the possible effects onto neurogenesis. Ras activation in neurons attenuates hippocampal precursor cell generation at an early stage of the proliferative cascade before neuronal lineage determination occurs. Therefore it is unlikely that the transgenically activated Ras in neurons mediates this effect by a direct, intracellular signaling mechanism. Voluntary exercise restores neurogenesis up to wild type level presumably mediated by brain derived neurotrophic factor. Reduced neurogenesis is linked to impairments in spatial short-term memory and object recognition, the latter can be rescued by voluntary exercise, as well. These data support the view that new cells significantly increase complexity that can be processed by the hippocampal network when experience requires high demands to associate stimuli over time and/or space.

  1. [Regulation of neurogenesis: factors affecting of new neurons formation in adult mammals brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respondek, Michalina; Buszman, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenesis is a complex and multi-step process of generating completely functional neurons. This process in adult brain is based on pluripotentional neuronal stem cells (NSC), which are able to proliferation and differentiation into mature neurons or glial cells. NSC are located in subgranular zone inside hippocampus and in subventricular zone. The new neurons formation depends on many endo- and exogenous factors which modulate each step of neurogenesis. This article describes the most important regulators of adult neurogenesis, mainly: neurotrophins, growth factors, hormones, neurotransmitters and microenvironment of NSC. Some drugs, especially antipsychotics, antidepressants and normothymics may affect the neurogenic properties of adult brain. Moreover pathological processes such as neuroinflammation, stroke or epilepsy are able to induce proliferation of NSC. The proneurogenic effects of psychotropic drugs and pathological processes are associated with their ability to increase some hormones and neurotrophins level, as well as with rising the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein and metalloproteinase MMP-2. Additionaly, some drugs, for example haloperidol, are able to block prolactin and dopaminergic neuroblasts receptors. Down-regulation of adult neurogenesis is associated with alcohol abuse and high stress level. Negative effect of many drugs, such as cytostatics, COX-2 inhibitors and opioides was also observed. The proneurogenic effect of described factors suggest their broad therapeutic potential and gives a new perspective on an effective and modern treatment of many neuropsychiatric disorders. This effect can also help to clarify the pathogenesis of disorders associated with proliferation and degeneration of adult brain cells. PMID:27259217

  2. Time-of-day-dependent enhancement of adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-ichi Tamai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adult neurogenesis occurs in specific regions of the mammalian brain such as the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. In the neurogenic region, neural progenitor cells continuously divide and give birth to new neurons. Although biological properties of neurons and glia in the hippocampus have been demonstrated to fluctuate depending on specific times of the day, it is unclear if neural progenitors and neurogenesis in the adult brain are temporally controlled within the day. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that in the dentate gyrus of the adult mouse hippocampus, the number of M-phase cells shows a day/night variation throughout the day, with a significant increase during the nighttime. The M-phase cell number is constant throughout the day in the subventricular zone of the forebrain, another site of adult neurogenesis, indicating the daily rhythm of progenitor mitosis is region-specific. Importantly, the nighttime enhancement of hippocampal progenitor mitosis is accompanied by a nighttime increase of newborn neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus occurs in a time-of-day-dependent fashion, which may dictate daily modifications of dentate gyrus physiology.

  3. Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Neuroinflammation after Cranial Irradiation with 56Fe Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rola, Radoslaw; Fishman, Kelly; Baure, Jennifer; Rosi, Susanna; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Obenaus, Andre; Nelson, Gregory A.; Fike, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to heavy-ion radiation is considered a potential health risk in long-term space travel. In the central nervous system (CNS), loss of critical cellular components may lead to performance decrements that could ultimately compromise mission goals and long-term quality of life. Hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairments occur after exposure to ionizing radiation, and while the pathogenesis of this effect is not yet clear, it may involve the production of newly born neurons (neurogenesis) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. We irradiated mice with 0.5–4 Gy of 56Fe ions and 2 months later quantified neurogenesis and numbers of activated microglia as a measure of neuroinflammation in the dentate gyrus. Results showed that there were few changes after 0.5 Gy, but that there was a dose-related decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis and a dose-related increase in numbers of newly born activated microglia from 0.5–4.0 Gy. While those findings were similar to what was reported after X irradiation, there were also some differences, particularly in the response of newly born glia. Overall, this study showed that hippocampal neurogenesis was sensitive to relatively low doses of 56Fe particles, and that those effects were associated with neuroinflammation. Whether these changes will result in functional impairments or if/how they can be managed are topics for further investigation. PMID:18494546

  4. Hippocampal neurogenesis and neuroinflammation after cranial irradiation with (56)Fe particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rola, Radoslaw; Fishman, Kelly; Baure, Jennifer; Rosi, Susanna; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Obenaus, Andre; Nelson, Gregory A; Fike, John R

    2008-06-01

    Exposure to heavy-ion radiation is considered a potential health risk in long-term space travel. In the central nervous system (CNS), loss of critical cellular components may lead to performance decrements that could ultimately compromise mission goals and long-term quality of life. Hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairments occur after exposure to ionizing radiation, and while the pathogenesis of this effect is not yet clear, it may involve the production of newly born neurons (neurogenesis) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. We irradiated mice with 0.5-4 Gy of (56)Fe ions and 2 months later quantified neurogenesis and numbers of activated microglia as a measure of neuroinflammation in the dentate gyrus. Results showed that there were few changes after 0.5 Gy, but that there was a dose-related decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis and a dose-related increase in numbers of newly born activated microglia from 0.5-4.0 Gy. While those findings were similar to what was reported after X irradiation, there were also some differences, particularly in the response of newly born glia. Overall, this study showed that hippocampal neurogenesis was sensitive to relatively low doses of (56)Fe particles, and that those effects were associated with neuroinflammation. Whether these changes will result in functional impairments or if/how they can be managed are topics for further investigation. PMID:18494546

  5. A Common Language: How Neuroimmunological Cross Talk Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Odette; Kempermann, Gerd; Walker, Tara L.

    2016-01-01

    Immune regulation of the brain is generally studied in the context of injury or disease. Less is known about how the immune system regulates the brain during normal brain function. Recent work has redefined the field of neuroimmunology and, as long as their recruitment and activation are well regulated, immune cells are now known to have protective properties within the central nervous system in maintaining brain health. Adult neurogenesis, the process of new neuron generation in the adult brain, is highly plastic and regulated by diverse extrinsic and intrinsic cues. Emerging research has shown that immune cells and their secreted factors can influence adult neurogenesis, both under baseline conditions and during conditions known to change neurogenesis levels, such as aging and learning in an enriched environment. This review will discuss how, under nonpathological conditions, the immune system can interact with the neural stem cells to regulate adult neurogenesis with particular focus on the hippocampus—a region crucial for learning and memory. PMID:27143977

  6. Retinoic acid restores adult hippocampal neurogenesis and reverses spatial memory deficit in vitamin A deprived rats.

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    Emilie Bonnet

    Full Text Available A dysfunction of retinoid hippocampal signaling pathway has been involved in the appearance of affective and cognitive disorders. However, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms remain unknown. Hippocampal granule neurons are generated throughout life and are involved in emotion and memory. Here, we investigated the effects of vitamin A deficiency (VAD on neurogenesis and memory and the ability of retinoic acid (RA treatment to prevent VAD-induced impairments. Adult retinoid-deficient rats were generated by a vitamin A-free diet from weaning in order to allow a normal development. The effects of VAD and/or RA administration were examined on hippocampal neurogenesis, retinoid target genes such as neurotrophin receptors and spatial reference memory measured in the water maze. Long-term VAD decreased neurogenesis and led to memory deficits. More importantly, these effects were reversed by 4 weeks of RA treatment. These beneficial effects may be in part related to an up-regulation of retinoid-mediated molecular events, such as the expression of the neurotrophin receptor TrkA. We have demonstrated for the first time that the effect of vitamin A deficient diet on the level of hippoccampal neurogenesis is reversible and that RA treatment is important for the maintenance of the hippocampal plasticity and function.

  7. A Putative Role for Neurogenesis in Neurocomputational Terms: Inferences from a Hippocampal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Victoria I.; Argibay, Pablo F.

    2009-01-01

    New neurons are generated daily in the hippocampus during adult life. They are integrated into the existing neuronal circuits according to several factors such as age, physical exercise and hormonal status. At present, the role of these new neurons is debated. Computational simulations of hippocampal function allow the effects of neurogenesis to…

  8. S-Nitrosylation-Mediated Redox Transcriptional Switch Modulates Neurogenesis and Neuronal Cell Death

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    Shu-ichi Okamoto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Redox-mediated posttranslational modifications represent a molecular switch that controls major mechanisms of cell function. Nitric oxide (NO can mediate redox reactions via S-nitrosylation, representing transfer of an NO group to a critical protein thiol. NO is known to modulate neurogenesis and neuronal survival in various brain regions in disparate neurodegenerative conditions. However, a unifying molecular mechanism linking these phenomena remains unknown. Here, we report that S-nitrosylation of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 transcription factors acts as a redox switch to inhibit both neurogenesis and neuronal survival. Structure-based analysis reveals that MEF2 dimerization creates a pocket, facilitating S-nitrosylation at an evolutionally conserved cysteine residue in the DNA binding domain. S-Nitrosylation disrupts MEF2-DNA binding and transcriptional activity, leading to impaired neurogenesis and survival in vitro and in vivo. Our data define a molecular switch whereby redox-mediated posttranslational modification controls both neurogenesis and neurodegeneration via a single transcriptional signaling cascade.

  9. Peripheral injection of human umbilical cord blood stimulates neurogenesis in the aged rat brain

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    Sanberg Paul R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurogenesis continues to occur throughout life but dramatically decreases with increasing age. This decrease is mostly related to a decline in proliferative activity as a result of an impoverishment of the microenvironment of the aged brain, including a reduction in trophic factors and increased inflammation. Results We determined that human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UCBMC given peripherally, by an intravenous injection, could rejuvenate the proliferative activity of the aged neural stem/progenitor cells. This increase in proliferation lasted for at least 15 days after the delivery of the UCBMC. Along with the increase in proliferation following UCBMC treatment, an increase in neurogenesis was also found in the aged animals. The increase in neurogenesis as a result of UCBMC treatment seemed to be due to a decrease in inflammation, as a decrease in the number of activated microglia was found and this decrease correlated with the increase in neurogenesis. Conclusion The results demonstrate that a single intravenous injection of UCBMC in aged rats can significantly improve the microenvironment of the aged hippocampus and rejuvenate the aged neural stem/progenitor cells. Our results raise the possibility of a peripherally administered cell therapy as an effective approach to improve the microenvironment of the aged brain.

  10. Effects of NOS inhibitor on dentate gyrus neurogenesis after diffuse brain injury in the adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunLi-Sha; XuJiang-ping

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors on dentate gyrus neurogenesis after diffuse brain injury (DBI) in the adult rat brain. Methods Adult male SD rats were subjected to diffuse brain injury (DBI) model. By using systemic bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells, we compared the proliferation rate of

  11. Arachidonic acid drives postnatal neurogenesis and elicits a beneficial effect on prepulse inhibition, a biological trait of psychiatric illnesses.

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    Motoko Maekawa

    Full Text Available Prepulse inhibition (PPI is a compelling endophenotype (biological markers for mental disorders including schizophrenia. In a previous study, we identified Fabp7, a fatty acid binding protein 7 as one of the genes controlling PPI in mice and showed that this gene was associated with schizophrenia. We also demonstrated that disrupting Fabp7 dampened hippocampal neurogenesis. In this study, we examined a link between neurogenesis and PPI using different animal models and exploring the possibility of postnatal manipulation of neurogenesis affecting PPI, since gene-deficient mice show biological disturbances from prenatal stages. In parallel, we tested the potential for dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, arachidonic acid (ARA and/or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, to promote neurogenesis and improve PPI. PUFAs are ligands for Fabp members and are abundantly expressed in neural stem/progenitor cells in the hippocampus. Our results are: (1 an independent model animal, Pax6 (+/- rats, exhibited PPI deficits along with impaired postnatal neurogenesis; (2 methylazoxymethanol acetate (an anti-proliferative drug elicited decreased neurogenesis even in postnatal period, and PPI defects in young adult rats (10 weeks when the drug was given at the juvenile stage (4-5 weeks; (3 administering ARA for 4 weeks after birth promoted neurogenesis in wild type rats; (4 raising Pax6 (+/- pups on an ARA-containing diet enhanced neurogenesis and partially improved PPI in adult animals. These results suggest the potential benefit of ARA in ameliorating PPI deficits relevant to psychiatric disorders and suggest that the effect may be correlated with augmented postnatal neurogenesis.

  12. Elevated homocysteine by levodopa is detrimental to neurogenesis in parkinsonian model.

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    Jin Young Shin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modulation of neurogenesis that acts as an endogenous repair mechanism would have a significant impact on future therapeutic strategies for Parkinson's disease (PD. Several studies demonstrated dopaminergic modulation of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the adult brain. Levodopa, the gold standard therapy for PD, causes an increase in homocysteine levels that induces neuronal death via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor. The present study investigated whether elevated homocysteine by levodopa treatment in a parkinsonian model would modulate neurogenesis via NMDA receptor signal cascade and compared the effect of levodopa and pramipexol (PPX on neurogenic activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Neurogenesis was assessed in vitro using neural progenitor cells (NPCs isolated from the SVZ and in vivo with the BrdU-injected animal model of PD using 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Modulation of homocysteine levels was evaluated using co-cultures of NPCs and astrocytes and PD animals. Immunochemical and Western blot analyses were used to measure neurogenesis and determine the cell death signaling. Levodopa treatment increased release of homocysteine on astrocytes culture media as well as in plasma and brain of PD animals. Increased homocysteine by levodopa led to increased apoptosis of NPCs through the NMDA receptor-dependent the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling pathways. The administration of a NMDA antagonist significantly attenuated apoptotic cell death in levodopa-treated NPCs and markedly increased the number of BrdU-positive cells in the SVZ of levodopa-treated PD animals. Comparative analysis revealed that PPX treatment significantly increased the number of NPCs and BrdU-positive cells in the SVZ of PD animals compared to levodopa treatment. Our present study demonstrated that increased homocysteine by levodopa has a detrimental effect on neurogenesis through NMDA receptor

  13. Female mice lacking cholecystokinin 1 receptors have compromised neurogenesis, and fewer dopaminergic cells in the olfactory bulb

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    Yi eSui

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the adult rodent brain is largely restricted to the subependymal zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricle and subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG. We examined whether cholecystokinin (CCK through actions mediated by CCK1 receptors (CCK1R is involved in regulating neurogenesis. Proliferating cells in the SVZ, measured by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU injected 2 hours prior to death or by immunoreactivity against Ki67, were reduced by 37% and 42%, respectively, in female (but not male mice lacking CCK1Rs (CCK1R-/- compared to wild-type (WT. Generation of neuroblasts in the SVZ and rostral migratory stream was also affected, since the number of doublecortin (DCX-immunoreactive (ir neuroblasts in these regions decreased by 29%. In the SGZ of female CCK1R-/- mice, BrdU-positive (+ and Ki67-ir cells were reduced by 38% and 56%, respectively, while DCX-ir neuroblasts were down 80%. Subsequently, the effect of reduced SVZ/SGZ proliferation on the generation and survival of mature adult-born cells in female CCK1R-/- mice was examined. In the OB granule cell layer (GCL, the number of neuronal nuclei (NeuN-ir and calretinin-ir cells was stable compared to WT, and 42 days after BrdU injections, the number of BrdU+ cells co-expressing GABA- or NeuN-like immunoreactivity (LI was similar. Compared to WT, the granule cell layer of the DG in female CCK1R-/- mice had a similar number of calbindin-ir cells and BrdU+ cells co-expressing calbindin-LI 42 days after BrdU injections. However, the OB glomerular layer (GL of CCK1R-/- female mice had 11% fewer NeuN-ir cells, 23% less TH-ir cells, and a 38% and 29% reduction in BrdU+ cells that co-expressed TH-LI or GABA-LI, respectively. We conclude that CCK, via CCK1Rs, is involved in regulating the generation of proliferating cells and neuroblasts in the adult female mouse brain, and mechanisms are in place to maintain steady neuronal populations in the OB and DG when the rate of proliferation is

  14. Defensive behaviors and prosencephalic neurogenesis in pigeons (Columba livia) are affected by environmental enrichment in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melleu, F F; Pinheiro, M V; Lino-de-Oliveira, C; Marino-Neto, J

    2016-05-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult brain appears to be phylogenetically conserved across the animal kingdom. In pigeons and other adult non-oscine birds, immature neurons are observed in several prosencephalic areas, suggesting that neurogenesis may participate in the control of different behaviors. The mechanisms controlling neurogenesis and its relevance to defensive behaviors in non-oscine birds remain elusive. Herein, the contribution of the environment to behavior and neurogenesis of pigeons was investigated. Adult pigeons (Columba livia, n = 6/group), housed in standard (SE) or enriched environment (EE) for 42 days, were exposed to an unfamiliar environment (UE) followed by presentation to a novel object (NO). Video recordings of UE+NO tests were analyzed and scored for latency, duration and frequency of angular head movements, peeping, grooming, immobility and locomotion. Twenty-four hours later, pigeons were submitted to the tonic immobility test (TI) and number of trials for TI and TI duration were scored, followed by euthanasia 2 h later. Brains were immunohistochemically processed to reveal doublecortin (DCX), a marker for newborn neurons. Compared to those housed in SE, the pigeons housed in EE responded to a NO with more immobility. In addition, the pigeons housed in EE presented longer TI, more DCX-immunoreactive (DCX-ir) cells in the hippocampus and fewer DCX-ir cells in the lateral striatum than those housed in SE. There was no correlation between the number of DCX-ir cells and the scores of immobility in behavioral tests. Together, these data suggest that enrichment favored behavioral inhibition and neurogenesis in the adult pigeons through different, parallel mechanisms. PMID:25869276

  15. Neurogenesis in the brain stem of the rabbit: an autoradiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aid of (3H)-thymidine autoradiography, neurogenesis was documented in the nuclear groups of the medulla oblongata, pons, and mid-brain, as well as in the brain stem reticular formation of the rabbit. Following single injections of (3H)-thymidine, counts were taken of intensely labeled neurons within the nuclei of the functional columns related to the cranial nerves, nuclei of several other functional classifications, and nuclei that did not fit into a functional category. In the brain stem as a whole, neurogenesis was found to occur between days 10.0 and 18.5 of gestation: however, the majority of nuclei studied contained intensely neurons only between days 12.0 and 15.0. Only in the pontine nucleus and the tectum were intensely labeled cells observed as late as day 18.5. Directional gradients of histogenesis were often observed within, as well as between, various nuclei. Within the nuclear columns related to the cranial nerves, a clear mediolateral spread of neurogenesis was observable such that nuclei of the motor columns reached a peak in neurogenesis before those in the sensory columns. Likewise, a mediolateral proliferation pattern was seen in the brain stem reticular formation. Other individual directional gradients were discernible; however, in the brain stem as a whole, distinct overall gradients were not observable. In many individual nuclei, gradients in neuron size were observed such that large neurons preferentially arose prior to smaller neurons. Information pertaining to gradients in neurogenesis, as well as to relationships among functionally related nuclei, are discussed

  16. Delayed and transient increase of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by physical exercise in DBA/2 mice.

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    Rupert W Overall

    Full Text Available This study builds on the findings that physical activity, such as wheel running in mice, enhances cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus of the common mouse strain C57BL/6, and that the baseline level of neurogenesis varies by strain, being considerably lower in DBA/2. Because C57BL/6 and DBA/2 are important as the parental strains of the BXD recombinant inbred cross which allows the detection of genetic loci regulating phenotypes such as adult neurogenesis, we performed the current study to investigate the gene x environment interactions regulating neurogenesis. At equal distances and times run DBA/2J mice lacked the acute increase in precursor cell proliferation known from C57BL/6. In DBA/2J proliferation even negatively correlated with the distance run. This was neither due to a stress response (to running itself or single housing nor differences in estrous cycle. DBA/2 animals exhibited a delayed and weaker pro-neurogenic response with a significant increase in numbers of proliferating cells first detectable after more than a week of wheel running. The proliferative response to running was transient in both strains, the effect being undetectable by 6 weeks. There was also a small transient increase in the production of new neurons in DBA/2J, although these extra cells did not survive. These findings indicate that the comparison between C57BL/6 and DBA/2, and by extension the BXD genetic reference population derived from these strains, should provide a powerful tool for uncovering the complex network of modifier genes affecting the activity-dependent regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. More generally, our findings also describe how the external physical environment interacts with the internal genetic environment to produce different responses to the same behavioral stimuli.

  17. Ketamine Affects the Neurogenesis of the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus in 7-Day-Old Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Liu, Cun-Ming; Sun, Jie; Hao, Ting; Xu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Yu-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Ketamine has been reported to cause neonatal neurotoxicity via a neuronal apoptosis mechanism; however, no in vivo research has reported whether ketamine could affect postnatal neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). A growing number of experiments suggest that postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis is the foundation of maintaining normal hippocampus function into adulthood. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of ketamine on hippocampal neurogenesis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: the control group (equal volume of normal saline), and the ketamine-anesthesia group (40 mg/kg ketamine in four injections at 1 h intervals). The S-phase marker 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered after ketamine exposure to postnatal day 7 (PND-7) rats, and the neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG was assessed using single- or double-immunofluorescence staining. The expression of GFAP in the hippocampal DG was measured by western blot analysis. Spatial reference memory was tested by Morris water maze at 2 months after PND-7 rats exposed to ketamine treatment. The present results showed that neonatal ketamine exposure significantly inhibited neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, decreased astrocytic differentiation, and markedly enhanced neuronal differentiation. The disruptive effect of ketamine on the proliferation and differentiation of NSCs lasted at least 1 week and disappeared by 2 weeks after ketamine exposure. Moreover, the migration of newborn neurons in the granule cell layer and the growth of astrocytes in the hippocampal DG were inhibited by ketamine on PND-37 and PND-44. Finally, ketamine caused a deficit in hippocampal-dependent spatial reference memory tasks at 2 months old. Our results suggested that ketamine may interfere with hippocampal neurogenesis and long-term neurocognitive function in PND-7 rats. These findings may provide a new perspective to explain the adult neurocognitive dysfunction induced by neonatal

  18. Differential environmental regulation of neurogenesis along the septo-temporal axis of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanti, Arnaud; Rainer, Quentin; Minier, Frederic; Surget, Alexandre; Belzung, Catherine

    2012-09-01

    The hippocampus is involved in both cognitive and emotional processing; these different functions are topographically distributed along its septo-temporal axis, the dorsal (septal) hippocampus being preferentially involved in cognitive processes such as learning and memory while the ventral (temporal) hippocampus participates in emotional regulation and anxiety-related behaviors. Newborn hippocampal neurons become functionally integrated into hippocampal networks and are likely to contribute to hippocampal functions, but whether their regulation and function are homogenous throughout this axis is not clear. Here we investigate changes in cell proliferation and neurogenesis along the septo-temporal axis of the hippocampus induced by the Unpredictable Chronic Mild Stress model of depression (UCMS), chronic fluoxetine treatment and enriched environment. Mice were either subjected to UCMS, standard housing or enriched environment. Stress-exposed mice were treated daily with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) or vehicle. Effects of UCMS regimen, fluoxetine treatment and enrichment were assessed by physical measures and behavioral testing. Quantitative changes in cell proliferation and neurogenesis were assessed by immunohistochemistry using BrdU labeling. Results indicate that UCMS decreased cell proliferation and neurogenesis preferentially in the ventral hippocampus, an effect that was reversed by fluoxetine treatment. Environmental enrichment on the other hand increased cell proliferation in both divisions but promoted neurogenesis only in the dorsal hippocampus. These results indicate that environmental factors can differentially regulate neurogenesis in a region-specific manner. This may possibly underlie heterogeneous function of newborn neurons along the septo-temporal axis of the hippocampus and have functional significance as to their implication in stress related disorders and memory processes. PMID:22561281

  19. Neurogenesis in sea urchin embryos and the diversity of deuterostome neurogenic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Sarah; Zysk, Ivona; Byrne, Glynis; Kramer, Marabeth; Moller, Daniel; Taylor, Valerie; Burke, Robert D

    2016-01-15

    A single origin to the diverse mechanisms of metazoan neurogenesis is suggested by the involvement of common signaling components and similar classes of transcription factors. However, in many forms we lack details of where neurons arise, patterns of cell division, and specific differentiation pathway components. The sea urchin larval nervous system is composed of an apical organ, which develops from neuroepithelium and functions as a central nervous system, and peripheral neurons, which differentiate in the ciliary band and project axons to the apical organ. To reveal developmental mechanisms of neurogenesis in this basal deuterostome, we developed antibodies to SoxC, SoxB2, ELAV and Brn1/2/4 and used neurons that develop at specific locations to establish a timeline for neurogenesis. Neural progenitors express, in turn, SoxB2, SoxC, and Brn1/2/4, before projecting neurites and expressing ELAV and SynB. Using pulse-chase labeling of cells with a thymidine analog to identify cells in S-phase, we establish that neurons identified by location are in their last mitotic cycle at the time of hatching, and S-phase is coincident with expression of SoxC. The number of cells expressing SoxC and differentiating as neurons is reduced in embryos injected with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides to SoxC, SoxB2 or Six3. Injection of RNA encoding SoxC into eggs does not enhance neurogenesis. In addition, inhibition of FGF receptors (SU5402) or a morpholino to FGFR1 reduces expression of SoxC. These data indicate that there are common features of neurogenesis in deuterostomes, and that sea urchins employ developmental mechanisms that are distinct from other ambulacraria. PMID:26511925

  20. Using High Performance Computing to Examine the Processes of Neurogenesis Underlying Pattern Separation and Completion of Episodic Information.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimone, James Bradley; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Vineyard, Craig Michael; Verzi, Stephen Joseph.

    2014-10-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus region of the brain is a neurobiological process that is believed to contribute to the brain's advanced abilities in complex pattern recognition and cognition. Here, we describe how realistic scale simulations of the neurogenesis process can offer both a unique perspective on the biological relevance of this process and confer computational insights that are suggestive of novel machine learning techniques. First, supercomputer based scaling studies of the neurogenesis process demonstrate how a small fraction of adult-born neurons have a uniquely larger impact in biologically realistic scaled networks. Second, we describe a novel technical approach by which the information content of ensembles of neurons can be estimated. Finally, we illustrate several examples of broader algorithmic impact of neurogenesis, including both extending existing machine learning approaches and novel approaches for intelligent sensing.

  1. Minocycline rescues decrease in neurogenesis, increase in microglia cytokines and deficits in sensorimotor gating in an animal model of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    D. Mattei; Djodari-Irani, A.; Hadar, R; Pelz, A.; de Cossio, L.F.; Goetz, T.; Matyash, M; Kettenmann, H.; Winter, C; Wolf, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is impaired in schizophrenic patients and in an animal model of schizophrenia. Amongst a plethora of regulators, the immune system has been shown repeatedly to strongly modulate neurogenesis under physiological and pathological conditions. It is well accepted, that schizophrenic patients have an aberrant peripheral immune status, which is also reflected in the animal model. The microglia as the intrinsic immune competent cells of the brain have recently c...

  2. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 mediates baseline and activity-induced survival of new neurons in adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Müller Anke; Tauber Svantje; Ramirez-Rodriguez Gerardo; Leal-Galicia Perla; Fabel Klaus; Bick-Sander Anika; Wolf Susanne A; Melnik Andre; Waltinger Tim P; Ullrich Oliver; Kempermann Gerd

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Adult neurogenesis is a particular example of brain plasticity that is partially modulated by the endocannabinoid system. Whereas the impact of synthetic cannabinoids on the neuronal progenitor cells has been described, there has been lack of information about the action of plant-derived extracts on neurogenesis. Therefore we here focused on the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD) fed to female C57Bl/6 and Nestin-GFP-reporter mice on proliferatio...

  3. Impairments in Neurogenesis Are Not Tightly Linked to Depressive Behavior in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Iascone, Daniel M.; Sneha Padidam; Pyfer, Mark S.; Xiaohong Zhang; Lijuan Zhao; Jeannie Chin

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia, is also associated with depression. Although the precise mechanisms that lead to depression in AD are unknown, the impairments in adult hippocampal neurogenesis observed in AD may play a role. Adult-born neurons play a critical role in regulating both cognition and mood, and reduced hippocampal neurogenesis is associated with depression in other neurological disorders. To assess the relationship between Alzheimer's disease, neurogen...

  4. Effect of exercise-induced neurogenesis on cognitive function deficit in a rat model of vascular dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Dong-Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Jongmin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is strongly correlated with progressive cognitive decline in neurological diseases, such as vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease. Exercise can enhance learning and memory, and delay age-related cognitive decline. However, exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis in experimental animals submitted to CCH has not been investigated. The present study aimed to investigate whether hippocampal neurogenesis induced by exercise can improve cognitive def...

  5. Aggravation of Chronic Stress Effects on Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Spatial Memory in LPA1 Receptor Knockout Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Hoyo-Becerra, Carolina; Pedraza, Carmen; Chun, Jerold; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The lysophosphatidic acid LPA1 receptor regulates plasticity and neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus. Here, we studied whether absence of the LPA1 receptor modulated the detrimental effects of chronic stress on hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial memory. Methodology/Principal Findings Male LPA1-null (NULL) and wild-type (WT) mice were assigned to control or chronic stress conditions (21 days of restraint, 3 h/day). Immunohistochemistry for bromodeoxyuridine and endogenous marker...

  6. Impaired adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

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    José J Rodríguez

    Full Text Available It has become generally accepted that new neurones are added and integrated mainly in two areas of the mammalian CNS, the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus, which is of central importance in learning and memory. The newly generated cells display neuronal morphology, are able to generate action potentials and receive functional synaptic inputs, i.e. their properties are similar to those found in mature neurones. Alzheimer's disease (AD is the primary and widespread cause of dementia and is an age-related, progressive and irreversible neurodegenerative disease that deteriorates cognitive functions. Here, we have used male and female triple transgenic mice (3xTg-AD harbouring three mutant genes (beta-amyloid precursor protein, presenilin-1 and tau and their respective non-transgenic (non-Tg controls at 2, 3, 4, 6, 9 and 12 months of age to establish the link between AD and neurogenesis. Using immunohistochemistry we determined the area density of proliferating cells within the SGZ of the DG, measured by the presence of phosphorylated Histone H3 (HH3, and their possible co-localisation with GFAP to exclude a glial phenotype. Less than 1% of the HH3 labeled cells co-localised with GFAP. Both non-Tg and 3xTg-AD showed an age-dependent decrease in neurogenesis. However, male 3xTg-AD mice demonstrated a further reduction in the production of new neurones from 9 months of age (73% decrease and a complete depletion at 12 months, when compared to controls. In addition, female 3xTg-AD mice showed an earlier but equivalent decrease in neurogenesis at 4 months (reduction of 63% with an almost inexistent rate at 12 months (88% decrease compared to controls. This reduction in neurogenesis was directly associated with the presence of beta-amyloid plaques and an increase in the number of beta-amyloid containing neurones in the hippocampus; which in the case of 3xgTg females was directly correlated. These

  7. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  8. Ly6C(hi) Monocytes Provide a Link between Antibiotic-Induced Changes in Gut Microbiota and Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhle, Luisa; Mattei, Daniele; Heimesaat, Markus M; Bereswill, Stefan; Fischer, André; Alutis, Marie; French, Timothy; Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Matzinger, Polly; Dunay, Ildiko R; Wolf, Susanne A

    2016-05-31

    Antibiotics, though remarkably useful, can also cause certain adverse effects. We detected that treatment of adult mice with antibiotics decreases hippocampal neurogenesis and memory retention. Reconstitution with normal gut flora (SPF) did not completely reverse the deficits in neurogenesis unless the mice also had access to a running wheel or received probiotics. In parallel to an increase in neurogenesis and memory retention, both SPF-reconstituted mice that ran and mice supplemented with probiotics exhibited higher numbers of Ly6C(hi) monocytes in the brain than antibiotic-treated mice. Elimination of Ly6C(hi) monocytes by antibody depletion or the use of knockout mice resulted in decreased neurogenesis, whereas adoptive transfer of Ly6C(hi) monocytes rescued neurogenesis after antibiotic treatment. We propose that the rescue of neurogenesis and behavior deficits in antibiotic-treated mice by exercise and probiotics is partially mediated by Ly6C(hi) monocytes. PMID:27210745

  9. Reawakening the sleeping beauty in the adult brain: neurogenesis from parenchymal glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péron, Sophie; Berninger, Benedikt

    2015-10-01

    Life-long neurogenesis is highly restricted to specialized niches in the adult mammalian brain and therefore the brain's capacity for spontaneous regeneration is extremely limited. However, recent work has demonstrated that under certain circumstances parenchymal astrocytes and NG2 glia can generate neuronal progeny. In the striatum, stroke or excitotoxic lesions can reawaken in astrocytes a latent neurogenic program resulting in the genesis of new neurons. By contrast, in brain areas that fail to mount a neurogenic response following injury, such as the cerebral cortex, forced expression of neurogenic reprogramming factors can lineage convert local glia into induced neurons. Yet, injury-induced and reprogramming-induced neurogenesis exhibit intriguing commonalities, suggesting that they may converge on similar mechanisms. PMID:26296150

  10. Progenitor cell maintenance and neurogenesis in sympathetic ganglia involves Notch signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsarovina, Konstantina; Schellenberger, Jens; Schneider, Carolin; Rohrer, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    Differentiation of noradrenergic neurons from neural crest-derived precursors results in the formation of primary sympathetic ganglia. As sympathetic neurons continue to divide after the acquisition of adrenergic and neuronal properties it was unclear, whether the increase in neuron number during neurogenesis is due to neuron proliferation rather than differentiation of progenitor cells. Here, we demonstrate Sox10-positive neural crest progenitor cells and continuous sympathetic neuron generation from Phox2b-positive autonomic progenitors during early chick sympathetic ganglion development. In vivo activation of Notch signaling resulted in a decreased neuronal population, whereas expression of the Notch signaling inhibitor Su(H)(DBM) increased the proportion of Scg10-positive neurons. Similar results were obtained for sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRG). The effects of Notch gain- and loss-of-function experiments support the notion that progenitor maintenance and neuron differentiation from progenitor cells are essential for neurogenesis also during early sympathetic ganglion development. PMID:17920293

  11. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid regulates neuroepithelial survival, proliferation, and neurogenesis in chick embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, Angel; Moro, J A; Alonso, M I; Bueno, D; De La Mano, A; Martín, C

    2005-05-01

    Early in development, the behavior of neuroepithelial cells is controlled by several factors, which act in a developmentally regulated manner. Diffusible factors are secreted locally by the neuroepithelium itself, although other nearby structures may also be involved. Evidence suggests a physiological role for the cerebrospinal fluid in the development of the brain. Here, using organotypic cultures of chick embryo neuroepithelial explants from the mesencephalon, we show that the neuroepithelium in vitro is not able to self-induce cell survival, replication, and neurogenesis. We also show that the embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) promotes neuroepithelial stem cell survival and induces proliferation and neurogenesis in mesencephalic explants. These data strongly suggest that E-CSF is involved in the regulation of neuroepithelial cells behavior, supporting the hypothesis that this fluid plays a key role during the early development of the central nervous system. PMID:15803475

  12. LSD1 co-repressor Rcor2 orchestrates neurogenesis in the developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixuan; Wu, Qian; Yang, Peng; Wang, Chenfei; Liu, Jing; Ding, Wenyu; Liu, Wensu; Bai, Ye; Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Hong; Gao, Shaorong; Wang, Xiaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulatory complexes play key roles in the modulation of transcriptional regulation underlying neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and progeny specification. How specific cofactors guide histone demethylase LSD1/KDM1A complex to regulate distinct NSC-related gene activation and repression in cortical neurogenesis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that Rcor2, a co-repressor of LSD1, is mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and plays a key role in epigenetic regulation of cortical development. Depletion of Rcor2 results in reduced NPC proliferation, neuron population, neocortex thickness and brain size. We find that Rcor2 directly targets Dlx2 and Shh, and represses their expressions in developing neocortex. In addition, inhibition of Shh signals rescues the neurogenesis defects caused by Rcor2 depletion both in vivo and in vitro. Hence, our findings suggest that co-repressor Rcor2 is critical for cortical development by repressing Shh signalling pathway in dorsal telencephalon. PMID:26795843

  13. Cerebrolysin enhances neurogenesis in the ischemic brain and improves functional outcome after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chunling; Chopp, Michael; Cui, Yisheng; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Ruilan; Zhang, Li; Lu, Mei; Szalad, Alexandra; Doppler, Edith; Hitzl, Monika; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrolysin is a peptide preparation mimicking the action of neurotrophic factors and has beneficial effects on neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. The present study investigated the effect of Cerebrolysin on neurogenesis in a rat model of embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Treatment with Cerebrolysin at doses of 2.5 and 5 ml/kg significantly increased the number of bromodeoxyuridine positive (BrdU+) subventricular zone (SVZ) neural progenitor cells and doublecortin (DCX) im...

  14. Physical exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects are mediated by the adipocyte hormone adiponectin

    OpenAIRE

    Yau, Suk Yu; Li, Ang; Hoo, Ruby L. C.; Ching, Yick Pang; Christie, Brian R.; Tatia M C Lee; Xu, Aimin; So, Kwok-Fai

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin (ADN) is an adipocyte-secreted protein with insulin-sensitizing, antidiabetic, antiinflammatory, and antiatherogenic properties. Evidence is also accumulating that ADN has neuroprotective activities, yet the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here we show that ADN could pass through the blood-brain barrier, and elevating its levels in the brain increased cell proliferation and decreased depression-like behaviors. ADN deficiency did not reduce the basal hippocampal neurogenesis ...

  15. Characterization of neural stemness status through the neurogenesis process for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Maeda H; Al-Shammari, Ahmed M; Al-Juboory, Ahmad Adnan; Yaseen, Nahi Y

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro isolation, identification, differentiation, and neurogenesis characterization of the sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were investigated to produce two types of cells in culture: neural cells and neural stem cells (NSCs). These types of stem cells were used as successful sources for the further treatment of central nervous system defects and injuries. The mouse bone marrow MSCs were used as the source of the stem cells in this study. β-Mercaptoethanol (BME) was used as the main inducer of the neurogenesis pathway to induce neural cells and to identify NSCs. Three types of neural markers were used: nestin as the immaturation stage marker, neurofilament light chain as the early neural marker, and microtubule-associated protein 2 as the maturation marker through different time intervals in the neurogenesis process starting from the MSCs, (as undifferentiated cells), NSCs, production stages, and toward neuron cells (as differentiated cells). The results of different exposure times to BME of the neural markers analysis done by immunocytochemistry and real time-polymerase chain reaction helped us to identify the exact timing for the neural stemness state. The results showed that the best exposure time that may be used for the production of NSCs was 6 hours. The best maintenance media for NSCs were also identified. Furthermore, we optimized exposure to BME with different times and concentrations, which could be an interesting way to modulate specific neuronal differentiation and obtain autologous neuronal phenotypes. This study was able to characterize NSCs in culture under differentiation for neurogenesis in the pathway of the neural differentiation process by studying the expressed neural genes and the ability to maintain these NSCs in culture for further differentiation in thousands of functional neurons for the treatment of brain and spinal cord injuries and defects. PMID:27143939

  16. Memory-enhancing effects of Cuscuta japonica Choisy via enhancement of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Minho; Jeong, Hyun Uk; Choi, Jin Gyu; Jeon, Seong Gak; Song, Eun Ji; Hong, Seon-Pyo; Oh, Myung Sook

    2016-09-15

    It is generally accepted that functional and structural changes within the hippocampus are involved in learning and memory and that adult neurogenesis in this region may modulate cognition. The extract of Cuscuta japonica Choisy (CJ) is a well-known traditional Chinese herbal medicine that has been used since ancient times as a rejuvenation remedy. The systemic effects of this herb are widely known and can be applied for the treatment of a number of physiological diseases, but there is a lack of evidence describing its effects on brain function. Thus, the present study investigated whether CJ would enhance memory function and/or increase hippocampal neurogenesis using mice orally administered with CJ water extract or vehicle for 21days. Performance on the novel object recognition and passive avoidance tests revealed that treatment with CJ dose-dependently improved the cognitive function of mice. Additionally, CJ increased the Ki-67-positive proliferating cells and the number of doublecortin-stained neuroblasts in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, and double labeling with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine and neuronal specific nuclear protein showed that CJ increased the number of mature neurons in the DG. Finally, CJ resulted in the upregulated expression of neurogenic differentiation factor, which is essential for the maturation and differentiation of granule cells in the hippocampus. Taken together, the present findings indicate that CJ stimulated neuronal cell proliferation, differentiation, and maturation, which are all processes associated with neurogenesis. Additionally, these findings suggest that CJ may improve learning and memory via the enhancement of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:27185736

  17. Neonatal BCG vaccination of mice improves neurogenesis and behavior in early life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junhua; Qi, Fangfang; Gu, Huaiyu; Zou, Juntao; Yang, Yang; Yuan, Qunfang; Yao, Zhibin

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is administered to neonates worldwide, but it is still unknown whether this neonatal vaccination affects brain development during early postnatal life, despite the close association of the immune system with the brain. Newborn C57BL/6 mice were injected subcutaneously with BCG or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and their mood status and spatial cognition were observed at four and eight weeks (w) old. The mice were also subjected to tests at 2 and 6 w to examine BCG's effects on neurogenesis, the hippocampal microglia phenotype and number, and the expression of hippocampal neuroimmune molecules and peripheral cytokines. The BCG-injected mice showed better behavioral performances at 4 w. We observed elevated neurogenesis, M2 microglial activation and a neurotrophic profile of neuroimmune molecules [more interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and less tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β] in the hippocampus of the 2-w-old BCG-mice. In the periphery, BCG induced a T helper (Th)-1 serum response. At the individual level, there were positive correlations between the serum IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio and the levels of neurotrophins and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that neonatal BCG vaccination improved neurogenesis and mouse behavior in early life by affecting the neuroimmune milieu in the brain, which may be associated with a systemic Th1 bias. PMID:26536170

  18. Abrogated inflammatory response promotes neurogenesis in a murine model of Japanese encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulagna Das

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV induces neuroinflammation with typical features of viral encephalitis, including inflammatory cell infiltration, activation of microglia, and neuronal degeneration. The detrimental effects of inflammation on neurogenesis have been reported in various models of acute and chronic inflammation. We investigated whether JEV-induced inflammation has similar adverse effects on neurogenesis and whether those effects can be reversed using an anti-inflammatory compound minocycline. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, using in vitro studies and mouse models, we observed that an acute inflammatory milieu is created in the subventricular neurogenic niche following Japanese encephalitis (JE and a resultant impairment in neurogenesis occurs, which can be reversed with minocycline treatment. Immunohistological studies showed that proliferating cells were replenished and the population of migrating neuroblasts was restored in the niche following minocycline treatment. In vitro, we checked for the efficacy of minocycline as an anti-inflammatory compound and cytokine bead array showed that production of cyto/chemokines decreased in JEV-activated BV2 cells. Furthermore, mouse neurospheres grown in the conditioned media from JEV-activated microglia exhibit arrest in both proliferation and differentiation of the spheres compared to conditioned media from control microglia. These effects were completely reversed when conditioned media from JEV-activated and minocycline treated microglia was used. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides conclusive evidence that JEV-activated microglia and the resultant inflammatory molecules are anti-proliferative and anti-neurogenic for NSPCs growth and development, and therefore contribute to the viral neuropathogenesis. The role of minocycline in restoring neurogenesis may implicate enhanced neuronal repair and attenuation of the neuropsychiatric sequelae in JE survivors.

  19. Erythropoietin promotes hippocampal neurogenesis in in-vitro models of neonatal stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Osredkar, Damjan; Sall, Jeffrey W; Bickler, Philip E; Ferriero, Donna M.

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampus is often injured in neonatal stroke. We have investigated the effect of erythropoietin (EPO) on oxygen-glucose deprived hippocampal slices and hypoxic progenitor cells. EPO improved survival of the organotypic hippocampal slices with significantly less cell death in the dentate gyrus and an increased number of proliferating cells 4-5 days after insult. Significantly fewer markers of neurogenesis were seen after the insult but when EPO was added to the culture medium, neurogene...

  20. Abstinence following Alcohol Drinking Produces Depression-Like Behavior and Reduced Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Jennie R; Schroeder, Jason P.; Nixon, Kimberly; Besheer, Joyce; Crews, Fulton T.; Hodge, Clyde W.

    2008-01-01

    Alcoholism and depression show high degrees of comorbidity. Clinical evidence also indicates that depression that emerges during abstinence from chronic alcohol use has a greater negative impact on relapse than pre-existing depression. Although no single neurobiological mechanism can account for the behavioral pathologies associated with these devastating disorders, converging evidence suggests that aspects of both alcoholism and depression are linked to reductions in hippocampal neurogenesis...

  1. Influence of superior cervical ganglionectomy on hippocampal neurogenesis and learning and memory in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanping Ding; Baoping Shao; Shiyuan Yu; Shanting Zhao; Jianlin Wang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus plays an important role in learning and memory. However, studies have not determined whether the superior cervical ganglion or the sympathetic nerve system influences hippocampal neurogenesis or learning and memory in adult rats. OBJECTIVE: To observe differences in dentate gyrus neurogenesis, as well as learning and memory, in adult rats following superior cervical ganglionectomy. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled, animal study was performed at the Immunohistochemistry Laboratory of the School of Life Sciences in Lanzhou University from July 2006 to July 2007.MATERIALS: Doublecortin polyclonal antibody was provided by Santa Cruz Biotechnology, USA;avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex was purchased from Zhongshan Goldenbride Biotechnology, China;Morris water maze was bought from Taimeng Technology, China. METHODS: A total of 20 adult, male, Wistar rats were randomly divided into surgery and control groups, with 10 rats in each group. In the surgery group, the bilateral superior cervical ganglions were transected. In the control group, the superior cervical ganglions were only exposed, but no ganglionectomy was performed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: To examine distribution, morphology, and number of newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus using doublecortin immunohistochemistry at 36 days following surgical procedures. To examine ability of learning and memory in adult rats using the Morris water maze at 30 days following surgical procedures. RESULTS: Doublecortin immunohistochemical results showed that a reduction in the number of doublecortin-positive neurons in the surgery group compared to the control group (P<0.05), while the distribution of doublecortin-positive neurons was identical in the two groups. The surgery group exhibited significantly worse performance in learning and spatial memory tasks compared to the control group (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Superior cervical ganglionectomy

  2. Habitat-Specific Shaping of Proliferation and Neuronal Differentiation in Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis of Wild Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eCavegn

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Daily life of wild mammals is characterized by a multitude of attractive and aversive stimuli. The hippocampus processes complex polymodal information associated with such stimuli and mediates adequate behavioral responses. How newly generated hippocampal neurons in wild animals contribute to hippocampal function is still a subject of debate. Here, we test the relationship between adult hippocampal neurogenesis and habitat types. To this end, we compare wild Muridae species of southern Africa (Namaqua rock mouse (Micaelamys namaquensis, red veld rat (Aethomys chrysophilus, highveld gerbil (Tatera brantsii and spiny mouse (Acomys spinosissimus with data from wild European Muridae (long-tailed wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus, pygmy field mice (Apodemus microps, yellow-necked wood mice (Apodemus flavicollis, and house mice (Mus musculus domesticus from previous studies. The pattern of neurogenesis, expressed in normalized numbers of Ki67- and DCX-positive cells to total granule cells, is similar for the species from a southern African habitat. However, we found low proliferation, but high neuronal differentiation in rodents from the southern African habitat compared to rodents from the European environment. Within the African rodents, we observe additional regulatory and morphological traits in the hippocampus. Namaqua rock mice with previous pregnancies showed lower adult hippocampal neurogenesis compared to males and nulliparous females. The phylogenetically closely related species (Namaqua rock mouse and red veld rat show a CA4, which is not usually observed in murine rodents. The specific features of the southern environment that may be associated with the high number of young neurons in African rodents still remain to be elucidated. This study provides the first evidence that a habitat can shape adult neurogenesis in rodents across phylogenetic groups.

  3. Long Course Hyperbaric Oxygen Stimulates Neurogenesis and Attenuates Inflammation after Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Ying-Sheng Lee; Chung-Ching Chio; Ching-Ping Chang; Liang-Chao Wang; Po-Min Chiang; Kuo-Chi Niu; Kuen-Jer Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have provided evidence with regard to the neuroprotection benefits of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy in cases of stroke, and HBO also promotes bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) proliferation and mobilization. This study investigates the influence of HBO therapy on the migration of BMSCs, neurogenesis, gliosis, and inflammation after stroke. Rats that sustained transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) were treated with HBO three weeks or two days. The results were examin...

  4. Actions of Prolactin in the Brain: From Physiological Adaptations to Stress and Neurogenesis to Psychopathology

    OpenAIRE

    Torner, Luz

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is one of the most versatile hormones known. It is considered an adaptive hormone due to the key roles it plays in the modulation of the stress response and during pregnancy and lactation. Within the brain, PRL acts as a neuropeptide to promote physiological responses related to reproduction, stress adaptation, neurogenesis, and neuroprotection. The action of PRL on the nervous system contributes to the wide array of changes that occur in the female brain during pregnancy and ...

  5. Pre-infection physical exercise decreases mortality and stimulates neurogenesis in bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liebetanz David

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Physical exercise has been shown to increase neurogenesis, to decrease neuronal injury and to improve memory in animal models of stroke and head trauma. Therefore, we investigated the effect of voluntary wheel running on survival, neuronal damage and cell proliferation in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Mice were housed in cages equipped with voluntary running wheels or in standard cages before induction of bacterial meningitis by a subarachnoid injection of a Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3 strain. 24 hours later antibiotic treatment was initiated with ceftriaxone (100 mg/kg twice daily. Experiments were terminated either 30 hours or 4 days (short-term or 7 weeks (long-term after infection, and the survival time, inflammatory cytokines and corticosterone levels, neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation and the cognitive function were evaluated in surviving mice. Survival time was significantly increased in running mice compared to control animals (p = 0.0087 in short-term and p = 0.016 in long-term experiments, log-rank test. At the end of the long-term experiment, mortality was lower in trained than in sedentary animals (p = 0.031, Fisher’s Exact test. Hippocampal neurogenesis – assessed by the density of doublecortin-, TUC-4- and BrdU + NeuN-colabeled cells - was significantly increased in running mice in comparison to the sedentary group after meningitis. However, Morris water maze performance of both groups 6 weeks after bacterial meningitis did not reveal differences in learning ability. In conclusion, physical exercise prior to infection increased survival in a mouse model of bacterial meningitis and stimulated neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation.

  6. Integrin-linked Kinase is Essential for Environmental Enrichment Enhanced Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xu-Feng; Li, Ting; Wang, Dong-Dong; Chen, Bing; Wang, Yue; Chen, Zhe-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Environment enrichment (EE) has a variety of effects on brain structure and function. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for EE-induced hippocampal neurogenesis and memory enhancement. However, the intracellular pathway downstream of BDNF to modulate EE effects is poorly understood. Here we show that integrin-linked kinase (ILK) levels are elevated upon EE stimuli in a BDNF-dependent manner. Using ILK-shRNA (siILK) lentivirus, we demonstrate that knockdown of ILK impairs EE...

  7. Il sistema nervoso di Octopus vulgaris come modello di studio della neurogenesi adulta

    OpenAIRE

    Bertapelle, Carla

    2015-01-01

    La neurogenesi adulta è stata evidenziata in organismi che presentano un'elevata complessità strutturale e funzionale del sistema nervoso, quali pesci, anfibi, rettili, uccelli e mammiferi, e, tra gli invertebrati, crostacei decapodi ed insetti. Sia nei vertebrati che negli invertebrati, essa ha luogo in aree che presentano un elevato grado di plasticità strutturale e che svolgono un ruolo fondamentale nell'apprendimento, nella memoria e nell'integrazione di stimoli sensoriali, ciò suggerisce...

  8. Prenatal stress produces learning deficits associated with an inhibition of neurogenesis in the hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Lemaire, V.; Koehl, M.; Le Moal, M; Abrous, D.N.

    2000-01-01

    Early experiences such as prenatal stress significantly influence the development of the brain and the organization of behavior. In particular, prenatal stress impairs memory processes but the mechanism for this effect is not known. Hippocampal granule neurons are generated throughout life and are involved in hippocampal-dependent learning. Here, we report that prenatal stress in rats induced lifespan reduction of neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and produced impairme...

  9. Effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on neurogenesis and tryptophan hydroxylase expression in adolescent and adult rats

    OpenAIRE

    Klomp, A.; Václavů, L.; Meerhoff, G.F.; Reneman, L.; Lucassen, P J

    2014-01-01

    The antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac) has been increasingly prescribed to children and adolescents with depressive disorders despite a lack of thorough understanding of its therapeutic effects in the paediatric population and of its putative neurodevelopmental effects. Within the framework of PRIOMEDCHILD ERA-NET, we investigated; a) effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a structural readout relevant for antidepressant action and hippocampal developm...

  10. Neural stem cells and the regulation of neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Seri, Bettina; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2002-01-01

    Neurogenesis continues in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult rodents and primates including humans. Neurons are born in the underlying subgranular layer (SGL) and move into the granule cell layer (GCL) to become mature granule neurons. Recent work indicates that the primary precursors for these new neurons correspond to radial astrocytes whose cell body is in the SGL and their processes traverse the GCL. These astrocytes divide to give rise to intermediate precursors, D cells that likely ...

  11. Long Course Hyperbaric Oxygen Stimulates Neurogenesis and Attenuates Inflammation after Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Sheng Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have provided evidence with regard to the neuroprotection benefits of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy in cases of stroke, and HBO also promotes bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs proliferation and mobilization. This study investigates the influence of HBO therapy on the migration of BMSCs, neurogenesis, gliosis, and inflammation after stroke. Rats that sustained transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO were treated with HBO three weeks or two days. The results were examined using a behavior test (modified neurological severity score, mNSS and immunostaining to evaluate the effects of HBO therapy on migration of BMSCs, neurogenesis, and gliosis, and expression of neurotrophic factors was also evaluated. There was a lower mNSS score in the three-week HBO group when compared with the two-day HBO group. Mobilization of BMSCs to an ischemic area was more improved in long course HBO treatments, suggesting the duration of therapy is crucial for promoting the homing of BMSCs to ischemic brain by HBO therapies. HBO also can stimulate expression of trophic factors and improve neurogenesis and gliosis. These effects may help in neuronal repair after ischemic stroke, and increasing the course of HBO therapy might enhance therapeutic effects on ischemic stroke.

  12. Effect of voluntary running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cholinergic lesioned mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawe Gavin S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholinergic neuronal dysfunction of the basal forebrain is observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease and dementia, and has been linked to decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampus, a region involved in learning and memory. Running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. This study aims to address the effect of running on hippocampal neurogenesis in lesioned mice, where septohippocampal cholinergic neurones have been selectively eliminated in the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca of the basal forebrain by infusion of mu-p75-saporin immunotoxin. Results Running increased the number of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in cholinergic denervated mice compared to non-lesioned mice 24 hours after injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU. Although similar levels of surviving cells were present in cholinergic depleted animals and their respective controls four weeks after injection of BrdU, the majority of progenitors that proliferate in response to the initial period of running were not able to survive beyond one month without cholinergic input. Despite this, the running-induced increase in the number of surviving neurones was not affected by cholinergic depletion. Conclusion The lesion paradigm used here models aspects of the cholinergic deficits associated with Alzheimer's Disease and aging. We showed that running still increased the number of newborn cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus in this model of neurodegenerative disease.

  13. Promotion of Cortical Neurogenesis from the Neural Stem Cells in the Adult Mouse Subcallosal Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Choi, Kyuhyun; Shaker, Mohammed R; Lee, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Boram; Lee, Eunsoo; Park, Jae-Yong; Lim, Mi-Sun; Park, Chang-Hwan; Shin, Ki Soon; Kim, Hyun; Geum, Dongho; Sun, Woong

    2016-04-01

    Neurogenesis occurs spontaneously in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle in adult rodent brain, but it has long been debated whether there is sufficient adult neurogenesis in human SVZ. Subcallosal zone (SCZ), a posterior continuum of SVZ closely associated with posterior regions of cortical white matter, has also been reported to contain adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in both rodents and humans. However, little is known whether SCZ-derived aNSC (SCZ-aNSCs) can produce cortical neurons following brain injury. We found that SCZ-aNSCs exhibited limited neuronal differentiation potential in culture and after transplantation in mice. Neuroblasts derived from SCZ initially migrated toward injured cortex regions following brain injury, but later exhibited apoptosis. Overexpression of anti-apoptotic bcl-xL in the SCZ by retroviral infection rescued neuroblasts from cell death in the injured cortex, but neuronal maturation was still limited, resulting in atrophy. In combination with Bcl-xL, infusion of brain-derived neurotropic factor rescued atrophy, and importantly, a subset of such SCZ-aNSCs differentiated and attained morphological and physiological characteristics of mature, excitatory neurons. These results suggest that the combination of anti-apoptotic and neurotrophic factors might enable the use of aNSCs derived from the SCZ in cortical neurogenesis for neural replacement therapy. Stem Cells 2016;34:888-901. PMID:26701067

  14. Abca7 deletion does not affect adult neurogenesis in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyun; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) is highly expressed in the brain. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified ABCA7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that increase Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk, however, the mechanisms by which ABCA7 may control AD risk remain to be fully elucidated. Based on previous research suggesting that certain ABC transporters may play a role in the regulation of neurogenesis, we conducted a study of cell proliferation and neurogenic potential using cellular bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining in adult Abca7 deficient mice and wild-type-like (WT) littermates. In the present study counting of BrdU-positive and DCX-positive cells in an established adult neurogenesis site in the dentate gyrus (DG) indicated there were no significant differences when WT and Abca7 deficient mice were compared. We also measured the area occupied by immunohistochemical staining for BrdU and DCX in the DG and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the same mice and this confirmed that ABCA7 does not play a significant role in the regulation of cell proliferation or neurogenesis in the adult mouse. PMID:26792809

  15. Differential genomic imprinting regulates paracrine and autocrine roles of IGF2 in mouse adult neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrón, S R; Radford, E J; Domingo-Muelas, A; Kleine, I; Ramme, A; Gray, D; Sandovici, I; Constancia, M; Ward, A; Menheniott, T R; Ferguson-Smith, A C

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is implicated in the control of gene dosage in neurogenic niches. Here we address the importance of Igf2 imprinting for murine adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus in vivo. In the SVZ, paracrine IGF2 is a cerebrospinal fluid and endothelial-derived neurogenic factor requiring biallelic expression, with mutants having reduced activation of the stem cell pool and impaired olfactory bulb neurogenesis. In contrast, Igf2 is imprinted in the hippocampus acting as an autocrine factor expressed in neural stem cells (NSCs) solely from the paternal allele. Conditional mutagenesis of Igf2 in blood vessels confirms that endothelial-derived IGF2 contributes to NSC maintenance in SVZ but not in the SGZ, and that this is regulated by the biallelic expression of IGF2 in the vascular compartment. Our findings indicate that a regulatory decision to imprint or not is a functionally important mechanism of transcriptional dosage control in adult neurogenesis. PMID:26369386

  16. A region-specific neurogenesis mode requires migratory progenitors in the Drosophila visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apitz, Holger; Salecker, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Brain areas each generate specific neuron subtypes during development. However, underlying regional variations in neurogenesis strategies and regulatory mechanisms remain poorly understood. In Drosophila, neurons in four optic lobe ganglia originate from two neuroepithelia, the outer (OPC) and inner (IPC) proliferation centers. Using genetic manipulations, we found that one IPC neuroepithelial domain progressively transformed into migratory progenitors that matured into neural stem cells (neuroblasts) in a second domain. Progenitors emerged by an epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like mechanism that required the Snail-family member Escargot and, in subdomains, Decapentaplegic signaling. The proneural factors Lethal of scute and Asense differentially controlled progenitor supply and maturation into neuroblasts. These switched expression from Asense to a third proneural protein, Atonal. Dichaete and Tailless mediated this transition, which was essential for generating two neuron populations at defined positions. We propose that this neurogenesis mode is central for setting up a new proliferative zone to facilitate spatio-temporal matching of neurogenesis and connectivity across ganglia. PMID:25501037

  17. Neurotoxic effect of 2,5-hexanedione on neural progenitor cells and hippocampal neurogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2,5-Hexanedione (HD), a metabolite of n-hexane, causes central and peripheral neuropathy leading to motor neuron deficits. Although chronic exposure to n-hexane is known to cause gradual sensorimotor neuropathy, there are no reports on the effects of low doses of HD on neurogenesis in the central nervous system. In the current study, we explored HD toxicity in murine neural progenitor cells (NPC), primary neuronal culture and young adult mice. HD (500 nM∼50 μM) dose-dependently suppressed NPC proliferation and cell viability, and also increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). HD (10 or 50 mg/kg for 2 weeks) inhibited hippocampal neuronal and NPC proliferation in 6-week-old male ICR mice, as measured by BrdU incorporation in the dentate gyrus, indicating HD impaired hippocampal neurogenesis. In addition, elevated microglial activation was observed in the hippocampal CA3 region and lateral ventricles of HD-treated mice. Lastly, HD dose-dependently decreased the viability of primary cultured neurons. Based on biochemical and histochemical evidence from both cell culture and HD-treated animals, the neurotoxic mechanisms by which HD inhibits NPC proliferation and hippocampal neurogenesis may relate to its ability to elicit an increased generation of deleterious ROS.

  18. MicroRNA expression profiling in neurogenesis of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jung Ah Cho; Ho Park; Eun Hye Lim; Kyo Won Lee

    2011-04-01

    Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are one population of adult stem cells that can self renew and differentiate into multiple lineages. Because of advantages in method and quantity of acquisition, ADSCs are gaining attention as an alternative source of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we performed microRNA profiling of undifferentiated and of neurally-differentiated ADSCs to identify the responsible microRNAs in neurogenesis using this type of stem cell. MicroRNAs from four different donors were analysed by microarray. Compared to the undifferentiation control, we identified 39–101 microRNAs with more than two-fold higher expression and 3–9 microRNAs with two-fold lower expression. The identified microRNAs were further analysed in terms of gene ontology (GO) in relation with neurogenesis, based on their target mRNAs predicted by computational analysis. This study revealed the specific microRNAs involved in neurogenesis via microRNA microarray, and may provide the basic information for genetic induction of adult stem cell differentiation using microRNAs.

  19. Constraint-induced movement therapy enhanced neurogenesis and behavioral recovery after stroke in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuansheng; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Shanshan; Nie, Yingxue

    2009-08-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) has been extensively used for stroke rehabilitation. CIMT encourages use of the impaired limb along with restraint of the ipsilesional limb in daily life, and may promote behavioral recovery and induce structural changes in brain after stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CIMT enhances neurogenesis in rat brain after stroke that was generated by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Adult rats were divided into sham group, ischemia group and ischemia treated with CIMT group. Rats of CIMT group were treated with a plaster cast to restrain the healthy forelimb for 14 days beginning 1 week after ischemia. The proliferation of neuronal cells labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and behavioral recovery were analyzed at day 29 after ischemia. We also measured the tissue level of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) by ELISA. SDF-1 might be involved in the regulation of neurogenesis following stroke. In the subventricular zone of the animals treated with CIMT, there was a significant increase in the number of BrdU-positive cells (135 +/- 18, P behavioral performances and increased the SDF-1 protein levels in the cortex and dentate gyrus. In conclusion, CIMT treatment enhances neurogenesis and functional recovery after stroke. PMID:19638734

  20. The role of mTOR signalling in neurogenesis, insights from tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Andrew R; Sampson, Julian R; Pal, Deb K; Bateman, Joseph M

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the development and function of the nervous system is one of the foremost aims of current biomedical research. The nervous system is generated during a relatively short period of intense neurogenesis that is orchestrated by a number of key molecular signalling pathways. Even subtle defects in the activity of these molecules can have serious repercussions resulting in neurological, neurodevelopmental and neurocognitive problems including epilepsy, intellectual disability and autism. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a monogenic disease characterised by these problems and by the formation of benign tumours in multiple organs, including the brain. TSC is caused by mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 gene leading to activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway. A desire to understand the neurological manifestations of TSC has stimulated research into the role of the mTOR pathway in neurogenesis. In this review we describe TSC neurobiology and how the use of animal model systems has provided insights into the roles of mTOR signalling in neuronal differentiation and migration. Recent progress in this field has identified novel mTOR pathway components regulating neuronal differentiation. The roles of mTOR signalling and aberrant neurogenesis in epilepsy are also discussed. Continuing efforts to understand mTOR neurobiology will help to identify new therapeutic targets for TSC and other neurological diseases. PMID:26849906

  1. Tactile stimulation effects on hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial learning and memory in prenatally stressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Los Angeles, Guerrero Aguilera María; Del Carmen, Rubio Osornio María; Wendy, Portillo Martínez; Socorro, Retana-Márquez

    2016-06-01

    Neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is increased by spatial learning and postnatal stimulation. Conversely, prenatal stress (PS) produces a decrease in the proliferation of hippocampal granular cells. This work evaluated the effect of postnatal tactile stimulation (PTS), when applied from birth to adulthood, on cognitive performance and hippocampal neurogenesis (survival and differentiation) in PS female and male rats. The response of the adrenal axis to training in the Morris water maze (MWM) was also analyzed. PS was provided during gestational days 15 through 21. Hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive performance in the MWM were assessed at an age of three months. Results showed that escape latencies of both female and male PS rats were longer compared to those of their controls (CON). DG cell survival increased in the PS female rats. Corticosterone concentrations were significantly higher in the male and female PS rats after MWM training. PTS improved escape latencies and increased the number of new neurons in the DG of PS animals, and their corticosterone concentrations were similar to those in CON. In CON, PTS diminished DG cell survival but increased differentiation and reduces latency in the MWM. These results show that long-term PTS in PS animals might prevent learning deficits in adults through increase in the number of DG new cells and decrease of the reactivity of the adrenal axis to MWM training. PMID:26993794

  2. Impact of treadmill running and sex on hippocampal neurogenesis in the mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Ma

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ of dentate gyrus (DG occurs throughout life and is regulated by pathological and physiological processes. The role of oxidative stress in hippocampal neurogenesis and its response to exercise or neurodegenerative diseases remains controversial. The present study was designed to investigate the impact of oxidative stress, treadmill exercise and sex on hippocampal neurogenesis in a murine model of heightened oxidative stress (G93A mice. G93A and wild type (WT mice were randomized to a treadmill running (EX or a sedentary (SED group for 1 or 4 wk. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU labeled proliferating cells, surviving cells, and their phenotype, as well as for determination of oxidative stress (3-NT; 8-OHdG. BDNF and IGF1 mRNA expression was assessed by in situ hybridization. Results showed that: (1 G93A-SED mice had greater hippocampal neurogenesis, BDNF mRNA, and 3-NT, as compared to WT-SED mice. (2 Treadmill running promoted hippocampal neurogenesis and BDNF mRNA content and lowered DNA oxidative damage (8-OHdG in WT mice. (3 Male G93A mice showed significantly higher cell proliferation but a lower level of survival vs. female G93A mice. We conclude that G93A mice show higher hippocampal neurogenesis, in association with higher BDNF expression, yet running did not further enhance these phenomena in G93A mice, probably due to a 'ceiling effect' of an already heightened basal levels of hippocampal neurogenesis and BDNF expression.

  3. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 mediates baseline and activity-induced survival of new neurons in adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Anke

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult neurogenesis is a particular example of brain plasticity that is partially modulated by the endocannabinoid system. Whereas the impact of synthetic cannabinoids on the neuronal progenitor cells has been described, there has been lack of information about the action of plant-derived extracts on neurogenesis. Therefore we here focused on the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and Cannabidiol (CBD fed to female C57Bl/6 and Nestin-GFP-reporter mice on proliferation and maturation of neuronal progenitor cells and spatial learning performance. In addition we used cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 deficient mice and treatment with CB1 antagonist AM251 in Nestin-GFP-reporter mice to investigate the role of the CB1 receptor in adult neurogenesis in detail. Results THC and CBD differed in their effects on spatial learning and adult neurogenesis. CBD did not impair learning but increased adult neurogenesis, whereas THC reduced learning without affecting adult neurogenesis. We found the neurogenic effect of CBD to be dependent on the CB1 receptor, which is expressed over the whole dentate gyrus. Similarly, the neurogenic effect of environmental enrichment and voluntary wheel running depends on the presence of the CB1 receptor. We found that in the absence of CB1 receptors, cell proliferation was increased and neuronal differentiation reduced, which could be related to CB1 receptor mediated signaling in Doublecortin (DCX-expressing intermediate progenitor cells. Conclusion CB1 affected the stages of adult neurogenesis that involve intermediate highly proliferative progenitor cells and the survival and maturation of new neurons. The pro-neurogenic effects of CBD might explain some of the positive therapeutic features of CBD-based compounds.

  4. Galectin-1 is expressed in early-type neural progenitor cells and down-regulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imaizumi Yoichi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the adult mammalian brain, neural stem cells (NSCs proliferate in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and generate new neurons throughout life. A multimodal protein, Galectin-1, is expressed in neural progenitor cells (NPCs and implicated in the proliferation of the NPCs in the DG. However, little is known about its detailed expression profile in the NPCs and functions in adult neurogenesis in the DG. Results Our immunohistochemical and morphological analysis showed that Galectin-1 was expressed in the type 1 and 2a cells, which are putative NSCs, in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the adult mouse DG. To study Galectin-1's function in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, we made galectin-1 knock-out mice on the C57BL6 background and characterized the effects on neurogenesis. In the SGZ of the galectin-1 knock-out mice, increased numbers of type 1 cells, DCX-positive immature progenitors, and NeuN-positive newborn neurons were observed. Using triple-labeling immunohistochemistry and morphological analyses, we found that the proliferation of the type-1 cells was increased in the SGZ of the galectin-1 knock-out mice, and we propose that this proliferation is the mechanism for the net increase in the adult neurogenesis in these knock-out mice DG. Conclusions Galectin-1 is expressed in the neural stem cells and down-regulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus.

  5. Increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis is not necessary for wheel running to abolish conditioned place preference for cocaine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustroph, M L; Merritt, J R; Holloway, A L; Pinardo, H; Miller, D S; Kilby, C N; Bucko, P; Wyer, A; Rhodes, J S

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that wheel running can abolish conditioned place preference (CPP) for cocaine in mice. Running significantly increases the number of new neurons in the hippocampus, and new neurons have been hypothesised to enhance plasticity and behavioral flexibility. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that increased neurogenesis was necessary for exercise to abolish cocaine CPP. Male nestin-thymidine kinase transgenic mice were conditioned with cocaine, and then housed with or without running wheels for 32 days. Half of the mice were fed chow containing valganciclovir to induce apoptosis in newly divided neurons, and the other half were fed standard chow. For the first 10 days, mice received daily injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. On the last 4 days, mice were tested for CPP, and then euthanized for measurement of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by counting the number of BrdU-positive neurons in the dentate gyrus. Levels of running were similar in mice fed valganciclovir-containing chow and normal chow. Valganciclovir significantly reduced the numbers of neurons (BrdU-positive/NeuN-positive) in the dentate gyrus of both sedentary mice and runner mice. Valganciclovir-fed runner mice showed similar levels of neurogenesis as sedentary, normal-fed controls. However, valganciclovir-fed runner mice showed the same abolishment of CPP as runner mice with intact neurogenesis. The results demonstrate that elevated adult hippocampal neurogenesis resulting from running is not necessary for running to abolish cocaine CPP in mice. PMID:25393660

  6. Gestational methyl donor deficiency alters key proteins involved in neurosteroidogenesis in the olfactory bulbs of newborn female rats and is associated with impaired olfactory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hajj Chehadeh, Sarah; Pourié, Grégory; Martin, Nicolas; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Daval, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Leininger-Muller, Brigitte

    2014-03-28

    Gestational methyl donor deficiency (MDD) leads to growth retardation as well as to cognitive and motor disorders in 21-d-old rat pups. These disorders are related to impaired neurogenesis in the cerebral neurogenic areas. Olfactory bulbs (OB), the main target of neuronal progenitors originating from the subventricular zone, play a critical role during the postnatal period by allowing the pups to identify maternal odour. We hypothesised that growth retardation could result from impaired suckling due to impaired olfactory discrimination through imbalanced apoptosis/neurogenesis in the OB. Since neurosteroidogenesis modulates neurogenesis in OB, in the present study, we investigated whether altered neurosteroidogenesis could explain some these effects. Pups born to dams fed a normal diet (n 24) and a MDD diet (n 27) were subjected to olfactory tests during the lactation and weaning periods (n 24 and 20, respectively). We studied the markers of apoptosis/neurogenesis and the expression levels of the key neurosteroidogenic enzyme aromatase, the cholesterol-transfer protein StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein) and the ERα oestrogen receptor and the content of oestradiol in OB. The 21-d-old MDD female pups displayed lower body weight and impaired olfactory discrimination when compared with the control pups. MDD led to greater homocysteine accumulation and more pronounced apoptosis, along with impaired cell proliferation in the OB of female pups. The expression levels of aromatase, StAR and ERα as well as the content of oestradiol were lower in the OB of the MDD female pups than in those of the control female pups. In conclusion, gestational MDD may alter olfactory discrimination performances by affecting neurogenesis, apoptosis and neurosteroidogenesis in OB in a sex-dependent manner. It may be involved in growth retardation through impaired suckling. PMID:24229781

  7. New Hippocampal Neurons Are Not Obligatory for Memory Formation; Cyclin D2 Knockout Mice with No Adult Brain Neurogenesis Show Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaholkowski, Piotr; Kiryk, Anna; Jedynak, Paulina; Abdallah, Nada M. Ben; Knapska, Ewelina; Kowalczyk, Anna; Piechal, Agnieszka; Blecharz-Klin, Kamilla; Figiel, Izabela; Lioudyno, Victoria; Widy-Tyszkiewicz, Ewa; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M.; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Filipkowski, Robert K.

    2009-01-01

    The role of adult brain neurogenesis (generating new neurons) in learning and memory appears to be quite firmly established in spite of some criticism and lack of understanding of what the new neurons serve the brain for. Also, the few experiments showing that blocking adult neurogenesis causes learning deficits used irradiation and various drugs…

  8. Altered Morphologies and Functions of the Olfactory Bulb and Hippocampus Induced by miR-30c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tingting; Li, Tianpeng; Davies, Henry; Li, Weiyun; Yang, Jing; Li, Shanshan; Ling, Shucai

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is considered to contribute to a certain degree of plasticity for the brain. However, the effects of adult-born neurons on the brain are still largely unknown. Here, we specifically altered the expression of miR-30c in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and dentate gyrus (DG) by stereotaxic injection with their respective up- and down-regulated lentiviruses. Results showed an increased level of miR-30c enhanced adult neurogenesis by prompting cell-cycles of stem cells, whereas down-regulated miR-30c led to the opposite results. When these effects of miR-30c lasted for 3 months, we detected significant morphological changes in the olfactory bulb (OB) and lineage alteration in the hippocampus. Tests of olfactory sensitivity and associative and spatial memory showed that a certain amount of adult-born neurons are essential for the normal functions of the OB and hippocampus, but there also exist redundant newborn neurons that do not further improve the functioning of these areas. Our study revealed the interactions between miRNA, adult neurogenesis, brain morphology and function, and this provides a novel insight into understanding the role of newborn neurons in the adult brain. PMID:27242411

  9. Altered morphologies and functions of the olfactory bulb and hippocampus induced by miR-30c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting eSun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis is considered to contribute to a certain degree of plasticity for the brain. However, the effects of adult-born neurons on the brain are still largely unknown. Here, we specifically altered the expression of miR-30c in the subventricular zone (SVZ and dentate gyrus (DG by stereotaxic injection with their respective up-and down-regulated lentiviruses. Results showed an increased level of miR-30c enhanced adult neurogenesis by prompting cell-cycles of stem cells, whereas down-regulated miR-30c led to the opposite results. When these effects of miR-30c lasted for three months, we detected significant morphological changes in the olfactory bulb (OB and lineage alteration in the hippocampus. Tests of olfactory sensitivity and associative and spatial memory showed that a certain amount of adult-born neurons are essential for the normal functions of the OB and hippocampus, but there also exist redundant newborn neurons that do not further improve the functioning of these areas. Our study revealed the interactions between miRNA, adult neurogenesis, brain morphology and function, and this provides a novel insight into understanding the role of newborn neurons in the adult brain.

  10. Early life stress and hippocampal neurogenesis in the neonate: sexual dimorphism, long term consequences and possible mediators. A minireview.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naima eLajud

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Adverse early life experience decreases adult hippocampal neurogenesis and results in increased vulnerability to neuropsychiatric disorders. Despite that the effects of postnatal stress on neurogenesis have been widely studied in adult individuals, few efforts have been done to evaluate its immediate effects on the developing hippocampus. Moreover, it is not clear whether postnatal stress causes a differential impact in hippocampus development in male and female neonates that could be related to emotional deficits in adulthood. It has been proposed that the long term effects of early stress exposure rise from a persistent HPA axis activation during sensitive time windows; nevertheless the exact mechanisms and mediators remain unknown. Here, we summarize the immediate and late effects of early life stress on hippocampal neurogenesis in male and female rat pups, compare its later consequences in emotionality, and highlight some relevant mediator peptides that could be potentially involved in programming.

  11. IFN-{gamma} enhances neurogenesis in wild-type mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Rona; Nemirovsky, Anna; Harpaz, Idan; Cohen, Hagit; Owens, Trevor; Monsonego, Alon

    2008-01-01

    mechanisms can generate immunity to such deficits in neuronal repair. We demonstrate that in contrast to primarily innate immunity cytokines, such as interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, the adaptive immunity cytokine IFN-gamma enhances neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult mice and improves...... mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. We demonstrate that limited amounts of IFN-gamma in the brain shape the neuropoietic milieu to enhance neurogenesis, possibly representing the normal function of the immune system in controlling brain inflammation and repair.-Baron, R., Nemirovsky, A., Harpaz, I......., Cohen, H., Owens, T., Monsonego, A. IFN-gamma enhances neurogenesis in wild-type mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease....

  12. Fat cell-secreted adiponectin mediates physical exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis:an alternative anti-depressive treatment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suk Yu Yau; Ang Li; Aimin Xu; Kwok-fai So

    2015-01-01

    Psychological depression is drawing accumulating attention nowadays, due to the skyrocketing incidence worldwide and the enormous burdens it incurs. Physical exercise has been long recog-nized for its therapeutic effects on depressive disorders, although knowledge of the underlying mechanisms remains limited. Suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis in adult brains has been regarded, at least partly, contributive to depression, whereas physical exercise that restores neuro-genesis accordingly exerts the anti-depressive action. Several recent publications have suggested the potential role of adiponectin, a protein hormone secreted by peripheral mature adipocytes, in mediating physical exercise-triggered enhancement of hippocampal neurogenesis and alleviation of depression. Here, we brielfy review these novel ifndings and discuss the possibility of counter-acting depression by modulating adiponectin signaling in the hippocampus with interventions including physical exercise and administration of pharmacological agents.

  13. Environmental changes in oxygen tension reveal ROS-dependent neurogenesis and regeneration in the adult newt brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, L Shahul; Berg, Daniel A; Belnoue, Laure; Jensen, Lasse D; Cao, Yihai; Simon, András

    2015-01-01

    Organisms need to adapt to the ecological constraints in their habitat. How specific processes reflect such adaptations are difficult to model experimentally. We tested whether environmental shifts in oxygen tension lead to events in the adult newt brain that share features with processes occurring during neuronal regeneration under normoxia. By experimental simulation of varying oxygen concentrations, we show that hypoxia followed by re-oxygenation lead to neuronal death and hallmarks of an injury response, including activation of neural stem cells ultimately leading to neurogenesis. Neural stem cells accumulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) during re-oxygenation and inhibition of ROS biosynthesis counteracts their proliferation as well as neurogenesis. Importantly, regeneration of dopamine neurons under normoxia also depends on ROS-production. These data demonstrate a role for ROS-production in neurogenesis in newts and suggest that this role may have been recruited to the capacity to replace lost neurons in the brain of an adult vertebrate. PMID:26485032

  14. No effect of running and laboratory housing on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in wild caught long-tailed wood mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipp Hans-Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN in laboratory rodents have raised hopes for therapeutic interventions in neurodegenerative diseases and mood disorders, as AHN can be modulated by physical exercise, stress and environmental changes in these animals. Since it is not known whether cell proliferation and neurogenesis in wild living mice can be experimentally changed, this study investigates the responsiveness of AHN to voluntary running and to environmental change in wild caught long-tailed wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus. Results Statistical analyses show that running had no impact on cell proliferation (p = 0.44, neurogenesis (p = 0.94 or survival of newly born neurons (p = 0.58. Likewise, housing in the laboratory has no effect on AHN. In addition, interindividual differences in the level of neurogenesis are not related to interindividual differences of running wheel performance (rs = -0.09, p = 0.79. There is a correlation between the number of proliferating cells and the number of cells of neuronal lineage (rs = 0.63, p s = 0.5, p = 0.009, respectively. Conclusion Plasticity of adult neurogenesis is an established feature in strains of house mice and brown rats. Here, we demonstrate that voluntary running and environmental changes which are effective in house mice and brown rats cannot influence AHN in long-tailed wood mice. This indicates that in wild long-tailed wood mice different regulatory mechanisms act on cell proliferation and neurogenesis. If this difference reflects a species-specific adaptation or a broader adaptive strategy to a natural vs. domestic environment is unknown.

  15. Pharmacological reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis modifies functional brain circuits in mice exposed to a cocaine conditioned place preference paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Blanco, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Ladrón de Guevara-Miranda, David; Pedraz, María; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Santín, Luis J

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) behaviour and the functional brain circuitry involved. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis was pharmacologically reduced with temozolomide (TMZ), and mice were tested for cocaine-induced CPP to study c-Fos expression in the hippocampus and in extrahippocampal addiction-related areas. Correlational and multivariate analysis revealed that, under normal conditions, the hippocampus showed widespread functional connectivity with other brain areas and strongly contributed to the functional brain module associated with CPP expression. However, the neurogenesis-reduced mice showed normal CPP acquisition but engaged an alternate brain circuit where the functional connectivity of the dentate gyrus was notably reduced and other areas (the medial prefrontal cortex, accumbens and paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus) were recruited instead of the hippocampus. A second experiment unveiled that mice acquiring the cocaine-induced CPP under neurogenesis-reduced conditions were delayed in extinguishing their drug-seeking behaviour. But if the inhibited neurons were generated after CPP acquisition, extinction was not affected but an enhanced long-term CPP retention was found, suggesting that some roles of the adult-born neurons may differ depending on whether they are generated before or after drug-contextual associations are established. Importantly, cocaine-induced reinstatement of CPP behaviour was increased in the TMZ mice, regardless of the time of neurogenesis inhibition. The results show that adult hippocampal neurogenesis sculpts the addiction-related functional brain circuits, and reduction of the adult-born hippocampal neurons increases cocaine seeking in the CPP model. PMID:25870909

  16. Hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic plasticity support running-improved spatial learning and depression-like behaviour in stressed rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk-Yu Yau

    Full Text Available Exercise promotes hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic plasticity while stress shows the opposite effects, suggesting a possible mechanism for exercise to counteract stress. Changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic modification occur simultaneously in rats with stress or exercise; however, it is unclear whether neurogenesis or dendritic remodeling has a greater impact on mediating the effect of exercise on stress since they have been separately examined. Here we examined hippocampal cell proliferation in runners treated with different doses (low: 30 mg/kg; moderate: 40 mg/kg; high: 50 mg/kg of corticosterone (CORT for 14 days. Water maze task and forced swim tests were applied to assess hippocampal-dependent learning and depression-like behaviour respectively the day after the treatment. Repeated CORT treatment resulted in a graded increase in depression-like behaviour and impaired spatial learning that is associated with decreased hippocampal cell proliferation and BDNF levels. Running reversed these effects in rats treated with low or moderate, but not high doses of CORT. Using 40 mg/kg CORT-treated rats, we further studied the role of neurogenesis and dendritic remodeling in mediating the effects of exercise on stress. Co-labelling with BrdU (thymidine analog /doublecortin (immature neuronal marker showed that running increased neuronal differentiation in vehicle- and CORT-treated rats. Running also increased dendritic length and spine density in CA3 pyramidal neurons in 40 mg/kg CORT-treated rats. Ablation of neurogenesis with Ara-c infusion diminished the effect of running on restoring spatial learning and decreasing depression-like behaviour in 40 mg/kg CORT-treated animals in spite of dendritic and spine enhancement. but not normal runners with enhanced dendritic length. The results indicate that both restored hippocampal neurogenesis and dendritic remodelling within the hippocampus are essential for running to counteract

  17. The male sex pheromone darcin stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis and cell proliferation in the subventricular zone in female mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Hoffman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The integration of newly generated neurons persists throughout life in the mammalian olfactory bulb and hippocampus, regions involved in olfactory and spatial learning. Social cues can be potent stimuli for increasing adult neurogenesis; for example, odors from dominant but not subordinate male mice increase neurogenesis in both brain regions of adult females. However, little is known about the role of neurogenesis in social recognition or the assessment of potential mates. Dominant male mice scent-mark territories using urine that contains a number of pheromones including darcin (MUP20, a male-specific major urinary protein that stimulates rapid learned attraction to the spatial location and individual odor signature of the scent owner. Here we investigate whether exposure to darcin stimulates neurogenesis in the female brain. Hippocampal neurons and cellular proliferation in the lateral ventricles that supply neurons to the olfactory bulbs increased in females exposed for seven days to male urine containing at least 0.5µg/µl darcin. Darcin was effective whether presented alone or in the context of male urine, but other information in male urine appeared to modulate the proliferative response. When exposed to urine from wild male mice, hippocampal proliferation increased only if urine was from the same individual over seven days, suggesting that consistency of individual scent signatures is important. While seven days exposure to male scent initiated the first stages of increased neurogenesis, this caused no immediate increase in female attraction to the scent or in the strength or robustness of spatial learning in short-term conditioned place preference tests. The reliable and consistent stimulation of neurogenesis by a pheromone important in rapid social learning suggests that this may provide an excellent model to explore the relationship between the integration of new neurons and plasticity in spatial and olfactory learning in a socially

  18. The male sex pheromone darcin stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis and cell proliferation in the subventricular zone in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Emma; Pickavance, Lucy; Thippeswamy, Thimmasettappa; Beynon, Robert J; Hurst, Jane L

    2015-01-01

    The integration of newly generated neurons persists throughout life in the mammalian olfactory bulb and hippocampus, regions involved in olfactory and spatial learning. Social cues can be potent stimuli for increasing adult neurogenesis; for example, odors from dominant but not subordinate male mice increase neurogenesis in both brain regions of adult females. However, little is known about the role of neurogenesis in social recognition or the assessment of potential mates. Dominant male mice scent-mark territories using urine that contains a number of pheromones including darcin (MUP20), a male-specific major urinary protein that stimulates rapid learned attraction to the spatial location and individual odor signature of the scent owner. Here we investigate whether exposure to darcin stimulates neurogenesis in the female brain. Hippocampal neurons and cellular proliferation in the lateral ventricles that supply neurons to the olfactory bulbs increased in females exposed for 7 days to male urine containing at least 0.5 μg/μl darcin. Darcin was effective whether presented alone or in the context of male urine, but other information in male urine appeared to modulate the proliferative response. When exposed to urine from wild male mice, hippocampal proliferation increased only if urine was from the same individual over 7 days, suggesting that consistency of individual scent signatures is important. While 7 days exposure to male scent initiated the first stages of increased neurogenesis, this caused no immediate increase in female attraction to the scent or in the strength or robustness of spatial learning in short-term conditioned place preference tests. The reliable and consistent stimulation of neurogenesis by a pheromone important in rapid social learning suggests that this may provide an excellent model to explore the relationship between the integration of new neurons and plasticity in spatial and olfactory learning in a socially-relevant context. PMID

  19. The role of additive neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity in a hippocampal memory model with grid-cell like input.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Appleby

    Full Text Available Recently, we presented a study of adult neurogenesis in a simplified hippocampal memory model. The network was required to encode and decode memory patterns despite changing input statistics. We showed that additive neurogenesis was a more effective adaptation strategy compared to neuronal turnover and conventional synaptic plasticity as it allowed the network to respond to changes in the input statistics while preserving representations of earlier environments. Here we extend our model to include realistic, spatially driven input firing patterns in the form of grid cells in the entorhinal cortex. We compare network performance across a sequence of spatial environments using three distinct adaptation strategies: conventional synaptic plasticity, where the network is of fixed size but the connectivity is plastic; neuronal turnover, where the network is of fixed size but units in the network may die and be replaced; and additive neurogenesis, where the network starts out with fewer initial units but grows over time. We confirm that additive neurogenesis is a superior adaptation strategy when using realistic, spatially structured input patterns. We then show that a more biologically plausible neurogenesis rule that incorporates cell death and enhanced plasticity of new granule cells has an overall performance significantly better than any one of the three individual strategies operating alone. This adaptation rule can be tailored to maximise performance of the network when operating as either a short- or long-term memory store. We also examine the time course of adult neurogenesis over the lifetime of an animal raised under different hypothetical rearing conditions. These growth profiles have several distinct features that form a theoretical prediction that could be tested experimentally. Finally, we show that place cells can emerge and refine in a realistic manner in our model as a direct result of the sparsification performed by the dentate gyrus

  20. Galvanic vestibular stimulation impairs cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the rat hippocampus but not spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yiwen; Geddes, Lisa; Sato, Go; Stiles, Lucy; Darlington, Cynthia L; Smith, Paul F

    2014-05-01

    Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is a method of activating the peripheral vestibular system using direct current that is widely employed in clinical neurological testing. Since movement is recognized to stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis and movement is impossible without activation of the vestibular system, we speculated that activating the vestibular system in rats while minimizing movement, by delivering GVS under anesthesia, would affect hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis, and spatial memory. Compared with the sham control group, the number of cells incorporating the DNA replication marker, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), was significantly reduced in the bilateral hippocampi in both the cathode left-anode right and cathode right-anode left stimulation groups (P ≤ 0.0001). The majority of the BrdU(+ve) cells co-expressed Ki-67, a marker for the S phase of the cell cycle, suggesting that these BrdU(+ve) cells were still in the cell cycle; however, there was no significant difference in the degree of co-labeling between the two stimulation groups. Single labeling for doublecortin (DCX), a marker of immature neurons, showed that while there was no significant difference between the different groups in the number of DCX(+ve) cells in the right dentate gryus, in the left dentate gyrus there was a significant decrease in the cathode left-anode right group compared with the sham controls (P ≤ 0.03). Nonetheless, when animals were tested in place recognition, object exploration and Morris water maze tasks, there were no significant differences between the GVS groups and the sham controls. These results suggest that GVS can have striking effects on cell proliferation and possibly neurogenesis in the hippocampus, without affecting spatial memory. PMID:24449222

  1. Ramipril mitigates radiation-induced impairment of neurogenesis in the rat dentate gyrus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sublethal doses of whole brain irradiation (WBI) are commonly administered therapeutically and frequently result in late delayed radiation injuries, manifesting as severe and irreversible cognitive impairment. Neural progenitors within the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus are among the most radiosensitive cell types in the adult brain and are known to participate in hippocampal plasticity and normal cognitive function. These progenitors and the specialized SZG microenvironment required for neuronal differentiation are the source of neurogenic potential in the adult dentate gyrus, and provide a continuous supply of immature neurons which may then migrate into the adjacent granule cell layer to become mature granule cell neurons. The extreme radiosensitivity of these progenitors and the SGZ microenvironment suggests the hippocampus as a prime target for radiation-induced cognitive impairment. The brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has previously been implicated as a potent modulator of neurogenesis within the SGZ and selective RAS inhibitors have been implicated as mitigators of radiation brain injury. Here we investigate the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, ramipril, as a mitigator of radiation injury in this context. Adult male Fisher 344 rats received WBI at doses of 10 Gy and 15 Gy. Ramipril was administered beginning 24 hours post-WBI and maintained continuously for 12 weeks. Ramipril produced small but significant reductions in the deleterious effects of radiation on progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the rat dentate gyrus following 10 Gy-WBI, but was not effective following 15 Gy-WBI. Ramipril also reduced the basal rate of neurogenesis within the SGZ in unirradiated control rats. Our results indicate that chronic ACE inhibition with ramipril, initiated 24 hours post-irradiation, may reduce apoptosis among SGZ progenitors and/or inflammatory disruption of neurogenic signaling within SGZ microenvironment, and

  2. The PPARα Agonist Fenofibrate Preserves Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Inhibits Microglial Activation After Whole-Brain Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Whole-brain irradiation (WBI) leads to cognitive impairment months to years after radiation. Numerous studies suggest that decreased hippocampal neurogenesis and microglial activation are involved in the pathogenesis of WBI-induced brain injury. The goal of this study was to investigate whether administration of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α agonist fenofibrate would prevent the detrimental effect of WBI on hippocampal neurogenesis. Methods and Materials: For this study, 129S1/SvImJ wild-type and PPARα knockout mice that were fed either regular or 0.2% wt/wt fenofibrate-containing chow received either sham irradiation or WBI (10-Gy single dose of 137Cs γ-rays). Mice were injected intraperitoneally with bromodeoxyuridine to label the surviving cells at 1 month after WBI, and the newborn neurons were counted at 2 months after WBI by use of bromodeoxyuridine/neuronal nuclei double immunofluorescence. Proliferation in the subgranular zone and microglial activation were measured at 1 week and 2 months after WBI by use of Ki-67 and CD68 immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: Whole-brain irradiation led to a significant decrease in the number of newborn hippocampal neurons 2 months after it was performed. Fenofibrate prevented this decrease by promoting the survival of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus. In addition, fenofibrate treatment was associated with decreased microglial activation in the dentate gyrus after WBI. The neuroprotective effects of fenofibrate were abolished in the knockout mice, indicating a PPARα-dependent mechanism or mechanisms. Conclusions: These data highlight a novel role for PPARα ligands in improving neurogenesis after WBI and offer the promise of improving the quality of life for brain cancer patients receiving radiotherapy.

  3. Morphine Modulates Adult Neurogenesis and Contextual Memory by Impeding the Maturation of Neural Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Xu, Chi; Zheng, Hui; Loh, Horace H.; Law, Ping-Yee

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of adult neurogenesis by opiates has been implicated in modulating different addiction cycles. At which neurogenesis stage opiates exert their action remains unresolved. We attempt to define the temporal window of morphine’s inhibition effect on adult neurogenesis by using the POMC-EGFP mouse model, in which newborn granular cells (GCs) can be visualized between days 3–28 post-mitotic. The POMC-EGFP mice were trained under the 3-chambers conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm with either saline or morphine. We observed after 4 days of CPP training with saline, the number of EGFP-labeled newborn GCs in sub-granular zone (SGZ) hippocampus significantly increased compared to mice injected with saline in their homecage. CPP training with morphine significantly decreased the number of EGFP-labeled GCs, whereas no significant difference in the number of EGFP-labeled GCs was observed with the homecage mice injected with the same dose of morphine. Using cell-type selective markers, we observed that morphine reduced the number of late stage progenitors and immature neurons such as Doublecortin (DCX) and βIII Tubulin (TuJ1) positive cells in the SGZ but did not reduce the number of early progenitors such as Nestin, SOX2, or neurogenic differentiation-1 (NeuroD1) positive cells. Analysis of co-localization between different cell markers shows that morphine reduced the number of adult-born GCs by interfering with differentiation of early progenitors, but not by inducing apoptosis. In addition, when NeuroD1 was over-expressed in DG by stereotaxic injection of lentivirus, it rescued the loss of immature neurons and prolonged the extinction of morphine-trained CPP. These results suggest that under the condition of CPP training paradigm, morphine affects the transition of neural progenitor/stem cells to immature neurons via a mechanism involving NeuroD1. PMID:27078155

  4. Role of C/EBPβ transcription factor in adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

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    Marta Cortes-Canteli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the regions in which neurogenesis takes place in the adult brain. We have previously demonstrated that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ is expressed in the granular layer of the dentate gyrus of the adult mouse hippocampus. Taking into account the important role of C/EBPβ in the consolidation of long term memory, the fact that newborn neurons in the hippocampus contribute to learning and memory processes, and the role of this transcription factor, previously demonstrated by our group, in regulating neuronal differentiation, we speculated that this transcription factor could regulate stem/progenitor cells in this region of the brain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show, using C/EBPβ knockout mice, that C/EBPβ expression is observed in the subset of newborn cells that proliferate in the hippocampus of the adult brain. Mice lacking C/EBPβ present reduced survival of newborn cells in the hippocampus, a decrease in the number of these cells that differentiate into neurons and a diminished number of cells that are proliferating in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. These results were further confirmed in vitro. Neurosphere cultures from adult mice deficient in C/EBPβ present less proliferation and neuronal differentiation than neurospheres derived from wild type mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, using in vivo and in vitro strategies, we have identified C/EBPβ as a key player in the proliferation and survival of the new neurons produced in the adult mouse hippocampus. Our results support a novel role of C/EBPβ in the processes of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, providing new insights into the mechanisms that control neurogenesis in this region of the brain.

  5. Effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on neurogenesis and tryptophan hydroxylase expression in adolescent and adult rats.

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    Anne Klomp

    Full Text Available The antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac has been increasingly prescribed to children and adolescents with depressive disorders despite a lack of thorough understanding of its therapeutic effects in the paediatric population and of its putative neurodevelopmental effects. Within the framework of PRIOMEDCHILD ERA-NET, we investigated; a effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a structural readout relevant for antidepressant action and hippocampal development; b effects on tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH expression, a measure of serotonin synthesis; c whether treatment effects during adolescence differed from treatment at an adult age, and d whether they were subregion-specific. Stereological quantification of the number of proliferating (Ki-67+ cells and of the number of young migratory neurons (doublecortin+, revealed a significant age-by-treatment interaction effect, indicating that fluoxetine affects both proliferation and neurogenesis in adolescent-treated rats differently than it does in adult-treated rats. In terms of subregional differences, fluoxetine enhanced proliferation mainly in the dorsal parts of the hippocampus, and neurogenesis in both the suprapyramidal and infrapyramidal blades of the dentate gyrus in adolescent-treated rats, while no such differences were seen in adult-treated rats. Fluoxetine exerted similar age-by-treatment interaction effects on TPH cells mainly in the ventral portion of the dorsal raphe nucleus. We conclude that fluoxetine exerts divergent effects on structural plasticity and serotonin synthesis in adolescent versus adult-treated rats. These preliminary data indicate a differential sensitivity of the adolescent brain to this drug and thus warrant further research into their behavioural and translational aspects. Together with recent related findings, they further call for caution in prescribing these drugs to the adolescent population.

  6. Mouse genetic differences in voluntary wheel running, adult hippocampal neurogenesis and learning on the multi-strain-adapted plus water maze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Jennifer; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2014-01-01

    Moderate levels of aerobic exercise broadly enhance cognition throughout the lifespan. One hypothesized contributing mechanism is increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Recently, we measured the effects of voluntary wheel running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in 12 different mouse strains, and found increased neurogenesis in all strains, ranging from 2 to 5 fold depending on the strain. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which increased neurogenesis from wheel running is associated with enhanced performance on the water maze for 5 of the 12 strains, chosen based on their levels of neurogenesis observed in the previous study (C57BL/6J, 129S1/SvImJ, B6129SF1/J, DBA/2J, and B6D2F1/J). Mice were housed with or without a running wheels for 30 days then tested for learning and memory on the plus water maze, adapted for multiple strains, and rotarod test of motor performance. The first 10 days, animals were injected with BrdU to label dividing cells. After behavioral testing animals were euthanized to measure adult hippocampal neurogenesis using standard methods. Levels of neurogenesis depended on strain but all mice had a similar increase in neurogenesis in response to exercise. All mice acquired the water maze but performance depended on strain. Exercise improved water maze performance in all strains to a similar degree. Rotarod performance depended on strain. Exercise improved rotarod performance only in DBA/2J and B6D2F1/J mice. Taken together, results demonstrate that despite different levels of neurogenesis, memory performance and motor coordination in these mouse strains, all strains have the capacity to increase neurogenesis and improve learning on the water maze through voluntary wheel running. PMID:25435316

  7. Drugs developed to treat diabetes, liraglutide and lixisenatide, cross the blood brain barrier and enhance neurogenesis

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    Hunter Kerry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD, most likely linked to an impairment of insulin signalling in the brain. Therefore, drugs that enhance insulin signalling may have therapeutic potential for AD. Liraglutide (Victoza and exenatide (Byetta are novel long-lasting analogues of the GLP-1 incretin hormone and are currently available to treat diabetes. They facilitate insulin signalling via the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that GLP-1 analogues have a range of neuroprotective properties. GLP-1Rs are expressed in the hippocampal area of the brain an important site of adult neurogenesis and maintenance of cognition and memory formation. Therefore, if GLP-1 analogues can cross the blood brain barrier, diffuse through the brain to reach the receptors and most importantly activate them, their neuroprotective effects may be realized. Results In the present study we profiled the GLP-1 receptor agonists liraglutide (Victoza and lixisenatide (Lyxumia. We measured the kinetics of crossing the blood brain barrier (BBB, activation of the GLP-1R by measuring cAMP levels, and physiological effects in the brain on neuronal stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Both drugs were able to cross the BBB. Lixisenatide crossed the BBB at all doses tested (2.5, 25, or 250 nmol/kg bw ip. when measured 30 min post-injection and at 2.5-25 nmol/kg bw ip. 3 h post-injection. Lixisenatide also enhanced neurogenesis in the brain. Liraglutide crossed the BBB at 25 and 250 nmol/kg ip. but no increase was detectable at 2.5 nmol/kg ip. 30 min post-injection, and at 250 nmol/kg ip. at 3 h post-injection. Liraglutide and lixisenatide enhanced cAMP levels in the brain, with lixisenatide being more effective. Conclusions Our results suggest that these novel incretin analogues cross the BBB and show physiological activity and neurogenesis in the brain, which may be of use as a treatment of

  8. Effect of high-intensity exercise on aged mouse brain mitochondria, neurogenesis, and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Lezi, E; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2014-01-01

    In aged mice we assessed how intensive exercise affects brain bioenergetics, inflammation, and neurogenesis-relevant parameters. After 8 weeks of a supra-lactate threshold treadmill exercise intervention, 21-month old C57BL/6 mice showed increased brain PGC-1α protein, mTOR and phospho-mTOR protein, citrate synthase mRNA, and mtDNA copy number. Hippocampal VEGF-A gene expression trended higher, and a positive correlation between VEGF-A and PRC mRNA levels was observed. Brain DCX, BDNF, TNF-α,...

  9. The orphan COUP-TF nuclear receptors are markers for neurogenesis from cnidarians to vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Gauchat-Feiss, Dominique Madeleine; Escriva, Hector; Miljkovic-Licina, Marijana; Chera, Simona; Langlois, Marie-Claire; Begue, Agnès; Laudet, Vincent; Galliot, Brigitte

    2004-01-01

    In bilaterians, COUP-TF nuclear receptors participate in neurogenesis and/or CNS patterning. In hydra, the nervous system is formed of sensory mechanoreceptor cells (nematocytes) and neuronal cells, both lineages deriving from a common stem cell. The hydra COUP-TF gene, hyCOUP-TF, which encodes highly conserved DNA-binding and ligand-binding domains, belongs to the monophyletic COUP-TFs orphan receptor family (NR2F). In adult polyps, hyCOUP-TF is expressed in nematoblasts and a subset of neur...

  10. Modulatory interventions in post-natal hippocampal neurogenesis : structural and functional implications

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Rui Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Ciências da Saúde – Ciências Biológicas e Biomédicas Post-natal neurogenesis is one of the most interesting brain events disclosed in the last century, with its modulation promising a new approach to the treatment of some central nervous system (CNS) pathologies. Despite the expectations, its clinical application is not yet a reality, mainly because the information concerning its function and regulatory mechanisms is still insufficient. In order to bette...

  11. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors reduce excitotoxic injury and may facilitate neurogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baskys, Andrius; Bayazitov, Ildar; Fang, Liwei;

    2005-01-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist DHPG reduced nerve cell death caused by their exposure to NMDA ("neuroprotective effect") and attenuated NMDA receptor-mediated currents [Blaabjerg, M., Baskys, A., Zimmer, J., Vawter, M. P., 2003b. Changes in hippocampal gene expression aft......GluRs reduces nerve cell susceptibility to excitotoxic injury in a PLC-dependent manner; (2) this reduction is associated with a PLC-dependent depression of excitatory synaptic transmission; and (3) mGluR1 activation may facilitate neurogenesis....

  12. Neonatal Maternal Separation Alters the Capacity of Adult Neural Precursor Cells to Differentiate into Neurons Via Methylation of Retinoic Acid Receptor Gene Promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Boku, Shuken; Toda, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shin; Kato, Akiko; Inoue, Takeshi; Koyama, Tsukasa; Hiroi, Noboru; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early life stress is thought to contribute to psychiatric disorders, but the precise mechanisms underlying this link are poorly understood. As neonatal stress decreases adult hippocampal neurogenesis, which, in turn, functionally contributes to many behavioral phenotypes relevant to psychiatric disorders, we examined how in vivo neonatal maternal separation (NMS) impacts the capacity of adult hippocampal neural precursor cells via epigenetic alterations in vitro. METHODS: Rat pups...

  13. Space and time sequence and mosaicism of neurogenesis in hippocampal area CA1 in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the times and sequence of neuron formation in various structures of the mammalian brain has made substantial progress thanks to the use of autoradiographic techniques, by which the germinative precursors of neurons can be tagged with tritium-thymidine and the subsequent fate of the labeled cells can be followed. The authors study the space and time sequence of neuron formation and look for the presence of mosaicism of neurogenesis in area CA1 of Ammon's horn of the mouse hippocampus, one of the most regularly arranged hippocampal areas. An analysis of the distribution of intensively labeled neurons in areas CA1 showed the presence of groups of intensively labeled neurons alternating with unlabeled and weakly labeled cells.. Mice receiving tritium-thymidine on the 13th-16th day of embryogenesis were most marked when the isotope was injected on the 14th-15th day of embroygeneisis. The investigation showed that a mosaic pattern of neurogenesis exists in the hippocampus, just as in the neocortex, and it can be regarded as the result of asynchronous production of neurons by local areas of the germinative zone, each of which constructs a radial segment of cortex

  14. Major unsolved points in adult neurogenesis: doors open on a translational future?

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    LucaBonfanti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of exploiting adult neurogenesis (AN as a source of cell replacement is far from being achieved. In spite of many data gathered during the last two decades on homeostatic and reactive neurogenesis, it is evident that such knowledge is not sufficient for granting translational outcomes. By asking the question whether AN research field has to be considered as a dead end in such a perspective, here we review some major unresolved issues: multifaceted evolutionary constraints emerged in mammals, stem/progenitor cell type/availability and tissue permissivity, the possible impact on other brain functions and/or interplay with other forms of plasticity, and relevance in humans. We suggest that full understanding of AN biological processes is an essential step to their possible exploitation for brain repair, and that further fundamental, multidisciplinary research is required before translational outcomes can be reached. Scientist's attitude and their communication skills are also important. To avoid overestimation of AN reparative potential, more distant goals of cell replacement should be kept clearly distinct from restorative approaches involving AN plasticity, both representing translational perspectives.

  15. ERF and ETV3L are retinoic acid-inducible repressors required for primary neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesick, Amanda; Abbey, Rachelle; Chung, Connie; Liu, Sophia; Taketani, Mao; Blumberg, Bruce

    2013-08-01

    Cells in the developing neural tissue demonstrate an exquisite balance between proliferation and differentiation. Retinoic acid (RA) is required for neuronal differentiation by promoting expression of proneural and neurogenic genes. We show that RA acts early in the neurogenic pathway by inhibiting expression of neural progenitor markers Geminin and Foxd4l1, thereby promoting differentiation. Our screen for RA target genes in early Xenopus development identified Ets2 Repressor Factor (Erf) and the closely related ETS repressors Etv3 and Etv3-like (Etv3l). Erf and Etv3l are RA responsive and inhibit the action of ETS genes downstream of FGF signaling, placing them at the intersection of RA and growth factor signaling. We hypothesized that RA regulates primary neurogenesis by inducing Erf and Etv3l to antagonize proliferative signals. Loss-of-function analysis showed that Erf and Etv3l are required to inhibit proliferation of neural progenitors to allow differentiation, whereas overexpression of Erf led to an increase in the number of primary neurons. Therefore, these RA-induced ETS repressors are key components of the proliferation-differentiation switch during primary neurogenesis in vivo. PMID:23824578

  16. Neurogenesis in the mossy chiton, Mopalia muscosa (Gould) (Polyplacophora): evidence against molluscan metamerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Stefan; Wanninger, Andreas; Brückner, Martin; Haszprunar, Gerhard

    2002-08-01

    Neurogenesis in the chiton Mopalia muscosa (Gould, 1846) was investigated by applying differential interference contrast microscopy, semithin serial sectioning combined with reconstruction techniques, as well as confocal laser scanning microscopy for the detection of fluorescence-conjugated antibodies against serotonin and FMRFamide. The ontogeny of serotonergic nervous structures starts with cells of the apical organ followed by those of the cerebral commissure, whereas the serotonergic prototroch innervation, pedal system, and the lateral cords develop later. In addition, there are eight symmetrically arranged serotonergic sensory cells in the dorsal pretrochal area of the larva. FMRFamide-positive neural elements include the cerebral commissure, specific "ampullary" sensory cells in the pretrochal region, as well as the larval lateral and pedal system. In the early juvenile the cerebral system no longer stains with either of the two antibodies and the pedal system lacks anti-FMRFamide immunoreactivity. Outgroup comparison with all other molluscan classes and related phyla suggests that the cord-like, nonganglionized cerebral system in the Polyplacophora is a reduced condition rather than a primitive molluscan condition. The immunosensitivity of the pedal commissures develops from posterior to anterior, suggesting independent serial repetition rather than annelid-like conditions and there is no trace of true segmentation during nervous system development. Polyplacophoran neurogenesis and all other available data on the subject contradict the idea of a segmented molluscan stem species. PMID:12112126

  17. The Adult Ventricular-Subventricular Zone (V-SVZ) and Olfactory Bulb (OB) Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Daniel A; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    A large population of neural stem/precursor cells (NSCs) persists in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) located in the walls of the lateral brain ventricles. V-SVZ NSCs produce large numbers of neuroblasts that migrate a long distance into the olfactory bulb (OB) where they differentiate into local circuit interneurons. Here, we review a broad range of discoveries that have emerged from studies of postnatal V-SVZ neurogenesis: the identification of NSCs as a subpopulation of astroglial cells, the neurogenic lineage, new mechanisms of neuronal migration, and molecular regulators of precursor cell proliferation and migration. It has also become evident that V-SVZ NSCs are regionally heterogeneous, with NSCs located in different regions of the ventricle wall generating distinct OB interneuron subtypes. Insights into the developmental origins and molecular mechanisms that underlie the regional specification of V-SVZ NSCs have also begun to emerge. Other recent studies have revealed new cell-intrinsic molecular mechanisms that enable lifelong neurogenesis in the V-SVZ. Finally, we discuss intriguing differences between the rodent V-SVZ and the corresponding human brain region. The rapidly expanding cellular and molecular knowledge of V-SVZ NSC biology provides key insights into postnatal neural development, the origin of brain tumors, and may inform the development regenerative therapies from cultured and endogenous human neural precursors. PMID:27048191

  18. A subtype-specific critical period for neurogenesis in the postnatal development of mouse olfactory glomeruli.

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    Yasuko Kato

    Full Text Available Sensory input is essential for the normal development of sensory centers in the brain, such as the somatosensory, visual, auditory, and olfactory systems. Visual deprivation during a specific developmental stage, called the critical period, results in severe and irreversible functional impairments in the primary visual cortex. Olfactory deprivation in the early postnatal period also causes significant developmental defects in the olfactory bulb, the primary center for olfaction. Olfactory bulb interneurons are continuously generated from neural stem cells in the ventricular-subventricular zone, suggesting that the olfactory system has plasticity even in adulthood. Here, we investigated the effect of transient neonatal olfactory deprivation on the addition of interneurons to the glomerular layer of the adult mouse olfactory bulb. We found that the addition of one subtype of interneurons was persistently inhibited even after reopening the naris. BrdU pulse-chase experiments revealed that the neonatal olfactory deprivation predominantly affected an early phase in the maturation of this neuronal subtype in the olfactory bulb. Subjecting the mice to odor stimulation for 6 weeks after naris reopening resulted in significant recovery from the histological and functional defects caused by the olfactory deprivation. These results suggest that a subtype-specific critical period exists for olfactory bulb neurogenesis, but that this period is less strict and more plastic compared with the critical periods for other systems. This study provides new insights into the mechanisms of postnatal neurogenesis and a biological basis for the therapeutic effect of olfactory training.

  19. Specific radiosensitivy and postnatal neurogenesis of the dentate gyrus of rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult and young rabbits were delivered a gamma exposure of 4.5 Gy. A light and electron microscope cytological investigation of the hippocampal region in the early hours following the exposure showed the particular radiosensitivity of the dentate gyrus which was demonstrated by: 1) pycnotic cells to be found at the basis of the granular cell layer (subgranular zone) exclusively; 2) a more discrete injury of the granular layer where most nuclei showed a lighter chromatin appearing as ''light spots''. Both radioinduced injuries are described, especially their kinetics, importance, and the effects of dose and age of the animal. The presence of pycnotic cells in the subgranular zone was related to the late postnatal neurogenesis occurring in this zone. The pattern and chronology of this late postnatal neurogenesis was investigated by autoradiography following 3H thymidine injection. Finally, two series of investigations combining autoradiography and irradiation brought further data on the radiosensitivity and radioresistance of the dental gyrus cells and demonstrated the recovery capacity of the subgranular zone

  20. Molecular mechanisms regulating impaired neurogenesis of fragile X syndrome human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telias, Michael; Mayshar, Yoav; Amit, Ami; Ben-Yosef, Dalit

    2015-10-15

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited cognitive impairment. It is caused by developmental inactivation of the FMR1 gene and the absence of its encoded protein FMRP, which plays pivotal roles in brain development and function. In FXS embryos with full FMR1 mutation, FMRP is expressed during early embryogenesis and is gradually downregulated at the third trimester of pregnancy. FX-human embryonic stem cells (FX-hESCs), derived from FX human blastocysts, demonstrate the same pattern of developmentally regulated FMR1 inactivation when subjected to in vitro neural differentiation (IVND). In this study, we used this in vitro human platform to explore the molecular mechanisms downstream to FMRP in the context of early human embryonic neurogenesis. Our results show a novel role for the SOX superfamily of transcription factors, specifically for SOX2 and SOX9, which could explain the reduced and delayed neurogenesis observed in FX cells. In addition, we assess in this study the "GSK3β theory of FXS" for the first time in a human-based model. We found no evidence for a pathological increase in GSK3β protein levels upon cellular loss of FMRP, in contrast to what was found in the brain of Fmr1 knockout mice. Our study adds novel data on potential downstream targets of FMRP and highlights the importance of the FX-hESC IVND system. PMID:26393806

  1. Adult neural stem cell behavior underlying constitutive and restorative neurogenesis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Joana S; Ninkovic, Jovica

    2016-01-01

    Adult Neural Stem Cells (aNSCs) generate new neurons that integrate into the pre-existing networks in specific locations of the Vertebrate brain. Moreover, aNSCs contribute with new neurons to brain regeneration in some non-mammalian Vertebrates. The similarities and the differences in the cellular and molecular processes governing neurogenesis in the intact and regenerating brain are still to be assessed. Toward this end, we recently established a protocol for non-invasive imaging of aNSC behavior in their niche in vivo in the adult intact and regenerating zebrafish telencephalon. We observed different modes of aNSC division in the intact brain and a novel mode of neurogenesis by direct conversion, which contributes to stem cell depletion with age. After injury, the generation of neurons is increased both by the activation of additional aNSCs and a shift in the division mode of aNSCs, thereby contributing to the successful neuronal regeneration. The cellular behavior we observed opens new questions regarding long-term aNSC maintenance in homeostasis and in regeneration. In this commentary we discuss our data and new questions arising in the context of aNSC behavior, not only in zebrafish but also in other species, including mammals. PMID:27606336

  2. A possible role for the immune system in adult neurogenesis: new insights from an invertebrate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzsch, Steffen; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Persistent neurogenesis in the adult brain of both vertebrates and invertebrates was previously considered to be driven by self-renewing neuronal stem cells of ectodermal origin. Recent findings in an invertebrate model challenge this view and instead provide evidence for a recruitment of neuronal precursors from a non-neuronal source. In the brain of adult crayfish, a neurogenic niche was identified that contributes progeny to the adult central olfactory pathway. The niche may function in attracting cells from the hemolymph and transforming them into cells with a neuronal fate. This finding implies that the first-generation neuronal precursors located in the crayfish neurogenic niche are not self-renewing. Evidence is summarized in support of a critical re-evaluation of long-term self-renewal of mammalian neuronal stem cells. Latest findings suggest that a tight link between the immune system and the system driving adult neurogenesis may not only exist in the crayfish but also in mammals. PMID:26739123

  3. Snail-type zinc finger proteins prevent neurogenesis in Scutoid and transgenic animals of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, N; Matakatsu, H; Taniguchi, M; Hayashi, S

    1999-10-01

    Scutoid is a classical dominant gain-of-function mutation of Drosophila, causing a loss of bristles and roughening of the compound eye. Previous genetic and molecular analyses have shown that Scutoid is associated with a chromosomal transposition resulting in a fusion of no-oceli and snail genes. How this gene fusion event leads to the defects in neurogenesis was not known until now. Here have found that snail is ectopically expressed in the eye-antennal and wing imaginal discs in Scutoid larvae, and that this expression is reduced in Scutoid revertants. We have also shown that the expressivity of Scutoid is enhanced by zeste mutations. snail and escargot encode evolutionarily conserved zinc-finger proteins involved in the development of mesoderm and limbs. Snail and Escargot proteins share a common target DNA sequence with the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) type proneural gene products. When expressed in the developing external sense organ precursors of the thorax and the eye, these proteins cause a loss of mechanosensory bristles in the thorax and perturbed the development of the compound eye. Such phenotypes resemble those associated with Scutoid. Furthermore, the effect of ectopic Escargot on bristle development is antagonized by coexpression of the bHLH gene asense. Thus, our results suggest that the Scutoid phenotype is due to an ectopic snail expression under the control of no-oceli enhancer, antagonizing neurogenesis through its inhibitory interaction with bHLH proteins. PMID:10552298

  4. The potential of endogenous neurogenesis for brain repair and regeneration following traumatic brain injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Sun

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability of persons under 45 years old in the United States, affecting over 1.5 million individuals each year. It had been th ought that recovery from such injuries is severely limited due to the inability of the adult bra in to replace damaged neurons. However, recent studies indicate that the mature mammalian central nervous system (CNS) has the potential to replenish damaged neurons by proliferation and neuronal differentiation of adult neural stem/progenitor cells residing in the neurogenic regions in the brain. Furthermore, increasing evidence indicates that these endogenous stem/progenitor cells may play regenerative and reparative roles in response to CNS injuries or diseases. In support of this notion, heightened levels of cell proliferation and neurogenesis have been ob-served in response to brain trauma or insults suggesting that the brain has the inherent potential to restore populations of damaged or destroyed neurons. This review will discuss the potential functions of adult neurogenesis and recent development of strategies aiming at harnessing this neurogenic capacity in order to repopulate and repair the injured brain.

  5. NRSF/REST is required for gastrulation and neurogenesis during zebrafish development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuesong Wang; Jianke Ren; Zhugang Wang; Jihua Yao; Jian Fei

    2012-01-01

    Repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST)was recognized as a transcription suppressor regulating nervous system differentiation.However,the role of REST during early development has not been clarified.We cloned the zebrafish homolog of human REST.Real-time polymerase chain reaction results showed that zebrafish REST mRNA was both maternal and zygotic with the higher expression level from blastula to the late segmentation period.Whole-mount in situ hybridization showed that REST was strongly expressed in the blastoderm since dome stage and dynamically expressed mainly in developing brain,especially in the border of the brain subdivisions in early segmentation period.Knockdown of REST using translation blocking morpholino (MO-tra) technique resulted in gastrulation delay or even blockage,and subsequently led to embryo lethality by early segmentation period with deficient neurogenesis.However,splicing blocking morpholino for REST did not show obviously abnormal phenotype until 48 hpf (hours postfertilization),indicating that maternal REST was an important regulator for gastrulation.Further study revealed that the abnormal development in MO-tra morphants was at least partly due to the dysfunction of protein transportation from the yolk to the blastoderm.Our results showed that REST (especially maternal supplied REST) was required for gastrulation and neurogenesis during zebraflsh early embryogenesis.

  6. Simulated apoptosis/neurogenesis regulates learning and memory capabilities of adaptive neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, R Andrew; Potenza, Marc N; Hoffman, Ralph E; Miranker, Willard

    2004-04-01

    Characterization of neuronal death and neurogenesis in the adult brain of birds, humans, and other mammals raises the possibility that neuronal turnover represents a special form of neuroplasticity associated with stress responses, cognition, and the pathophysiology and treatment of psychiatric disorders. Multilayer neural network models capable of learning alphabetic character representations via incremental synaptic connection strength changes were used to assess additional learning and memory effects incurred by simulation of coordinated apoptotic and neurogenic events in the middle layer. Using a consistent incremental learning capability across all neurons and experimental conditions, increasing the number of middle layer neurons undergoing turnover increased network learning capacity for new information, and increased forgetting of old information. Simulations also showed that specific patterns of neural turnover based on individual neuronal connection characteristics, or the temporal-spatial pattern of neurons chosen for turnover during new learning impacts new learning performance. These simulations predict that apoptotic and neurogenic events could act together to produce specific learning and memory effects beyond those provided by ongoing mechanisms of connection plasticity in neuronal populations. Regulation of rates as well as patterns of neuronal turnover may serve an important function in tuning the informatic properties of plastic networks according to novel informational demands. Analogous regulation in the hippocampus may provide for adaptive cognitive and emotional responses to novel and stressful contexts, or operate suboptimally as a basis for psychiatric disorders. The implications of these elementary simulations for future biological and neural modeling research on apoptosis and neurogenesis are discussed. PMID:14702022

  7. Gamma radiation-induced Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis, comparison of single and fractionated dose regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy of the brain is associated with many consequences, including cognitive disorders. Pathogenesis of radiation induced cognitive disorder is not clear, but reduction of neurogenesis in hippocampus may be an underlying reason. 24 adult male rats entered to study. Radiation absorbed dose to midbrain was 10 Gy, delivered by routine cobalt radiotherapy machine which its output was measured 115.24 cGy/min. The rats were divided in four groups of sixes, including groups of control, single fraction 10 Gy, fractionated 10 Gy and finally anaesthesia sham group. Number of pyramidal nerve cells was counted in two regions of hippocampus formation (CA1 and CA3). The radiation could reduce the number of cells in two regions of hippocampus significantly (p=0.000). It seems fractionated 10 Gy irradiation to more efficient than single fraction, while role of anaesthesia drug should be cautiously assessed. Moreover the rate of neurogenesis reduction was determined the same in these regions of hippocampus meaning the same radiosensitivity of cells

  8. Regulation of adult neurogenesis by stress, sleep disruption, exercise and inflammation : Implications for depression and antidepressant action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, P. J.; Meerlo, P.; Naylor, A. S.; van Dam, A.M.; Dayer, A. G.; Fuchs, E.; Oomen, C. A.; Czeh, B.

    2010-01-01

    Adult hippocampal. neurogenesis, a once unorthodox concept, has changed into one of the most rapidly growing fields in neuroscience. The present report results from the ECNP targeted expert meeting in 2007 during which cellular plasticity changes were addressed in the adult brain, focusing on neurog

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for the enhancement of hippocampal neurogenesis following environmental enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Chiara; Angelucci, Andrea; Costantin, Laura; Braschi, Chiara; Mazzantini, Mario; Babbini, Francesco; Fabbri, Maria Elena; Tessarollo, Lino; Maffei, Lamberto; Berardi, Nicoletta; Caleo, Matteo

    2006-10-01

    Neurogenesis continues to occur in the adult mammalian hippocampus and is regulated by both genetic and environmental factors. It is known that exposure to an enriched environment enhances the number of newly generated neurons in the dentate gyrus. However, the mechanisms by which enriched housing produces these effects are poorly understood. To test a role for neurotrophins, we used heterozygous knockout mice for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF+/-) and mice lacking neurotrophin-4 (NT-4-/-) together with their wild-type littermates. Mice were either reared in standard laboratory conditions or placed in an enriched environment for 8 weeks. Animals received injections of the mitotic marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label newborn cells. Enriched wild-type and enriched NT-4-/- mice showed a two-fold increase in hippocampal neurogenesis as assessed by stereological counting of BrdU-positive cells in the dentate gyrus and double labelling for BrdU and the neuronal marker NeuN. Remarkably, this enhancement of hippocampal neurogenesis was not seen in enriched BDNF+/- mice. Failure to up-regulate BDNF accompanied the lack of a neurogenic response in enriched BDNF heterozygous mice. We conclude that BDNF but not NT-4 is required for the environmental induction of neurogenesis. PMID:17040481

  10. Neurogenin2 directs granule neuroblast production and amplification while NeuroD1 specifies neuronal fate during hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Roybon

    Full Text Available The specification and differentiation of dentate gyrus granule neurons in the hippocampus require temporally and spatially coordinated actions of both intrinsic and extrinsic molecules. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Neurogenin2 (Ngn2 and NeuroD1 are key regulators in these processes. Based on existing classification, we analyzed the molecular events occurring during hippocampal neurogenesis, primarily focusing on juvenile animals. We found that Ngn2 is transiently expressed by late type-2a amplifying progenitors. The Ngn2 progenies mature into hippocampal granule neurons. Interestingly, the loss of Ngn2 at early stages of development leads to a robust reduction in neurogenesis, but does not disturb granule neuron maturation per se. We found that the role of Ngn2 is to maintain progenitors in an undifferentiated state, allowing them to amplify prior to their maturation into granule neurons upon NeuroD1 induction. When we overexpressed Ngn2 and NeuroD1 in vivo, we found NeuroD1 to exhibit a more pronounced neuron-inductive effect, leading to granule neuron commitment, than that displayed by Ngn2. Finally, we observed that all markers expressed during the transcriptional control of hippocampal neurogenesis in rodents are also present in the human hippocampus. Taken together, we demonstrate a critical role of for Ngn2 and NeuroD1 in controlling neuronal commitment and hippocampal granule neuroblast formation, both during embryonic development and in post-natal hippocampal granule neurogenesis.

  11. Loss of neurogenesis in Hydra leads to compensatory regulation of neurogenic and neurotransmission genes in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Y; Buzgariu, W; Galliot, B

    2016-01-01

    Hydra continuously differentiates a sophisticated nervous system made of mechanosensory cells (nematocytes) and sensory-motor and ganglionic neurons from interstitial stem cells. However, this dynamic adult neurogenesis is dispensable for morphogenesis. Indeed animals depleted of their interstitial stem cells and interstitial progenitors lose their active behaviours but maintain their developmental fitness, and regenerate and bud when force-fed. To characterize the impact of the loss of neurogenesis in Hydra, we first performed transcriptomic profiling at five positions along the body axis. We found neurogenic genes predominantly expressed along the central body column, which contains stem cells and progenitors, and neurotransmission genes predominantly expressed at the extremities, where the nervous system is dense. Next, we performed transcriptomics on animals depleted of their interstitial cells by hydroxyurea, colchicine or heat-shock treatment. By crossing these results with cell-type-specific transcriptomics, we identified epithelial genes up-regulated upon loss of neurogenesis: transcription factors (Dlx, Dlx1, DMBX1/Manacle, Ets1, Gli3, KLF11, LMX1A, ZNF436, Shox1), epitheliopeptides (Arminins, PW peptide), neurosignalling components (CAMK1D, DDCl2, Inx1), ligand-ion channel receptors (CHRNA1, NaC7), G-Protein Coupled Receptors and FMRFRL. Hence epitheliomuscular cells seemingly enhance their sensing ability when neurogenesis is compromised. This unsuspected plasticity might reflect the extended multifunctionality of epithelial-like cells in early eumetazoan evolution. PMID:26598723

  12. Promoting neurogenesis via Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway accounts for the neurorestorative effects of morroniside against cerebral ischemia injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fang-Ling; Wang, Wen; Zuo, Wei; Xue, Jin-Long; Xu, Jing-dong; Ai, Hou-Xi; Zhang, Li; Wang, Xiao-Min; Ji, Xun-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of mortality and permanent disability in adults worldwide. Neurogenesis triggered by ischemia in the adult mammalian brain may provide insights into stroke treatment. Morroniside is an active component of sarcocarp of C. officinalis that have shown neuroprotective effects. The aim of the present study is to test whether morroniside promotes neurogenesis via Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway for brain recovery in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Morroniside was administered intragastrically once daily at the concentrations of 30, 90 and 270 mg/kg for 7 days post-ischemia. Neurological functions were detected by Ludmila Belayev score tests. Endogenous neural stem cells responses were investigated with immunofluorescence staining of Ki-67 and Nestin to identify the neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ). The expression of proteins involved in and related to Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was detected by western blotting analysis. Morroniside significantly promoted neurogenesis for brain recovery 7 days post-ischemia. Increased expression of Wnt 3a, β-catenin and T-cell transcription factor-4 (Tcf-4), along with activation of downstream transcription factors Pax6 and neurogenin2 (Ngn2), indicated that the neurorestorative effects of morroniside may be associated with Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These data provide support for understanding the mechanisms of morroniside in neurorestorative effects and suggest a potential new strategy for ischemic stroke treatment. PMID:24876057

  13. p600 regulates spindle orientation in apical neural progenitors and contributes to neurogenesis in the developing neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Belzil

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Apical neural progenitors (aNPs drive neurogenesis by means of a program consisting of self-proliferative and neurogenic divisions. The balance between these two manners of division sustains the pool of apical progenitors into late neurogenesis, thereby ensuring their availability to populate the brain with terminal cell types. Using knockout and in utero electroporation mouse models, we report a key role for the microtubule-associated protein 600 (p600 in the regulation of spindle orientation in aNPs, a cellular event that has been associated with cell fate and neurogenesis. We find that p600 interacts directly with the neurogenic protein Ndel1 and that aNPs knockout for p600, depleted of p600 by shRNA or expressing a Ndel1-binding p600 fragment all display randomized spindle orientation. Depletion of p600 by shRNA or expression of the Ndel1-binding p600 fragment also results in a decreased number of Pax6-positive aNPs and an increased number of Tbr2-positive basal progenitors destined to become neurons. These Pax6-positive aNPs display a tilted mitotic spindle. In mice wherein p600 is ablated in progenitors, the production of neurons is significantly impaired and this defect is associated with microcephaly. We propose a working model in which p600 controls spindle orientation in aNPs and discuss its implication for neurogenesis.

  14. (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL: a GLP-1 agonist that improves hippocampal neurogenesis, glucose homeostasis, and β-cell function in high-fat-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Rachael; Porter, David W; Flatt, Peter R; Gault, Victor A

    2013-04-01

    This study examined the biological properties of a novel GLP-1 peptide, (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL, engineered with an Ala(8)→Val(8) substitution and additional incorporation of a C(16) fatty acid moiety at Lys(26) via a glutamic acid linker. GLP-1 underwent 75 % degradation by DPP-IV over 8 h, whereas (Val(8))GLP-1 and (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL remained intact. All GLP-1 peptides significantly stimulated insulin secretion at 5.6 mM (1.3- to 4.9-fold, peffect on bodyweight or food intake, but significantly lowered non-fasting plasma glucose (43-46 % decrease, pconsumption, CO(2) production, RER, and energy expenditure were not altered by (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL therapy. Treatment with (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL resulted in a significant increase in BrdU-positive cells (1.3-fold, p<0.05) in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. These data demonstrate that (Val(8))GLP-1-Glu-PAL is a long-acting GLP-1 peptide that significantly improves hippocampal neurogenesis, glucose homeostasis, and insulin secretion in high-fat-fed mice. PMID:23138973

  15. Kif11 dependent cell cycle progression in radial glial cells is required for proper neurogenesis in the zebrafish neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kimberly; Moriarty, Chelsea; Tania, Nessy; Ortman, Alissa; DiPietrantonio, Kristina; Edens, Brittany; Eisenman, Jean; Ok, Deborah; Krikorian, Sarah; Barragan, Jessica; Golé, Christophe; Barresi, Michael J F

    2014-03-01

    Radial glia serve as the resident neural stem cells in the embryonic vertebrate nervous system, and their proliferation must be tightly regulated to generate the correct number of neuronal and glial cell progeny in the neural tube. During a forward genetic screen, we recently identified a zebrafish mutant in the kif11 loci that displayed a significant increase in radial glial cell bodies at the ventricular zone of the spinal cord. Kif11, also known as Eg5, is a kinesin-related, plus-end directed motor protein responsible for stabilizing and separating the bipolar mitotic spindle. We show here that Gfap+ radial glial cells express kif11 in the ventricular zone and floor plate. Loss of Kif11 by mutation or pharmacological inhibition with S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC) results in monoastral spindle formation in radial glial cells, which is characteristic of mitotic arrest. We show that M-phase radial glia accumulate over time at the ventricular zone in kif11 mutants and STLC treated embryos. Mathematical modeling of the radial glial accumulation in kif11 mutants not only confirmed an ~226× delay in mitotic exit (likely a mitotic arrest), but also predicted two modes of increased cell death. These modeling predictions were supported by an increase in the apoptosis marker, anti-activated Caspase-3, which was also found to be inversely proportional to a decrease in cell proliferation. In addition, treatment with STLC at different stages of neural development uncovered two critical periods that most significantly require Kif11 function for stem cell progression through mitosis. We also show that loss of Kif11 function causes specific reductions in oligodendroglia and secondary interneurons and motorneurons, suggesting these later born populations require proper radial glia division. Despite these alterations to cell cycle dynamics, survival, and neurogenesis, we document unchanged cell densities within the neural tube in kif11 mutants, suggesting that a mechanism of

  16. Severely impaired hippocampal neurogenesis associates with an early serotonergic deficit in a BAC α-synuclein transgenic rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Zacharias; Ben Abdallah, Nada; Vogelgsang, Jonathan; Tischer, Lucas; Deusser, Janina; Amato, Davide; Anderson, Scott; Müller, Christian P; Riess, Olaf; Masliah, Eliezer; Nuber, Silke; Winkler, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multisystem disorder, involving several monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems resulting in a broad range of motor and non-motor symptoms. Pathological hallmarks of PD are the loss of dopaminergic neurons and the accumulation of alpha-synuclein, however also being present in the serotonergic raphe nuclei early in the disease course. The dysfunction of the serotonergic system projecting to the hippocampus may contribute to early non-motor symptoms such as anxiety and depression. The adult hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), a unique niche of the forebrain continuously generating new neurons, may particularly present enhanced susceptibility towards accumulating alpha-synuclein levels. The underlying molecular mechanisms in the context of neuronal maturation and survival of new-born neurons are yet not well understood. To characterize the effects of overexpression of human full-length alpha-synuclein on hippocampal cellular and synaptic plasticity, we used a recently generated BAC alpha-synuclein transgenic rat model showing important features of PD such as widespread and progressive alpha-synuclein aggregation pathology, dopamine loss and age-dependent motor decline. At the age of four months, thus prior to the occurrence of the motor phenotype, we observed a profoundly impaired dendritogenesis of neuroblasts in the hippocampal DG resulting in severely reduced survival of adult new-born neurons. Diminished neurogenesis concurred with a serotonergic deficit in the hippocampus as defined by reduced levels of serotonin (5-HT) 1B receptor, decreased 5-HT neurotransmitter levels, and a loss of serotonergic nerve terminals innervating the DG/CA3 subfield, while the number of serotonergic neurons in the raphe nuclei remained unchanged. Moreover, alpha-synuclein overexpression reduced proteins involved in vesicle release, in particular synapsin-1 and Rab3 interacting molecule (RIM3), in conjunction with an altered ultrastructural architecture of

  17. Recombinant human erythropoietin increases cerebral cortical width index and neurogenesis following ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongmin Wen; Peiji Wang

    2012-01-01

    The cerebral cortical expansion index refers to the ratio between left and right cortex width and is recognized as an indicator for cortical hyperplasia. Cerebral ischemia was established in CB-17 mice in the present study, and the mice were subsequently treated with recombinant human erythropoietin via subcutaneous injection. Results demonstrated that cerebral cortical width index significantly increased. Immunofluorescence detection showed that the number of nuclear antigen antibody/5-bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells at the infarction edge significantly increased. Correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between neurological scores and cortical width indices in rats following ischemic stroke. These experimental findings suggested that recombinant human erythropoietin promoted cerebral cortical hyperplasia, increased cortical neurogenesis, and enhanced functional recovery following ischemic stroke.

  18. The impact of adult neurogenesis on olfactory bulb circuits and computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepousez, Gabriel; Valley, Matthew T; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Modern neuroscience has demonstrated how the adult brain has the ability to profoundly remodel its neurons in response to changes in external stimuli or internal states. However, adult brain plasticity, although possible throughout life, remains restricted mostly to subcellular levels rather than affecting the entire cell. New neurons are continuously generated in only a few areas of the adult brain-the olfactory bulb and the dentate gyrus-where they integrate into already functioning circuitry. In these regions, adult neurogenesis adds another dimension of plasticity that either complements or is redundant to the classical molecular and cellular mechanisms of plasticity. This review extracts clues regarding the contribution of adult-born neurons to the different circuits of the olfactory bulb and specifically how new neurons participate in existing computations and enable new computational functions. PMID:23190074

  19. Post-translational Control of the Temporal Dynamics of Transcription Factor Activity Regulates Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiao-Jiang; Yuan, Liqun; Tiberi, Luca; Claeys, Annelies; De Geest, Natalie; Yan, Jiekun; van der Kant, Rob; Xie, Wei R; Klisch, Tiemo J; Shymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Bollen, Mathieu; Beullens, Monique; Zoghbi, Huda Y; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre; Hassan, Bassem A

    2016-01-28

    Neurogenesis is initiated by the transient expression of the highly conserved proneural proteins, bHLH transcriptional regulators. Here, we discover a conserved post-translational switch governing the duration of proneural protein activity that is required for proper neuronal development. Phosphorylation of a single Serine at the same position in Scute and Atonal proneural proteins governs the transition from active to inactive forms by regulating DNA binding. The equivalent Neurogenin2 Threonine also regulates DNA binding and proneural activity in the developing mammalian neocortex. Using genome editing in Drosophila, we show that Atonal outlives its mRNA but is inactivated by phosphorylation. Inhibiting the phosphorylation of the conserved proneural Serine causes quantitative changes in expression dynamics and target gene expression resulting in neuronal number and fate defects. Strikingly, even a subtle change from Serine to Threonine appears to shift the duration of Atonal activity in vivo, resulting in neuronal fate defects. PMID:26824657

  20. The evidence for increased L1 activity in the site of human adult brain neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A Kurnosov

    Full Text Available Retroelement activity is a common source of polymorphisms in human genome. The mechanism whereby retroelements contribute to the intraindividual genetic heterogeneity by inserting into the DNA of somatic cells is gaining increasing attention. Brain tissues are suspected to accumulate genetic heterogeneity as a result of the retroelements somatic activity. This study aims to expand our understanding of the role retroelements play in generating somatic mosaicism of neural tissues. Whole-genome Alu and L1 profiling of genomic DNA extracted from the cerebellum, frontal cortex, subventricular zone, dentate gyrus, and the myocardium revealed hundreds of somatic insertions in each of the analyzed tissues. Interestingly, the highest concentration of such insertions was detected in the dentate gyrus-the hotspot of adult neurogenesis. Insertions of retroelements and their activity could produce genetically diverse neuronal subsets, which can be involved in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory.

  1. Short-term sleep deprivation stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in rats following global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oumei Cheng

    Full Text Available Sleep deprivation (SD plays a complex role in central nervous system (CNS diseases. Recent studies indicate that short-term SD can affect the extent of ischemic damage. The aim of this study was to investigate whether short-term SD could stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis in a rat model of global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (GCIR.One hundred Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into Sham, GCIR and short-term SD groups based on different durations of SD; the short-term SD group was randomly divided into three subgroups: the GCIR+6hSD*3d-treated, GCIR+12hSD-treated and GCIR+12hSD*3d-treated groups. The GCIR rat model was induced via the bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries and hemorrhagic hypotension. The rats were sleep-deprived starting at 48 h following GCIR. A Morris water maze test was used to assess learning and memory ability; cell proliferation and differentiation were analyzed via 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU and neuron-specific enolase (NSE, respectively, at 14 and 28 d; the expression of hippocampal BDNF was measured after 7 d.The different durations of short-term SD designed in our experiment exhibited improvement in cognitive function as well as increased hippocampal BDNF expression. Additionally, the short-term SD groups also showed an increased number of BrdU- and BrdU/NSE-positive cells compared with the GCIR group. Of the three short-term SD groups, the GCIR+12hSD*3d-treated group experienced the most substantial beneficial effects.Short-term SD, especially the GCIR+12hSD*3d-treated method, stimulates neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG of rats that undergo GCIR, and BDNF may be an underlying mechanism in this process.

  2. Beta-nerve growth factor promotes neurogenesis and angiogenesis during the repair of bone defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-hui Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously showed that the repair of bone defects is regulated by neural and vascular signals. In the present study, we examined the effect of topically applied β-nerve growth factor (β-NGF on neurogenesis and angiogenesis in critical-sized bone defects filled with collagen bone substitute. We created two symmetrical defects, 2.5 mm in diameter, on either side of the parietal bone of the skull, and filled them with bone substitute. Subcutaneously implanted osmotic pumps were used to infuse 10 μg β-NGF in PBS (β-NGF + PBS into the right-hand side defect, and PBS into the left (control defect, over the 7 days following surgery. Immunohistochemical staining and hematoxylin-eosin staining were carried out at 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days postoperatively. On day 7, expression of β III-tubulin was lower on the β-NGF + PBS side than on the control side, and that of neurofilament 160 was greater. On day 14, β III-tubulin and protein gene product 9.5 were greater on the β-NGF + PBS side than on the control side. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression was greater on the experimental side than the control side at 7 days, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 expression was elevated on days 14 and 21, but lower than control levels on day 28. However, no difference in the number of blood vessels was observed between sides. Our results indicate that topical application of β-NGF promoted neurogenesis, and may modulate angiogenesis by promoting nerve regeneration in collagen bone substitute-filled defects.

  3. p53 Mutation suppresses adult neurogenesis in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes)

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    Isoe, Yasuko; Okuyama, Teruhiro [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Taniguchi, Yoshihito [Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Keio University, 35, Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Kubo, Takeo [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Takeuchi, Hideaki, E-mail: takeuchi@biol.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Progenitor migration is accompanied by an increase in their numbers in the adult brain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53 Mutation suppressed an increase in the number of the migrated progenitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The decreased progenitor number is not due to enhanced cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53 Mutation did not affect proliferation of stem cells. -- Abstract: Tumor suppressor p53 negatively regulates self-renewal of neural stem cells in the adult murine brain. Here, we report that the p53 null mutation in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) suppressed neurogenesis in the telencephalon, independent of cell death. By using 5-bromo-29-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry, we identified 18 proliferation zones in the brains of young medaka fish; in situ hybridization showed that p53 was expressed selectively in at least 12 proliferation zones. We also compared the number of BrdU-positive cells present in the whole telencephalon of wild-type (WT) and p53 mutant fish. Immediately after BrdU exposure, the number of BrdU-positive cells did not differ significantly between them. One week after BrdU-exposure, the BrdU-positive cells migrated from the proliferation zone, which was accompanied by an increased number in the WT brain. In contrast, no significant increase was observed in the p53 mutant brain. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (dUTP) nick end-labeling revealed that there was no significant difference in the number of apoptotic cells in the telencephalon of p53 mutant and WT medaka, suggesting that the decreased number of BrdU-positive cells in the mutant may be due to the suppression of proliferation rather than the enhancement of neural cell death. These results suggest that p53 positively regulates neurogenesis via cell proliferation.

  4. Agmatine increases proliferation of cultured hippocampal progenitor cells and hippocampal neurogenesis in chronically stressed mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-feng LI; Hong-xia CHEN; Ying LIU; You-zhi ZHANG; Yan-qin LIU; Jin LI

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To explore the mechanism of agmatine's antidepressant action.Methods: Male mice were subjected to a variety of unpredictable stressors on a daily basis over a 24-d period.The open-field behaviors of the mice were displayed and recorded using a Videomex-V image analytic system automatically.For bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU;thymidine analog as a marker for dividing cells) labeling,the mice were injected with BrdU (100 mg/kg,ip,twice per d for 2 d),and the hippocampal neurogenesis in stressed mice was measured by immunohistochemistry.The proliferation of cultured hippocampal progenitor cells from neonatal rats was determined by colorimetric assay (cell counting kit-8) and 3H-thymidine incorporation assay.Results:After the onset of chronic stress,the locomotor activity of the mice in the open field significantly decreased,while coadministration of agmatine 10 mg/kg (po) blocked it.Furthermore,the number of BrdU-labeled cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus significantly decreased in chronically stressed mice, which was also blocked by chronic coadministration with agmatine 10 mg/kg (po). Four weeks after the BrdU injection, some of the new born cells matured and became neurons, as determined by double labeling for BrdU and neuron specific enolase (NSE), a marker for mature neurons.In vitro treatment with agmatine 0.1-10 μmo1/L for 3 d significantly increased the proliferation of the cultured hippocampal progenitor cells in a dose-dependent manner.Conclusion:We have found that agmatine increases proliferation of hippocampal progenitor cells in vitro and the hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo in chronically stressed mice.This may be one of the important mechanisms involved in agmatine's antidepressant action.

  5. Low-intensity treadmill exercise and/or bright light promote neurogenesis in adult rat brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung Jin Kwon; Jeongsook Park; So Yun Park; Kwang Seop Song; Sun Tae Jung; So Bong Jung; Ik Ryeul Park; Wan Sung Choi; Sun Ok Kwon

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus is a brain region responsible for learning and memory functions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of low-intensity exercise and bright light exposure on neurogenesis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in adult rat hippocampus. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to control, exercise, light, or exercise + light groups (n = 9 per group). The rats in the exercise group were subjected to treadmill exercise (5 days per week, 30 minutes per day, over a 4-week period), the light group rats were irradiated (5 days per week, 30 minutes per day, 10 000 lx, over a 4-week period), the exercise + light group rats were subjected to treadmill exercise in combination with bright light exposure, and the control group rats remained sedentary over a 4-week period. Compared with the control group, there was a significant increase in neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rats in the exercise, light, and exercise + light groups. Moreover, the expression level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus was significantly higher in the exercise group and light group than that in the control group. Interestingly, there was no significant difference in brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression between the control group and exercise + light group. These results indicate that low-intensity treadmill exercise (first 5 minutes at a speed of 2 m/min, second 5 minutes at a speed of 5 m/min, and the last 20 minutes at a speed of 8 m/min) or bright-light exposure therapy induces positive biochemical changes in the brain. In view of these findings, we propose that moderate exercise or exposure to sunlight during childhood can be beneficial for neural development.

  6. Transforming Growth Factor -α Improves Memory Impairment and Neurogenesis Following Ischemia Reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Alipanahzadeh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stroke is most important cause of death and disability in adults. The hippocampal CA1 and sub-ventricular zone neurons are vulnerable to ischemia that can impair memory and learning functions. Although neurogenesis normally occurs in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and sub-ventricular zone (SVZ following brain damage, this response is unable to compensate for severely damaged areas. This study aims to assess both neurogenesis and the neuroprotective effects of transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α on the hippocampus and SVZ following ischemia-reperfusion. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, a total of 48 male Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: surgical (n=12, phosphate buffered saline (PBS treated vehicle shams (n=12, ischemia (n=12 and treatment (n=12 groups. Ischemia was induced by common carotid occlusion for 30 minutes followed by reperfusion, and TGF-α was then injected into the right lateral ventricle. Spatial memory was assessed using Morris water maze (MWM. Nestin and Bcl-2 family protein expressions were studied by immunohistochemistry (IHC and Western blot methods, respectively. Finally, data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, SPSS Inc., Chicago, USA version 16 and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: TGF-α injection significantly increased nestin expression in both the hippocampal DG and SVZ areas. TGF-α treatment caused a significant decrease in Bax expression and an increase in Bcl-2 anti-apoptotic protein expression in the hippocampus. Our results showed a significant increase in the number of pyramidal neurons. Memory also improved significantly following TGF-α treatment. Conclusion: Our findings proved that TGF-α reduced ischemic injury and played a neuroprotective role in the pathogenesis of ischemic injury.

  7. Impaired olfactory bulb neurogenesis depends on the presence of human wild-type alpha-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, V E L; Nuber, S; Marxreiter, F; Riess, O; Winner, B; Winkler, J

    2012-10-11

    Synucleinopathies including Parkinson's disease (PD) are characterized by the accumulation of alpha-synuclein (α-syn) within neural cell bodies and their processes. Transgenic mice overexpressing human wild-type or mutant forms of α-syn under the control of different promoters were developed to analyse the underlying neuropathology of PD. One of the earliest clinical symptoms associated with PD is olfactory impairment. The generation of new neurons persists up to adulthood in mammals, in particular the olfactory bulb (OB). In order to assess this process in relation to α-syn accumulation, we used mice overexpressing human wild-type α-syn under the regulatable control (tet-off) of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα-promoter (CaMKII). We observed a decrease in OB neurogenesis in transgenic animals compared to controls using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label newly generated cells (neuron-specific nuclear protein; NeuN). After cessation of transgene expression we detected an increase in newly generated cells both in granular (GCL) and glomerular (GLOM) layers of the OB. This led to a rescue of newly generated neurons (BrdU(+)/NeuN(+)) within the GLOM with a distinct specificity for the dopaminergic subpopulation. In contrast, we did not detect a cell-specific rescue of neuronal cells in the GCL suggesting diverse effects of alpha-synucleinopathy in both interneuronal layers of the OB. Colabelling of BrdU with glial markers showed that a differentiation into neither astroglia nor microglia attributed to the observed phenotype in the GCL. In particular, BrdU(+) particles located within microglial cells were predominantly associated close to the membrane therefore the resembling phagocytosed nuclear fragments of BrdU(+) cells. Thus, our study further contributes insights into α-syn accumulation as a causative player in the impairment of adult neurogenesis and emphasizes its diverse role in cell renewal of distinct OB cell layers. PMID:22814000

  8. p53 Mutation suppresses adult neurogenesis in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Progenitor migration is accompanied by an increase in their numbers in the adult brain. ► p53 Mutation suppressed an increase in the number of the migrated progenitors. ► The decreased progenitor number is not due to enhanced cell death. ► p53 Mutation did not affect proliferation of stem cells. -- Abstract: Tumor suppressor p53 negatively regulates self-renewal of neural stem cells in the adult murine brain. Here, we report that the p53 null mutation in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) suppressed neurogenesis in the telencephalon, independent of cell death. By using 5-bromo-29-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry, we identified 18 proliferation zones in the brains of young medaka fish; in situ hybridization showed that p53 was expressed selectively in at least 12 proliferation zones. We also compared the number of BrdU-positive cells present in the whole telencephalon of wild-type (WT) and p53 mutant fish. Immediately after BrdU exposure, the number of BrdU-positive cells did not differ significantly between them. One week after BrdU-exposure, the BrdU-positive cells migrated from the proliferation zone, which was accompanied by an increased number in the WT brain. In contrast, no significant increase was observed in the p53 mutant brain. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (dUTP) nick end-labeling revealed that there was no significant difference in the number of apoptotic cells in the telencephalon of p53 mutant and WT medaka, suggesting that the decreased number of BrdU-positive cells in the mutant may be due to the suppression of proliferation rather than the enhancement of neural cell death. These results suggest that p53 positively regulates neurogenesis via cell proliferation.

  9. Beta-nerve growth factor promotes neurogenesis and angiogenesis during the repair of bone defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-hui Chen; Chuan-qing Mao; Li-li Zhuo; Joo L Ong

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that the repair of bone defects is regulated by neural and vascular signals. In the present study, we examined the effect of topically appliedβ-nerve growth factor (β-NGF) on neurogenesis and angiogenesis in critical-sized bone defects iflled with collagen bone substi-tute. We created two symmetrical defects, 2.5 mm in diameter, on either side of the parietal bone of the skull, and filled them with bone substitute. Subcutaneously implanted osmotic pumps were used to infuse 10 μgβ-NGF in PBS (β-NGF + PBS) into the right-hand side defect, and PBS into the left (control) defect, over the 7 days following surgery. Immunohistochemical staining and hematoxylin-eosin staining were carried out at 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days postoperatively. On day 7, expression of β III-tubulin was lower on theβ-NGF + PBS side than on the control side, and that of neuroiflament 160 was greater. On day 14,β III-tubulin and protein gene product 9.5 were greater on theβ-NGF + PBS side than on the control side. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression was greater on the experimental side than the control side at 7 days, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 expression was elevated on days 14 and 21, but lower than control levels on day 28. However, no difference in the number of blood vessels was observed between sides. Our results indicate that topical application ofβ-NGF promoted neu-rogenesis, and may modulate angiogenesis by promoting nerve regeneration in collagen bone substitute-iflled defects.

  10. P2X7 Receptor Inhibition Increases CNTF in the Subventricular Zone, But Not Neurogenesis or Neuroprotection After Stroke in Adult Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Seong Su; Keasey, Matthew Phillip; Hagg, Theo

    2013-01-01

    Increasing endogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) expression with a pharmacological agent might be beneficial after stroke as CNTF both promotes neurogenesis and, separately, is neuroprotective. P2X7 purinergic receptor inhibition is neuroprotective in rats and increases CNTF release in rat CMT1A Schwann cells. We, first, investigated the role of P2X7 in regulating CNTF and neurogenesis in adult mouse subventricular zone (SVZ). CNTF expression was increased by daily intravenous injecti...

  11. The Effects of Exercise on Adolescent Hippocampal Neurogenesis in a Rat Model of Binge Alcohol Exposure During the Brain Growth Spurt

    OpenAIRE

    Helfer, Jennifer L.; Goodlett, Charles R.; Greenough, William T.; Klintsova, Anna Y.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to alcohol during the brain growth spurt results in impaired cognition and learning in adulthood. This impairment is accompanied by permanent structural changes in the hippocampal formation. Exercise improves performance on hippocampal-dependent learning and memory tasks and increases adult neurogenesis in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus. The present study examined the effects of wheel running during adolescence on dentate gyrus cell proliferation and neurogenesis after postnatal b...

  12. Decreased postnatal neurogenesis in the hippocampus combined with stress experience during adolescence is accompanied by an enhanced incidence of behavioral pathologies in adult mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi Fumihiko; Takashima Noriko; Murayama Akiko; Inokuchi Kaoru

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Adolescence is a vulnerable period in that stress experienced during this time can affect the incidence of psychiatric disorders later, during adulthood. Neurogenesis is known to be involved in the postnatal development of the brain, but its role in determining an individual's biological vulnerability to the onset of psychiatric disorders has not been addressed. Results We examined the role of postnatal neurogenesis during adolescence, a period between 3 to 8 weeks of age ...

  13. Syndecan-4 modulates the proliferation of neural cells and the formation of CaP axons during zebrafish embryonic neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ning; Li, Hongda; Xiang, Bo; Qiao, Liangjun; He, Jiao; Ji, Yi; Liu, Yuan; Li, Siying; Lu, Ran; Li, Yu; Meng, Wentong; Wu, Yang; Xu, Hong; Mo, Xianming

    2016-01-01

    Syndecan-4 (Syn4), a single-pass transmembrane heparin sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG), plays significant role in the formation of focal adhesions and interacts with many growth factors to regulate cell migration and neural induction. Here, we show the new roles of syndecan-4(syn4) in zebrafish embryonic neurogenesis. Syn4 is broadly and dynamically expressed throughout the early stages of embryonic development. Knockdown of syn4 increases the expression of the marker genes of multiple types of neural cells. The increased expression of the marker genes is resulted from excessive proliferation of the neural cells. In addition, disrupting syn4 expression results in truncated and multiple aberrant branching of caudal primary (CaP) axons. Collectively, these data indicate that Syn4 suppresses the cellular proliferation during neurogenesis and is crucial for the formation of CaP axons during zebrafish embryogenesis. PMID:27143125

  14. Syndecan-4 modulates the proliferation of neural cells and the formation of CaP axons during zebrafish embryonic neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ning; Li, Hongda; Xiang, Bo; Qiao, Liangjun; He, Jiao; Ji, Yi; Liu, Yuan; Li, Siying; Lu, Ran; Li, Yu; Meng, Wentong; Wu, Yang; Xu, Hong; Mo, Xianming

    2016-01-01

    Syndecan-4 (Syn4), a single-pass transmembrane heparin sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG), plays significant role in the formation of focal adhesions and interacts with many growth factors to regulate cell migration and neural induction. Here, we show the new roles of syndecan-4(syn4) in zebrafish embryonic neurogenesis. Syn4 is broadly and dynamically expressed throughout the early stages of embryonic development. Knockdown of syn4 increases the expression of the marker genes of multiple types of neural cells. The increased expression of the marker genes is resulted from excessive proliferation of the neural cells. In addition, disrupting syn4 expression results in truncated and multiple aberrant branching of caudal primary (CaP) axons. Collectively, these data indicate that Syn4 suppresses the cellular proliferation during neurogenesis and is crucial for the formation of CaP axons during zebrafish embryogenesis. PMID:27143125

  15. Cell Cycle Inhibition without Disruption of Neurogenesis Is a Strategy for Treatment of Aberrant Cell Cycle Diseases: An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Da-Zhi Liu; Ander, Bradley P.

    2012-01-01

    Since publishing our earlier report describing a strategy for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases by inhibiting the cell cycle and without disrupting neurogenesis (Liu et al. 2010), we now update and extend this strategy to applications in the treatment of cancers as well. Here, we put forth the concept of “aberrant cell cycle diseases” to include both cancer and CNS diseases, the two unrelated disease types on the surface, by focusing on a common mechanism in each aberr...

  16. Increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis is not necessary for wheel running to abolish conditioned place preference for cocaine in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mustroph, M.L.; Merritt, J R; Holloway, A.L.; Pinardo, H.; Miller, D S; Kilby, C.N.; Bucko, P.; Wyer, A.; Rhodes, J S

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests wheel running can abolish conditioned place preference (CPP) for cocaine in mice. Running significantly increases the number of new neurons in the hippocampus, and new neurons have been hypothesized to enhance plasticity and behavioral flexibility. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that increased neurogenesis was necessary for exercise to abolish cocaine CPP. Male nestin thymidine kinase transgenic mice were conditioned with cocaine, and then housed with or without ...

  17. Impact of trichostatin A and sodium valproate treatment on post-stroke neurogenesis and behavioral outcomes in immature mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kadam, Shilpa D.; Charles Rohde; Smith, Dani R.; Anne Marie Comi

    2013-01-01

    Stroke in the neonatal brain frequently results in neurologic impairments including cognitive disability. We investigated the effect of long-term sodium valproate (valproate) and trichostatin A (TSA) treatment upon post-stroke neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of stroke-injured immature mice. Decreased or abnormal integration of newborn DG neurons into hippocampal circuits can result in impaired visual-spatial function, abnormal modulation of mood-related behaviors, and the development o...

  18. Training your brain: Do mental and physical (MAP) training enhance cognition through the process of neurogenesis in the hippocampus?

    OpenAIRE

    Curlik, D.M.; Shors, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    New neurons are produced each day in the hippocampus through the process of neurogenesis. Both mental and physical training can modify this process by increasing the number of new cells that mature into functional neurons in the adult brain. However, the mechanisms whereby these increases occur are not necessarily the same. Physical activity, especially aerobic exercise greatly increases the number of new neurons that are produced in the hippocamal formation. In contrast, mental training via ...

  19. Reelin Signaling, Hippocampal Neurogenesis, and Efficacy of Aspirin Intake & Stem Cell Transplantation in Aging and Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Ashok K.

    2010-01-01

    Comprehending the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of aging and Alzheimer’s disease has immense value for developing strategies that promote successful aging and prevent or cure Alzheimer’s disease. The first issue of the new journal, “Aging & Disease” comprises articles that discuss the current knowledge pertaining to changes in reelin signaling in normal & pathological forms of aging, memory and neurogenesis in Aging & Alzheimer’s disease, the efficacy of a non-steroidal anti-infla...

  20. Effects of rapamycin treatment after controlled cortical impact injury on neurogenesis and synaptic reorganization in the mouse dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery A Boychuk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE is one consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI. A prominent cell signaling pathway activated in animal models of both TBI and epilepsy is the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin has shown promise as a potential modulator of epileptogenesis in several animal models of epilepsy, but cellular mechanisms linking mTOR expression and epileptogenesis are unclear. In this study, the role of mTOR in modifying functional hippocampal circuit reorganization after focal TBI induced by controlled cortical impact was investigated. Rapamycin (3 or 10 mg/kg, an inhibitor of mTOR signaling, was administered by intraperitoneal injection beginning on the day of injury and continued daily until tissue collection. Relative to controls, rapamycin treatment reduced dentate granule cell area in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the injury two weeks post-injury. Brain injury resulted in a significant increase in doublecortin immunolabeling in the dentate gyrus ipsilateral to the injury, indicating increased neurogenesis shortly after TBI. Rapamycin treatment prevented the increase in doublecortin labeling, with no overall effect on Fluoro-Jade B staining in the ipsilateral hemisphere, suggesting that rapamycin treatment reduced posttraumatic neurogenesis but did not prevent cell loss after injury. At later times post-injury (8-13 weeks, evidence of mossy fiber sprouting and increased recurrent excitation of dentate granule cells was detected, which were attenuated by rapamycin treatment. Rapamycin treatment also diminished seizure prevalence relative to vehicle-treated controls after TBI. Collectively, these results support a role for adult neurogenesis in PTE development and suggest that suppression of epileptogenesis by mTOR inhibition includes effects on post-injury neurogenesis.

  1. Hippocampal neurogenesis in the APP/PS1/nestin-GFP triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Q; Zheng, M; Zhang, T; He, G

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common causes of dementia. Although the exact mechanisms of AD are not entirely clear, the impairment in adult hippocampal neurogenesis has been reported to play a role in AD. To assess the relationship between AD and neurogenesis, we studied APP/PS1/nestin-green fluorescent protein (GFP) triple transgenic mice, a well-characterized mouse model of AD, which express GFP under the control of the nestin promoter. Different ages of AD mice and their wild-type littermates (WT) were used in our study. Immunofluorescent staining showed that neurogenesis occurred mainly in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) and subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LVs). The expression of neural stem cells (NSCs) (nestin) and neural precursors such as doublecortin (DCX) and GFAP in AD mice were decreased with age, as well as there being a reduction in 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells, when compared to WT. However, the number of maturate neurons (NeuN) was not significantly different between AD mice and wild-type controls, and NeuN changed only slightly with age. By Golgi-Cox staining, the morphologies of dendrites were observed, and significant differences existed between AD mice and wild-type controls. These results suggest that AD has a far-reaching influence on the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, leading to a gradual decrease in the generation of neural progenitors (NPCs), and inhibition of the differentiation and maturation of neurons. PMID:26639620

  2. Pheromones from males of different familiarity exert divergent effects on adult neurogenesis in the female accessory olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jyun-Han; Han, Yueh-Ting; Yu, Jenn-Yah; Wang, Tsu-Wei

    2013-08-01

    Pheromones from urine of unfamiliar conspecific male animals can reinitiate a female's estrus cycle to cause pregnancy block through the vomeronasal organ (VNO)-accessory olfactory bulb (AOB)-hypothalamic pathway. This phenomenon is called the Bruce effect. Pheromones from the mate of the female, however, do not trigger re-entrance of the estrus cycle because an olfactory memory toward its mate is formed. The activity of the VNO-AOB-hypothalamic pathway is negatively modulated by GABAergic granule cells in the AOB. Since these cells are constantly replenished by neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle throughout adulthood and adult neurogenesis is required for mate recognition and fertility, we tested the hypothesis that pheromones from familiar and unfamiliar males may have different effects on adult AOB neurogenesis in female mice. When female mice were exposed to bedding used by a male or lived with one, cell proliferation and neuroblast production in the SVZ were increased. Furthermore, survival of newly generated cells in the AOB was enhanced. This survival effect was transient and mediated by norepinephrine. Interestingly, male bedding-induced newborn cell survival in the AOB but not cell proliferation in the SVZ was attenuated when females were subjected to bedding from an unfamiliar male. Our results indicate that male pheromones from familiar and unfamiliar males exert different effects on neurogenesis in the adult female AOB. Given that adult neurogenesis is required for reproductive behaviors, these divergent pheromonal effects may provide a mechanism for the Bruce effect. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 73: 632-645, 2013. PMID:23696538

  3. Changes in adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis in mice expressing the A30P mutant form of alpha-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marxreiter, Franz; Nuber, Silke; Kandasamy, Mahesh; Klucken, Jochen; Aigner, Robert; Burgmayer, Ralf; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Riess, Olaf; Winkler, Jürgen; Winner, Beate

    2009-03-01

    In familial and sporadic forms of Parkinson's disease (PD), alpha-synuclein pathology is present in the brain stem nuclei and olfactory bulb (OB) long before Lewy bodies are detected in the substantia nigra. The OB is an active region of adult neurogenesis, where newly generated neurons physiologically integrate. While accumulation of wild-type alpha-synuclein is one of the pathogenic hallmarks of non-genetic forms of PD, the A30P alpha-synuclein mutation results in an earlier disease onset and a severe clinical phenotype. Here, we study the regulation of adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ)/OB system in a tetracycline-suppressive (tet-off) transgenic model of synucleinopathies, expressing human mutant A30P alpha-synuclein under the control of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (CaMK) promoter. In A30P transgenic mice alpha-synuclein was abundant at the site of integration in the glomerular cell layer of the OB. Without changes in proliferation in the SVZ, significantly fewer newly generated neurons were observed in the OB granule cell and glomerular layers of A30P transgenic mice than in controls, most probably due to increased cell death. By tetracycline-dependent abrogation of A30P alpha-synuclein expression, OB neurogenesis and programmed cell death was restored to control levels. Our results indicate that, using A30P conditional (tet-off) mice, A30P alpha-synuclein has a negative impact on olfactory neurogenesis and suppression of A30P alpha-synuclein enhances survival of newly generated neurons. This finding suggests that interfering with alpha-synuclein pathology can rescue newly generated neurons, possibly leading to new targets for therapeutic interventions in synucleinopathies. PMID:19291219

  4. Interactions with the young down-regulate adult olfactory neurogenesis and enhance the maturation of olfactory neuroblasts in sheep mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Frédéric Levy

    2014-01-01

    New neurons are continuously added in the dentate gyrus and the olfactory bulb of mammalian brain. While numerous environmental factors controlling survival of newborn neurons have been extensively studied, regulation by social interactions is less documented. We addressed this question by investigating the influence of parturition and interactions with the young on neurogenesis in sheep mothers. Using Bromodeoxyuridine, a marker of cell division, in combination with markers of neuronal matur...

  5. Etanercept Attenuates Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats by Reducing Brain TNF-α Contents and by Stimulating Newly Formed Neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chong-Un Cheong; Ching-Ping Chang; Chien-Ming Chao; Bor-Chih Cheng; Chung-Zhing Yang; Chung-Ching Chio

    2013-01-01

    It remains unclear whether etanercept penetrates directly into the contused brain and improves the outcomes of TBI by attenuating brain contents of TNF- α and/or stimulating newly formed neurogenesis. Rats that sustained TBI are immediately treated with etanercept. Acute neurological and motor injury is assessed in all rats the day prior to and 7 days after surgery. The numbers of the colocalizations of 5-bromodeoxyuridine and doublecortin specific markers in the contused brain injury that oc...

  6. Fluoxetine during development reverses the effects of prenatal stress on depressive-like behavior and hippocampal neurogenesis in adolescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ine Rayen

    Full Text Available Depression during pregnancy and the postpartum period is a growing health problem, which affects up to 20% of women. Currently, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs medications are commonly used for treatment of maternal depression. Unfortunately, there is very little research on the long-term effect of maternal depression and perinatal SSRI exposure on offspring development. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the role of exposure to fluoxetine during development on affective-like behaviors and hippocampal neurogenesis in adolescent offspring in a rodent model of maternal depression. To do this, gestationally stressed and non-stressed Sprague-Dawley rat dams were treated with either fluoxetine (5 mg/kg/day or vehicle beginning on postnatal day 1 (P1. Adolescent male and female offspring were divided into 4 groups: 1 prenatal stress+fluoxetine exposure, 2 prenatal stress+vehicle, 3 fluoxetine exposure alone, and 4 vehicle alone. Adolescent offspring were assessed for anxiety-like behavior using the Open Field Test and depressive-like behavior using the Forced Swim Test. Brains were analyzed for endogenous markers of hippocampal neurogenesis via immunohistochemistry. Results demonstrate that maternal fluoxetine exposure reverses the reduction in immobility evident in prenatally stressed adolescent offspring. In addition, maternal fluoxetine exposure reverses the decrease in hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis in maternally stressed adolescent offspring. This research provides important evidence on the long-term effect of fluoxetine exposure during development in a model of maternal adversity.

  7. MicroRNAs Establish Robustness and Adaptability of a Critical Gene Network to Regulate Progenitor Fate Decisions during Cortical Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanay Ghosh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the course of cortical neurogenesis, the transition of progenitors from proliferation to differentiation requires a precise regulation of involved gene networks under varying environmental conditions. In order to identify such regulatory mechanisms, we analyzed microRNA (miRNA target networks in progenitors during early and late stages of neurogenesis. We found that cyclin D1 is a network hub whose expression is miRNA-dosage sensitive. Experimental validation revealed a feedback regulation between cyclin D1 and its regulating miRNAs miR-20a, miR-20b, and miR-23a. Cyclin D1 induces expression of miR-20a and miR-20b, whereas it represses miR-23a. Inhibition of any of these miRNAs increases the developmental stage-specific mean and dynamic expression range (variance of cyclin D1 protein in progenitors, leading to reduced neuronal differentiation. Thus, miRNAs establish robustness and stage-specific adaptability to a critical dosage-sensitive gene network during cortical neurogenesis. Understanding such network regulatory mechanisms for key developmental events can provide insights into individual susceptibilities for genetically complex neuropsychiatric disorders.

  8. Hypertension impairs hippocampus-related adult neurogenesis, CA1 neuron dendritic arborization and long-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Y-H; Tsai, S-F; Huang, S-H; Chiang, Y-T; Hughes, M W; Wu, S-Y; Lee, C-W; Yang, T-T; Kuo, Y-M

    2016-05-13

    Hypertension is associated with neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive impairment. Several studies using spontaneous hypertensive rats to study the effect of hypertension on memory performance and adult hippocampal neurogenesis have reached inconsistent conclusions. The contradictory findings may be related to the genetic variability of spontaneous hypertensive rats due to the conventional breeding practices. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of hypertension on hippocampal structure and function in isogenic mice. Hypertension was induced by the '2 kidneys, 1 clip' method (2K1C) which constricted one of the two renal arteries. The blood pressures of 2K1C mice were higher than the sham group on post-operation day 7 and remained high up to day 28. Mice with 2K1C-induced hypertension had impaired long-term, but not short-term, memory. Dendritic complexity of CA1 neurons and hippocampal neurogenesis were reduced by 2K1C-induced hypertension on post-operation day 28. Furthermore, 2K1C decreased the levels of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor, while blood vessel density and activation status of astrocytes and microglia were not affected. In conclusion, hypertension impairs hippocampus-associated long-term memory, dendritic arborization and neurogenesis, which may be caused by down-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling pathways. PMID:26921651

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Enhance Endogenous Neurogenesis in an Ischemic Stroke Model

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    Chang Hyun Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have reported that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can ameliorate neurological deficits in ischemic stroke models. Among the various hypotheses that have been suggested to explain the therapeutic mechanism underlying these observations, neurogenesis is thought to be critical. To enhance the therapeutic benefits of human bone marrow-derived MSCs (hBM-MSCs, we efficiently modified hBM-MSCs by introduction of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene via adenoviral transduction mediated by cell-permeable peptides and investigated whether BDNF-modified hBM-MSCs (MSCs-BDNF contributed to functional recovery and endogenous neurogenesis in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. Transplantation of MSCs induced the proliferation of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU- positive cells in the subventricular zone. Transplantation of MSCs-BDNF enhanced the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells more significantly, while suppressing cell death. Newborn cells differentiated into doublecortin (DCX- positive neuroblasts and Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN- positive mature neurons in the subventricular zone and ischemic boundary at higher rates in animals with MSCs-BDNF compared with treatment using solely phosphate buffered saline (PBS or MSCs. Triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and behavioral analysis revealed greater functional recovery in animals with MSCs-BDNF compared with the other groups. MSCs-BDNF exhibited effective therapeutic potential by protecting cell from apoptotic death and enhancing endogenous neurogenesis.

  10. Aberrant Adult Neurogenesis in the Subventricular Zone-Rostral Migratory Stream-Olfactory Bulb System Following Subchronic Manganese Exposure.

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    Fu, Sherleen; Jiang, Wendy; Gao, Xiang; Zeng, Andrew; Cholger, Daniel; Cannon, Jason; Chen, Jinhui; Zheng, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Adult neurogenesis occurs in brain subventricular zone (SVZ). Our recent data reveal an elevated proliferation of BrdU(+) cells in SVZ following subchronic manganese (Mn) exposure in rats. This study was designed to distinguish Mn effect on the critical stage of adult neurogenesis, ie, proliferation, migration, survival and differentiation from the SVZ via the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb (OB). Adult rats received a single ip-dose of BrdU at the end of 4-week Mn exposure to label proliferating cells. Immunostaining and cell-counting showed a 48% increase of BrdU(+) cells in Mn-exposed SVZ than in controls (Padult rats received 3 daily ip-injections of BrdU followed by subchronic Mn exposure. By 4-week post BrdU labeling, most of the surviving BrdU(+) cells in the OB were differentiated into NeuN(+) matured neurons. However, survival rates of BrdU/NeuN/DAPI triple-labeled cells in OB were 33% and 64% in Mn-exposed and control animals, respectively (Padult SVZ. In the OB, however, Mn exposure significantly reduces the surviving adult-born cells and markedly inhibits their differentiation into mature neurons, resulting in an overall decreased adult neurogenesis in the OB. PMID:26794142

  11. IGF-I: A key growth factor that regulates neurogenesis and synaptogenesis from embryonic to adult stages of the brain

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    Vanesa eNieto-Estévez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The generation of neurons in the adult mammalian brain requires the activation of quiescent neural stem cells (NSCs. This activation and the sequential steps of neuron formation from NSCs are regulated by a number of stimuli, which include growth factors. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I exert pleiotropic effects, regulating multiple cellular processes depending on their concentration, cell type and the developmental stage of the animal. Although IGF-I expression is relatively high in the embryonic brain its levels drop sharply in the adult brain except in neurogenic regions, i.e., the hippocampus (HP and the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb (SVZ-OB. By contrast, the expression of IGF-IR remains relatively high in the brain irrespective of the age of the animal. Evidence indicates that IGF-I influences NSC proliferation and differentiation into neurons and glia as well as neuronal maturation including synapse formation. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that IGF-I not only promote adult neurogenesis by regulating NSC number and differentiation but also, by influencing neuronal positioning and migration as described during SVZ-OB neurogenesis. In this article we will revise and discuss the actions reported for IGF-I signaling in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models, focusing on the maintenance and proliferation of NSCs/progenitors, neurogenesis and neuron integration in synaptic circuits.

  12. IGF-I: A Key Growth Factor that Regulates Neurogenesis and Synaptogenesis from Embryonic to Adult Stages of the Brain.

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    Nieto-Estévez, Vanesa; Defterali, Çağla; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The generation of neurons in the adult mammalian brain requires the activation of quiescent neural stem cells (NSCs). This activation and the sequential steps of neuron formation from NSCs are regulated by a number of stimuli, which include growth factors. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) exert pleiotropic effects, regulating multiple cellular processes depending on their concentration, cell type, and the developmental stage of the animal. Although IGF-I expression is relatively high in the embryonic brain its levels drop sharply in the adult brain except in neurogenic regions, i.e., the hippocampus (HP) and the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb (SVZ-OB). By contrast, the expression of IGF-IR remains relatively high in the brain irrespective of the age of the animal. Evidence indicates that IGF-I influences NSC proliferation and differentiation into neurons and glia as well as neuronal maturation including synapse formation. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that IGF-I not only promote adult neurogenesis by regulating NSC number and differentiation but also by influencing neuronal positioning and migration as described during SVZ-OB neurogenesis. In this article we will revise and discuss the actions reported for IGF-I signaling in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models, focusing on the maintenance and proliferation of NSCs/progenitors, neurogenesis, and neuron integration in synaptic circuits. PMID:26941597

  13. Severe instead of mild hyperglycemia inhibits neurogenesis in the subventricular zone of adult rats after transient focal cerebral ischemia.

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    Tan, S; Zhi, P K; Luo, Z K; Shi, J

    2015-09-10

    Accumulated evidence suggests that enhanced neurogenesis stimulated by ischemic injury contributes to stroke outcome. However, it is unclear whether hyperglycemia, which is frequently tested positive in patients with acute ischemic stroke, influences stroke-induced neurogenesis. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of hyperglycemia on stroke-induced neurogenesis in a rat model of transient focal cerebral ischemia. For this purpose, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (220-250 g) were subjected to 90 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Glucose was administered during ischemia to produce target blood levels ranging from 4.83 ± 0.94 mM (normoglycemia) to 20.76 ± 1.56 mM. To label proliferating cells in ischemic ipsilateral subventricular zone (SVZ) of lateral ventricles, 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected 24h after MCAO. Brains were harvested 2h post-BrdU to evaluate the effects of hyperglycemia on infarct volume and SVZ cell proliferation. Rats that were severely hyperglycemic (19.26 ± 1.48 mM to 20.76 ± 1.56 mM) during ischemia had 24.26% increase in infarct volume (Pneurogenesis by a mechanism involving suppression of CREB and BDNF signaling. PMID:26126927

  14. 2D-gel based proteomics unravels neurogenesis and energetic metabolism dysfunction of the olfactory bulb in CUMS rat model.

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    Cheng, Ke; Li, Juan; Yang, Deyu; Yang, Yongtao; Rao, Chenglong; Zhang, Shuxiao; Wang, Wei; Guo, Hua; Fang, Liang; Zhu, Dan; Han, Yu; Xie, Peng

    2016-10-15

    Major depression is a devastating psychiatric disease worldwide currently. A reduced olfactory sensitivity in MDD patients was well evidenced. We previously interrogated the mechanism of decreasing hippocampus neurogenesis in CUMS rat model of depression. The Olfactory Bulb (OB) is crucial part of the olfactory system which functions in post-developmental neurogenesis. However, the mechanism of the dysfunction of OB induced by CUMS is still largely unknown. Herein, by using the chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rat model of depression, differential protein expression between the OB proteomes of CUMS and control group was interrogated through two-dimensional electrophoresis coupling with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty nine differential protein expression was analyzed by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway over-representation and Ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA). Seven identified differential proteins were selected for Western blotting validation. This study provides insight that neurogenesis and Energy metabolism disorder is involved in OB dysfunction induced by CUMS. PMID:27340088

  15. Differential responses of Trans-Resveratrol on proliferation of neural progenitor cells and aged rat hippocampal neurogenesis.

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    Kumar, Vivek; Pandey, Ankita; Jahan, Sadaf; Shukla, Rajendra Kumar; Kumar, Dipak; Srivastava, Akriti; Singh, Shripriya; Rajpurohit, Chetan Singh; Yadav, Sanjay; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Pant, Aditya Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    The plethora of literature has supported the potential benefits of Resveratrol (RV) as a life-extending as well as an anticancer compound. However, these two functional discrepancies resulted at different concentration ranges. Likewise, the role of Resveratrol on adult neurogenesis still remains controversial and less understood despite its well documented health benefits. To gather insight into the biological effects of RV on neurogenesis, we evaluated the possible effects of the compound on the proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in culture, and in the hippocampus of aged rats. Resveratrol exerted biphasic effects on NPCs; low concentrations (10 μM) stimulated cell proliferation mediated by increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and p38 kinases, whereas high concentrations (>20 μM) exhibited inhibitory effects. Administration of Resveratrol (20 mg/kg body weight) to adult rats significantly increased the number of newly generated cells in the hippocampus, with upregulation of p-CREB and SIRT1 proteins implicated in neuronal survival and lifespan extension respectively. We have successfully demonstrated that Resveratrol exhibits dose dependent discrepancies and at a lower concentration can have a positive impact on the proliferation, survival of NPCs and aged rat hippocampal neurogenesis implicating its potential as a candidate for restorative therapies against age related disorders. PMID:27334554

  16. Histopathologic characterization of the BTBR mouse model of autistic-like behavior reveals selective changes in neurodevelopmental proteins and adult hippocampal neurogenesis

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    Stephenson Diane T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inbred mouse strain BTBR T+ tf/J (BTBR exhibits behavioral deficits that mimic the core deficits of autism. Neuroanatomically, the BTBR strain is also characterized by a complete absence of the corpus callosum. The goal of this study was to identify novel molecular and cellular changes in the BTBR mouse, focusing on neuronal, synaptic, glial and plasticity markers in the limbic system as a model for identifying putative molecular and cellular substrates associated with autistic behaviors. Methods Forebrains of 8 to 10-week-old male BTBR and age-matched C57Bl/6J control mice were evaluated by immunohistochemistry using free-floating and paraffin embedded sections. Twenty antibodies directed against antigens specific to neurons, synapses and glia were used. Nissl, Timm and acetylcholinesterase (AchE stains were performed to assess cytoarchitecture, mossy fibers and cholinergic fiber density, respectively. In the hippocampus, quantitative stereological estimates for the mitotic marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU were performed to determine hippocampal progenitor proliferation, survival and differentiation, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF mRNA was quantified by in situ hybridization. Quantitative image analysis was performed for NG2, doublecortin (DCX, NeuroD, GAD67 and Poly-Sialic Acid Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (PSA-NCAM. Results In midline structures including the region of the absent corpus callosum of BTBR mice, the myelin markers 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase and myelin basic protein (MBP were reduced, and the oligodendrocyte precursor NG2 was increased. MBP and CNPase were expressed in small ectopic white matter bundles within the cingulate cortex. Microglia and astrocytes showed no evidence of gliosis, yet orientations of glial fibers were altered in specific white-matter areas. In the hippocampus, evidence of reduced neurogenesis included significant reductions in the number of

  17. Curcumin-loaded nanoparticles potently induce adult neurogenesis and reverse cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease model via canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Agarwal, Swati; Seth, Brashket; Yadav, Anuradha; Nair, Saumya; Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Karmakar, Madhumita; Kumari, Manisha; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Srivastava, Vikas; Singh, Dhirendra; Gupta, Shailendra Kumar; Tripathi, Anurag; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar; Gupta, Kailash Chand

    2014-01-28

    Neurogenesis, a process of generation of new neurons, is reported to be reduced in several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Induction of neurogenesis by targeting endogenous neural stem cells (NSC) could be a promising therapeutic approach to such diseases by influencing the brain self-regenerative capacity. Curcumin, a neuroprotective agent, has poor brain bioavailability. Herein, we report that curcumin-encapsulated PLGA nanoparticles (Cur-PLGA-NPs) potently induce NSC proliferation and neuronal differentiation in vitro and in the hippocampus and subventricular zone of adult rats, as compared to uncoated bulk curcumin. Cur-PLGA-NPs induce neurogenesis by internalization into the hippocampal NSC. Cur-PLGA-NPs significantly increase expression of genes involved in cell proliferation (reelin, nestin, and Pax6) and neuronal differentiation (neurogenin, neuroD1, neuregulin, neuroligin, and Stat3). Curcumin nanoparticles increase neuronal differentiation by activating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, involved in regulation of neurogenesis. These nanoparticles caused enhanced nuclear translocation of β-catenin, decreased GSK-3β levels, and increased promoter activity of the TCF/LEF and cyclin-D1. Pharmacological and siRNA-mediated genetic inhibition of the Wnt pathway blocked neurogenesis-stimulating effects of curcumin. These nanoparticles reverse learning and memory impairments in an amyloid beta induced rat model of AD-like phenotypes, by inducing neurogenesis. In silico molecular docking studies suggest that curcumin interacts with Wif-1, Dkk, and GSK-3β. These results suggest that curcumin nanoparticles induce adult neurogenesis through activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway and may offer a therapeutic approach to treating neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, by enhancing a brain self-repair mechanism. PMID:24467380

  18. Garcinol promotes neurogenesis in rat cortical progenitor cells through the duration of extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling.

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    Weng, Meng-Shih; Liao, Chiung-Ho; Yu, Sheng-Yung; Lin, Jen-Kun

    2011-02-01

    Garcinol is a polyisoprenylated benzophenone derivative found in Garcinia indica fruit rind and other species. The potential antioxidative and neuroprotective effects of garcinol in rat cortical astrocyte were demonstrated in our laboratory recently. Here, the effects of garcinol on the neuritogenesis process in cultured cortical progenitor cells were investigated to understand the roles of garcinol in neuronal survival and differentiation. These cells, derived from embryonic day 17 rats, differentiated into EGF-responsive neural precursor cells, would further form neurospheres. Our data exhibited garcinol induced neurite outgrowth in early developing EGF-treated neurospheres and significantly enhanced the expression of neuronal proteins, microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Furthermore, the neuronal marker, high-molecular-weight subunit of neurofilaments (NFH), was highly expressed after 5 μM garcinol treatment in neural precursor cells for 20 days. To identify the extracellular mechanism, rat cortical progenitor cells were treated garcinol and accordingly mediated the sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) for different periods up to 20 h. In this regard, NMDA receptor-mediated calcium influx led to excitotoxic death and activated tyrosine phosphatase which limited the duration of ERK in cultured neurons. MK801, the NMDA receptor antagonist, treatment also induced the sustained phosphorylation of ERK and therefore enhanced neuronal survival. In our observation, garcinol treatment reduced growth factor deprivation-mediated cell death and nuclear import of C/EBPβ levels. Noteworthy, garcinol could promote neurite outgrowth in EGF-responsive neural precursor cells and modulate the ERK pathway in the enhancement of neuronal survival. PMID:21214247

  19. Review of transcranial photobiomodulation for major depressive disorder: targeting brain metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, and neurogenesis.

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    Cassano, Paolo; Petrie, Samuel R; Hamblin, Michael R; Henderson, Theodore A; Iosifescu, Dan V

    2016-07-01

    We examined the use of near-infrared and red radiation (photobiomodulation, PBM) for treating major depressive disorder (MDD). While still experimental, preliminary data on the use of PBM for brain disorders are promising. PBM is low-cost with potential for wide dissemination; further research on PBM is sorely needed. We found clinical and preclinical studies via PubMed search (2015), using the following keywords: "near-infrared radiation," "NIR," "low-level light therapy," "low-level laser therapy," or "LLLT" plus "depression." We chose clinically focused studies and excluded studies involving near-infrared spectroscopy. In addition, we used PubMed to find articles that examine the link between PBM and relevant biological processes including metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, and neurogenesis. Studies suggest the processes aforementioned are potentially effective targets for PBM to treat depression. There is also clinical preliminary evidence suggesting the efficacy of PBM in treating MDD, and comorbid anxiety disorders, suicidal ideation, and traumatic brain injury. Based on the data collected to date, PBM appears to be a promising treatment for depression that is safe and well-tolerated. However, large randomized controlled trials are still needed to establish the safety and effectiveness of this new treatment for MDD. PMID:26989758

  20. Age-Dependent Neurogenesis and Neuron Numbers within the Olfactory Bulb and Hippocampus of Homing Pigeons

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    Meskenaite, Virginia; Krackow, Sven; Lipp, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Many birds are supreme long-distance navigators that develop their navigational ability in the first months after fledgling but update the memorized environmental information needed for navigation also later in life. We studied the extent of juvenile and adult neurogenesis that could provide such age-related plasticity in brain regions known to mediate different mechanisms of pigeon homing: the olfactory bulb (OB), and the triangular area of the hippocampal formation (HP tr). Newly generated neurons (visualized by doublecortin, DCX) and mature neurons were counted stereologically in 35 pigeon brains ranging from 1 to 168 months of age. At the age of 1 month, both areas showed maximal proportions of DCX positive neurons, which rapidly declined during the first year of life. In the OB, the number of DCX-positive periglomerular neurons declined further over time, but the number of mature periglomerular cells appeared unchanged. In the hippocampus, the proportion of DCX-positive neurons showed a similar decline yet to a lesser extent. Remarkably, in the triangular area of the hippocampus, the oldest birds showed nearly twice the number of neurons as compared to young adult pigeons, suggesting that adult born neurons in these regions expanded the local circuitry even in aged birds. This increase might reflect navigational experience and, possibly, expanded spatial memory. On the other hand, the decrease of juvenile neurons in the aging OB without adding new circuitry might be related to the improved attachment to the loft characterizing adult and old pigeons. PMID:27445724