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Sample records for altered nanotube dimension

  1. INFLUENCES OF DENSITY AND DIMENSION OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON THEIR FIELD EMISSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.B. Zhu; W.L. Wang; C.G. Hu

    2003-01-01

    The influences of density and dimension of carbon nanotubes on their electron emission from arrays are studied. The tip electric field of nanotubes, electric field enhancement factor, and optimum nanotube density are expressed by analytic equations. The theoretical analyses show that the field enhancement factor is sensitive to nanotube density, and can be sharply improved at a specific and optimum density. Some experiments have demonstrated these. Owning to electrostatic screening effect, the length of carbon nanotubes has little effect on their emission. A uniformly-distributed carbon nanotube array model is set up, and applied to analysis of carbon nanotube arrays.The results obtained here are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Image formation mechanisms in scanning electron microscopy of carbon nanotubes, and retrieval of their intrinsic dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, H., E-mail: henrik.jackman@kau.se [Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Karlstad University, SE-651 88 Karlstad (Sweden); Krakhmalev, P. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Karlstad University, SE-651 88 Karlstad (Sweden); Svensson, K. [Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Karlstad University, SE-651 88 Karlstad (Sweden)

    2013-01-15

    We present a detailed analysis of the image formation mechanisms that are involved in the imaging of carbon nanotubes with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We show how SEM images can be modelled by accounting for surface enhancement effects together with the absorption coefficient for secondary electrons, and the electron-probe shape. Images can then be deconvoluted, enabling retrieval of the intrinsic nanotube dimensions. Accurate estimates of their dimensions can thereby be obtained even for structures that are comparable to the electron-probe size (on the order of 2 nm). We also present a simple and robust model for obtaining the outer diameter of nanotubes without any detailed knowledge about the electron-probe shape. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the image formation of free-standing carbon nanotubes in SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electron-probe shape is characterized from SEM-images. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use the electron-probe shape to deconvolute SEM-images of carbon nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a simple method for retrieval of intrinsic nanotube dimensions.

  3. Image formation mechanisms in scanning electron microscopy of carbon nanotubes, and retrieval of their intrinsic dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, H; Krakhmalev, P; Svensson, K

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the image formation mechanisms that are involved in the imaging of carbon nanotubes with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We show how SEM images can be modelled by accounting for surface enhancement effects together with the absorption coefficient for secondary electrons, and the electron-probe shape. Images can then be deconvoluted, enabling retrieval of the intrinsic nanotube dimensions. Accurate estimates of their dimensions can thereby be obtained even for structures that are comparable to the electron-probe size (on the order of 2 nm). We also present a simple and robust model for obtaining the outer diameter of nanotubes without any detailed knowledge about the electron-probe shape.

  4. Memory generalization is selectively altered in the psychosis dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivleva, Elena I; Shohamy, Daphna; Mihalakos, Perry; Morris, David W; Carmody, Thomas; Tamminga, Carol A

    2012-06-01

    Global deficits in declarative memory are commonly reported in individuals with schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder, and in their biological relatives. However, it remains unclear whether there are specific components within the global declarative memory dysfunction that are unique to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, or whether these impairments overlap the two psychoses. This study sought to characterize differential components of learning and memory in individuals within the psychosis dimension: probands with schizophrenia (SZP, n=33), probands with psychotic bipolar I disorder (BDP, n=20), and biological relatives of SZP (SZR, n=21), contrasted with healthy controls (HC, n=26). A computerized cognitive paradigm, the Acquired Equivalence test, with probes for associative learning, memory for learned associations, and memory generalization was administered, along with standardized neuropsychological measures of declarative memory. All study groups were able to learn and remember the associations, although SZP were slower than HC in the initial learning stages. Both SZP (significantly) and BDP (at a trend level) showed altered memory generalization compared to HC (SZP vs. HC, p=.038, d=.8; BDP vs. HC, p=.069, d=.95). SZR showed memory generalization intermediate between SZP and HC, although their performance did not differ significantly from either group. These findings indicate that probands with schizophrenia and bipolar psychoses have similar alteration in the ability to flexibly generalize learned knowledge when probed with novel stimuli, despite overall sufficient associative learning and memory for what they learned. These results suggest that the two disorders present a clinical continuum with overlapping hippocampus-mediated memory generalization dysfunction underlying the psychosis phenotype.

  5. Bamboo-like Te Nanotubes with Tailored Dimensions Synthesized from Segmental NiFe Nanowires as Sacrificial Templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Ho Young; Jung, Hyun Sung; Myung, No Sang [University of California-Riverside, Riverside (United States); Hong, Kim In [KICET, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Bamboo-like Te nanotubes were synthesized via the galvanic displacement reaction of NiFe nanowires with Ni-rich and Fe-rich segments. The thick and thin components of the synthesized Te nanotubes were converted from the Ni-rich and Fe-rich segments in the NiFe nanowires respectively. The dimensions of the Te nanotubes were controlled by employing sacrificial NiFe nanowires with tailored dimensions as the template for the galvanic displacement reaction. The segment lengths of the Te nanotubes were found to be dependent on those of the sacrificial NiFe nanowires. The galvanic displacement reaction was characterized by analyzing the open circuit potential and the corrosion resistance.

  6. Titania nanotubes dimensions-dependent protein adsorption and its effect on the growth of osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weihu; Xi, Xingfeng; Shen, Xinkun; Liu, Peng; Hu, Yan; Cai, Kaiyong

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we report the influence of titania nanotubes (TiNTs) dimensions on the adsorption of collagen (COL) and fibronectin (FN), and its subsequent effect on the growth of osteoblasts. TiNTs with different diameters of around 30 and 100 nm were prepared with anodization. The adsorption profiles of proteins and cell behaviors were evaluated using spectrophotometric measurement, immunofluorescence staining, cell viability, and cytoskeleton morphology, respectively. The results showed that although the growth of osteoblasts was highly sensitive to the dimensions TiNTs, the preadsorbed COL and FN could reduce the difference. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation results confirmed that the main driving force for protein adsorption was the physical adsorption. The TiNTs with bigger dimensions had higher interaction energies, and thus leading to higher proteins (COL and FN) adsorption and obvious influences on cell behaviors. MD simulation revealed that the orientation and conformation of proteins adsorbed onto surfaces of TiNTs was critical for cell integrins to recognize specific sites. When FN molecules adsorbed onto the surfaces of TiNTs, their RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) sites were easily exposed to outside and more likely to bond with the fibronectin receptors, in turn regulating the cellular behaviors.

  7. The investigation of the diameter dimension effect on the Si nano-tube transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-H. Liao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The vertical gate-all-around (V-GAA Si nano-tube (NT devices with different diameter dimensions are studied in this work with the promising device performance. The V-GAA structure makes the transistor easy to be scaled down continuously to meet the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS scaling requirements of the 7/10 nm technology node and beyond. The Si NT device with the hollow structure is demonstrated to have the capability to “deplete” and “screen-out” the out-of gate control carriers in the center of the NT and further result in the better device short channel control. Based on the study in this work, the V-GAA Si NT device with the optimized diameter dimension (=20 nm can benefit the Ion-state current and reduce the Ioff-state stand-by power simultaneously, due to the less surface roughness scattering and the better short channel control characteristics. The proposed V-GAA Si NT device is regarded as one of the most promising candidates for the future application of the sub-7/10 nm logic era.

  8. Synthesis of collagen nanotubes with highly regular dimensions through membrane-templated layer-by-layer assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoulsi, Jessem; Roy, Cécile J; Dupont-Gillain, Christine; Demoustier-Champagne, Sophie

    2009-05-11

    Nanotubes made from a fibrillar protein, namely, collagen, were fabricated by a template-based method combined with layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition. The ability to incorporate collagen in LbL multilayered film was first demonstrated by in situ quartz crystal microbalance and ex situ ellipsometry on a flat model substrate, using poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS) as polyanion. Collagen-based nanotubes were then fabricated by alternately immersing a polycarbonate membrane, used as template, in PSS and collagen aqueous solutions. Direct evidence for nanotube formation was obtained by dissolving the membrane and imaging the liberated (PSS/collagen)(n) nanostructures by scanning electron microscopy and by transmission electron microscopy. The proposed strategy constitutes a practical alternative to electrospinning as it allows a very good control over the dimensions (outside and inside diameters and length) of the resulting nanotubes. Besides their fundamental interest, collagen-based nanotubes are useful nano-objects for the creation of new nanostructured biomaterials with numerous potential applications in the biomedical field.

  9. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G; Orji, Ndubuisi G; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V

    2016-07-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips.

  10. Influence of the titania nanotubes dimensions on adsorption of collagen: an experimental and computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weihu; Xi, Xingfeng; Ran, Qichun; Liu, Peng; Hu, Yan; Cai, Kaiyong

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the influence of the titanium nanotube (TiNT) diameters on the adsorption of collagen type I (Col-I), TiNTs with different diameters were prepared with anodization. The adsorption amount of Col-I on the different TiNTs substrates was evaluated by spectrophotometric measurement and immunofluorescence staining, respectively. The results showed that the diameters of TiNTs played a key role in the adsorption process of Col-I. TiNTs with diameters around 100nm displayed a higher adsorption amount and faster adsorption speed than that of 30nm TiNTs. Furthermore, more collagen molecules were aggregated in the tubes of 100nm TiNTs. Molecular dynamics simulation was performed to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. The simulation results confirmed that physical adsorption was the main driving force, including van der Waals force and hydrogen bond between Col-I molecules and TiNTs. The calculated interaction energies indicated that the TiNTs with bigger dimensions had higher interaction energies, thus leading to the higher collagen adsorption.

  11. Altered sleep in Borderline Personality Disorder in relation to the core dimensions of psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simor, Péter; Horváth, Klára

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to review the literature regarding sleep disturbances in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and to relate the reported sleep alterations to the underlying core dimensions of BPD pathology. We present a qualitative and theoretical review regarding the empirical studies that investigated objective and subjective sleep quality in BPD and in different psychiatric conditions showing high co-morbidity with this disorder. We show that disturbed sleep including sleep fragmentation, alterations in Slow Wave Sleep and REM sleep, and dysphoric dreaming are prevalent symptoms in BPD. We provide a framework relating the specific sleep alterations to the core dimensions of BPD pathology in order to clarify the inconsistencies of the different findings. The specific sleep disturbances in BPD seem to be related to different dimensions of psychopathological functioning and may have detrimental consequences on waking affect and cognition. Investigating disturbed sleep in BPD in relation to waking symptoms and underlying neural functioning would shed more light on the nature of this complex disorder. Moreover, a stronger emphasis on sleep disturbances would enrich the treatment protocols of BPD.

  12. Study of modification methods of probes for critical-dimension atomic-force microscopy by the deposition of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageev, O. A., E-mail: ageev@sfedu.ru [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation); Bykov, Al. V. [NT-MDT (Russian Federation); Kolomiitsev, A. S.; Konoplev, B. G.; Rubashkina, M. V.; Smirnov, V. A.; Tsukanova, O. G. [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The results of an experimental study of the modification of probes for critical-dimension atomicforce microscopy (CD-AFM) by the deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to improve the accuracy with which the surface roughness of vertical walls is determined in submicrometer structures are presented. Methods of the deposition of an individual CNT onto the tip of an AFM probe via mechanical and electrostatic interaction between the probe and an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are studied. It is shown that, when the distance between the AFM tip and a VACNT array is 1 nm and the applied voltage is within the range 20–30 V, an individual carbon nanotube is deposited onto the tip. On the basis of the results obtained in the study, a probe with a carbon nanotube on its tip (CNT probe) with a radius of 7 nm and an aspect ratio of 1:15 is formed. Analysis of the CNT probe demonstrates that its use improves the resolution and accuracy of AFM measurements, compared with the commercial probe, and also makes it possible to determine the roughness of the vertical walls of high-aspect structures by CD-AFM. The results obtained can be used to develop technological processes for the fabrication and reconditioning of special AFM probes, including those for CD-AFM, and procedures for the interoperational express monitoring of technological process parameters in the manufacturing of elements for micro- and nanoelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering.

  13. Does altering the occlusal vertical dimension produce temporomandibular disorders? A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Hay, I; Okeson, J P

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this review was to present a comprehensive review of the scientific evidence available in the literature regarding the effect of altering the occlusal vertical dimens-ion (OVD) on producing temporomandibular disorders. The authors conducted a PubMed search with the following search terms 'temporoman-dibular disorders', 'occlusal vertical dimension', 'stomatognatic system', 'masticatory muscles' and 'skeletal muscle'. Bibliographies of all retrieved articles were consulted for additional publications. Hand-searched publications from 1938 were included. The literature review revealed a lack of well-designed studies. Traditional beliefs have been based on case reports and anecdotal opinions rather than on well-controlled clinical trials. The available evidence is weak and seems to indicate that the stomatognathic system has the ability to adapt rapidly to moderate changes in occlusal vertical dimension (OVD). Nevertheless, it should be taken into consideration that in some patients mild transient symptoms may occur, but they are most often self-limiting and without major consequence. In conclusion, there is no indication that permanent alteration in the OVD will produce long-lasting TMD symptoms. However, additional studies are needed.

  14. Titania nanotubes with adjustable dimensions for drug reservoir sites and enhanced cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalışkan, Nazlı; Bayram, Cem; Erdal, Ebru; Karahaliloğlu, Zeynep; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2014-02-01

    This study aims to generate a bactericidal agent releasing surface via nanotube layer on titanium metal and to investigate how aspect ratio of nanotubes affects drug elution time and cell proliferation. Titania nanotube layers were generated on metal surfaces by anodic oxidation at various voltage and time parameters. Gentamicin loading was carried out via simple pipetting and the samples were tested against S. aureus for the efficacy of the applied modification. Drug releasing time and cell proliferation were also tested in vitro. Titania nanotube layers with varying diameters and lengths were prepared after anodization and anodizing duration was found as the most effective parameter for amount of loaded drug and drug releasing time. Drug elution lasted up to 4 days after anodizing for 80 min of the samples, whereas release completed in 24 h when the samples were anodized for 20 min. All processed samples had bactericidal properties against S. aureus organism except unmodified titanium, which was also subjected to drug incorporation step. The anodization also enhanced water wettability and cell adhesion results. Anodic oxidation is an effective surface modification to enhance tissue-implant interactions and also resultant titania layer can act as a drug reservoir for the release of bactericidal agents. The use of implants as local drug eluting devices is promising but further in vivo testing is required.

  15. Titania nanotubes with adjustable dimensions for drug reservoir sites and enhanced cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Çalışkan, Nazlı; Bayram, Cem; Erdal, Ebru; Karahaliloğlu, Zeynep; Denkbaş, Emir Baki, E-mail: denkbas@hacettepe.edu.tr

    2014-02-01

    This study aims to generate a bactericidal agent releasing surface via nanotube layer on titanium metal and to investigate how aspect ratio of nanotubes affects drug elution time and cell proliferation. Titania nanotube layers were generated on metal surfaces by anodic oxidation at various voltage and time parameters. Gentamicin loading was carried out via simple pipetting and the samples were tested against S. aureus for the efficacy of the applied modification. Drug releasing time and cell proliferation were also tested in vitro. Titania nanotube layers with varying diameters and lengths were prepared after anodization and anodizing duration was found as the most effective parameter for amount of loaded drug and drug releasing time. Drug elution lasted up to 4 days after anodizing for 80 min of the samples, whereas release completed in 24 h when the samples were anodized for 20 min. All processed samples had bactericidal properties against S. aureus organism except unmodified titanium, which was also subjected to drug incorporation step. The anodization also enhanced water wettability and cell adhesion results. Anodic oxidation is an effective surface modification to enhance tissue–implant interactions and also resultant titania layer can act as a drug reservoir for the release of bactericidal agents. The use of implants as local drug eluting devices is promising but further in vivo testing is required. - Highlights: • Titanium surfaces were anodized and a nanotubular titania layer was obtained. • Drug eluting time was found to be increasing with anodizaton time. • Varying nanotube diameters has no effect in drug elution time but amount of incorporated drug.

  16. Altered Cell Mechanics from the Inside: Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Integrate with and Restructure Actin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad F. Islam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics.

  17. Transparent, well-aligned TiO(2) nanotube arrays with controllable dimensions on glass substrates for photocatalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lee Kheng; Kumar, Manippady K; An, Wen Wen; Gao, Han

    2010-02-01

    Transparent, well-aligned TiO(2) nanotube arrays (NTAs) with controllable dimensions are grown on glass substrates via atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO(2) onto free-standing porous anodic alumina (PAA) templates. Photodegradation of aqueous methylene blue (MB) solution and solid stearic acid (SA) film using TiO(2) NTAs of various wall thicknesses are investigated. The Pd functionalized TiO(2) NTAs, with a wall thickness of 15 nm and height of 200 nm, has the highest photodegradation efficiency at 76% after 4 h of UV irradiation. These functionalized NTAs are able to photodegrade MB molecules completely as no obvious demethylated byproducts are observed during the process. It also demonstrates excellent photocatalytic activity for solid contaminants such as SA film. By using the ALD technique, the nanotube wall thickness can be precisely controlled so that it is sufficiently thin to be transparent while sufficiently thick for excellent photocatalytic performances. The transparent TiO(2) NTAs on glass substrates with excellent photocatalytic properties might have potential applications in self-cleaning coating, transparent electronics, and solar cells.

  18. Fermionic condensate and Casimir densities in the presence of compact dimensions with applications to nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Elizalde, E; Saharian, A A

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the fermionic condensate and the vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor for a massive fermionic field in the geometry of two parallel plate on the background of Minkowski spacetime with an arbitrary number of toroidally compactified spatial dimensions, in the presence of a constant gauge field. Bag boundary conditions are imposed on the plates and periodicity conditions with arbitrary phases are considered along the compact dimensions. The boundary induced parts in the fermionic condensate and the vacuum energy density are negative, with independence of the phases in the periodicity conditions and of the value of the gauge potential. Interaction forces between the plates are thus always attractive. However, in physical situations where the quantum field is confined to the region between the plates, the pure topological part contributes as well, and then the resulting force can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the specific phases encoded in the periodicity conditio...

  19. Effects of different sterilization techniques and varying anodized TiO₂ nanotube dimensions on bacteria growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Kim M; Taylor, Erik N; Durmas, Naside G; Tarquinio, Keiko M; Ercan, Batur; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-07-01

    Infection of titanium (Ti)-based orthopedic implants is a growing problem due to the ability of bacteria to develop a resistance to today's antibiotics. As an attempt to develop a new strategy to combat bacteria functions, Ti was anodized in the present study to possess different diameters of nanotubes. It is reported here for the first time that Ti anodized to possess 20 nm tubes then followed by heat treatment to remove fluorine deposited from the HF anodization electrolyte solution significantly reduced both S. aureus and S. epidermidis growth compared to unanodized Ti controls. It was further found that the sterilization method used for both anodized nanotubular Ti and conventional Ti played an important role in the degree of bacteria growth on these substrates. Overall, UV light and ethanol sterilized samples decreased bacteria growth, while autoclaving resulted in the highest amount of bacteria growth. In summary, this study indicated that through a simple and inexpensive process, Ti can be anodized to possess 20 nm tubes that no matter how sterilized (UV light, ethanol soaking, or autoclaving) reduces bacteria growth and, thus, shows great promise as an antibacterial implant material.

  20. A meta-analysis of carbon nanotube pulmonary toxicity studies--how physical dimensions and impurities affect the toxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernand, Jeremy M; Casman, Elizabeth A

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a regression-tree-based meta-analysis of rodent pulmonary toxicity studies of uncoated, nonfunctionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) exposure. The resulting analysis provides quantitative estimates of the contribution of CNT attributes (impurities, physical dimensions, and aggregation) to pulmonary toxicity indicators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid: neutrophil and macrophage count, and lactate dehydrogenase and total protein concentrations. The method employs classification and regression tree (CART) models, techniques that are relatively insensitive to data defects that impair other types of regression analysis: high dimensionality, nonlinearity, correlated variables, and significant quantities of missing values. Three types of analysis are presented: the RT, the random forest (RF), and a random-forest-based dose-response model. The RT shows the best single model supported by all the data and typically contains a small number of variables. The RF shows how much variance reduction is associated with every variable in the data set. The dose-response model is used to isolate the effects of CNT attributes from the CNT dose, showing the shift in the dose-response caused by the attribute across the measured range of CNT doses. It was found that the CNT attributes that contribute the most to pulmonary toxicity were metallic impurities (cobalt significantly increased observed toxicity, while other impurities had mixed effects), CNT length (negatively correlated with most toxicity indicators), CNT diameter (significantly positively associated with toxicity), and aggregate size (negatively correlated with cell damage indicators and positively correlated with immune response indicators). Increasing CNT N2 -BET-specific surface area decreased toxicity indicators.

  1. Fractal Dimension Change Point Model for Hydrothermal Alteration Anomalies in Silk Road Economic Belt, the Beishan Area, Gansu, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, H. H.; Wang, Y. L.; Ren, G. L.; LI, J. Q.; Gao, T.; Yang, M.; Yang, J. L.

    2016-11-01

    Remote sensing plays an important role in mineral exploration of “One Belt One Road” plan. One of its applications is extracting and locating hydrothermal alteration zones that are related to mines. At present, the extracting method for alteration anomalies from principal component image mainly relies on the data's normal distribution, without considering the nonlinear characteristics of geological anomaly. In this study, a Fractal Dimension Change Point Model (FDCPM), calculated by the self-similarity and mutability of alteration anomalies, is employed to quantitatively acquire the critical threshold of alteration anomalies. The realization theory and access mechanism of the model are elaborated by an experiment with ASTER data in Beishan mineralization belt, also the results are compared with traditional method (De-Interfered Anomalous Principal Component Thresholding Technique, DIAPCTT). The results show that the findings produced by FDCPM are agree with well with a mounting body of evidence from different perspectives, with the extracting accuracy over 80%, indicating that FDCPM is an effective extracting method for remote sensing alteration anomalies, and could be used as an useful tool for mineral exploration in similar areas in Silk Road Economic Belt.

  2. [Vertical dimension in the OSAHS in adults: an example of functional alteration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, S; Limme, M

    2003-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea and hypoapnea syndrome (OSAHS) is important to orthodontists for several reasons. The authors, after defining OSAHS and describing it briefly, review the literature dealing with the cranio-facial morphology of apnea patients. They report the results of their cephalometric study, which is based on an architectural analysis of 274 patients. Their facial characteristics, especially vertical dimension, are consistent with those displayed by mouth breathing children. Changes in respiratory functioning modify the mechanical behavior and the structures of the upper airways. Osseous tissues also show signs caused by these changes. The authors propose an etiopathogenic model.

  3. Inorganic nanotube nanofluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rong

    The ability to manipulate charge carriers (electrons and holes) in metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) has revolutionized how information is processed and stored, and created the modern digital age. Introducing direct field effect modulation in fluidic systems would enable the manipulation of ionic and molecular species at a similar level and even logic operation. Due to strong Debye screening in aqueous solutions, field effect manipulation of ion transport arises only in systems whose dimensions are comparable to the critical Debye Length, i.e. in nanofluidic systems. Nanofluidics has already been explored in various cases, e.g. biological channel proteins and artificial solid-state nanopores. All these two terminal systems usually transport the ions the same way as passive electron conduction in a resistor. My work is aimed at developing nanotube nanofluidic units with a third terminal that can electrically turn on/off and control ion and biomolecule transport. Moreover, the systematic study on "doping" and transient phenomena can provide rich information to assess the electrokinetics theory and fluidic physics in nanoscale. Silica nanotubes were synthesized by oxidation/etching approach using vertical silicon nanowires as templates. A single nanotube was integrated into a metal-oxide-solution field effect transistor (MOSolFET) by interfacing with two microfluidic channels and a metallic gate electrode. Concentration dependence of ionic conductance through single nanotubes revealed the emergence of unipolar environment at low ionic strength regime. In this case, ionic conductance is only associated with majority ions and governed by surface potentials and charge densities. By applying a gate voltage, the ionic conductance can be quickly modulated. The gate voltages alter the surface potential of the silica nanotubes via capacitive coupling through the nanotube wall and the electrical double layer. In a negatively charged silica nanotube

  4. Performances of carbon nanotube field effect transistors with altered channel length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The influence of channel length on the performances of carbon nanotube field effect transistors(CNT-FETs) has been studied.Buffered oxide etching was used to remove approximately a 60 nm layer from the original 100 nm silicon dioxide layer,to thin the dielectric layer of the back gate.Channel length of the CNT-FETs was changed along with the etching process.The dependence of drain-source current on gate voltage was measured to analyze the performance of the CNT-FETs,including the transconductance,carrier mobility,current ON/OFF ratio,etc.The results indicate that the devices still keep good quality.

  5. From two-dimension to one-dimension: the curvature effect of silicon-doped graphene and carbon nanotubes for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Hou, Xiuli; Mi, Jianli; He, Yanqiong; Lin, Lin; Jiang, Qing; Dong, Mingdong

    2014-09-07

    For the goal of practical industrial development of fuel cells, inexpensive, sustainable, and highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) are highly desirable alternatives to platinum (Pt) and other rare metals. In this work, based on density functional theory, silicon (Si)-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene as metal-free, low cost, and high-performance electrocatalysts for ORR are studied systematically. It is found that the curvature effect plays an important role in the adsorption and reduction of oxygen. The adsorption of O2 becomes weaker as the curvature varies from positive values (outside CNTs) to negative values (inside CNTs). The free energy change of the rate-determining step of ORR on the concave inner surface of Si-doped CNTs is smaller than that on the counterpart of Si-doped graphene, while that on the convex outer surface of Si-doped CNTs is larger than that on Si-doped graphene. Uncovering this new ORR mechanism on silicon-doped carbon electrodes is significant as the same principle could be applied to the development of various other metal-free efficient ORR catalysts for fuel cell applications.

  6. Fractal dimension as a measure of altered actin cytoskeleton in MC3T3-E1 cells under simulated microgravity using 3-D/2-D clinostats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, A R; Li, D; Han, J; Gao, X; Di, S M; Zhang, W; Hu, L F; Shang, Peng

    2012-05-01

    Osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, respond to various mechanical forces, such as stretch and fluid shear force in essentially similar ways. The cytoskeleton, as the load-bearing architecture of the cell, is sensitive to altered inertial forces. Disruption of the cytoskeleton will result in alteration of cellular structure and function. However, it is difficult to quantitatively illustrate cytoskeletal rearrangement because of the complexity of cytoskeletal structure. Usually, the morphological changes in actin organization caused by external stimulus are basically descriptive. In this study, fractal dimensions (D) analysis was used to quantify the morphological changes in the actin cytoskeleton of osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1) under simulated microgravity using 3-D/2-D clinostats. The ImageJ software was used to count the fractal dimension of actin cytoskeleton by box-counting methods. Real-time PCR and immunofluroscent assays were used to further confirm the results obtained by fractal dimension analysis. The results showed significant decreases in D value of actin cytoskeleton, β-actin mRNA expression, and the mean fluorescence intensity of F-actin in osteoblast-like cells after 24 or 48 h of incubation under 3-D/2-D clinorotation condition compared with control. The findings indicate that 3-D/2-D clinorotation affects both actin cytoskeleton architecture and mRNA expression, and fractal may be a promising approach for quantitative analysis of the changes in cytoskeleton in different environments.

  7. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  8. PEGylated Carbon Nanotubes Impair Retrieval of Contextual Fear Memory and Alter Oxidative Stress Parameters in the Rat Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiane Dal Bosco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNT are promising materials for biomedical applications, especially in the field of neuroscience; therefore, it is essential to evaluate the neurotoxicity of these nanomaterials. The present work assessed the effects of single-walled CNT functionalized with polyethylene glycol (SWCNT-PEG on the consolidation and retrieval of contextual fear memory in rats and on oxidative stress parameters in the hippocampus. SWCNT-PEG were dispersed in water at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.1 mg/mL and infused into the rat hippocampus. The infusion was completed immediately after training and 30 min before testing of a contextual fear conditioning task, resulting in exposure times of 24 h and 30 min, respectively. The results showed that a short exposure to SWCNT-PEG impaired fear memory retrieval and caused lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus. This response was transient and overcome by the mobilization of antioxidant defenses at 24 h. These effects occurred at low and intermediate but not high concentration of SWCNT-PEG, suggesting that the observed biological response may be related to the concentration-dependent increase in particle size in SWCNT-PEG dispersions.

  9. Interactions of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with algal cells: quantification of association, visualization of uptake, and measurement of alterations in the composition of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhiem, Stefan; Riding, Matthew J; Baumgartner, Werner; Martin, Francis L; Semple, Kirk T; Jones, Kevin C; Schäffer, Andreas; Maes, Hanna M

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered promising materials in nanotechnology. We quantified CNT accumulation by the alga Desmodesmus subspicatus. Cells were exposed to radiolabeled CNTs ((14)C-CNTs;1 mg/L) to determine uptake and association, as well as elimination and dissociation in clear media.Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to detect effects of CNTs on algae. CNT-cell interactions were visualized by electron microscopy and related to alterations in their cell composition. A concentration factor of 5000 L/kg dry weight was calculated. Most of the material agglomerated around the cells, but single tubes were detected in the cytoplasm. Computational analyses of the ATR-FTIR data showed that CNT treated algae differed from controls at all sampling times.CNT exposure changed the biochemical composition of cells. The fact that CNTs are bioavailable for algae and that they influence the cell composition is important with regard to environmental risk assessment of this nanomaterial.

  10. Single-nanotube tracking reveals the nanoscale organization of the extracellular space in the live brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Antoine G.; Varela, Juan A.; Gao, Zhenghong; Danné, Noémie; Dupuis, Julien P.; Lounis, Brahim; Groc, Laurent; Cognet, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    The brain is a dynamic structure with the extracellular space (ECS) taking up almost a quarter of its volume. Signalling molecules, neurotransmitters and nutrients transit via the ECS, which constitutes a key microenvironment for cellular communication and the clearance of toxic metabolites. The spatial organization of the ECS varies during sleep, development and aging and is probably altered in neuropsychiatric and degenerative diseases, as inferred from electron microscopy and macroscopic biophysical investigations. Here we show an approach to directly observe the local ECS structures and rheology in brain tissue using super-resolution imaging. We inject single-walled carbon nanotubes into rat cerebroventricles and follow the near-infrared emission of individual nanotubes as they diffuse inside the ECS for tens of minutes in acute slices. Because of the interplay between the nanotube geometry and the ECS local environment, we can extract information about the dimensions and local viscosity of the ECS. We find a striking diversity of ECS dimensions down to 40 nm, and as well as of local viscosity values. Moreover, by chemically altering the extracellular matrix of the brains of live animals before nanotube injection, we reveal that the rheological properties of the ECS are affected, but these alterations are local and inhomogeneous at the nanoscale.

  11. Magnetic nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  12. Carbon nanotube filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  13. Dimension quotients

    OpenAIRE

    Hartl, M; Mikhailov, R.; Passi, I. B. S.

    2008-01-01

    We present two approaches, one homological and the other simplicial, for the investigation of dimension quotients of groups. The theory is illustrated, in particular, with a conceptual discussion of the fourth and fifth dimension quotients.

  14. Multiwalled nanotube faceting unravelled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leven, Itai; Guerra, Roberto; Vanossi, Andrea; Tosatti, Erio; Hod, Oded

    2016-12-01

    Nanotubes show great promise for miniaturizing advanced technologies. Their exceptional physical properties are intimately related to their morphological and crystal structure. Circumferential faceting of multiwalled nanotubes reinforces their mechanical strength and alters their tribological and electronic properties. Here, the nature of this important phenomenon is fully rationalized in terms of interlayer registry patterns. Regardless of the nanotube identity (that is, diameter, chirality, chemical composition), faceting requires the matching of the chiral angles of adjacent layers. Above a critical diameter that corresponds well with experimental results, achiral multiwalled nanotubes display evenly spaced extended axial facets whose number equals the interlayer difference in circumferential unit cells. Elongated helical facets, commonly observed in experiment, appear in nanotubes that exhibit small interlayer chiral angle mismatch. When the wall chiralities are uncorrelated, faceting is suppressed and outer layer corrugation, which is induced by the Moiré superlattice, is obtained in agreement with experiments. Finally, we offer an explanation for the higher incidence of faceting in multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes with respect to their carbon-based counterparts.

  15. Quantum physics in one dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Giamarchi, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    This book presents in a pedagogical yet complete way correlated systems in one dimension. Recent progress in nanotechnology and material research have made one dimensional systems a crucial part of today's physics. After an introduction to the basic concepts of correlated systems, the book gives a step by step description of the techniques needed to treat one dimension, and discusses the resulting physics. Then specific experimental realizations of one dimensional systems such asspin chains, quantum wires, nanotubes, organic superconductors etc. are examined. Given its progressive and pedagogi

  16. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.;

    2015-01-01

    by recent advances in theory. As well as the well-understood overall picture, we also state clearly open questions for the field. These advances position nanotubes as a leading system for the study of spin and valley physics in one dimension where electronic disorder and hyperfine interaction can both...... and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and from valley freedom. We focus on the interplay between the two....... In single quantum dots defined in short lengths of nanotube, the energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are revealed by Coulomb blockade spectroscopy. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli...

  17. Analysis of the effects of applying external fields and device dimensions alterations on GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well slow light devices based on excitonic population oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohandani, Reza; Zandi, Ashkan; Kaatuzian, Hassan

    2014-02-20

    This paper demonstrates the effects of applying magnetic and electric fields and physical dimensions alterations on AlGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well (QW) slow light devices. Physical parameters include quantum well sizes and number of quantum wells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first analysis of the effects of both applying magnetic/electric fields and physical parameters alterations and the first suggestion for matching the prefabrication and post fabrication tuning of the slow light devices based on excitonic population oscillations. The aim of our theoretical analysis is controlling the optical properties such as central frequency, bandwidth, and slow down factor (SDF) in slow light devices based on excitonic population oscillation to achieve better tuning. To reach these purposes, first we investigate the quantum well size and number of quantum wells alteration effects. Next, we analyze the effects of applying magnetic and electric fields to the multiple quantum well structure, separately. Finally, physical parameters and applied external fields are changed for measuring frequency shift and SDF for coherent population oscillation slow light devices. The results show the available central frequency shifts in about 1.6 THz at best. Also the SDF value improvement is about one order of magnitude. These results will be applicable for optical nonlinearity enhancements, all-optical signal processing, optical communications, all-optical switches, optical modulators, and variable true delays.

  18. Modelling encapsulation of gold and silver nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baowan, Duangkamon; Thamwattana, Ngamta

    2014-02-01

    Lipid nanotubes are of particular interest for use as a template to create various one-dimensional nanostructures and as a carrier for drug and gene delivery. Understanding the encapsulation process is therefore crucial for such development. This paper models the interactions between lipid nanotubes and spheres of gold and silver nanoparticles and determines the critical dimension of lipid nanotubes that maximises the interaction with the nanoparticles. Our results confirm the acceptance of gold and silver nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes. Further, we find that the lipid nanotube of radius approximately 10.23 nm is most favourable to encapsulate both types of nanoparticles.

  19. A statistical mechanics model of carbon nanotube macro-films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube macro-films are two-dimensional films with micrometer thickness and centimeter by centimeter in-plane dimension.These carbon nanotube macroscopic assemblies have attracted significant attention from the material and mechanics communities recently because they can be easily handled and tailored to meet specific engineering needs.This paper reports the experimental methods on the preparation and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotube macro-films,and a statistical mechanics model on ...

  20. Carbon nanotubes affect the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to denitrification in marine sediments by altering cellular internalization of nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Huang, Haining; Li, Xu

    2016-06-01

    Denitrification is an important pathway for nitrate transformation in marine sediments, and this process has been observed to be negatively affected by engineered nanomaterials. However, previous studies only focused on the potential effect of a certain type of nanomaterial on microbial denitrification. Here we show that the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) to denitrification in marine sediments is highly affected by the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It was found that the removal efficiency of total NOX‑-N (NO3‑-N and NO2‑-N) in the presence of CuO NPs was only 62.3%, but it increased to 81.1% when CNTs appeared in this circumstance. Our data revealed that CuO NPs were more easily attached to CNTs rather than cell surface because of the lower energy barrier (3.5 versus 36.2 kT). Further studies confirmed that the presence of CNTs caused the formation of large, incompact, non-uniform dispersed, and more negatively charged CuO-CNTs heteroaggregates, and thus reduced the nanoparticle internalization by cells, leading to less toxicity to metabolism of carbon source, generation of reduction equivalent, and activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. These results indicate that assessing nanomaterial-induced risks in real circumstances needs to consider the “mixed” effects of nanomaterials.

  1. Polymer Self-assembly on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulianini, Michele; Motta, Nunzio

    This chapter analyses the poly(3-hexylthiophene) self-assembly on carbon nanotubes and the interaction between the two materials forming a new hybrid nanostructure. The chapter starts with a review of the several studies investigating polymers and biomolecules self-assembled on nanotubes. Then conducting polymers and polythiophenes are briefly introduced. Accordingly, carbon nanotube structure and properties are reported in Sect. 3. The experimental section starts with the bulk characterisation of polymer thin films with the inclusion of uniformly distributed carbon nanotubes. By using volume film analysis techniques (AFM, TEM, UV-Vis and Raman), we show how the polymer's higher degree of order is a direct consequence of interaction with carbon nanotubes. Nevertheless, it is through the use of nanoscale analysis and molecular dynamic simulations that the self-assembly of the polymer on the nanotube surface can be clearly evidenced and characterised. In Sect. 6, the effect of the carbon templating structure on the P3HT organisation on the surface is investigated, showing the chirality-driven polymer assembly on the carbon nanotube surface. The interaction between P3HT and CNTs brings also to charge transfer, with the modification of physical properties for both species. In particular, the alteration of the polymer electronic properties and the modification of the nanotube mechanical structure are a direct consequence of the P3HT π-π stacking on the nanotube surface. Finally, some considerations based on molecular dynamics studies are reported in order to confirm and support the experimental results discussed.

  2. Nanotube phonon waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2013-10-29

    Disclosed are methods and devices in which certain types of nanotubes (e.g., carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes conduct heat with high efficiency and are therefore useful in electronic-type devices.

  3. Multiplying dimensions

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    A few weeks ago, I had a vague notion of what TED was, and how it worked, but now I’m a confirmed fan. It was my privilege to host CERN’s first TEDx event last Friday, and I can honestly say that I can’t remember a time when I was exposed to so much brilliance in such a short time.   TEDxCERN was designed to give a platform to science. That’s why we called it Multiplying Dimensions – a nod towards the work we do here, while pointing to the broader importance of science in society. We had talks ranging from the most subtle pondering on the nature of consciousness to an eighteen year old researcher urging us to be patient, and to learn from our mistakes. We had musical interludes that included encounters between the choirs of local schools and will.i.am, between an Israeli pianist and an Iranian percussionist, and between Grand Opera and high humour. And although I opened the event by announcing it as a day off from physics, we had a quite brill...

  4. Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization and catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dommele, S.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen containing Carbon Nanotubes (NCNT) have altered physical- and chemical properties with respect to polarity, conductivity and reactivity as compared to conventional carbon nanotubes (CNT) and have potential for use in electronic applications or catalysis. In this thesis the incorporation of

  5. Nanotube News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Smaller, faster computers, bullet-proof t-shirts, and itty-bitty robots--such are the promises of nanotechnology and the cylinder-shaped collection of carbon molecules known as nanotubes. But for these exciting ideas to become realities, scientists must understand how these miracle molecules perform under all sorts of conditions. This brief…

  6. Carbon Nanotube Tape Vibrating Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibrating gyroscope includes a piezoelectric strip having length and width dimensions. The piezoelectric strip includes a piezoelectric material and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) substantially aligned and polled along the strip's length dimension. A spindle having an axis of rotation is coupled to the piezoelectric strip. The axis of rotation is parallel to the strip's width dimension. A first capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The first capacitance sensor is positioned at one of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from one of the strip's opposing faces. A second capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The second capacitance sensor is positioned at another of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from another of the strip's opposing faces. A voltage source applies an AC voltage to the piezoelectric strip.

  7. Modification of Carbon Nanotube Powder Microelectrode and Nitrite Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The properties of the carbon nanotube powder microelectrodes (denoted CNTPME) are remarkably altered by anodic pretreatment and preadsorption of mediators. It seems that anodic pretreatment leads the long and tangled carbon nanotubes to be partially cut shorter, resulting in more openings as shown by TEM. Besides, the anodic pretreatment may adjust the hydrophobicity of nanotubes to match with that of Os(bpy)32+. As a result, the real surface area and the ability of adsorbing mediator Os(bpy)32+ of the nanotubes are markedly increased so as to effectively catalyze NO2- reduction in acidic solution.

  8. Modification of Carbon Nanotube Powder Microelectrode and Nitrite Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PeiFangLIU; JunFuHU

    2002-01-01

    The properties of the carbon nanotube powder microelectroes (denoted CNTPME) are remarkably altered by anodic pretreatment and preadsorption of mediators. It seems that anodic pretreatment leads the long and tangled carbon nanotubes to be partially cut shorter, resulting in more openings as shown by TEM. Besides, the anodic pretreatment may adjust the hydrophobicity of nanotubes to match with that of Os(bpy)32+. As a result, the real surface area and the ability of adsorbing mediator Os(bpy)32+ of the nanotubes are markedly increased so as to effectively catalyze NO2- reduction in acidic solution.

  9. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  10. Carbon Nanotubes and Related Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsuk Mukhopadhyay

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists world wide. The small dimensions,strength, and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review, the structural aspects, the advantages and disadvantages of different for their procedures synthesis, the qualitative and quantitative estimation of carbon nanotubes by different analytical techniques, the present status on their applications as well as the current challenges faced in the application field, national, in particular DRDO, DMSRDE status, and interest in this field, have been discussed.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(4, pp.437-450, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1666

  11. Membrane-targeted self-assembling cyclic peptide nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Nuria; Ozores, H Lionel; Guerra, Arcadio; González-Freire, Eva; Fuertes, Alberto; Panciera, Michele; Priegue, Juan M; Outeiral, Juan; Montenegro, Javier; Garcia-Fandino, Rebeca; Amorin, Manuel; Granja, Juan R

    2014-01-01

    Peptide nanotubes are novel supramolecular nanobiomaterials that have a tubular structure. The stacking of cyclic components is one of the most promising strategies amongst the methods described in recent years for the preparation of nanotubes. This strategy allows precise control of the nanotube surface properties and the dimensions of the tube diameter. In addition, the incorporation of 3- aminocycloalkanecarboxylic acid residues in the nanotube-forming peptides allows control of the internal properties of the supramolecular tube. The research aimed at the application of membrane-interacting self-assembled cyclic peptide nanotubes (SCPNs) is summarized in this review. The cyclic peptides are designed to interact with phospholipid bilayers to induce nanotube formation. The properties and orientation of the nanotube can be tuned by tailoring the peptide sequence. Hydrophobic peptides form transmembrane pores with a hydrophilic orifice, the nature of which has been exploited to transport ions and small molecules efficiently. These synthetic ion channels are selective for alkali metal ions (Na(+), K(+) or Cs(+)) over divalent cations (Ca(2+)) or anions (Cl(-)). Unfortunately, selectivity was not achieved within the series of alkali metal ions, for which ion transport rates followed the diffusion rates in water. Amphipathic peptides form nanotubes that lie parallel to the membrane. Interestingly, nanotube formation takes place preferentially on the surface of bacterial membranes, thus making these materials suitable for the development of new antimicrobial agents.

  12. Vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes as electronic interconnects.

    OpenAIRE

    Gopee, Vimal C.

    2017-01-01

    The drive for miniaturisation of electronic circuits provides new materials challenges for the electronics industry. Indeed, the continued downscaling of transistor dimensions, described by Moore’s Law, has led to a race to find suitable replacements for current interconnect materials to replace copper. Carbon nanotubes have been studied as a suitable replacement for copper due to its superior electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. One of the advantages of using carbon nanotubes is th...

  13. Synthesis of anisotropic gold shell on carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minati, L., E-mail: luminati@fbk.eu [CNR-IFN, CSMFO Lab. (Italy); Torrengo, S. [FBK (Italy); Ischia, G. [University of Trento, Department of Industrial Engineering (Italy); Speranza, G. [FBK (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    This paper reports a simple procedure to synthesize gold-coated carbon nanotubes. The method involves the reduction of gold precursor on oxidized carbon nanotubes. UV–Visible absorption spectroscopy and electron microscopy were used to study the gold precursor reduction on the carbon nanotubes. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy analysis showed the formation of an irregular gold layer around the CNT surface. The resulting nanoparticles show an anisotropic shape with dimensions between 100 and 200 nm. This hybrid material displays an intense absorption in the near infrared range with an absorption maximum at 840 nm.

  14. Improved photocatalytic degradation of textile dye using titanium dioxide nanotubes formed over titanium wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Archana; Smith, York R; Subramanian, Vaidyanathan

    2009-05-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes formed by anodization over titanium wires show a significant improvement in photocatalytic activity compared to the nanotubes formed over foils. This is evident when the fractional conversion of a textile dye, methyl orange, increased from 19% over a foil to 40% over wires in the presence of nanotubes of identical dimensions illuminated over the same geometrical area. Higher degradation rates with Pt-TiO2 nanotubes over foils are matched by the Pt-free TiO2 nanotubes over the wires. The higher photocatalytic activity over the anodized wires can be attributed to the efficient capture of reflected and refracted light by the radially outward oriented TiO2 nanotubes formed over the circumference of the titanium wire. The formation of TiO2 nanotubes over wires can be considered as an effective alternate to improve photodegradation rates by avoiding expensive additives.

  15. Conformational changes of fibrinogen in dispersed carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park SJ

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sung Jean Park,1 Dongwoo Khang21College of Pharmacy, Gachon University, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon, South Korea; 2School of Nano and Advanced Materials Science Engineering and Center for PRC and RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, South KoreaAbstract: The conformational changes of plasma protein structures in response to carbon nanotubes are critical for determining the nanotoxicity and blood coagulation effects of carbon nanotubes. In this study, we identified that the functional intensity of carboxyl groups on carbon nanotubes, which correspond to the water dispersity or hydrophilicity of carbon nanotubes, can induce conformational changes in the fibrinogen domains. Also, elevation of carbon nanotube density can alter the secondary structures (ie, helices and beta sheets of fibrinogen. Furthermore, fibrinogen that had been in contact with the nanoparticle material demonstrated a different pattern of heat denaturation compared with free fibrinogen as a result of a variation in hydrophilicity and concentration of carbon nanotubes. Considering the importance of interactions between carbon nanotubes and plasma proteins in the drug delivery system, this study elucidated the correlation between nanoscale physiochemical material properties of carbon nanotubes and associated structural changes in fibrinogen.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, fibrinogen, nanotoxicity, conformational change, denaturation

  16. Differentiating Left- and Right-Handed Carbon Nanotubes by DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Geyou; Streit, Jason K; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Zheng, Ming

    2016-12-28

    New structural characteristics emerge when solid-state crystals are constructed in lower dimensions. This is exemplified by single-wall carbon nanotubes, which exhibit a degree of freedom in handedness and a multitude of helicities that give rise to three distinct types of electronic structures: metals, quasi-metals, and semiconductors. Here we report the use of intrinsically chiral single-stranded DNA to achieve simultaneous handedness and helicity control for all three types of nanotubes. We apply polymer aqueous two-phase systems to select special DNA-wrapped carbon nanotubes, each of which we argue must have an ordered DNA structure that binds to a nanotube of defined handedness and helicity and resembles a well-folded biomacromolecule with innate stereoselectivity. We have screened over 300 short single-stranded DNA sequences with palindrome symmetry, leading to the selection of more than 20 distinct carbon nanotube structures that have defined helicity and handedness and cover the entire chiral angle range and all three electronic types. The mechanism of handedness selection is illustrated by a DNA sequence that adopts two distinct folds on a pair of (6,5) nanotube enantiomers, rendering them large differences in fluorescence intensity and chemical reactivity. This result establishes a first example of functionally distinguishable left- and right-handed carbon nanotubes. Taken together, our work demonstrates highly efficient enantiomer differentiation by DNA and offers a first comprehensive solution to achieve simultaneous handedness and helicity control for all three electronic types of carbon nanotubes.

  17. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  18. Novel Bismuth Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏长荣; 李家明

    2002-01-01

    Theoretical investigations show that bismuth nanotubes are semiconductors for all diameters. For smalldiameter bismuth nanotubes, the band structures and bandgaps vary strongly with the strong hybridization effect. When the diameters are larger than 18 A, the bandgaps ofBi (n, n) and (n, 0) nanotubes approach 0.63 e V, corresponding to the bandgap of bismuth sheet at the Γ point. Thus, bismuth nanotubes are expected to be a potential semiconductor nanomaterial in future nanoelectronics.

  19. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  20. Biomimetic Nanotubes Based on Cyclodextrins for Ion-Channel Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamad-Hemouch, Hajar; Ramoul, Hassen; Abou Taha, Mohammad; Bacri, Laurent; Huin, Cécile; Przybylski, Cédric; Oukhaled, Abdelghani; Thiébot, Bénédicte; Patriarche, Gilles; Jarroux, Nathalie; Pelta, Juan

    2015-11-11

    Biomimetic membrane channels offer a great potential for fundamental studies and applications. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of short cyclodextrin nanotubes, their insertion into membranes, and cytotoxicity assay. Mass spectrometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to confirm the synthesis pathway leading to the formation of short nanotubes and to describe their structural parameters in terms of length, diameter, and number of cyclodextrins. Our results show the control of the number of cyclodextrins threaded on the polyrotaxane leading to nanotube synthesis. Structural parameters obtained by electron microscopy are consistent with the distribution of the number of cyclodextrins evaluated by mass spectrometry from the initial polymer distribution. An electrophysiological study at single molecule level demonstrates the ion channel formation into lipid bilayers, and the energy penalty for the entry of ions into the confined nanotube. In the presence of nanotubes, the cell physiology is not altered.

  1. Synthesis of self-ordered titanium oxide nanotubes by anodization of titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, A. Yaadhav; Sivabalan, S.; Subhachandhar, S.; Balakrishnan, M.; Narayanan, R.

    2012-07-01

    Self-ordered arrays of titanium oxide nanotubes were prepared by anodization of Ti in sodium sulphate solution containing sodium fluoride. The dimensions of the nanotubes (diameter: 20-100 nm and length: 1000-1500 nm) could be tuned by changing the synthesis parameters. The as-anodized nanotubes showed amorphous structure which upon annealing at 500°C in oxygen atmosphere turned crystalline, according to XRD analysis. The pit morphologies show that pit initiation occurs due to NaF content in the electrolyte and nanotube formation starts after pit growth terminates.

  2. On Universal Quantum Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Mkrtchyan, R L

    2016-01-01

    We derive universal expressions for quantum dimensions (universal characters) of some series of irreps of simple Lie algebras. This allows us to check Deligne's hypothesis on universal quantum dimensions for symmetric cube of adjoint representation.

  3. DIFFERENT DIMENSIONS OF TEAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhakar, Goparaju Purna

    2013-01-01

    Popularity of teams is growing in 21st Century. Organizations are getting their work done through different types of teams. Teams have proved that the collective performance is more than the sum of the individual performances. Thus, the teams have got different dimensions such as quantitative dimensions and qualitative dimensions. The Quantitative dimensions of teams such as team performance, team productivity, team innovation, team effectiveness, team efficiency, team decision making and tea...

  4. Strongly Gorenstein Flat Dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Xia ZHANG; Li Min WANG

    2011-01-01

    This article is concerned with the strongly Gorenstein flat dimensions of modules and rings.We show this dimension has nice properties when the ring is coherent,and extend the well-known Hilbert's syzygy theorem to the strongly Gorenstein flat dimensions of rings.Also,we investigate the strongly Gorenstein flat dimensions of direct products of rings and (almost)excellent extensions of rings.

  5. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Kalpana; Srivastava, Anchal; Srivastava, O N

    2005-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes play a fundamental role in the rapidly developing field of nanoscience and nanotechnology because of their unique properties and high potential for applications. In this article, the different synthesis methods of carbon nanotubes (both multi-walled and single-walled) are reviewed. From the industrial point of view, the chemical vapor deposition method has shown advantages over laser vaporization and electric arc discharge methods. This article also presents recent work in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes with ordered architectures. Special carbon nanotube configurations, such as nanocoils, nanohorns, bamboo-shaped and carbon cylinder made up from carbon nanotubes are also discussed.

  6. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haibing; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  7. Carbon nanotube inner phase chemistry: the Cl- exchange SN2 reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halls, Mathew D; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2005-10-01

    Density functional calculations have been carried out to investigate the nature of the inner phase of a (6,6) carbon nanotube, using the Cl(-) exchange S(N)2 reaction as an indicator. Inside the carbon nanotube the classical barrier height increases by 6.6 kcal/mol due to the nanotube polarizability. This suggests that the inner phase environment can be considered a form of solid solvation, offering the possibility of obtaining altered guest properties and reactivity through dielectric stabilization.

  8. Synthesis of cadmium chalcogenide nanotubes at room temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Jun

    2012-10-01

    Cadmium chalcogenide (CdE, E=S, Se, Te) polycrystalline nanotubes have been synthesized from precursor of CdS/cadmium thiolate complex at room temperature. The precursor was hydrothermally synthesized at 180 °C using thioglycolic acid (TGA) and cadmium acetate as starting materials. The transformation from the rod-like precursor of CdS/cadmium thiolate complex to CdS, CdSe and CdTe nanotubes were performed under constant stirring at room temperature in aqueous solution containing S 2-, Se 2- and Te 2-, respectively. The nanotube diameter can be controlled from 150 to 400 nm related to the dimension of templates. The XRD patterns show the cadmium chalcogenide nanotubes all corresponding to face-centered cubic structure. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors.

  10. Recent Advances in Directed Assembly of Nanowires or Nanotub es

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Liu; Zhizheng Wu; Woon Ming Lau; Jun Yang

    2012-01-01

    Nanowires and nanotubes of diverse material compositions, properties and/or functions have been produced or fabricated through various bottom-up or top-down approaches. These nanowires or nanotubes have also been utilized as potential building blocks for functional nanodevices. The key for the integration of those nanowire or nanotube based devices is to assemble these one dimensional nanomaterials to specific locations using techniques that are highly controllable and scalable. Ideally such techniques should enable assembly of highly uniform nanowire/nanotube arrays with precise control of density, location, dimension or even ma-terial types of nanowires/nanotubes. Numerous assembly techniques are being developed that can quickly align and assemble large quantities of one type or multiple types of nanowires through parallel processes, in-cluding flow-assisted alignment, Langmuir-Blodgett assembly, bubble-blown technique, electric/magnetic- field directed assembly, contact/roll printing, knocking-down, etc.. With these assembling techniques, applications of nanowire/nanotube based devices such as flexible electronics and sensors have been demonstrated. This paper delivers an overall review of directed nanowire/nanotube assembling approaches and analyzes advantages and limitations of each method. The future research directions have also been discussed.

  11. Templated electrodeposition of functional nanostructures: nanowires, nanotubes and nanocubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maijenburg, Albert Wouter

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is entitled “Templated electrodeposition of functional nanostructures: nanowires, nanotubes and nanocubes”. Templated electrodeposition is the synthesis technique that was used throughout this thesis, and it comprises the use of a template with specific shape and dimensions for the forma

  12. Titania nanotube arrays: Interfaces for implantable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Barbara Symie

    For the 8--10% of Americans (20--25 million people) that have implanted biomedical devices, biomaterial failure and the need for revision surgery are critical concerns. The major causes for failure in implantable biomedical devices promoting a need for re-implantation and revision surgery include thrombosis, post-operative infection, immune driven fibrosis and biomechanical failure. The successful integration of long-term implantable devices is highly dependent on the early events of tissue/biomaterial interaction, promoting either implant rejection or a wound healing response (extracellular matrix production and vasculature). Favorable interactions between the implant surface and the respective tissue are critical for the long-term success of any implantable device. Recent studies have shown that material surfaces which mimic the natural physiological hierarchy of in vivo tissue may provide a possible solution for enhancing biomaterial integration, thus preventing infection and biomaterial rejection. Titania nanotube arrays, fabricated using a simple anodization technique, provide a template capable of promoting altered cellular functionality at a hierarchy similar to that of natural tissue. This work focuses on the fabrication of immobilized, vertically oriented and highly uniform titania nanotube arrays to determine how this specific nano-architecture affects skin cell functionality, hemocompatibility, thrombogenicity and the immune response. The results in this work identify enhanced dermal matrix production, altered hemocompatibility, reduced thrombogenicity and a deterred immune response on titania nanotube arrays. This evidences promising implications with respect to the use of titania nanotube arrays as beneficial interfaces for the successful implantation of biomedical devices.

  13. Hollow dimension of modules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we are interested in the following general question: Given a module Mwhich has finite hollow dimension and which has a finite collection of submodules Ki (1≤i≤n) such that M=K1+... +Kn, can we find an expression for the hollow dimension of Min terms of hollow dimensions of modules built up in some way from K1 Kn? We prove the following theorem:Let Mbe an amply supplemented module having finite hollow dimension and let Ki (1≤i≤n) be a finite collection of submodules of Msuch that M=K1+...+Kn. Then the hollow dimension h(M) of Mis the sum of the hollow dimensions of Ki (1≤i≤n) ifand only if Ki is a supplement of K1+...+Ki-1+Ki+1+...+Kn in Mfor each 1≤i≤n.

  14. Nanotubes and nanowires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C N R Rao; A Govindaraj

    2001-10-01

    Synthesis and characterization of nanotubes and nanowires constitute an important part of nanoscience since these materials are essential bui lding units for several devices. We have prepared aligned carbon nanotube bundles and Y-junction nanotubes by the pyrolysis of appropriate organic precursors. The aligned bundles are useful for field emission display while the Y-junction nanotubes are likely to be useful as nanochips since they exhibit diode properties at the junction. By making use of carbon nanotubes, nanowires of metals, metal oxides and GaN have be en obt a ined. Both the oxide and GaN nanowires are single crystalline. Gold nanowires exhibit plasmon bands varying markedly with the aspect ratio. GaN nanowires show excellent photoluminescence characteristics. It has been possible to synthesise nanotubes and nanowires of metal chalcogenides by employing different strategies.

  15. Dimension of Physical Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quznetsov G.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Each vector of state has its own corresponing element of the CayleyDickson algebra. Properties of a state vector require that this algebra was a normalized division algebra. By the Hurwitz and Frobenius theorems maximal dimension of s uch algebra is 8. Con- sequently, a dimension of corresponding complex state vectors is 4, and a dimension of the Clifford set elements is 4 × 4. Such set contains 5 matrices — among them — 3-diagonal. Hence, a dimension of the dot events space is equal to 3 + 1.

  16. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube (CNT Composite Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Losic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are attractive approach for designing of new membranes for advanced molecular separation because of their unique transport properties and ability to mimic biological protein channels. In this work the synthetic approach for fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs composite membranes is presented. The method is based on growth of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT using chemical vapour deposition (CVD on the template of nanoporous alumina (PA membranes. The influence of experimental conditions including carbon precursor, temperature, deposition time, and PA template on CNT growth process and quality of fabricated membranes was investigated. The synthesis of CNT/PA composites with controllable nanotube dimensions such as diameters (30–150 nm, and thickness (5–100 µm, was demonstrated. The chemical composition and morphological characteristics of fabricated CNT/PA composite membranes were investigated by various characterisation techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and x-ray diffraction (XRD. Transport properties of prepared membranes were explored by diffusion of dye (Rose Bengal used as model of hydrophilic transport molecule.

  17. THE DISTRIBUTIONAL DIMENSION OF FRACTALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the book [1] H.Triebel introduces the distributional dimension of fractals in and distributional dimension, respectively. Thus we might say that the distributional dimension is an analytical definition for Hausdorff dimension. Therefore we can study Hausdorff dimension through the distributional dimension analytically.By discussing the distributional dimension, this paper intends to set up a criterion for estimating the upper and lower bounds of Hausdorff dimension analytically. Examples illustrating the criterion are included in the end.

  18. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex

    2008-05-13

    Some of the most important potential applications of carbon nanotubes are related to their mechanical properties. Stiff sp2 bonds result in a Young's modulus close to that of diamond, while the relatively weak van der Waals interaction between the graphitic shells acts as a form of lubrication. Previous characterization of the mechanical properties of nanotubes includes a rich variety of experiments involving mechanical deformation of nanotubes using scanning probe microscopes. These results have led to promising prototypes of nanoelectromechanical devices such as high-performance nanomotors, switches and oscillators based on carbon nanotubes.

  19. Pure carbon nanoscale devices: Nanotube heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chico, L.; Crespi, V.H.; Benedict, L.X.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)]|[Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Introduction of pentagon-heptagon pair defects into the hexagonal network of a single carbon nanotube can change the helicity of the tube and alter its electronic structure. Using a tight-binding method to calculate the electronic structure of such systems we show that they behave as nanoscale metal/semiconductor or semiconductor/semiconductor junctions. These junctions could be the building blocks of nanoscale electronic devices made entirely of carbon. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Gorenstein homological dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Henrik Granau

    2004-01-01

    In basic homological algebra, the projective, injective and 2at dimensions of modules play an important and fundamental role. In this paper, the closely related Gorenstein projective, Gorenstein injective and Gorenstein 2at dimensions are studied. There is a variety of nice results about Gorenstein...

  1. Gorenstein homological dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Henrik Granau

    2004-01-01

    In basic homological algebra, the projective, injective and 2at dimensions of modules play an important and fundamental role. In this paper, the closely related Gorenstein projective, Gorenstein injective and Gorenstein 2at dimensions are studied. There is a variety of nice results about Gorenste...

  2. User Experience Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Jantzen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The present study develops a set of 10 dimensions based on a systematic understanding of the concept of experience as a holistic psychological. Seven of these are derived from a psychological conception of what experiencing and experiences are. Three supplementary dimensions spring from the obser...

  3. Dimensions of Creative Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo; Ball, Linden J.

    2016-01-01

    continue. Each dimension was associated with a specific underpinning ‘logic’ determining how these dimensions were evaluated in practice. Our analysis clarified how these dimensions triggered reasoning strategies such as running mental simulations or making design suggestions, ranging from ‘go......We examined evaluative reasoning taking place during expert ‘design critiques’. We focused on key dimensions of creative evaluation (originality, functionality and aesthetics) and ways in which these dimensions impact reasoning strategies and suggestions offered by experts for how the student could....../kill’ decisions to loose recommendations to continue without directional steer. The findings advance our theoretical understanding of evaluation behaviour in design and alert practicing design evaluators to the nature and consequences of their critical appraisals....

  4. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Jones, K.M.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen burns pollution-free and may be produced from renewable energy resources. It is therefore an ideal candidate to replace fossil fuels as an energy carrier. However, the lack of a convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage system greatly impedes the wide-scale use of hydrogen in both domestic and international markets. Although several hydrogen storage options exist, no approach satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. A material consisting exclusively of micropores with molecular dimensions could simultaneously meet all of the requirements for transportation use if the interaction energy for hydrogen was sufficiently strong to cause hydrogen adsorption at ambient temperatures. Small diameter ({approx}1 mm) carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are elongated micropores of molecular dimensions, and materials composed predominantly of SWNTs may prove to be the ideal adsorbent for ambient temperature storage of hydrogen. Last year the authors reported that hydrogen could be adsorbed on arc-generated soots containing 12{Angstrom} diameter nanotubes at temperatures in excess of 285K. In this past year they have learned that such adsorption does not occur on activated carbon materials, and that the cobalt nanoparticles present in their arc-generated soots are not responsible for the hydrogen which is stable at 285 K. These results indicate that enhanced adsorption forces within the internal cavities of the SWNTs are active in stabilizing hydrogen at elevated temperatures. This enhanced stability could lead to effective hydrogen storage under ambient temperature conditions. In the past year the authors have also demonstrated that single-wall carbon nanotubes in arc-generated soots may be selectively opened by oxidation in H{sub 2}O resulting in improved hydrogen adsorption, and they have estimated experimentally that the amount of hydrogen stored is {approximately}10% of the nanotube weight.

  5. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yiying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-04-08

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  6. Organic modification of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The organic modification of carbon nanotubes is a novel research field being developed recently. In this article, the history and newest progress of organic modification of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from two aspects:organic covalent modification and organic noncovalent modification of carbon nanotubes. The preparation and properties of organic modified carbon nanotubes are discussed in detail. In addition, the prospective development of organic modification of carbon nanotubes is suggested.

  7. The fourth dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Rucker, Rudy

    2014-01-01

    ""This is an invigorating book, a short but spirited slalom for the mind."" - Timothy Ferris, The New York Times Book Review ""Highly readable. One is reminded of the breadth and depth of Hofstadter's Gödel, Escher, Bach."" - Science""Anyone with even a minimal interest in mathematics and fantasy will find The Fourth Dimension informative and mind-dazzling... [Rucker] plunges into spaces above three with a zest and energy that is breathtaking."" - Martin Gardner ""Those who think the fourth dimension is nothing but time should be encouraged to read The Fourth Dimension, along with anyone else

  8. Dimension control of Superradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Tyler; Hui Deng Collaboration; Barry C. Sanders Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We develop a theory for quantum dipole-dipole coupling when the electromagnetic fields are confined to an open line, open plane, or open space, commensurate with experimental capability for collective atomic effects subject to dimensional confinement. Our mathematical model naturally interpolates for all real dimension between one dimension for the line to three dimensions for open space. We show how superradiant emission can be controlled by dimensional confinement, including near-field and dipole-orientation effects, and we propose a two-dimensional confinement experiment to test our theory's efficacy. University of Michigan.

  9. DIFFERENT DIMENSIONS OF TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goparaju Purna SUDHAKAR

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Popularity ofteams is growing in 21st Century. Organizations are getting theirwork done through different types of teams. Teams have proved that thecollective performance is more than the sum of the individual performances.Thus, the teams have got different dimensions such as quantitative dimensionsand qualitative dimensions. The Quantitative dimensions of teams such as teamperformance, team productivity, team innovation, team effectiveness, teamefficiency, team decision making and team conflicts and Qualitative dimensionsof teams such as team communication, team coordination, team cooperation, teamcohesion, team climate, team creativity, team leadership and team conflictshave been discussed in this article.

  10. Elaboration of nanostructured biointerfaces with tunable degree of coverage by protein nanotubes using electrophoretic deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaskar, Deepak M; Poleunis, Claude; Dupont-Gillain, Christine; Demoustier-Champagne, Sophie

    2011-11-14

    This study shows that electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is a fast and efficient technique for producing protein nanotube-based biointerfaces. Well-shaped collagen-based nanotubes of controlled dimensions are synthesized by a template method combined with the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique. Separation of nanotubes from the template material and collection of nanotubes on ITO glass carried out by EPD leads to a fairly homogeneous distribution of protein nanotubes at the support surface. Biointerfaces with different and tunable densities of protein nanotubes are obtained by changing either the applied voltage, solution concentration of nanotubes, or deposition time. Moreover, it is proved that the collected nanotubes are template-free and keep their biofunctional outermost layer after EPD. A preliminary study of the behavior of preosteoblasts cells with the elaborated biointerfaces indicates a specific interaction of cells with the nanotubes through filopodia. This contribution paves the way to the easy preparation of a large variety of useful nanostructured collagen and other protein-based interfaces for controlling cell-surface interactions in diverse biomaterials applications.

  11. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, A.C.; Parilla, P.A.; Jones, K.M.; Riker, G.; Heben, M.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are essentially elongated pores of molecular dimensions and are capable of adsorbing hydrogen at relatively high temperatures and low pressures. This behavior is unique to these materials and indicates that SWNTs are the ideal building block for constructing safe, efficient, and high energy density adsorbents for hydrogen storage applications. In past work the authors developed methods for preparing and opening SWNTs, discovered the unique adsorption properties of these new materials, confirmed that hydrogen is stabilized by physical rather than chemical interactions, measured the strength of interaction to be {approximately} 5 times higher than for adsorption on planar graphite, and performed infrared absorption spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the surface terminations before, during, and after oxidation. This year the authors have made significant advances in synthesis and characterization of SWNT materials so that they can now prepare gram quantities of high-purity SWNT samples and measure and control the diameter distribution of the tubes by varying key parameters during synthesis. They have also developed methods which purify nanotubes and cut nanotubes into shorter segments. These capabilities provide a means for opening the tubes which were unreactive to the oxidation methods that successfully opened tubes, and offer a path towards organizing nanotube segments to enable high volumetric hydrogen storage densities. They also performed temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy on high purity carbon nanotube material obtained from collaborator Prof. Patrick Bernier and finished construction of a high precision Seivert`s apparatus which will allow the hydrogen pressure-temperature-composition phase diagrams to be evaluated for SWNT materials.

  12. Biochips Containing Arrays of Carbon-Nanotube Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Meyyappan, M.; Koehne, Jessica; Cassell, Alan; Chen, Hua

    2008-01-01

    Biochips containing arrays of nanoelectrodes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are being developed as means of ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of specific deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) biomarkers for purposes of medical diagnosis and bioenvironmental monitoring. In mass production, these biochips could be relatively inexpensive (hence, disposable). These biochips would be integrated with computer-controlled microfluidic and microelectronic devices in automated hand-held and bench-top instruments that could be used to perform rapid in vitro genetic analyses with simplified preparation of samples. Carbon nanotubes are attractive for use as nanoelectrodes for detection of biomolecules because of their nanoscale dimensions and their chemical properties.

  13. EF & den sociale dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Jesper Jørgen; Madsen, Jørgen Steen; Jensen, Carsten Strøby

    En analyse af EU's institutioner og udviklingen af den sociale dimension i forbindelse med etbaleringen af det indre marked med særlig henblik på effekterne på det danske aftalesystem.......En analyse af EU's institutioner og udviklingen af den sociale dimension i forbindelse med etbaleringen af det indre marked med særlig henblik på effekterne på det danske aftalesystem....

  14. A variational principle for the Hausdorff dimension of fractal sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars; Cutler, Colleen D.

    1994-01-01

    Matematik, fraktal (fractal), Hausdorff dimension, Renyi dimension, pakke dimension (packing dimension)......Matematik, fraktal (fractal), Hausdorff dimension, Renyi dimension, pakke dimension (packing dimension)...

  15. Synthesis of Platinum Nanotubes and Nanorings via Simultaneous Metal Alloying and Etching

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Zhiqi

    2016-04-19

    Metallic nanotubes represent a class of hollow nanostructures with unique catalytic properties. However, the wet-chemical synthesis of metallic nanotubes remains a substantial challenge, especially for those with dimensions below 50 nm. This communication describes a simultaneous alloying-etching strategy for the synthesis of Pt nanotubes with open ends by selective etching Au core from coaxial Au/Pt nanorods. This approach can be extended for the preparation of Pt nanorings when Saturn-like Au core/Pt shell nanoparticles are used. The diameter and wall thickness of both nanotubes and nanorings can be readily controlled in the range of 14-37 nm and 2-32 nm, respectively. We further demonstrated that the nanotubes with ultrathin side walls showed superior catalytic performance in oxygen reduction reaction. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  16. Evaluation of nanostructural, mechanical, and biological properties of collagen-nanotube composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei; Twomey, John; Guo, Dongjie; Madhavan, Krishna; Li, Min

    2010-06-01

    Collagen I is an essential structural and mechanical building block of various tissues, and it is often used as tissue-engineering scaffolds. However, collagen-based constructs reconstituted in vitro often lacks robust fiber structure, mechanical stability, and molecule binding capability. To enhance these performances, the present study developed 3-D collagen-nanotube composite constructs with two types of functionalized carbon nanotubes, carboxylated nanotubes and covalently functionalized nanotubes (CFNTs). The influences of nanotube functionalization and loading concentration on the collagen fiber structure, mechanical property, biocompatibility, and molecule binding were examined. Results revealed that surface modification and loading concentration of nanotubes determined the interactions between nanotubes and collagen fibrils, thus altering the structure and property of nanotube-collagen composites. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy revealed that the incorporation of CFNT in collagen-based constructs was an effective means of restructuring collagen fibrils because CFNT strongly bound to collagen molecules inducing the formation of larger fibril bundles. However, increased nanotube loading concentration caused the formation of denser fibril network and larger aggregates. Static stress-strain tests under compression showed that the addition of nanotube into collagen-based constructs did not significantly increase static compressive moduli. Creep/recovery testing under compression revealed that CFNT-collagen constructs showed improved mechanical stability under continuous loading. Testing with endothelial cells showed that biocompatibility was highly dependent on nanotube loading concentration. At a low loading level, CFNT-collagen showed higher endothelial coverage than the other tested constructs or materials. Additionally, CFNT-collagen showed capability of binding to other biomolecules to enhance the construct functionality. In conclusion

  17. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardharajula S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sandhya Vardharajula,1 Sk Z Ali,2 Pooja M Tiwari,1 Erdal Eroğlu,1 Komal Vig,1 Vida A Dennis,1 Shree R Singh11Center for NanoBiotechnology and Life Sciences Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USA; 2Department of Microbiology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, IndiaAbstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, cytotoxicity, functionalization, biomedical applications

  18. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  19. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alex K.; Jensen, Kenneth J.; Girit, Caglar; Mickelson, William E.; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2011-03-29

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  20. Novel Silicon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Novel silicon nanotubes with inner-diameter of 60-80 nm was prepared using hydrogen-added dechlorination of SiCl4 followed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a NixMgyO catalyst. The TEM observation showed that the suitable reaction temperature is 973 K for the formation of silicon nanotubes. Most of silicon nanotubes have one open end and some have two closed ends. The shape ofnanoscale silicon, however, is a micro-crystal type at 873 K, a rod or needle type at 993 K and an onion-type at 1023 K, respectively.

  1. Nanotube resonator devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  2. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.

  3. Neurocognitve Dimensions of Self-consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Grossi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-consciousness is considered in a framework comprising four dimensions which are theoretically defined and supported by clinical neuropsychological evidence. Self-monitoring is defined as the ability to reflect on one’s own behaviour, with supporting evidence for deficits in this capacity noted in anosognosia syndrome. Self-feeling is defined as the capacity to feel all sensations related to one’s own body (interoception and exteroception, with supporting evidence from deficiencies occurring in alexithymia, psychosomatic states and Cotard’s delusion. Identity refers to the capacity to recognize an object as identical to oneself, based on autobiographic memory; pathological conditions related to this dimension include delusions of identity and the Zelig syndrome. Ownership is the capacity to perceive the status of ones’ own body, and is clinically altered in somatoparaphrenia. All four dimensions are related to specific brain networks.

  4. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Tortorich

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  5. Multifunctional composites using reinforced laminae with carbon-nanotube forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veedu, Vinod P.; Cao, Anyuan; Li, Xuesong; Ma, Kougen; Soldano, Caterina; Kar, Swastik; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2006-06-01

    Traditional fibre-reinforced composite materials with excellent in-plane properties fare poorly when out-of-plane through-thickness properties are important. Composite architectures with fibres designed orthogonal to the two-dimensional (2D) layout in traditional composites could alleviate this weakness in the transverse direction, but all of the efforts so far have only produced limited success. Here, we unveil an approach to the 3D composite challenge, without altering the 2D stack design, on the basis of the concept of interlaminar carbon-nanotube forests that would provide enhanced multifunctional properties along the thickness direction. The carbon-nanotube forests allow the fastening of adjacent plies in the 3D composite. We grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the surface of micro-fibre fabric cloth layouts, normal to the fibre lengths, resulting in a 3D effect between plies under loading. These nanotube-coated fabric cloths serve as building blocks for the multilayered 3D composites, with the nanotube forests providing much-needed interlaminar strength and toughness under various loading conditions. For the fabricated 3D composites with nanotube forests, we demonstrate remarkable improvements in the interlaminar fracture toughness, hardness, delamination resistance, in-plane mechanical properties, damping, thermoelastic behaviour, and thermal and electrical conductivities making these structures truly multifunctional.

  6. Selective Attention to Perceptual Dimensions and Switching between Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiran, Nachshon; Dimov, Eduard; Ganel, Tzvi

    2013-01-01

    In the present experiments, the question being addressed was whether switching attention between perceptual dimensions and selective attention to dimensions are processes that compete over a common resource? Attention to perceptual dimensions is usually studied by requiring participants to ignore a never-relevant dimension. Selection failure…

  7. Polymer composites containing nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bley, Richard A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to polymer composite materials containing carbon nanotubes, particularly to those containing singled-walled nanotubes. The invention provides a polymer composite comprising one or more base polymers, one or more functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers and carbon nanotubes. The invention also relates to functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers, particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having side chain functionalization, and more particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having olefin side chains and alkyl epoxy side chains. The invention further relates to methods of making polymer composites comprising carbon nanotubes.

  8. Cultural dimensions and innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Strychalska-Rudzewicz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of culture’s dimensions on national innovation index. The results of Pearson correlation coefficient between culture dimensions and the Global Innovation Index (GII are very similar to the results obtained in the case of Summary Innovation Index (SII in European countries. The strong negative correlation was observed in the case of power distance and uncertainty avoidance whereas individualism has a positive effect on innovation index. The results suggest that low power distance and uncertainty-accepting countries may be more innovative than high power distance and uncertainty-avoiding societies.

  9. Titanium dioxide nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, Ioan, E-mail: roman@metav-cd.ro [S.C. METAV-Research and Development S.R.L., Bucharest, 31C. A. Rosetti, 020011 (Romania); Trusca, Roxana Doina; Soare, Maria-Laura [S.C. METAV-Research and Development S.R.L., Bucharest, 31C. A. Rosetti, 020011 (Romania); Fratila, Corneliu [Research and Development National Institute for Nonferrous and Rare Metals, Pantelimon, 102 Biruintei, 077145 (Romania); Krasicka-Cydzik, Elzbieta [University of Zielona Gora, Department of Biomedical Engineering Division, 9 Licealna, 65-417 (Poland); Stan, Miruna-Silvia; Dinischiotu, Anca [University of Bucharest, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 36-46 Mihail Kogalniceanu, 050107 (Romania)

    2014-04-01

    Titania nanotubes (TNTs) were prepared by anodization on different substrates (titanium, Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb alloys) in ethylene glycol and glycerol. The influence of the applied potential and processing time on the nanotube diameter and length is analyzed. The as-formed nanotube layers are amorphous but they become crystalline when subjected to subsequent thermal treatment in air at 550 °C; TNT layers grown on titanium and Ti6Al4V alloy substrates consist of anatase and rutile, while those grown on Ti6Al7Nb alloy consist only of anatase. The nanotube layers grown on Ti6Al7Nb alloy are less homogeneous, with supplementary islands of smaller diameter nanotubes, spread across the surface. Better adhesion and proliferation of osteoblasts was found for the nanotubes grown on all three substrates by comparison to an unprocessed titanium plate. The sensitivity towards bovine alkaline phosphatase was investigated mainly by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in relation to the crystallinity, the diameter and the nature of the anodization electrolyte of the TNT/Ti samples. The measuring capacity of the annealed nanotubes of 50 nm diameter grown in glycerol was demonstrated and the corresponding calibration curve was built for the concentration range of 0.005–0.1 mg/mL. - Highlights: • Titania nanotubes (TNTs) on Ti, Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb substrates were prepared. • Quantitative dependences of anodization conditions on TNT features were established. • Morphology and electrochemical tests revealed inhomogeneity of TNT/Ti6Al7Nb films. • Particular characteristics of TNT films induce electrochemical sensitivity to ALP. • Annealed TNT/Ti impedimetric sensitivity towards ALP was demonstrated and quantified.

  10. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  11. Quantum Physics in One Dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, David [University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-14

    To a casual ostrich the world of quantum physics in one dimension may sound a little one-dimensional, suitable perhaps for those with an unhealthy obsession for the esoteric. Nothing of course could be further from the truth. The field is remarkably rich and broad, and for more than fifty years has thrown up innumerable challenges. Theorists, realising that the role of interactions in 1D is special and that well known paradigms of higher dimensions (Fermi liquid theory for example) no longer apply, took up the challenge of developing new concepts and techniques to understand the undoubted peculiarities of one-dimensional systems. And experimentalists have succeeded in turning pipe dreams into reality, producing an impressive and ever increasing array of experimental realizations of 1D systems, from the molecular to the mesoscopic - spin and ladder compounds, organic superconductors, carbon nanotubes, quantum wires, Josephson junction arrays and so on. Many books on the theory of one-dimensional systems are however written by experts for experts, and tend as such to leave the non-specialist a touch bewildered. This is understandable on both fronts, for the underlying theoretical techniques are unquestionably sophisticated and not usually part of standard courses in many-body theory. A brave author it is then who aims to produce a well rounded, if necessarily partial, overview of quantum physics in one dimension, accessible to a beginner yet taking them to the edge of current research, and providing en route a thorough grounding in the fundamental ideas, basic methods and essential phenomenology of the field. It is of course the brave who succeed in this world, and Thierry Giamarchi does just that with this excellent book, written by an expert for the uninitiated. Aimed in particular at graduate students in theoretical condensed matter physics, and assuming little theoretical background on the part of the reader (well just a little), Giamarchi writes in a

  12. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Nathaniel P.; Agrawal, Aneil F.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health. PMID:27015430

  13. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel P Sharp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health.

  14. Unravelling the mechanisms behind mixed catalysts for the high yield production of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetali, Sailaja; Zaka, Mujtaba; Schönfelder, Ronny; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Börrnert, Felix; Ibrahim, Imad; Lin, Jarrn H; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Warner, Jamie H; Büchner, Bernd; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2009-12-22

    The use of mixed catalysts for the high-yield production of single-walled carbon nanotubes is well-known. The mechanisms behind the improved yield are poorly understood. In this study, we systematically explore different catalyst combinations from Ni, Co, and Mo for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes via laser evaporation. Our findings reveal that the mixing of catalysts alters the catalyst cluster size distribution, maximizing the clusters' potential to form a hemispherical cap at nucleation and, hence, form a single-walled carbon nanotube. This process significantly improves the single-walled carbon nanotube yields.

  15. The Regional Dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskjær, Mikkel Fugl

    2013-01-01

    is largely dependent on regional media systems, yet the role this regional dimension plays has been largely overlooked. This article presents a comparative study of climate-change coverage in three geo-cultural regions, The Middle East, Scandinavia, and North America, and explores the link between global...

  16. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2009-06-09

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  17. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  18. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or semiconduct

  19. Majorana fermion wavefunctions in carbon nanotubes and carbynes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, N. R.; Aporoski, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    Electron properties of semiconducting zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be described by two uncoupled Dirac equations of dimension (1+1) for the particle with nonzero mass. The solutions of these equations are two charge-neutral Majorana fields. An analogous equation is obtained for the carbon chains. We use the approach, wherein wavefunction of charged particle is represented as the production of a rapidly oscillating exponent and the slowly varying function amplitude depending on the longitudinal coordinate.

  20. Cosmology With Extra Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Martín, J

    2005-01-01

    We review several properties of models that include extra dimensions, focusing on aspects related to cosmology and particle physics phenomenology. The properties of effective four dimensional inflationary geometry are studied in two distinct frameworks: (i) in Kaluza- Klein (KK) compactifications and (ii) in braneworld scenarios. From numerical simulations we find that inflationary braneworlds are unstable if the scale of inflation is too large in comparison with the stabilization scale of the interbrane distance. The analysis of perturbations confirms the existence of a tachyon associated with the volume modulus of the extra dimensions both in braneworlds and KK compactifications. With the numerical program BRANECODE non- perturbative properties of braneworlds are studied. We fully understand the non-perturbative consequences of this instability. Generic attractors are (i) an increase of the interbrane distance and the formation of a naked singularity, (ii) the brane colli...

  1. Cultural dimensions of learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyford, Glen A.

    1990-06-01

    How, what, when and where we learn is frequently discussed, as are content versus process, or right brain versus left brain learning. What is usually missing is the cultural dimension. This is not an easy concept to define, but various aspects can be identified. The World Decade for Cultural Development emphasizes the need for a counterbalance to a quantitative, economic approach. In the last century poets also warned against brutalizing materialism, and Sorokin and others have described culture more recently in terms of cohesive basic values expressed through aesthetics and institutions. Bloom's taxonomy incorporates the category of affective learning, which internalizes values. If cultural learning goes beyond knowledge acquisition, perhaps the surest way of understanding the cultural dimension of learning is to examine the aesthetic experience. This can use myths, metaphors and symbols, and to teach and learn by using these can help to unlock the human potential for vision and creativity.

  2. Dimension of linear models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høskuldsson, Agnar

    1996-01-01

    of these criteria are widely used ones, while the remaining four are ones derived from the H-principle of mathematical modeling. Many examples from practice show that the criteria derived from the H-principle function better than the known and popular criteria for the number of components. We shall briefly review...... the basic problems in determining the dimension of linear models. Then each of the eight measures are treated. The results are illustrated by examples....

  3. Soldering of Nanotubes onto Microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Mølhave, Kristian; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina;

    2003-01-01

    Suspended bridges of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes were fabricated inside a scanning electron microscope by soldering the nanotube onto microelectrodes with highly conducting gold-carbon material. By the decomposition of organometallic vapor with the electron beam, metal-containing solder...... bonds were formed at the intersection of the nanotube and the electrodes. Current-voltage curves indicated metallic conduction of the nanotubes, with resistances in the range of 9-29 kOmega. Bridges made entirely of the soldering material exhibited resistances on the order of 100 Omega, and the solder...... bonds were consistently found to be mechanically stronger than the carbon nanotubes....

  4. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  6. Carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui; Li, Jianyi; Feng, Yuanping

    2010-01-05

    As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  7. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  8. Biophotofuel cell anode containing self-organized titanium dioxide nanotube array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Yong X., E-mail: yong.gan@utoledo.edu [Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, 2801 W Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Gan, Bo J. [Ottawa Hills High School, 2532 Evergreen Road, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Su Lusheng [Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, 2801 W Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: {center_dot} A photoactive anode containing highly ordered TiO{sub 2} nanotube array was made and the formation mechanism of self-organized TiO{sub 2} nanotube array on Ti was revealed. {center_dot} Effect of electrolyte concentration and voltage on the size distribution of the nanotubes was investigated. {center_dot} Self-organized TiO{sub 2} nanotube array anode possesses good photo-catalytic behavior of biomass decomposition under ultraviolet (UV) radiation. {center_dot} The fuel cell generates electricity and hydrogen via photoelectrochemical decomposition of ethanol, apple vinegar, sugar and tissue paper. - Abstract: We made a biophotofuel cell consisting of a titanium dioxide nanotube array photosensitive anode for biomass decomposition, and a low-hydrogen overpotential metal, Pt, as the cathode for hydrogen production. The titanium dioxide nanotubes (TiO{sub 2} NTs) were prepared via electrochemical oxidation of pure Ti in NaF solutions. Scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the morphology of the nanotubes. The average diameter, wall thickness and length of the as-prepared TiO{sub 2} NTs were 88 {+-} 16 nm, 10 {+-} 2 nm and 491 {+-} 56 nm, respectively. Such dimensions are affected by the NaF concentration and the applied voltage during processing. Higher NaF concentrations result in the formation of longer and thicker nanotubes. The higher the voltage is, the thicker the nanotubes. The photosensitive anode made from the highly ordered TiO{sub 2} NTs has good photo-catalytic property, as can be seen from the test results of ethanol, apple vinegar, sugar and tissue paper decomposition under ultraviolet (UV) radiation. It is concluded that the biophotofuel cell with the TiO{sub 2} nanotube photoanode and a Pt cathode can generate electricity, hydrogen and clean water depending on the pH value and the oxygen presence in the solutions.

  9. Public Value Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, lotte bøgh; Beck Jørgensen, Torben; Kjeldsen, Anne-Mette

    2012-01-01

    Further integration of the public value literature with other strands of literature within Public Administration necessitates a more specific classification of public values. This paper applies a typology linked to organizational design principles, because this is useful for empirical public...... administration studies. Based on an existing typology of modes of governance, we develop a classification and test it empirically, using survey data from a study of the values of 501 public managers. We distinguish between seven value dimensions (the public at large, rule abidance, societal interests, budget...... the integration between the public value literature and other parts of the Public Administration discipline....

  10. Non-covalent interactions between carbon nanotubes and conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncel, Dönüs

    2011-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are interest to many different disciplines including chemistry, physics, biology, material science and engineering because of their unique properties and potential applications in various areas spanning from optoelectronics to biotechnology. However, one of the drawbacks associated with these materials is their insolubility which limits their wide accessibility for many applications. Various approaches have been adopted to circumvent this problem including modification of carbon nanotube surfaces by non-covalent and covalent attachments of solubilizing groups. Covalent approach modification may alter the intrinsic properties of carbon nanotubes and, in turn make them undesirable for many applications. On the other hand, a non-covalent approach helps to improve the solubility of CNTs while preserving their intrinsic properties. Among many non-covalent modifiers of CNTs, conjugated polymers are receiving increasing attention and highly appealing because of a number of reasons. To this end, the aim of this feature article is to review the recent results on the conjugated polymer-based non-covalent functionalization of CNTs with an emphasis on the effect of conjugated polymers in the dispersibility/solubility, optical, thermal and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes as well as their usage in the purification and isolation of a specific single-walled nanotube from the mixture of the various tubes.

  11. Three-dimensional imaging of single nanotube molecule endocytosis on plasmonic substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Guosong; Robinson, Joshua T; Wang, Hailiang; Zhang, Bo; Dai, Hongjie

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the cellular internalization pathways of single molecules or single nano-objects is important to understanding cell-matter interactions and to applications in drug delivery and discovery. Imaging and tracking the motion of single molecules on cell plasma membrane require high spatial resolution in three dimensions (3D). Fluorescence imaging along the axial dimension with nanometer resolution has been highly challenging but critical to revealing displacements in trans-membrane events. Here, utilizing a plasmonic ruler based on the sensitive distance dependence of near-infrared fluorescence enhancement (NIR-FE) of carbon nanotubes on a gold plasmonic substrate, we probe ~10 nm scale trans-membrane displacements through changes in nanotube fluorescence intensity, enabling observations of single nanotube endocytosis in 3D. Cellular uptake and trans-membrane displacements show clear dependences to temperature and clathrin assembly on cell membrane, suggesting that the cellular entry mechanism for a n...

  12. Adjoint Functors and Representation Dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Chang XI

    2006-01-01

    We study the global dimensions of the coherent functors over two categories that are linked by a pair of adjoint functors. This idea is then exploited to compare the representation dimensions of two algebras. In particular, we show that if an Artin algebra is switched from the other, then they have the same representation dimension.

  13. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  14. From Carbon Nanotube Crystals to Carbon Nanotube Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhengjun; ZHAO Ye; ZHOU Ya

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the very initial deposition stages of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with ferrocene (Fe(C5H5)2) and xylene (C8H10) for growing carbon nanotubes, and made clear that the mechanism for the self-organization behaviors of nanotubes at different growth stages by this approach. For instance, the organization of nanotubes into flower-like structures at prolonged deposition is developed from the crystal-like structures formed at early growth stages, both of which are closely related to and determined by the very initial deposition stages of this CVD approach. Based on this approach, ways have been established to build up different architectures of carbon nanotubes, by controlling the initial deposition stages of the CVD process, with which we have realized the selective growth of self-organized carbon nanotube structures. This study provides a new idea for growing carbon nanotube architectures by CVD.

  15. Carbon nanotubes for microelectronics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Andrew P; Duesberg, Georg S; Seidel, Robert V; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Pamler, Werner; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Despite all prophecies of its end, silicon-based microelectronics still follows Moore's Law and continues to develop rapidly. However, the inherent physical limits will eventually be reached. Carbon nanotubes offer the potential for further miniaturization as long as it is possible to selectively deposit them with defined properties.

  16. Qubits from extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Lévay, Péter

    2011-01-01

    We link the recently discovered black hole-qubit correspondence to the structure of extra dimensions. In particular we show that for toroidal compactifications of type IIB string theory simple qubit systems arise naturally from the geometrical data of the tori parametrized by the moduli. We also generalize the recently suggested idea of the attractor mechanism as a distillation procedure of GHZ-like entangled states on the event horizon, to moduli stabilization for flux attractors in F-theory compactifications on elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau four-folds. Finally using a simple example we show that the natural arena for qubits to show up is an embedded one within the realm of fermionic entanglement of quantum systems with indistinguishable constituents.

  17. Dimensions of trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Georg Simmel is the seminal author on trust within sociology, but though inspired by Simmel, subsequent studies of intersubjective trust have failed to address Simmel’s suggestion that trust is as differentiated as the social relations of which it is part. Rather, trust has been studied within...... limited sets of exchange or work relations. This article revisits Simmel’s concept of trust as social form in order to investigate this differentiation. From an interview study, the differentiation and limits of trust are analysed within different types of social relations. Trust is found to vary greatly...... in scope and mode influenced by the intersecting dimensions of relations, objects and situations. Furthermore, trust exists between an outer threshold of expected deceit and an inner threshold of confident reliance. The findings from the qualitative study contribute new knowledge on the diversity of trust...

  18. Method card design dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wölfel, Christiane; Merritt, T.

    2013-01-01

    . The card-based tools are explained in terms of five design dimensions including the intended purpose and scope of use, duration of use, methodology, customization, and formal/material qualities. Our analysis suggests three design patterns or archetypes for existing card-based design method tools...... and highlights unexplored areas in the design space. The paper concludes with recommendations for the future development of card-based methods for the field of interaction design.......There are many examples of cards used to assist or provide structure to the design process, yet there has not been a thorough articulation of the strengths and weaknesses of the various examples. We review eighteen card-based design tools in order to understand how they might benefit designers...

  19. The fourth Dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Schweitzer, Eugen

    2009-01-01

    In different passages of his dialogues, Plato showed deep mathematically-based physical insights. Regrettably most readers overlooked the respective statements, or they utterly did not understand those hints since they were full of philological fallacious terms. Respectable translators misinterpreted such statements and therefore Plato's respective remarks were not recognized as substantial knowledge. Furthermore, Plato often supplemented such basic remarks by diffusely veiled and varied allusions that were often ironically hidden somewhere in his dialogues by inconspicuous double meanings. However, this mode of intentionally coded discrete communication was generally not understood because such irony is not to everyone's taste. However, the attempts to reconstruct Plato's system on the basis of admittedly individually interpreted double meanings lead to a conclusive mathematical-physical cyclical system of dimensions. Additionally it was possible to assign Plato's system of philosophical ideas analogously to...

  20. Phenomenology of Extra Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewett, J.L.; /SLAC

    2006-11-07

    If the structure of spacetime is different than that readily observed, gravitational physics, particle physics and cosmology are all immediately affected. The physics of extra dimensions offers new insights and solutions to fundamental questions arising in these fields. Novel ideas and frameworks are continuously born and evolved. They make use of string theoretical features and tools and they may reveal if and how the 11-dimensional string theory is relevant to our four-dimensional world. We have outlined some of the experimental observations in particle and gravitational physics as well as astrophysical and cosmological considerations that can constrain or confirm these scenarios. These developing ideas and the wide interdisciplinary experimental program that is charted out to investigate them mark a renewed effort to describe the dynamics behind spacetime. We look forward to the discovery of a higher dimensional spacetime.

  1. Unification in One Dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, David J

    2016-01-01

    A physical theory of the world is presented under the unifying principle that all of nature is laid out before us and experienced through the passage of time. The one-dimensional progression in time is opened out into a multi-dimensional mathematically consistent flow, with the simplicity of the former giving rise to symmetries of the latter. The act of perception identifies an extended spacetime arena of intermediate dimension, incorporating the symmetry of geometric spatial rotations, against which physical objects are formed and observed. The spacetime symmetry is contained as a subgroup of, and provides a natural breaking mechanism for, the higher general symmetry of time. It will be described how the world of gravitation and cosmology, as well as quantum theory and particle physics, arises from these considerations.

  2. Atomic transportation via carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan

    2009-01-01

    The transportation of helium atoms in a single-walled carbon nanotube is reported via molecular dynamics simulations. The efficiency of the atomic transportation is found to be dependent on the type of the applied loading and the loading rate as well as the temperature in the process. Simulations show the transportation is a result of the van der Waals force between the nanotube and the helium atoms through a kink propagation initiated in the nanotube.

  3. Growth of nanotubes for electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Robertson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The roadmap for semiconductor devices envisages that carbon nanotubes or semiconducting nanowires could become important in about ten years. This article reviews where carbon nanotubes could contribute to microelectronics, in terms of vias, interconnects, and field-effect transistors. It focuses particularly on the requirements microelectronics places on the growth of nanotubes. That is, control over the formation of semiconducting or metallic tubes, controlling the growth location and direction, and achieving high enough nucleation densities.

  4. Lithium interaction with carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalimova, V.A. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Khimicheskij Fakul`tet; Sklovsky, D.E. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Khimicheskij Fakul`tet; Bondarenko, G.N. [Topcheiv Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis, Leninsky Prospekt, 29, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alvergnat-Gaucher, H. [CRMD, CNRS, Universite d`Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, 45071, Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Bonnamy, S. [CRMD, CNRS, Universite d`Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, 45071, Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Beguin, F. [CRMD, CNRS, Universite d`Orleans, 1B rue de la Ferollerie, 45071, Orleans Cedex 02 (France)

    1997-05-01

    Lithium interaction with catalytic carbon nanotubes under high-pressure conditions was studied. A large amount of Li (2Li/C) reacted with the carbon nanotubes forming an intercalation compound (I{sub c}{proportional_to}4.1 A) which follows from X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy data. We cannot exclude also the possibility of insertion of a part of Li into the channel of the nanotubes. (orig.)

  5. Light-scattering and dispersion behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltiel, Craig; Manickavasagam, Siva; Pinar Mengüc, M.; Andrews, Rodney

    2005-08-01

    Elliptically polarized light-scattering measurements were performed to investigate the dispersion behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). Xylene- and pyridine-derived MWNT powders were dispersed in water and ethanol in separate optic cells and allowed to sit undisturbed over a two-week time period after probe sonication. Continuous light-scattering measurements taken between scattering angles of 10-170 deg and repeated over several days showed that the nanotubes formed fractal-like networks. The pyridine-derived MWNTs showed greater dispersion variation over time, tending to aggregate and clump much faster than the xylene-derived tubes. The water suspensions appeared much more stable than the ethanol suspensions, which transformed into nonfractal morphology after a few hours. We relate the dispersion stability to size and fringe patterns on the outer surface of the nanotubes. Measured values of fractal dimension were distinctly lower than those in previous studies of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Profiles of both diagonal and off-diagonal scattering matrix elements are presented.

  6. Dry Sintered Metal Coating of Halloysite Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Nicholson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs are a naturally-occurring aluminosilicate whose dimensions measure microns in length and tens of nanometers in diameter. Bonding defects between the alumina and silica lead to net negative and positive charges on the exterior and interior lumen, respectively. HNTs have been shown to enhance the material properties of polymer matrices and enable the sustained release of loaded chemicals, drugs, and growth factors. Due to the net charges, these nanotubes can also be readily coated in layered-depositions using the HNT exterior lumen’s net negative charge as the basis for assembly. These coatings are primarily done through wet chemical processes, the majority of which are limited in their use of desired chemicals, due to the polarity of the halloysite. Furthermore, this restriction in the type of chemicals used often requires the use of more toxic chemicals in place of greener options, and typically necessitates the use of a significantly longer chemical process to achieve the desired coating. In this study, we show that HNTs can be coated with metal acetylacetonates—compounds primarily employed in the synthesis of nanoparticles, as metal catalysts, and as NMR shift reagents—through a dry sintering process. This method was capable of thermally decaying the metal acetylacetonate, resulting in a free positively-charged metal ion that readily bonded to the negatively-charged HNT exterior, resulting in metallic coatings forming on the HNT surface. Our coating method may enable greater deposition of coated material onto these nanotubes as required for a desired application. Furthermore, the use of chemical processes using toxic chemicals is not required, thus eliminating exposure to toxic chemicals and costs associated with the disposal of the resultant chemical waste.

  7. Interactive Dimensioning of Parametric Models

    KAUST Repository

    Kelly, T.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a solution for the dimensioning of parametric and procedural models. Dimensioning has long been a staple of technical drawings, and we present the first solution for interactive dimensioning: A dimension line positioning system that adapts to the view direction, given behavioral properties. After proposing a set of design principles for interactive dimensioning, we describe our solution consisting of the following major components. First, we describe how an author can specify the desired interactive behavior of a dimension line. Second, we propose a novel algorithm to place dimension lines at interactive speeds. Third, we introduce multiple extensions, including chained dimension lines, controls for different parameter types (e.g. discrete choices, angles), and the use of dimension lines for interactive editing. Our results show the use of dimension lines in an interactive parametric modeling environment for architectural, botanical, and mechanical models. © 2015 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  9. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  10. Luminescence of carbon nanotube bulbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChuanGang; WU DeHai; WANG KunLin; WEI JinQuan; WEI BingQing; ZHU HongWei; WANG ZhiCheng; LUO JianBin; LIU WenJin; ZHENG MingXin

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) bulbs made of decimeter-scale double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) strands and films were fabricated and their luminescence properties, including the lighting efficiency, voltage-current relation and thermal stability were investigated. The results show that the DWCNT bulb has a comparable spectrum of visible light with tungsten bulb and its average efficiency is 40% higher than that of a tungsten filament at the same temperature (1400-2300 K). The nanotube filaments show both resistance and thermal stability over a large temperature region. No obvious damage was found for a nanotube bulb illuminating at 2300 K for more than 24 hours in vacuum.

  11. Microtribology of aqueous carbon nanotube dispersions

    KAUST Repository

    Kristiansen, Kai De Lange

    2011-09-23

    The tribological behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in aqueous humic acid (HA) solutions was studied using a surface forces apparatus (SFA) and shows promising lubricant additive properties. Adding CNTs to the solution changes the friction forces between two mica surfaces from "adhesion controlled" to "load controlled" friction. The coefficient of friction with either single-walled (SW) or multi-walled (MW) CNT dispersions is in the range 0.30-0.55 and is independent of the load and sliding velocity. More importantly, lateral sliding promotes a redistribution or accumulation, rather than squeezing out, of nanotubes between the surfaces. This accumulation reduced the adhesion between the surfaces (which generally causes wear/damage of the surfaces), and no wear or damage was observed during continuous shearing experiments that lasted several hours even under high loads (pressures â∼10 MPa). The frictional properties can be understood in terms of the Cobblestone Model where the friction force is related to the fraction of the adhesion energy dissipated during impacts of the nanoparticles. We also develop a simple generic model based on the van der Waals interactions between particles and surfaces to determine the relation between the dimensions of nanoparticles and their tribological properties when used as additives in oil- or water-based lubricants. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Higgs Pair Production in Models with Universal Extra Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    de Sandes, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    In this letter we study the process of gluon fusion into a pair of Higgs bosons in a model with one universal extra dimension. We find that the contributions from the extra top quark Kaluza-Klein excitations lead to a Higgs pair production cross section that can be significantly altered compared to the Standard Model value for small values of the compactification scale.

  13. Neocortical Maturation during Adolescence: Change in Neuronal Soma Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowicz, Theodore; Petetot, Jean MacDonald-Comber; Khoury, Jane C.; de Courten-Myers, Gabrielle M.

    2009-01-01

    During adolescence, cognitive abilities increase robustly. To search for possible related structural alterations of the cerebral cortex, we measured neuronal soma dimension (NSD = width times height), cortical thickness and neuronal densities in different types of neocortex in post-mortem brains of five 12-16 and five 17-24 year-olds (each 2F,…

  14. Thermal dimension of quantum spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Gubitosi, Giulia; Santos, Grasiele

    2016-01-01

    Recent results suggest that a crucial crossroad for quantum gravity is the characterization of the effective dimension of spacetime at short distances, where quantum properties of spacetime become significant. This is relevant in particular for various scenarios of "dynamical dimensional reduction" which have been discussed in the literature. We are here concerned with the fact that the related research effort has been based exclusively on analyses of the "spectral dimension", which involves an unphysical Euclideanization of spacetime and is highly sensitive to the off-shell properties of a theory. As here shown, different formulations of the same physical theory can have wildly different spectral dimension. We propose that dynamical dimensional reduction should be described in terms of the "thermal dimension" which we here introduce, a notion that only depends on the physical content of the theory. We analyze a few models with dynamical reduction both of the spectral dimension and of our thermal dimension, f...

  15. Beta Function and Anomalous Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Pica, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to determine the coefficients of an all-order beta function linear in the anomalous dimensions using as data the two-loop coefficients together with the first one of the anomalous dimensions which are universal. The beta function allows to determine the anomalous dimension of the fermion masses at the infrared fixed point, and the resulting values compare well with the lattice determinations.

  16. Anomalous Dimensions of Conformal Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Pica, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    We determine the anomalous dimensions of baryon operators for the three color theory as function of the number of massless flavours within the conformal window to the maximum known order in perturbation theory. We show that the anomalous dimension of the baryon is controllably small for a wide range of number of flavours. We also find that this is always smaller than the anomalous dimension of the fermion mass operator. These findings challenge the partial compositeness paradigm.

  17. Flying in Two Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Prakash, Manu

    2011-01-01

    Diversity and specialization of behavior in insects is unmatched. Insects hop, walk, run, jump, row, swim, glide and fly to propel themselves in a variety of environments. We have uncovered an unusual mode of propulsion of aerodynamic flight in two dimensions in Waterlilly Beetles \\emph{(Galerucella)}. The adult beetles, often found in water lilly ponds, propel themselves strictly in a two-dimensional plane on the surface of water via flapping wing flight. Here we analyze the aerodynamics of this peculiar flight mode with respect to forces exerted on the organism during flight. The complexity of 2-D flight is captured by accounting for additional forces beyond gravitational, thrust, lift and drag, exerted on the insect body in 3D flight. Understanding this constrained propulsion mode requires accounting for viscous drag, surface tension, buoyancy force, and capillary-wave drag. Moreover, dramatic differences exist in the magnitude of the resultant forces in 2D vs. 3D flight. Here, in this fluid dynamics video...

  18. Physics in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houselt, A.; Schäfer, J.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Claessen, R.

    2013-01-01

    With modern microelectronics moving towards smaller and smaller length scales on the (sub-) nm scale, quantum effects (apart from band structure and band gaps) have begun to play an increasingly important role. This especially concerns dimensional confinement to 2D (high electron mobility transistors and integer/fractional quantum Hall effect physics, graphene and topological insulators) and 1D (with electrical connections eventually reaching the quantum limit). Recent developments in the above-mentioned areas have revealed that the properties of electron systems become increasingly exotic as one progresses from the 3D case into lower dimensions. As compared to 2D electron systems, much less experimental progress has been achieved in the field of 1D electron systems. The main reason for the lack of experimental results in this field is related to the difficulty of realizing 1D electron systems. Atom chains created in quantum mechanical break junction set-ups are too short to exhibit the typically 1D signatures. As an alternative, atomic chains can be produced on crystal surfaces, either via assembling them one-by-one using a scanning tunnelling microscope or via self-assembly. The drawback of the latter systems is that the atomic chains are not truly 1D since they are coupled to the underlying crystal and sometimes even to the neighbouring chains. In retrospect, this coupling turns out to be an absolute necessity in the experiment since true 1D systems are disordered at any non-zero temperature [1]. The coupling to the crystal and/or neighbouring chains shifts the phase transition, for example, a Peierls instability, to a non-zero temperature and thus allows experiments to be performed in the ordered state. Here, we want to emphasize that the electronic properties of the 1D electron system are fundamentally different from its 2D and 3D counterparts. The Fermi liquid theory, which is applicable to 2D and 3D electron systems, breaks down spectacularly in the 1D case

  19. Carbon nanotubes: artificial nanomaterials to engineer single neurons and neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Bosi, Susanna; Ballerini, Laura; Prato, Maurizio

    2012-08-15

    In the past decade, nanotechnology applications to the nervous system have often involved the study and the use of novel nanomaterials to improve the diagnosis and therapy of neurological diseases. In the field of nanomedicine, carbon nanotubes are evaluated as promising materials for diverse therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Besides, carbon nanotubes are increasingly employed in basic neuroscience approaches, and they have been used in the design of neuronal interfaces or in that of scaffolds promoting neuronal growth in vitro. Ultimately, carbon nanotubes are thought to hold the potential for the development of innovative neurological implants. In this framework, it is particularly relevant to document the impact of interfacing such materials with nerve cells. Carbon nanotubes were shown, when modified with biologically active compounds or functionalized in order to alter their charge, to affect neurite outgrowth and branching. Notably, purified carbon nanotubes used as scaffolds can promote the formation of nanotube-neuron hybrid networks, able per se to affect neuron integrative abilities, network connectivity, and synaptic plasticity. We focus this review on our work over several years directed to investigate the ability of carbon nanotube platforms in providing a new tool for nongenetic manipulations of neuronal performance and network signaling.

  20. Carbon nanotubes instruct physiological growth and functionally mature syncytia: nongenetic engineering of cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Valentina; Cellot, Giada; Toma, Francesca Maria; Long, Carlin S; Caldwell, John H; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Turco, Antonio; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura; Mestroni, Luisa

    2013-07-23

    Myocardial tissue engineering currently represents one of the most realistic strategies for cardiac repair. We have recently discovered the ability of carbon nanotube scaffolds to promote cell division and maturation in cardiomyocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote cardiomyocyte growth and maturation by altering the gene expression program, implementing the cell electrophysiological properties and improving networking and maturation of functional syncytia. In our study, we combine microscopy, biological and electrophysiological methodologies, and calcium imaging, to verify whether neonatal rat ventricular myocytes cultured on substrates of multiwall carbon nanotubes acquire a physiologically more mature phenotype compared to control (gelatin). We show that the carbon nanotube substrate stimulates the induction of a gene expression profile characteristic of terminal differentiation and physiological growth, with a 2-fold increase of α-myosin heavy chain (P carbon nanotubes appear to exert a protective effect against the pathologic stimulus of phenylephrine. Finally, cardiomyocytes on carbon nanotubes demonstrate a more mature electrophysiological phenotype of syncytia and intracellular calcium signaling. Thus, carbon nanotubes interacting with cardiomyocytes have the ability to promote physiological growth and functional maturation. These properties are unique in the current vexing field of tissue engineering, and offer unprecedented perspectives in the development of innovative therapies for cardiac repair.

  1. Adhesion to carbon nanotube conductive scaffolds forces action-potential appearance in immature rat spinal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Sucapane, Antonietta; Toma, Francesca Maria; Calura, Enrica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Carrieri, Claudia; Roncaglia, Paola; Martinelli, Valentina; Scaini, Denis; Masten, Lara; Turco, Antonio; Gustincich, Stefano; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, carbon nanotube growth substrates have been used to investigate neurons and neuronal networks formation in vitro when guided by artificial nano-scaled cues. Besides, nanotube-based interfaces are being developed, such as prosthesis for monitoring brain activity. We recently described how carbon nanotube substrates alter the electrophysiological and synaptic responses of hippocampal neurons in culture. This observation highlighted the exceptional ability of this material in interfering with nerve tissue growth. Here we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote the development of immature neurons isolated from the neonatal rat spinal cord, and maintained in vitro. To address this issue we performed electrophysiological studies associated to gene expression analysis. Our results indicate that spinal neurons plated on electro-conductive carbon nanotubes show a facilitated development. Spinal neurons anticipate the expression of functional markers of maturation, such as the generation of voltage dependent currents or action potentials. These changes are accompanied by a selective modulation of gene expression, involving neuronal and non-neuronal components. Our microarray experiments suggest that carbon nanotube platforms trigger reparative activities involving microglia, in the absence of reactive gliosis. Hence, future tissue scaffolds blended with conductive nanotubes may be exploited to promote cell differentiation and reparative pathways in neural regeneration strategies.

  2. DIMENSION STONE DEPOSITS IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Crnković

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available The geology, petrographycal composition and properties of dimension stone deposits in Croatia are described. Dimension stone deposits in the conception of mobilistic view of the genesis and structure of Dinarides, as well as after stratigraphic units, are considered. Valuation of the dimension stones of the active quarries is exposed. The marketable categories of dimension stone in Croatia are different varietes of limestones and calcareous clastites, primarly of Cretaceous age, and to lesser degree of Jurassic and Paleogene. The greatest part of deposits is concentrated in the Adriatic carbonate platform or Adriaticum.

  3. Exterior dimension of fat fractals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebogi, C.; Mcdonald, S. W.; Ott, E.; Yorke, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Geometric scaling properties of fat fractal sets (fractals with finite volume) are discussed and characterized via the introduction of a new dimension-like quantity which is called the exterior dimension. In addition, it is shown that the exterior dimension is related to the 'uncertainty exponent' previously used in studies of fractal basin boundaries, and it is shown how this connection can be exploited to determine the exterior dimension. Three illustrative applications are described, two in nonlinear dynamics and one dealing with blood flow in the body. Possible relevance to porous materials and ballistic driven aggregation is also noted.

  4. Carbon nanotube Archimedes screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroszlány, László; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J

    2010-12-28

    Recently, nanomechanical devices composed of a long stationary inner carbon nanotube and a shorter, slowly rotating outer tube have been fabricated. In this paper, we study the possibility of using such devices as nanoscale transducers of motion into electricity. When the outer tube is chiral, we show that such devices act like quantum Archimedes screws, which utilize mechanical energy to pump electrons between reservoirs. We calculate the pumped charge from one end of the inner tube to the other, driven by the rotation of a chiral outer nanotube. We show that the pumped charge can be greater than one electron per 360° rotation, and consequently, such a device operating with a rotational frequency of 10 MHz, for example, would deliver a current of ≈1 pAmp.

  5. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  6. Engineering carbon nanotubes and nanotube circuits using electrical breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, P G; Arnold, M S; Avouris, P

    2001-04-27

    Carbon nanotubes display either metallic or semiconducting properties. Both large, multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), with many concentric carbon shells, and bundles or "ropes" of aligned single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), are complex composite conductors that incorporate many weakly coupled nanotubes that each have a different electronic structure. Here we demonstrate a simple and reliable method for selectively removing single carbon shells from MWNTs and SWNT ropes to tailor the properties of these composite nanotubes. We can remove shells of MWNTs stepwise and individually characterize the different shells. By choosing among the shells, we can convert a MWNT into either a metallic or a semiconducting conductor, as well as directly address the issue of multiple-shell transport. With SWNT ropes, similar selectivity allows us to generate entire arrays of nanoscale field-effect transistors based solely on the fraction of semiconducting SWNTs.

  7. Progress in Research on Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As one-dimensional (1D nanofiber, carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been widely used to improve the performance of nanocomposites due to their high strength, small dimensions, and remarkable physical properties. Progress in the field of CNTs presents a potential opportunity to enhance cementitious composites at the nanoscale. In this review, current research activities and key advances on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs reinforced cementitious composites are summarized, including the effect of MWCNTs on modulus of elasticity, porosity, fracture, and mechanical and microstructure properties of cement-based composites. The issues about the improvement mechanisms, MWCNTs dispersion methods, and the major factors affecting the mechanical properties of composites are discussed. In addition, large-scale production methods of MWCNTs and the effects of CNTs on environment and health are also summarized.

  8. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Thermoelectric Coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-06

    conductance. Inside thecentral section of the carbon nanotube, we obtained an impressive Peltier cooling 57 K down from the liquid nitrogentemperature. 15... trapped charges or dipoles) that occur either at the interface between the CNT and the gate dielectric (interface defects) or at some position within... liquid nitrogen temperature 77T  K up to hot 134 8T  K, or decreases from 77T  K down to about cold 20 6T  K, thus evidencing a strong

  10. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we pr...

  11. Warped Geometry in Higher Dimensions with an Orbifold Extra Dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, M

    2001-01-01

    We solve the Einstein equations in higher dimensions with warped geometry where an extra dimension is assumed to have orbifold symmetry, $S^{1}/Z_{2}$. The setup we consider here is an extension to (5+D)-dimensions of the 5-dimensional Randall-Sundrum model, and two hidden brane and observable brane are fixed on orbifold. Anisotropic cosmological constant on each brane with (4+D)-dimensional spacetime is assumed, and the warped metric of 4-dimensions is generally different from one of extra D-dimensions. It is pointed out that the form of metric depends on both the sign of bulk cosmological constant and initial condition of brane world. Furthermore, anisotropic cosmological constant on each brane can be realized due to the presence of brane.

  12. Photoluminescence imaging of electronic-impurity-induced exciton quenching in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crochet, Jared J; Duque, Juan G; Werner, James H; Doorn, Stephen K

    2012-02-01

    The electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes can be altered by surface adsorption of electronic impurities or dopants. However, fully understanding the influence of these impurities is difficult because of the inherent complexity of the solution-based colloidal chemistry of nanotubes, and because of a lack of techniques for directly imaging dynamic processes involving these impurities. Here, we show that photoluminescence microscopy can be used to image exciton quenching in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes during the early stages of chemical doping with two different species. The addition of AuCl(3) leads to localized exciton-quenching sites, which are attributed to a mid-gap electronic impurity level, and the adsorbed species are also found sometimes to be mobile on the surface of the nanotubes. The addition of H(2)O(2) leads to delocalized exciton-quenching hole states, which are responsible for long-range photoluminescence blinking, and are also mobile.

  13. Influence of the structural properties on the pseudocritical magnetic behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar-Enriquez, C.D. [PCM Computational Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [PCM Computational Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo, J. [Grupo de Magnetismo y Simulacion Gplus, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, A.A. 1226 Medellin (Colombia)

    2012-04-15

    In this work we address the influence of the crystalline structure, concretely when the system under study is formed by square or hexagonal unit cells, upon the magnetic properties and pseudocritical behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes. We focus not only on the effect of the geometrical shape of the unit cell but also on their dimensions. The model employed is based on the Monte Carlo method, the Metropolis dynamics and a nearest neighbors classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Magnetization per magnetic site, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and magnetic energy were computed. These properties were computed varying the system size, unit cell dimension and temperature. The dependence of the nearest neighbor exchange integral on the nanotubes geometrical characteristics is also discussed. Results revealed a strong influence of the system topology on the magnetic properties caused by the difference in the coordination number between square and hexagonal unit cell. Moreover, the nanotubes diameter influence on magnetic properties is only observed at very low values, when the distance between atoms is less than it, presented by the 2D sheet. On the other hand, it was concluded that the surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties, contrary to the case of other nano-systems as thin films and nanoparticles among others. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit cell geometry has strong influence on the magnetic properties in ferromagnetic nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanotube diameter increase produces a decrease of interaction between nearest neighbor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties.

  14. Building Highly Flexible Polyelectrolyte Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Flexibility of polyelectrolyte nanotubes is necessary if they are to be exploited in applications such as developing photoelectric devices with strong mechanical properties. In a recent attempt, high flexibility has been observed from such nanotubes prepared by a research team headed by Prof. Li Junbai of the CAS Institute of Chemistry (ICCAS).

  15. The Synthesis and Characterization of Titania Nanotubes Formed at Various Anodisation Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekantan, S.; Hung, L. M.; Lockman, Z.; Ahmad, Z. A.; Noor, A. F. Mohd

    2008-03-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructured titania such as nanowires, nanorod and nanotubes have attracted considerable attention recently due to their unique physical properties and their potential application in water photoelectrolysis, photocatalysis, gas sensing, and photovoltaic. In this work, a simple anodisation method has been developed to fabricate titania nanotubes in 1M Na2SO4 containing various amount of NH4F. The dimension of the titania nanotube produced depend on the electrochemical process parameter: composition of the electrolyte, pH of the electrolyte and time of anodisation. As for this paper, the effect of fluoride content and anodisation time on the formation of titania nanotube was discussed in detail. The nanotubes formed were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and X-Ray diffraction (XRD). The minimum fluoride content that is required to form nice well ordered nanotube for sample anodized for 30 minutes is 0.3g whereas for 120 minutes is 0.1g.

  16. Anomalous Dimensions of Conformal Baryons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We determine the anomalous dimensions of baryon operators for the three color theory as function of the number of massless flavours within the conformal window to the maximum known order in perturbation theory. We show that the anomalous dimension of the baryon is controllably small, within...

  17. Mathematics Teachers' Criteria of Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Alattin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine mathematics teachers' decisions about dimensions of the geometric figures, criteria of dimension and consistency of decision-criteria. The research is a qualitative research and the model applied in the study is descriptive method on the basis of general scanning model. 15 mathematics teachers attended the…

  18. The Hausdorff Dimension of Sections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min NIU; Lifeng XI

    2007-01-01

    The notion of finite-type open set condition is defined to calculate the Hausdorff dimensions of the sections of some self-similar sets, such as the dimension of intersection of the Koch curve and the line x = a with a ∈(Q).

  19. Dimensioning, Tolerancing, and Machine Finishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, George C.

    Intended for use with the vocational education student interested in technical drawing, this guide provides answers to questions relating to dimensioning and tolerancing machine drawings. It also gives examples of standard dimensioning practices, tolerancing applications, and finish applications. The problems and examples presented are based on…

  20. Anomalous Dimensions of Conformal Baryons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We determine the anomalous dimensions of baryon operators for the three color theory as function of the number of massless flavours within the conformal window to the maximum known order in perturbation theory. We show that the anomalous dimension of the baryon is controllably small, within the $...

  1. Beta Function and Anomalous Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to determine the coefficients of an all-order beta function linear in the anomalous dimensions using as data the two-loop coefficients together with the first one of the anomalous dimensions which are universal. The beta function allows to determine the anomalou...

  2. Physical Removal of Metallic Carbon Nanotubes from Nanotube Network Devices Using a Thermal and Fluidic Process

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Alexandra C.; Shaughnessy, Michael; Wong, Bryan M.; Kane, Alexander A.; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V.; Krafcik, Karen L.; Billups, W. E.; Hauge, Robert H.; Léonard, François

    2013-01-01

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices based on thin films of carbon nanotubes are currently limited by the presence of metallic nanotubes. Here we present a novel approach based on nanotube alkyl functionalization to physically remove the metallic nanotubes from such network devices. The process relies on preferential thermal desorption of the alkyls from the semiconducting nanotubes and the subsequent dissolution and selective removal of the metallic nanotubes in chloroform. The approach is ...

  3. Modification of carbon nanotubes and synthesis of polymeric composites involving the nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badamshina, E R; Gafurova, M P; Estrin, Yakov I [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-29

    The results of studies, mainly published in recent years, on modification of carbon nanotubes and design of composites with these nanotubes for the manufacture of new-generation materials are generalized and analyzed. The methods of modification of the nanotubes by low- and high-molecular compounds and methods of polymer modification by carbon nanotubes are considered. Data on the properties of modified nanotubes are presented. The current and potential applications of materials based on the nanotubes are indicated.

  4. Synthesis, properties and applications of 3D carbon nanotube-graphene junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Zhao, Zhenghang; Niu, Jianbing; Xia, Zhenhai

    2016-11-01

    Integration of 1D carbon nanotubes and 2D graphene sheets through covalent bonding can create novel 3D nanoporous hybrid nanostructures that inherit unique mechanical, thermal, electrical and chemical properties of their building blocks and even have new properties in three dimensions. Great progress has been made in developing 3D carbon nanotube-graphene nanoarchitectures for various applications such as mechanical cushions, thermal sinkers, transistors, and renewable energy conversion. This review presents the recent advances in synthesis and analysis of the 3D nanostructures. Emphasis is put on design principles, molecular structures, processes and properties of the materials.

  5. Mechanical behavior of carbon nanotubes in the rippled and buckled phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, H.; Krakhmalev, P.; Svensson, K.

    2015-02-01

    We have studied the mechanical behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotubes for bending strains beyond the onset for rippling and buckling. We found a characteristic drop in the bending stiffness at the rippling and buckling onset and the relative retained stiffness was dependent on the nanotube dimensions and crystallinity. Thin tubes are more prone to buckle, where some lose all of their bending stiffness, while thicker tubes are more prone to ripple and on average retain about 20% of their bending stiffness. In defect rich tubes, the bending stiffness is very low prior to rippling, but these tubes retain up to 70% of their initial bending stiffness.

  6. Application of Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy for Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, N.; Jain, S.; Mittal, J.

    2015-03-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is among the few techniques that are available for the characterization of modified single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) having nanometer dimensions (~1-3 nm). CNTs can be modified either by surface functionalization or coating, between bundles of nanotubes by doping, intercalation and fully or partially filling the central core. EELS is an exclusive technique for the identification, composition analysis, and crystallization studies of the chemicals and materials used for the modification of SWCNTs. The present paper serves as a compendium of research work on the application of EELS for the characterization of modified SWCNTs.

  7. Carbon Nanotubes and Modern Nanoagriculture

    KAUST Repository

    Bayoumi, Maged Fouad

    2015-01-27

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have been prominent members of the nanomaterial family. Owing to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been proven to be a useful tool in the field of plant science. They were frequently perceived to bring about valuable biotechnological and agricultural applications that still remain beyond experimental realization. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the ability of carbon nanotubes to traverse different plant cell barriers. These studies, also, assessed the toxicity and environmental impacts of these nanomaterials. The knowledge provided by these studies is of practical and fundamental importance for diverse applications including intracellular labeling and imaging, genetic transformation, and for enhancing our knowledge of plant cell biology. Although different types of nanoparticles have been found to activate physiological processes in plants, carbon nanotubes received particular interest. Following addition to germination medium, carbon nanotubes enhanced root growth and elongation of some plants such as onion, cucumber and rye-grass. They, also, modulated the expression of some genes that are essential for cell division and plant development. In addition, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were evidenced to penetrate thick seed coats, stimulate germination, and to enhance growth of young tomato seedlings. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes can penetrate deeply into the root system and further distribute into the leaves and the fruits. In recent studies, carbon nanotubes were reported to be chemically entrapped into the structure of plant tracheary elements. This should activate studies in the fields of plant defense and wood engineering. Although, all of these effects on plant physiology and plant developmental biology have not been fully understood, the valuable findings promises more research activity in the near future toward complete scientific understanding of

  8. An alternative adhesive based technique of raising the occlusal vertical dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Nanda

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The technique has two basic aims. The first is to accurately implement the occlusal scheme as planned in the diagnostic wax-up in the reversible method of altering the vertical dimension. The second aim is to increase the vertical dimension with minimal damage to the teeth.

  9. Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity risk of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    Novel materials are often commercialized without a complete assessment of the risks they pose to human health because such assessments are costly and time-consuming; additionally, sometimes the methodology needed for such an assessment does not exist. Carbon nanotubes have the potential for widespread application in engineering, materials science and medicine. However, due to the needle-like shape and high durability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), concerns have been raised that they may induce asbestos-like pathogenicity when inhaled. Indeed, experiments in rodents supported this hypothesis. Notably, the genetic alterations in MWCNT-induced rat malignant mesothelioma were similar to those induced by asbestos. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) cause mitotic disturbances in cultured cells, but thus far, there has been no report that SWCNTs are carcinogenic. This review summarizes the recent noteworthy publications on the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of CNTs and explains the possible molecular mechanisms responsible for this carcinogenicity. The nanoscale size and needle-like rigid structure of CNTs appear to be associated with their pathogenicity in mammalian cells, where carbon atoms are major components in the backbone of many biomolecules. Publishing adverse events associated with novel materials is critically important for alerting people exposed to such materials. CNTs still have a bright future with superb economic and medical merits. However, appropriate regulation of the production, distribution and secondary manufacturing processes is required, at least to protect the workers.

  10. Preimage entropy dimension of topological dynamical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Lei; Zhou, Xiaomin; Zhou, Xiaoyao

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new definition of preimage entropy dimension for continuous maps on compact metric spaces, investigate fundamental properties of the preimage entropy dimension, and compare the preimage entropy dimension with the topological entropy dimension. The defined preimage entropy dimension holds various basic properties of topological entropy dimension, for example, the preimage entropy dimension of a subsystem is bounded by that of the original system and topologically conjugated system...

  11. Signatures of Large Extra Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Hossenfelder, S; Stöcker, H

    2004-01-01

    String theory suggests modifications of our spacetime such as extra dimensions and the existence of a mininal length scale. In models with addidional dimensions, the Planck scale can be lowered to values accessible by future colliders. Effective theories which extend beyond the standart-model by including extra dimensions and a minimal length allow computation of observables and can be used to make testable predictions. Expected effects that arise within these models are the production of gravitons and black holes. Furthermore, the Planck-length is a lower bound to the possible resolution of spacetime which might be reached soon.

  12. Critical dimension for chaotic cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoya, Akio; Jensen, L.G.; Stein-Schabes, J.A.

    1987-03-16

    Using the ADM formalism for general relativity the approach to a space-time singularity of a general inhomogeneous universe, in an arbitrary number of dimensions, is studied. The question of whether chaotic behaviour is a generic feature of Einstein's equations, in an arbitrary number of dimensions, is explored. We find that models that contain ten or more spatial dimensions are non-chaotic and their approach toward the initial singularity is monotonic, whereas for those with dimensionality between four and nine their approach is chaotic. A clear geometrical picture is constructed whereby this result can be understood.

  13. Carbon nanotubes: a potential concept for drug delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Dhanawat, Meenakshi; Kumar, Sudhir; Singh, Brahma N; Pandit, Jayant K; Sinha, Vivek R

    2014-04-01

    The unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them a highly interesting and demandable nanocarrier in the field of nanoscience. CNTs facilitate efficient delivery of therapeutics like drugs, proteins, genes, nucleic acids, vitamins and lot more. Even though highly beneficial, the biocompatibility of CNTs is a major issue in their questioning their potential application in targeting drug delivery. Studies confirmed subdued toxicity of CNTs following slight modifications like functionalization, controlled dimensions, purification etc. A well-established mechanism for cellular internalization is an insistent need to attain a more efficient and targeted delivery. Recent patents have been thoroughly discussed in the text below.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  15. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CARBON NANOTUBE PROBE AND CONVENTIONAL ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY PROBE ON SURFACE ROUGHNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jinghe; WANG Hongxiang; XU Zongwei; DONG Shen; WANG Shiqian; ZHANG Huali

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, three different tips are employed, i.e., the carbon nanotube tip, monocrystalline silicon tip and silicon nitride tip. Resorting to atomic force microscope (AFM), they are used for measuring the surface roughness of indium tin oxide (ITO) film and the immunoglobulin G (IgG) proteins within the scanning area of 10 μm×10 μm and 0.5 μm×0.5 μm, respectively. Subsequently, the scanned surface of the ITO film and IgG proteins are analyzed by using fractal dimension. The results show that the fractal dimension measured by carbon nanotube tip is biggest with the highest frequency components and the most microscopic information. Therefore, the carbon nanotube tip is the ideal measuring tool for measuring super-smooth surface, which will play a more and more important role in the high-resolution imaging field.

  16. Influence of Anode Area and Electrode Gap on the Morphology of TiO2 Nanotubes Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to fabricate the titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanotubes arrays which were used in the photocatalytic degradation of total volatile organic compounds (TVOC by anodization, the influence of the electrode gap and anode area on the morphology of the titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanotubes was studied. Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanotube arrays were prepared by anodization with various electrode gaps and anode areas. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the morphology of the TiO2 nanotubes arrays. The results showed that the morphology of TiO2 nanotubes arrays was influenced by electrode gap and anode area. The appropriate anode area and electrode gap were 5 cm × 2 cm and 20 mm, respectively. Thus, TiO2 nanotube arrays with better morphology (with larger dimension and uniform TiO2 nanotubes were successfully fabricated by anodic oxidation with 5 cm × 2 cm anode area and 20 mm electrode gap at 30 V.

  17. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  18. Nanotube electronics and optoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phaedon Avouris

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Among the many materials that have been proposed to supplement and, in the long run, possibly succeed Si as a basis for nanoelectronics, carbon nanotubes (CNTs have attracted the most attention. CNTs are quasi-one-dimensional materials with unique properties ideally suited for electronics. We briefly discuss the electrical and optical properties of CNTs and how they can be employed in electronics and optoelectronics. We focus on single CNT transistors, their fabrication, assembly, doping, electrical characteristics, and integration. We also address the possible use of CNTs in optoelectronic devices such as electroluminescent light emitters and photodetectors.

  19. Production of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journet, C.; Bernier, P.

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs) or graphitic polyhedral nanoparticles can be produced using various methods. Most of them are based on the sublimation of carbon under an inert atmosphere, such as the electric arc discharge process, the laser ablation method, or the solar technique. But chemical methods can also be used to synthesize these kinds of carbon materials: the catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons, the production by electrolysis, the heat treatment of a polymer, the low temperature solid pyrolysis, or the in situ catalysis.

  20. A Periodic Table in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, Arne

    Access to techniques to produce and characterize free clusters built up from two to thousands of atoms has during the last decades generated several exciting discoveries and established cluster science as a research field of its own. This field is highly interdisciplinary, and knowledge from different areas of physics and chemistry has been of considerable importance for this rapid development. One of the objectives is to gain an understanding of the material growth i. e. how many atoms are needed in a cluster to make its physical or chemical properties similar to what is known for the corresponding solid. Studies of various properties for some clusters have, however, revealed large fluctuations and periodicities which can be interpreted either as geometric or electronic shell closings, with the appearance of so-called magic numbers. This kind of periodicity is quite different from what is known from the periodic table in atomic physics but has some similarities with the magic numbers in nuclear physics. In addition to clusters characterized by shell structure, also very unique clusters exist such as the fullerenes, in particular Buckminsterfullerene or Ceo discovered in 1985, which was a new form of carbon different from the earlier known forms of graphite and diamond. The field of fullerenes has, especially, after the invention of a method for production of macroscopic amounts in 1990, developed in an extremely exciting way with several serendipitous advances including fabrication of crystals, films and new materials with unique properties such as the nanotubes, carbon onions and met cars. Many of these discoveries have opened up new areas of modern mesoscopic physics and materials science. Particularly interesting is how some data available for clusters and fullerenes show periodicities which might be classified in "A Periodic Table in Three Dimensions".

  1. NASA Innovation Builds Better Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Nanotailor Inc., based in Austin, Texas, licensed Goddard Space Flight Center's unique single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) fabrication process with plans to make high-quality, low-cost SWCNTs available commercially. Carbon nanotubes are being used in a wide variety of applications, and NASA's improved production method will increase their applicability in medicine, microelectronics, advanced materials, and molecular containment. Nanotailor built and tested a prototype based on Goddard's process, and is using this technique to lower the cost and improve the integrity of nanotubes, offering a better product for use in biomaterials, advanced materials, space exploration, highway and building construction, and many other applications.

  2. Recycling dodecylamine intercalated vanadate nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Odair P., E-mail: odair@iqm.unicamp.br; Souza Filho, Antonio G., E-mail: agsf@fisica.ufc.br; Alves, Oswaldo L., E-mail: oalves@iqm.unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas-UNICAMP, LQES - Laboratorio de Quimica do Estado Solido, Instituto de Quimica (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    In this article, we report the thermal decomposition processes of dodecylamine intercalated vanadate nanotubes and their recycling process. Structural, vibrational, and morphological properties of the annealed samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The data analysis unveiled that vanadate nanotubes (VONTs) decompose into nanoplates which is isostructural to xerogel, and finally to nanoparticle aggregates whose composition is a single V{sub 2}O{sub 5} bulk phase. These aggregates can be successfully recycled for converting the residues of decomposition process into vanadate nanotubes again.

  3. Radiation reaction in various dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal'Tsov, Dmitri V.

    2002-07-01

    We discuss the radiation reaction problem for an electric charge moving in flat space-time of arbitrary dimensions. It is shown that four is the unique dimension where a local differential equation exists accounting for the radiation reaction and admitting a consistent mass renormalization (the Lorentz-Dirac equation). In odd dimensions Huygens's principle does not hold, and, as a result, the radiation reaction force depends on the whole past history of a charge (radiative tail). We show that the divergence in the tail integral can be removed by the mass renormalization only in the 2+1 theory. In even dimensions higher than four, divergences cannot be removed by the mass renormalization.

  4. Dimensions of Intercultural Communication Competence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭飞燕

    2016-01-01

    Intercultural communication competence can help us adapt better to the host culture and deal with culture shock suc-cessfully. This paper mainly discusses the dimensions of intercultural communication competence.

  5. Radiation reaction in various dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Galtsov, D V

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the radiation reaction problem for an electric charge moving in flat space-time of arbitrary dimensions. It is shown that four is the unique dimension where a local differential equation exists accounting for the radiation reaction and admitting a consistent mass-renormalization (the Dirac-Lorentz equation). In odd dimensions the Huygens principle does not hold; as a result, the radiation reaction force depends on the whole past history of a charge (radiative tail). We show that the divergence in the tail integral can be removed by the mass renormalization only in the 2+1 theory. In even dimensions higher than four, divergences can not be removed by a renormalization.

  6. Inflation from periodic extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Higaki, Tetsutaro

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a realization of a small field inflation based on string inspired supergravities. In theories accompanying extra dimensions, compactification of them with small radii is required for realistic situations. Since the extra dimension can have a periodicity, there will appear (quasi-)periodic functions under transformations of moduli of the extra dimensions in low energy scales. Such a periodic property can lead to a UV completion of so-called multi-natural inflation model where inflaton potential consists of a sum of multiple sinusoidal functions with a decay constant smaller than the Planck scale. As an illustration, we construct a SUSY breaking model, and then show that such an inflaton potential can be generated by a sum of world sheet instantons in intersecting brane models on extra dimensions containing $T^2/{\\mathbb Z}_2$ orbifold. We show also predictions of cosmic observables by numerical analyzes.

  7. Timbre Dimensions for Musical Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Gregory Roy

    This dissertation addresses the folowing question: Given the technologies to develop and implement any kind of sound generating and controlling device, what will the instrument designer, the composer, and the performer need to know in order to more fully utilize the dimensions of timbre in music and musical performance? This question is approached from the standpoint of music theory. Definitions of timbre and a few examples of related physical and perceptual research are reviewed. Included is a discussion of the essential elements of musical control and of intelligent organization of sound in music. This discussion raises more questions than can be answered simply. It is an attempt to unravel the nature of sound clues and sound qualities as they convey sound identities and musical gesture. A theoretical simplification of sound dimensions for musical use is proposed. Sounds which can be sustained indefinitely consist of steady-state acoustical dimensions. These dimensions rely upon the perceptual phenomenon of simultaneous fusion (synance). Sounds which can not be sustained indefinitely consist of transitions. Transitions may cause successive fusion (sonance). The discussion of steady-state and transition dimensions includes a review of a few informal experiments. This work reveals problems that will influence the musical use of timbre dimensions. It also leads to a theory for the organization and control of timbre dimensions in music. Among the timbre dimensions discussed are: spectral envelope, harmonic content, brightness, phase, inharmonicity, aperiodicity, and temporal transitions. Questions are raised regarding the perception of harmonic content. The effect of register on perception of tones consisting of from two to nine partials is explored and discussed. The size of interval between partials determines a unique quality. This is most apparent with tones consisting of only two or three partials (dions or trions).

  8. Phenomenology of universal extra dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.; /Florida U.

    2006-10-01

    In this proceeding, the phenomenology of Universal Extra Dimensions (UED), in which all the Standard Model fields propagate, is explored. We focus on models with one universal extra dimension, compactified on an S{sub 1}/Z{sub 2} orbifold. We revisit calculations of Kaluza-Klein (KK) dark matter without an assumption of the KK mass degeneracy including all possible coannihilations. We then contrast the experimental signatures of low energy supersymmetry and UED.

  9. 1D nanocrystals with precisely controlled dimensions, compositions, and architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xinchang; He, Yanjie; Jung, Jaehan; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-09-01

    The ability to synthesize a diverse spectrum of one-dimensional (1D) nanocrystals presents an enticing prospect for exploring nanoscale size- and shape-dependent properties. Here we report a general strategy to craft a variety of plain nanorods, core-shell nanorods, and nanotubes with precisely controlled dimensions and compositions by capitalizing on functional bottlebrush-like block copolymers with well-defined structures and narrow molecular weight distributions as nanoreactors. These cylindrical unimolecular nanoreactors enable a high degree of control over the size, shape, architecture, surface chemistry, and properties of 1D nanocrystals. We demonstrate the synthesis of metallic, ferroelectric, upconversion, semiconducting, and thermoelectric 1D nanocrystals, among others, as well as combinations thereof.

  10. Peel test of spinnable carbon nanotube webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandoker, Noman; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Ibrahim, Raafat; Huynh, Chi P.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents results of peel tests with spinnable carbon nanotube webs. Peel tests were performed to study the effect of orientation angles on interface energies between nanotubes. In absence of any binding agent the interface energy represents the Van Der Waals energies between the interacting nanotubes. Therefore, the effect of the orientations on Van Der Waals energies between carbon nanotubes is obtained through the peel test. It is shown that the energy for crossed nanotubes at 90° angle is lower than the energy for parallel nanotubes at 0° angle. This experimental observation was validated by hypothetical theoretical calculations.

  11. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  12. Carbon nanotubes: engineering biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Burgos, Juan C; Yu, Jiamei; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylinder-shaped allotropic forms of carbon, most widely produced under chemical vapor deposition. They possess astounding chemical, electronic, mechanical, and optical properties. Being among the most promising materials in nanotechnology, they are also likely to revolutionize medicine. Among other biomedical applications, after proper functionalization carbon nanotubes can be transformed into sophisticated biosensing and biocompatible drug-delivery systems, for specific targeting and elimination of tumor cells. This chapter provides an introduction to the chemical and electronic structure and properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a description of the main synthesis and post-synthesis methods. These sections allow the reader to become familiar with the specific characteristics of these materials and the manner in which these properties may be dependent on the specific synthesis and post-synthesis processes. The chapter ends with a review of the current biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes, highlighting successes and challenges.

  13. Enhanced Carbon Nanotube Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation utilizes carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with pseudo-capacitive MnO2 material as nano-composite electrode and ionic electrolyte for the...

  14. Noble-Metal Chalcogenide Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourdine Zibouche

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We explore the stability and the electronic properties of hypothetical noble-metal chalcogenide nanotubes PtS2, PtSe2, PdS2 and PdSe2 by means of density functional theory calculations. Our findings show that the strain energy decreases inverse quadratically with the tube diameter, as is typical for other nanotubes. Moreover, the strain energy is independent of the tube chirality and converges towards the same value for large diameters. The band-structure calculations show that all noble-metal chalcogenide nanotubes are indirect band gap semiconductors. The corresponding band gaps increase with the nanotube diameter rapidly approaching the respective pristine 2D monolayer limit.

  15. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K;

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individua...

  16. Dimension-based statistical learning of vowels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ran; Holt, Lori L

    2015-12-01

    Speech perception depends on long-term representations that reflect regularities of the native language. However, listeners rapidly adapt when speech acoustics deviate from these regularities due to talker idiosyncrasies such as foreign accents and dialects. To better understand these dual aspects of speech perception, we probe native English listeners' baseline perceptual weighting of 2 acoustic dimensions (spectral quality and vowel duration) toward vowel categorization and examine how they subsequently adapt to an "artificial accent" that deviates from English norms in the correlation between the 2 dimensions. At baseline, listeners rely relatively more on spectral quality than vowel duration to signal vowel category, but duration nonetheless contributes. Upon encountering an "artificial accent" in which the spectral-duration correlation is perturbed relative to English language norms, listeners rapidly down-weight reliance on duration. Listeners exhibit this type of short-term statistical learning even in the context of nonwords, confirming that lexical information is not necessary to this form of adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Moreover, learning generalizes to both novel lexical contexts and acoustically distinct altered voices. These findings are discussed in the context of a mechanistic proposal for how supervised learning may contribute to this type of adaptive plasticity in speech perception.

  17. Directing peptide crystallization through curvature control of nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobeaux, Frédéric; Tarabout, Christophe; Fay, Nicolas; Meriadec, Cristelle; Ligeti, Melinda; Buisson, David-Alexandre; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Artzner, Franck; Paternostre, Maïté

    2014-07-01

    In the absence of efficient crystallization methods, the molecular structures of fibrous assemblies have so far remained rather elusive. In this paper, we present a rational method to crystallize the lanreotide octapeptide by modification of a residue involved in a close contact. Indeed, we show that it is possible to modify the curvature of the lanreotide nanotubes and hence their diameter. This fine tuning leads to crystallization because the radius of curvature of the initially bidimensional peptide wall can be increased up to a point where the wall is essentially flat and a crystal is allowed to grow along a third dimension. By comparing X-ray diffraction data and Fourier transform Raman spectra, we show that the nanotubes and the crystals share similar cell parameters and molecular conformations, proving that there is indeed a structural continuum between these two morphologies. These results illustrate a novel approach to crystallization and represent the first step towards the acquisition of an Å-resolution structure of the lanreotide nanotubes β-sheet assembly.

  18. Field emission from open ended aluminum nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondare, V. N.; Balasubramanian, C.; Shende, S. V.; Joag, D. S.; Godbole, V. P.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Bhadbhade, M.

    2002-06-01

    This letter reports the field emission measurements from the nanotubes of aluminum nitride which were synthesized by gas phase condensation using the solid-vapor equilibria. A dc arc plasma reactor was used for producing the vapors of aluminum in a reactive nitrogen atmosphere. Nanoparticles and nanotubes of aluminum nitride were first characterized by transmission electron microscope and tube dimensions were found to be varying from 30 to 200 nm in diameter and 500 to 700 nm in length. These tubes were mixed with nanoparticles of size range between 5 and 200 nm in diameter. Tungsten tips coated with these nanoparticles and tubes were used as a field emitter. The field emission patterns display very interesting features consisting of sharp rings which were often found to change their shapes. The patterns are attributed to the open ended nanotubes of aluminum nitride. A few dot patterns corresponding to the nanoparticles were also seen to occur. The Fowler-Nordheim plots were seen to be nonlinear in nature, which reflects the semi-insulating behavior of the emitter. The field enhancement factor is estimated to be 34 500 indicating that the field enhancement due to the nanometric size of the emitter is an important cause for the observed emission.

  19. Molybdenum Disulfide Sheathed Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Chun SONG; Zhu De XU; Yi Fan ZHENG; Gui HAN; Bo LIU; Wei Xiang CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Single and double layered MoS2-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNs) were successfully prepared by pyrolyzing (NH4)2MoS4-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes in an H2 atmosphere at 900℃. MoS2-coated MWCNs would be expected to have different tribological and mechanical properties compared to MoS2, so it may have potential applications in many fields.

  20. Gold(I)-Alkanethiolate Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yu Xin

    2009-12-28

    (Figure Presented) A solution approach to assembling Au(I) - alkanethiolates into nanotube structures at room temperature is presented, in which Au(I) cations and alkanethiolate ligands are coordinated into thin platelet forms that then evolve into an open tubular configuration (see figure). The organic-inorganic hybrid nature of the nanotubes, their ability to be modified, and their high stability make them of interest for practical applications. © 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  1. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  2. Carbon nanotubes for coherent spintronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Churchill, H O H; Herring, P K

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes bridge the molecular and crystalline quantum worlds, and their extraordinary electronic, mechanical and optical properties have attracted enormous attention from a broad scientific community. We review the basic principles of fabricating spin-electronic devices based on individual......, electrically-gated carbon nanotubes, and present experimental efforts to understand their electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom, which in the future may enable quantum applications....

  3. On Gorenstein projective, injective and flat dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Winther; Frankild, Anders Juel; Holm, Henrik Granau

    2006-01-01

    Gorenstein homological dimensions are refinements of the classical homological dimensions, and finiteness singles out modules with amenable properties reflecting those of modules over Gorenstein rings. As opposed to their classical counterparts, these dimensions do not immediately come with pract...

  4. On transfinite extension of asymptotic dimension

    OpenAIRE

    Radul, Taras

    2006-01-01

    We prove that a transfinite extension of asymptotic dimension asind is trivial. We introduce a transfinite extension of asymptotic dimension asdim and give an example of metric proper space which has transfinite infinite dimension.

  5. Extra dimensions in space and time

    CERN Document Server

    Bars, Itzhak

    2010-01-01

    Covers topics such as Einstein and the Fourth Dimension; Waves in a Fifth Dimension; and String Theory and Branes Experimental Tests of Extra Dimensions. This book offers a discussion on Two-Time Physics

  6. Hemocompatibility of titania nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Barbara S; Yoriya, Sorachon; Grissom, Laura; Grimes, Craig A; Popat, Ketul C

    2010-11-01

    Hemocompatibility is a key consideration for the long-term success of blood contacting biomaterials; hence, there is a critical need to understand the physiological response elicited from blood/nano-biomaterial interactions. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption of key blood serum proteins, in vitro adhesion and activation of platelets, and clotting kinetics of whole blood on titania nanotube arrays. Previous studies have demonstrated improved mesenchymal stem cell functionality, osteoblast phenotypic behavior, localized drug delivery, and the production of endothelial cell ECM on titania nanotube arrays. Furthermore, these titania nanotube arrays have elicited minimal levels of monocyte activation and cytokine secretion, thus exhibiting a very low degree of immunogenicity. Titania nanotube arrays were fabricated using anodization technique and the surface morphology was examined through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crystalline phases were identified using glancing angled X-ray diffraction (GAXRD). Nanoindentation and scratch tests were used to characterize the mechanical properties of titania nanotube arrays. The adsorption of key blood proteins (albumin, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin-g) was evaluated using a micro-BCA assay and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adhesion and activation of platelets was investigated using live-cell staining, MTT assay, and SEM. Whole blood clotting kinetics was evaluated by measuring the free hemoglobin concentration, and SEM was used to visualize the clot formation. Our results indicate increased blood serum protein adsorption, platelet adhesion and activation, and whole blood clotting kinetics on titania nanotube arrays.

  7. Dimensions of attractors in pinched skew products

    OpenAIRE

    Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2011-01-01

    We study dimensions of strange non-chaotic attractors and their associated physical measures in so-called pinched skew products, introduced by Grebogi and his coworkers in 1984. Our main results are that the Hausdorff dimension, the pointwise dimension and the information dimension are all equal to one, although the box-counting dimension is known to be two. The assertion concerning the pointwise dimension is deduced from the stronger result that the physical measure is rectifiable. Our findi...

  8. Higuchi dimension of digital images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Ahammer

    Full Text Available There exist several methods for calculating the fractal dimension of objects represented as 2D digital images. For example, Box counting, Minkowski dilation or Fourier analysis can be employed. However, there appear to be some limitations. It is not possible to calculate only the fractal dimension of an irregular region of interest in an image or to perform the calculations in a particular direction along a line on an arbitrary angle through the image. The calculations must be made for the whole image. In this paper, a new method to overcome these limitations is proposed. 2D images are appropriately prepared in order to apply 1D signal analyses, originally developed to investigate nonlinear time series. The Higuchi dimension of these 1D signals is calculated using Higuchi's algorithm, and it is shown that both regions of interests and directional dependencies can be evaluated independently of the whole picture. A thorough validation of the proposed technique and a comparison of the new method to the Fourier dimension, a common two dimensional method for digital images, are given. The main result is that Higuchi's algorithm allows a direction dependent as well as direction independent analysis. Actual values for the fractal dimensions are reliable and an effective treatment of regions of interests is possible. Moreover, the proposed method is not restricted to Higuchi's algorithm, as any 1D method of analysis, can be applied.

  9. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2008-01-01

    an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From......In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms...... are known. The parameters of the liquid surface model and its potential applications are discussed. The model has been suggested for open end and capped nanotubes. The influence of the catalytic nanoparticle, atop which nanotubes grow, on the nanotube stability is also discussed. The suggested model gives...

  10. Glucose oxidase immobilization onto carbon nanotube networking

    CERN Document Server

    Karachevtsev, V A; Zarudnev, E S; Karachevtsev, M V; Leontiev, V S; Linnik, A S; Lytvyn, O S; Plokhotnichenko, A M; Stepanian, S G

    2012-01-01

    When elaborating the biosensor based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), it is necessary to solve such an important problem as the immobilization of a target biomolecule on the nanotube surface. In this work, the enzyme (glucose oxidase (GOX)) was immobilized on the surface of a nanotube network, which was created by the deposition of nanotubes from their solution in 1,2-dichlorobenzene by the spray method. 1-Pyrenebutanoic acid succinimide ester (PSE) was used to form the molecular interface, the bifunctional molecule of which provides the covalent binding with the enzyme shell, and its other part (pyrene) is adsorbed onto the nanotube surface. First, the usage of such a molecular interface leaves out the direct adsorption of the enzyme (in this case, its activity decreases) onto the nanotube surface, and, second, it ensures the enzyme localization near the nanotube. The comparison of the resonance Raman (RR) spectrum of pristine nanotubes with their spectrum in the PSE environment evidences the creat...

  11. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  12. Oligomer functionalized nanotubes and composites formed therewith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K; Sainsbury, Toby; Frechet, Jean M.J.

    2014-03-18

    Disclosed herein is a sequential functionalization methodology for the covalent modification of nanotubes with between one and four repeat units of a polymer. Covalent attachment of oligomer units to the surface of nanotubes results in oligomer units forming an organic sheath around the nanotubes, polymer-functionalized-nanotubes (P-NTs). P-NTs possess chemical functionality identical to that of the functionalizing polymer, and thus provide nanoscale scaffolds which may be readily dispersed within a monomer solution and participate in the polymerization reaction to form a polymer-nanotube/polymer composite. Formation of polymer in the presence of P-NTs leads to a uniform dispersion of nanotubes within the polymer matrix, in contrast to aggregated masses of nanotubes in the case of pristine-NTs. The covalent attachment of oligomeric units to the surface of nanotubes represents the formation of a functional nanoscale building block which can be readily dispersed and integrated within the polymer to form a novel composite material.

  13. LDRD final report on carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, P.A.; Rand, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes and their composites were examined using computational and experimental techniques in order to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of resins. Single walled nanotubes were the focus of the first year effort; however, sufficient quantities of high purity single walled nanotubes could not be obtained for mechanical property investigations. The unusually high electrical conductivity of composites loaded with <1% of multiwalled nanotubes is useful, and is the focus of continuing, externally funded, research.

  14. Formation and Structure of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang ZHANG; Zongquan LI; Jin XU

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes were simply synthesized by heating well-mixed boric acid, urea and iron nitrate powders at 1000℃. A small amount of BN nanowires was also obtained in the resultants. The morphological and structural characters of the BN nanostructures were studied using transmission electron microscopy. Other novel BN nanostructures, such as Y-junction nanotubes and bamboo-like nanotubes, were simultaneously observed. The growth mechanism of the BN nanotubes was discussed briefly.

  15. Attachment of Gold Nanoparticles to Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Cheng MA; Ning LUN; Shu Lin WEN

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were initially chemically modified with an H2SO4-HNO3 treatment,and subsequently activated with Pd-Sn catalytic nuclei via a one-step activation approach. These activated nanotubes were used as precursors for obtaining gold nanoparticles-attached nanotubes via simple electroless plating. This approach provides an efficient method for attachment of metal nanostructures to carbon nanotubes. Such novel hybrid nanostructures are attractive for many applications.

  16. Peridynamic modeling and simulation of polymer-nanotube composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Steven F.

    In this document, we develop and demonstrate a framework for simulating the mechanics of polymer materials that are reinforced by carbon nanotubes. Our model utilizes peridynamic theory to describe the mechanical response of the polymer and polymer-nanotube interfaces. We benefit from the continuum formulation used in peridynamics because (1) it allows the polymer material to be coarse-grained to the scale of the reinforcing nanofibers, and (2) failure via nanotube pull-out and matrix tearing are possible based on energetic considerations alone (i.e. without special treatment). To reduce the degrees of freedom that must be simulated, the reinforcement effect of the nanotubes is represented by a mesoscale bead-spring model. This approach permits the arbitrary placement of reinforcement ``strands'' in the problem domain and motivates the need for irregular quadrature point distributions, which have not yet been explored in the peridynamic setting. We address this matter in detail and report on aspects of mesh sensitivity that we uncovered in peridynamic simulations. Using a manufactured solution, we study the effects of quadrature point placement on the accuracy of the solution scheme in one and two dimensions. We demonstrate that square grids and the generator points of a centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) support solutions of similar accuracy, but CVT grids have desirable characteristics that may justify the additional computational cost required for their construction. Impact simulations provide evidence that CVT grids support fracture patterns that resemble those obtained on higher resolution cubic Cartesian grids with a reduced computational burden. With the efficacy of irregular meshing schemes established, we exercise our model by dynamically stretching a cylindrical specimen composed of the polymer-nanotube composite. We vary the number of reinforcements, alignment of the filler, and the properties of the polymer-nanotube interface. Our results suggest

  17. Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonesteel, Nicholas E [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes the work accomplished under the support of US DOE grant # DE-FG02-97ER45639, "Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions." The underlying hypothesis of the research supported by this grant has been that studying the unique behavior of correlated electrons in reduced dimensions can lead to new ways of understanding how matter can order and how it can potentially be used. The systems under study have included i) fractional quantum Hall matter, which is realized when electrons are confined to two-dimensions and placed in a strong magnetic field at low temperature, ii) one-dimensional chains of spins and exotic quasiparticle excitations of topologically ordered matter, and iii) electrons confined in effectively ``zero-dimensional" semiconductor quantum dots.

  18. The Geographical Dimension of Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Houston T.

    The events of September 11 ushered us all into a world in which our security and sense of invulnerability were savagely replaced by vulnerability and irrational fear. To the delight of our adversaries who planned these attacks, we often responded in ways that furthered their agenda by weakening the cultural colossus that we call home. Normally terrorism is viewed as intense but localized violence. Seldom is terrorism viewed in its more expansive dimensions. It is burned into our collective memories as a collapsed building, a shattered bus, an incinerated nightclub, or facilities closed by a few anthrax-laced letters. However, terrorism must be studied in dimensions larger than the view from a news camera. This conclusion forms the intellectual basis for The Geographical Dimension of Terrorism.

  19. Personality dimensions of opiate addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukov, M; Baba-Milkic, N; Lecic, D; Mijalkovic, S; Marinkovic, J

    1995-02-01

    A survey of 80 opiate addicts included in a detoxification program was conducted at the Institute on Addictions in Belgrade. In addition to a dependence diagnosis and mental disorders based on DSM-III-R, we applied a Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ) that measures the 3 major personality dimensions: novelty-seeking (NS), harm avoidance (HA) and reward dependence (RD). When compared with a control group (a sample of Yugoslav undergraduate students), the opiate addicts demonstrate significantly high NS dimension as well as significant divergences of HA and RD subscales. The surveyed opiate addicts demonstrate a high percentage of personality disorders specifically in cluster B. The personality dimensions of opiate addicts showed certain temperament traits, such as: impulsiveness, shyness with strangers, fear of uncertainty and dependence. NS, HA and RD determined by temperament specifics may be an etiological factor in forming of a personality disorder, an affective disorder as well as of a drug choice.

  20. Collider searches for extra dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landsberg, Greg; /Brown U.

    2004-12-01

    Searches for extra spatial dimensions remain among the most popular new directions in our quest for physics beyond the Standard Model. High-energy collider experiments of the current decade should be able to find an ultimate answer to the question of their existence in a variety of models. Until the start of the LHC in a few years, the Tevatron will remain the key player in this quest. In this paper, we review the most recent results from the Tevatron on searches for large, TeV{sup -1}-size, and Randall-Sundrum extra spatial dimensions, which have reached a new level of sensitivity and currently probe the parameter space beyond the existing constraints. While no evidence for the existence of extra dimensions has been found so far, an exciting discovery might be just steps away.

  1. In vivo evaluation of anodic TiO2 nanotubes: an experimental study in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Bauer, Sebastian; Lutz, Rainer; Meisel, Mark; Neukam, Friedrich Wilhelm; Toyoshima, Takeshi; Schmuki, Patrik; Nkenke, Emeka; Schlegel, Karl Andreas

    2009-04-01

    Because of their ability to mimic the dimensions of constituent components of natural bone and the possibility to serve as a gene and drug-delivery carrier, nanotubes seem to be a promising coating for medical implants. Aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a TiO(2) nanotube structured surface on periimplant bone formation in vivo when compared with an untreated standard titanium surface. Twenty-five titanium implants covered with an ordered TiO(2) nanotube layer with an individual tube diameter of 30 nm and 25 commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) implants were placed in the frontal skull of 25 domestic pigs. To evaluate the effects of the nanotube structured implants on the periimplant bone formation, bone-implant contact (BIC), and immunohistochemistry analysis were performed at day 3, 7, 14, 30, and 90. Evaluating immunohistochemistry, a significantly higher collagen type- I expression occurred at day 7 (p = 0.003), day 14 (p = 0.016), and day 30 (p = 0.044), for the nanostructured implants in comparison with the control group. It could be found that a nanotube structured implant surface with a diameter of 30 nm does influence bone formation and bone development by enhancing osteoblast function. SEM evaluation of the specimen surfaces revealed that the nanotube coatings do resist shearing forces that evoked by implant insertion. Because of their simple, low cost, flexible manufacturing and the possibility for the usage as drug or growth factor delivery system, nanotubes seem to be a promising method for future medical implant coatings.

  2. Novel poly-dopamine adhesive for a halloysite nanotube-Ru(bpy(32+ electrochemiluminescent sensor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xing

    Full Text Available Herein, for the first time, the electrochemiluminescent sensor based on Ru(bpy(3 (2+-modified electrode using dopamine as an adhesive was successfully developed. After halloysite nanotube slurry was cast on a glassy carbon electrode and dried, an alkaline dopamine solution was added on the electrode surface. Initially, polydopamine belts with dimensions of tens to hundreds of nanometers formed via oxidization of the dopamine by ambient oxygen. As the incubation time increased, the nanobelts became broader and then united with each other to form a polydopamine film. The halloysite nanotubes were embedded within the polydopamine film. The above electrode was soaked in Ru(bpy(3 (2+ aqueous solution to adsorb Ru(bpy(3 (2+ into the active sites of the halloysite nanotubes via cation-exchange procedure. Through this simple procedure, a Ru(bpy(3 (2+-modified electrode was obtained using only 6.25 microg Ru(bpy(3 (2+, 15.0 microg dopamine, and 9.0 microg halloysite nanotubes. The electrochemistry and electrochemiluminescence (ECL of the modified electrode was investigated using tripropylamine (TPA and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA as co-reactants. The different ECL behaviors of the modified electrode using NTA and TPA as well as the contact angle measurements reflected the hydrophilic character of the electrode. The results indicate that halloysite nanotubes have a high loading capacity for Ru(bpy(3 (2+ and that dopamine is suitable for the preparation of modified electrodes.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  4. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  6. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Haider; Yetisen, Ali K.; Ahmed, Rajib; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-01

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2-3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  7. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  8. Chiral gravity in higher dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Ootsuka, T; Ura, K; Ootsuka, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Erico; Ura, Kousuke

    2003-01-01

    We construct a chiral theory of gravity in 7 and 8 dimensions, which are equivalent to Einstein-Cartan theory using less variables. In these dimensions, we can construct such higher dimensional chiral gravity because of the existence of gravitational instanton. The octonionic-valued variables in the theory represent the deviation from the gravitational instanton, and from their non-associativity, prevents the theory to be SO(n) gauge invariant. Still the chiral gravity holds G_2 (7-D), and Spin(7) (8-D) gauge symmetry.

  9. The Ethical Dimension of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nogueira, Leticia Antunes; Nogueira, Tadeu Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The view of innovation as a positive concept has been deeply rooted in business and academic cultures ever since Schumpeter coined the concept of creative destruction. Even though there is a large body of literature on innovation studies, limited attention has been given to its ethical dimension....... In this chapter, the ethical implications of innovations are illustrated with a case study of “destructive creation” in the food industry, and upon which an argumentative analysis is conducted. The main message of this chapter is that innovations have inherent ethical dimensions and that quality innovations...

  10. The Creative Dimension of Visuality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Anders Ib

    2013-01-01

    own appearance. It will indicate an alternative conceptual framework based on Johann P. Arnason’s draft of tripartite culturalization which focuses on a shift from essences to dimensions of culture. This will be further developed by relating Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s idea of ‘chiasm’ of ‘the visible...... and the invisible’ to the notion of collective creativity and ‘the imaginary institution of society’ of Cornelius Castoriadis. In the theoretical relationship between Merleau-Ponty and Castoriadis it is possible to indicate a notion of visuality as a creative dimension....

  11. Theoretical Studies of the Interaction of Excitons with Charged Impurities in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayo, Benjamin O.

    A fundamental theory of the electronic and optical properties of semiconductors shows the importance of impurities, which are often unavoidable and can alter intrinsic properties of semiconductor materials substantially. While the subject of impurity doping is well understood in bulk semiconductors, the role and impact of doping in low dimensional materials like carbon nanotubes is still under investigation and there exists significant debate on the exact nature of electronic impurity levels in single-walled carbon nanotubes associated with adatoms. In this work, we address the role of impurities in single-walled carbon nanotubes. A simple model is developed for studying the interaction of bright (singlet) excitons in semiconducting single-wall nanotubes with charged impurities. The model reveals a red shift in the energy of excitonic states in the presence of an impurity, thus indicating binding of excitons in the impurity potential well. Signatures of several bound states were found in the absorption spectrum below the onset of excitonic optical transitions in the bare nanotube. The dependence of the binding energy on the model parameters, such as impurity charge and position, was determined and analytical fits were derived for a number of tubes of different diameter. The nanotube family splitting is seen in the diameter dependence, gradually decreasing with the diameter. By calculating the partial absorption coefficient for a small segment of nanotube the local nature of the wave function of the bound states was derived. Our studies provide useful insights into the role of the physical environment (here, a charged impurity atom) in the manipulation of the excited states of carbon nanotubes. We performed very detailed calculations of the electronic and optical properties of carbon nanotubes in the presence of an immobile impurity atom, thus going beyond previous many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) studies in which the carbon nanotubes were considered in vacuum

  12. Hybrid Composite of Polyaniline Containing Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-polyaniline hybrid material was synthesized by emulsion polymerization in-situ. The morphology of hybrid material was studied by TEM and X-ray diffraction. The conductivity of nanocomposite increases with the increasing of carbon nanotube content because of the new conductivity passageways formed by carbon nanotubes.

  13. Synthesis and Application of Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun Zeng; Zhenhua Li; Yuhong Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Owing to the unique structure, the superior physical and chemical properties, the super strong mechanical performances, and so on, carbon nanotubes have attracted the attention of researchers all over the world. In this article, the basic properties and the main production processes of carbon nanotubes are introduced in brief, and the progress of applied research for carbon nanotubes is reviewed.

  14. Computational Evidence for the Smallest Boron Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian Jie LIN; Dong Ju ZHANG; Cheng Bu LIU

    2006-01-01

    The structure of boron nanotubes (BNTs) was found not to be limited to hexagonal pyramidal structures. Based on density functional theory calculations we provided evidence for the smallest boron nanotube, a geometrical analog of the corresponding carbon nanotube. As shown by our calculations, the smallest BNT possesses highly structural, dynamical, and thermal stability, which should be interest for attempts at its synthesis.

  15. Large-scale synthesis of isolated Mn2O3 nanotube/fiber with ferric nitrate as catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Aifei; LIU Jiping; L(U) Guangshu

    2007-01-01

    Isolated Mn203 nanotubes and nanofibers were prepared very easily at a large scale with the liquid-phase catalysis method.The Mn2O3 nanotubes had dimensions of 30-50 nm (exterior diameter) and 0.2-1.0 μm (length),approximately.The Mn2O3 nanofibers had dimensions of 10-30 nm (diameter) and 0.4-2.0 μm (length),approximately.Nano-Mn2O3 with different microstructures including nanotubes,nanofibers and nanoparticles could be selectively synthesized by controlling the contents and proportions of potassium permanganate and ferric nitrate.Ferric nitrate was an ideal catalyst for the preparation of Mn2O3 nanotube/fiber.When cobalt nitrate or nickel nitrate was used as catalyst,only amorphous nano-Mn2O3 was synthesized.Xray diffraction (XRD) result shows that the Mn2O3 nanotube has a crystalline structure different from o-Mn2O3,t-Mn2O3,h-Mn2O3 and 7-Mn2O3.

  16. Quantum Gravity in Two Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ipsen, Asger Cronberg

    The topic of this thesis is quantum gravity in 1 + 1 dimensions. We will focus on two formalisms, namely Causal Dynamical Triangulations (CDT) and Dy- namical Triangulations (DT). Both theories regularize the gravity path integral as a sum over triangulations. The difference lies in the class...

  17. Massive Gravity in Three Dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Hohm, Olaf; Townsend, Paul K.

    2009-01-01

    A particular higher-derivative extension of the Einstein-Hilbert action in three spacetime dimensions is shown to be equivalent at the linearized level to the (unitary) Pauli-Fierz action for a massive spin-2 field. A more general model, which also includes "topologically-massive" gravity as a speci

  18. The Visuospatial Dimension of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Thierry; Passerault, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    The authors suggest that writing should be conceived of not only as a verbal activity but also as a visuospatial activity, in which writers process and construct visuospatial mental representations. After briefly describing research on visuospatial cognition, they look at how cognitive researchers have investigated the visuospatial dimension of…

  19. Unexploited Dimensions of Virtual Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruttkay, Zsófia; Reidsma, Dennis; Nijholt, Anton; Huang, Thomas; Nijholt, Anton; Pantic, Maja; Pentlant, Alex

    2007-01-01

    Virtual Humans are on the border of fiction and realism: while it is obvious that they do not exist in reality and function on different principles than real people, they have been endowed with human features such as being emotionally sensitive. In this article we argue that many dimensions, both hu

  20. Cosmology With Dynamical Extra Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Erickson, J K

    2005-01-01

    Nearly every attempt to unify the fundamental forces incorporates the idea of compact extra dimensions. The notion was introduced by Kaluza and Klein in the 1920s and is an essential part of contemporary string theory and M-theory. In most treatments the extra dimensions are static. We consider the consequences of extra dimensions with time-varying radii. The radii are modeled by light scalar fields. These may have unusual properties which produce observable effects, such as non-canonical kinetic energies, couplings to matter and radiation, and non- minimal coupling to gravity. Extra dimensions may be responsible for dark energy in the late universe. The simplest model of dark energy is characterized by its equation of state. We show that constraints placed on realistic models by the universality of free fall, variation of fundamental constants and metric tests of gravity are often stricter than bounds on the equation of state. Testing the equivalence principle maybe an effective way of distinguishing some qu...

  1. New dimensions in cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedl, P.; Sahai, E.; Weiss, S.; Yamada, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of cell migration in three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems and in vivo have revealed several differences when compared with cell migration in two dimensions, including their morphology and mechanical and signalling control. Here, researchers assess the contribution of 3D models to our

  2. Manual tracking in three dimensions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mrotek, L.A.; Gielen, C.C.A.M.; Flanders, M.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the manual tracking of targets that move in three dimensions. In the present study, human subjects followed, with the tip of a hand-held pen, a virtual target moving four times (period 5 s) around a novel, unseen path. Two basic types of target paths were used: a peanut-shaped

  3. Effective dimension in flocking mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglietto, Gabriel; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2011-03-01

    Even in its minimal representation (Vicsek Model, VM [T. Vicsek, A. Czirok, E. Ben-Jacob, I. Cohen and O. Shochet. Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 1226 (1995).]), the widespread phenomenon of flocking raises intriguing questions to the statistical physicists. While the VM is very close to the better understood XY Model because they share many symmetry properties, a major difference arises by the fact that the former can sustain long-range order in two dimensions, while the latter can not. Aiming to contribute to the understanding of this feature, by means of extensive numerical simulations of the VM, we study the network structure of clusters showing that they can also sustain purely orientational, mean-field-like, long-range order. We identify the reason of this capability with the key concept of "effective dimension." In fact, by analyzing the behavior of the average path length and the mean degree, we show that this dimension is very close to four, which coincides with the upper critical dimension of the XY Model, where orientational order is also of a mean-field nature. We expect that this methodology could be generalized to other types of dynamical systems.

  4. Competitive dimensions of human resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neykova Rumyana Mykolaivna

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the essence of human resources competitive dimensions. Their competitive priorities are analyzed in dynamic business environment, with an emphasis on the quality of human resources, their adaptive skills, communication skills and mobility. The attention is paid to the role behavior of personnel and the policies for its management in the context of cutting down management costs.

  5. Competitive dimensions of human resources

    OpenAIRE

    Neykova Rumyana Mykolaivna; Prokopenko Olha Volodymyrіvna; Shcherbachenko Viktoriia Oleksiivna

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the essence of human resources competitive dimensions. Their competitive priorities are analyzed in dynamic business environment, with an emphasis on the quality of human resources, their adaptive skills, communication skills and mobility. The attention is paid to the role behavior of personnel and the policies for its management in the context of cutting down management costs.

  6. Heat conduction in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, T. M.; Fesler, L. W.; Mongan, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Multidimensional heat conduction program computes transient temperature history and steady state temperatures of complex body geometries in three dimensions. Emphasis is placed on type of problems associated with Space Shuttle thermal protection system, but program could be used in thermal analysis of most three dimensional systems.

  7. Graphene: carbon in two dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail I. Katsnelson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon is one of the most intriguing elements in the Periodic Table. It forms many allotropes, some known from ancient times (diamond and graphite and some discovered 10-20 years ago (fullerenes and nanotubes. Interestingly, the two-dimensional form (graphene was only obtained very recently, immediately attracting a great deal of attention. Electrons in graphene, obeying a linear dispersion relation, behave like massless relativistic particles. This results in the observation of a number of very peculiar electronic properties – from an anomalous quantum Hall effect to the absence of localization – in this, the first two-dimensional material. It also provides a bridge between condensed matter physics and quantum electrodynamics, and opens new perspectives for carbon-based electronics.

  8. Soldering and Mass Generation in Four Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, R; Banerjee, Rabin; Wotzasek, Clovis

    2000-01-01

    We propose bosonised expressions for the chiral Schwinger models in four dimensions. Then, in complete analogy with the two dimensional case, we show the soldering of two bosonised chiral Schwinger models with opposite chiralities to yield the bosonised Schwinger model in four dimensions. The implications of the Schwinger model or its chiral version, as known for two dimensions, thereby get extended to four dimensions.

  9. Cosmology with dynamical extra dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Joel K.

    Nearly every attempt to unify the fundamental forces incorporates the idea of compact extra dimensions. The notion was introduced by Kaluza and Klein in the 1920s and is an essential part of contemporary string theory and M-theory. In most treatments the extra dimensions are static. We consider the consequences of extra dimensions with time-varying radii. The radii are modeled by light scalar fields. These may have unusual properties which produce observable effects, such as non-canonical kinetic energies, couplings to matter and radiation, and non-minimal coupling to gravity. Extra dimensions may be responsible for dark energy in the late universe. The simplest model of dark energy is characterized by its equation of state. We show that constraints placed on realistic models by the universality of free fall, variation of fundamental constants and metric tests of gravity are often stricter than bounds on the equation of state. Testing the equivalence principle maybe an effective way of distinguishing some quintessence models from a cosmological constant. In certain dark energy models the speed of sound is much less than the speed of light. We calculate how this affects the cosmic microwave background and show that the speed of sound may be measurable, provided dark energy is sufficiently dense at decoupling. This is another possible signature of quintessence. Dynamical extra dimensions may have consequences for the early universe. In the cyclic model, the universe is described in terms of a series of contractions and expansions of an extra dimension. The big bang is preceded by a big crunch and quantum fluctuations of the scalar field produce structure in universe. We consider how the fluctuations evolve and build over many cycles and show that there are no observable instabilities or adverse effects. In the cyclic model extra dimensions act as both dark energy and as an agent to cause contraction and a big crunch. Previous theorems suggested that contraction

  10. Multiple dimensions of cardiopulmonary dyspnea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Jiang-na; XIONG Chang-ming; YAO Wei; FANG Qiu-hong; ZHU Yuan-jue; CHENG Xian-sheng; Karel P Van de Woestijne

    2011-01-01

    Background The current theory of dyspnea perception presumes a multidimensional conception of dyspnea.However,its validity in patients with cardiopulmonary dyspnea has not been investigated.Methods A respiratory symptom checklist incorporating spontaneously reported descriptors of sensory experiences of breathing discomfort,affective aspects,and behavioral items was administered to 396 patients with asthma,chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD),diffuse parenchymal lung disease,pulmonary vascular disease,chronic heart failure,and medically unexplained dyspnea.Symptom factors measuring different qualitative components of dyspnea were derived by a principal component analysis.The separation of patient groups was achieved by a variance analysis on symptom factors.Results Seven factors appeared to measure three dimensions of dyspnea:sensory (difficulty breathing and phase of respiration,depth and frequency of breathing,urge to breathe,wheeze),affective (chest tightness,anxiety),and behavioral (refraining from physical activity) dimensions.Difficulty breathing and phase of respiration occurred more often in COPD,followed by asthma (R2=0.12).Urge to breathe was unique for patients with medically unexplained dyspnea (R2=0.12).Wheeze occurred most frequently in asthma,followed by COPD and heart failure (R2=0.17).Chest tightness was specifically linked to medically unexplained dyspnea and asthma (R2=0.04).Anxiety characterized medically unexplained dyspnea (R2=0.08).Refraining from physical activity appeared more often in heart failure,pulmonary vascular disease,and COPD (R2=0.15).Conclusions Three dimensions with seven qualitative components of dyspnea appeared in cardiopulmonary disease and the components under each dimension allowed separation of different patient groups.These findings may serve as a validation on the multiple dimensions of cardiopulmonary dyspnea.

  11. Individual dispersion of synthetic imogolite nanotubes via droplet evaporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG HuiXian; SU ZhaoHui

    2007-01-01

    Morphology of synthetic imogolite nanotubes formed in droplet evaporation was investigated by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. The nanotubes form a dense entangled network at higher concentrations, while at lower concentrations the nanotubes are liable to form oriented bundles. Under enthanol atmosphere, individual dispersion of nanotubes was observed for the first time, which reveals the length polydispersity of synthetic imogolite nanotubes.

  12. Growing carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Ando

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of ‘fullerenes’ added a new dimension to the knowledge of carbon science1; and the subsequent discovery of ‘carbon nanotubes’ (CNTs, the elongated fullerene added a new dimension to the knowledge of technology2;. Today, ‘nanotechnology’ is a hot topic attracting scientists, industrialists, journalists, governments, and even the general public. Nanotechnology is the creation of functional materials, devices, and systems through control of matter on the nanometer scale and the exploitation of novel phenomena and properties of matter (physical, chemical, biological, electrical, etc. at that length scale. CNTs are supposed to be a key component of nanotechnology. Almost every week a new potential application of CNTs is identified, stimulating scientists to peep into this tiny tube with ever increasing curiosity.

  13. Carbon nanotube coated fiber Bragg grating for photomechanical optic modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivananju, B N; Suri, Ashish; Asokan, Sundarrajan; Misra, Abha

    2013-09-01

    We have demonstrated novel concept of utilizing the photomechanical actuation in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to tune and reversibly switch the Bragg wavelength. When fiber Bragg grating coated with CNTs (CNT-FBG) is exposed externally to a wide range of optical wavelengths, e.g., ultraviolet to infrared (0.2-200 μm), a strain is induced in the CNTs which alters the grating pitch and refractive index in the CNT-FBG system resulting in a shift in the Bragg wavelength. This novel approach will find applications in telecommunication, sensors and actuators, and also for real time monitoring of the photomechanical actuation in nanoscale materials.

  14. Fibroblast functionality on novel Ti-30Ta nanotube array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capellato, Patricia, E-mail: pat_capellato@yahoo.com.br [Department of Materials, Faculty of Engineering Guaratingueta, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, Av. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha, 333, Pedregulho, CEP 12516-410, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil); Smith, Barbara S. [School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); Popat, Ketul C. [School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Claro, Ana P.R. Alves [Department of Materials, Faculty of Engineering Guaratingueta, Sao Paulo State University-UNESP, Av. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha, 333, Pedregulho, CEP 12516-410, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2012-10-01

    In this study, the mechanical substrate and topographical surface properties of anodized Ti-30Ta alloy were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and contact angle measurement. The anodization process was performed in an electrolyte solution containing HF (48%) and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (98%) in the volumetric ratios 1:9 with the addition of 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) at 15 V, 25 V and 35 V for 20 and 40 min, producing a nanotube architecture when anodized at 35 V for 40 min. Human dermal fibroblasts (HDF, neonatal) were utilized to evaluate the biocompatibility of Ti-30Ta nanotubes and Ti-30Ta alloy after 1 and 3 days of culture. Cellular adhesion, proliferation, viability, cytoskeletal organization and morphology were investigated using fluorescence microscope imaging, biochemical assay and SEM imaging respectively. The results presented identify altered material properties and improved cellular interaction on Ti-30Ta nanotubes as compared to Ti-30 Ta alloy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface was modified by anodization, biomimetic treatment and ion bean etching. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEM, EDS and contact angle measurements were used to characterize the surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Group 5 the most hydrophobic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Group 4 the most hydrophilic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Group 3 and 4 are the more indicated for biomedical application.

  15. Architecture and Characteristics of Bacterial Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Gyanendra P; Malli Mohan, Ganesh Babu; Dubrovsky, Anna; Amen, Triana; Tsipshtein, Shai; Rouvinski, Alex; Rosenberg, Alex; Kaganovich, Daniel; Sherman, Eilon; Medalia, Ohad; Ben-Yehuda, Sigal

    2016-02-22

    Bacteria display an array of contact-dependent interaction systems that have evolved to facilitate direct cell-to-cell communication. We have previously identified a mode of bacterial communication mediated by nanotubes bridging neighboring cells. Here, we elucidate nanotube architecture, dynamics, and molecular components. Utilizing Bacillus subtilis as a model organism, we found that at low cell density, nanotubes exhibit remarkable complexity, existing as both intercellular tubes and extending tubes, with the latter frequently surrounding the cells in a "root-like" fashion. Observing nanotube formation in real time showed that these structures are formed in the course of minutes, displaying rapid movements. Utilizing a combination of super-resolution, light, and electron microscopy, we revealed that nanotubes are composed of chains of membranous segments harboring a continuous lumen. Furthermore, we discovered that a conserved calcineurin-like protein, YmdB, presents in nanotubes and is required for both nanotube production and intercellular molecular trade.

  16. A DFT study of adsorption of glycine onto the surface of BC2N nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Alireza; Azmoodeh, Zivar; Javan, Masoud Bezi; Lemeski, E. Tazikeh; Karami, Leila

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical study of structure and the energy interaction of amino acid glycine (NH2CH2COOH) with BC2N nanotube is crucial for apperception behavior occurring at the nanobiointerface. Herein, we studied the adsorption of glycine in their radical and zwitterionic forms upon the surface of BC2N nanotube using M06 functional and 6-311G** standard basis set. We also considered the different orientations of the glycine amino acid on the surface of adsorbent. Further, we found out that the stability of glycine from its carbonyl group is higher than hydroxyl and amine groups. Our results also indicated that the electronic structure of BC2N nanotube on the adsorption of glycine from its amine group is more altered than the other groups. Our study exhibits that opto-electronic property of adsorbent is changed after the glycine adsorption.

  17. Selective etching of metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes with hydrogen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanien, A; Tokumoto, M; Umek, P; Vrbanič, D; Mozetič, M; Mihailović, D; Venturini, P; Pejovnik, S

    2005-02-01

    We present Raman scattering and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) measurements on hydrogen plasma etched single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Interestingly, both the STM and Raman spectroscopy show that the metallic SWNTs are dramatically altered and highly defected by the plasma treatment. In addition, structural characterizations show that metal catalysts are detached from the ends of the SWNT bundles. For semiconducting SWNTs we observe no feature of defects or etching along the nanotubes. Raman spectra in the radial breathing mode region of plasma-treated SWNT material show that most of the tubes are semiconducting. These results show that hydrogen plasma treatment favours etching of metallic nanotubes over semiconducting ones and therefore could be used to tailor the electronic properties of SWNT raw materials.

  18. Pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanotube and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramel, A. A.; Gupta, M. C.; Lee, H. R.; Yu, J.; Edwards, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we report on the fabrication of carbon nanotube thin films via pulsed laser deposition using a pulsed, diode pumped, Tm:Ho:LuLF laser with 2 μm wavelength. The thin films were deposited on silicon substrates using pure carbon nanotube targets and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite targets. Raman spectra, scanning electron micrographs, and transmission electron micrographs show that carbon nanotubes are present in the deposited thin films, and that the pulsed laser deposition process causes minimal degradation to the quality of the nanotubes when using pure carbon nanotube targets.

  19. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    modifies their transport behaviour. Interaction between electrons inside and outside a quantum dot is manifested in SU(4) Kondo behavior and level renormalization. Interaction within a dot leads to Wigner molecules and more complex correlated states. This review takes an experimental perspective informed...... and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and from valley freedom. We focus on the interplay between the two....... In single quantum dots defined in short lengths of nanotube, the energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are revealed by Coulomb blockade spectroscopy. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli...

  20. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jódar, Esther; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio; Rojas, Fernando

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case.

  1. Hydrodynamic properties of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, J H; Werder, T; Jaffe, R L; Koumoutsakos, P

    2004-06-01

    We study water flowing past an array of single walled carbon nanotubes using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For carbon nanotubes mounted with a tube spacing of 16.4 x 16.4 nm and diameters of 1.25 and 2.50 nm, respectively, we find drag coefficients in reasonable agreement with the macroscopic, Stokes-Oseen solution. The slip length is -0.11 nm for the 1.25 nm carbon nanotube, and 0.49 for the 2.50 nm tube for a flow speed of 50 m/s, respectively, and 0.28 nm for the 2.50 nm tube at 200 m/s. A slanted flow configuration with a stream- and spanwise velocity component of 100 ms(-1) recovers the two-dimensional results, but exhibits a significant 88 nm slip along the axis of the tube. These results indicate that slip depends on the particular flow configuration.

  2. Bloch oscillations in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jodar, Esther; Perez-Garrido, Antonio [Departamento Fisica Aplicada, Antiguo Hospital de Marina Campus Muralla del Mar, UPCT, Cartagena 30202 Murcia (Spain); Rojas, Fernando [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia-UNAM, Apartado Postal 356, Ensenada, Baja California 22800 (Mexico)], E-mail: ejodar@upct.es

    2009-05-27

    Bloch oscillations arise when electrons are in a one-dimensional linear chain of atoms under a constant electric field. In this paper we show numerically that electrons in different types of carbon nanotubes show oscillations with a Bloch frequency proportional to the constant electric field applied along the nanotube axis. We show these oscillations, calculating the quadratic displacement as a function of the electric field. Because of the double periodicity of the nanotubes' geometry (the lattice constant and the lines of atoms) two frequencies appear, one twice the value of the other. These frequencies coincide perfectly with those predicted for a linear chain of atoms, taking into account the periodicity considered in each case. (fast track communication)

  3. Adsorption on the carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yi; YANG Xiao-bao; NI Jun

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is a subject of growing experimental and theoretical interest.The possible adsorbed patterns of atoms and molecules on the single-walled carbon nanotubes vary with the diameters and chirality of the tubes due to the confinement.The curvature of the carbon nanotube surface enlarges the distance of the adsorbate atoms and thus enhances the stability of high coverage structures of adsorbate.There exist two novel high-coverage stable structures of potassium adsorbed on SWCNTs,which are not stable on graphite.The electronic properties of SWCNTs can be modified by adsorbate atoms and metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semi-conductor transitions can be achieved by the doping of alkali atoms.

  4. Self-response multi-functional composite material base on carbon nanotube paper using deicing, flame retardancy, thermal insulation, and lightning-strike protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hetao; Zhang, Zhichun; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanotube paper (CNP) based multi-functional composite material is an attractive candidate for deicing, flame retardancy, thermal insulation and lighting strike protection due to the excellent conductivity, light weight and thin dimensions. In this article, multi-functional carbon nanotube paper was fabricated successfully by using commercial carbon nanotube. As a deicing composite material, carbon nanotube was used directly without pretreatment in fabricating carbon nanotube paper. The conductivities of the carbon nanotube paper and deicing composite were 77.8S/cm and 64.9S/ respectively. Electrical heating and deicing performance were test by infrared camera with deicing time less than 220s and 450s to melt a certain amount of ice under different ambient condition. CNT was grafted by zirconium (IV) butoxide solution and dimethyl dichlorosilicane to form co-oligomers on the tube surface while oligomers decompose under a certain temperature to develop an inorganic layer of silicon zirconium oxide. The oxidizing temperature of carbon nanotube increases more than 20°C and the weight loss rate decreases 20% than the untreated carbon nanotube. Lightning protection material required high electro conductivity, due to the utmost high current in a short time. Therefore, silver nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of carbon nanotube with the diameter around 100nm. The conductivity increased sharply from 84s/cm to1756s/cm with the mount of 5.9wt% Ag of the modified carbon nanotube paper because the silver nanoparticles deposited on the surface. In addition, the silver modified also can be used as thermal insulation material decreasing the infrared radiation.

  5. Epitaxial Approaches to Carbon Nanotube Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismach, Ariel

    Carbon nanotubes have unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties, which make them ideal candidates as building blocks in nano-electronic and electromechanical systems. However, their organization into well-defined geometries and arrays on surfaces remains a critical challenge for their integration into functional nanosystems. In my PhD, we developed a new approach for the organization of carbon nanotubes directed by crystal surfaces. The principle relies on the guided growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by atomic features presented on anisotropic substrates. We identified three different modes of surface-directed growth (or 'nanotube epitaxy'), in which the growth of carbon nanotubes is directed by crystal substrates: We first observed the nanotube unidirectional growth along atomic steps ('ledge-directed epitaxy') and nanofacets ('graphoepitaxy') on the surface of miscut C-plane sapphire and quartz. The orientation along crystallographic directions ('lattice-directed epitaxy') was subsequently observed by other groups on different crystals. We have proposed a "wake growth" mechanism for the nanotube alignment along atomic steps and nanofacets. In this mechanism, the catalyst nanoparticle slides along the step or facet, leaving the nanotube behind as a wake. In addition, we showed that the combination of surface-directed growth with external forces, such as electric-field and gas flow, can lead to the simultaneous formation of complex nanotube structures, such as grids and serpentines. The "wake growth" model, which explained the growth of aligned nanotubes, could not explain the formation of nanotube serpentines. For the latter, we proposed a "falling spaghetti" mechanism, in which the nanotube first grows by a free-standing process, aligned in the direction of the gas flow, then followed by absorption on the stepped surface in an oscillatory manner, due to the competition between the drag force caused by the gas flow on the suspended

  6. Processing and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Czabaj, Michael W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Hull, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the synthesis of large-scale quantities of carbon nanotubes (CNT) have provided the opportunity to study the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites using these novel materials as reinforcement. Nanocomp Technologies, Inc. currently supplies large sheets with dimensions up to 122 cm x 244 cm containing both single-wall and few-wall CNTs. The tubes are approximately 1 mm in length with diameters ranging from 8 to 12 nm. In the present study being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), single and multiple layers of CNT sheets were infused or coated with various polymer solutions that included commercial toughened-epoxies and bismaleimides, as well as a LaRC developed polyimide. The resulting CNT composites were tested in tension using a modified version of ASTM D882-12 to determine their strength and modulus values. The effects of solvent treatment and mechanical elongation/alignment of the CNT sheets on the tensile performance of the composite were determined. Thin composites (around 50 wt% CNT) fabricated from acetone condensed and elongated CNT sheets with either a BMI or polyimide resin solution exhibited specific tensile moduli approaching that of toughened epoxy/ IM7 carbon fiber unidirectional composites.

  7. Carbon nanotubes and graphene towards soft electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2014-04-01

    Although silicon technology has been the main driving force for miniaturizing device dimensions to improve cost and performance, the current application of Si to soft electronics (flexible and stretchable electronics) is limited due to material rigidity. As a result, various prospective materials have been proposed to overcome the rigidity of conventional Si technology. In particular, nano-carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are promising due to outstanding elastic properties as well as an excellent combination of electronic, optoelectronic, and thermal properties compared to conventional rigid silicon. The uniqueness of these nano-carbon materials has opened new possibilities for soft electronics, which is another technological trend in the market. This review covers the recent progress of soft electronics research based on CNTs and graphene. We discuss the strategies for soft electronics with nano-carbon materials and their preparation methods (growth and transfer techniques) to devices as well as the electrical characteristics of transparent conducting films (transparency and sheet resistance) and device performances in field effect transistor (FET) (structure, carrier type, on/off ratio, and mobility). In addition to discussing state of the art performance metrics, we also attempt to clarify trade-off issues and methods to control the trade-off on/off versus mobility). We further demonstrate accomplishments of the CNT network in flexible integrated circuits on plastic substrates that have attractive characteristics. A future research direction is also proposed to overcome current technological obstacles necessary to realize commercially feasible soft electronics.

  8. Double Semions in Arbitrary Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Michael H.; Hastings, Matthew B.

    2016-10-01

    We present a generalization of the double semion topological quantum field theory to higher dimensions, as a theory of {d-1} dimensional surfaces in a d dimensional ambient space. We construct a local Hamiltonian that is a sum of commuting projectors and analyze the excitations and the ground state degeneracy. Defining a consistent set of local rules requires the sign structure of the ground state wavefunction to depend not just on the number of disconnected surfaces, but also upon their higher Betti numbers through the semicharacteristic. For odd d the theory is related to the toric code by a local unitary transformation, but for even d the dimension of the space of zero energy ground states is in general different from the toric code and for even {d > 2} it is also in general different from that of the twisted {Z_2} Dijkgraaf-Witten model.

  9. INTERDEPENDENCE BETWEEN RELATIONSHIP QUALITY DIMENSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Pepur

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Tourism-dependent economy, unfavourable structure of accommodation and hotel capacity, seasonality of business and liquidity problems indicate importance of the relationships between hotels and banks in Croatia. Since the capital investments in new and modern capacities are necessity, the quality of their relationship would determine the future of Croatian economy as a whole in the long run. Regarding the capital investments, it is crucially important that cooperation between the employees in both business entities is based on the satisfaction, trust and commitment. In this way, every potential uncertainty as a consequence of the entity’s actions could be minimized. In this paper, 356 tourist objects are hierarchically clustered according to the relationship quality dimensions for the purpose of testing the characteristics according to which the clusters significantly differentiate. Consequently, the interdependence between the observed relationship quality dimensions is examined.

  10. Flavor Symmetries in Extra Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Aranda, A; Aranda, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    We present a model of flavor based on a discrete local symmetry that reproduces all fermion masses and mixing angles both in the quark and lepton sectors. The particle content of the model is that of the standard model plus an additional flavon field. All the fields propagate in a fifth universal extra dimension and the flavor scale is associated with the cutoff of the 5D theory which is $\\sim 10$ TeV. The Yukawa matrices as well as the Majorana mass matrix for the neutrinos are generated by higher dimension operators involving the flavon field. When the flavon field acquires a vacuum expectation value it breaks the flavor symmetry and thus generates the Yukawa couplings. The model is consistent with the nearly bimaximal solution to the solar and atmospheric neutrino deficits.

  11. The influence of titania-zirconia-zirconium titanate nanotube characteristics on osteoblast cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minagar, Sepideh; Li, Yuncang; Berndt, Christopher C; Wen, Cuie

    2015-01-01

    Studies of biomaterial surfaces and their influence on cell behavior provide insights concerning the design of surface physicochemical and topography properties of implant materials. Fabrication of biocompatible metal oxide nanotubes on metallic biomaterials, especially titanium alloys such as Ti50Zr via anodization, alters the surface chemistry as well as surface topography of the alloy. In this study, four groups of TiO2-ZrO2-ZrTiO4 nanotubes that exhibit diverse nanoscale dimensional characteristics (i.e. inner diameter Di, outer diameter Do and wall thicknesses Wt) were fabricated via anodization. The nanotubes were annealed and characterized using scanning electron microscopy and 3-D profilometry. The potential applied during anodization influenced the oxidation rate of titanium and zirconium, thereby resulting in different nanoscale characteristics for the nanotubes. The different oxidation and dissolution rates both led to changes in the surface roughness parameters. The in vitro cell response to the nanotubes with different nanoscale dimensional characteristics was assessed using osteoblast cells (SaOS2). The results of the MTS assay indicated that the nanotubes with inner diameter (Di)≈40nm exhibited the highest percentage of cell adhesion of 41.0%. This result can be compared to (i) 25.9% cell adhesion at Di≈59nm, (ii) 33.1% at Di≈64nm, and (iii) 33.5% at Di≈82nm. The nanotubes with Di≈59nm exhibited the greatest roughness parameter of Sa (mean roughness), leading to the lowest ability to interlock with SaOS2 cells.

  12. Atomistic Simulations of Nanotube Fracture

    CERN Document Server

    Belytschko, T; Schatz, G; Ruoff, R S

    2002-01-01

    The fracture of carbon nanotubes is studied by atomistic simulations. The fracture behavior is found to be almost independent of the separation energy and to depend primarily on the inflection point in the interatomic potential. The rangle of fracture strians compares well with experimental results, but predicted range of fracture stresses is marketly higher than observed. Various plausible small-scale defects do not suffice to bring the failure stresses into agreement with available experimental results. As in the experiments, the fracture of carbon nanotubes is predicted to be brittle. The results show moderate dependence of fracture strength on chirality.

  13. Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Samina; Bullmore, Daniel; Duran, Michael; Jacobs, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Different synthesizing methods are used to create various nanostructures of carbon; we are mainly interested in single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, (SWCNTs) and (MWCNTs) respectively. The properties of these tubes are related to their synthetic methods, chirality, and diameter. The extremely sturdy structure of CNTs, with their distinct thermal and electromagnetic properties, suggests a tremendous use of these tubes in electronics and medicines. Here, we analyze various physical properties of SWCNTs with a special emphasis on electromagnetic and chemical properties. By examining their electrical properties, we demonstrate the viability of discrete CNT based components. After considering the advantages of using CNTs over microstructures, we make a case for the advancement and development of nanostructures based electronics. As for current CNT applications, it's hard to overlook their use and functionality in the development of cancer treatment. Whether the tubes are involved in chemotherapeutic drug delivery, molecular imaging and targeting, or photodynamic therapy, we show that the remarkable properties of SWCNTs can be used in advantageous ways by many different industries.

  14. Carbon nanotube computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulaker, Max M; Hills, Gage; Patil, Nishant; Wei, Hai; Chen, Hong-Yu; Wong, H-S Philip; Mitra, Subhasish

    2013-09-26

    The miniaturization of electronic devices has been the principal driving force behind the semiconductor industry, and has brought about major improvements in computational power and energy efficiency. Although advances with silicon-based electronics continue to be made, alternative technologies are being explored. Digital circuits based on transistors fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to outperform silicon by improving the energy-delay product, a metric of energy efficiency, by more than an order of magnitude. Hence, CNTs are an exciting complement to existing semiconductor technologies. Owing to substantial fundamental imperfections inherent in CNTs, however, only very basic circuit blocks have been demonstrated. Here we show how these imperfections can be overcome, and demonstrate the first computer built entirely using CNT-based transistors. The CNT computer runs an operating system that is capable of multitasking: as a demonstration, we perform counting and integer-sorting simultaneously. In addition, we implement 20 different instructions from the commercial MIPS instruction set to demonstrate the generality of our CNT computer. This experimental demonstration is the most complex carbon-based electronic system yet realized. It is a considerable advance because CNTs are prominent among a variety of emerging technologies that are being considered for the next generation of highly energy-efficient electronic systems.

  15. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ying; LI WenXin

    2008-01-01

    With large-scale production and application at large scale, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may cause ad-verse response to the environment and human health. Thus, study on bio-effects and safety of CNTs has attracted great attention from scientists and governments worldwide. This report briefly summa-rizes the main results from the in vitro toxicity study of CNTs. The emphasis is placed on the descrip-tion of a variety of factors affecting CNTs cytotoxicity, including species of CNTs, impurities contained,lengths of CNTs, aspect ratios, chemical modification, and assaying methods of cytotoxicity. However,experimental information obtained thus far on CNTs' cytotoxicity is lacking in comparability, and some-times there is controversy about it. In order to assess more accurately the potential risks of CNTs to human health, we suggest that care should be taken for issues such as chemical modification and quantitative characterization of CNTa in cytotoxicity assessment. More importantly, studies on physical and chemical mechanisms of CNTs' cytotoxicity should be strengthened; assaying methods and evaluating criteria characterized by nanotoxicology should be gradually established.

  16. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With large-scale production and application at large scale, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may cause ad-verse response to the environment and human health. Thus, study on bio-effects and safety of CNTs has attracted great attention from scientists and governments worldwide. This report briefly summa-rizes the main results from the in vitro toxicity study of CNTs. The emphasis is placed on the descrip-tion of a variety of factors affecting CNTs cytotoxicity, including species of CNTs, impurities contained, lengths of CNTs, aspect ratios, chemical modification, and assaying methods of cytotoxicity. However, experimental information obtained thus far on CNTs’ cytotoxicity is lacking in comparability, and some-times there is controversy about it. In order to assess more accurately the potential risks of CNTs to human health, we suggest that care should be taken for issues such as chemical modification and quantitative characterization of CNTs in cytotoxicity assessment. More importantly, studies on physical and chemical mechanisms of CNTs’ cytotoxicity should be strengthened; assaying methods and evaluating criteria characterized by nanotoxicology should be gradually established.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Delzeit, Clement J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for cleaning or otherwise removing amorphous carbon and other residues that arise in growth of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array. The CNT array is exposed to a plurality of hydroxyls or hydrogen, produced from a selected vapor or liquid source such as H2O or H2O2. and the hydroxyls or hydrogen (neutral or electrically charged) react with the residues to produce partly or fully dissolved or hydrogenated or hydroxylizated products that can be removed or separated from the CNT array. The hydroxyls or hydrogen can be produced by heating the CNT array, residue and selected vapor or liquid source or by application of an electromagnetic excitation signal with a selected frequency or range of frequencies to dissociate the selected vapor or liquid. The excitation frequency can be chirped to cover a selected range of frequencies corresponding to dissociation of the selected vapor or liquid. Sonication may be uscd to supplement dissociation of the H2O and/or H2O2.

  18. Læsningens sproglige dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulvad, Ruth; Kabel, Kristine

    2007-01-01

    Flere af projekterne i Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning arbejder for at styrke læsning gennem et kombineret fokus på teksters sproglige dimension og på den pædagogiske kontekst, som teksterne indgår i. To af dem har som mål at designe et kompetenceløft for seminarieundervisere og at udvikle...

  19. Performance appraisal: dimensions and determinants

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The determinants of the dimensions that shape a formal system of performance appraisal are studied in relation to a sample of Spanish manufacturing establishments. In particular, the factors that influence the measures used to evaluate performance, the person who carries out such appraisal and its frequency are analysed. Our results show that the characteristics of the establishment exert a significant influence on the configuration of performance appraisal. Specifically, we find that the use...

  20. The social dimension of entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes an integrative framework to conceptualize important social dimensions of entrepreneurship. The paper reviews and evaluates the current status of research dealing with entrepreneurship, social capital and trust. The proposed framework rests on the recognition that entrepreneurial...... activities are results of social interactions and mechanisms. In consequence, entrepreneurship cannot merely be understood in terms of 'personality characteristics' or in sterile economic terms. The paper addresses by concluding implications for practitioners and for research....

  1. The social dimensions of entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes an integrative framework to conceptualize important social dimensions of entrepreneurship. The paper reviews and evaluates the current status of research dealing with entrepreneurship, social capital and trust. The proposed framework rests on the recognition that entrepreneurial...... activities are results of social interactions and mechanisms. In consequence, entrepreneurship cannot merely be understood in terms of "personality characteristics" or in sterile economic terms. In closing, the paper addresses implications for practitioners and for research. Udgivelsesdato: AUG...

  2. Wave equations in higher dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Shi-Hai

    2011-01-01

    Higher dimensional theories have attracted much attention because they make it possible to reduce much of physics in a concise, elegant fashion that unifies the two great theories of the 20th century: Quantum Theory and Relativity. This book provides an elementary description of quantum wave equations in higher dimensions at an advanced level so as to put all current mathematical and physical concepts and techniques at the reader’s disposal. A comprehensive description of quantum wave equations in higher dimensions and their broad range of applications in quantum mechanics is provided, which complements the traditional coverage found in the existing quantum mechanics textbooks and gives scientists a fresh outlook on quantum systems in all branches of physics. In Parts I and II the basic properties of the SO(n) group are reviewed and basic theories and techniques related to wave equations in higher dimensions are introduced. Parts III and IV cover important quantum systems in the framework of non-relativisti...

  3. Wormholes leading to extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Bronnikov, K A

    2016-01-01

    In 6D general relativity with a scalar field as a source of gravity, a new type of static wormhole solutions is presented: such wormholes connect our universe with a small 2D extra subspace with a universe where this extra subspace is large, and the whole space-time is effectively 6-dimensional. We consider manifolds with the structure M0 x M1 x M2 , where M0 is 2D Lorentzian space-time while each of M1 an M2 can be a 2-sphere or a 2-torus. After selecting possible asymptotic behaviors of the metric functions compatible with the field equations, we give two explicit examples of wormhole solutions with spherical symmetry in our space-time and toroidal extra dimensions. In one example, with a massless scalar field (it is a special case of a well-known more general solution), the extra dimensions have a large constant size at the "far end"; the other example contains a nonzero potential $V(\\phi)$ which provides a 6D anti-de Sitter asymptotic, where all spatial dimensions are infinite.

  4. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  5. Dimensions of attractors in pinched skew products

    CERN Document Server

    Gröger, M

    2011-01-01

    We study dimensions of strange non-chaotic attractors and their associated physical measures in so-called pinched skew products, introduced by Grebogi and his coworkers in 1984. Our main results are that the Hausdorff dimension, the pointwise dimension and the information dimension are all equal to one, although the box-counting dimension is known to be two. The assertion concerning the pointwise dimension is deduced from the stronger result that the physical measure is rectifiable. Our findings confirm a conjecture by Ding, Grebogi and Ott from 1989.

  6. Dimensions of Attractors in Pinched Skew Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2013-05-01

    We study dimensions of strange non-chaotic attractors and their associated physical measures in so-called pinched skew products, introduced by Grebogi and his coworkers in 1984. Our main results are that the Hausdorff dimension, the pointwise dimension and the information dimension are all equal to one, although the box-counting dimension is known to be two. The assertion concerning the pointwise dimension is deduced from the stronger result that the physical measure is rectifiable. Our findings confirm a conjecture by Ding, Grebogi and Ott from 1989.

  7. Mathematical modelling for nanotube bundle oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamwattana, Ngamta; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2009-07-01

    This paper investigates the mechanics of a gigahertz oscillator comprising a nanotube oscillating within the centre of a uniform concentric ring or bundle of nanotubes. The study is also extended to the oscillation of a fullerene inside a nanotube bundle. In particular, certain fullerene-nanotube bundle oscillators are studied, namely C60-carbon nanotube bundle, C60-boron nitride nanotube bundle, B36N36-carbon nanotube bundle and B36N36-boron nitride nanotube bundle. Using the Lennard-Jones potential and the continuum approach, we obtain a relation between the bundle radius and the radii of the nanotubes forming the bundle, as well as the optimum bundle size which gives rise to the maximum oscillatory frequency for both the fullerene and the nanotube bundle oscillators. While previous studies in this area have been undertaken through molecular dynamics simulations, this paper emphasizes the use of applied mathematical modelling techniques which provides considerable insight into the underlying mechanisms. The paper presents a synopsis of the major results derived in detail by the present authors in [1, 2].

  8. OPPORTUNITIES OF BIOMEDICAL USE OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Mitrofanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials  –  materials,  whouse  structure  elements  has  proportions  doesn’t  exceed  100  nm.  In superdispersed state matter acquire new properties. In the last decade, carbon nanotubes become the most popular nanomaterials, that cause attention of representatives of various scientific field. The сarbon nanotubes offer new opportunities for biological and medical applications: imaging at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels, biosensors and electrodes based on carbon nanotubes, target delivery of various substances, radiation and photothermal therapy. The most promising of carbon nanotubes in the context of biomedical applications is their ability to penetrate the various tissues of the body and carry large doses of agents, providing diagnostic and therapeutic effects. Functionalized nanotubes are biodegradable. Other current direction of using carbon nanotubes in medicine and biology is to visualize objects on the molecular, cellular and tissue level. Associated with carbon nanotubes contrasting substances improve the visualization of cells and tissues, which can detected new patterns of development of the pathological process. Due to the vagueness of the question of biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes possibility of their practical application is hampered. Before the introduction of carbon nanotubes into practical health care is necessary to provide all the possible consequences of using nanotubes. High rates of properties and development of new nanostructures based on carbon nanotubes in the near future will lead to new advances related to the application and development of new parameters that will determine their properties and effects. In these review attention is paid to the structure, physico-chemical properties of nanotubes, their functionalization, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and all aspects of using of carbon nanotubes.

  9. Nickel oxide nanotube synthesis using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sacrificial templates for supercapacitor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ahmed M.; Sahu, Rakesh P.; Wallar, Cameron J.; Chen, Ri; Zhitomirsky, Igor; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2017-02-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of nickel oxide nanotubes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sacrificial template is described. Electroless deposition is employed to deposit nickel onto carbon nanotubes. The subsequent annealing of the product in the presence of air oxidizes nickel to nickel oxide, and carbon is released as gaseous carbon dioxide, leaving behind nickel oxide nanotubes. Electron microscopy and elemental mapping confirm the formation of nickel oxide nanotubes. New chelating polyelectrolytes are used as dispersing agents to achieve high colloidal stability for both the nickel-coated carbon nanotubes and the nickel oxide nanotubes. A gravimetric specific capacitance of 245.3 F g-1 and an areal capacitance of 3.28 F cm-2 at a scan rate of 2 mV s-1 is achieved, with an electrode fabricated using nickel oxide nanotubes as the active element with a mass loading of 24.1 mg cm-2.

  10. Dimensions and disorder specificity of impulsivity in pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kräplin, Anja; Bühringer, Gerhard; Oosterlaan, Jaap; van den Brink, Wim; Goschke, Thomas; Goudriaan, Anna E

    2014-11-01

    Impulsivity is a core characteristic of pathological gambling (PG), even though the underlying structure and disorder specificity is unclear. This study aimed to explore different dimensions of impulsivity in a clinical sample including PG. Furthermore, we aimed to test which alterations of the impulsivity-related dimensions are disorder specific for PG. Participants were individuals diagnosed with PG (n=51) and two groups also characterized by various impulsive behaviors: an alcohol dependence (AD; n=45) and a Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS; n=49) group. A healthy control (HC; n=53) group was recruited as comparison group. A comprehensive assessment was used including impulsivity-related and antipodal parameters of the Stop Signal Task, Stroop Task, Tower of London Task, Card Playing Task, Iowa Gambling Task and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11. Principal axis factor analysis revealed four impulsivity-related dimensions that were labeled 'self-reported impulsivity', 'prepotent response impulsivity', 'choice impulsivity' and 'motor impulsivity'. The PG group scored significantly higher on all four dimensions compared to the HC group. In contrast, the PG group did not differ on any of the dimensions from the AD or the GTS group, except for 'choice impulsivity' where the PG group exhibited higher factor scores compared to the GTS group. Altogether, PG is associated with generally heightened impulsivity profiles compared to a HC group, which may be further used for intervention strategies. However, heightened scores in the impulsivity dimensions are not disorder specific for PG. Further research on shared or different underlying mechanisms of these overlapping impulsivity impairments is necessary.

  11. Evaluating the mechanistic evidence and key data gaps in assessing the potential carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuempel, Eileen D; Jaurand, Marie-Claude; Møller, Peter; Morimoto, Yasuo; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Pinkerton, Kent E; Sargent, Linda M; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Fubini, Bice; Kane, Agnes B

    2017-01-01

    In an evaluation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the IARC Monograph 111, the Mechanisms Subgroup was tasked with assessing the strength of evidence on the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs in humans. The mechanistic evidence was considered to be not strong enough to alter the evaluations based on the

  12. Modifying the electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes using designed surfactant peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarajeewa, Dinushi R; Dieckmann, Gregg R; Nielsen, Steven O; Musselman, Inga H

    2012-08-07

    The electronic properties of carbon nanotubes can be altered significantly by modifying the nanotube surface. In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were functionalized noncovalently using designed surfactant peptides, and the resultant SWCNT electronic properties were investigated. These peptides have a common amino acid sequence of X(Valine)(5)(Lysine)(2), where X indicates an aromatic amino acid containing either an electron-donating or electron-withdrawing functional group (i.e. p-amino-phenylalanine or p-cyano-phenylalanine). Circular dichroism spectra showed that the surfactant peptides primarily have random coil structures in an aqueous medium, both alone and in the presence of SWCNTs, simplifying analysis of the peptide/SWCNT interaction. The ability of the surfactant peptides to disperse individual SWCNTs in solution was verified using atomic force microscopy and ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectroscopy. The electronic properties of the surfactant peptide/SWCNT composites were examined using the observed nanotube Raman tangential band shifts and the observed additional features near the Fermi level in the scanning tunneling spectroscopy dI/dV spectra. The results revealed that SWCNTs functionalized with surfactant peptides containing electron-donor or electron-acceptor functional groups showed n-doped or p-doped altered electronic properties, respectively. This work unveils a facile and versatile approach to modify the intrinsic electronic properties of SWCNTs using a simple peptide structure, which is easily adaptable to obtain peptide/SWCNT composites for the design of tunable nanoscale electronic devices.

  13. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  14. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laird, E.A.; Kuemmeth, F.; Steele, G.A.; Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Nygard, J.; Flensberg, K.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This revie

  15. Improved synthesis of carbon nanotubes with junctions and of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F L Deepak; A Govindaraj; C N R Rao

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis of thiophene over nickel nanoparticles dispersed on silica is shown to yield Yjunction carbon nanotubes with smaller diameters than those obtained by the pyrolysis of organometallicthiophene mixtures. In the presence of water vapour, the pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures yields single-walled nanotubes, as well as relatively narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes with Y-junctions. Pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures, in the absence of water vapour, only gives nanotubes with T- and Y-junctions.

  16. Morphology and growth of titania nanotubes. Nanostructuring and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albu, Sergiu P.

    2012-10-26

    this nanostructure. It draws attention to important aspects that should be considered when using organic electrolytes, poses specific questions regarding the electrochemical methods and provides some solutions to them. The second part is focused on the growth of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes under different conditions. This part deals with a wide range of parameters that influence the formation of nanotubes, their chemical composition, geometry, etc. The most important factors in nanotube growth were found to be the applied voltage, water content, temperature and background electrolyte. Oxidation and metal ion dissolution are reactions governing the anodic process and the efficiency of oxide growth which is directly connected with these reactions determines whether self-ordering takes place or not. Many high-end technologies such as scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were adopted for the detailed characterization of the nanotubes. In the third part, the crystallization of ''as grown'' amorphous TiO{sub 2} nanotubes is addressed. In addition to the influence of well-known annealing parameters (final temperature, heating ramp-rate) on nanotube crystallization, some specific aspects are provided which may drastically affect the efficiency of devices based on TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. Here it is shown that heat treatment can be successfully used to control the size of the anatase crystals inside nanotube walls or to alter completely the nanotubular structure. In the last chapter, advanced nanostructures based on TiO{sub 2} nanotubes are investigated. Many of these nanostructures are formed via manipulation of electrochemical parameters such as the applied voltage or the chemical etching. Novel ''nanolace'' and ''bamboo-type nanotube'' structures are shown and characterized here. In order to demonstrate the advantageous features of these nanotubes, some

  17. Entangling light in high dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pors, Jan Bardeus

    2011-01-01

    Quantum entanglement is a fundamental trait of quantum mechanics that causes the information about the properties of two (or more) objects to be inextricably linked. When a measurement on one of the objects is performed, the state of the other object is immediately altered, even when these objects a

  18. Personality dimensions and disorders in pathological gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Schreiber, Liana R N; Grant, Jon E

    2013-01-01

    This review presents the most current research in personality dimensions and disorders with respect to pathological gambling.......This review presents the most current research in personality dimensions and disorders with respect to pathological gambling....

  19. NONHOMOGENEOUS HOPF EQUATIONS IN HIGHER DIMENSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIU QUANSEN

    1999-01-01

    The existence and uniqueness of the localclassical solution of nonhomogenuous Hopf equationsin higher dimensions are proved in this paper. Thissolution is obtained by vanishing the viscosity termof Burger's equations in higher dimensions.

  20. [Altered states of consciousness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, E P

    2005-01-01

    The review of modern ideas concerning the altered states of consciousness is presented in this article. Various methods of entry into the altered states of consciousness are looked over. It is shown that the altered states of consciousness are insufficiently known, but important aspects of human being existence. The role of investigation of the altered states of consciousness for the creation of integrative scientific conception base is discussed.

  1. The fourth dimension simply explained

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Henry P

    2005-01-01

    To remove the contents of an egg without puncturing its shell or to drink the liquor in a bottle without removing the cork is clearly unthinkable - or is it? Understanding the world of Einstein and curved space requires a logical conception of the fourth dimension.This readable, informative volume provides an excellent introduction to that world, with 22 essays that employ a minimum of mathematics. Originally written for a contest sponsored by Scientific American, these essays are so well reasoned and lucidly written that they were judged to merit publication in book form. Their easily unders

  2. Quantum cosmology near two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Teresa; Dabholkar, Atish

    2016-08-01

    We consider a Weyl-invariant formulation of gravity with a cosmological constant in d -dimensional spacetime and show that near two dimensions the classical action reduces to the timelike Liouville action. We show that the renormalized cosmological term leads to a nonlocal quantum momentum tensor which satisfies the Ward identities in a nontrivial way. The resulting evolution equations for an isotropic, homogeneous universe lead to slowly decaying vacuum energy and power-law expansion. We outline the implications for the cosmological constant problem, inflation, and dark energy.

  3. Cultural Dimensions Of Legal Discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sierocka Halina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the intention for precision and accuracy, legal discourse is oftentimes complex, archaic and ambiguous - which gives rise to contentious interpretation. Moreover, little or no attention is paid to the cultural dimension of legal discourse, which plays a critical role in the translation and interpretation of legal texts, as well as in the application of law. This paper endeavours to illustrate the impact the culture, or, more precisely, legal culture has on the way legal texts are construed or translated and to present problems which arise in the interpretation, translation and application of law as a result of cultural diversities

  4. Correlation dimension of complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lacasa, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new measure to characterize the dimension of complex networks based on the ergodic theory of dynamical systems. This measure is derived from the correlation sum of a trajectory generated by a random walker navigating the network, and extends the classical Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm to the context of complex networks. The method is validated with reliable results for both synthetic networks and real-world networks such as the world air-transportation network or urban networks, and provides a computationally fast way for estimating the dimensionality of networks which only relies on the local information provided by the walkers.

  5. Nonlinear Filtering in High Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-02

    dimension cardV . Remark 4.9. In the language of statistical mechanics, we exploit the fact that the smoothing distribution Px(X0, . . . , Xn ∈ · |Y1...does the mixing property of the random field X imply the conditional mixing property of (X, Y )? It will be insightful to reformulate the problem in...edge observations in Example 7.17 is merely cosmetic: the same example can be reformulated in terms of vertex observations. Indeed, let us define the

  6. Noncentrosymmetric superconductors in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhin, K. V.

    2017-02-01

    We study the fermionic boundary modes (Andreev bound states) in a time-reversal invariant one-dimensional superconductor. In the presence of a substrate, spatial inversion symmetry is broken and the electronic properties are strongly affected by an antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling. We assume an arbitrary even number of nondegenerate bands crossing the Fermi level. We show that there is only one possible pairing symmetry in one dimension, an analog of s -wave pairing. The zero-energy Andreev bound states are present if the sign of the gap function in an odd number of the bands is different from all other bands.

  7. Extended scaling in high dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berche, B.; Chatelain, C.; Dhall, C.; Kenna, R.; Low, R.; Walter, J.-C.

    2008-11-01

    We apply and test the recently proposed 'extended scaling' scheme in an analysis of the magnetic susceptibility of Ising systems above the upper critical dimension. The data are obtained by Monte Carlo simulations using both the conventional Wolff cluster algorithm and the Prokof'ev-Svistunov worm algorithm. As already observed for other models, extended scaling is shown to extend the high-temperature critical scaling regime over a range of temperatures much wider than that achieved conventionally. It allows for an accurate determination of leading and sub-leading scaling indices, critical temperatures and amplitudes of the confluent corrections.

  8. Flavor Models In Extra Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Valadez, J

    2005-01-01

    This thesis consists of implementing flavor symmetries in the context of extra dimensions. To the particle content of the Standard Model we add an additional scalar (flavon) field and we assume that all the fields propagate in the extra-dimensional space-time. When the flavon field acquires a vacuum expectation value the flavor symmetry is effectively broken thus generating the Yukawa textures associated with the particles. An specific model in 5D that reproduces all fermion masses, mixing angles and ratios is presented.

  9. Low Dimension Semiconducting Composite Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mang; CHEN Hong-zheng; SUN Jing-zhi

    2004-01-01

    Recently, low dimension nanostructures have gained considerable attention due to their technological potential as unique types of nanoscale building blocks for future optoelectronic devices and systems. Semiconducting composite nanomaterials, which can combine the advantages of two or more components, have been the focus in the area of nanomaterials synthesis and device application.In this paper, we report our work on the preparation of composite nanomaterials based on CNTs.CNTs were coated by organic or inorganic species via novel and facile methods (Fig. 1 and Fig.2).These functional CNTs based composites show eminent prospects and opportunities for new applications in a wide variation of areas.

  10. Tantalum coating on TiO{sub 2} nanotubes induces superior rate of matrix mineralization and osteofunctionality in human osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frandsen, Christine J.; Brammer, Karla S. [Materials Science and Engineering, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Noh, Kunbae [Corporate Research Institute, Cheil Industries, Inc., Gocheon-Dong, Uiwang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do, 437-711 (Korea, Republic of); Johnston, Gary [Materials Science and Engineering, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Jin, Sungho, E-mail: jin@ucsd.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Nanostructured surface geometries have been the focus of a multitude of recent biomaterial research, and exciting findings have been published. However, only a few publications have directly compared nanostructures of various surface chemistries. The work herein directly compares the response of human osteoblast cells to surfaces of identical nanotube geometries with two well-known orthopedic biomaterials: titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) and tantalum (Ta). The results reveal that the Ta surface chemistry on the nanotube architecture enhances alkaline phosphatase activity, and promotes a ∼ 30% faster rate of matrix mineralization and bone-nodule formation when compared to results on bare TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. This study implies that unique combinations of surface chemistry and nanostructure may influence cell behavior due to distinctive physico-chemical properties. These findings are of paramount importance to the orthopedics field for understanding cell behavior in response to subtle alterations in nanostructure and surface chemistry, and will enable further insight into the complex manipulation of biomaterial surfaces. With increased focus in the field of orthopedic materials research on nanostructured surfaces, this study emphasizes the need for careful and systematic review of variations in surface chemistry in concurrence with nanotopographical changes. - Highlights: • A TiO{sub 2} nanotube surface structure was coated with tantalum. • Osteoblast cell response was compared between the tantalum coated and as-formed TiO{sub 2} nanotube surface. • We observed superior rates of bone matrix mineralization and osteoblast maturation on the tantalum coated nanotube surface.

  11. Direct intermolecular force measurements between functional groups and individual metallic or semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thong, Ya Xuan; Poon, Yin Fun; Chen, Tzu-Yin; Li, Lain-Jong; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2014-02-26

    Many electronic applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) require electronic homogeneity in order to maximally exploit their outstanding properties. Non-covalent separation is attractive as it is scalable and results in minimal alteration of nanotube properties. However, fundamental understanding of the metallicity-dependence of functional group interactions with nanotubes is still lacking; this lack is compounded by the absence of methods to directly measure these interactions. Herein, a novel technology platform based on a recently developed atomic force microscopy (AFM) mode is reported which directly quantifies the adhesion forces between a chosen functional group and individual nanotubes of known metallicity, permitting comparisons between different metallicity. These results unambiguously show that this technology platform is able to discriminate the subtle adhesion force differences of a chosen functional group with pure metallic as opposed to pure semiconducting nanotubes. This new method provides a route towards rapid advances in understanding of non-covalent interactions of large libraries of compounds with nanotubes of varying metallicity and diameter; presenting a superior tool to assist the discovery of more effective metallicity-based SWNT separation agents.

  12. Liberating Efimov physics from three dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Nishida, Yusuke; Tan, Shina

    2011-01-01

    When two particles attract via a resonant short-range interaction, three particles always form an infinite tower of bound states characterized by a discrete scaling symmetry. It has been considered that this Efimov effect exists only in three dimensions. Here we review how the Efimov physics can be liberated from three dimensions by considering two-body and three-body interactions in mixed dimensions and four-body interaction in one dimension. In such new systems, intriguing phenomena appear,...

  13. Vertical dimension: a dynamic concept based on facial form and oropharyngeal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, M R

    1991-10-01

    Craniofacial vertical dimension is a more accurate measure of facial proportion than mere measurement of the mid and lower part of the face. Craniomaxillary dimension is skeletally determined, whereas facial height of the lower part of the face is partly dependent on the vertical dimension of occlusion. Alterations in the vertical dimension of occlusion can dramatically affect the esthetics of the soft facial tissue. The "Golden Proportion" quantitatively defines ideal measured relationships and encourages a scientific appreciation of beauty. Faces with deficiencies in lower facial balance (brachyfacial) often exhibit insufficient height of the occlusal plane. The scientific literature has suggested a pliability of skeletal muscle allowing for physiologic variance in vertical facial height. Temporomandibular joint compliance is demonstrated with elevations in resting muscle length. Facial balance and location of the occlusal planes are the primary determinants for establishing an appropriate vertical dimension of occlusion.

  14. Purification of Carbon Nanotubes: Alternative Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, Bradley; Scott, Carl; Gorelik, Olga; Nikolaev, Pasha; Hulse, Lou; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2000-01-01

    Traditional carbon nanotube purification process involves nitric acid refluxing and cross flow filtration using surfactant TritonX. This is believed to result in damage to nanotubes and surfactant residue on nanotube surface. Alternative purification procedures involving solvent extraction, thermal zone refining and nitric acid refiuxing are used in the current study. The effect of duration and type of solvent to dissolve impurities including fullerenes and P ACs (polyaromatic compounds) are monitored by nuclear magnetic reasonance, high performance liquid chromatography, and thermogravimetric analysis. Thermal zone refining yielded sample areas rich in nanotubes as seen by scanning electric microscopy. Refluxing in boiling nitric acid seem to improve the nanotube content. Different procedural steps are needed to purify samples produced by laser process compared to arc process. These alternative methods of nanotube purification will be presented along with results from supporting analytical techniques.

  15. Dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotube devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria

    The purpose of this project has been to assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes on electrodes at the tip of a biocompatible cantilever and use these for chemical species sensing in air and liquid, for example in order to measure the local activity from ion channels in the cell membrane....... The electrical resistance of carbon nanotubes has been shown to be extremely sensitive to gas molecules. Dielectrophoresis is a method capable of quickly attracting nanotubes on microelectrodes by using an electric field, thus enabling nanotube integration in microsystems. Dielectrophoresis offers also...... the potential of distinguishing between nanotubes of different electrical properties, which is very important for the optimisation of the properties of the carbon nanotube sensors. Various cantilever and planar structures were designed, fabricated and tested both with multi-walled and single-walled carbon...

  16. Facile Synthesis of Ternary Boron Carbonitride Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Lijie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, a novel and facile approach for the synthesis of ternary boron carbonitride (B–C–N nanotubes was reported. Growth occurred by heating simple starting materials of boron powder, zinc oxide powder, and ethanol absolute at 1150 °C under a mixture gas flow of nitrogen and hydrogen. As substrate, commercial stainless steel foil with a typical thickness of 0.05 mm played an additional role of catalyst during the growth of nanotubes. The nanotubes were characterized by SEM, TEM, EDX, and EELS. The results indicate that the synthesized B–C–N nanotubes exhibit a bamboo-like morphology and B, C, and N elements are homogeneously distributed in the nanotubes. A catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid (VLS mechanism was proposed for the growth of the nanotubes.

  17. Selective intercalation of polymers in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazilevsky, Alexander V; Sun, Kexia; Yarin, Alexander L; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2007-07-03

    A room-temperature, open-air method is devised to selectively intercalate relatively low-molecular-weight polymers (approximately 10-100 kDa) from dilute, volatile solutions into open-end, as-grown, wettable carbon nanotubes with 50-100 nm diameters. The method relies on a novel self-sustained diffusion mechanism driving polymers from dilute volatile solutions into carbon nanotubes and concentrating them there. Relatively low-molecular-weight polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO, 600 kDa) and poly(caprolactone) (PCL, 80 kDa), were encapsulated in graphitic nanotubes as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, which revealed morphologies characteristic of mixtures in nanoconfinements affected by intermolecular forces. Whereas relatively small, flexible polymer molecules can conform to enter these nanotubes, larger macromolecules (approximately 1000 kDa) remain outside. The selective nature of this process is useful for filling nanotubes with polymers and could also be valuable in capping nanotubes.

  18. Deconvoluting hepatic processing of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidori, Simone; Bowman, Robert L.; Yarilin, Dmitry; Romin, Yevgeniy; Barlas, Afsar; Mulvey, J. Justin; Fujisawa, Sho; Xu, Ke; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Riabov, Vladimir; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ulmert, Hans David S.; Brea, Elliott J.; Behling, Katja; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes present unique opportunities for drug delivery, but have not advanced into the clinic. Differential nanotube accretion and clearance from critical organs have been observed, but the mechanism not fully elucidated. The liver has a complex cellular composition that regulates a range of metabolic functions and coincidently accumulates most particulate drugs. Here we provide the unexpected details of hepatic processing of covalently functionalized nanotubes including receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular trafficking and biliary elimination. Ammonium-functionalized fibrillar nanocarbon is found to preferentially localize in the fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver but not resident macrophages. Stabilin receptors mediate the endocytic clearance of nanotubes. Biocompatibility is evidenced by the absence of cell death and no immune cell infiltration. Towards clinical application of this platform, nanotubes were evaluated for the first time in non-human primates. The pharmacologic profile in cynomolgus monkeys is equivalent to what was reported in mice and suggests that nanotubes should behave similarly in humans.

  19. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  20. DIMENSIONS FOR RANDOM SELF-CONFORMAL SETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yanyan; Wu Jun

    2003-01-01

    A set is called regular if its Hausdorff dimension and upper box-counting dimension coincide.In this paper,we prove that the random self-conformal set is regular almost surely.Also we determine the dimensions for a class of random self-conformal sets.

  1. Speaker Identification Based on Fractal Dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯丽敏; 王朔中

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses application of fractal dimensions to speech processing. Generalized dimensions of arbitrary orders and associated fractal parameters are used in speaker identification. A characteristic vactor based on these parameters is formed, and a recognition criterion definded in order to identify individual speakers. Experimental results show the usefulness of fractal dimensions in characterizing speaker identity.

  2. Spectral Dimension from Causal Set Nonlocal Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Belenchia, Alessio; Marciano, Antonino; Modesto, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spectral dimension obtained from non-local continuum d'Alembertians derived from causal sets. We find a universal dimensional reduction to 2 dimensions, in all dimensions. We conclude by discussing the validity and relevance of our results within the broader context of quantum field theories based on these nonlocal dynamics.

  3. Random walks on Sierpinski gaskets of different dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Sebastian; Klafter, Joseph; Blumen, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    We study random walks (RWs) on classical and dual Sierpinski gaskets (SG and DSG), naturally embedded in d -dimensional Euclidian spaces (ESs). For large d the spectral dimension ds approaches 2, the marginal RW dimension. In contrast to RW over two-dimensional ES, RWs over SG and DSG show a very rich behavior. First, the time discrete scale invariance leads to logarithmic-periodic (log-periodic) oscillations in the RW properties monitored, which increase in amplitude with d . Second, the asymptotic approach to the theoretically predicted RW power laws is significantly altered depending on d and on the variant of the fractal (SG or DSG) under study. In addition, we discuss the suitability of standard RW properties to determine ds , a question of great practical relevance.

  4. Pressure-Induced Interlinking of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim, T.; Gulseren, O.; Kilic, C.; Ciraci, S.

    2000-01-01

    We predict new forms of carbon consisting of one and two dimensional networks of interlinked single wall carbon nanotubes, some of which are energetically more stable than van der Waals packing of the nanotubes on a hexagonal lattice. These interlinked nanotubes are further transformed with higher applied external pressures to more dense and complicated stable structures, in which curvature-induced carbon sp$^{3}$ re-hybridizations are formed. We also discuss the energetics of the bond format...

  5. Different Technical Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Abdalla, S; Al-Marzouki, F.; Ahmed A. Al-Ghamdi; Abdel-Daiem, A.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been of great interest because of their simplicity and ease of synthesis. The novel properties of nanostructured carbon nanotubes such as high surface area, good stiffness, and resilience have been explored in many engineering applications. Research on carbon nanotubes have shown the application in the field of energy storage, hydrogen storage, electrochemical supercapacitor, field-emitting devices, transistors, nanoprobes and sensors, composite material, templates, etc....

  6. Faster and Smaller with Carbon Nanotubes?

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel, Robert V.; Graham, Andrew P.; Duesberg, Georg S.; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Carbon Nanotubes seem to be one of the most promising candidates for nanoelectronic devices beyond presumable scaling limits of silicon and compound semiconductors and independent from lithographic limitations. Discovered only about a decade ago, there has been a tremendous advance in the field of carbon nanotubes. Their exciting properties, especially with respect to electronic applications, and their fabrication methods will be discussed. A variety of Carbon Nanotube...

  7. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  8. A Tester for Carbon Nanotube Mode Lockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-Won; Yamashita, Shinji

    2007-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a tester for laser pulsating operation of carbon nanotubes employing a circulator with the extra degree of freedom of the second port to access diversified nanotube samples. The nanotubes are deposited onto the end facet of a dummy optical fiber by spray method that guarantees simple sample loading along with the minimized perturbation of optimized laser cavity condition. Resultant optical spectra, autocorrelation traces and pulse train of the laser outputs with qualified samples are presented.

  9. Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 11-Mar-2013 to 10-Mar-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Boron nitride nanotubes have been proposed as a...and titanium (Ti) metal clusters with boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT). First-principles density-functional theory plus dispersion (DFT-D) calculations

  10. Topological dimension and dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Coornaert, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Translated from the popular French edition, the goal of the book is to provide a self-contained introduction to mean topological dimension, an invariant of dynamical systems introduced in 1999 by Misha Gromov. The book examines how this invariant was successfully used by Elon Lindenstrauss and Benjamin Weiss to answer a long-standing open question about embeddings of minimal dynamical systems into shifts. A large number of revisions and additions have been made to the original text. Chapter 5 contains an entirely new section devoted to the Sorgenfrey line. Two chapters have also been added: Chapter 9 on amenable groups and Chapter 10 on mean topological dimension for continuous actions of countable amenable groups. These new chapters contain material that have never before appeared in textbook form. The chapter on amenable groups is based on Følner’s characterization of amenability and may be read independently from the rest of the book. Although the contents of this book lead directly to several active ar...

  11. Grand Unification in Higher Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, L J; Hall, Lawrence J.; Nomura, Yasunori

    2003-01-01

    We have recently proposed an alternative picture for the physics at the scale of gauge coupling unification, where the unified symmetry is realized in higher dimensions but is broken locally by a symmetry breaking defect. Gauge coupling unification, the quantum numbers of quarks and leptons and the longevity of the proton arise as phenomena of the symmetrical bulk, while the lightness of the Higgs doublets and the masses of the light quarks and leptons probe the symmetry breaking defect. Moreover, the framework is extremely predictive if the effective higher dimensional theory is valid over a large energy interval up to the scale of strong coupling. Precise agreement with experiments is obtained in the simplest theory --- SU(5) in five dimensions with two Higgs multiplets propagating in the bulk. The weak mixing angle is predicted to be sin^2theta_w = 0.2313 \\pm 0.0004, which fits the data with extraordinary accuracy. The compactification scale and the strong coupling scale are determined to be M_c \\simeq 5 x...

  12. Lighting up silica nanotubes transcribed from the submicron structure of a metal-peptide hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong

    2013-09-01

    Fluorescent silica nanotubes are attracting increasing interest because of their versatile applicability in a range of diverse fields. By using sol-gel transcription of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) from various soft templates, silica nanotubes can be conveniently prepared. Metal-peptide hybrids with well-defined nanostructures and outstanding functionalities are very interesting candidates to serve as templates. Herein, we demonstrate that glutathione (GSH) can act as a building block for a bioinspired structure with dimensions down to the nanoscale, based on specific interactions between metal ions and the peptide. Congo red is able to selectively stain the nanofibres obtained, and appears apple-green in colour, implying that Congo red is promising to serve as an effective and convenient probe for determining the self-assembly of GSH and copper ions. Furthermore, silica nanotubes are synthesized using the nanofibres as a template in a very simple way. The silica nanotubes can be lit up by biomolecule-templated metal nanoparticles or nanoclusters and emit bright fluorescence. This work will certainly open up new opportunities in fabricating a broad range of nanostructured materials with versatile functionalities.

  13. Fabrication of Gate-Electrode Integrated Carbon-Nanotube Bundle Field Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Risaku; Bronikowski, Michael; Luong, Edward; Manohara, Harish

    2008-01-01

    A continuing effort to develop carbon-nanotube-based field emitters (cold cathodes) as high-current-density electron sources has yielded an optimized device design and a fabrication scheme to implement the design. One major element of the device design is to use a planar array of bundles of carbon nanotubes as the field-emission tips and to optimize the critical dimensions of the array (principally, heights of bundles and distances between them) to obtain high area-averaged current density and high reliability over a long operational lifetime a concept that was discussed in more detail in Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters (NPO-40817), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 2 (February 2007), page 58. Another major element of the design is to configure the gate electrodes (anodes used to extract, accelerate, and/or focus electrons) as a ring that overhangs a recess wherein the bundles of nanotubes are located, such that by virtue of the proximity between the ring and the bundles, a relatively low applied potential suffices to generate the large electric field needed for emission of electrons.

  14. Purification of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by spiral counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Martha; Lazo-Portugal, Rodrigo; Ahn, Saeyoung Nate; Stefansson, Steingrimur

    2017-02-03

    Over the last decade man-made carbon nanostructures have shown great promise in electronic applications, but they are produced as very heterogeneous mixtures with different properties so the achievement of a significant commercial application has been elusive. The dimensions of single-wall carbon nanotubes are generally a nanometer wide, up to hundreds of microns long and the carbon nanotubes have anisotropic structures. They are processed to have shorter lengths but they need to be sorted by diameter and chirality. Thus counter-current chromatography methods developed for large molecules are applied to separate these compounds. A modified mixer-settler spiral CCC rotor made with 3 D printed disks was used with a polyethylene glycol-dextran 2-phase solvent system and a surfactant gradient to purify the major species in a commercial preparation. We isolated the semi-conducting single walled carbon nanotube chiral species identified by UV spectral analysis. The further development of spiral counter-current chromatography instrumentation and methods will enable the scalable purification of carbon nanotubes useful for the next generation electronics.

  15. Plasticity and Kinky Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor

    2000-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research interest based on early predictions of their unique mechanical, electronic, and chemical properties. Materials with the predicted unique properties of carbon nanotubes are of great interest for use in future generations of aerospace vehicles. For their structural properties, carbon nanotubes could be used as reinforcing fibers in ultralight multifunctional composites. For their electronic properties, carbon nanotubes offer the potential of very high-speed, low-power computing elements, high-density data storage, and unique sensors. In a continuing effort to model and predict the properties of carbon nanotubes, Ames accomplished three significant results during FY99. First, accurate values of the nanomechanics and plasticity of carbon nanotubes based on quantum molecular dynamics simulations were computed. Second, the concept of mechanical deformation catalyzed-kinky-chemistry as a means to control local chemistry of nanotubes was discovered. Third, the ease of nano-indentation of silicon surfaces with carbon nanotubes was established. The elastic response and plastic failure mechanisms of single-wall nanotubes were investigated by means of quantum molecular dynamics simulations.

  16. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Kaji Muhammad; Srivastava, Ashok; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Mayberry, Clay

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI) interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT) interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  17. Fe nanowire encapsulated in boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koi, Naruhiro; Oku, Takeo; Nishijima, Masahiko

    2005-11-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes, nanohorns, nanocoils were synthesized by annealing Fe 4N and B powders at 1000 °C for 1 h in nitrogen gas atmosphere. Especially, Fe-filled BN nanotubes were produced, and investigated by high-resolution electron microscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which indicates that the [110] of Fe is parallel to the BN nanotube axis. Formation mechanism of Fe-filled BN nanotube was speculated based on these results.

  18. Coulomb drag in multiwall armchair carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, A.M.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the transresistivity rho(21) between two concentric armchair nanotubes in a diffusive multiwall carbon nanotube as a function of temperature T and Fermi level epsilon(F). We approximate the tight-binding band structure by two crossing bands with a linear dispersion near the Fermi...... surface. The cylindrical geometry of the nanotubes and the different parities of the Bloch states are accounted for in the evaluation of the effective Coulomb interaction between charges in the concentric nanotubes. We find a broad peak in rho(21) as a function of temperature at roughly T similar to 0.4T...

  19. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  20. Nanomechanics and the viscoelastic behavior of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Frank Thomas

    Recent experimental results demonstrate that substantial improvements in the mechanical behavior of polymers can be attained using small amounts of carbon nanotubes as a reinforcing phase. While this suggests the potential use of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymers (NRPs) for structural applications, the development of predictive models describing NRP effective behavior will be critical in the development and ultimate employment of such materials. To date many researchers have simply studied the nanoscale behavior of NRPs using techniques developed for traditional composite materials. While such studies can be useful, this dissertation seeks to extend these traditional theories to more accurately model the nanoscale interaction of the NRP constituent phases. Motivated by micrographs showing that embedded nanotubes often exhibit significant curvature within the polymer, in the first section of this dissertation a hybrid finite element-micromechanical model is developed to incorporate nanotube waviness into micromechanical predictions of NRP effective modulus. While also suitable for other types of wavy inclusions, results from this model indicate that moderate nanotube waviness can dramatically decrease the effective modulus of these materials. The second portion of this dissertation investigates the impact of the nanotubes on the overall NRP viscoelastic behavior. Because the nanotubes are on the size scale of the individual polymer chains, nanotubes may alter the viscoelastic response of the NRP in comparison to that of the pure polymer; this behavior is distinctly different from that seen in traditional polymer matrix composites. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results for each of three modes of viscoelastic behavior (glass transition temperature, relaxation spectrum, and physical aging) are all consistent with the hypothesis of a reduced mobility, non-bulk polymer phase in the vicinity of the embedded nanotubes. These models represent initial efforts to

  1. Duality Symmetry and Soldering in Different Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, R

    1997-01-01

    We develop a systematic method of obtaining duality symmetric actions in different dimensions. This technique is applied for the quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator, the scalar field theory in two dimensions and the Maxwell theory in four dimensions. In all cases there are two such distinct actions. Furthermore, by soldering these distinct actions in any dimension a master action is obtained which is duality invariant under a much bigger set of symmetries than is usually envisaged. The concept of swapping duality is introduced and its implications are discussed. The effects of coupling to gravity are also elaborated. Finally, the extension of the analysis for arbitrary dimensions is indicated.

  2. Potential of carbon nanotube field effect transistors for analogue circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Hayat, Khizar

    2013-05-11

    This Letter presents a detailed comparison of carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNFETs) and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) with special focus on carbon nanotube FET\\'s potential for implementing analogue circuits in the mm-wave and sub-terahertz range. The latest CNFET lithographic dimensions place it at-par with complementary metal oxide semiconductor in terms of current handling capability, whereas the forecasted improvement in the lithography enables the CNFETs to handle more than twice the current of MOSFETs. The comparison of RF parameters shows superior performance of CNFETs with a g m , f T and f max of 2.7, 2.6 and 4.5 times higher, respectively. MOSFET- and CNFET-based inverter, three-stage ring oscillator and LC oscillator have been designed and compared as well. The CNFET-based inverters are found to be ten times faster, the ring oscillator demonstrates three times higher oscillation frequency and CNFET-based LC oscillator also shows improved performance than its MOSFET counterpart.

  3. Dimension variation prediction and control for composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chensong

    This dissertation presents a systematic study on the dimension variation prediction and control for polymer matrix fiber reinforced composites. A dimension variation model was developed for process simulation based on thermal stress analysis and finite element analysis (FEA). This model was validated against the experimental data, the analytical solutions and the data from literature. Using the FEA-based dimension variation model, the deformations of typical composite structures were studied and the regression-based dimension variation model was developed. The regression-based dimension variation model can significantly reduce computation time and provide a quick design guide for composite products with reduced dimension variations. By introducing the material modification coefficient, this comprehensive model can handle various fiber/resin types and stacking sequences. It eliminates the complicated, time-consuming finite element meshing and material parameter defining process. The deformation compensation through tooling design was investigated using the FEA-based and the regression-based dimension variation models. The structural tree method (STM) was developed to compute the assembly deformation from the deformations of individual components, as well as the deformation of general shape composite components. The STM enables rapid dimension variation analysis/synthesis for complex composite assemblies with the regression-based dimension variation model. Using the STM and the regression-based dimension variation model, design optimization and tolerance analysis/synthesis were conducted. The exploring work presented in this research provides a foundation to develop practical and proactive dimension control techniques for composite products.

  4. Through silicon vias filled with planarized carbon nanotube bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Teng; Jeppson, Kjell; Olofsson, Niklas; Campbell, Eleanor E B; Liu, Johan

    2009-12-02

    The feasibility of using carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles as the fillers of through silicon vias (TSVs) has been demonstrated. CNT bundles are synthesized directly inside TSVs by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD). The growth of CNTs in vias is found to be highly dependent on the geometric dimensions and arrangement patterns of the vias at atmospheric pressure. The CNT-Si structure is planarized by a combined lapping and polishing process to achieve both a high removal rate and a fine surface finish. Electrical tests of the CNT TSVs have been performed and their electrical resistance was found to be in the few hundred ohms range. The reasons for the high electrical resistance have been discussed and possible methods to decrease the electrical resistance have been proposed.

  5. Psychophysical dimensions of tactile perception of textures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Shogo; Nagano, Hikaru; Yamada, Yoji

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews studies on the tactile dimensionality of physical properties of materials in order to determine a common structure for these dimensions. Based on the commonality found in a number of studies and known mechanisms for the perception of physical properties of textures, we conclude that tactile textures are composed of three prominent psychophysical dimensions that are perceived as roughness/smoothness, hardness/softness, and coldness/warmness. The roughness dimension may be divided into two dimensions: macro and fine roughness. Furthermore, it is reasonable to consider that a friction dimension that is related to the perception of moistness/dryness and stickiness/slipperiness exists. Thus, the five potential dimensions of tactile perception are macro and fine roughness, warmness/coldness, hardness/softness, and friction (moistness/dryness, stickiness/slipperiness). We also summarize methods such as psychological experiments and mathematical approaches for structuring tactile dimensions and their limitations.

  6. 4-N-pyridin-2-yl-benzamide nanotubes compatible with mouse stem cell and oral delivery in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Jhillu S.; Lavanya, Madugula P.; Das, Pragna P.; Bag, Indira; Krishnan, Anita; Jagannadh, Bulusu; Mohapatra, Debendra K.; Pal Bhadra, Manika; Bhadra, Utpal

    2010-04-01

    p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), a structural moiety of many commercial drugs, is self-assembled with linker alkyl side chains to form tubular nanostructures. The tubes exhibited fluorescence either intrinsic or from fluorescent molecules embedded in the wall during self-assembly. Uptake and inter-cellular delivery of the conjugated nanotubes in human cancer cells and in mouse embryonic stem cells were demonstrated by fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry. Biocompatibility, cytotoxicity and clearance were monitored both ex vivo in mouse multipotent embryonic stem cells and in vivo in adult Drosophila. Accumulation of nanotubes had no adverse effects and abnormalities on stem cell morphology and proliferation rate. A distinct distribution of two separate nanotubes in various internal organs of Drosophila interprets that accumulation of nanomaterials might be interdependent on the side chain modifications and physiological settings of cell or tissue types. Unlike carbon nanomaterials, exposure of PABA nanotubes does not produce any hazards including locomotion defects and mortality of adult flies. Despite differential uptake and clearance from multiple live tissues, the use of self-assembled nanotubes can add new dimensions and scope to the development of dual-purpose oral carriers for the fulfilment of many biological promises.

  7. 4-N-pyridin-2-yl-benzamide nanotubes compatible with mouse stem cell and oral delivery in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Jhillu S; Lavanya, Madugula P; Das, Pragna P; Bag, Indira; Krishnan, Anita; Leary, R; Bagchi, A; Jagannadh, Bulusu; Mohapatra, Debendra K; Bhadra, Manika Pal; Bhadra, Utpal

    2010-04-16

    p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), a structural moiety of many commercial drugs, is self-assembled with linker alkyl side chains to form tubular nanostructures. The tubes exhibited fluorescence either intrinsic or from fluorescent molecules embedded in the wall during self-assembly. Uptake and inter-cellular delivery of the conjugated nanotubes in human cancer cells and in mouse embryonic stem cells were demonstrated by fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry. Biocompatibility, cytotoxicity and clearance were monitored both ex vivo in mouse multipotent embryonic stem cells and in vivo in adult Drosophila. Accumulation of nanotubes had no adverse effects and abnormalities on stem cell morphology and proliferation rate. A distinct distribution of two separate nanotubes in various internal organs of Drosophila interprets that accumulation of nanomaterials might be interdependent on the side chain modifications and physiological settings of cell or tissue types. Unlike carbon nanomaterials, exposure of PABA nanotubes does not produce any hazards including locomotion defects and mortality of adult flies. Despite differential uptake and clearance from multiple live tissues, the use of self-assembled nanotubes can add new dimensions and scope to the development of dual-purpose oral carriers for the fulfilment of many biological promises.

  8. 4-N-pyridin-2-yl-benzamide nanotubes compatible with mouse stem cell and oral delivery in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Jhillu S; Das, Pragna P; Bag, Indira; Krishnan, Anita; Jagannadh, Bulusu; Mohapatra, Debendra K; Bhadra, Manika Pal [Division of Organic Chemistry-I, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500007 (India); Lavanya, Madugula P; Bhadra, Utpal [Functional Genomics and Gene Silencing Group, Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500007 (India)

    2010-04-16

    p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), a structural moiety of many commercial drugs, is self-assembled with linker alkyl side chains to form tubular nanostructures. The tubes exhibited fluorescence either intrinsic or from fluorescent molecules embedded in the wall during self-assembly. Uptake and inter-cellular delivery of the conjugated nanotubes in human cancer cells and in mouse embryonic stem cells were demonstrated by fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry. Biocompatibility, cytotoxicity and clearance were monitored both ex vivo in mouse multipotent embryonic stem cells and in vivo in adult Drosophila. Accumulation of nanotubes had no adverse effects and abnormalities on stem cell morphology and proliferation rate. A distinct distribution of two separate nanotubes in various internal organs of Drosophila interprets that accumulation of nanomaterials might be interdependent on the side chain modifications and physiological settings of cell or tissue types. Unlike carbon nanomaterials, exposure of PABA nanotubes does not produce any hazards including locomotion defects and mortality of adult flies. Despite differential uptake and clearance from multiple live tissues, the use of self-assembled nanotubes can add new dimensions and scope to the development of dual-purpose oral carriers for the fulfilment of many biological promises.

  9. [Temporal dimensions of suicide: hypothesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell-Camós, Eliseu

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author examines the temporal dimensions of suicide by taking into account the multiple existing approaches-circadian physiology, psychiatric or sociological epidemiology of suicide-however promoting a socio-anthropological perspective. From this perspective, suicide is examined as a social phenomenon inscribed in time. By beginning with a concern that is characteristic of anthropology of time, knowingly the relation between time of nature and time of society, the author addresses a key issue of the study of suicide already elaborated by Durkheim, in the relation between change that is a basic expression of the passage of time and suicide. After presenting different scientific contributions on the subject, the author proposes an hypothesis allowing integration of the influence of time related to natural phenomenon (cosmobiological rhythms) and the relation of time to social phenomenon (politico-economic rhythms) in relation with suicide and this, according to Gabennesch's theory of "failed promises."

  10. Psychological dimensions of Energy Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonello, Graciela

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most serious current environmental problems is the depletion of non renewable natural resources. The vast majority of our daily actions involve the consumption of energy and they increase the problem. Environmental psychology studies the psychological motivations that determine pro-ecological behaviour. In this context the aim of this review was to determine which psychological models and variables are better descriptors of residential energy conservation, comparing the predictive power of different models related to behaviour, residential consumption as well as to the acceptability of energy policies. Results suggest that energy saving is mainly linked to altruistic motivations, followed by egoistic reasons and in a minor way to environmental concerns. People would act according to these dimensions when contextual conditions are perceived as appropriate.

  11. Accessible solitons of fractional dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Wei-Ping, E-mail: zhongwp6@126.com [Department of Electronic and Information Engineering, Shunde Polytechnic, Guangdong Province, Shunde 528300 (China); Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Belić, Milivoj [Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Zhang, Yiqi [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education & Shaanxi Key Lab of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrate that accessible solitons described by an extended Schrödinger equation with the Laplacian of fractional dimension can exist in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media. The soliton solutions of the model are constructed by two special functions, the associated Legendre polynomials and the Laguerre polynomials in the fraction-dimensional space. Our results show that these fractional accessible solitons form a soliton family which includes crescent solitons, and asymmetric single-layer and multi-layer necklace solitons. -- Highlights: •Analytic solutions of a fractional Schrödinger equation are obtained. •The solutions are produced by means of self-similar method applied to the fractional Schrödinger equation with parabolic potential. •The fractional accessible solitons form crescent, asymmetric single-layer and multilayer necklace profiles. •The model applies to the propagation of optical pulses in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media.

  12. Robust large dimension terahertz cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Dachuan; Han, Jiaguang; Yang, Yuanmu; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Weili

    2011-01-01

    Invisibility cloaking not only catches the human imagination, but also promises fascinating applications in optics and photonics. By manipulating electromagnetic waves with metamaterials, researchers have been able to realize electromagnetic cloaking in the microwave, terahertz and optical regimes. Nevertheless, the complex design and fabrication process, narrow bandwidth, and high intrinsic losses in the metamaterial-based cloaks have imposed intractable limitations on their realistic applications. Seeking new approaches to overcome these perceived disadvantages is in progress. Here by using uniform sapphire crystal, we demonstrate the first homogenous invisibility cloak functioning at terahertz frequencies. The terahertz invisibility device features a large concealed volume, low loss, and broad bandwidth. In particular, it is capable of hiding objects with a dimension nearly an order of magnitude larger than that of its lithographic counterpart, but without involving complex and time-consuming cleanroom pro...

  13. Human dimension of strategic partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petković Mirjana M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to point to the widespread practice of neglecting behavioral aspects of different forms of fusions and integrations of enterprises that have emerged in the process of privatization through strategic partnerships with foreign companies among Serbian enterprises. The initial hypothesis in this paper is that the process of privatization, restructuring and transformation in Serbian enterprises cannot be completely successful and equally advantageous for all the subjects involved if there is no concern for human dimension of these processes. Without this concern there is a possibility for behavioral problems to arise, and the only way to resolve them is through post festum respecting and introducing elements that should never have been neglected in the first place. This paper refers to the phenomenon of collision of cultures and the ways of resolving it while forming strategic partnerships.

  14. Keynote speech: Dimensions of Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kenneth Mølbjerg

    2004-01-01

    and identities. As such the work of these disciplines is often rather misplaced and it tends to be rather unsuccessful. I argue that we need to adjust knowledge and learning strategies to local circumstances in order to be more successful in creating new knowledge. The presentation has three parts. First I...... introduce a basic framework for understanding knowledge. This is done by means of Wittgenstein's concept of language games. Second, I introduce the four dimensions of reality. Third I relate the model to the disciplines organizational learning and knowledge management....... I argue that this framework leads to a new and critical understanding of the disciplines organizational learning and knowledge management. In particular I argue that these disciplines often contain their own image of work and identity, which may be a sharp contrast to extant work forms...

  15. The spatial dimensions of innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Anne

    2005-01-01

    The paper discusseses the spatial dimensions of innovation in Polish manufacturing companies. The conceptual framework of the paper is an understanding of social networks as a potential resource of the company, whether they are internal or external. Whether the company benefits from the potential...... by the common perceptions, and the institutional infrastructure prevailing in the (local)society. In Poland the latter is closely connected with the process of transition since 1990. The paper reports from a study among Polish manufacturing companies. It categorises the types of innovation prevailing...... in the companies and detects the role of networks in the innovation process of the companies. To what extend do the companies draw on external networks, on what points of the innovation process are the networks involved, what kind of networks are involved, and not least, what are the spatial characteristics...

  16. Trading in Risk Dimensions (TRD)

    CERN Document Server

    Ingber, Lester

    2007-01-01

    Previous work, mostly published, developed two-shell recursive trading systems. An inner-shell of Canonical Momenta Indicators (CMI) is adaptively fit to incoming market data. A parameterized trading-rule outer-shell uses the global optimization code Adaptive Simulated Annealing (ASA) to fit the trading system to historical data. A simple fitting algorithm, usually not requiring ASA, is used for the inner-shell fit. An additional risk-management middle-shell has been added to create a three-shell recursive optimization/sampling/fitting algorithm. Portfolio-level distributions of copula-transformed multivariate distributions (with constituent markets possessing different marginal distributions in returns space) are generated by Monte Carlo samplings. ASA is used to importance-sample weightings of these markets. The core code, Trading in Risk Dimensions (TRD), processes Training and Testing trading systems on historical data, and consistently interacts with RealTime trading platforms at minute resolutions, but ...

  17. Anisotropic inflation from extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Litterio, M; Amendola, L; Dyrek, A; Litterio, Marco; Amendola, Luca; Dyrek, Andrzej

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum multidimensional cosmological models with internal spaces being compact n-dimensional Lie group manifolds are considered. Products of 3-spheres and SU(3) manifold (a novelty in cosmology) are studied. It turns out that the dynamical evolution of the internal space drives an accelerated expansion of the external world (power law inflation). This generic solution (attractor in a phase space) is determined by the Lie group space without any fine tuning or arbitrary inflaton potentials. Matter in the four dimensions appears in the form of a number of scalar fields representing anisotropic scale factors for the internal space. Along the attractor solution the volume of the internal space grows logarithmically in time. This simple and natural model should be completed by mechanisms terminating the inflationary evolution and transforming the geometric scalar fields into ordinary particles.

  18. Supergravity Fluxbranes in Various Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C M; Saffin, P M; Chen, Chiang-Mei; Gal'tsov, Dmitri V.; Saffin, Paul M.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate fluxbrane solutions to the Einstein-antisymmetric form-dilaton theory in arbitrary space-time dimensions for a transverse space of cylindrical topology $S^k\\times R^n$, corresponding to smeared and unsmeared solutions. A master equation for a single metric function is derived. This is a non-linear second-order ordinary differential equation admitting an analytic solution, singular at the origin, which serves as an attractor for globally regular solutions, whose existence is demonstrated numerically. For all fluxbranes of different levels of smearing the metric function diverges at infinity as the same power of the radial coordinate except for the maximally smeared case, where a global solution is known in closed form and can be obtained algebraically using U-duality. The particular cases of F6 and F3 fluxbranes in D=11 supergravity and fluxbranes in IIA, IIB supergravities are discussed.

  19. Numerical relativity in higher dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilhao, Miguel; Herdeiro, Carlos [Departamento de Fisica e Centro de Fisica do Porto, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Witek, Helvi; Cardoso, Vitor; Nerozzi, Andrea [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica - CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico - IST, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Sperhake, Ulrich [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Gualtieri, Leonardo, E-mail: mzilhao@fc.up.p, E-mail: helvi.witek@ist.utl.p, E-mail: vitor.cardoso@ist.utl.p, E-mail: Leonardo.Gualtieri@roma1.infn.i, E-mail: crherdei@fc.up.p, E-mail: andrea.nerozzi@ist.utl.p, E-mail: sperhake@tapir.caltech.ed [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' Sapienza' and Sezione, INFN Roma1, P.A. Moro 5, 00185, Roma (Italy)

    2010-05-01

    We give a status report on our project targeted at performing numerical simulations of a head-on collision of non-spinning black holes in higher dimensional non-compact space-times. These simulations should help us understand black objects in higher dimensions and their stability properties. They are also relevant for the problem of black hole formation and evaporation in particle accelerators and cosmic rays. We use the symmetries of the system to reduce the problem to an effective 3+1 problem, allowing the use of existing numerical codes. As a simple application of the formalism, we present the results for the evolution of a five dimensional single black hole space-time.

  20. Dimensions of problem based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche; Andreasen, Lars Birch

    2013-01-01

    The article contributes to the literature on problem based learning and problem-oriented project work, building on and reflecting the experiences of the authors through decades of work with problem-oriented project pedagogy. The article explores different dimensions of problem based learning...... such as the exploration of problems, the project method, online collaboration, and the dialogic nature of students’ working together. A special attention is given to the historical development and theoretical roots of problem-oriented project work in Denmark. The case to be explored will be the Masters programme in ICT...... and Learning (MIL). We discuss changes in the roles of the teachers as supervisors within this learning environment, and we explore the involvement of students as active participants and co-designers of how course and project activities unfold....

  1. Kolmogorov Flow in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.; Woodruff, Stephen L.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical study of the long-time evolution of incompressible Navier-Stokes turbulence forced at a single long-wavelength Fourier mode, i.e., a Kolmogorov flow, has been completed. The boundary conditions are periodic in three dimensions and the forcing is effected by imposing a steady, two-dimensional, sinusoidal shear velocity which is directed along the x-direction and varies along the z-direction. A comparison with experimental data shows agreement with measured cross-correlations of the turbulent velocity components which lie in the mean-flow plane. A statistical analysis reveals that the shear-driven turbulence studied here has significant spectral anisotropy which increases with wave number.

  2. Grand unification in higher dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Nomura, Yasunori

    2003-07-01

    We have recently proposed an alternative picture for the physics at the scale of gauge coupling unification, where the unified symmetry is realized in higher dimensions but is broken locally by a symmetry breaking defect. Gauge coupling unification, the quantum numbers of quarks and leptons and the longevity of the proton arise as phenomena of the symmetrical bulk, while the lightness of the Higgs doublets and the masses of the light quarks and leptons probe the symmetry breaking defect. Moreover, the framework is extremely predictive if the effective higher dimensional theory is valid over a large energy interval up to the scale of strong coupling. Precise agreement with experiments is obtained in the simplest theory— SU(5) in five dimensions with two Higgs multiplets propagating in the bulk. The weak mixing angle is predicted to be sin 2θw=0.2313±0.0004, which fits the data with extraordinary accuracy. The compactification scale and the strong coupling scale are determined to be M c≃5×10 14 GeV and M s≃1×10 17 GeV, respectively. Proton decay with a lifetime of order 10 34 years is expected with a variety of final states such as e+π0, and several aspects of flavor, including large neutrino mixing angles, are understood by the geometrical locations of the matter fields. When combined with a particular supersymmetry breaking mechanism, the theory predicts large lepton flavor violating μ→ e and τ→ μ transitions, with all superpartner masses determined by only two free parameters. The predicted value of the bottom quark mass from Yukawa unification agrees well with the data. This paper is mainly a review of the work presented in hep-ph/0103125, hep-ph/0111068, and hep-ph/0205067 [1-3].

  3. Higher Curvature Gravity in TeV-Scale Extra Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2006-03-31

    We begin a general exploration of the phenomenology of TeV-scale extra-dimensional models with gravitational actions that contain higher curvature terms. In particular, we examine how the classic collider signatures of the models of Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali (missing energy and new dimension-8 contact interactions) and of Randall and Sundrum (TeV-scale graviton Kaluza-Klein resonances) are altered by these modifications to the usual Einstein-Hilbert action. We find that not only are the detailed signatures for these gravitationally induced processes altered but new contributions are found to arise due to the existence of additional scalar Kaluza-Klein states in the spectrum.

  4. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, F.; Shi, W.; Ideue, T.; Yoshida, M.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.; Kikitsu, T.; Inoue, D.; Hashizume, D.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity--unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures.

  5. New direction in nanotube science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Terrones

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available We review the latest advances in the production and state-of-the art characterization of B- and N-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs and nanofibers. We briefly discuss different approaches to producing these novel doped nano-systems. The use of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS, scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS, Raman spectroscopy, and allied techniques to characterize these doped systems is reviewed. The field emission properties as well as some applications to the fabrication of novel polymer composites, Li+ batteries, and gas sensors are also discussed. It is clear that these materials possess outstanding properties when compared with pure CNTs, and it is foreseen that these systems will revolutionize some aspects of nanotube science and technology, thus opening a vast field of experimental and theoretical research.

  6. A Tunable Carbon Nanotube Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Vera

    2005-03-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. Carbon nanotubes (NT) are perhaps the ultimate material for realizing a NEMS device as they are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus is able to sense its own motion. Here, we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string oscillation modes of doubly-clamped NT oscillators. We observed resonance frequencies in the 5MHz to 150MHz range with quality factors in the 50 to 100 range. We showed that the resonance frequencies can be widely tuned by a gate voltage. We also report on the temperature dependence of the quality factor and present a discussion of possible loss mechanisms.

  7. Ballistic Fracturing of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Sehmus; Machado, Leonardo D; Tiwary, ChandraSekhar; Autreto, Pedro A S; Vajtai, Robert; Barrera, Enrique V; Galvao, Douglas S; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-09-21

    Advanced materials with multifunctional capabilities and high resistance to hypervelocity impact are of great interest to the designers of aerospace structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with their lightweight and high strength properties are alternative to metals and/or metallic alloys conventionally used in aerospace applications. Here we report a detailed study on the ballistic fracturing of CNTs for different velocity ranges. Our results show that the highly energetic impacts cause bond breakage and carbon atom rehybridizations, and sometimes extensive structural reconstructions were also observed. Experimental observations show the formation of nanoribbons, nanodiamonds, and covalently interconnected nanostructures, depending on impact conditions. Fully atomistic reactive molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out in order to gain further insights into the mechanism behind the transformation of CNTs. The simulations show that the velocity and relative orientation of the multiple colliding nanotubes are critical to determine the impact outcome.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  9. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Torsional Carbon Nanotube Artificial Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Fang, Shaoli; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Madden, John D. W.; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H.

    2011-10-01

    Rotary motors of conventional design can be rather complex and are therefore difficult to miniaturize; previous carbon nanotube artificial muscles provide contraction and bending, but not rotation. We show that an electrolyte-filled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn, much thinner than a human hair, functions as a torsional artificial muscle in a simple three-electrode electrochemical system, providing a reversible 15,000° rotation and 590 revolutions per minute. A hydrostatic actuation mechanism, as seen in muscular hydrostats in nature, explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and torsional rotation during the yarn volume increase caused by electrochemical double-layer charge injection. The use of a torsional yarn muscle as a mixer for a fluidic chip is demonstrated.

  11. Multibiomarker response in the earthworm Eisenia fetida as tool for assessing multi-walled carbon nanotube ecotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisi, A; Grimaldi, A; Leomanni, A; Lionetto, M G; Dondero, F; Schettino, T

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have received a great attention in the last years thanks to their remarkable structural, electrical, and chemical properties. Nowadays carbon nanotubes are increasingly found in terrestrial and aquatic environment and potential harmful impacts of these nanoparticles on humans and wildlife are attracting increasing research and public attention. The effects of carbon nanotubes on aquatic organisms have been explored by several authors, but comparatively the information available on the impact of these particles on soil organisms is much less. Earthworms have traditionally been considered to be convenient indicators of land use impact and soil fertility. The aim of this work was to study the integrated response of a suite of biomarkers covering molecular to whole organism endpoints for the assessment of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) effects on earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to spiked soil. Results showed that cellular and biochemical responses, such as immune cells morphometric alterations and lysosomal membrane destabilization, acetylcholinesterase inhibition and metallothionein tissue concentration changes, showed high sensitivity to MWCNTs exposure. They can improve our understanding and ability to predict chronic toxicity outcomes of MWCNTs exposure such as reproductive alterations. In this context although more investigation is needed to understand the mechanistic pathway relating the biochemical and cellular biomarker analyzed to reproductive alterations, the obtained results give an early contribution to the future development of an adverse outcomes pathways for MWCNTs exposure.

  12. Oriented nanotube electrodes for lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Arthur J.; Zhu, Kai; Wang, Qing

    2013-03-05

    An electrode having an oriented array of multiple nanotubes is disclosed. Individual nanotubes have a lengthwise inner pore defined by interior tube walls which extends at least partially through the length of the nanotube. The nanotubes of the array may be oriented according to any identifiable pattern. Also disclosed is a device featuring an electrode and methods of fabrication.

  13. Static and dynamic wetting measurements of single carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Asa H; Cohen, Sidney R; Wagner, H Daniel

    2004-05-07

    Individual carbon nanotubes were immersed and removed from various organic liquids using atomic force microscopy. The carbon nanotube-liquid interactions could be monitored in situ, and accurate measurements of the contact angle between liquids and the nanotube surface were made. These wetting data were used to produce Owens and Wendt plots giving the dispersive and polar components of the nanotube surface.

  14. Removing structural disorder from oriented TiO2 nanotube arrays: reducing the dimensionality of transport and recombination in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kai; Vinzant, Todd B; Neale, Nathan R; Frank, Arthur J

    2007-12-01

    We report on the influence of morphological disorder, arising from bundling of nanotubes (NTs) and microcracks in films of oriented TiO2 NT arrays, on charge transport and recombination in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Capillary stress created during evaporation of liquids from the mesopores of dense TiO2 NT arrays was of sufficient magnitude to induce bundling and microcrack formation. The average lateral deflection of the NTs in the bundles increased with the surface tension of the liquids and with the film thicknesses. The supercritical CO2 drying technique was used to produce bundle-free and crack-free NT films. Charge transport and recombination properties of sensitized films were studied by frequency-resolved modulated photocurrent/photovoltage spectroscopies. Transport became significantly faster with decreased clustering of the NTs, indicating that bundling creates additional pathways via intertube contacts. Removing such contacts alters the transport mechanism from a combination of one and three dimensions to the expected one dimension and shortens the electron-transport pathway. Reducing intertube contacts also resulted in a lower density of surface recombination centers by minimizing distortion-induced surface defects in bundled NTs. A causal connection between transport and recombination is observed. The dye coverage was greater in the more aligned NT arrays, suggesting that reducing intertube contacts increases the internal surface area of the films accessible to dye molecules. The solar conversion efficiency and photocurrent density were highest for DSSCs incorporating films with more aligned NT arrays owing to an enhanced light-harvesting efficiency. Removing structural disorder from other materials and devices consisting of nominally one-dimensional architectures (e.g., nanowire arrays) should produce similar effects.

  15. Carbon nanotubes periodically decorated by highdensity polyethylene crystalline using solution crystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The carbon nanotubes (CNTs) periodically decorated by high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites with nanohybrid shish kebabs (NHSK) structures were prepared by CNTs-initiated solution crystalli-zation. The disc-shaped HDPE crystalline lamellae were periodically located on the surface of CNTs in the direction perpendicular to the nanotube axis. Observations from scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that with the increasing of crystallization temperature, the lateral dimension of the lamellae was decreased and the distance between two neighboring lamellae was increased. However, the thickness of the lamellae did not vary with the crystallization temperature. The formation mechanism of the NHSK structures was also explained. The one-dimensional structure and the ultra-high curved surface of CNTs lead to strong geometry confinement, which plays a main role in the formation of the NHSKs.

  16. Nonlinear damping in mechanical resonators made from carbon nanotubes and graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, A.; Moser, J.; Chaste, J.; Zdrojek, M.; Wilson-Rae, I.; Bachtold, A.

    2011-06-01

    The theory of damping is discussed in Newton's Principia and has been tested in objects as diverse as the Foucault pendulum, the mirrors in gravitational-wave detectors and submicrometre mechanical resonators. In general, the damping observed in these systems can be described by a linear damping force. Advances in nanofabrication mean that it is now possible to explore damping in systems with one or more atomic-scale dimensions. Here we study the damping of mechanical resonators based on carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets. The damping is found to strongly depend on the amplitude of motion, and can be described by a nonlinear rather than a linear damping force. We exploit the nonlinear nature of damping in these systems to improve the figures of merit for both nanotube and graphene resonators. For instance, we achieve a quality factor of 100,000 for a graphene resonator.

  17. Carbon nanotubes in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Susanna; Ballerini, Laura; Prato, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    As a result of their peculiar features, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging in many areas of nanotechnology applications. CNT-based technology has been increasingly proposed for biomedical applications, to develop biomolecule nanocarriers, bionanosensors and smart material for tissue engineering purposes. In the following chapter this latter application will be explored, describing why CNTs can be considered an ideal material able to support and boost the growth and the proliferation of many kinds of tissues.

  18. Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    coagulant. The second process (patent pending) is novel in that it directly results polymer-free nanotube fibers without using a super acid spinning...chemical and electrochemical stability, hydrophobicity and viscosity . The generic structure, chemical name and abbreviations for the most common ions...modification procedure involved the electrochemical infiltration of small amounts of the polypyrrole/p-toluene sulphonate (PPy/PTS) conducting polymer

  19. Sorting carbon nanotubes for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Richard

    2008-11-25

    Because of their unique structure and composition, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are at the interface between molecules and crystalline solids. They also present properties that are ideal for making lightweight, inexpensive, and flexible electronics. The raw material is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of SWNTs that differ in helicity and diameter and, therefore, requires purification and separation. In a series of groundbreaking experiments, a robust process serving this purpose was developed based on SWNTs encapsulated in surfactants and water. Ultracentrifugation in a density gradient combined with surfactant mixtures provided buoyant density differences, enabling enrichment for both diameter and electronic properties. A new paper in this issue explores further the process through the hydrodynamic properties of SWNT-surfactant complexes. The study reveals that we have just begun to uncover the dynamics and properties of nanotube-surfactant interactions and highlights the potential that could be gained from a better understanding of their chemistry. The time scale of integration of carbon nanotubes into electronics applications remains unclear, but the recent developments in sorting out SWNTs paves the way for improving on the properties of network-based SWNTs.

  20. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insepov, Zeke; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  1. The electrical conduction variation in stained carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shih-Jye; Wei Fan, Jun; Lin, Chung-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes become stained from coupling with foreign molecules, especially from adsorbing gas molecules. The charge exchange, which is due to the orbital hybridization, occurred in the stained carbon nanotube induces electrical dipoles that consequently vary the electrical conduction of the nanotube. We propose a microscopic model to evaluate the electrical current variation produced by the induced electrical dipoles in a stained zigzag carbon nanotube. It is found that stronger orbital hybridization strengths and larger orbital energy differences between the carbon nanotube and the gas molecules help increasing the induced electrical dipole moment. Compared with the stain-free carbon nanotube, the induced electrical dipoles suppress the current in the nanotube. In the carbon nanotubes with induced dipoles the current increases as a result of increasing orbital energy dispersion via stronger hybridization couplings. In particular, at a fixed hybridization coupling, the current increases with the bond length for the donor-carbon nanotube but reversely for the acceptor-carbon nanotube.

  2. Methods for preparation of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakov, Eduard G [D.I. Mendeleev Russian University of Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-01-31

    The most important methods of synthesis and purification of carbon nanotubes, a new form of material, are described. The prospects for increasing the scale of preparation processes and for more extensive application of nanotubes are evaluated. The bibliography includes 282 references.

  3. Sacrificial template method of fabricating a nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yi-Ying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2007-05-01

    Methods of fabricating uniform nanotubes are described in which nanotubes were synthesized as sheaths over nanowire templates, such as using a chemical vapor deposition process. For example, single-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are utilized as templates over which gallium nitride (GaN) is epitaxially grown. The ZnO templates are then removed, such as by thermal reduction and evaporation. The completed single-crystalline GaN nanotubes preferably have inner diameters ranging from 30 nm to 200 nm, and wall thicknesses between 5 and 50 nm. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that the resultant nanotubes are single-crystalline with a wurtzite structure, and are oriented along the direction. The present invention exemplifies single-crystalline nanotubes of materials with a non-layered crystal structure. Similar "epitaxial-casting" approaches could be used to produce arrays and single-crystalline nanotubes of other solid materials and semiconductors. Furthermore, the fabrication of multi-sheath nanotubes are described as well as nanotubes having multiple longitudinal segments.

  4. Nanotubes based on monolayer blue phosphorus

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-07-08

    We demonstrate structural stability of monolayer zigzag and armchair blue phosphorus nanotubes by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational spectrum and electronic band structure are determined and analyzed as functions of the tube diameter and axial strain. The nanotubes are found to be semiconductors with a sensitive indirect band gap that allows flexible tuning.

  5. Suspended carbon nanotubes coupled to superconducting circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, B.H.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are unique candidates to study quantum mechanical properties of a nanomechanical resonator. However to access this quantum regime, present detectors are not yet sensitive enough. In this thesis we couple a carbon nanotube CNT mechanical resonator to a superconducting circuit which i

  6. Carbon nanotubes for RF and microwaves

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, P. J.; Yu, Z; Rutherglen, C.

    2005-01-01

    In this invited overview paper we provide a brief up-to-date summary of the potential applications of carbon nanotubes for RF and microwave devices and systems. We focus in particular on the use of nanotubes as ultra-high speed interconnects in integrated circuits.

  7. Carbon Nanotubes – Interactions with Biological Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Joana; Capela-Silva, Fernando; Potes, José; Fonseca, Alexandra; Oliveira, Mónica; Kanagaraj, Subramani; Marques, António Torres

    2011-01-01

    his book chapter discusses the prospective biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes based materials, the impact of carbon nanotubes properties in the interaction with biological systems. Protein adsorption, impact on cell viability and cytokine production are explored. Potential respiratory and dermal toxicity are reviewed, as the difficulties on studying the biological response. In face of recent studies, special attention is drawn upon promising orthopaedic use.

  8. Multiscale Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes and Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2005-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics and hybrid continuum/atomistic simulations of carbon nanotubes in liquid environments with an emphasis on aqueous solutions. We emphasize computational issues such as interaction potentials and coupling techniques and their influence on the simulated physics. We present results from simulations of water flows inside and outside doped and pure carbon nanotubes and discuss their implications for experimental studies.

  9. Carbon nanotubes as heat dissipaters in microelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Paz, Alejandro; García-Lastra, Juan María; Markussen, Troels

    2013-01-01

    We review our recent modelling work of carbon nanotubes as potential candidates for heat dissipation in microelectronics cooling. In the first part, we analyze the impact of nanotube defects on their thermal transport properties. In the second part, we investigate the loss of thermal properties...

  10. Carbon Nanotubes for Human Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Files, Brad; Yowell, Leonard

    2003-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes offer the promise of a new class of revolutionary materials for space applications. The Carbon Nanotube Project at NASA Johnson Space Center has been actively researching this new technology by investigating nanotube production methods (arc, laser, and HiPCO) and gaining a comprehensive understanding of raw and purified material using a wide range of characterization techniques. After production and purification, single wall carbon nanotubes are processed into composites for the enhancement of mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. This "cradle-to-grave" approach to nanotube composites has given our team unique insights into the impact of post-production processing and dispersion on the resulting material properties. We are applying our experience and lessons-learned to developing new approaches toward nanotube material characterization, structural composite fabrication, and are also making advances in developing thermal management materials and electrically conductive materials in various polymer-nanotube systems. Some initial work has also been conducted with the goal of using carbon nanotubes in the creation of new ceramic materials for high temperature applications in thermal protection systems. Human space flight applications such as advanced life support and fuel cell technologies are also being investigated. This discussion will focus on the variety of applications under investigation.

  11. CARBON NANOTUBES: PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, John, E.

    2009-07-24

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered in 1991 as a minority byproduct of fullerene synthesis. Remarkable progress has been made in the ensuing years, including the discovery of two basic types of nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall), great strides in synthesis and purification, elucidation of many fundamental physical properties, and important steps towards practical applications. Both the underlying science and technological potential of SWNT can profitably be studied at the scale of individual tubes and on macroscopic assemblies such as fibers. Experiments on single tubes directly reveal many of the predicted quantum confinement and mechanical properties. Semiconductor nanowires have many features in common with nanotubes, and many of the same fundamental and practical issues are in play – quantum confinement and its effect on properties; possible device structures and circuit architectures; thermal management; optimal synthesis, defect morphology and control, etc. In 2000 we began a small effort in this direction, conducted entirely by undergraduates with minimal consumables support from this grant. With DOE-BES approval, this grew into a project in parallel with the carbon nanotube work, in which we studied of inorganic semiconductor nanowire growth, characterization and novel strategies for electronic and electromechanical device fabrication. From the beginnings of research on carbon nanotubes, one of the major applications envisioned was hydrogen storage for fuel-cell powered cars and trucks. Subsequent theoretical models gave mixed results, the most pessimistic indicating that the fundamental H2-SWNT interaction was similar to flat graphite (physisorption) with only modest binding energies implying cryogenic operation at best. New material families with encouraging measured properties have emerged, and materials modeling has gained enormously in predictive power, sophistication, and the ability to treat a realistically representative number of atoms. One of

  12. Enzymatic degradation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Allen, Brett L; Star, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    Because of their unique properties, carbon nanotubes and, in particular, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been used for the development of advanced composite and catalyst materials. Despite their growing commercial applications and increased production, the potential environmental and toxicological impacts of MWNTs are not fully understood; however, many reports suggest that they may be toxic. Therefore, a need exists to develop protocols for effective and safe degradation of MWNTs. In this article, we investigated the effect of chemical functionalization of MWNTs on their enzymatic degradation with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). We investigated HRP/H(2)O(2) degradation of purified, oxidized, and nitrogen-doped MWNTs and proposed a layer-by-layer degradation mechanism of nanotubes facilitated by side wall defects. These results provide a better understanding of the interaction between HRP and carbon nanotubes and suggest an eco-friendly way of mitigating the environmental impact of nanotubes.

  13. Development of supercapacitors based on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Block-type electrodes made of carbon nanotubes were fabricated by different processes. The volumetric specific capacitance based on such electrodes reached 107 F/cm3, which proves carbon nanotubes to be ideal candidate materials for supercapacitors. The composite electrodes consisting of carbon nanotubes and RuO2.xH2O were developed by the deposition of RuO2 on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show much higher specific capacitance than those based on pure carbon nanotube ones. A specific capacitance of 600 F/g can be achieved when the weight percent of RuO2.xH2O in the composite electrodes reaches 75%. In addition, supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show both high energy density and high power density characteristics.

  14. Development of supercapacitors based on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马仁志; 魏秉庆; 徐才录; 梁吉; 吴德海

    2000-01-01

    Block-type electrodes made of carbon nanotubes were fabricated by different processes. The volumetric specific capacitance based on such electrodes reached 107 F/cm3, which proves carbon nanotubes to be ideal candidate materials for supercapacitors. The composite electrodes consisting of carbon nanotubes and RuO2 ·xH2O were developed by the deposition of RuO2 on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show much higher specific capacitance than those based on pure carbon nanotube ones. A specific capacitance of 600 F/g can be achieved when the weight percent of RuO2· xH2O in the composite electrodes reaches 75% . In addition , supercapacitors based on the composite electrodes show both high energy density and high power density characteristics.

  15. Pure and doped boron nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Terrones

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available More than ten years ago, it was suggested theoretically that boron nitride (BN nanotubes could be produced. Soon after, various reports on their synthesis appeared and a new area of nanotube science was born. This review aims to cover the latest advances related to the synthesis of BN nanotubes. We show that these tubes can now be produced in larger amounts and, in particular, that the chemistry of BN tubes appears to be very important to the production of reinforced composites with insulating characteristics. From the theoretical standpoint, we also show that (BN-C heteronanotubes could have important implications for nanoelectronics. We believe that BN nanotubes (pure and doped could be used in the fabrication of novel devices in which pure carbon nanotubes do not perform very efficiently.

  16. [Occlusal vertical dimension in removable complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Haan, R; Witter, D J

    2011-12-01

    In removable complete dentures, the occlusal vertical dimension is an important factor for patients' satisfaction with aesthetics. An excessively reduced occlusal vertical dimension is especially likely to lead to complaints about aesthetics, whereas an increased occlusal vertical dimension may lead to discomfort and a decision not to wear the complete dentures. There are various methods for determining the occlusal vertical dimension in complete dentures, based on the vertical dimension in the rest position of the mandible or on phonetics. However, none of the methods have proven to be clearly superior, in terms of reliability, than the others. The assessment of the occlusal vertical dimension will become more reliable if several methods are used simultaneously. Moreover, knowledge of the characteristics of the ageing face is essential.

  17. Delimiting Maximal Kissing Configurations in Four Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Altschuler, Eric Lewin

    2013-01-01

    How many unit $n-$dimensional spheres can simultaneously touch or kiss a central $n-$dimensional unit sphere? Beyond mathematics this question has implications for fields such as cryptography and the structure of biologic and chemical macromolecules. The kissing number is only known for dimensions 1-4, 8 and 24 (2, 6, 12, 24, 240, 19650, respectively) and only particularly obvious for dimensions one and two. Indeed, in four dimensions it is not even known if Platonic polytope unique to that dimension known as the 24-cell is the unique kissing configuration. We have not been able to prove that the 24-cell is unique, but, using a physical approach utilizing the hopf map from four to three dimensions, we for the first time delimit the possible other configurations which could be kissing in four dimensions.

  18. Making junctions between carbon nanotubes using an ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Krasheninnikov, A V; Keinonen, J; Banhart, F

    2003-01-01

    Making use of empirical potential molecular dynamics, we study ion bombardment of crossed single-walled carbon nanotubes as a tool to join the nanotubes. We demonstrate that ion irradiation should result in welding of crossed nanotubes, both suspended and deposited on substrates. We further predict optimum ion doses and energies for ion-mediated nanotube welding which may potentially be used for developing complicated networks of joined nanotubes.

  19. Bulk Cutting of Carbon Nanotubes Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Kirk J. (Inventor); Rauwald, Urs (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Schmidt, Howard K. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Gu, Zhenning (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a method for attaining short carbon nanotubes utilizing electron beam irradiation, for example, of a carbon nanotube sample. The sample may be pretreated, for example by oxonation. The pretreatment may introduce defects to the sidewalls of the nanotubes. The method is shown to produces nanotubes with a distribution of lengths, with the majority of lengths shorter than 100 tun. Further, the median length of the nanotubes is between about 20 nm and about 100 nm.

  20. Chitosan-mediated synthesis of carbon nanotube-gold nanohybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GRAVEL; Edmond; FOILLARD; Stéphanie; DORIS; Eric

    2010-01-01

    Metal-nanotube nanohybrids were produced by in situ synthesis and stabilization of gold nanoparticles on chitosan-functionalized carbon nanotubes.The formation of gold nanoparticles from tetrachloroauric acid was observed after only a few minutes of contact with the functionalized nanotubes,at room temperature.These results suggest that adsorption of chitosan at the surface of carbon nanotubes permits smooth reduction of the metallic salt and efficient anchoring of gold nanoparticles to the nanotubes.

  1. {ital In Situ} Band Gap Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, V.H.; Cohen, M.L. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Rubio, A. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    1997-09-01

    Bond rotation defects close the gap in large-gap nanotubes, open the gap in small-gap nanotubes, and increase the density of states in metallic nanotubes. Not only are these defects likely to be present in as-grown nanotubes, but they could be introduced locally into intact nanotubes, thereby opening a new road towards device applications. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Spectral dimension flow on continuum random multigraph

    CERN Document Server

    Giasemidis, Georgios; Zohren, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We review a recently introduced effective graph approximation of causal dynamical triangulations (CDT), the multigraph ensemble. We argue that it is well suited for analytical computations and that it captures the physical degrees of freedom which are important for the reduction of the spectral dimension as observed in numerical simulations of CDT. In addition multigraph models allow us to study the relationship between the spectral dimension and the Hausdorff dimension, thus establishing a link to other approaches to quantum gravity

  3. Exploring Extra Dimensions in Spectroscopy Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Feng; LIU Hong-Ya

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose an idea in spectroscopy to search for extra spatial dimensions as well as to detect the possible deviation from Newton's inverse-square law at small scale, and we take high-Z hydrogenic systems and muonic atoms as illustrations. The relevant experiments might help to explore a more than two extra dimensions scenario in the brane world model proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, Dvali (ADD) and to set constraints for fundamental parameters such as the size of extra dimensions.

  4. Climate Dimensions in E-Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyöngyi Bujdosó

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In designing organization and environment,climate is a conventional conception. By an observation of Halpin, climate means the same for organizations as personality for individuals.This paper introduces the concept of cyber climate and some climate dimensions in e-learning. We deal with some new cyber climate dimensions that should be observed during designing e-learning materials,and provides some other important climate dimensions that should be taken into account while designing digital learning environments.

  5. The international dimensions of neuroethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombera, Sofia; Illes, Judy

    2009-08-01

    Neuroethics, in its modern form, investigates the impact of brain science in four basic dimensions: the self, social policy, practice and discourse. In this study, we analyzed a set of 461 peer-reviewed articles with neuroethics content, published by authors from 32 countries. We analyzed the data for: (1) trends in the development of international neuroethics over time, and (2) how challenges at the intersection of ethics and neuroscience are viewed in countries that are considered developed by International Monetary Fund (IMF) standards, and in those that are developing. Our results demonstrate a steady increase in global participation in neuroethics from 1989 to 2005, characterized by an increase in numbers of articles published specifically on neuroethics, journals publishing these articles, and countries contributing to the literature. The focus from all countries was on the practice of brain science and the amelioration of neurological disease. Indicators of technology creation and diffusion in developing countries were specifically correlated with increases in publications concerning policy implications of brain science. Neuroethics is an international endeavor and, as such, should be sensitive to the impact that context has on acceptance and use of technological innovation.

  6. Higgs Bosons in Extra Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Quiros, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, motivated by the recent discovery of a Higgs-like boson at the LHC with a mass m_H\\simeq 126 GeV, we review different models where the hierarchy problem is solved by means of a warped extra dimension. In the Randall-Sundrum model electroweak observables provide very strong bounds on the mass of KK modes which motivates extensions to overcome this problem. Two extensions are briefly discussed. One particular extension is based on the deformation of the metric such that it strongly departs from the AdS_5 structure in the IR region while it goes asymptotically to AdS_5 in the UV brane. This model has the IR brane close to a naked metric singularity (which is outside the physical interval) characteristic of soft-walls constructions. The proximity of the singularity provides a strong wave-function renormalization for the Higgs field which suppresses the T and S parameters. The second class of considered extensions are based on the introduction of an extra gauge group in the bulk such that the custod...

  7. Contagion Shocks in One Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi, Andrea L.; Rosado, Jesus; Short, Martin B.; Wang, Li

    2015-02-01

    We consider an agent-based model of emotional contagion coupled with motion in one dimension that has recently been studied in the computer science community. The model involves movement with a speed proportional to a "fear" variable that undergoes a temporal consensus averaging based on distance to other agents. We study the effect of Riemann initial data for this problem, leading to shock dynamics that are studied both within the agent-based model as well as in a continuum limit. We examine the behavior of the model under distinguished limits as the characteristic contagion interaction distance and the interaction timescale both approach zero. The limiting behavior is related to a classical model for pressureless gas dynamics with "sticky" particles. In comparison, we observe a threshold for the interaction distance vs. interaction timescale that produce qualitatively different behavior for the system - in one case particle paths do not cross and there is a natural Eulerian limit involving nonlocal interactions and in the other case particle paths can cross and one may consider only a kinetic model in the continuum limit.

  8. Moving into the third dimension

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    One detail at a time, digital 3-D models of CERN’s various machines are being created by the Integration Section in the Machines & Experimental Facilities Group (EN/MEF) . The work, which requires painstaking attention to detail on a colossal scale, facilitates improvements to existing accelerators and the design of new machines in the future.   Virtual representation of the LHC A complete digital mockup of the LHC in three dimensions already exists, including of course the tunnel, the machine systems including magnets and vacuum chambers, but also all of the various services such as cable ladders, piping systems and access control and so on. Only the colour and the texture of the surfaces betray that it is a mockup and not the real thing! The mockup of LINAC4 is finished too. The mockups for the SPS, ISOLDE and the entire PS complex, including transfer lines, are still being created. “Creating these 3-D mockups will allow us to work on forthcoming machine improvements, esp...

  9. Extra dimensions at particle colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvergsnes, Erik Wolden

    2004-08-01

    This thesis consists of an introduction where we consider different aspects of theories involving extra dimensions, together with four research publications (Papers I-IV) attached at the end. The introductional chapters should serve as background material for better understanding the models on which the articles are based. In Chap. 4 we also present some plots not included in the papers. The topic of Papers I-III is graviton induced Bremsstrahlung. In Paper I we consider the contribution to this process from graviton exchange through gluon-gluon fusion at the LHC, compared to the QED background. Only final-state radiation is considered in Paper I, whereas in Paper II we extend this work to include also the quark-antiquark annihilation with graviton exchange, as well as initial-state radiation for both graviton and Standard Model exchange. Paper III is a study of graviton-induced Bremsstrahlung at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders, including both initial- and final-state radiation. Paper IV is devoted to a study of the center-edge asymmetry at hadron colliders, an asymmetry which previously had been studied for e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. The center-edge asymmetry can be used as a method of distinguishing between spin-1 and spin-2 exchange, something which will be of major importance if a signal is observed.

  10. A Carbon Arc Apparatus For Production Of Nanotubes In Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    Although many methods are available for production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), the conventional carbon arc process remains the most popular due to its simplicity and large production rate. However, high temperatures inside the carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection, and it is hypothesized that the non-uniform environment created by this flow will have large effects on the growth and morphology of SWNTs produced by the arc process. Indeed, using normal gravity experiments, Marin et al. have demonstrated that changes in the buoyant convection plume produced by altering the arc electrode orientation can be used to change the diameter distribution of the SWNTs produced; an effect they attribute to changes in the temperature of the local nanotube growth environment. While these experiments present convincing evidence that buoyant convection has a strong effect on nanotube growth, normal gravity experiments are severely limited in scope. The ideal way to study the effect of buoyancy on SWNT production is to remove it completely. Toward this goal, a microgravity carbon arc reactor has been designed for use in the NASA Glenn 2.2 and 5 second drop towers. Although simple in principle, conventional carbon arc machines, which generally employ large reaction chambers and require heavy duty welding power supplies capable of supplying kilowatts of power, are not suitable for microgravity experiments. Here we describe a miniature carbon arc machine for SWNT production that fits into a conventional drop rig for use on the NASA Glenn 2.2 and 5 second drop towers, but that has a performance (production rate) that is better than most large ground-based machines.

  11. Ab initio study of H2O and water-chain-induced properties of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, B. K.; Singh, V.; Pathak, A.; Srivastava, R.

    2007-05-01

    We perform an ab initio study of the motion of the nano sized water dimer through a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), the stability of an encapsulated one-dimensional (1D) water chain inside SWCNT, and the H2O -induced structural, energetic, electronic, and optical properties of the SWCNTs. The adsorption of the water molecules is caused by the dispersion forces, i.e., the van der Waals (vdW) interactions. Thus, the role of the vdW interactions in the estimation of the BE for the weakly bound adsorbates cannot be ignored as has been done in several earlier publications. We find that a single H2O molecule or single water dimer or a 1D chain of water dimers is trapped inside the medium-sized (6,6) carbon nanotube placed in vacuum. However, the H2O molecule or water dimer may be transmitted in case the tube is surrounded by water or water vapor at high vapor pressure at high temperatures. On the other hand, a chain of single H2O molecules or more number of the encapsulated H2O molecules is very weakly coupled to the wide (10,10) carbon nanotube and can, thus, easily transmit through the carbon nanotube in agreement with the recent experiments. Further, appreciable adsorption both inside and on the surface of the (10,10) carbon nanotube is predicted in concurrence with the experiments. The small (medium-sized) diameter tubes will adsorb strongly (accommodate) the water molecules outside (inside) the nanotubes. The H2O adsorption converts the conducting small-diameter zigzag (5,0) tube into a semiconductor. Further, the adsorption reduces the band gap of the semiconducting achiral zigzag (10,0) nanotube but increases the band gap of a chiral semiconducting (4,2) tube. The adsorbed H2O molecules increase the electrical conductivity in agreement with the experiment. The overall peak structure in the optical absorption for the pristine tube is not altered significantly by the adsorption except for small alterations in the energy locations and the relative intensities

  12. Fractal Dimension of Voice-Signal Waveforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The fractal dimension is one important parameter that characterizes waveforms. In this paper, we derive a new method to calculate fractal dimension of digital voice-signal waveforms. We show that fractal dimension is an efficient tool for speaker recognition or speech recognition. It can be used to identify different speakers or distinguish speech. We apply our results to Chinese speaker recognition and numerical experiment shows that fractal dimension is an efficient parameter to characterize individual Chinese speakers. We have developed a semiautomatic voiceprint analysis system based on the theory of this paper and former researches.

  13. Spherical Gravitating Systems of Arbitrary Dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Das, A

    2001-01-01

    We study spherically symmetric solutions to the Einstein field equations under the assumption that the space-time may possess an arbitrary number of spatial dimensions. The general solution of Synge is extended to describe systems of any dimension. Arbitrary dimension analogues of known four dimensional solutions are also presented, derived using the above scheme. Finally, we discuss the requirements for the existence of Birkhoff's theorems in space-times of arbitrary dimension with or without matter fields present. Cases are discussed where the assumptions of the theorem are considerably weakened yet the theorem still holds. We also discuss where the weakening of certain conditions may cause the theorem to fail.

  14. Origin of Everything and the 21 Dimensions of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loev, Mark

    2009-03-01

    The Dimensions of the Universe correspond with the Dimensions of the human body. The emotion that is a positive for every dimension is Love. The negative emotion that effects each dimension are listed. All seven negative emotions effect Peace, Love and Happiness. 21st Dimension: Happiness Groin & Heart 20th Dimension: Love Groin & Heart 19th Dimension: Peace Groin & heart 18th Dimension: Imagination Wave Eyes Anger 17th Dimension: Z Wave / Closed Birth 16th Dimension: Electromagnetic Wave Ears Anger 15th Dimension: Universal Wave Skin Worry 14th Dimension: Lover Wave Blood Hate 13th Dimension: Disposal Wave Buttocks Fear 12th Dimension: Builder Wave Hands Hate 11th Dimension: Energy Wave Arms Fear 10th Dimension: Time Wave Brain Pessimism 9th Dimension: Gravity Wave Legs Fear 8th Dimension: Sweet Wave Pancreas Fear 7th Dimension: File Wave Left Lung Fear 6th Dimension: Breathing Wave Right Lung Fear 5th Dimension: Digestive Wave Stomach Fear 4th Dimension: Swab Wave Liver Guilt 3rd Dimension: Space Wave Face Sadness 2nd Dimension: Line Wave Mouth Revenge 1st Dimension: Dot Wave Nose Sadness The seven deadly sins correspond: Anger Hate Sadness Fear Worry Pessimism Revenge Note: Guilt is fear

  15. New dimensions of educational inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Felix; Roksa, Josipa

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of an educational system is often accompanied by differentiation. In the U.S., expansion of higher education included an increasing reliance on work. For a growing proportion of students, including those of traditional college-going age, going to college also involved going to work....... This raises a crucial question of whether this form of differentiation has altered the patterns of inequality in higher education. While growing proportions of disadvantaged students are entering higher education, are they increasingly depending on work during their studies? We address this question using...... while enrolled in college in two time periods. Presented analyses reveal a substantial amount of stability in social class inequality over time, with a modest increase in inequality among students attending four-year institutions full-time. Implications of these findings for policy and research...

  16. Physiological changes of the lichen Parmotrema tinctorum as result of carbon nanotubes exposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Camila de O; Vaz, Raissa P; Cano, Abraham; Santos, Adelina P; Cançado, Luiz G; Ladeira, Luiz O; Junior, Ary Corrêa

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) is one of the more abundant nanomaterial produced in the world. Therefore, it is desirable to access its effects in all environment compartments, in order to mitigate environmental distress. This study aims to verify the potential use of lichens - classical atmospheric pollution indicators - as biomonitors of carbon nanotubes aerosols. To examine cause-effect relationships, preserving environmental microclimatic parameters, the lichen Parmotrema tinctorum (Nyl.) Hale was transplanted to open top chambers where aerosols of CNT were daily added. Physiological parameters such as cell viability, photosynthetic efficiency, cell permeability as well as nanoparticle internalization were assessed. Carbon nanotubes exposure led to reduction on the cell viability of P. tinctorum. The treatment with 100µg/mL of MWCNT-COOH resulted in intracellular ion leakage, probably due to changes in membrane permeability. No alterations on photosynthetic efficiency were detected. Carbon nanotubes entrapment and internalization into the lichen thallus were observed. Short term exposition of CNT produced measurable physiological changes in P. tinctorum lichen. This suggests the possibility of use of lichens as models to assess the environmental impact (air related) of engineered nanomaterials.

  17. Full mouth rehabilitation of a patient with reduced vertical dimension using multiple metal ce ramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ashish R; Nallaswamy, Deepak; Ariga, Padma; Philip, Jacob Mathew

    2013-10-01

    Rehabilitation of a patient with severely worn dentition after restoring the vertical dimension is a complex procedure and assessment of the vertical dimension is an important aspect in these cases. This clinical report describes the full mouth rehabilitation of a patient who was clinically monitored to evaluate the adaptation to a removable occlusal splint to restore vertical dimension for a period 1 month and provisional restorations to determine esthetic and functional outcome for a period of 3 months. It is necessary to recognizing that form follows function and that anterior teeth play a vital role in the maintenance of oral health. Confirmation of tolerance to changes in the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) is of paramount importance. Articulated study casts and a diagnostic wax-up can provide important information for the evaluation of treatment options. Alteration of the VDO should be conservative and should not be changed without careful consideration.

  18. New generation fiber reinforced polymer composites incorporating carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Eslam

    The last five decades observed an increasing use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites as alternative construction materials for aerospace and infrastructure. The high specific strength of FRP attracted its use as non-corrosive reinforcement. However, FRP materials were characterized with a relatively low ductility and low shear strength compared with steel reinforcement. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced in the last decade as a material with minimal defect that is capable of increasing the mechanical properties of polymer matrices. This dissertation reports experimental investigations on the use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce a new generation of FRP composites. The experiments showed significant improvements in the flexure properties of the nanocomposite when functionalized MWCNTs were used. In addition, MWCNTs were used to produce FRP composites in order to examine static, dynamic, and creep behavior. The MWCNTs improved the off-axis tension, off-axis flexure, FRP lap shear joint responses. In addition, they reduced the creep of FRP-concrete interface, enhanced the fracture toughness, and altered the impact resistance significantly. In general, the MWCNTs are found to affect the behaviour of the FRP composites when matrix failure dominates the behaviour. The improvement in the mechanical response with the addition of low contents of MWCNTs would benefit many industrial and military applications such as strengthening structures using FRP composites, composite pipelines, aircrafts, and armoured vehicles.

  19. Use of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes for Covalent Attachment of Nanotubes to Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M.; Dyke, Christopher A.; Maya, Francisco; Stewart, Michael P.; Chen, Bo; Flatt, Austen K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to covalently attach functionalized carbon nanotubes to silicon. This step allows for the introduction of carbon nanotubes onto all manner of silicon surfaces, and thereby introduction of carbon nano - tubes covalently into silicon-based devices, onto silicon particles, and onto silicon surfaces. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed as individuals in surfactant were functionalized. The nano - tube was first treated with 4-t-butylbenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate to give increased solubility to the carbon nanotube; the second group attached to the sidewall of the nanotube has a silyl-protected terminal alkyne that is de-protected in situ. This gives a soluble carbon nanotube that has functional groups appended to the sidewall that can be attached covalently to silicon. This reaction was monitored by UV/vis/NJR to assure direct covalent functionalization.

  20. Relationship between symptom dimensions and brain morphology in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Motohisa; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nemoto, Kiyotaka; Sutoh, Chihiro; Asano, Kenichi; Miyata, Haruko; Matsumoto, Junko; Nakazato, Michiko; Matsumoto, Koji; Masuda, Yoshitada; Iyo, Masaomi; Shimizu, Eiji; Nakagawa, Akiko

    2016-10-11

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is known as a clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by symptom dimensions. Although substantial numbers of neuroimaging studies have demonstrated the presence of brain abnormalities in OCD, their results are controversial. The clinical heterogeneity of OCD could be one of the reasons for this. It has been hypothesized that certain brain regions contributed to the respective obsessive-compulsive dimensions. In this study, we investigated the relationship between symptom dimensions of OCD and brain morphology using voxel-based morphometry to discover the specific regions showing alterations in the respective dimensions of obsessive-compulsive symptoms. The severities of symptom dimensions in thirty-three patients with OCD were assessed using Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R). Along with numerous MRI studies pointing out brain abnormalities in autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) patients, a previous study reported a positive correlation between ASD traits and regional gray matter volume in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and amygdala in OCD patients. We investigated the correlation between gray and white matter volumes at the whole brain level and each symptom dimension score, treating all remaining dimension scores, age, gender, and ASD traits as confounding covariates. Our results revealed a significant negative correlation between washing symptom dimension score and gray matter volume in the right thalamus and a significant negative correlation between hoarding symptom dimension score and white matter volume in the left angular gyrus. Although our result was preliminary, our findings indicated that there were specific brain regions in gray and white matter that contributed to symptom dimensions in OCD patients.

  1. Representation dimension of m-replicated algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Let A be a finite-dimensional hereditary algebra over an algebraically closed field and A(m) be the m-replicated algebra of A.We prove that the representation dimension of A(m) is at most 3,and that the dominant dimension of A(m) is at least m.

  2. Selforthogonal modules with finite injective dimension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄兆泳

    2000-01-01

    The category consisting of finitely generated modules which are left orthogonal with a cotilting bimodule is shown to be functorially finite. The notion of left orthogonal dimension is introduced , and then a necessary and sufficient condition of selforthogonal modules having finite injective dimension and a characterization of cotilting modules are given.

  3. Selforthogonal modules with finite injective dimension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The category consisting of finitely generated modules which are left orthogonal with a cotilting bimodule is shown to be functorially finite. The notion of left orthogonal dimension is introduced, and then a necessary and sufficient condition of selforthogonal modules having finite injective dimension and a characterization of cotilting modules are given.

  4. Understanding Dimensions of Organizational Evaluation Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Isabelle; Cousins, J. Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Organizational evaluation capacity building has been a topic of increasing interest in recent years. However, the actual dimensions of evaluation capacity have not been clearly articulated through empirical research. This study sought to address this gap by identifying the key dimensions of evaluation capacity in Canadian federal government…

  5. Dimensions of cookie-cutter-like sets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马际华; 饶辉; 文志英

    2001-01-01

    The cookie-cutter-like sets are defined as the limit sets of a sequence of classical cookiecutter mappings. By introducing Gibbs-like measures, we study the dimensions, Hausdorff and packing measures of the CC-like sets, and then discuss the continuous dependence of the dimensions.

  6. A unified theory in higher dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapetanakis, D. (National Research Centre for the Physical Sciences Democritos, Athens (Greece)); Zoupanos, G. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1990-10-11

    We present a grand unified model defined in ten dimensions and based on the group SO(13). The model is dimensionally reduced over the non-simply-connected space (Su(3)/U(1)xU(1))/Z{sub 2} giving in four dimensions the standard model. (orig.).

  7. Quantum Field Theory in (0 + 1) Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, A. D.

    2007-01-01

    We show that many of the key ideas of quantum field theory can be illustrated simply and straightforwardly by using toy models in (0 + 1) dimensions. Because quantum field theory in (0 + 1) dimensions is equivalent to quantum mechanics, these models allow us to use techniques from quantum mechanics to gain insight into quantum field theory. In…

  8. Unconscious Evaluation of Faces on Social Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Lorna H.; Ajina, Sara; Getov, Spas; Bahrami, Bahador; Todorov, Alexander; Rees, Geraint

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that two major axes, dominance and trustworthiness, characterize the social dimensions of face evaluation. Whether evaluation of faces on these social dimensions is restricted to conscious appraisal or happens at a preconscious level is unknown. Here we provide behavioral evidence that such preconscious evaluations exist and…

  9. The pointwise dimensions of Moran measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper,we get the formulas of upper(lower) pointwise dimensions of some Moran measures on Moran sets in Rd under the strong separation condition.We also obtain formulas for the dimension of the Moran measures.Our results extend the known results of some self-similar measures and Moran measures studied by Cawley and Mauldin.

  10. [Vertical dimension in the Begg technic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, C; Dion, J G

    1989-01-01

    This data of 25 treated cases in BEGG technic show, with RICKETTS analysis, a small augmentation of vertical dimensions during treatment. During retention, four of five factors improved. No correlation have been found between increase rate of vertical dimensions, treatment duration, and initial typology.

  11. Quality Dimensions of Internet Search Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, M.; Wang, H.; Goh, T. N.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews commonly used search engines (AltaVista, Excite, infoseek, Lycos, HotBot, WebCrawler), focusing on existing comparative studies; considers quality dimensions from the customer's point of view based on a SERVQUAL framework; and groups these quality expectations in five dimensions: tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and…

  12. Differential Krull dimension in differential polynomial extensions

    OpenAIRE

    Smirnov, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the differential Krull dimension of differential polynomials over a differential ring. We prove a differential analogue of Jaffard's Special Chain Theorem and show that differential polynomial extensions of certain classes of differential rings have no anomaly of differential Krull dimension.

  13. The effects of substrate phonon mode scattering on transport in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perebeinos, Vasili; Rotkin, Slava V; Petrov, Alexey G; Avouris, Phaedon

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have large intrinsic carrier mobility due to weak acoustic phonon scattering. However, unlike two-dimensional metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), substrate surface polar phonon (SPP) scattering has a dramatic effect on the CNTFET mobility, due to the reduced vertical dimensions of the latter. We find that for the van der Waals distance between CNT and an SiO2 substrate, the low-field mobility at room temperature is reduced by almost an order of magnitude depending on the tube diameter. We predict additional experimental signatures of the SPP mechanism in dependence of the mobility on density, temperature, tube diameter, and CNT-substrate separation.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Thin Film Biosensors for Sensitive and Reproducible Whole Virus Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himadri S. Mandal, Zhengding Su, Andrew Ward, Xiaowu (Shirley Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the label-free, sensitive, and real-time electrical detection of whole viruses using carbon nanotube thin film (CNT-TF field effect devices. Selective detection of approximately 550 model viruses, M13-bacteriophage, is demonstrated using a simple two-terminal (no gate electrode configuration. Chemical gating through specific antibody-virus binding on CNT surface is proposed to be the sensing mechanism. Compared to electrical impedance sensors with identical microelectrode dimensions (no CNT, the CNT-TF sensors exhibit sensitivity 5 orders higher. We believe the reported approach could lead to a reproducible and cost-effective solution for rapid viral identification.

  15. Purification of carbon nanotube by wet oxidation; Shisshiki sanka ni yoru carbon nanotube no seisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, K.; Takarada, T. [Gunma University, Gunma (Japan)

    1997-07-10

    In order to efficiently recover carbon nanotubes, the purification method by wet oxidation with orthoperiodic acid and perchloric acid is investigated. The reactivity of the carbonaceous material toward the acids depends on the type of carbon. Carbon nanotubes are selectively recovered under the mild oxidation conditions. The degree of purification depends on the concentration of orthoperiodic acid. It is suggested that wet oxidation is an effective method for purification of carbon nanotubes. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Manipulation et fonctionnalisation de nanotube : Application aux nanotubes de nitrure de bore.

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are new tubular materials which are structurally related to carbon nanotubes and are made of one or several rolled-up hexagonal boron nitride sheets. Nanoelectronics, material science and medicine are among the potential application fields of these tubular structures. Single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) are being produced by continuous LASER ablation at the ONERA. The crude samples contain SWBNNTs and boron nitride cages but are also contaminated by boric a...

  17. SYNTHESIS OF CARBON NANOTUBES FOR ACETYLENE DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Y. FAIZAH

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A gas sensor, utilizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs in a pellet form for acetylene detection has been developed. This research was carried out to investigate the absorption effect of acetylene (C2H2 towards the change of resistance of carbon nanotubes pellet as sensor signal. Source Measurement Unit (SMU was used to study the gas sensing behaviour of resistance based sensors employing carbon nanotubes pellet as the active sensing element. Studies revealed that the absorption of acetylene into the carbon nanotubes pellet resulting in increase in pellet resistance. The changes are attributed to p-type conductivity in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes used in this research was synthesized by means of Floating Catalyst Chemical Vapor Deposition (FC-CVD method. Benzene was used as a hydrocarbon source while ferrocene as a source of catalyst with Hydrogen and Argon as carrier and purge gas respectively. From the research, it was shown that carbon nanotubes show high sensitivity towards acetylene. The highest sensitivity recorded was 1.21, 1.16 and 17.86 for S1, S2 and S3 respectively. It is expected that many applications of CNT-based sensors will be explored in future as the interest of the nanotechnology research in this field increases.

  18. Optical properties of titanium dioxide nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelmoula, Mohamed [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Department of Materials Science, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Sokoloff, Jeffrey; Lu, Wen-Tao; Menon, Latika [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Close, Thomas; Richter, Christiaan, E-mail: christiaan.richter@rit.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York, 14623 (United States)

    2014-01-07

    We present experimental measurements and a theoretical analysis of the near UV to NIR optical properties of free standing titania nanotube arrays. An improved understanding of the optical physics of this type of nanostructure is important to several next generation solar energy conversion technologies. We measured the transmission, reflection, and absorption of the electromagnetic spectrum from 300 nm to 1000 nm (UV to NIR) of titania nanotube arrays. We measured the total, specular, and diffuse reflection and transmission using both single point detection and an integrating sphere spectrometer. We find that the transmission, but not the reflection, of light (UV to NIR) through the nanotube array is well-explained by classic geometric optics using an effective medium model taking into account the conical geometry of the nanotubes. For wavelengths shorter than ∼500 nm, we find the surprising result that the reflection coefficient for light incident on the open side of the nanotube array is greater than the reflection coefficient for light incident on the closed “floor” of the nanotube array. We consider theoretical models based on the eikonal approximation, photonic crystal band theory, and a statistical treatment of scattering to explain the observed data. We attribute the fact that light with wavelengths shorter than 500 nm is more highly reflected from the open than the closed tube side as being due to disorder scattering inside the nanotube array.

  19. Effects of Ni-coated Carbon Nanotubes addition on the electromigration of Sn–Ag–Cu solder joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhongbao; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Ping, E-mail: pingwu@tju.edu.cn

    2013-12-25

    Highlights: •The electromigration behaviors of the composite solder joints were investigated. •The presence of Ni altered the morphology of the IMC layer after reflow. •Carbon nanotube network was observed in solder matrix. •Current crowding occurred at the carbon nanotube networks. •The electromigration effect of composite solder joint was suppressed effectively. -- Abstract: The electromigration behaviors of line-type Cu/Sn–Ag–Cu/Cu interconnects with and without Ni-Coated multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes addition were investigated in this work. After soldering, the (Cu,Ni){sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic compounds formed at the solder/Cu interface. The electromigration analysis shows that the presence of Carbon Nanotubes can suppress the atomic diffusion in the solder induced by electromigration effectively. And finite element simulation indicates that the Carbon Nanotube networks can reduce the current density in the solder matrix, which results in the improvement of electromigration resistance of composite solders.

  20. Interaction of pristine and functionalized carbon nanotubes with lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Monticelli, Luca; Tieleman, D Peter

    2013-10-10

    Carbon nanotubes are widely used in a growing number of applications. Their interactions with biological materials, cell membranes in particular, is of interest in applications including drug delivery and for understanding the toxicity of carbon nanotubes. We use extensive molecular dynamics simulations with the MARTINI model to study the interactions of model nanotubes of different thickness, length, and patterns of chemical modification with model membranes. In addition, we characterize the interactions of small bundles of carbon nanotubes with membrane models. Short pristine carbon nanotubes readily insert into membranes and adopt an orientation parallel to the plane of the membrane in the center of the membrane. Larger aggregates and functionalized nanotubes exhibit a range of possible interactions. The distribution and orientation of carbon nanotubes can be controlled by functionalizing the nanotubes. Free energy calculations provide thermodynamic insight into the preferred orientations of different nanotubes and quantify structural defects in the lipid matrix.

  1. Behavioral dimensions of food security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmer, C Peter

    2012-07-31

    The empirical regularities of behavioral economics, especially loss aversion, time inconsistency, other-regarding preferences, herd behavior, and framing of decisions, present significant challenges to traditional approaches to food security. The formation of price expectations, hoarding behavior, and welfare losses from highly unstable food prices all depends on these behavioral regularities. At least when they are driven by speculative bubbles, market prices for food staples (and especially for rice, the staple food of over 2 billion people) often lose their efficiency properties and the normative implications assigned by trade theory. Theoretical objections to government efforts to stabilize food prices, thus, have reduced saliency, although operational, financing, and implementation problems remain important, even critical. The experience of many Asian governments in stabilizing their rice prices over the past half century is drawn on in this paper to illuminate both the political mandates stemming from behavioral responses of citizens and operational problems facing efforts to stabilize food prices. Despite the theoretical problems with free markets, the institutional role of markets in economic development remains. All policy instruments must operate compatibly with prices in markets. During policy design, especially for policies designed to alter market prices, incentive structures need to be compatible with respect to both government capacity (bureaucratic and budgetary) and empirical behavior on the part of market participants who will respond to planned policy changes. A new theoretical underpinning to political economy analysis is needed that incorporates this behavioral perspective, with psychology, sociology, and anthropology all likely to make significant contributions.

  2. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  3. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  4. Nanotube substituted source/drain regions for carbon nanotube transistors for VLSI circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Shibesh; Shankar, Balakrishnan

    2011-12-01

    Aggressive scaling of silicon technology over the years has pushed CMOS devices to their fundamental limits. Pioneering works on carbon nanotube during the last decade possessing exceptional electrical properties have provided an intriguing solution for high performance integrated circuits. So far, at best, carbon nanotubes have been considered only for the channel, with metal electrodes being used for source/drain. Here, alternative schemes of 'All-Nanotube' transistor are presented where even the transistor components are derived from carbon nanotubes which hold the promise for smaller, faster, denser and more power efficient electronics.

  5. THE EQUALITY OF FRACTAL DIMENSION AND UNCERTAINTY DIMENSION FOR CERTAIN DYNAMIC-SYSTEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NUSSE, HE; YORKE, JA

    1992-01-01

    [MGOY] introduced the uncertainty dimension as a quantative measure for final state sensitivity in a system. In [MGOY] and [P] it was conjectured that the box-counting dimension equals the uncertainty dimension for basin boundaries in typical dynamical systems. In this paper our main result is that

  6. Mechanical resonators based on nanotubes and graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtold, Adrian

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes and graphene offer unique scientific and technological opportunities as nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Namely, they have allowed the fabrication of mechanical resonators that can be operable at ultra-high frequencies and that can be employed as ultra-sensitive sensors of mass and charge. In addition, nanotubes and graphene have exceptional electron transport properties, including ballistic conduction over long distances. Coupling the mechanical motion to electron transport in these remarkable materials is thus highly appealing. Here, I will review some of our recent results on nanotube and graphene NEMSs, including the control of the mechanical oscillation using Coulomb blockade and mass sensing at the proton mass level.

  7. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  8. Statics and dynamics of fluids in nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Gouin, Henri

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to study the statics and dynamics of nanotubes by using the methods of continuum mechanics. The nanotube can be filled with only a liquid or a vapour phase according to the physicochemical characteristics of the wall and to the disjoining pressure associated with the liquid and vapour mother bulks of the fluid, regardless of the nature of the external mother bulk. In dynamics, flows through nanotubes can be much more important than classical Poiseuille flows. When the external mother bulk is of vapour, the flow can be a million times larger than the classical flows when slippage on wall does not exist.

  9. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  10. Nanotube Arrays in Porous Anodic Alumina Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang LI; Naoto KOSHIZAKI; Guanghai LI

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes the various techniques developed for fabricating nanotube arrays in porous anodic alumina membranes (AAMs). After a brief introduction to the fabrication process of AAMs, taking carbons, metals, semiconductors, organics, biomoleculars, and heterojunctions as typical examples, attention will be focused on the recently established methods to fabricate nanotubes in AAM, including electrochemical deposition, surface sol-gel, modified chemical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition, and layer-by-layer growth. Every method is demonstrated by one or two reported results. Finally, this review is concluded with some perspectives on the research directions and focuses on the AAM-based nanotubes fields.

  11. Ordered phases of cesium in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung; Song, Ki Oh; Choi, Won Young; Byun, Ki Ryang [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Keun [Semyung University, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ha [Sangmyung University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won Woo [Juseong College, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-15

    We investigate the structural phases of Cs in carbon nanotubes by using a structural optimization process applied to an atomistic simulation method. As the radius of the carbon nanotubes is increased, the structures are found in various phases from an atomic strand to multishell packs composed of coaxial cylindrical shells. Both helical structures and layered structures are found. The numbers of helical atom rows composed of coaxial tubes and the orthogonal vectors of the circular rolling of a triangular network can explain the structural phases of Cs in carbon nanotubes.

  12. ON THE CONTINUUM MODELING OF CARBON NANOTUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 黄永刚; Philippe H.Geubelle; 黄克智

    2002-01-01

    We have recently proposed a nanoscale continuum theory for carbonnanotubes. The theory links continuum analysis with atomistic modeling by incor-porating interatomic potentials and atomic structures of carbon nanotubes directlyinto the constitutive law. Here we address two main issues involved in setting upthe nanoscale continuum theory for carbon nanotubes, namely the multi-body in-teratomic potentials and the lack of centrosymmetry in the nanotube structure. Weexplain the key ideas behind these issues in establishing a nanoscale continuum theoryin terms of interatomic potentials and atomic structures.

  13. Microcapsule carbon nanotube devices for therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulamarva, Arun; Raja, Pavan M. V.; Bhathena, Jasmine; Chen, Hongmei; Talapatra, Saikat; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Nalamasu, Omkaram; Prakash, Satya

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a new class of nanomaterials that have immense potential in the field of biomedicine. Their ability to carry large quantities of therapeutic molecules makes them prime candidates for providing targeted delivery of therapeutics for use in various diseases. However, their utility is limited due to the problems faced during their delivery to target sites. This article for the first time describes the design of a novel microcapsule carbon nanotube targeted delivery device. This device has potential in the targeted delivery of carbon nanotubes in suitable membranes along with their cargo, safely and effectively to the target loci.

  14. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Joseph; Gilbert, Matthew; Naab, Fabian; Savage, Lauren; Holland, Wayne; Duggan, Jerome; McDaniel, Floyd

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen as a fuel source is an attractive, relatively clean alternative to fossil fuels. However, a major limitation in its use for the application of automobiles has been the requirement for an efficient hydrogen storage medium. Current hydrogen storage systems are: physical storage in high pressure tanks, metal hydride, and gas-on-solid absorption. However, these methods do not fulfill the Department of Energy's targeted requirements for a usable hydrogen storage capacity of 6.5 wt.%, operation near ambient temperature and pressure, quick extraction and refueling, reliability and reusability.Reports showing high capacity hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes originally prompted great excitement in the field, but further research has shown conflicting results. Results for carbon nanostructures have ranged from less than 1 wt.% to 70 wt.%. The wide range of adsorption found in previous experiments results from the difficulty in measuring hydrogen in objects just nanometers in size. Most previous experiments relied on weight analysis and residual gas analysis to determine the amount of hydrogen being adsorbed by the CNTs. These differing results encouraged us to perform our own analysis on single-walled (SWNTs), double-walled (DWNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), as well as carbon fiber. We chose to utilize direct measurement of hydrogen in the materials using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's Research Experience for Undergraduates and the University of North Texas.

  15. Microfabricated electroactive carbon nanotube actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Arti; Baughman, Ray H.; De Rossi, Danilo; Mazzoldi, Alberto; Tesconi, Mario; Tognetti, Alessandro; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2001-07-01

    A variety of microfabrication techniques have been developed at the University of Pisa. They are based either on pressure or piston actuated microsyringes or modified ink-jet printers. This work present the results of a study aimed at fabricating carbon nanotube (NT) actuators using micro-syringes. In order to prevent the nanotubes from aggregating into clumps, they were enclosed in a partially cross-linked polyvinylalcohol - polyallylamine matrix. After sonication the solution remained homogenously dispersed for about 40 minutes, which was sufficient time for deposition. Small strips of NT, about 5 mm across and 15 mm long were deposited. Following deposition, the films were baked at 80 degree(s)C and their thickness, impedance and mechanical resistance measured. The results indicate that 50 minutes of baking time is sufficient to give a constant resistivity of 1.12 x 10-2 (Omega) m per layer similar to a typical semiconductor, and each layer has a thickness of about 6 micrometers .

  16. Flightweight Carbon Nanotube Magnet Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J. N.; Schmidt, H. J.; Ruoff, R. S.; Chandrasekhar, V.; Dikin, D. A.; Litchford, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Virtually all plasma-based systems for advanced airborne/spaceborne propulsion and power depend upon the future availability of flightweight magnet technology. Unfortunately, current technology for resistive and superconducting magnets yields system weights that tend to counteract the performance advantages normally associated with advanced plasma-based concepts. The ongoing nanotechnology revolution and the continuing development of carbon nanotubes (CNT), however, may ultimately relieve this limitation in the near future. Projections based on recent research indicate that CNTs may achieve current densities at least three orders of magnitude larger than known superconductors and mechanical strength two orders of magnitude larger than steel. In fact, some published work suggests that CNTs are superconductors. Such attributes imply a dramatic increase in magnet performance-to-weight ratio and offer real hope for the construction of true flightweight magnets. This Technical Publication reviews the technology status of CNTs with respect to potential magnet applications and discusses potential techniques for using CNT wires and ropes as a winding material and as an integral component of the containment structure. The technology shortfalls are identified and a research and technology strategy is described that addresses the following major issues: (1) Investigation and verification of mechanical and electrical properties, (2) development of tools for manipulation and fabrication on the nanoscale, (3) continuum/molecular dynamics analysis of nanotube behavior when exposed to practical bending and twisting loads, and (4) exploration of innovative magnet fabrication techniques that exploit the natural attributes of CNTs.

  17. DJ-1 as a potential biomarker for the development of biocompatible multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haniu H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Hisao Haniu1, Tamotsu Tsukahara2, Yoshikazu Matsuda3, Yuki Usui4, Kaoru Aoki5, Masayuki Shimizu5, Nobuhide Ogihara5, Kazuo Hara5, Seiji Takanashi5, Masanori Okamoto5, Norio Ishigaki5, Koichi Nakamura5, Hiroyuki Kato5, Naoto Saito6 1Institute of Carbon Science and Technology, 2Department of Integrative Physiology and Bio-System Control, Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Nagano, 3Clinical Pharmacology Educational Center, Nihon Pharmaceutical University, Ina-machi, Saitama, 4Research Center for Exotic Nanocarbons, 5Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 6Department of Applied Physical Therapy, Shinshu University School of Health Sciences, Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan Background: In the present study, we investigated whether DJ-1 could serve as a biomarker for assessing the biocompatibility of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, using the highly purified carbon nanotube, HTT2800. Methods: Using Western blot analysis, we determined DJ-1 protein levels in two different types of cells (one capable and the other incapable of HTT2800 endocytosis. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we also investigated the ability of purified nanotubes to alter DJ-1 mRNA levels. Results: We demonstrated that the DJ-1 protein concentration was reduced, regardless of the cytotoxic activity of intracellular HTT2800. Furthermore, HTT2800 decreased the DJ-1 mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. This decrease in DJ-1 mRNA levels was not observed in the case of Sumi black or cup-stacked carbon nanotubes. Conclusion: These data indicate that modification of DJ-1 expression is caused by the cell response to MWCNTs. We conclude that DJ-1 is a promising candidate biomarker for the development of biocompatible MWCNTs. Keywords: multiwalled carbon nanotubes, DJ-1 protein, Western blot, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction

  18. Effects of the covalent linker groups on the spin transport properties of single nickelocene molecules attached to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng; Sun, Lili; Benassi, Enrico; Shen, Ziyong; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2012-05-01

    The understanding of how the spin moment of a magnetic molecule transfers to a carbon nanotube, when the molecule is attached to it, is crucial for designing novel supramolecular spin devices. Here we explore such an issue by modeling the spin transport of a single-walled carbon nanotube grafted with one nickelocene molecule. In particular we investigate how the electron transport becomes spin-polarized depending on the specific linking group bonding nickelocene to the nanotube. We consider as linkers both aziridine and pyrrolidine rings and the amide group. Our calculations show that, at variance with aziridine, both pyrrolidine and amide, do alter the sp2 character of the binding site of the nanotube and thus affect the transmission around the Fermi level. However, only aziridine allows transferring the spin polarization of the nickelocene to the nanotube, whose conductance at the Fermi level becomes spin-polarized. This suggests the superiority of aziridine as a linker for grafting magnetic molecules onto carbon nanotubes with efficient spin filtering functionality.

  19. Effects of electrode distance and nature of electrolyte on the diameter of titanium dioxide nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, S., E-mail: sum.abbasi@gmail.com; Mohamed, N. M., E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my; Singh, B. S. M., E-mail: balbir@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences Unviersiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750, Bandar Seri Iskandar (Malaysia); Abbasi, S. H., E-mail: sarfrazabbasi@gmail.com [SABIC Plastic Application Development Center, Riyadh Technovalley, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-07-22

    The titanium nanotubes were synthesized using viscous electrolytes consisting of ethylene glycol and non-viscous electrolytes consisting of aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid. Sodium fluoride and ammonium fluoride were utilized as the source of fluorine ions. The samples were then characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Their morphologies were investigated under different anodic potentials and various electrolyte compositions. It was found out that nanotubes can be obtained in fluoride ions and morphology is dependent on various parameters like anodic potential, time, electrolyte composition and the effects by varying the distance between the electrodes on the morphology was also investigated. It was found that by altering the distance between the electrodes, change in the diameter and the porosity was observed.

  20. Modifying the electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes using designed surfactant peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarajeewa, Dinushi R.; Dieckmann, Gregg R.; Nielsen, Steven O.; Musselman, Inga H.

    2012-07-01

    The electronic properties of carbon nanotubes can be altered significantly by modifying the nanotube surface. In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were functionalized noncovalently using designed surfactant peptides, and the resultant SWCNT electronic properties were investigated. These peptides have a common amino acid sequence of X(Valine)5(Lysine)2, where X indicates an aromatic amino acid containing either an electron-donating or electron-withdrawing functional group (i.e. p-amino-phenylalanine or p-cyano-phenylalanine). Circular dichroism spectra showed that the surfactant peptides primarily have random coil structures in an aqueous medium, both alone and in the presence of SWCNTs, simplifying analysis of the peptide/SWCNT interaction. The ability of the surfactant peptides to disperse individual SWCNTs in solution was verified using atomic force microscopy and ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectroscopy. The electronic properties of the surfactant peptide/SWCNT composites were examined using the observed nanotube Raman tangential band shifts and the observed additional features near the Fermi level in the scanning tunneling spectroscopy dI/dV spectra. The results revealed that SWCNTs functionalized with surfactant peptides containing electron-donor or electron-acceptor functional groups showed n-doped or p-doped altered electronic properties, respectively. This work unveils a facile and versatile approach to modify the intrinsic electronic properties of SWCNTs using a simple peptide structure, which is easily adaptable to obtain peptide/SWCNT composites for the design of tunable nanoscale electronic devices.The electronic properties of carbon nanotubes can be altered significantly by modifying the nanotube surface. In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were functionalized noncovalently using designed surfactant peptides, and the resultant SWCNT electronic properties were investigated. These peptides have a common amino

  1. The fabrication and electrochemical properties of electrospun nanofibers of a multiwalled carbon nanotube grafted by chitosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Wei; Wu Zigang; Li Yu; Feng Yiyu; Yuan Xiaoyan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)], E-mail: weifeng@tju.edu.cn

    2008-03-12

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were grafted by chitosan (CS); the product could disperse well in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) aqueous solution with 2% (v/v) acetic acid solution. Because this product has potential in several biological fields, it was electrospun so as to enlarge the surface area. Raman spectra indicated that the electrospinning process did not severely alter the electron hybridization of carbon atoms within the nanotube framework. Moreover and interestingly, these nanofibers showed a novel sheath-core structure; the outer and inner diameters of these sheath-core nanofibers were about 200 nm and 100 nm, respectively. These nanofibers' electrochemical properties were characterized by detection of hydrogen peroxide and voltammetric responses of potassium ferricyanide. The electrospun fibers' web displayed faster electron transfer kinetics and better electrochemical properties than its cast film, which justified further applications in biological areas.

  2. The fabrication and electrochemical properties of electrospun nanofibers of a multiwalled carbon nanotube grafted by chitosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Wu, Zigang; Li, Yu; Feng, Yiyu; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2008-03-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were grafted by chitosan (CS); the product could disperse well in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) aqueous solution with 2% (v/v) acetic acid solution. Because this product has potential in several biological fields, it was electrospun so as to enlarge the surface area. Raman spectra indicated that the electrospinning process did not severely alter the electron hybridization of carbon atoms within the nanotube framework. Moreover and interestingly, these nanofibers showed a novel sheath-core structure; the outer and inner diameters of these sheath-core nanofibers were about 200 nm and 100 nm, respectively. These nanofibers' electrochemical properties were characterized by detection of hydrogen peroxide and voltammetric responses of potassium ferricyanide. The electrospun fibers' web displayed faster electron transfer kinetics and better electrochemical properties than its cast film, which justified further applications in biological areas.

  3. Scaling dimensions in hidden Kerr/CFT

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, David A; Skanata, Antun

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that a hidden conformal field theory (CFT) governs the dynamics of low frequency scattering in a general Kerr black hole background. We further investigate this correspondence by mapping higher order corrections to the massless wave equations in a Kerr background to an expansion within the CFT in terms of higher dimension operators. This implies the presence of infinite towers of CFT primary operators with positive conformal dimensions compatible with unitarity. The exact Kerr background softly breaks the conformal symmetry and the scaling dimensions of these operators run with frequency. The scale-invariant fixed point is dual to a degenerate case of flat spacetime.

  4. Social dimensions of nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunwald, Armin [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear waste disposal is a two-faceted challenge: a scientific and technological endeavour, on the one hand, and confronted with social dimensions, on the other. In this paper I will sketch the respective social dimensions and will give a plea for interdisciplinary research approaches. Relevant social dimensions of nuclear waste disposal are concerning safety standards, the disposal 'philosophy', the process of determining the disposal site, and the operation of a waste disposal facility. Overall, cross-cutting issues of justice, responsibility, and fairness are of major importance in all of these fields.

  5. Questing mass dimension 1 spinor fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalobos, C.H.C.; Hoff da Silva, J.M. [UNESP Universidade Estadual Paulista, Guaratingueta, SP CEP (Brazil); Rocha, Roldao da [CMCC, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil)

    2015-06-15

    This work deals with new classes of spinors of mass dimension 1 in Minkowski spacetime. In order to accomplish it, Lounesto's classification scheme and the inversion theorem are going to be used. The algebraic framework shall be revisited by explicating the central point performed by the Fierz aggregate. Then the spinor classification is generalized in order to encompass the new mass dimension 1 spinors. The spinor operator is shown to play a prominent role to engender the new mass dimension 1 spinors, accordingly. (orig.)

  6. Carbon nanotube polymer composition and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao; Johnson, Stephen; Kerr, John B.; Minor, Andrew M.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2011-06-14

    A thin film device and compound having an anode, a cathode, and at least one light emitting layer between the anode and cathode, the at least one light emitting layer having at least one carbon nanotube and a conductive polymer.

  7. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-11-11

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  8. Fast readout of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwaldt, Harold; Singh, Vibhor; Schneider, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van der Zant, Herre; Steele, Gary

    2013-03-01

    We perform fast readout measurements of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators. Using an electronic mixing scheme, we can detect the amplitude of the mechanical motion with an intermediate frequency (IF) of 46 MHz and a timeconstant of 1 us, up to 5 orders of magnitude faster than before. Previous measurements suffered from a low bandwidth due to the combination of the high resistance of the carbon nanotube and a large stray capacitance. We have increased the bandwidth significantly by using a high-impedance, close-proximity HEMT amplifier. The increased bandwidth should allow us to observe the nanotube's thermal motion and its transient response, approaching the regime of real-time detection of the carbon nanotube's mechanical motion.

  9. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clay Mayberry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Tower-Based Supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A supercapacitor system, including (i) first and second, spaced apart planar collectors, (ii) first and second arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) towers or single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) towers, serving as electrodes, that extend between the first and second collectors where the nanotube towers are grown directly on the collector surfaces without deposition of a catalyst and without deposition of a binder material on the collector surfaces, and (iii) a porous separator module having a transverse area that is substantially the same as the transverse area of at least one electrode, where (iv) at least one nanotube tower is functionalized to permit or encourage the tower to behave as a hydrophilic structure, with increased surface wettability.

  11. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core-shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the ‘confined effect’ and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties.

  12. Cylindrical-shaped nanotube field effect transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2015-12-29

    A cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET may be manufactured on silicon (Si) substrates as a ring etched into a gate stack and filled with semiconductor material. An inner gate electrode couples to a region of the gate stack inside the inner circumference of the ring. An outer gate electrode couples to a region of the gate stack outside the outer circumference of the ring. The multi-gate cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET operates in volume inversion for ring widths below 15 nanometers. The cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET demonstrates better short channel effect (SCE) mitigation and higher performance (I.sub.on/I.sub.off) than conventional transistor devices. The cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET may also be manufactured with higher yields and cheaper costs than conventional transistors.

  13. Fabrication of porous carbon nanotube network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jun-Wei; Fu, Shu-Juan; Gwo, Shangjr; Lin, Kuan-Jiuh; Lin, Kuna-Jiuh

    2008-11-21

    We used the spin-coating method combined with ultrasonic atomization as a continuous, one-step process to generate a two-dimensional honeycomb network that was constructed from pure multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  14. A tunable carbon nanotube electromechanical oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Vera; Yaish, Yuval; Üstünel, Hande; Roundy, David; Arias, Tomás A.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2004-09-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. In particular, NEMS oscillators have been proposed for use in ultrasensitive mass detection, radio-frequency signal processing, and as a model system for exploring quantum phenomena in macroscopic systems. Perhaps the ultimate material for these applications is a carbon nanotube. They are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross-sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus may be able to sense its own motion. In spite of this great promise, a room-temperature, self-detecting nanotube oscillator has not been realized, although some progress has been made. Here we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string-like oscillation modes of doubly clamped nanotube oscillators. We show that the resonance frequency can be widely tuned and that the devices can be used to transduce very small forces.

  15. Self Assembled Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Ultracapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this NASA STTR program is to develop single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based ultracapacitors for energy storage devices (ESD) application, using...

  16. Manipulation and cutting of carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nanomanipulation plays an important role in nanofabrication, it is also a technology necessary in exploring the secrets of nanoworld, and it thus beco mesa start point to research future nanomachine. In this study, manipulation and cutting of carbon nanotubes have been conducted in order to examine whether we can move a nanocomponent from one site to another by using the tip of atomic fo rce microscope (AFM). The technique may also be valuable for providing the const ructive materials of nanofabrication. While exploring the method for manipulatin g and cutting of nanotubes, some new phenomena have been observed during the process. Results show that carbon nanotubes present a feature of deformation combin ing bending and distortion when subjected to large mechanical forces exerted by the tip of AFM. In special cases, long carbon nanotubes can be cut into two part s, by which we can remove the part where crystal lattice is flawed, and therefor e a perfect nanocomponent can be obtained.

  17. Piezoresistive Sensors Based on Carbon Nanotube Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Jian-wei; WANG Wan-lu; LIAO Ke-jun; WANG Yong-tian; LIU CHang-lin; Zeng Qing-gao

    2005-01-01

    Piezoresistive effect of carbon nanotube films was investigated by a three-point bending test.Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition.The experimental results showed that the carbon nanotubes have a striking piezoresistive effect.The relative resistance was changed from 0 to 10.5×10-2 and 3.25×10-2 for doped and undoped films respectively at room temperature when the microstrain under stress from 0 to 500. The gauge factors for doped and undoped carbon nanotube films under 500 microstrain were about 220 and 67 at room temperature, respectively, exceeding that of polycrystalline silicon (30) at 35℃.The origin of the resistance changes in the films may be attributed to a strain-induced change in the band gap for the doped tubes and the defects for the undoped tubes.

  18. Carbon Nanotube-Based Permeable Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, J K; Park, H G; Bakajin, O; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D

    2004-04-06

    A membrane of multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for use in studying fluid mechanics on the nanometer scale. Characterization by fluorescent tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is void-free near the silicon substrate on which it rests, implying that the hollow core of the nanotube is the only conduction path for molecular transport. Assuming Knudsen diffusion through this nanotube membrane, a maximum helium transport rate (for a pressure drop of 1 atm) of 0.25 cc/sec is predicted. Helium flow measurements of a nanoporous silicon nitride membrane, fabricated by sacrificial removal of carbon, give a flow rate greater than 1x10{sup -6} cc/sec. For viscous, laminar flow conditions, water is estimated to flow across the nanotube membrane (under a 1 atm pressure drop) at up to 2.8x10{sup -5} cc/sec (1.7 {micro}L/min).

  19. BX CY NZ nanotubes and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marvin Lou; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2001-01-01

    The invention provides crystalline nanoscale particles and tubes made from a variety of stoichiometries of B.sub.x C.sub.y N.sub.z where x, y, and z indicate a relative amount of each element compared to the others and where no more than one of x, y, or z are zero for a single stoichiometry. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are useful as miniature electronic components, such as wires, coils, schotky barriers, diodes, etc. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are also useful as coating that will protect an item from detection by electromagnetic monitoring techniques like radar. The nanotubes and nanoparticles are additionally useful for their mechanical properties, being comparable in strength and stiffness to the best graphite fibers or carbon nanotubes. The inventive nanoparticles are useful in lubricants and composites.

  20. Electrochemical biosensing based on polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yibing, E-mail: ybxie@seu.edu.cn; Zhao, Ye

    2013-12-01

    The glucose oxidase (GOD) modified polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is fabricated for electrochemical biosensing application. The titania nanotube array is grown directly on a titanium substrate through an anodic oxidation process. A thin film of polypyrrole is coated onto titania nanotube array to form polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid through a normal pulse voltammetry process. GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is prepared by the covalent immobilization of GOD onto polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid via the cross-linker of glutaraldehyde. The morphology and microstructure of nanotube electrodes are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis. The biosensing properties of this nanotube enzyme electrode have been investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid provides highly accessible nanochannels for GOD encapsulation, presenting good enzymatic affinity. As-formed GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode well conducts bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose, exhibiting a good biosensing performance with a high sensitivity, low detection limit and wide linear detection range. - Graphical abstract: The schematic diagram presents the fabrication of glucose oxidase modified polypyrrole/titania (GOD-PPy/TiO{sub 2}) nanotube enzyme electrode for biosensing application. - Highlights: • Hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid is well used as biosensing substrate. • Polypyrrole promotes GOD immobilization on titania nanotubes via glutaraldehyde. • GOD-polypyrrole/titania enzyme electrode shows good bioelectrocatalytic reactivity.