WorldWideScience

Sample records for altered metaphase chromosome

  1. Automatic Metaphase Finding by Inter-Chromosome Extrema Profile Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vega-Alvarado, Leticia

    2001-01-01

    ...-level inter-chromosome coarseness features in microscopic images of metaphase spreads, and allows to quantity the texture of the cytological objects analysing the intensity profile between chromosome...

  2. Mapping EBNA-1 Domains Involved in Binding to Metaphase Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marechal, Vincent; Dehee, Axelle; Chikhi-Brachet, Roxane; Piolot, Tristan; Coppey-Moisan, Maité; Nicolas, Jean-Claude

    1999-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome can persist in dividing human B cells as multicopy circular episomes. Viral episomes replicate in synchrony with host cell DNA and are maintained at a relatively constant copy number for a long time. Only two viral elements, the replication origin OriP and the EBNA-1 protein, are required for the persistence of viral genomes during latency. EBNA-1 activates OriP during the S phase and may also contribute to the partition and/or retention of viral genomes during mitosis. Indeed, EBNA-1 has been shown to interact with mitotic chromatin. Moreover, viral genomes are noncovalently associated with metaphase chromosomes. This suggests that EBNA-1 may facilitate the anchorage of viral genomes on cellular chromosomes, thus ensuring proper partition and retention. In the present paper, we have investigated the chromosome-binding activity of EBV EBNA-1, herpesvirus papio (HVP) EBNA-1, and various derivatives of EBV EBNA-1, fused to a variant of the green fluorescent protein. The results show that binding to metaphase chromosomes is a common property of EBV and HVP EBNA-1. Further studies indicated that at least three independent domains (CBS-1, -2, and -3) mediate EBNA-1 binding to metaphase chromosomes. In agreement with the anchorage model, two of these domains mapped to a region that has been previously demonstrated to be required for the long-term persistence of OriP-containing plasmids. PMID:10196336

  3. Distribution of sex chromosomes (XY) in lymphocyte metaphase spreads of dairy bulls

    OpenAIRE

    Kotikalapudi Rosaiah; Patel Rajesh Kumar; Medidi Hemanth; Sugali Nagaraju Naik

    2013-01-01

    Position of autosome and sex chromosomes in metaphase spreads is grate concerned of Cytogeneticians worldwide to understand cell biology. A few isolated studies have been conducted for the distribution of chromosomes in metaphase spread. Our studies reveal that most sex chromosomes (XY) remain on periphery and semi-periphery, 84.16% for X and 86.97% for Y respectively, in round metaphase spreads. The application of sex chromosome position in metaphase sprea...

  4. Metaphase chromosome and nucleoid differences between CHO-K1 and its radiosensitive derivative xrs-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.L.; Stephens, J.; Vaughan, A.T.M.

    1992-05-01

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line xrs-5 is a radiation-sensitive mutant isolated from CHO-K1 cells. The radiation sensitivity is associated with a defect in DNA double-strand break rejoining. Chromatin structure also appears altered in xrs-5 cells compared to the parental CHO-K1 cells. Metaphase chromosomes from xrs-5 are more condensed in appearance than CHO-K1 chromosomes. The overcondensed look is not the result of colcemid sensitivity. Electron microscopy studies suggest that xrs-5 metaphase chromosomes have larger loops of chromatin extending out from the chromosome core. There are also differences between CHO-K1 and xrs-5 cells in the size and fluorescence pattern of ethidium bromide-stained nucleoid preparations. These results suggest that there is a fundamental difference between CHO-K1 and xrs-5 in either the organization of the supercoiled loops of DNA attached to the nuclear matrix or in the nature of the proteins that attach the DNA to the matrix. These alterations in chromosome structure may underlie, in part, the radiation sensitivity of xrs-5 cells

  5. Metaphase chromosome and nucleoid differences between CHO-K1 and its radiosensitive derivative xrs-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.L.; Stephens, J.; Vaughan, A.T.M.

    1993-01-01

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line xrs-5 is a radiation-sensitive mutant isolated from CHO-K1 cells. The radiosensitivity is associated with a defect in DNA double-strand break rejoining. Chromatin structure also appears altered in xrs-5 cells compared with the parental CHO-K1 cells. Metaphase chromosomes form xrs-5 are more condensed in appearance than CHO-K1 chromosomes. The overcondensed look is not the result of colcemid sensitivity. Electron microscopy studies suggest that xrs-5 metaphase chromosomes have larger loops of chromatin extending out from the chromosome core. There are also differences between CHO-K1 and xrs-5 cells in the size and fluorescence pattern of ethidium bromide-stained nucleoid preparations. These results suggest that there is a fundamental difference between CHO-K1 and xrs-5 in either the organization of the supercoiled loops of DNA attached to the nuclear matrix or in the nature of the proteins that attach the DNA to the matrix. These alterations in chromosome structure may underlie, in part the radiation sensitivity of xrs-5 cells. (Author)

  6. AFM picking-up manipulation of the metaphase chromosome fragment by using the tweezers-type probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Saito, Masato; Shichiri, Motoharu; Sugiyama, Sigeru; Takamura, Yuzuru; Hashiguchi, Gen; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the development of a new procedure based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the analysis of metaphase chromosome. The aim of this study was to obtain detailed information about the specific locations of genes on the metaphase chromosome. In this research, we performed the manipulation of the metaphase chromosome by using novel AFM probes to obtain chromosome fragments of a smaller size than the ones obtained using the conventional methods, such as glass microneedles. We could pick up the fragment of the metaphase chromosome dissected by the knife-edged probe by using our tweezers-type probe

  7. Geant4.10 simulation of geometric model for metaphase chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafat-Motavalli, L., E-mail: rafat@um.ac.ir; Miri-Hakimabad, H.; Bakhtiyari, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a geometric model of metaphase chromosome is explained. The model is constructed according to the packing ratio and dimension of the structure from nucleosome up to chromosome. A B-DNA base pair is used to construct 200 base pairs of nucleosomes. Each chromatin fiber loop, which is the unit of repeat, has 49,200 bp. This geometry is entered in Geant4.10 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit and can be extended to the whole metaphase chromosomes and any application in which a DNA geometrical model is needed. The chromosome base pairs, chromosome length, and relative length of chromosomes are calculated. The calculated relative length is compared to the relative length of human chromosomes.

  8. Geant4.10 simulation of geometric model for metaphase chromosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafat-Motavalli, L.; Miri-Hakimabad, H.; Bakhtiyari, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a geometric model of metaphase chromosome is explained. The model is constructed according to the packing ratio and dimension of the structure from nucleosome up to chromosome. A B-DNA base pair is used to construct 200 base pairs of nucleosomes. Each chromatin fiber loop, which is the unit of repeat, has 49,200 bp. This geometry is entered in Geant4.10 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit and can be extended to the whole metaphase chromosomes and any application in which a DNA geometrical model is needed. The chromosome base pairs, chromosome length, and relative length of chromosomes are calculated. The calculated relative length is compared to the relative length of human chromosomes.

  9. Applying deep learning technology to automatically identify metaphase chromosomes using scanning microscopic images: an initial investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Lu, Xianglan; Yan, Shiju; Tan, Maxine; Cheng, Samuel; Li, Shibo; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Automated high throughput scanning microscopy is a fast developing screening technology used in cytogenetic laboratories for the diagnosis of leukemia or other genetic diseases. However, one of the major challenges of using this new technology is how to efficiently detect the analyzable metaphase chromosomes during the scanning process. The purpose of this investigation is to develop a computer aided detection (CAD) scheme based on deep learning technology, which can identify the metaphase chromosomes with high accuracy. The CAD scheme includes an eight layer neural network. The first six layers compose of an automatic feature extraction module, which has an architecture of three convolution-max-pooling layer pairs. The 1st, 2nd and 3rd pair contains 30, 20, 20 feature maps, respectively. The seventh and eighth layers compose of a multiple layer perception (MLP) based classifier, which is used to identify the analyzable metaphase chromosomes. The performance of new CAD scheme was assessed by receiver operation characteristic (ROC) method. A number of 150 regions of interest (ROIs) were selected to test the performance of our new CAD scheme. Each ROI contains either interphase cell or metaphase chromosomes. The results indicate that new scheme is able to achieve an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.886+/-0.043. This investigation demonstrates that applying a deep learning technique may enable to significantly improve the accuracy of the metaphase chromosome detection using a scanning microscopic imaging technology in the future.

  10. Computer graphics of SEM images facilitate recognition of chromosome position in isolated human metaphase plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, L D; Barrett, J M; Welter, D A

    1995-04-01

    There is general agreement that at the time of mitosis chromosomes occupy precise positions and that these positions likely affect subsequent nuclear function in interphase. However, before such ideas can be investigated in human cells, it is necessary to determine first the precise position of each chromosome with regard to its neighbors. It has occurred to us that stereo images, produced by scanning electron microscopy, of isolated metaphase plates could form the basis whereby these positions could be ascertained. In this paper we describe a computer graphic technique that permits us to keep track of individual chromosomes in a metaphase plate and to compare chromosome positions in different metaphase plates. Moreover, the computer graphics provide permanent, easily manipulated, rapid recall of stored chromosome profiles. These advantages are demonstrated by a comparison of the relative position of group A-specific and groups D- and G-specific chromosomes to the full complement of chromosomes in metaphase plates isolated from a nearly triploid human-derived cell (HeLa S3) to a hypo-diploid human fetal lung cell.

  11. DNA Catenation Maintains Structure of Human Metaphase Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L. V. Bauer, David; Marie, Rodolphe; Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted

    2012-01-01

    Mitotic chromosome structure is pivotal to cell division but difficult to observe in fine detail using conventional methods. DNA catenation has been implicated in both sister chromatid cohesion and chromosome condensation, but has never been observed directly. We have used a lab-on-a-chip microfl...

  12. Preparation and Fluorescent Analysis of Plant Metaphase Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzacher, Trude

    2016-01-01

    Good preparations are essential for informative analysis of both somatic and meiotic chromosomes, cytogenetics, and cell divisions. Fluorescent chromosome staining allows even small chromosomes to be visualized and counted, showing their morphology. Aneuploidies and polyploidies can be established for species, populations, or individuals while changes occurring in breeding lines during hybridization or tissue culture and transformation protocols can be assessed. The process of division can be followed during mitosis and meiosis including pairing and chiasma distribution, as well as DNA organization and structure during the evolution of chromosomes can be studied. This chapter presents protocols for pretreatment and fixation of material, including tips of how to grow plants to get good and healthy meristem with many divisions. The chromosome preparation technique is described using proteolytic enzymes, but acids can be used instead. Chromosome slide preparations are suitable for fluorochrome staining for fast screening (described in the chapter) or fluorescent in situ hybridization (see Schwarzacher and Heslop-Harrison, In situ hybridization. BIOS Scientific Publishers, Oxford, 2000).

  13. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; Wiegant, J.C.A.G.; Raap, A.K.; Greve, Jan; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization o­n human metaphase chromosomes is detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy. This combination of cytochemical and scanning probe techniques enables the localization and identification of several fluorescently labelled genomic DNA fragments o­n a single

  14. Chromosome mapping by FISH to metaphase and interphase nuclei. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trask, B.

    1997-08-01

    The overall specific aims of this project were: (1) to determine the large-scale structure of interphase and metaphase chromosomes, in order to establish new capabilities for genome mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH); (2) to detect chromosome abnormalities associated with genetic disease and map DNA sequences relative to them in order to facilitate the identification of new genes with disease-causing mutations; (3) to establish medium resolution physical maps of selected chromosomal regions using a combined metaphase and interphase mapping strategy and to corroborate physical and genetic maps and integrate these maps with the cytogenetic map; (4) to analyze the polymorphism and sequence evolution of subtelomeric regions of human chromosomes; (5) to establish a state-of-the-art FISH and image processing facility in the Department of Molecular Biotechnology, University of Washington, in order to map DNA sequences rapidly and accurately to benefit the Human Genome Project.

  15. Techniques for imaging human metaphase chromosomes in liquid conditions by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushiki, Tatsuo; Hoshi, Osamu [Division of Microscopic Anatomy and Bio-imaging, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 1-757 Asahimachi-dori, Chuo-ku, Niigata 951-8510 (Japan); Shigeno, Masatsugu [SII NanoTechnology Incorporated, RBM Tsukiji Building, Shintomi 2-15-5, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0041 (Japan)], E-mail: t-ushiki@med.niigata-u.ac.jp

    2008-09-24

    The purpose of this study was to obtain three-dimensional images of wet chromosomes by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid conditions. Human metaphase chromosomes-obtained either by chromosome spreads or by an isolation technique-were observed in a dynamic mode by AFM in a buffer solution. Under suitable operating conditions with a soft triangular cantilever (with the spring constant of 0.08-0.4 N m{sup -1}), clear images of fixed chromosomes in the chromosome spread were obtained by AFM. For imaging isolated chromosomes with the height of more than 400 nm, a cantilever with a high aspect ratio probing tip was required. The combination of a Q-control system and the sampling intelligent scan (SIS) system in dynamic force mode AFM was useful for obtaining high-quality images of the isolated chromosomes, in which globular or cord-like structures about 50 nm thick were clearly observed on the surface of each chromatid.

  16. Manipulating chromosome structure and metaphase status with ultraviolet light and repair synthesis inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullinger, A.M.; Johnson, R.T. (Cambridge Univ. (UK). Dept. of Zoology)

    1985-02-01

    DNA repair occurs in metaphase-arrested cells in response to ultraviolet irradiation. In the presence of the repair synthesis inhibitors, hydroxyurea and 1-..beta..-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine, the chromosomes of such cells are decondensed. The dose response of chromosome decondensation varies between different cell types. In human cells defective in excision repair there is much less chromosome decondensation in response to the same ultraviolet dose and time of repair inhibition. However, a simian virus 40-transformed muntjac cell displays pronounced chromosome decondensation but has limited incision ability. Both chromosome decondensation and single-strand break accumulation in the presence of inhibitors are reversed when DNA precursors are provided, but reversal after higher ultraviolet doses and longer period of incubation leads to recondensed chromosomes that are fragmented. Although the chromosomes of repair-inhibited metaphase cells are decondensed in fixed preparations, their morphology appears normal in intact cells. The cells also retain a capacity to induce prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC) when fused with interphase cells: compared with control mitotic cells, the speed of induction is sometimes reduced but the final amount of PCC produced is similar.

  17. Stage-specific damage to synaptonemal complexes and metaphase chromosomes induced by X rays in male mouse germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backer, L.C.; Sontag, M.R.; Allen, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Synaptonemal complexes (SCs) reveal mutagen-induced effects in germ cell meiotic chromosomes. The study was aimed at characterizing relationships between SC and metaphase I chromosome damage following radiation exposure at various stages of spermatogenesis. Male mice were irradiated with doses of 0, 2, or 4 Gy, and spermatocytes were harvested at times consistent with earlier exposures as spermatogonial stem cells, preleptotene cells (premeiotic DNA synthesis), or meiotic prophase cells. After stem-cell exposure, twice as many rearrangements were observed in SCs as in metaphase I chromosomes. Irradiation during premeiotic DNA synthesis resulted in dose-related increases in SC breakage and rearrangements (including novel forms) and in metaphase chromosomal aberrations. Following prophase exposure, various types and levels of SC and metaphase damage were observed. Irradiation of zygotene cells led to high frequencies of chromosome multivalents in metaphase I without a correspondingly high level of damage in preceding prophase SCs. Thus, irradiation of premeiotic and meiotic cells results in variable relationships between SC and metaphase chromosome damage

  18. Automated detection of analyzable metaphase chromosome cells depicted on scanned digital microscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Wang, Xingwei; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong; Li, Shibo; Zheng, Bin

    2010-02-01

    Visually searching for analyzable metaphase chromosome cells under microscopes is quite time-consuming and difficult. To improve detection efficiency, consistency, and diagnostic accuracy, an automated microscopic image scanning system was developed and tested to directly acquire digital images with sufficient spatial resolution for clinical diagnosis. A computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme was also developed and integrated into the image scanning system to search for and detect the regions of interest (ROI) that contain analyzable metaphase chromosome cells in the large volume of scanned images acquired from one specimen. Thus, the cytogeneticists only need to observe and interpret the limited number of ROIs. In this study, the high-resolution microscopic image scanning and CAD performance was investigated and evaluated using nine sets of images scanned from either bone marrow (three) or blood (six) specimens for diagnosis of leukemia. The automated CAD-selection results were compared with the visual selection. In the experiment, the cytogeneticists first visually searched for the analyzable metaphase chromosome cells from specimens under microscopes. The specimens were also automated scanned and followed by applying the CAD scheme to detect and save ROIs containing analyzable cells while deleting the others. The automated selected ROIs were then examined by a panel of three cytogeneticists. From the scanned images, CAD selected more analyzable cells than initially visual examinations of the cytogeneticists in both blood and bone marrow specimens. In general, CAD had higher performance in analyzing blood specimens. Even in three bone marrow specimens, CAD selected 50, 22, 9 ROIs, respectively. Except matching with the initially visual selection of 9, 7, and 5 analyzable cells in these three specimens, the cytogeneticists also selected 41, 15 and 4 new analyzable cells, which were missed in initially visual searching. This experiment showed the feasibility of

  19. Separate Location of Parental Chromosomes in Squashed Metaphases of Hybrid between Hordeum vulgare L. and Four Polyploid, Alien Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Linde-Laursen, Ib

    1984-01-01

    In 38 squashed, somatic metaphases of four hybrids between diploid Hordeum vulgare and two tetra-and two hexaploid alien species, each of the H. vulgare chromosomes was identifed, and differentiated from the chromosomes of the other parental species, by its Giemsa C-banding pattern. The H. vulgare...

  20. Accurate cytogenetic biodosimetry through automated dicentric chromosome curation and metaphase cell selection [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Accurate digital image analysis of abnormal microscopic structures relies on high quality images and on minimizing the rates of false positive (FP and negative objects in images. Cytogenetic biodosimetry detects dicentric chromosomes (DCs that arise from exposure to ionizing radiation, and determines radiation dose received based on DC frequency. Improvements in automated DC recognition increase the accuracy of dose estimates by reclassifying FP DCs as monocentric chromosomes or chromosome fragments. We also present image segmentation methods to rank high quality digital metaphase images and eliminate suboptimal metaphase cells. A set of chromosome morphology segmentation methods selectively filtered out FP DCs arising primarily from sister chromatid separation, chromosome fragmentation, and cellular debris. This reduced FPs by an average of 55% and was highly specific to these abnormal structures (≥97.7% in three samples. Additional filters selectively removed images with incomplete, highly overlapped, or missing metaphase cells, or with poor overall chromosome morphologies that increased FP rates. Image selection is optimized and FP DCs are minimized by combining multiple feature based segmentation filters and a novel image sorting procedure based on the known distribution of chromosome lengths. Applying the same image segmentation filtering procedures to both calibration and test samples reduced the average dose estimation error from 0.4 Gy to <0.2 Gy, obviating the need to first manually review these images. This reliable and scalable solution enables batch processing for multiple samples of unknown dose, and meets current requirements for triage radiation biodosimetry of high quality metaphase cell preparations.

  1. Detection of short repeated genomic sequences on metaphase chromosomes using padlock probes and target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stougaard Magnus

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situ detection of short sequence elements in genomic DNA requires short probes with high molecular resolution and powerful specific signal amplification. Padlock probes can differentiate single base variations. Ligated padlock probes can be amplified in situ by rolling circle DNA synthesis and detected by fluorescence microscopy, thus enhancing PRINS type reactions, where localized DNA synthesis reports on the position of hybridization targets, to potentially reveal the binding of single oligonucleotide-size probe molecules. Such a system has been presented for the detection of mitochondrial DNA in fixed cells, whereas attempts to apply rolling circle detection to metaphase chromosomes have previously failed, according to the literature. Methods Synchronized cultured cells were fixed with methanol/acetic acid to prepare chromosome spreads in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides. Apart from the slide format and the chromosome spreading everything was done essentially according to standard protocols. Hybridization targets were detected in situ with padlock probes, which were ligated and amplified using target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis, and detected by fluorescence labeling. Results An optimized protocol for the spreading of condensed metaphase chromosomes in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides was developed. Applying this protocol we generated specimens for target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis of padlock probes recognizing a 40 nucleotide sequence in the male specific repetitive satellite I sequence (DYZ1 on the Y-chromosome and a 32 nucleotide sequence in the repetitive kringle IV domain in the apolipoprotein(a gene positioned on the long arm of chromosome 6. These targets were detected with good efficiency, but the efficiency on other target sites was unsatisfactory. Conclusion Our aim was to test the applicability of the method used on mitochondrial DNA to the analysis of nuclear genomes, in particular as

  2. In situ hybridization of iodinated 5S and 18/25S RNA to Vicia faba metaphase chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, I.; Baeumlein, H.; Wobus, U.

    1978-01-01

    In vitro labelled 125 I ribosomal RNA fractions (18/25S and 5S) were in situ hybridized to metaphase chromosomes of a reconstructed karyotype of Vicia faba (characterized by two translocations and one pericentric inversion, each being present homozygously). The sites of 18S and 25S RNA were found to be confined to the nucleolus organizing secondary constriction. Two loci of 5S RNA were recognized on the satellite of nucleolus bearing chromosome. Possible correlations between the location of ribosomal genes, heterochromatic G-bands and clusters of mutagen induced chromatid aberrations are discussed. (author)

  3. Preimplantation diagnosis of repeated miscarriage due to chromosomal translocations using metaphase chromosomes of a blastomere biopsied from 4- to 6-cell-stage embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Nagayoshi, Motoi; Awata, Shoichiro; Mawatari, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Izumi; Kusunoki, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and accuracy of karyotyping the blastomere chromosomes at metaphase in the natural cell cycle for preimplantation diagnosis. A pilot study. A private infertility clinic and a university laboratory. Eleven patients undergoing IVF and preimplantation diagnosis. Intact human embryos at the 4- to 6-cell stage and human-mouse heterokaryons were cultured and checked hourly for disappearance of the nuclear envelope. After it disappeared, the metaphase chromosomes were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Percentage of analyzable metaphase plates and safety and accuracy of the method. The success rate of electrofusion to form human-mouse heterokaryons was 87.1% (27/31), and analyzable chromosomes were obtained from 77.4% (24/31) of the heterokaryons. On the other hand, disappearance of the nuclear envelope occurred in 89.5% (17/19) of the human embryos and it began earlier than that in the heterokaryons. Analyzable chromosomes were obtained and their translocation sites were identified in all blastomeres biopsied from the 17 embryos. After the biopsy, 67.0% of the embryos could develop to the blastocyst stage. The natural cell cycle method reported herein requires frequent observation, but it is safe, with no artificial effects on the chromosomes and without loss of or damage to blastomeres, which occurred with the electrofusion method. Using the natural cell cycle method, we could perform preimplantation diagnosis with nearly 100% accuracy.

  4. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Gyoyeon [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hansol [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jiyeon, E-mail: jylee@kist.re.kr [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. - Highlights: • We prepared a probe linked between QD and telomeric oligonucleotide with platinum-guanine bonding. • Telomeres were detected by our new telomere probes successfully in three different human metaphase chromosomes. • QDPt-DNA probe has high fluorescence intensity in comparison with organic dye-DNA probe.

  5. [THE INFLUENCE OF THE PREPARATION PRETREATMENT ON IN SITU DETECTION OF 5-METHYLCYTOSINE IN METAPHASE CHROMOSOMES AND IN INTERPHASE NUCLEI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudinina, N A; Sasina, L K; Noniashvili, E M; Neronova, E G; Pavlinova, L I; Suchkova, I O; Sofronov, G A; Patkin, E L

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitate analysis of DNA methylation in situ at the level of cells, chromosomes and chromosomal domains is extremely important for the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases, the study of ageing and the consequences of environmental impacts. An important question arises, whether the revealed in situ methylation pattern reflects DNA methylation per se and (or) availability of the DNA for antibodies, which in turn depends on the peculiarities of chromatin structure and chromosome condensation. These events can lead to an incorrect evaluation of the actual pattern of DNA methylation. To avoid this shortcoming as far as possible, we have modified the most widely used method of revealing 5-methylcytosine in situ with monoclonal antibodies. Here we have shown that the detection of DNA methylation staining of chromosomes including C-heterochromatin, chromosomal arms and sister chromatids is drastically dependent on pretreatment of chromosomal preparations for immunocytochemical study using fluorescent antibodies. Using undifferentiated stem cells of mouse embryonal carcinoma line F9, it has been found that change in preparations storage results in a sharp fluorescence decrease up to complete disappearance of the signal in centromeric heterochromatin. With the help of the method described in the work, we have first revealed the asymmetry of sister chromatids methylation in metaphase chromosomes of F9 cell and lymphocytes of human periphery blood. This may lead to asymmetry of transcriptional signature of daughter cells after division. The proposed here modification of 5-methylcytosine detection in situ provides a more complete characterization of methylation of chromosomes and chromosomal domains, compared to previously published methods.

  6. Proteomic analysis of human metaphase chromosomes reveals Topoisomerase II alpha as an Aurora B substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ciaran; Henzing, Alexander J; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2002-01-01

    B in the presence of radioactive ATP. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the HeLa scaffold fraction to be enriched for known chromosomal proteins including CENP-A, CENP-B, CENP-C, ScII and INCENP. Mass spectrometry of bands excised from one-dimensional polyacrylamide gels further defined the protein......The essential Aurora B kinase is a chromosomal passenger protein that is required for mitotic chromosome alignment and segregation. Aurora B function is dependent on the chromosome passenger, INCENP. INCENP, in turn, requires sister chromatid cohesion for its appropriate behaviour. Relatively few...... composition of the extracted chromosome fraction. Cloning, fluorescent tagging and expression in HeLa cells of the putative GTP-binding protein NGB/CRFG demonstrated it to be a novel mitotic chromosome protein, with a perichromosomal localisation. Identi fication of the protein bands corresponding to those...

  7. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Vale, Carlos H.F.P.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources 241 AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  8. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Vale, Carlos H.F.P.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)], e-mail: psouza@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: jodinilson@cnen.gov.br; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources {sup 241}AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  9. Cytogenetic and genetic studies of radiation-induced chromosome damage in mouse oocytes. Part 1. Numerical and structural chromosome anomalies in metaphase II oocytes, pre- and post-implantation embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tease, Charles; Fisher, Graham

    1996-01-01

    The incidences of X-ray induced numerical and structural chromosome anomalies were screened in a range of developmental stages from metaphase II oocytes through to post-implantation embryos. Following 1 Gy of acute X-rays to immediately preovulatory stage oocytes, the rate of hyperploidy (chromosome gain) was found to be elevated over levels in unirradiated controls, at metaphase II, in 1-cell and 3.5 day pre-implantation embryos but not in 8.5 day post-implantation foetuses. In the latter, however, the frequency of mosaicism was significantly increased. A similar response of an increase in mosaicism but not in hyperploidy in 8.5 day post-implantation embryos was also found after irradiation of dictyate stage oocytes with 4 Gy of acute X-rays. Significantly elevated frequencies of structural chromosome anomalies were present in metaphase II oocytes and pre-implantation embryonic stages, but could not be detected in block-stained chromosome preparations from 8.5 day post-implantation foetuses. However, analysis of chromosome preparations after G-banding showed that almost 14% of 14.5 day foetuses carried a chromosome rearrangement after 1 Gy of X-rays to immediately preovulatory stage oocytes. Overall, our data indicate that the presence of radiation-induced chromosome gains are incompatible with embryonic survival but that a proportion of embryos with structural chromosome damage develop past mid-gestation. These latter embryos are therefore potentially capable of contributing to the genetic burden of the next generation

  10. Structural Chromosomal Alterations Induced by Dietary Bioflavonoids in Fanconi Anemia Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Guevara

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionFanconi anemia is an autosomal recessive diseasecharacterized by a variety of congenital abnormalities,progressive bone marrow failure,increased chromosomal instability and higherrisk to acute myeloid leukemia, solid tumors. Thisentity can be considered an appropriate biologicalmodel to analyze natural substances with possiblegenotoxic effect. The aims of this study wereto describe and quantify structural chromosomalaberrations induced by 5 flavones, 2 isoflavonesand a topoisomerase II chemotherapeutic inhibitorin Fanconi anemia lymphocytes in order todetermine chromosomal numbers changes and/or type of chromosomal damage.Materials and methodsChromosomes stimulated by phytohaemagglutininM, from Fanconi anemia lymphocytes,were analysed by conventional cytogenetic culture.For each chemical substance and controls,one hundred metaphases were evaluated. Chromosomalalterations were documented by photographyand imaging analyzer. To statisticalanalysis was used chi square test to identify significantdifferences between frequencies of chromosomaldamage of basal and exposed cellcultured a P value less than 0.05.ResultsThere were 431 chromosomal alterations in1000 metaphases analysed; genistein was themore genotoxic bioflavonoid, followed in descendentorder by genistin, fisetin, kaempferol,quercetin, baicalein and miricetin. Chromosomalaberrations observed were: chromatidbreaks, chromosomal breaks, cromatid andchromosomal gaps, quadriratials exchanges,dicentrics chromosome and complex rearrangements.ConclusionBioflavonoids as genistein, genistin and fisetin,which are commonly present in the human diet,showed statistical significance in the number ofchromosomal aberrations in Fanconi anemialymphocytes, regarding the basal damage.

  11. [Tripartite motif-containing protein 34 (TRIM34) colocalized with micronuclei chromosome and hampers its movement to equatorial plate during the metaphase stage of mitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dakang; An, Xinye; Ji, Bing; Cheng, Yanli; Gao, Honglian; Tian, Mingming

    2016-06-01

    Objective To examine whether tripartite motif-containing protein 34 (TRIM34) is colocalized with micronuclei and investigate the influence on the movement of micronuclei chromosome in mitosis. Methods The eukaryotic expression vector TRIM34-pEGFP-N3 was constructed, identified and then transfected into HEK293T cells. With 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole 2HCI (DAPI) staining, the colocalization between TRIM34 and micronuclei was observed under a fluorescence microscope. Moreover, MitoTracker(R)Deep Red was used to identify the colocalization between the complex of TRIM34-micronulei and mitochondria under a confocal microscope. Finally, the effect of TRIM34 on the movement of micronuclei chromosome in mitosis was examined. Results DNA sequencing confirmed that the vector TRIM34-pEGFP-N3 was constructed successfully. A fluorescence microscope revealed that TRIM34 could be colocalized with micronuclei in HEK293T cells transfected with TRIM34-pEGFP-N3. In the same manner, a confocal microscope distinctly showed that TRIM34 was colocalized with micronuclei similarly in appearance. However, there was no distinguished colocalization relationship between the complex of TRIM34-micronulei and mitochondria. Interestingly, the micronuclei chromosome conjugated with TRIM34 was hardly transferred to equatorial plate during the metaphase stage of mitosis. Conclusion TRIM34 is colocalized with micronuclei chromosome and hampers its movement to equatorial plate in mitosis.

  12. Immunostimulatory oligonucleotide-induced metaphase cytogenetics detect chromosomal aberrations in 80% of CLL patients: A study of 132 CLL cases with correlation to FISH, IgVH status, and CD38 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicker, Frank; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Torsten; Kern, Wolfgang; Schoch, Claudia

    2006-11-01

    Compared with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), conventional metaphase cytogenetics play only a minor prognostic role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) so far, due to technical problems resulting from limited proliferation of CLL cells in vitro. Here, we present a simple method for in vitro stimulation of CLL cells that overcomes this limitation. In our unselected patient population, 125 of 132 cases could be successfully stimulated for metaphase generation by culture with the immunostimulatory CpG-oligonucleotide DSP30 plus interleukin 2. Of 125 cases, 101 showed chromosomal aberrations. The aberration rate is comparable to the rate detected by parallel interphase FISH. In 47 patients, conventional cytogenetics detected additional aberrations not detected by FISH analysis. A complex aberrant karyotype, defined as one having at least 3 aberrations, was detected in 30 of 125 patients, compared with only one such case as defined by FISH. Conventional cytogenetics frequently detected balanced and unbalanced translocations. A significant correlation of the poor-prognosis unmutated IgV(H) status with unbalanced translocations and of the likewise poor-prognosis CD38 expression to balanced translocations and complex aberrant karyotype was found. We demonstrate that FISH analysis underestimates the complexity of chromosomal aberrations in CLL. Therefore, conventional cytogenetics may define subgroups of patients with high risk of progression.

  13. Discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masubuchi, Masanori

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography. In this method, the difference in DNA synthetic phase between each chromosome was used as a standard, and the used chromosome was in metaphase, as morphological characteristics were markedly in this phase. Cell cycle and autoradiography with 3 H-thymidine were also examined. In order to discriminate chromosome by autoradiography, it was effective to utilize the labelled pattern in late DNA synthetic phase, where asynchronous replication of chromosome appeared most obviously. DNA synthesis in chromosome was examined in each DNA synthetic phase by culturing the chromosome after the treatment with 3 H-thymidine and altering the time to prepare chromosome specimen. Discrimination of chromosome in plants and animals by autoradiography was also mentioned. It was noticed as a structural and functional discrimination of chromosome to observe amino acid uptake into chromosome protein and to utilize the difference in labelled pattern between the sites of chromosome. (K. Serizawa)

  14. Preliminary study about frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Mariana E.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2011-01-01

    The estimate on approximate dose in exposed individual can be made through conventional cytogenetic analysis of dicentric, this technique has been used to support physical dosimetry. It is important to estimate the absorbed dose in case of accidents with the aim of developing an appropriate treatment and biological dosimetry can be very useful in case where the dosimetry is unavailable. Exposure to gamma and neutron radiation leads to the same biological effects such as chromosomal alterations and cancer. However, neutrons cause more genetic damage, such as mutation or more structural damage, such as chromosome alterations. The aim of research is to compare frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma beam with those from neutron-gamma mixed field. Two blood samples were obtained from one healthy donor and irradiated at different sources. The first sample was exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources 241 AmBe at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL - CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil) and the second one was exposed to 137 Cs gamma rays at 137 Cs Laboratory (CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil), both exposures resulting in an absorbed dose of 0.66Gy. Mitotic metaphase cells were obtained by lymphocyte culture for chromosomal analysis and slides were stained with Giemsa 5%. These preliminary results showed a similarity in associated dicentrics frequency per cell (0.041 and 0.048) after 137 Cs and 241 AmBe sources irradiations, respectively. However, it was not observed centric rings frequency per cell (0.0 and 0.027). This study will be continue to verify the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by only gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field. (author)

  15. Preliminary study about frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Mariana E.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide [Universidade Federal de Pernanmbuco (CCB/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Genetica

    2011-07-01

    The estimate on approximate dose in exposed individual can be made through conventional cytogenetic analysis of dicentric, this technique has been used to support physical dosimetry. It is important to estimate the absorbed dose in case of accidents with the aim of developing an appropriate treatment and biological dosimetry can be very useful in case where the dosimetry is unavailable. Exposure to gamma and neutron radiation leads to the same biological effects such as chromosomal alterations and cancer. However, neutrons cause more genetic damage, such as mutation or more structural damage, such as chromosome alterations. The aim of research is to compare frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma beam with those from neutron-gamma mixed field. Two blood samples were obtained from one healthy donor and irradiated at different sources. The first sample was exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources {sup 241}AmBe at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL - CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil) and the second one was exposed to {sup 137}Cs gamma rays at {sup 137}Cs Laboratory (CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil), both exposures resulting in an absorbed dose of 0.66Gy. Mitotic metaphase cells were obtained by lymphocyte culture for chromosomal analysis and slides were stained with Giemsa 5%. These preliminary results showed a similarity in associated dicentrics frequency per cell (0.041 and 0.048) after {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}AmBe sources irradiations, respectively. However, it was not observed centric rings frequency per cell (0.0 and 0.027). This study will be continue to verify the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by only gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field. (author)

  16. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes: altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Werken, C; Avo Santos, M; Laven, J S E; Eleveld, C; Fauser, B C J M; Lens, S M A; Baart, E B

    2015-10-01

    Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal phosphorylation dynamics of histone H2A at T120 (H2ApT120) by Bub1 kinase and subsequent recruitment of Shugoshin, but phosphorylation of histone H3 at threonine 3 (H3pT3) by Haspin failed to show the expected centromeric enrichment on metaphase chromosomes in the zygote. Human cleavage stage embryos show high levels of chromosomal instability. What causes this high error rate is unknown, as mechanisms used to ensure proper chromosome segregation in mammalian embryos are poorly described. In this study, we investigated the pathways regulating CPC targeting to the inner centromere in human embryos. We characterized the distribution of the CPC in relation to activity of its two main centromeric targeting pathways: the Bub1-H2ApT120-Sgo-CPC and Haspin-H3pT3-CPC pathways. The study was conducted between May 2012 and March 2014 on human surplus embryos resulting from in vitro fertilization treatment and donated for research. In zygotes, nuclear envelope breakdown was monitored by time-lapse imaging to allow timed incubations with specific inhibitors to arrest at prometaphase and metaphase, and to interfere with Haspin and Aurora B/C kinase activity. Functionality of the targeting pathways was assessed through characterization of histone phosphorylation dynamics by immunofluorescent analysis, combined with gene expression by RT-qPCR and immunofluorescent localization of key pathway proteins. Immunofluorescent analysis of the CPC subunit Inner Centromere Protein revealed the pool of stably bound CPC proteins was not strictly confined to the inner centromere of prometaphase chromosomes in human zygotes, as observed in later stages of preimplantation development and somatic cells. Investigation of the

  17. Somatic pairing, endomitosis and chromosome aberrations in snakes (Viperidae and Colubridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beçak Maria Luiza

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The positioning of macrochromosomes of Bothrops jararaca and Bothrops insularis (Viperidae was studied in undistorted radial metaphases of uncultured cells (spermatogonia and oogonia not subjected to spindle inhibitors. Colchicinized metaphases from uncultured (spleen and intestine and cultured tissues (blood were also analyzed. We report two antagonic non-random chromosome arrangements in untreated premeiotic cells: the parallel configuration with homologue chromosomes associated side by side in the metaphase plate and the antiparallel configuration having homologue chromosomes with antipolar distribution in the metaphase ring. The antiparallel aspect also appeared in colchicinized cells. The spatial chromosome arrangement in both configurations is groupal size-dependent and maintained through meiosis. We also describe, in untreated gonia cells, endomitosis followed by reductional mitosis which restores the diploid number. In B. jararaca males we observed that some gonad regions present changes in the meiotic mechanism. In this case, endoreduplicated cells segregate the diplochromosomes to opposite poles forming directly endoreduplicated second metaphases of meiosis with the suppression of first meiosis. By a successive division, these cells form nuclei with one set of chromosomes. Chromosome doubling in oogonia is known in hybrid species and in parthenogenetic salamanders and lizards. This species also presented chromosome rearrangements leading to aneuploidies in mitosis and meiosis. It is suggested that somatic pairing, endomitosis, meiotic alterations, and chromosomal aberrations can be correlated processes. Similar aspects of nuclei configurations, endomitosis and reductional mitosis were found in other Viperidae and Colubridae species.

  18. FISHprep: A Novel Integrated Device for Metaphase FISH Sample Preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Kwasny, Dorota

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel integrated device for preparing metaphase chromosomes spread slides (FISHprep). The quality of cytogenetic analysis from patient samples greatly relies on the efficiency of sample pre-treatment and/or slide preparation. In cytogenetic slide preparation, cell cultures...... are routinely used to process samples (for culture, arrest and fixation of cells) and/or to expand limited amount of samples (in case of prenatal diagnostics). Arguably, this expansion and other sample pretreatments form the longest part of the entire diagnostic protocols spanning over 3–4 days. We present here...... with minimal handling for metaphase FISH slide preparation....

  19. The Project Of Another Low-Cost Metaphase Finder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The most popular and 'gold standard' phenomenon in Biological dosimetry is the appearance of dicentric chromosomes in metaphase in white blood cells. The metaphase finder is a tool for biological dosimetry that finds metaphase cells on slide glasses. The author and a software company were using new special software that was faster than conventional systems. A Nikon Eclipse Ni-E microscope with motorised X-Y stage, 4x objective lens and 1920 x 1024 pixels colour camera for hardware were used. The software uses mathematical morphology filters. The new system was compact and low-priced. And the remarkable point is, this system can be applicable not only to human blood, but also to non-human samples. The speed was 208-236 s per 5 x 20 mm area, while capturing 378 images, which achieved the aim of the project. The false-positive ratio achieved below 5% in some slides. (author)

  20. Identification of Chromosomes Alterations in Primary Breast Cancer Using Premature Chromosome Condensation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Griffin, Constance

    2000-01-01

    .... We are developing a new method, premature chromosome condensation (PCC),using mitotic Xenopus extracts that will allow us to obtain G-banded karyotypes from primary, uncultured breast cancer specimens...

  1. Alterations and abnormal mitosis of wheat chromosomes induced by wheat-rye monosomic addition lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulan Fu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wheat-rye addition lines are an old topic. However, the alterations and abnormal mitotic behaviours of wheat chromosomes caused by wheat-rye monosomic addition lines are seldom reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Octoploid triticale was derived from common wheat T. aestivum L. 'Mianyang11'×rye S. cereale L. 'Kustro' and some progeny were obtained by the controlled backcrossing of triticale with 'Mianyang11' followed by self-fertilization. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH using rye genomic DNA and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH using repetitive sequences pAs1 and pSc119.2 as probes were used to analyze the mitotic chromosomes of these progeny. Strong pSc119.2 FISH signals could be observed at the telomeric regions of 3DS arms in 'Mianyang11'. However, the pSc119.2 FISH signals were disappeared from the selfed progeny of 4R monosomic addition line and the changed 3D chromosomes could be transmitted to next generation stably. In one of the selfed progeny of 7R monosomic addition line, one 2D chromosome was broken and three 4A chromosomes were observed. In the selfed progeny of 6R monosomic addition line, structural variation and abnormal mitotic behaviour of 3D chromosome were detected. Additionally, 1A and 4B chromosomes were eliminated from some of the progeny of 6R monosomic addition line. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicated that single rye chromosome added to wheat might cause alterations and abnormal mitotic behaviours of wheat chromosomes and it is possible that the stress caused by single alien chromosome might be one of the factors that induced karyotype alteration of wheat.

  2. Alterations and Abnormal Mitosis of Wheat Chromosomes Induced by Wheat-Rye Monosomic Addition Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shulan; Yang, Manyu; Fei, Yunyan; Tan, Feiquan; Ren, Zhenglong; Yan, Benju; Zhang, Huaiyu; Tang, Zongxiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Wheat-rye addition lines are an old topic. However, the alterations and abnormal mitotic behaviours of wheat chromosomes caused by wheat-rye monosomic addition lines are seldom reported. Methodology/Principal Findings Octoploid triticale was derived from common wheat T. aestivum L. ‘Mianyang11’×rye S. cereale L. ‘Kustro’ and some progeny were obtained by the controlled backcrossing of triticale with ‘Mianyang11’ followed by self-fertilization. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) using rye genomic DNA and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using repetitive sequences pAs1 and pSc119.2 as probes were used to analyze the mitotic chromosomes of these progeny. Strong pSc119.2 FISH signals could be observed at the telomeric regions of 3DS arms in ‘Mianyang11’. However, the pSc119.2 FISH signals were disappeared from the selfed progeny of 4R monosomic addition line and the changed 3D chromosomes could be transmitted to next generation stably. In one of the selfed progeny of 7R monosomic addition line, one 2D chromosome was broken and three 4A chromosomes were observed. In the selfed progeny of 6R monosomic addition line, structural variation and abnormal mitotic behaviour of 3D chromosome were detected. Additionally, 1A and 4B chromosomes were eliminated from some of the progeny of 6R monosomic addition line. Conclusions/Significance These results indicated that single rye chromosome added to wheat might cause alterations and abnormal mitotic behaviours of wheat chromosomes and it is possible that the stress caused by single alien chromosome might be one of the factors that induced karyotype alteration of wheat. PMID:23936213

  3. Comparison of the induction and disappearance of DNA double strand breaks and gamma-H2AX foci after irradiation of chromosomes in G1-phase or in condensed metaphase cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takamitsu A; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Bedford, Joel S

    2008-03-01

    The induction and disappearance of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) after irradiation of G1 and mitotic cells were compared with the gamma-H2AX foci assay and a gel electrophoresis assay. This is to determine whether cell cycle related changes in chromatin structure might influence the gamma-H2AX assay which depends on extensive phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the H2AX histone variant surrounding DSBs. The disappearance of gamma-H2AX foci after irradiation was much slower for mitotic than for G1 cells. On the other hand, no difference was seen for the gel electrophoresis assay. Our data may suggest the limited accessibility of dephosphorylation enzyme in irradiated metaphase cells or trapped gamma-H2AX in condensed chromatin.

  4. Comparison of the induction and disappearance of DNA double strand breaks and γ-H2AX foci after irradiation of chromosomes in G1-phase or in condensed metaphase cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takamitsu A.; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Bedford, Joel S.

    2008-01-01

    The induction and disappearance of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) after irradiation of G1 and mitotic cells were compared with the γ-H2AX foci assay and a gel electrophoresis assay. This is to determine whether cell cycle related changes in chromatin structure might influence the γ-H2AX assay which depends on extensive phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the H2AX histone variant surrounding DSBs. The disappearance of γ-H2AX foci after irradiation was much slower for mitotic than for G1 cells. On the other hand, no difference was seen for the gel electrophoresis assay. Our data may suggest the limited accessibility of dephosphorylation enzyme in irradiated metaphase cells or trapped γ-H2AX in condensed chromatin

  5. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... St Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:chap 69. Taber's Medical Dictionary Online. Chromosome. www.tabers.com/tabersonline/view/Tabers-Dictionary/753321/all/chromosome?q=Chromosome&ti=0 . Accessed June 11, 2017.

  6. A note on chromosomes of Pontellopsis herdmani and Pontella princeps (Copepoda) from the Laccadive sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, U.; Goswami, S.C.

    Pontellopsis herdmani and Pontella princeps (Pontellidae, Calanoida, Copepoda) showed a diploid number of 20 and a haploid number of 10 chromosomes during the spermatogonial metaphase and metaphase II stages. The chromosomes were in the size range...

  7. Nuclear organization in human sperm: preliminary evidence for altered sex chromosome centromere position in infertile males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, K A; Fonseka, K G L; Abogrein, A; Ioannou, D; Handyside, A H; Thornhill, A R; Hickson, N; Griffin, D K

    2008-06-01

    Many genetic defects with a chromosomal basis affect male reproduction via a range of different mechanisms. Chromosome position is a well-known marker of nuclear organization, and alterations in standard patterns can lead to disease phenotypes such as cancer, laminopathies and epilepsy. It has been demonstrated that normal mammalian sperm adopt a pattern with the centromeres aligning towards the nuclear centre. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that altered chromosome position in the sperm head is associated with male infertility. The average nuclear positions of fluorescence in-situ hybridization signals for three centromeric probes (for chromosomes X, Y and 18) were compared in normoozoospermic men and in men with compromised semen parameters. In controls, the centromeres of chromosomes X, Y and 18 all occupied a central nuclear location. In infertile men the sex chromosomes appeared more likely to be distributed in a pattern not distinguishable from a random model. Our findings cast doubt on the reliability of centromeric probes for aneuploidy screening. The analysis of chromosome position in sperm heads should be further investigated for the screening of infertile men.

  8. High-order chromatin architecture shapes the landscape of chromosomal alterations in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Getz, Gad; Meyerson, Matthew; Mirny, Leonid

    2012-02-01

    The rapid growth of cancer genome structural information provides an opportunity for a better understanding of the mutational mechanisms of genomic alterations in cancer and the forces of selection that act upon them. Here we test the evidence for two major forces, spatial chromosome structure and purifying (or negative) selection, that shape the landscape of somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs) in cancer (Beroukhim et al, 2010). Using a maximum likelihood framework we compare SCNA maps and three-dimensional genome architecture as determined by genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (HiC) and described by the proposed fractal-globule (FG) model (Lieberman-Aiden and Van Berkum et al, 2009). This analysis provides evidence that the distribution of chromosomal alterations in cancer is spatially related to three-dimensional genomic architecture and additionally suggests that purifying selection as well as positive selection shapes the landscape of SCNAs during somatic evolution of cancer cells.

  9. Chromosome alterations in the X-ray-induced transformants of cultured mouse cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji; Komatsu, Kenshi; Okumura, Yutaka; Sasaki, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Mouse m5S cells were subjected to soft X-ray irradiation. Twenty-four transformants were separated as indicators of focus formation. Two clones, cl.4103 and cl.6310, were chosen for the analysis of chromosome alterations in transformants. A parent strain, m5S/1M, served as the control. Anchorage independence (AG) was not detected in the control strain, irrespective of culture conditions and population doubling number (PDN). In the case of transformants, the frequency of AG was increased with increasing PDN for cl.4103, and was constant for cl.6310, irrespective of PDN. Karyotype of m5S/1M was 42, X, -Y, +der (6) t(6;13), t(8;8), +8, +15. In addition, -13, der(10) and -der(6)t(6;13), der(5), +mar occurred as karyotype alterations for cl.4103 and cl. 6310, respectively. The present experiment indicated that chromosome alterations secondary to primary alterations occur in a high frequency in the transforming process of X-ray irradiated cells, and that the secondary chromosome alterations result in selective proliferation of transformed clones. (Namekawa, K)

  10. Nicotine-induced Disturbances of Meiotic Maturation in Cultured Mouse Oocytes: Alterations of Spindle Integrity and Chromosome Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenzes Maria

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We investigated whether nicotine exposure in vitro of mouse oocytes affects spindle and chromosome function during meiotic maturation (M-I and M-II. Oocytes in germinal vesicle (GV stage were cultured in nicotine for 8 h or for 16 h, to assess effects in M-I and in metaphase II (M-II. The latter culture setting used the three protocols: 8 h nicotine then 8 h medium (8N + 8M; 16 h nicotine (16N; 8 h medium then 8 h nicotine (8M + 8N. Non-toxic concentrations of nicotine at 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mmol/L were used. Spindle-chromosome configurations were analyzed with wide-field optical sectioning microscopy. In 8 h cultures, nicotine exposure resulted in dose-related increased proportions of M-I oocytes with defective spindle-chromosome configurations. A dose-related delayed entry into anaphase I was also detected. In 16 h cultures, nicotine exposure for the first 8 h (8N + 8M, or for 16 h (16N, resulted in dose- and time-related increased proportions of oocytes arrested in M-I (10 mmol/L; 8 h: 53.2%, controls 9.6%; 16 h: 87.6%, controls 8.5%. Defects in M-I spindles and chromosomes caused M-I arrest leading to dose-related decreased proportions of oocytes that reached metaphase-II (10 mmol/L 8 h: 46.8%, controls 90.4%;16 h: 12.4%, controls 91.5%. A delayed anaphase-I affected the normal timing of M-II, leading to abnormal oocytes with dispersed chromosomes, or with double spindles and no polar body. Nicotine exposure during the second 8 h (8M + 8N resulted in dose-related, increased proportions of M-II oocytes with defective spindles and chromosomes (10 mmol/L: 42.9%, controls 2.0%. Nicotine has no adverse effects on GV break down, but induces spindle and chromosome defects compromising oocyte meiotic maturation and development.

  11. FahamecV1:A Low Cost Automated Metaphase Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yilmaz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, FahamecV1 is introduced and investigated as a low cost and high accuracy solution for metaphase detection. Chromosome analysis is performed at the metaphase stage and high accuracy and automated detection of the metaphase stage plays an active role in decreasing analysis time. FahamecV1 includes an optic microscope, a motorized microscope stage, an electronic control unit, a camera, a computer and a software application. Printing components of the motorized microscope stage (using a 3D printer is of the main reasons for cost reduction. Operations such as stepper motor calibration, are detection, focusing, scanning, metaphase detection and saving of coordinates into a database are automatically performed. To detect metaphases, a filter named Metafilter is developed and applied. Average scanning time per preparate is 77 sec/cm2. True positive rate is calculated as 95.1%, true negative rate is calculated as 99.0% and accuracy is calculated as 98.8%.

  12. Automatic aberration scoring using whole chromosome F.I.S.H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piper, J.; Bayley, R.; Boyle, S.; Fantes, J.A.; Green, D.K.; Gordon, J.; Hill, W.; Ji, L.; Malloy, P.; Perry, P.; Rutovitz, D.; Stark, M.; Whale, D.

    1993-01-01

    A radiation-induced rearrangement involving a painted and a non-painted chromosome will usually result in two partly-painted chromosomes, typically either a dicentric chromosome and associated fragment, or a reciprocal translocation pair. A consequence of such a rearrangement is that the number of painted image regions in the metaphase is increased by one, and their size distribution is altered. More complex rearrangements are uncommon, particularly at low doses. A high proportion of damaged cells can therefore be registered simply by detecting when the distribution of painted components differs from the expected number and size. A system has been constructed to pre-screen for damaged cells. It comprises automatic fluorescence metaphase finding followed by relocation and digitization of probe and counterstain channels at high resolution. Fully automatic segmentation in counterstain discriminates chromosomes from interphase nuclei and determines whether a metaphase is approximately diploid. The painted regions are segmented and their relative sizes estimated. Rules are applied which reduce the false positives due to artifacts such as overlapped painted chromosomes. More than 70% of cells with radiation damage involving painted and unpainted chromosomes were detected in a preliminary experiment using a small data set, with a low false positive rate. Results from a larger experiment in progress are presented

  13. A quantitative study of the second meiotic metaphase in male mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, R A; Lim, M C; Coulter, V J

    1975-01-01

    Over 11,000 second meiotic metaphase spreads stained for the pericentromeric region have been studied quantitatively in male mice of 14 strains. The sex-chromosome constitution of a cell could be judged objectively if X and Y chromosomes and ploidy were all scored. A bias arose if only Y chromosomes and ploidy were scored but could be corrected statistically. There was no sign of other forms of bias. The original contiguity of X and Y second metaphases in vivo was very occasionally evident in the preparations. Most of the subhaploid aneuploid counts were assumed to be artifactual. The incidence of truly aneuploid second metaphases in 13 strains was estimated as 0.38+/-0.12%. The estimated average rate per chromosome was 0.019+/-0.006%, with a comparable order of magnitude for the sex chromosomes alone. Simultaneous aneuploidy of two or more chromosomes of the haploid set was estimated to be very rare. Of the spreads from 13 strains, 9.6% were polyploid (2N, 3N, 4N) and showed most of the possible combinations of sex chromosomes. Nearly all the polyploid spreads were considered to arise by artifactual cell fusion at the time of second metaphase during the preparative technique, especially of the X and Y daughter-cell products of the first meiotic division. Other modes of origin (true polyploidy, accidental superposition of cells during preparation) were unlikely. The data could be accommodated by a statistical model with only four parameters. It allowed for artifactual fusion mainly between daughter cells but also between non-daughter cells, bias in one scoring method, and bias in the numbers of cells with given ploidy successfully mounted. Current techniques of chromosome preparation were thought to be wholly unsuitable for the recognition of true polyploidy. The artifactual origin of polyploid spreads was borne out by an absence of polyploid spermatozoa in 14 strains. There appeared to be a virtually constant transmission rate of paternal X and Y chromosomes from

  14. Alteration of terminal heterochromatin and chromosome rearrangements in derivatives of wheat-rye hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shulan; Lv, Zhenling; Guo, Xiang; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu

    2013-08-20

    Wheat-rye addition and substitution lines and their self progenies revealed variations in telomeric heterochromatin and centromeres. Furthermore, a mitotically unstable dicentric chromosome and stable multicentric chromosomes were observed in the progeny of a Chinese Spring-Imperial rye 3R addition line. An unstable multicentric chromosome was found in the progeny of a 6R/6D substitution line. Drastic variation of terminal heterochromatin including movement and disappearance of terminal heterochromatin occurred in the progeny of wheat-rye addition line 3R, and the 5RS ditelosomic addition line. Highly stable minichromosomes were observed in the progeny of a monosomic 4R addition line, a ditelosomic 5RS addition line and a 6R/6D substitution line. Minichromosomes, with and without the FISH signals for telomeric DNA (TTTAGGG)n, derived from a monosomic 4R addition line are stable and transmissible to the next generation. The results indicated that centromeres and terminal heterochromatin can be profoundly altered in wheat-rye hybrid derivatives. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The Y chromosome of the Atelidae family (Platyrrhini): study by chromosome microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifalli-Iughetti, C; Koiffmann, C P

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the intergeneric variability of the Y chromosome, we describe the hybridization of the Y chromosome of Brachytelesarachnoides, obtained by microdissection, to metaphases of Atelesbelzebuthmarginatus, Lagothrixlagothricha, and Alouatta male specimens. Brachytelesarachnoides (Atelinae) has 62 chromosomes and a very small Y chromosome. Our results showed that the Brachytelesarachnoides Y chromosome probe hybridized to Lagothrixlagothricha metaphases yielding one hybridization signal on only the tiny Y chromosome, and when hybridized with Atelesbelzebuthmarginatus metaphases it yielded one hybridization signal on two thirds of the small acrocentric Y chromosome. However, no hybridization signal was observed in Alouatta metaphases (subfamily Alouattinae), a closely related genus in the Atelidae family. Furthermore, our data support a close phylogenetic relationship among Brachyteles, Ateles, and Lagothrix and their placement in the Atelinae subfamily, but exclude Alouatta from this group indicating its placement as basal to this group. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes : Altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Werken, C.; Avo Santos, M.; Laven, J. S E; Eleveld, C.; Fauser, B. C J M; Lens, S. M A; Baart, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal

  17. Distinction of metaphases in the first cell cycle for automated system in radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayata, I.; Kajima, J.; Okabe, N.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the biological improvements for developing an automated scoring system of radiation induced chromosome aberrations for radiation dosimetry, we introduce a new method for identifying the metaphases in the first cell cycle. Differing from the conventional method with BrdUrd, it focuses on the difference of chromosome number to be induced by inhibiting the cytokinesis with Cytochalasin B. Majority of the cells with 46 chromosomes were in the first cell cycle, and the ratio of those with 46 chromosomes in the second division was less than one per cent both when Cytochalasin B of 1.5 μg/ml was added to the culture of irradiated lymphocytes and when that of 1.8 μg/ml was added to that of non-irradiated cells for one day, respectively. The ratio of metaphases with over-condensed chromosomes is reduced, the clear-cut image of chromosomes is obtained, culture and staining processes are simpler, and the device of UV irradiation is not necessary. Thus the present Cytochalasin B method offers more qualified input, data based on the numerical difference, than conventional image based recognition, and upgrades the quality of the scoring in the automated analysis system. (Author)

  18. Human oocyte chromosome analysis: complicated cases and major ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Human oocyte chromosome analysis: complicated cases and major ... dardized even after more than 20 years of research, making it difficult to draw .... (c) Part of a metaphase with a chromosome break in the centromeric region (arrows).

  19. Metaphase FISH on a Chip: Miniaturized Microfluidic Device for Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Tommerup

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH is a major cytogenetic technique for clinical genetic diagnosis of both inherited and acquired chromosomal abnormalities. Although FISH techniques have evolved and are often used together with other cytogenetic methods like CGH, PRINS and PNA-FISH, the process continues to be a manual, labour intensive, expensive and time consuming technique, often taking over 3–5 days, even in dedicated labs. We have developed a novel microFISH device to perform metaphase FISH on a chip which overcomes many shortcomings of the current laboratory protocols. This work also introduces a novel splashing device for preparing metaphase spreads on a microscope glass slide, followed by a rapid adhesive tape-based bonding protocol leading to rapid fabrication of the microFISH device. The microFISH device allows for an optimized metaphase FISH protocol on a chip with over a 20-fold reduction in the reagent volume. This is the first demonstration of metaphase FISH on a microfluidic device and offers a possibility of automation and significant cost reduction of many routine diagnostic tests of genetic anomalies.

  20. Flow cytogenetics: progress toward chromosomal aberration detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrano, A.V.; Gray, J.W.; Van Dilla, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    Using clonal derivatives of the Chinese hamster M3-1 cell line, we demonstrate the potential of flow systems to karyotype homogeneous aberrations (aberrations which are identical and present in every cell) and to detect heterogeneous aberrations (aberrations which occur randomly in a population and are not identical in every cell). Flow cytometry (FCM) of ethidium bromide stained isolated chromosomes from clone 650A of the M3-1 cells distinguishes nine chromosome types from the fourteen present in the actual karyotype. X-irradiation of this parent 650A clone produced two sub-clones with an altered flow karyotype, that is, their FCM distributions were characterized by the addition of new peaks and alterations in area under existing peaks. From the relative DNA content and area for each peak, as determined by computer analysis, we predicted that each clone had undergone a reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes from two peaks. This prediction was confirmed by Giemsa-banding the metaphase cells. Heterogeneous aberrations are reflected in the flow karyotype as an increase in background, that is, an increase in area underlying the chromosome peaks. This increase is dose dependent but, as yet, the sample variability has been too large for quantitative analysis. Flow sorting of the valleys between chromosome peaks produces enriched fractions of aberrant chromosomes for visual analysis. These approaches are potentially applicable to the analysis of chromsomal aberrations induced by environmental contaminants

  1. The Physics of the Metaphase Spindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriola, David; Needleman, Daniel J; Brugués, Jan

    2018-05-20

    The assembly of the mitotic spindle and the subsequent segregation of sister chromatids are based on the self-organized action of microtubule filaments, motor proteins, and other microtubule-associated proteins, which constitute the fundamental force-generating elements in the system. Many of the components in the spindle have been identified, but until recently it remained unclear how their collective behaviors resulted in such a robust bipolar structure. Here, we review the current understanding of the physics of the metaphase spindle that is only now starting to emerge.

  2. Evidence for X-chromosomal schizophrenia associated with microRNA alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinong Feng

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe disabling brain disease affecting about 1% of the population. Individual microRNAs (miRNAs affect moderate downregulation of gene expression. In addition, components required for miRNA processing and/or function have also been implicated in X-linked mental retardation, neurological and neoplastic diseases, pointing to the wide ranging involvement of miRNAs in disease.To explore the role of miRNAs in schizophrenia, 59 microRNA genes on the X-chromosome were amplified and sequenced in males with (193 and without (191 schizophrenia spectrum disorders to test the hypothesis that ultra-rare mutations in microRNA collectively contribute to the risk of schizophrenia. Here we provide the first association of microRNA gene dysfunction with schizophrenia. Eight ultra-rare variants in the precursor or mature miRNA were identified in eight distinct miRNA genes in 4% of analyzed males with schizophrenia. One ultra-rare variant was identified in a control sample (with a history of depression (8/193 versus 1/191, p = 0.02 by one-sided Fisher's exact test, odds ratio = 8.2. These variants were not found in an additional 7,197 control X-chromosomes.Functional analyses of ectopically expressed copies of the variant miRNA precursors demonstrate loss of function, gain of function or altered expression levels. While confirmation is required, this study suggests that microRNA mutations can contribute to schizophrenia.

  3. Evaluation of chromosomal abnormalities and common trombophilic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... Infections, genetic, endocrine, anatomic and immunologic problems have been suggested as causes for RM. ... Metaphase chromosome preparations from the .... The rate of karyotypically abnormal abortion specimens.

  4. Gene alterations at Drosophila inversion breakpoints provide prima facie evidence for natural selection as an explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Chromosomal inversions have been pervasive during the evolution of the genus Drosophila, but there is significant variation between lineages in the rate of rearrangement fixation. D. mojavensis, an ecological specialist adapted to a cactophilic niche under extreme desert conditions, is a chromosomally derived species with ten fixed inversions, five of them not present in any other species. Results In order to explore the causes of the rapid chromosomal evolution in D. mojavensis, we identified and characterized all breakpoints of seven inversions fixed in chromosome 2, the most dynamic one. One of the inversions presents unequivocal evidence for its generation by ectopic recombination between transposon copies and another two harbor inverted duplications of non-repetitive DNA at the two breakpoints and were likely generated by staggered single-strand breaks and repair by non-homologous end joining. Four out of 14 breakpoints lay in the intergenic region between preexisting duplicated genes, suggesting an adaptive advantage of separating previously tightly linked duplicates. Four out of 14 breakpoints are associated with transposed genes, suggesting these breakpoints are fragile regions. Finally two inversions contain novel genes at their breakpoints and another three show alterations of genes at breakpoints with potential adaptive significance. Conclusions D. mojavensis chromosomal inversions were generated by multiple mechanisms, an observation that does not provide support for increased mutation rate as explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution. On the other hand, we have found a number of gene alterations at the breakpoints with putative adaptive consequences that directly point to natural selection as the cause of D. mojavensis rapid chromosomal evolution. PMID:22296923

  5. Gene alterations at Drosophila inversion breakpoints provide prima facie evidence for natural selection as an explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, Yolanda; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2012-02-01

    Chromosomal inversions have been pervasive during the evolution of the genus Drosophila, but there is significant variation between lineages in the rate of rearrangement fixation. D. mojavensis, an ecological specialist adapted to a cactophilic niche under extreme desert conditions, is a chromosomally derived species with ten fixed inversions, five of them not present in any other species. In order to explore the causes of the rapid chromosomal evolution in D. mojavensis, we identified and characterized all breakpoints of seven inversions fixed in chromosome 2, the most dynamic one. One of the inversions presents unequivocal evidence for its generation by ectopic recombination between transposon copies and another two harbor inverted duplications of non-repetitive DNA at the two breakpoints and were likely generated by staggered single-strand breaks and repair by non-homologous end joining. Four out of 14 breakpoints lay in the intergenic region between preexisting duplicated genes, suggesting an adaptive advantage of separating previously tightly linked duplicates. Four out of 14 breakpoints are associated with transposed genes, suggesting these breakpoints are fragile regions. Finally two inversions contain novel genes at their breakpoints and another three show alterations of genes at breakpoints with potential adaptive significance. D. mojavensis chromosomal inversions were generated by multiple mechanisms, an observation that does not provide support for increased mutation rate as explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution. On the other hand, we have found a number of gene alterations at the breakpoints with putative adaptive consequences that directly point to natural selection as the cause of D. mojavensis rapid chromosomal evolution.

  6. Gene alterations at Drosophila inversion breakpoints provide prima facie evidence for natural selection as an explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillén Yolanda

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal inversions have been pervasive during the evolution of the genus Drosophila, but there is significant variation between lineages in the rate of rearrangement fixation. D. mojavensis, an ecological specialist adapted to a cactophilic niche under extreme desert conditions, is a chromosomally derived species with ten fixed inversions, five of them not present in any other species. Results In order to explore the causes of the rapid chromosomal evolution in D. mojavensis, we identified and characterized all breakpoints of seven inversions fixed in chromosome 2, the most dynamic one. One of the inversions presents unequivocal evidence for its generation by ectopic recombination between transposon copies and another two harbor inverted duplications of non-repetitive DNA at the two breakpoints and were likely generated by staggered single-strand breaks and repair by non-homologous end joining. Four out of 14 breakpoints lay in the intergenic region between preexisting duplicated genes, suggesting an adaptive advantage of separating previously tightly linked duplicates. Four out of 14 breakpoints are associated with transposed genes, suggesting these breakpoints are fragile regions. Finally two inversions contain novel genes at their breakpoints and another three show alterations of genes at breakpoints with potential adaptive significance. Conclusions D. mojavensis chromosomal inversions were generated by multiple mechanisms, an observation that does not provide support for increased mutation rate as explanation for rapid chromosomal evolution. On the other hand, we have found a number of gene alterations at the breakpoints with putative adaptive consequences that directly point to natural selection as the cause of D. mojavensis rapid chromosomal evolution.

  7. Heritable alteration of DNA methylation induced by whole-chromosome aneuploidy in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lihong; Diarso, Moussa; Zhang, Ai; Zhang, Huakun; Dong, Yuzhu; Liu, Lixia; Lv, Zhenling; Liu, Bao

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy causes changes in gene expression and phenotypes in all organisms studied. A previous study in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana showed that aneuploidy-generated phenotypic changes can be inherited to euploid progenies and implicated an epigenetic underpinning of the heritable variations. Based on an analysis by amplified fragment length polymorphism and methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism markers, we found that although genetic changes at the nucleotide sequence level were negligible, extensive changes in cytosine DNA methylation patterns occurred in all studied homeologous group 1 whole-chromosome aneuploid lines of common wheat (Triticum aestivum), with monosomic 1A showing the greatest amount of methylation changes. The changed methylation patterns were inherited by euploid progenies derived from the aneuploid parents. The aneuploidy-induced DNA methylation alterations and their heritability were verified at selected loci by bisulfite sequencing. Our data have provided empirical evidence supporting earlier suggestions that heritability of aneuploidy-generated, but aneuploidy-independent, phenotypic variations may have an epigenetic basis. That at least one type of aneuploidy - monosomic 1A - was able to cause significant epigenetic divergence of the aneuploid plants and their euploid progenies also lends support to recent suggestions that aneuploidy may have played an important and protracted role in polyploid genome evolution. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Chromosome 17 alterations identify good-risk and poor-risk tumors independently of clinical factors in medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Martin G.; Bäcklund, L. Magnus; Leong, Hui Sun; Ichimura, Koichi; Collins, V. Peter

    2011-01-01

    Current risk stratification schemas for medulloblastoma, based on combinations of clinical variables and histotype, fail to accurately identify particularly good- and poor-risk tumors. Attempts have been made to improve discriminatory power by combining clinical variables with cytogenetic data. We report here a pooled analysis of all previous reports of chromosomal copy number related to survival data in medulloblastoma. We collated data from previous reports that explicitly quoted survival data and chromosomal copy number in medulloblastoma. We analyzed the relative prognostic significance of currently used clinical risk stratifiers and the chromosomal aberrations previously reported to correlate with survival. In the pooled dataset metastatic disease, incomplete tumor resection and severe anaplasia were associated with poor outcome, while young age at presentation was not prognostically significant. Of the chromosomal variables studied, isolated 17p loss and gain of 1q correlated with poor survival. Gain of 17q without associated loss of 17p showed a trend to improved outcome. The most commonly reported alteration, isodicentric chromosome 17, was not prognostically significant. Sequential multivariate models identified isolated 17p loss, isolated 17q gain, and 1q gain as independent prognostic factors. In a historical dataset, we have identified isolated 17p loss as a marker of poor outcome and 17q gain as a novel putative marker of good prognosis. Biological markers of poor-risk and good-risk tumors will be critical in stratifying treatment in future trials. Our findings should be prospectively validated independently in future clinical studies. PMID:21292688

  9. Stabilization of chromosomes by DNA intercalators for flow karyotyping and identification by banding of isolated chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aten, J. A.; Buys, C. H.; van der Veen, A. Y.; Mesa, J. R.; Yu, L. C.; Gray, J. W.; Osinga, J.; Stap, J.

    1987-01-01

    A number of structurally unrelated DNA intercalators have been studied as stabilizers of mitotic chromosomes during isolation from rodent and human metaphase cells. Seven out of the nine intercalators tested were found to be useful as chromosome stabilizing agents. Chromosome suspensions prepared in

  10. X Chromosome Inactivation and Breast Cancer: Epigenetic Alteration in Tumor Initiation and Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Panning, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    We tested whether reactivation of the inactive X chromosome in the mouse mammary gland contributes to tumorigenesis in vivo and whether that reactivation of the inactive X can cooperate with the MYC...

  11. Analysis of chromosome rearrangements on the basis of synaptonemal complexes in the offspring of mice exposed to γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalikinskaya, E.I.; Bogdanov, Yu.F.; Kolomiets, O.L.; Shevchenko, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Electron-microscopic analysis of synaptonemic complexes (SC), spread on the hypophase surface, was conducted to investigate chromosome rearrangements in sterile and semisterile F 1 malemause offsprings, exposed to 5 Gy γ-rays Paralelly Chromosome rearrangement account in diakinesis-metaphase 1 was conducted using light microscope, in the same animals. During SC analysis in pachytene chromosome rearrangements were found in 63% of spermatocytes. Under chromosome analysis in diakinesis-metaphase 1 in the same animals chromosome rearrangements were found only in 32% of cells. SC analysis allows one to reveal chromosome rearrangements, which can not be revealed in diakinesis-metaphase 1

  12. ADP-ribosylation of nonhistone proteins from metaphase and interphase HeLa cells: factors responsible for differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adolph, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    A striking reduction was previously detected for HeLa metaphase chromosomes, compared to interphase nuclei, in the number of modified nonhistone species. Several factors which could contribute to this cell cycle change in ADP-ribosylation have therefore been examined. In these experiments, mitotic or interphase cells were incubated with [ 32 P]NAD, chromosomes and nuclei were prepared, and the proteins were resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The level of incorporation of 32 P label was found to be substantially influenced by chromosome expansion, DNA nicking, disruption of chromosomes or nuclei, and the growth activity of cells. The level of ADP-ribosylation was not greatly affected by the presence of inhibitors of RNA, DNA, and protein synthesis. NAD concentration influenced the extent of labelling but not the pattern of labeled species. A similar change in the pattern from interphase to mitosis was observed for whole cells as well as for isolated chromosomes and nuclei. The procedure used to arrest cells in mitosis was not artifactually responsible for the results. The difference in metaphase and interphase ADP-ribosylation is not confined to HeLa cells, since comparable patterns were found for chromosomes and nuclei from Novikoff rat hepatoma cells

  13. Deletion of DXZ4 on the human inactive X chromosome alters higher-order genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Huntley, Miriam H; Dudchenko, Olga; Stamenova, Elena K; Durand, Neva C; Sun, Zhuo; Huang, Su-Chen; Sanborn, Adrian L; Machol, Ido; Shamim, Muhammad; Seberg, Andrew P; Lander, Eric S; Chadwick, Brian P; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-08-02

    During interphase, the inactive X chromosome (Xi) is largely transcriptionally silent and adopts an unusual 3D configuration known as the "Barr body." Despite the importance of X chromosome inactivation, little is known about this 3D conformation. We recently showed that in humans the Xi chromosome exhibits three structural features, two of which are not shared by other chromosomes. First, like the chromosomes of many species, Xi forms compartments. Second, Xi is partitioned into two huge intervals, called "superdomains," such that pairs of loci in the same superdomain tend to colocalize. The boundary between the superdomains lies near DXZ4, a macrosatellite repeat whose Xi allele extensively binds the protein CCCTC-binding factor. Third, Xi exhibits extremely large loops, up to 77 megabases long, called "superloops." DXZ4 lies at the anchor of several superloops. Here, we combine 3D mapping, microscopy, and genome editing to study the structure of Xi, focusing on the role of DXZ4 We show that superloops and superdomains are conserved across eutherian mammals. By analyzing ligation events involving three or more loci, we demonstrate that DXZ4 and other superloop anchors tend to colocate simultaneously. Finally, we show that deleting DXZ4 on Xi leads to the disappearance of superdomains and superloops, changes in compartmentalization patterns, and changes in the distribution of chromatin marks. Thus, DXZ4 is essential for proper Xi packaging.

  14. Influence of incorporated bromodeoxyuridine on the induction of chromosomal alterations by ionizing radiation and long-wave UV in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanenburg, T S; van Zeeland, A A; Natarajan, A T

    1985-01-01

    Incorporation of BrdUrd into nuclear DNA sensitizes CHO cells (1) to the induction of chromosomal aberrations by X-rays and 0.5 MeV neutrons and (2) to induction of chromosomal aberrations and SCEs by lw-UV. We have attempted to establish a correlation between induced chromosomal alterations and induced single- or double-strand breaks in DNA. The data show that while DSBs correlate very well with X-ray-induced aberrations, no clear correlation could be established between lw-UV induced SSBs (including alkali-labile sites) and chromosomal alterations. In addition the effect of 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) on the induction of chromosomal aberrations and SCEs induced by lw-UV has been determined. It is shown that 3AB is without any effect when lw-UV-irradiated cells are posttreated with this inhibitor. The significance of these results is discussed.

  15. Chromosome aberrations and oncogene alterations in atomic bomb related leukemias - different mechanisms from de novo leukemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, H.; Kamada, N.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that leukemia occurred more frequently among atomic bomb survivors. In 132 atomic bomb related ( AB- related) leukemia patients during 1978-1999, 33 acute myeloid leukemia (AML)/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients had their exposure doses of more than 1Gy (DS86). Chromosome aberrations of the 33 patients were compared with those from 588 de novo AML/MDS patients who had been bone before August 1945 as control. No FAB M3 patient was observed in the exposed group. Most AB-related AML preceded a long term of MDS stage. Twenty seven of the 33 patients showed complex types of chromosome aberrations with more than three chromosomes involving chromosomes 5,7 and 11. The number of chromosomes abnormality per cell in the AB-related leukemia was 3.78 while 0.92 in de novo leukemia. Only one of the 33 patients had normal karyotype, while 44.1% in de novo leukemia patients. Translocations of chromosome 11 at 11q13 to 11q23 and deletion/ loss of chromosome 20 were frequently observed in AB-related leukemia. No leukemia-type specific translocations such as t(8;21),t(15;17) and 11q23 were found in the 33 AB-related leukemia patients. Furthermore, molecular analyses using FISH and PCR-SSCP revealed the presence of breakpoint located outside of MLL gene in the patients with translocations at 11q22-23 and DNA base derangements of RUNT domain of AML1(CBF β 2)gene with AML/MDS patients without t(8;21) and with a high dose of exposure. These results suggest that AB-related leukemia derives from an exposed pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell which has been preserved for a long time in the bone marrow, expressing high genetic instability such as microsatellite instability. On the other hand, de novo leukemia develops from a committed hematopoietic stem cell and shows simple and leukemia-type specific chromosome aberrations. These findings are important for understanding mechanisms for radiation-induced leukemia

  16. Y chromosome microdeletions and alterations of spermatogenesis, patient approach and genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rives, Nathalie

    2014-05-01

    Infertility affects 15% of couples at reproductive age and human male infertility appears frequently idiopathic. The main genetic causes of spermatogenesis defect responsible for non-obstructive azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia are constitutional chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions in the azoospermia factor region of the Y chromosome. The improvement of the Yq microdeletion screening method gave new insights in the mechanism responsible for the genesis of Yq microdeletions and for the consequences of the management of male infertility and genetic counselling in case of assisted reproductive technology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Klinefelter syndrome comorbidities linked to increased X chromosome gene dosage and altered protein interactome activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belling, Kirstine González-Izarzugaza; Russo, Francesco; Jensen, Anders Boeck

    2017-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) (47,XXY) is the most common male sex chromosome aneuploidy. Diagnosis and clinical supervision remain a challenge due to varying phenotypic presentation and insufficient characterization of the syndrome. Here we combine health data-driven epidemiology and molecular level...

  18. Meiotic double-strand breaks at the interface of chromosome movement, chromosome remodeling, and reductional division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Aurora; Tessé, Sophie; Gargano, Silvana; James, Françoise; Kleckner, Nancy; Zickler, Denise

    2003-01-01

    Chromosomal processes related to formation and function of meiotic chiasmata have been analyzed in Sordaria macrospora. Double-strand breaks (DSBs), programmed or γ-rays-induced, are found to promote four major events beyond recombination and accompanying synaptonemal complex formation: (1) juxtaposition of homologs from long-distance interactions to close presynaptic coalignment at midleptotene; (2) structural destabilization of chromosomes at leptotene/zygotene, including sister axis separation and fracturing, as revealed in a mutant altered in the conserved, axis-associated cohesin-related protein Spo76/Pds5p; (3) exit from the bouquet stage, with accompanying global chromosome movements, at zygotene/pachytene (bouquet stage exit is further found to be a cell-wide regulatory transition and DSB transesterase Spo11p is suggested to have a new noncatalytic role in this transition); (4) normal occurrence of both meiotic divisions, including normal sister separation. Functional interactions between DSBs and the spo76-1 mutation suggest that Spo76/Pds5p opposes local destabilization of axes at developing chiasma sites and raise the possibility of a regulatory mechanism that directly monitors the presence of chiasmata at metaphase I. Local chromosome remodeling at DSB sites appears to trigger an entire cascade of chromosome movements, morphogenetic changes, and regulatory effects that are superimposed upon a foundation of DSB-independent processes. PMID:14563680

  19. Altered expression of mitochondrial and extracellular matrix genes in the heart of human fetuses with chromosome 21 trisomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olla Carlo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Down syndrome phenotype has been attributed to overexpression of chromosome 21 (Hsa21 genes. However, the expression profile of Hsa21 genes in trisomic human subjects as well as their effects on genes located on different chromosomes are largely unknown. Using oligonucleotide microarrays we compared the gene expression profiles of hearts of human fetuses with and without Hsa21 trisomy. Results Approximately half of the 15,000 genes examined (87 of the 168 genes on Hsa21 were expressed in the heart at 18–22 weeks of gestation. Hsa21 gene expression was globally upregulated 1.5 fold in trisomic samples. However, not all genes were equally dysregulated and 25 genes were not upregulated at all. Genes located on other chromosomes were also significantly dysregulated. Functional class scoring and gene set enrichment analyses of 473 genes, differentially expressed between trisomic and non-trisomic hearts, revealed downregulation of genes encoding mitochondrial enzymes and upregulation of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins. There were no significant differences between trisomic fetuses with and without heart defects. Conclusion We conclude that dosage-dependent upregulation of Hsa21 genes causes dysregulation of the genes responsible for mitochondrial function and for the extracellular matrix organization in the fetal heart of trisomic subjects. These alterations might be harbingers of the heart defects associated with Hsa21 trisomy, which could be based on elusive mechanisms involving genetic variability, environmental factors and/or stochastic events.

  20. Genomic alterations detected by comparative genomic hybridization in ovarian endometriomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C. Veiga-Castelli

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a complex and multifactorial disease. Chromosomal imbalance screening in endometriotic tissue can be used to detect hot-spot regions in the search for a possible genetic marker for endometriosis. The objective of the present study was to detect chromosomal imbalances by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH in ectopic tissue samples from ovarian endometriomas and eutopic tissue from the same patients. We evaluated 10 ovarian endometriotic tissues and 10 eutopic endometrial tissues by metaphase CGH. CGH was prepared with normal and test DNA enzymatically digested, ligated to adaptors and amplified by PCR. A second PCR was performed for DNA labeling. Equal amounts of both normal and test-labeled DNA were hybridized in human normal metaphases. The Isis FISH Imaging System V 5.0 software was used for chromosome analysis. In both eutopic and ectopic groups, 4/10 samples presented chromosomal alterations, mainly chromosomal gains. CGH identified 11q12.3-q13.1, 17p11.1-p12, 17q25.3-qter, and 19p as critical regions. Genomic imbalances in 11q, 17p, 17q, and 19p were detected in normal eutopic and/or ectopic endometrium from women with ovarian endometriosis. These regions contain genes such as POLR2G, MXRA7 and UBA52 involved in biological processes that may lead to the establishment and maintenance of endometriotic implants. This genomic imbalance may affect genes in which dysregulation impacts both eutopic and ectopic endometrium.

  1. The Detection and Analysis of Chromosome Fragile Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Victoria A; Özer, Özgün; Hickson, Ian D

    2018-01-01

    A fragile site is a chromosomal locus that is prone to form a gap or constriction visible within a condensed metaphase chromosome, particularly following exposure of cells to DNA replication stress. Based on their frequency, fragile sites are classified as either common (CFSs; present in all...... for detection and analysis of chromosome fragile sites....

  2. DNA fingerprinting tags novel altered chromosomal regions and identifies the involvement of SOX5 in the progression of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Stephanie; Chan, Yuen Piu; Woolcock, Bruce; Hu, Liang; Wong, Kai Yau; Ling, Ming Tat; Bainbridge, Terry; Webber, Douglas; Chan, Tim Hon Man; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Lam, Wan; Vielkind, Juergen; Chan, Kwok Wah

    2009-05-15

    Identification of genomic alterations associated with the progression of prostate cancer may facilitate the better understanding of the development of this highly variable disease. Matched normal, premalignant high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive prostate carcinoma cells were procured by laser capture microdissection (LCM) from human radical prostatectomy specimens. From these cells, comparative DNA fingerprints were generated by a modified PCR-based technique called scanning of microdissected archival lesion (SMAL)-PCR. Recurrent polymorphic fingerprint fragments were used in tagging altered chromosomal regions. Altered regions were found at cytobands 1p31.3, 1q44, 2p23.1, 3p26.3, 3q22.3, 4q22.3, 4q35.2, 5q23.2, 8q22.3, 8q24.13, 9q21.3, 9q22.32, 10q11.21, 11p13, 12p12.1, 13q12.1, 16q12.2 and 18q21.31. Candidate genes in the surrounding area that may possibly harbor mutations that change normal prostatic cells to progress into their tumor stages were proposed. Of these fragments, a 420 bp alteration, absent in all 26 normal samples screened, was observed in 2 tumors. This fragment was cloned, sequenced and localized to chromosome 12p12.1. Within this region, candidate gene sex determining region Y-box 5 (SOX5) was proposed. Further studies of SOX5 in cell lines, xenografts and human prostate specimens, at both the RNA and protein levels, found overexpression of the gene in tumors. This overexpression was then subsequently found by fluorescent in situ hybridization to be caused by amplification of the region. In conclusion, our results suggest LCM coupled with SMAL-PCR DNA fingerprinting is a useful method for the screening and identification of chromosomal regions and genes associated with cancer development. Further, overexpression of SOX5 is associated with prostate tumor progression and early development of distant metastasis. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. A case-control study identifying chromosomal polymorphic variations as forms of epigenetic alterations associated with the infertility phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Athalye, Arundhati S; Madon, Prochi F

    2009-01-01

    To study the association of chromosomal polymorphic variations with infertility and subfertility.......To study the association of chromosomal polymorphic variations with infertility and subfertility....

  4. Influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase on DNA repair, chromosomal alterations, and mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, A.T.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Zwanenburg, T.S.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase such as 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) and benzamide (B) on the spontaneously occurring as well as mutagen induced chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and point mutations has been studied. In addition, the influence of 3AB on DNA repair was measured following treatment with physical and chemical mutagens. Post treatment of X-irradiated mammalian cells with 3AB increases the frequencies of induced chromosomal aberrations by a factor of 2 to 3. 3AB, when present in the medium containing bromodeoxyuridine(BrdUrd) during two cell cycles, increases the frequencies of SCEs in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) in a concentration dependent manner leading to about a 10-fold increase at 10 mM concentration. The extent of increase in the frequencies of SCEs due to 1 mM 3AB in several human cell lines has been studied, including those derived from patients suffering from genetic diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), Fanconi's anemia (FA), and Huntington's chorea. None of these syndromes showed any increased response when compared to normal cells. 3AB, however, increased the frequencies of spontaneously occurring chromosomal aberrations in A-T and FA cells. 3AB does not influence the frequencies of SCEs induced by UV or mitomycin C (MMC) in CHO cells. However, it increases the frequencies of SCEs induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Under the conditions in which 3AB increases the frequencies of spontaneously occurring as well as induced SCEs, it does not increase the frequencies of point mutations in hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) locus. 3AB does not influence the amount of repair replication following dimethylsulphate (DMS) treatment of human fibroblasts, or UV irradiated human lymphocytes.

  5. Chronic exposure to a low concentration of bisphenol A during follicle culture affects the epigenetic status of germinal vesicles and metaphase II oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapphoff, Tom; Heiligentag, Martyna; El Hajj, Nady; Haaf, Thomas; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether exposure to low concentrations of the endocrine disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA) during follicle culture and oocyte growth alters the methylation status of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of imprinted genes and histone posttranslational modification patterns in mammalian oocytes. Comparative and control study. Experimental laboratory. C57/Bl6JxCBA/Ca mice. Exposure of oocytes to 3 nM or 300 nM BPA during follicle culture from preantral to antral stage. Methylation status of DMRs of maternally imprinted (Snrpn, Igf2r, and Mest) and paternally imprinted gene(s) (H19) in mouse germinal vesicle oocytes; trimethylation of histone H3K9, acetylation of histone H4K12, and distance between centromeres of sister chromatids in metaphase II oocytes. Exposure to 3 nM BPA was associated with slightly accelerated follicle development, statistically significant increases in allele methylation errors in DMRs of maternally imprinted genes, and statistically significant decreases in histone H3K9 trimethylation and interkinetochore distance. The disturbances in oocyte genomic imprinting and modification of posttranslational histone and centromere architecture provide the first link between low BPA exposures and induction of epigenetic changes that may contribute to chromosome congression failures and meiotic errors, and to altered gene expression that might affect health of the offspring. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Aurora Kinase in Trypanosoma brucei plays distinctive roles in metaphase-anaphase transition and cytokinetic initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyin Li

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aurora B kinase is an essential regulator of chromosome segregation with the action well characterized in eukaryotes. It is also implicated in cytokinesis, but the detailed mechanism remains less clear, partly due to the difficulty in separating the latter from the former function in a growing cell. A chemical genetic approach with an inhibitor of the enzyme added to a synchronized cell population at different stages of the cell cycle would probably solve this problem. In the deeply branched parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, an Aurora B homolog, TbAUK1, was found to control both chromosome segregation and cytokinetic initiation by evidence from RNAi and dominant negative mutation. To clearly separate these two functions, VX-680, an inhibitor of TbAUK1, was added to a synchronized T. brucei procyclic cell population at different cell cycle stages. The unique trans-localization pattern of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC, consisting of TbAUK1 and two novel proteins TbCPC1 and TbCPC2, was monitored during mitosis and cytokinesis by following the migration of the proteins tagged with enhanced yellow fluorescence protein in live cells with time-lapse video microscopy. Inhibition of TbAUK1 function in S-phase, prophase or metaphase invariably arrests the cells in the metaphase, suggesting an action of TbAUK1 in promoting metaphase-anaphase transition. TbAUK1 inhibition in anaphase does not affect mitotic exit, but prevents trans-localization of the CPC from the spindle midzone to the anterior tip of the new flagellum attachment zone for cytokinetic initiation. The CPC in the midzone is dispersed back to the two segregated nuclei, while cytokinesis is inhibited. In and beyond telophase, TbAUK1 inhibition has no effect on the progression of cytokinesis or the subsequent G1, S and G2 phases until a new metaphase is attained. There are thus two clearly distinct points of TbAUK1 action in T. brucei: the metaphase-anaphase transition and

  7. The structure of chromosom 5 in interphase-nucleii of HeLa-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Claussen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In order to examine the structure of chromosoms during the interphase HeLa-cells were synchronised and preperated. In further steps visulaised we the chromosom5 with help of multicour-banding. It could be showed that the chromosom 5 has a similar structure during the interphase as a metaphase-chromosom.

  8. Altered expression of testis-specific genes, piRNAs, and transposons in the silkworm ovary masculinized by a W chromosome mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, femaleness is strongly controlled by the female-specific W chromosome. Originally, it was presumed that the W chromosome encodes female-determining gene(s), accordingly called Fem. However, to date, neither Fem nor any protein-coding gene has been identified from the W chromosome. Instead, the W chromosome is occupied with numerous transposon-related sequences. Interestingly, the silkworm W chromosome is a source of female-enriched PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). piRNAs are small RNAs of 23-30 nucleotides in length, which are required for controlling transposon activity in animal gonads. A recent study has identified a novel mutant silkworm line called KG, whose mutation in the W chromosome causes severe female masculinization. However, the molecular nature of KG line has not been well characterized yet. Results Here we molecularly characterize the KG line. Genomic PCR analyses using currently available W chromosome-specific PCR markers indicated that no large deletion existed in the KG W chromosome. Genetic analyses demonstrated that sib-crosses within the KG line suppressed masculinization. Masculinization reactivated when crossing KG females with wild type males. Importantly, the KG ovaries exhibited a significantly abnormal transcriptome. First, the KG ovaries misexpressed testis-specific genes. Second, a set of female-enriched piRNAs was downregulated in the KG ovaries. Third, several transposons were overexpressed in the KG ovaries. Conclusions Collectively, the mutation in the KG W chromosome causes broadly altered expression of testis-specific genes, piRNAs, and transposons. To our knowledge, this is the first study that describes a W chromosome mutant with such an intriguing phenotype. PMID:22452797

  9. Induction of chromosome aberrations and mitotic arrest by cytomegalovirus in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AbuBakar, S.; Au, W.W.; Legator, M.S.; Albrecht, T.

    1988-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is potentially an effective but often overlooked genotoxic agent in humans. We report here evidence that indicates that infection by CMV can induce chromosome alterations and mitotic inhibition. The frequency of chromosome aberrations induced was dependent on the input multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) for human lung fibroblasts (LU), but not for human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) when both cell types were infected at the GO phase of the cell cycle. The aberrations induced by CMV were mostly chromatid breaks and chromosome pulverizations that resembled prematurely condensed S-phase chromatin. Pulverized chromosomes were not observed in LU cells infected with virus stocks that had been rendered nonlytic by UV-irradiation at 24,000 ergs/mm2 or from infection of human lymphocytes. In LU cells infected with UV-irradiated CMV, the frequency of aberrations induced was inversely dependent on the extent of the exposure of the CMV stock to the UV-light. In permissive CMV infection of proliferating LU cells at 24 hr after subculture, a high percentage (greater than 40%) of the metaphase cells were arrested at their first metaphase and displayed severely condensed chromosomes when harvested 48 hr later. A significant increase (p less than 0.05) in the chromosome aberration frequency was also observed. Our study shows that CMV infection is genotoxic to host cells. The types and extent of damage are dependent on the viral genome expression and on the cell cycle stage of the cells at the time of infection. The possible mechanisms for induction of chromosome damage by CMV are discussed

  10. Unexpected rates of chromosomal instabilities and alterations of hormone levels in Namibian uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaire, R.; Notter, M.; Thiel, E.

    1997-01-01

    A common problem in determining the health consequences of radiation exposure is factoring out other carcinogenic influences. The conditions in Namibia provide a test case for distinguishing the effects of long-term low-dose exposure to uranium from the other environmental factors because of good air quality and the lack of other industries with negative health effects. Present records indicate a much higher prevalence of cancer among male workers in the open-pit uranium mine in Namibia compared with the general population. The objective of the present study was to determine whether long-term exposure to low doses of uranium increases the risk of a biological radiation damage which would lead to malignant diseases and to derive a dose-response model for these miners. To investigate this risk, we measured uranium excretion in urine, neutrophil counts and the serum level of FSH, LH and testosterone and analyzed chromosome aberrations in whole blood cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization. A representative cohort of 75 non-smoking, HIV-negative miners was compared to a control group of 31 individuals with no occupational history in mining. A sixfold increase in uranium excretion among the miners compared to the controls was recorded (P < 0.001). Furthermore, we determined a significant reduction in testosterone levels (P < 0.008) and neutrophil count (P < 0.0001). Most remarkably, cells with multiple aberrations such as open-quotes rogueclose quotes cells were observed for the first time in miners; these cells had previously been found only after short-term high-dose radiation exposure, e.g. from the Hiroshima atomic bomb or the Chernobyl accident. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  11. High resolution genome-wide analysis of chromosomal alterations in Burkitt's lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloua Toujani

    Full Text Available Additional chromosomal abnormalities are currently detected in Burkitt's lymphoma. They play major roles in the progression of BL and in prognosis. The genes involved remain elusive. A whole-genome oligonucleotide array CGH analysis correlated with karyotype and FISH was performed in a set of 27 Burkitt's lymphoma-derived cell lines and primary tumors. More than half of the 145 CNAs2 Mb, gains were found in 1q (12/27, 13q (7/27, 7q (6/27, 8q(4/27, 2p (3/27, 11q (2/27 and 15q (2/27. Losses were found in 3p (5/27, 4p (4/27, 4q (4/27, 9p (4/27, 13q (4/27, 6p (3/27, 17p (3/27, 6q (2/27,11pterp13 (2/27 and 14q12q21.3 (2/27. Twenty one minimal critical regions (MCR, (range 0.04-71.36 Mb, were delineated in tumors and cell lines. Three MCRs were localized to 1q. The proximal one was mapped to 1q21.1q25.2 with a 6.3 Mb amplicon (1q21.1q21.3 harboring BCA2 and PIAS3. In the other 2 MCRs, 1q32.1 and 1q44, MDM4 and AKT3 appeared as possible drivers of these gains respectively. The 13q31.3q32.1 MCR contained an amplicon and ABCC4 might be the driver of this amplicon. The 40 Kb 2p16.1 MCR was the smallest gained MCR and specifically encompassed the REL oncogene which is already implicated in B cell lymphomas. The most frequently deleted MCR was 3p14.1 that removed the fifth exon of FHIT. Further investigations which combined gene expression and functional studies are essential to understand the lymphomagenesis mechanism and for the development of more effective, targeted therapeutic strategies.

  12. Induction of premature chromosome condensation by calyculin A for bio dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, S.; Mozdarani, H.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Premature chromosome condensation is a method for interphase chromosome analysis in bio dosimetry. This study was performed to verify the usefulness of premature chromosome condensation induced by calyculin A in human peripheral blood lymphocytes for biological dosimetry and possible construction of dose-response curve. Materials and methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from a healthy donor and exposed to various doses(0.25- 4 Gy) of γ-rays. The frequency of simple breaks and dicentrics were scored in G 2/M chromosomes of Giemsa stained cells. Results:Results show that the frequency of simple chromosome breaks appears to increase linearly with dose; while the frequency of dicentrics apparently increases linear-quadratically with the dose. Conclusion: Induction of chromosome condensation by calyculin A is a powerful biodisimetric method, which provides a high number of spreads for analysis. With the use of this method, it is possible to overcome problems related to low mitotic index or cell-cycle alterations in routine metaphase analysis and low fusion rate in conventional Premature chromosome condensation technique

  13. Chromosomal Alterations and Gene Expression Changes Associated with the Progression of Leukoplakia to Advanced Gingivobuccal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka G. Bhosale

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an integrative genome-wide analysis that can be used to predict the risk of progression from leukoplakia to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC arising in the gingivobuccal complex (GBC. We find that the genomic and transcriptomic profiles of leukoplakia resemble those observed in later stages of OSCC and that several changes are associated with this progression, including amplification of 8q24.3, deletion of 8p23.2, and dysregulation of DERL3, EIF5A2, ECT2, HOXC9, HOXC13, MAL, MFAP5 and NELL2. Comparing copy number profiles of primary tumors with and without lymph-node metastasis, we identify alterations associated with metastasis, including amplifications of 3p26.3, 8q24.21, 11q22.1, 11q22.3 and deletion of 8p23.2. Integrative analysis reveals several biomarkers that have never or rarely been reported in previous OSCC studies, including amplifications of 1p36.33 (attributable to MXRA8, 3q26.31 (EIF5A2, 9p24.1 (CD274, and 12q13.2 (HOXC9 and HOXC13. Additionally, we find that amplifications of 1p36.33 and 11q22.1 are strongly correlated with poor clinical outcome. Overall, our findings delineate genomic changes that can be used in treatment management for patients with potentially malignant leukoplakia and OSCC patients with higher risk of lymph-node metastasis.

  14. New trends and techniques in chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: automation of chromosome analysis; storage of fixed cells from cultures of lymphocytes obtained routinely during periodic employee medical examinations; analysis of banded chromosomes; identification of first division metaphases; sister chromatid exchange; and patterns of aberration induction

  15. Supernumerary ring chromosome 20 characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Langen, Irene M.; Otter, Mariëlle A.; Aronson, Daniël C.; Overweg-Plandsoen, W.C.G.; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Leschot, Nico J.; Hoovers, Jan M.N.

    1996-01-01

    We report on a boy with mild dysmorphic features and developmental delay, in whom karyotyping showed an additional minute ring chromosome in 60% of metaphases. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a centromere specific probe demonstrated that the ring chromosome contained the centromeric

  16. Oligonucleotide arrays vs. metaphase-comparative genomic hybridisation and BAC arrays for single-cell analysis: first applications to preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Robertsonian translocation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈ 20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers.

  17. Oligonucleotide arrays vs. metaphase-comparative genomic hybridisation and BAC arrays for single-cell analysis: first applications to preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Robertsonian translocation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Ramos

    Full Text Available Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈ 20 kb. Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14(q10;q10. Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers.

  18. Oligonucleotide Arrays vs. Metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation and BAC Arrays for Single-Cell Analysis: First Applications to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Robertsonian Translocation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers. PMID:25415307

  19. Identification of the facultative heterochromatic X chromosome in females of 25 rodent species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, N; Yosida, T H

    1979-01-01

    Treatment of the chromosomes of 25 rodent species with a 50 degrees C hypotonic solution and Giemsa staining permitted identification of the heterochromatic X chromosome in 24 species. With this technique, the facultative of the heterochromatic X chromosome or the facultative portion of large, composite-type X chromosoms is stained darker than the other chromosomes, allowing it to be distinguished from the homologous euchromatic X chromosome in female metaphase cells. Intense staining of the single X chromosome was not observed in male metaphase cells. It is suggested that this differential staining of one of the two X chromosomes might be due to qualitative differences in chromosomal proteins rather than to differences in the degree of chromosomal condensation or in DNA base sequence.

  20. Analysis gives alterations stable chromosomic induced by the radiation in vitro the sanguine samples to well-known dose. Preliminary results obtained by means of chromosomic painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto, M.J.; Moreno, M.; Gomez-Espi, M.; Olivares, P.; Herranz, R.

    1998-01-01

    In the University General Hospital Gregorio Marannon, once standardized the technique in situ hybridization with fluorescence by means of painting chromosomic the couples 1 and 2 you this carrying out the irradiation gives sanguine samples to well-known dose The objective these irradiations it is the elaboration in vitro a calibration chart dose effect for gamma ray. This new curve will allow to estimate dose in individuals with suspicion overexposure to ionizing radiations, solving some gives the limitations that it presents the technique classic cytogenetics

  1. Procedure Improvement in Blood Processing for Chromosome Aberration Analyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noraisyah Mohd Yusof; Juliana Mahamad; Rahimah Abd Rahim; Yahaya Talib; Mohd Rodzi Ali

    2015-01-01

    Detection of chromosome at metaphase of the cell cycle is performed either manually or automatically. Procedure for slide preparation published by the IAEA does not guarantee that the quality of slide is suitable for automatic detection. The detection efficiency reduces if there is cells debris on slides. This paper describes the modifications made to the standard procedure. The period of hypotonic treatment to the cell was lengthened; the slides were pre-treated with RNase and the frequency of rinsing during the chromosomal coloring process was increased. Results show the metaphase images were better and clearer, and numbers of metaphase that can be detected automatically were also increased. In conclusion, modification to the current standard protocol helps to easy the process of chromosome aberration analysis at Nuclear Malaysia. (author)

  2. Chromosomal instability detected by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization and its relation to p3 alteration in prostate carcinoma in Saudi patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A.

    2005-01-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is a feature of human neoplasm. The p53 mutation has been shown to be associated with CIN in many human dysplastic and neoplastic lesions. The objective of this study was to examine CIN and p53 mutations in prostate carcinoma (Pca) resected from Saudi patients. Testing of p53 alterations using immunohistochemistry was performed on 28 archived prostatic carcinoma specimens containing Pca foci from Saudi patients seen at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Chrosomal instability was evaluated in the same tissues by interphase in situ hybridization (IFISH) using centromere probes for chromosomes 7 and 8. Immunochemistry and IFISH were performed at Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada in 2001. The p53 immunoreactivity was found in 29% in Pca and 0% in benign epithelium. Interphase in situ hybridization revealed numerical chromosomal alterations in keeping with CIN in 63% of p53 positive and 20% p53 negative Pca. No evidence of CIN was seen in non-neoplastic epithelium. We concluded that CIN as determined by IFISH is present in Pca from Saudi patients similarly to those reported in western countries. The p53 mutation occurs relatively infrequently in Pca and associated with the presence of CIN at least in a subset of Pca. (author)

  3. Chromosomal instability induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Marder, B.A.; Day, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence indicating genomic instability can manifest multiple generations after cellular exposure to DNA damaging agents. For instance, some cells surviving exposure to ionizing radiations show delayed reproductive cell death, delayed mutation and / or delayed chromosomal instability. Such instability, especially chromosome destabilization has been implicated in mutation, gene amplification, cellular transformation, and cell killing. To investigate chromosomal instability following DNA damage, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal rearrangements in a human/hamster somatic hybrid cell line following exposure to ionizing radiation. Delayed chromosomal instability was detected when multiple populations of uniquely arranged metaphases were observed in clonal isolates raised from single cells. The relationship between delayed chromosomal destabilization and other endpoints of genomic instability, namely; delayed mutation and gene amplification will be discussed, as will the potential cytogenetic and molecular mechanisms contributing to delayed chromosomal instability

  4. Delayed chromosomal instability induced by DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Marder, B.A.; Day, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Cellular exposure to DNA damaging agents rapidly results in a dose dependent increase in chromosomal breakage and gross structural chromosomal rearrangements. Over recent years, evidence has been accumulating indicating genomic instability can manifest multiple generations after cellular exposure to physical and chemical DNA damaging agents. Genomic instability manifests in the progeny of surviving cells, and has been implicated in mutation, gene application, cellular transformation, and cell killing. To investigate chromosome instability following DNA damage, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal rearrangements in a human/hamster somatic hybrid cell line following exposure to ionizing radiation. Delayed chromosomal instability was detected when multiple populations of uniquely arranged metaphases were observed in clonal isolates raised from single cells surviving X-irradiation many generations after exposure. At higher radiation doses, chromosomal instability was observed in a relatively high frequency of surviving clones and, in general, those clones showed delayed chromosome instability also showed reduced survival as measured by colony forming ability

  5. LOH at 16p13 is a novel chromosomal alteration detected in benign and malignant microdissected papillary neoplasms of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lininger, R A; Park, W S; Man, Y G; Pham, T; MacGrogan, G; Zhuang, Z; Tavassoli, F A

    1998-10-01

    Papillary carcinoma of the breast is a variant of predominantly intraductal carcinoma characterized by a papillary growth pattern with fibrovascular support. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was evaluated at multiple chromosomal loci (including loci reported to show frequent genetic alterations in breast cancer) to determine the frequency of genetic mutations in these tumors and their precursors. Thirty-three papillary lesions of the breast (6 papillary carcinomas, 12 carcinomas arising in a papilloma, and 15 intraductal papillomas with florid epithelial hyperplasia) were retrieved from the files of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP). Tumor cells and normal tissue were microdissected in each case and screened for LOH at INT-2 and p53 as well as several loci on chromosome 16p13 in the TSC2/PKD1 gene region (D16S423, D16S663, D16S665). LOH on chromosome 16p13 was present in 10 of 16 (63%) informative cases of either papillary carcinoma or carcinoma arising in a papilloma as well as in 6 of 10 (60%) informative cases of intraductal papilloma with florid epithelial hyperplasia (IDH). One case showed simultaneous LOH in both the florid IDH and carcinoma components of a papilloma. LOH was not observed at either INT-2 or p53 in any of the papillary carcinomas or papillomas with florid IDH. In conclusion, a high frequency of LOH at chromosome 16p13 (the TSC2/PKD1 gene region) is in both papillary carcinomas of the breast as well as in papillomas with florid IDH, including a case with LOH present simultaneously in both components. These findings suggest that chromosome 16p contains a tumor suppressor gene that frequently is mutated early in papillary neoplasia.

  6. Trisomy 11 as an Additional Chromosome Alteration in a Child with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia with Poor Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenice Ferreira Bastos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prognostic significance of the additional abnormalities to the t(15; 17 remains controversial. We report a case of promyelocytic leukemia (APL in a ten-year-old boy. Classical and molecular cytogenetic (FISH studies of a bone marrow sample obtained at diagnosis revealed the presence of trisomy of chromosome 11 as an additional chromosomal abnormality to the t(15; 17. The presence of the translocation t(15; 17, the cytogenetic marker of APL, is usually associated with good response to treatment with ATRA. In this case, although the patient had risk factors associated with good prognosis, he evolved and died quickly. So it seems that the presence of the trisomy 11 may be associated with disease progression and the poor outcome. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of t(15; 17 associated with trisomy of chromosome 11 in a child with APL.

  7. An approach to automated chromosome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Go, Roland

    1972-01-01

    The methods of approach developed with a view to automatic processing of the different stages of chromosome analysis are described in this study divided into three parts. Part 1 relates the study of automated selection of metaphase spreads, which operates a decision process in order to reject ail the non-pertinent images and keep the good ones. This approach has been achieved by Computing a simulation program that has allowed to establish the proper selection algorithms in order to design a kit of electronic logical units. Part 2 deals with the automatic processing of the morphological study of the chromosome complements in a metaphase: the metaphase photographs are processed by an optical-to-digital converter which extracts the image information and writes it out as a digital data set on a magnetic tape. For one metaphase image this data set includes some 200 000 grey values, encoded according to a 16, 32 or 64 grey-level scale, and is processed by a pattern recognition program isolating the chromosomes and investigating their characteristic features (arm tips, centromere areas), in order to get measurements equivalent to the lengths of the four arms. Part 3 studies a program of automated karyotyping by optimized pairing of human chromosomes. The data are derived from direct digitizing of the arm lengths by means of a BENSON digital reader. The program supplies' 1/ a list of the pairs, 2/ a graphic representation of the pairs so constituted according to their respective lengths and centromeric indexes, and 3/ another BENSON graphic drawing according to the author's own representation of the chromosomes, i.e. crosses with orthogonal arms, each branch being the accurate measurement of the corresponding chromosome arm. This conventionalized karyotype indicates on the last line the really abnormal or non-standard images unpaired by the program, which are of special interest for the biologist. (author) [fr

  8. Chromosome breakage in Vicia faba by ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetner, R H

    1958-02-15

    Meristem cells of Vicia faba roots were exposed to an atmosphere of ozone and the fraction of cells showing chromosome aberrations were recorded. Chromosome aberrations were observed on a dose-response basis after exposing the seeds to 0.4 wt. percent ozone for 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The results of ozone, x-rays, and ozone and x-ray treatments are presented. A small number of root tips from each group was treated with colchicine and an analysis made of metaphase aberrations. These observations confirmed that the aberrations were all of the chromosome-type.

  9. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia-associated chromosomal abnormalities and miRNA deregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiefer Y

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Yvonne Kiefer1, Christoph Schulte2, Markus Tiemann2, Joern Bullerdiek11Center for Human Genetics, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany; 2Hematopathology Hamburg, Hamburg, GermanyAbstract: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is the most common leukemia in adults. By cytogenetic investigations major subgroups of the disease can be identified that reflect different routes of tumor development. Of these chromosomal deviations, trisomy 12 and deletions of parts of either the long arm of chromosome 13, the long arm of chromosome 11, or the short arm of chromosome 17 are most commonly detected. In some of these aberrations the molecular target has been identified as eg, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM in case of deletions of chromosomal region 11q22~23 and the genes encoding microRNAs miR-15a/16-1 as likely targets of deletions of chromosomal band 13q14.3. Of note, these aberrations do not characterize independent subgroups but often coexist within the metaphases of one tumor. Generally, complex aberrations are associated with a worse prognosis than simple karyotypic alterations. Due to smaller sizes of the missing segment the detection of recurrent deletions is not always possible by means of classical cytogenetics but requires more advanced techniques as in particular fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Nevertheless, at this time it is not recommended to replace classical cytogenetics by FISH because this would miss additional information given by complex or secondary karyotypic alterations. However, the results of cytogenetic analyses allow the stratification of prognostic and predictive groups of the disease. Of these, the group characterized by deletions involving TP53 is clinically most relevant. In the future refined methods as eg, array-based comparative genomic hybridization will supplement the existing techniques to characterize CLL. Keywords: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chromosomal abnormality, miRNA deregulation

  10. Interphase Chromosome Profiling: A Method for Conventional Banded Chromosome Analysis Using Interphase Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Ramesh; Van Dyke, Daniel L; Dev, Vaithilingam G; Koduru, Prasad; Rao, Nagesh; Mitter, Navnit S; Liu, Mingya; Fuentes, Ernesto; Fuentes, Sarah; Papa, Stephen

    2018-02-01

    - Chromosome analysis on bone marrow or peripheral blood samples fails in a small proportion of attempts. A method that is more reliable, with similar or better resolution, would be a welcome addition to the armamentarium of the cytogenetics laboratory. - To develop a method similar to banded metaphase chromosome analysis that relies only on interphase nuclei. - To label multiple targets in an equidistant fashion along the entire length of each chromosome, including landmark subtelomere and centromere regions. Each label so generated by using cloned bacterial artificial chromosome probes is molecularly distinct with unique spectral characteristics, so the number and position of the labels can be tracked to identify chromosome abnormalities. - Interphase chromosome profiling (ICP) demonstrated results similar to conventional chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in 55 previously studied cases and obtained useful ICP chromosome analysis results on another 29 cases in which conventional methods failed. - ICP is a new and powerful method to karyotype peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate preparations without reliance on metaphase chromosome preparations. It will be of particular value for cases with a failed conventional analysis or when a fast turnaround time is required.

  11. Application and potentiality of laser micro-irradiation of chromosomes in animal and plant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H Liang; Wang, L L [Laboratory of Laser and Genetics, Institute of Genetics, Academia Sinica, Beijing (China)

    1990-01-01

    Full text: The classical methods of inducing genetic variation use chemical or physical mutagens applied to populations of cells. Since the development of laser techniques allows focussing a beam to a submicron spot, laser microsurgery of chromosomes was attempted. In mammalian cells, the nucleolus formation could be prevented. Also several chromosome damages were produced by focussing on specific chromosomes in prophase, metaphase and anaphase. Chromosomes of broad bean, maize, wheat, barley were dissected into small fragments. (author)

  12. ''Protective'' effect of cells gamma-irradiation at the metaphase of mitosis after UV-irradiation at the S-period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedeva, L I; Chubykin, V L [AN SSSR, Novosibirsk. Inst. Tsitologii i Genetiki

    1975-10-01

    As a result of the ultraviolet irradiation in vitro of the embryo fibroblasts of BALB mice in the S-stage with an incident dose of 40 erg/mm/sup 2/, 20.1% cells showed chromosome aberrations. Additional gamma irradiation of cells in the metaphase of the first mitosis with a dose of 5 krad leads with a high degree of certainty to a decrease to 11.7% in the frequency of aberrant cells observed in the same mitotic stage. The frequency of spontaneous aberrations does not change during the first few minutes after the gamma irradiation of intact cells. The ''protective'' effect of gamma rays cannot be attributed to non-uniform changes in the duration of the mitotic stages for aberrant and normal cells, to the adhesion of chromosome fragments or to the breaking of bridges in the anaphase. The destruction of cells during irradiation is also an unlikely explanation of the observed effect. It is assumed that the decrease in the frequency of aberrations is a result of the previously predicted modification of the processes involved, when potential chromosome damage becomes visible abberations during metaphase.

  13. Methods of scoring induced chromosome structural changes in barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoleff, H.; Gecheff, K.

    1976-01-01

    In barley, a material widely used in mutation and chromosomal aberration studies, the method most frequently used for scoring induced chromosomal changes is still anaphase analysis. In this paper, data obtained after treatment of barley with gamma-rays and ethyleneimine (EI) and comparative scoring of aberrations in metaphase and anaphase are reported and discussed. It is evident that the metaphase aberrations induced by gamma-rays and ethyleneimine, due probably to their specific location, showed a differential manifestation during anaphase. Thus, after treatment with ethyleneimine a great portion of the induced aberrations, being located preferentially at the centromere regions, gave no scorable bridges, and an apparent excess of fragments was observed at anaphase. After gamma-irradiation the differences between metaphase and anaphase scoring were mainly due to a large portion of fragments escaping detection

  14. Heavy ion-induced chromosomal aberrations analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durante, M.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Cella, L.; Greco, O.; George, K.; Yang, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells by the recent technique of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes. FISH-painting was used both in metaphase and interphase (prematurely condensed) chromosomes. The purpose of our experiments was to address the following problems: (a) the ratio of different types of aberrations as a function of radiation quality (search for biomarkers); (b) the ratio between aberrations scored in interphase and metaphase as a function of radiation quality (role of apoptosis); (c) differences between cytogenetic effects produced by different ions at the same LET (role of track structure). (orig./MG)

  15. Heavy ion-induced chromosomal aberrations analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durante, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Pugliese, M [Univ. ` ` Federico II` ` , Naples (Italy). Dept. of Physics; [INFN, Naples (Italy); Cella, L; Greco, O [Univ. ` ` Federico II` ` , Naples (Italy). Dept. of Physics; Furusawa, Y [NIRS, Chiba (Japan); George, K; Yang, T C [NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated the effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells by the recent technique of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes. FISH-painting was used both in metaphase and interphase (prematurely condensed) chromosomes. The purpose of our experiments was to address the following problems: (a) the ratio of different types of aberrations as a function of radiation quality (search for biomarkers); (b) the ratio between aberrations scored in interphase and metaphase as a function of radiation quality (role of apoptosis); (c) differences between cytogenetic effects produced by different ions at the same LET (role of track structure). (orig./MG)

  16. High resolution FISH on super-stretched flow-sorted plant chromosomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valárik, M.; Bartos, J.; Kovarova, P.; Kubalakova, M.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Dolezel, J.

    2004-01-01

    A novel high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) strategy, using super-stretched flow-sorted plant chromosomes as targets, is described. The technique that allows longitudinal extension of chromosomes of more than 100 times their original metaphase size is especially attractive for

  17. A device for extraction, manipulation and stretching of DNA from single human chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kristian Hagsted; Marie, Rodolphe; Moresco, Jacob Lange

    2011-01-01

    by time-lapse imaging; pressure-driven flow was then used to shunt the chromosomal DNA package into a nanoslit. A long linear DNA strand (>1.3 Mbp) was seen to stretch out from the DNA package and along the length of the nanoslit. Delivery of DNA in its native metaphase chromosome package as well...

  18. Amphitelic orientation of centromeres at metaphase I is an important ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-31

    Jul 31, 2014 ... sion of sister chromatids at AI without the second meiotic division (Matsuoka and .... level of chromosome pairing with 0.28 bivalents/PMC was seen in 20% of the ... The union of two such unreduced games could result in the ...

  19. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells leading to acute myeloid leukemia in mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobuhiko Ban; Tomoko Kusama

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (RI-AML) in mice is charaterized by deletion and/or rearrangement of chromosome 2. While chromosome 2 has been suspected to be a target of RI-AML, radiation-sensitive site of the chromosome might be implicated in the leukemogenesis. There were few cytogenetical studies, however, focusing on chromosomal rearrangements shortly after irradiation, and little was known about the frequency and pattern of chromosome 2 aberrations during the early period. In this study, metaphase samples were prepared from whole-body irradiated mice 24 hours after irradiation, most of the cells considered to be in the first mitotic stage. Distribution of chromosomal breakpoints on the metaphase samples were analyzed to study the relationship between chromosome aberrations and RI-AML. (author)

  20. Cytological evidence of chromosomal rearrangement in the second meiotic division after exposure to X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szemere, G. (Orvostudomanyi Egyetem, Szeged (Hungary). Orvosbiologiai Intezet)

    1982-01-01

    Metaphase II cells with unequal dyad-arms and obvious X/autosomal rearrangements were found after an exposure to X-rays (2 Gy) of male mice at different stages of meiosis (pachytene, diplotene and diakinesis) with a frequency of 0.2, 1.26 and 0.6%, respectively, giving a direct cytological evidence of structural chromosomal rearrangements in metaphase II cells, partly with autosomal and partly with X/autosomal partners.

  1. Cytological evidence of chromosomal rearrangement in the second meiotic division after exposure to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szemere, G.

    1982-01-01

    Metaphase II cells with unequal dyad-arms and obvious X/autosomal rearrangements were found after an exposure to X-rays (2 Gy) of male mice at different stages of meiosis (pachytene, diplotene and diakinesis) with a frequency of 0.2, 1.26 and 0.6%, respectively, giving a direct cytological evidence of structural chromosomal rearrangements in metaphase II cells, partly with autosomal and partly with X/autosomal partners. (author)

  2. A rapid, non-sacrificial chromosome preparation technique for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... centrifuges or sacrificing the specimen. In situations such as the induction of triploidy or tetraploidy, it is necessary to have a quick, reliable method of assessing the results of experimental design. The technique presented in this report provides numerous, well-spread metaphase chromosomes with a tissue handling time ...

  3. A rapid, non-sacrificial chromosome preparation technique for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1987-09-16

    Sep 16, 1987 ... Contribution to the knowledge of eggs and early larval stages of mullets ... Giemsa staining makes it possible to achieve good quality metaphase chromosome spreads using small fish without the use of sterile conditions, ... Genetic mechanisms of sex determination have been described for a number of ...

  4. P190B RhoGAP Regulates Chromosome Segregation in Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Melissa; Peddibhotla, Sirisha; McHenry, Peter; Chang, Peggy; Yochum, Zachary; Park, Ko Un; Sears, James Cooper; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Rho GTPases are overexpressed and hyperactivated in many cancers, including breast cancer. Rho proteins, as well as their regulators and effectors, have been implicated in mitosis, and their altered expression promotes mitotic defects and aneuploidy. Previously, we demonstrated that p190B Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) deficiency inhibits ErbB2-induced mammary tumor formation in mice. Here we describe a novel role for p190B as a regulator of mitosis. We found that p190B localized to centrosomes during interphase and mitosis, and that it is differentially phosphorylated during mitosis. Knockdown of p190B expression in MCF-7 and Hela cells increased the incidence of aberrant microtubule-kinetochore attachments at metaphase, lagging chromosomes at anaphase, and micronucleation, all of which are indicative of aneuploidy. Cell cycle analysis of p190B deficient MCF-7 cells revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cells with a concomitant decrease in cells in G1 and S phase, suggesting that p190B deficient cells die at the G1 to S transition. Chemical inhibition of the Rac GTPase during mitosis reduced the incidence of lagging chromosomes in p190B knockdown cells to levels detected in control cells, suggesting that aberrant Rac activity in the absence of p190B promotes chromosome segregation defects. Taken together, these data suggest that p190B regulates chromosome segregation and apoptosis in cancer cells. We propose that disruption of mitosis may be one mechanism by which p190B deficiency inhibits tumorigenesis

  5. P190B RhoGAP Regulates Chromosome Segregation in Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Melissa [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1234 Notre Dame Avenue, South Bend, IN 46617 (United States); Peddibhotla, Sirisha [Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, John P. McGovern Campus, NABS-0250, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); McHenry, Peter [Department of Biology, Southwestern Adventist University, 100 W. Hillcrest, Keene, TX 76059 (United States); Chang, Peggy; Yochum, Zachary; Park, Ko Un; Sears, James Cooper; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy, E-mail: vargo-gogola.1@nd.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1234 Notre Dame Avenue, South Bend, IN 46617 (United States)

    2012-04-25

    Rho GTPases are overexpressed and hyperactivated in many cancers, including breast cancer. Rho proteins, as well as their regulators and effectors, have been implicated in mitosis, and their altered expression promotes mitotic defects and aneuploidy. Previously, we demonstrated that p190B Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) deficiency inhibits ErbB2-induced mammary tumor formation in mice. Here we describe a novel role for p190B as a regulator of mitosis. We found that p190B localized to centrosomes during interphase and mitosis, and that it is differentially phosphorylated during mitosis. Knockdown of p190B expression in MCF-7 and Hela cells increased the incidence of aberrant microtubule-kinetochore attachments at metaphase, lagging chromosomes at anaphase, and micronucleation, all of which are indicative of aneuploidy. Cell cycle analysis of p190B deficient MCF-7 cells revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cells with a concomitant decrease in cells in G1 and S phase, suggesting that p190B deficient cells die at the G1 to S transition. Chemical inhibition of the Rac GTPase during mitosis reduced the incidence of lagging chromosomes in p190B knockdown cells to levels detected in control cells, suggesting that aberrant Rac activity in the absence of p190B promotes chromosome segregation defects. Taken together, these data suggest that p190B regulates chromosome segregation and apoptosis in cancer cells. We propose that disruption of mitosis may be one mechanism by which p190B deficiency inhibits tumorigenesis.

  6. Cyclophosphamide and acrolein induced oxidative stress leading to deterioration of metaphase II mouse oocyte quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeelani, Roohi; Khan, Sana N; Shaeib, Faten; Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Aldhaheri, Sarah R; Najafi, Tohid; Thakur, Mili; Morris, Robert; Abu-Soud, Husam M

    2017-09-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CTX) is a chemotherapeutic agent widely used to treat ovarian, breast, and hematological cancers as well as autoimmune disorders. Such chemotherapy is associated with reproductive failure and premature ovarian insufficiency. The mechanism by which CTX and/or its main metabolite, acrolein, affect female fertility remains unclear, but it is thought to be caused by an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we investigated the effect of CTX on metaphase II mouse oocytes obtained from treated animals (120mg/kg, 24h of single treatment), and oocytes directly exposed to increasing concentrations of CTX and acrolein (n=480; 0, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100μM) with and without cumulus cells (CCs) for 45min which correlates to the time of maximum peak plasma concentrations after administration. Oocytes were fixed and subjected to indirect immunofluorescence and were scored based on microtubule spindle structure (MT) and chromosomal alignment (CH). Generation of ROS was evaluated using the Cellular Reactive Oxygen Species Detection Assay Kit. Deterioration of oocyte quality was noted when oocytes were obtained from CTX treated mice along with CTX and acrolein treated oocytes in a dose-dependent manner as shown by an increase in poor scores. Acrolein had an impact at a significantly lower level as compared to CTX, plateau at 10μM versus 50μM, respectively. These variation is are associated with the higher amount of ROS generated with acrolein exposure as compared to CTX (pacrolein scavengers may mitigate the damaging effects of these compounds and help women undergoing such treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Impact of chromosome alterations, genetic mutations and clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP) on the classification and risk stratification of MDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Bani Bandana; Banerjee, Debasis; Agarwal, Mohan B

    2018-03-01

    The advent of technological development has undoubtedly advanced biological and molecular inputs for better understanding the heterogeneous hematopoietic pre-malignant disorder of the stem cells known as myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Chromosomal rearrangements, including del(3q/5q/7q/11q/12p/20q), loss of 5/7/Y, trisomy 8/19, i(17q), etc. frequently detected in MDS with variable frequencies and combinations, are the integral components of the 5-tier risk-stratification and WHO-2016 classification. Observations on mutations in genes involved in RNA-splicing, DNA methylation, chromatin modification, transcription factor, signal transduction/kinases, RAS pathway, cohesin complex, DNA repair and other pathways have given insights in independent effects and biological interaction of co-occurrence on disease-phenotype and treatment outcome. However, recent concepts of clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP) and idiopathic cytopenia of undetermined significance (ICUS) have urged a re-definition of mutational events in non-clonal cytopenia and non-MDS healthy elderly but with a higher risk of overt leukemia. Considering gene mutations, chromosomal alterations, CHIP, ICUS and their significance in classification and risk-scoring certainly presents a comprehensive picture of disease-phenotype towards better understanding of MDS-pathogenesis, its evolution to AML and its response to therapeutic agents. The present review summarizes chromosomal and gene mutations, co-existence of mutational complexity, and WHO-2016 classification and risk-stratifications of MDS to facilitate a better understanding of its pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Microdissection and Chromosome Painting of the Alien Chromosome in an Addition Line of Wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R.-C.; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th . intermedium . Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th . intermedium , 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th . intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a Js genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (Js, J and St) in Th . intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th . bessarabicum . Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the Js genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th . intermedium . Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different

  9. The multiple roles of Bub1 in chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Venkatachalam, Sundaresan

    2009-06-19

    Aneuploidy, any deviation from an exact multiple of the haploid number of chromosomes, is a common occurrence in cancer and represents the most frequent chromosomal disorder in newborns. Eukaryotes have evolved mechanisms to assure the fidelity of chromosome segregation during cell division that include a multiplicity of checks and controls. One of the main cell division control mechanisms is the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) that monitors the proper attachment of chromosomes to spindle fibers and prevents anaphase until all kinetochores are properly attached. The mammalian SAC is composed by at least 14 evolutionary-conserved proteins that work in a coordinated fashion to monitor the establishment of amphitelic attachment of all chromosomes before allowing cell division to occur. Among the SAC proteins, the budding uninhibited by benzimidazole protein 1 (Bub1), is a highly conserved protein of prominent importance for the proper functioning of the SAC. Studies have revealed many roles for Bub1 in both mitosis and meiosis, including the localization of other SAC proteins to the kinetochore, SAC signaling, metaphase congression and the protection of the sister chromatid cohesion. Recent data show striking sex specific differences in the response to alterations in Bub1 activity. Proper Bub1 functioning is particularly important during oogenesis in preventing the generation of aneuploid gametes that can have detrimental effects on the health status of the fetus and the newborn. These data suggest that Bub1 is a master regulator of SAC and chromosomal segregation in both mitosis and meiosis. Elucidating its many essential functions in regulating proper chromosome segregation can have important consequences for preventing tumorigenesis and developmental abnormalities.

  10. Metaphase FISH on a Chip: Miniaturized Microfluidic Device for Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Dimaki, Maria

    2010-01-01

    -FISH, the process continues to be a manual, labour intensive, expensive and time consuming technique, often taking over 3-5 days, even in dedicated labs. We have developed a novel microFISH device to perform metaphase FISH on a chip which overcomes many shortcomings of the current laboratory protocols. This work...... also introduces a novel splashing device for preparing metaphase spreads on a microscope glass slide, followed by a rapid adhesive tape-based bonding protocol leading to rapid fabrication of the microFISH device. The microFISH device allows for an optimized metaphase FISH protocol on a chip with over...... a 20-fold reduction in the reagent volume. This is the first demonstration of metaphase FISH on a microfluidic device and offers a possibility of automation and significant cost reduction of many routine diagnostic tests of genetic anomalies....

  11. A large scale survey reveals that chromosomal copy-number alterations significantly affect gene modules involved in cancer initiation and progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigudosa Juan C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent observations point towards the existence of a large number of neighborhoods composed of functionally-related gene modules that lie together in the genome. This local component in the distribution of the functionality across chromosomes is probably affecting the own chromosomal architecture by limiting the possibilities in which genes can be arranged and distributed across the genome. As a direct consequence of this fact it is therefore presumable that diseases such as cancer, harboring DNA copy number alterations (CNAs, will have a symptomatology strongly dependent on modules of functionally-related genes rather than on a unique "important" gene. Methods We carried out a systematic analysis of more than 140,000 observations of CNAs in cancers and searched by enrichments in gene functional modules associated to high frequencies of loss or gains. Results The analysis of CNAs in cancers clearly demonstrates the existence of a significant pattern of loss of gene modules functionally related to cancer initiation and progression along with the amplification of modules of genes related to unspecific defense against xenobiotics (probably chemotherapeutical agents. With the extension of this analysis to an Array-CGH dataset (glioblastomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas we demonstrate the validity of this approach to investigate the functional impact of CNAs. Conclusions The presented results indicate promising clinical and therapeutic implications. Our findings also directly point out to the necessity of adopting a function-centric, rather a gene-centric, view in the understanding of phenotypes or diseases harboring CNAs.

  12. On-line sorting of human chromosomes by centromeric index, and identification of sorted populations by GTG-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, G. A.; Rens, W.; Manders, E.; van Oven, C.; Barendsen, G. W.; Aten, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Using slit-scan flow cytometry, the shape of human metaphase chromosomes, as expressed in their centromeric index (CI), and the DNA content of the chromosomes have been used as parameters in bivariate flow karyotyping. The resolution of the DNA vs CI flow karyogram of the larger chromosomes up to

  13. Chromosome behaviour in Rhoeo spathacea var. variegata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y J

    1980-01-01

    Rhoeo spathacea var. variegata is unusual in that its twelve chromosomes are arranged in a ring at meiosis. The order of the chromosomes has been established, and each chromosome arm has been designated a letter in accordance with the segmental interchange theory. Chromosomes are often irregularly orientated at metaphase I. Chromosomes at anaphase I are generally distributed equally (6-6, 58.75%) although not necessarily balanced. Due to adjacent distribution, 7-5 distribution at anaphase I was frequently observed (24.17%), and due to lagging, 6-1-5 and 5-2-5 distributions were also observed (10.83% and 3.33% respectively). Three types of abnormal distribution, 8-4, 7-1-4 and 6-2-4 were observed very infrequently (2.92% total), and their possible origins are discussed. Irregularities, such as adjacent distribution and lagging, undoubtedly reduce the fertility of the plant because of the resulting unbalanced gametes.

  14. Drug-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) protocols: cytogenetic approaches in mitotic chromosome and interphase chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Eisuke

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is a fundamental technique which is used in wide areas of cytogenetic study including karyotyping species, hereditary diseases diagnosis, or chromosome biology study. Chromosomes are usually prepared from mitotic cells arrested by colcemid block protocol. However, obtaining mitotic chromosomes is often hampered under several circumstances. As a result, cytogenetic analysis will be sometimes difficult or even impossible in such cases. Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) (see Note 1) is an alternative method that has proved to be a unique and useful way in chromosome analysis. Former, PCC has been achieved following cell fusion method (cell-fusion PCC) mediated either by fusogenic viruses (e.g., Sendai virus) or cell fusion chemicals (e.g., polyethylene glycol), but the cell fusion PCC has several drawbacks. The novel drug-induced PCC using protein phosphatase inhibitors was introduced about 20 years ago. This method is much simpler and easier even than the conventional mitotic chromosome preparation protocol use with colcemid block and furthermore obtained PCC index (equivalent to mitotic index for metaphase chromosome) is usually much higher than colcemid block method. Moreover, this method allows the interphase chromatin to be condensed to visualize like mitotic chromosomes. Therefore drug-induced PCC has opened the way for chromosome analysis not only in metaphase chromosomes but also in interphase chromatin. The drug-induced PCC has thus proven the usefulness in cytogenetics and other cell biology fields. For this second edition version, updated modifications/changes are supplemented in Subheadings 2, 3, and 4, and a new section describing the application of PCC in chromosome science fields is added with citation of updated references.

  15. Nanometer-Scale Dissection of Chromosomes by Atomic Force Microscopy Combined with Heat-Denaturing Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Kazumi; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shichiri, Motoharu; Yoshino, Tomoyuki; Ohtani, Toshio; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a method for dissecting chromosome fragments with a size of a few hundred nanometers by atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using this method, we demonstrated reproducible dissections of silkworm chromosomes in the pachytene phase. The dissected fragments were successfully recovered on the cantilever tips, as confirmed by fluorescent microscopy using fluorescent stained chromosomes. To recover dissected chromosome fragments from a larger chromosome, such as the human metaphase chromosome of a somatic cell, heat denaturation was found to be effective. Further improvements in this method may lead to a novel tool for isolating valuable genes and/or investigating local genome structures in the near future.

  16. Chromosomes and their meiotic behaviour in two species of Dieuches Dohrn, 1860 (Heteroptera: Lygaeidae: Rhyparochromini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harbhajan Kaur

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Lygaeidae (Heteroptera are a large and diverse family in which the male diploid chromosomal complement ranges from 10 to 30. Diploid numbers of 14 and 16 are taken as two modal numbers of the family. The Rhyparochrominae, one of the largest subfamilies of the Lygaeidae, are known to be heterogeneous both cytologically and morphologically. Available data on the tribe Rhyparochromini reveal that all species are characterized by the presence of a pair of microchromosomes (m-chromosomes and have an XY/XX (♂/♀ sex chromosome determining system. Dieuches coloratus (Distant, 1909 and D. insignis (Distant, 1918 belonging to Rhyparochromini, have 2n=14=10A+2m+XY and 2n=12=8A+2m+XY respectively. Both the species are similar inone pair of distinctly large autosomes in their chromosome complements. The metaphase plate arrangement of autosomes, sex chromosomes and m-chromosomes in D. coloratus is similar to the common condition observed in the tribe Rhyparochromini. In D. insignis, however, the arrangement is different. Here, metaphase I is usual in showing peripheral position of autosomes and central position of sex chromosomes and m-chromosomes. At metaphase II, however, autosomes, sex chromosomes and m-chromosomes are peripherally placed, an arrangement, which is not reported earlier in the tribe Rhyparochromini.

  17. Roles of Cohesin and Condensin in Chromosome Dynamics During Mammalian Meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    LEE, Jibak

    2013-01-01

    Meiosis is a key step for sexual reproduction in which chromosome number is halved by two successive meiotic divisions after a single round of DNA replication. In the first meiotic division (meiosis I), homologous chromosomes pair, synapse, and recombine with their partners in prophase I. As a result, homologous chromosomes are physically connected until metaphase I and then segregated from each other at the onset of anaphase I. In the subsequent second meiotic division (meiosis II), sister c...

  18. Possible mechanisms of chromosome aberrations. 2. Formation of aberrations after UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, L.I.

    1982-01-01

    One of mechanisms of chromosome aberrations after UV-radiation of animal cells initiated by thymine dimerization from different dna threads (by cross joints) and finished in mitosis metaphase is discussed. The model of aberration formation, taking a count of peculiarities of chromosome ansate structure and predicting the important role of chromosome isolation during mitosis in realization of structural aberrations, is suggested. An attempt to present aberration formation under conditions of exact repair is the distinguishing feature of the model

  19. Common chromosomal fragile sites (CFS) may be involved in normal and traumatic cognitive stress memory consolidation and altered nervous system immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, G S

    2010-05-01

    Previous reports of specific patterns of increased fragility at common chromosomal fragile sites (CFS) found in association with certain neurobehavioural disorders did not attract attention at the time due to a shift towards molecular approaches to delineate neuropsychiatric disorder candidate genes. Links with miRNA, altered methylation and the origin of copy number variation indicate that CFS region characteristics may be part of chromatinomic mechanisms that are increasingly linked with neuroplasticity and memory. Current reports of large-scale double-stranded DNA breaks in differentiating neurons and evidence of ongoing DNA demethylation of specific gene promoters in adult hippocampus may shed new light on the dynamic epigenetic changes that are increasingly appreciated as contributing to long-term memory consolidation. The expression of immune recombination activating genes in key stress-induced memory regions suggests the adoption by the brain of this ancient pattern recognition and memory system to establish a structural basis for long-term memory through controlled chromosomal breakage at highly specific genomic regions. It is furthermore considered that these mechanisms for management of epigenetic information related to stress memory could be linked, in some instances, with the transfer of the somatically acquired information to the germline. Here, rearranged sequences can be subjected to further selection and possible eventual retrotranscription to become part of the more stable coding machinery if proven to be crucial for survival and reproduction. While linkage of cognitive memory with stress and fear circuitry and memory establishment through structural DNA modification is proposed as a normal process, inappropriate activation of immune-like genomic rearrangement processes through traumatic stress memory may have the potential to lead to undesirable activation of neuro-inflammatory processes. These theories could have a significant impact on the

  20. Genome and gene alterations by insertions and deletions in the evolution of human and chimpanzee chromosome 22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volfovsky Natalia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding structure and function of human genome requires knowledge of genomes of our closest living relatives, the primates. Nucleotide insertions and deletions (indels play a significant role in differentiation that underlies phenotypic differences between humans and chimpanzees. In this study, we evaluated distribution, evolutionary history, and function of indels found by comparing syntenic regions of the human and chimpanzee genomes. Results Specifically, we identified 6,279 indels of 10 bp or greater in a ~33 Mb alignment between human and chimpanzee chromosome 22. After the exclusion of those in repetitive DNA, 1,429 or 23% of indels still remained. This group was characterized according to the local or genome-wide repetitive nature, size, location relative to genes, and other genomic features. We defined three major classes of these indels, using local structure analysis: (i those indels found uniquely without additional copies of indel sequence in the surrounding (10 Kb region, (ii those with at least one exact copy found nearby, and (iii those with similar but not identical copies found locally. Among these classes, we encountered a high number of exactly repeated indel sequences, most likely due to recent duplications. Many of these indels (683 of 1,429 were in proximity of known human genes. Coding sequences and splice sites contained significantly fewer of these indels than expected from random expectations, suggesting that selection is a factor in limiting their persistence. A subset of indels from coding regions was experimentally validated and their impacts were predicted based on direct sequencing in several human populations as well as chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and two subspecies of orangutans. Conclusion Our analysis demonstrates that while indels are distributed essentially randomly in intergenic and intronic genomic regions, they are significantly under-represented in coding sequences. There are

  1. Time course of enhancement of chromosomal aberration production in human lyphocytes by post-treatment with aphidicolin following X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have shown earlier that the DNA polymerase inhibitor, aphidicolin, enhances the production of chromosomal aberration by X-rays when administered as a post-treatment. The effect is marked in metaphases collected for the first hour or two following irradiation. Because the yield of X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations falls rapidly with increasing irradiation-fixation interval in G 2 cells it is possible that a difference in yield between cells post-treated with a drug like aphidicolin and those not-treated could arise simply through alteration of the time required for post-treated cells to reach metaphase. The results of the present experiments agree with those of the earlier one in that the X-ray and X-ray plus 1.5 h 5 x 10 -5 M aphidicolin post-treatment-induced chromatid aberration yield fall very rapidly with increasing X-ray-fixation interval, with the marked excess caused by the post-treatment rapidly disappearing and the yield for post-treated samples fixed between 3 and 6 h post-irradiation becoming no greater than those for samples treated with X-rays alone. The answer to the question of whether the yields increase again at later irradiation-fixation intervals, though complicated by the greater delay in aphidicolin post-treated samples and by admixture at later fixation times of metaphases that were in G 1 when irradiated, appears clearly to be yes. (author). 15 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  2. Simultaneous scoring of 10 chromosomes (9,13,14,15,16,18,21,22,X, and Y) in interphase nuclei by using spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Jingly; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Goldberg, James D.; Pedersen, Roger A.

    1999-06-01

    Numerical aberrations involving parts of or entire chromosomes have detrimental effects on mammalian embryonic, and perinatal development. Only few fetuses with chromosomal imbalances survive to term, and their abnormalities lead to stillbirth or cause severely altered phenotypes in the offspring (such as trisomies involving chromosomes 13, 18, 21, and anomalies of X, and Y). Because aneuploidy of any of the 24 chromosomes will have significant consequences, an optimized preimplantation and prenatal genetic diagnosis (PGD) test will score all the chromosomes. Since most cells to be analyzed will be in interphase rather than metaphase, we developed a rapid procedure for the analysis of interphase cells such as lymphocytes, amniocytes, or early embryonic cells (blastomeres). Our approach was based on in situ hybridization of chromosome-specific non-isotopically labeled DNA probes and Spectral Imaging. The Spectral Imaging system uses an interferometer instead of standard emission filters in a fluorescence microscope to record high resolution spectra from fluorescently stained specimens. This bio-imaging system combines the techniques of fluorescence optical microscopy, charged coupled device imaging, Fourier spectroscopy, light microscopy, and powerful analysis software. The probe set used here allowed simultaneous detection of 10 chromosomes (9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 21, 22, X, Y) in interphase nuclei. Probes were obtained commercially or prepared in-house. Following 16 - 40 h hybridization to interphase cells and removal of unbound probes, image spectra (range 450 - 850 nm, resolution 10 nm) were recorded and analyzed using an SD200 Spectral Imaging system (ASI, Carlsbad, CA). Initially some amniocytes were unscoreable due to their thickness, and fixation protocols had to be modified to achieve satisfactory results. In summary, this study shows the simultaneous detection of at least 10 different chromosomes in interphase cells using a novel approach for multi-chromosome

  3. Laser uv microirradiation of interphase nuclei and post-treatment with caffeine. A new approach to establish the arrangement of interphase chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorn, C; Cremer, T; Cremer, C; Zimmer, J

    1977-12-29

    Laser uv microirradiation of Chinese hamster interphase cells combined with caffeine post-treatment produced different patterns of chromosome damage in mitosis following irradiation of a small area of the nucleus that may be classified in three categories: (I) intact metaphase figures, (II) chromosome damage confined to a small area of the metaphase spread, (III) mitotic figures with damage on all chromosomes. Category III might be the consequence of a non-localized distortion of nuclear metabolism. By contrast, category II may reflect localized DNA damage induced by microirradiation, which could not be efficiently repaired due to the effect of caffeine. If this interpretation is right, in metaphase figures of category II chromosome damage should occur only at the irradiation site. The effect might then be used to investigate neighbourhood relationships of individual chromosomes in the interphase nucleus.

  4. Radiation exposure and chromosome damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.

    1979-01-01

    Chromosome damage is discussed as a means of biologically measuring radiation exposure to the body. Human lymphocytes are commonly used for this test since the extent of chromosome damage induced is related to the exposure dose. Several hundred lymphocytes are analysed in metaphase for chromosome damage, particularly dicentrics. The dose estimate is made by comparing the observed dicentric yield against calibration curves, previously produced by in vitro irradiation of blood samples to known doses of different types of radiation. This test is useful when there is doubt that the film badge has recorded a reasonable whole body dose and also when there is an absence of any physical data. A case of deliberate exposure is described where the chromosome damage test estimated an exposure of 152 rads. The life span of cell aberrations is also considered. Regular checks on radiotherapy patients and some accidental overdose cases have shown little reduction in the aberration levels over the first six weeks after which the damage disappears slowly with a half-life of about three years. In conclusion, chromosome studies have been shown to be of value in resolving practical problems in radiological protection. (U.K.)

  5. Protocol for chromosome-specific probe construction using PRINS, micromanipulation and DOP-PCR techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULO Z. PASSAMANI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Chromosome-specific probes have been widely used in molecular cytogenetics, being obtained with different methods. In this study, a reproducible protocol for construction of chromosome-specific probes is proposed which associates in situ amplification (PRINS, micromanipulation and degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR. Human lymphocyte cultures were used to obtain metaphases from male and female individuals. The chromosomes were amplified via PRINS, and subcentromeric fragments of the X chromosome were microdissected using microneedles coupled to a phase contrast microscope. The fragments were amplified by DOP-PCR and labeled with tetramethyl-rhodamine-5-dUTP. The probes were used in fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH procedure to highlight these specific regions in the metaphases. The results show one fluorescent red spot in male and two in female X chromosomes and interphase nuclei.

  6. Age-Associated Lipidome Changes in Metaphase II Mouse Oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuck Jun Mok

    Full Text Available The quality of mammalian oocytes declines with age, which negatively affects fertilization and developmental potential. The aging process often accompanies damages to macromolecules such as proteins, DNA, and lipids. To investigate if aged oocytes display an altered lipidome compared to young oocytes, we performed a global lipidomic analysis between oocytes from 4-week-old and 42 to 50-week-old mice. Increased oxidative stress is often considered as one of the main causes of cellular aging. Thus, we set up a group of 4-week-old oocytes treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, a commonly used oxidative stressor, to compare if similar lipid species are altered between aged and oxidative-stressed oocytes. Between young and aged oocytes, we identified 26 decreased and 6 increased lipids in aged oocytes; and between young and H2O2-treated oocytes, we identified 35 decreased and 26 increased lipids in H2O2-treated oocytes. The decreased lipid species in these two comparisons were overlapped, whereas the increased lipid species were distinct. Multiple phospholipid classes, phosphatidic acid (PA, phosphatidylinositol (PI, phosphatidylserine (PS, and lysophosphatidylserine (LPS significantly decreased both in H2O2-treated and aged oocytes, suggesting that the integrity of plasma membrane is similarly affected under these conditions. In contrast, a dramatic increase in diacylglycerol (DG was only noted in H2O2-treated oocytes, indicating that the acute effect of H2O2-caused oxidative stress is distinct from aging-associated lipidome alteration. In H2O2-treated oocytes, the expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 increased along with increases in phosphatidylcholine. Overall, our data reveal that several classes of phospholipids are affected in aged oocytes, suggesting that the integrity of plasma membrane is associated with maintaining fertilization and developmental potential of mouse oocytes.

  7. Chromosomal instability in mouse embryonic fibroblasts null for the transcriptional co-repressor Ski.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelain, Katherine; Armisen, Ricardo; Aguirre, Adam; Ueki, Nobuhide; Toro, Jessica; Colmenares, Clemencia; Hayman, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Ski is a transcriptional regulator that has been considered an oncoprotein given its ability to induce oncogenic transformation in avian model systems. However, studies in mouse and in some human tumor cells have also indicated a tumor suppressor activity for this protein. We found that Ski-/- mouse embryo fibroblasts exhibit high levels of genome instability, namely aneuploidy, consistent with a tumor suppressor function for Ski. Time-lapse microscopy revealed lagging chromosomes and chromatin/chromosome bridges as the major cause of micronuclei (MN) formation and the subsequent aneuploidy. Although these cells arrested in mitosis after treatment with spindle disrupting drugs and exhibited a delayed metaphase/anaphase transition, spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) was not sufficient to prevent chromosome missegregation, consistent with a weakened SAC. Our in vivo analysis also showed dynamic metaphase plate rearrangements with switches in polarity in cells arrested in metaphase. Importantly, after ectopic expression of Ski the cells that displayed this metaphase arrest died directly during metaphase or after aberrant cell division, relating SAC activation and mitotic cell death. This increased susceptibility to undergo mitosis-associated cell death reduced the number of MN-containing cells. The presented data support a new role for Ski in the mitotic process and in maintenance of genetic stability, providing insights into the mechanism of tumor suppression mediated by this protein. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  9. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chuanliang; Bai, Lili; Fu, Shulan; Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R-C; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a J(s) genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (J(s) , J and St) in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the J(s) genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different

  10. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanliang Deng

    Full Text Available In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome and pDbH12 (a J(s genome specific probe as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (J(s , J and St in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the J(s genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of

  11. 3-GROUP METAPHASE AS A MORPHOLOGIC CRITERION OF PROGRESSIVE CERVICAL INTRAEPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOURITS, MJE; PIETERS, WJLM; HOLLEMA, H; BURGER, MPM

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of our study was to investigate the presence of three-group metaphase in progressive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective histologic study on the conization specimens of 41 women with microinvasive cervical carcinoma, 28 of whom were

  12. Three-group metaphase as a morphologic criterion of progressive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M. J.; Pieters, W. J.; Hollema, H.; Burger, M. P.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of our study was to investigate the presence of three-group metaphase in progressive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective histologic study on the conization specimens of 41 women with microinvasive cervical carcinoma, 28 of whom were

  13. Inhibition of colorectal cancer genomic copy number alterations and chromosomal fragile site tumor suppressor FHIT and WWOX deletions by DNA mismatch repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelincik, Ozkan; Blecua, Pedro; Edelmann, Winfried; Kucherlapati, Raju; Zhou, Kathy; Jasin, Maria; Gümüş, Zeynep H.; Lipkin, Steven M.

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) enables precise DNA repair after DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) using identical sequence templates, whereas homeologous recombination (HeR) uses only partially homologous sequences. Homeologous recombination introduces mutations through gene conversion and genomic deletions through single-strand annealing (SSA). DNA mismatch repair (MMR) inhibits HeR, but the roles of mammalian MMR MutL homologues (MLH1, PMS2 and MLH3) proteins in HeR suppression are poorly characterized. Here, we demonstrate that mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) carrying Mlh1, Pms2, and Mlh3 mutations have higher HeR rates, by using 7,863 uniquely mapping paired direct repeat sequences (DRs) in the mouse genome as endogenous gene conversion and SSA reporters. Additionally, when DSBs are induced by gamma-radiation, Mlh1, Pms2 and Mlh3 mutant MEFs have higher DR copy number alterations (CNAs), including DR CNA hotspots previously identified in mouse MMR-deficient colorectal cancer (dMMR CRC). Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas CRC data revealed that dMMR CRCs have higher genome-wide DR HeR rates than MMR proficient CRCs, and that dMMR CRCs have deletion hotspots in tumor suppressors FHIT/WWOX at chromosomal fragile sites FRA3B and FRA16D (which have elevated DSB rates) flanked by paired homologous DRs and inverted repeats (IR). Overall, these data provide novel insights into the MMR-dependent HeR inhibition mechanism and its role in tumor suppression. PMID:29069730

  14. Radiation hybrid mapping of human chromosome 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francke, U.; Moon, A.J.; Chang, E.; Foellmer, B.; Strauss, B.; Haschke, A.; Chihlin Hsieh; Geigl, E.M.; Welch, S.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have generated a Chinese hamster V79/380-6 HPRT minus x human leukocyte hybrid cell line (18/V79) with chromosome 18 as the only human chromosome that is retained at high frequency without specific selection. Hybrid cells were selected in HAT medium, and 164 individual colonies were isolated. Of 110 colonies screened for human DNA by PCR amplification using a primer specific for human Alu repeats 67 (61%) were positive. These were expanded in culture for large-scale DNA preparations. Retesting expanded clones by PCR with Alu and LINE primers has revealed unique patterns of amplification products. In situ hybridization of biotin labelled total human DNA to metaphase spreads from various hybrids revealed the presence of one or more human DNA fragments integrated in hamster chromosomes. The authors have generated a resource that should allow the construction of a radiation map, to be compared with the YAC contig map also under construction in their laboratory

  15. Hidden chromosomal abnormalities in pleuropulmonary blastomas identified by multiplex FISH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quilichini, Benoit; Andre, Nicolas; Bouvier, Corinne; Chrestian, Marie-Anne; Rome, Angelique; Intagliata, Dominique; Coze, Carole; Lena, Gabriel; Zattara, Helene

    2006-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) is a rare childhood dysontogenetic intrathoracic neoplasm associated with an unfavourable clinical behaviour. We report pathological and cytogenetic findings in two cases of PPB at initial diagnosis and recurrence. Both tumors were classified as type III pneumoblastoma and histological findings were similar at diagnosis and relapse. In both cases, conventional cytogenetic techniques revealed complex numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities. Molecular cytogenetic analysis (interphase/metaphase FISH and multicolor FISH) identified accurately chromosomal aberrations. In one case, TP53 gene deletion was detected on metaphase FISH. To date, only few cytogenetic data have been published about PPB. The PPB genetic profile remains to be established and compared to others embryonal neoplasia. Our cytogenetic data are discussed reviewing cytogenetics PPBs published cases, illustrating the contribution of multicolor FISH in order to identify pathogenetically important recurrent aberrations in PPB

  16. Karyotype and chromosome banding of endangered crucian carp, carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758) (Teleostei, Cyprinidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knytl, M.; Kalous, L.; Ráb, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2013), s. 205-215 ISSN 1993-0771 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP506/11/P596 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : fish cytogenetics * paleotetraploid * heterochromatin * metaphase chromosomes Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.211, year: 2013

  17. 40 CFR 799.9537 - TSCA in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... effects are clear but do not immediately reveal the identity of the coded slides to the reader. Examples... if applicable. (H) Modal number of chromosomes. (iv) Test conditions. (A) Identity of metaphase... Mutation Assay. Environmental Mutagenesis 5, 795-801 (1983). (17) Locke-Huhle, C. Endoreduplication in...

  18. Disruption of chromosome 11 in canine fibrosarcomas highlights an unusual variability of CDKN2B in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haugland Sean

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In dogs in the western world neoplasia constitutes the most frequently diagnosed cause of death. Although there appear to be similarities between canine and human cancers, rather little is known about the cytogenetic and molecular alterations in canine tumours. Different dog breeds are susceptible to different types of cancer, but the genetic basis of the great majority of these predispositions has yet to be discovered. In some retriever breeds there is a high incidence of soft tissue sarcomas and we have previously reported alterations of chromosomes 11 and 30 in two poorly differentiated fibrosarcomas. Here we extend our observations and present a case report on detail rearrangements on chromosome 11 as well as genetic variations in a tumour suppressor gene in normal dogs. Results BAC hybridisations on metaphases of two fibrosarcomas showed complex rearrangements on chromosome 11, and loss of parts of this chromosome. Microsatellite markers on a paired tumour and blood DNA pointed to loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 11 in the CDKN2B-CDKN2A tumour suppressor gene cluster region. PCR and sequencing revealed the homozygous loss of coding sequences for these genes, except for exon 1β of CDKN2A, which codes for the N-terminus of p14ARF. For CDKN2B exon 1, two alleles were observed in DNA from blood; one of them identical to the sequence in the dog reference genome and containing 4 copies of a 12 bp repeat found only in the canine gene amongst all species so far sequenced; the other allele was shorter due to a missing copy of the repeat. Sequencing of this exon in 141 dogs from 18 different breeds revealed a polymorphic region involving a GGC triplet repeat and a GGGGACGGCGGC repeat. Seven alleles were recorded and sixteen of the eighteen breeds showed heterozygosity. Conclusion Complex chromosome rearrangements were observed on chromosome 11 in two Labrador retriever fibrosarcomas. The chromosome alterations were reflected

  19. Automating dicentric chromosome detection from cytogenetic biodosimetry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Peter K; Li, Yanxin; Wickramasinghe, Asanka; Subasinghe, Akila; Caminsky, Natasha; Khan, Wahab; Samarabandu, Jagath; Wilkins, Ruth; Flegal, Farrah; Knoll, Joan H

    2014-06-01

    We present a prototype software system with sufficient capacity and speed to estimate radiation exposures in a mass casualty event by counting dicentric chromosomes (DCs) in metaphase cells from many individuals. Top-ranked metaphase cell images are segmented by classifying and defining chromosomes with an active contour gradient vector field (GVF) and by determining centromere locations along the centreline. The centreline is extracted by discrete curve evolution (DCE) skeleton branch pruning and curve interpolation. Centromere detection minimises the global width and DAPI-staining intensity profiles along the centreline. A second centromere is identified by reapplying this procedure after masking the first. Dicentrics can be identified from features that capture width and intensity profile characteristics as well as local shape features of the object contour at candidate pixel locations. The correct location of the centromere is also refined in chromosomes with sister chromatid separation. The overall algorithm has both high sensitivity (85 %) and specificity (94 %). Results are independent of the shape and structure of chromosomes in different cells, or the laboratory preparation protocol followed. The prototype software was recoded in C++/OpenCV; image processing was accelerated by data and task parallelisation with Message Passaging Interface and Intel Threading Building Blocks and an asynchronous non-blocking I/O strategy. Relative to a serial process, metaphase ranking, GVF and DCE are, respectively, 100 and 300-fold faster on an 8-core desktop and 64-core cluster computers. The software was then ported to a 1024-core supercomputer, which processed 200 metaphase images each from 1025 specimens in 1.4 h. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Automating dicentric chromosome detection from cytogenetic bio-dosimetry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogan, Peter K.; Li, Yanxin; Wickramasinghe, Asanka; Subasinghe, Akila; Caminsky, Natasha; Khan, Wahab; Samarabandu, Jagath; Knoll, Joan H.; Wilkins, Ruth; Flegal, Farrah

    2014-01-01

    We present a prototype software system with sufficient capacity and speed to estimate radiation exposures in a mass casualty event by counting dicentric chromosomes (DCs) in metaphase cells from many individuals. Top-ranked metaphase cell images are segmented by classifying and defining chromosomes with an active contour gradient vector field (GVF) and by determining centromere locations along the centreline. The centreline is extracted by discrete curve evolution (DCE) skeleton branch pruning and curve interpolation. Centromere detection minimises the global width and DAPI-staining intensity profiles along the centreline. A second centromere is identified by reapplying this procedure after masking the first. Dicentrics can be identified from features that capture width and intensity profile characteristics as well as local shape features of the object contour at candidate pixel locations. The correct location of the centromere is also refined in chromosomes with sister chromatid separation. The overall algorithm has both high sensitivity (85 %) and specificity (94 %). Results are independent of the shape and structure of chromosomes in different cells, or the laboratory preparation protocol followed. The prototype software was re-coded in C++/OpenCV; image processing was accelerated by data and task parallelization with Message Passaging Interface and Intel Threading Building Blocks and an asynchronous non-blocking I/O strategy. Relative to a serial process, metaphase ranking, GVF and DCE are, respectively, 100 and 300-fold faster on an 8-core desktop and 64-core cluster computers. The software was then ported to a 1024-core supercomputer, which processed 200 metaphase images each from 1025 specimens in 1.4 h. (authors)

  1. Karyotype evolution in Phalaris (Poaceae): The role of reductional dysploidy, polyploidy and chromosome alteration in a wide-spread and diverse genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterfeld, Grit; Becher, Hannes; Voshell, Stephanie; Hilu, Khidir; Röser, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Karyotype characteristics can provide valuable information on genome evolution and speciation, in particular in taxa with varying basic chromosome numbers and ploidy levels. Due to its worldwide distribution, remarkable variability in morphological traits and the fact that ploidy change plays a key role in its evolution, the canary grass genus Phalaris (Poaceae) is an excellent study system to investigate the role of chromosomal changes in species diversification and expansion. Phalaris comprises diploid species with two basic chromosome numbers of x = 6 and 7 as well as polyploids based on x = 7. To identify distinct karyotype structures and to trace chromosome evolution within the genus, we apply fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) of 5S and 45S rDNA probes in four diploid and four tetraploid Phalaris species of both basic numbers. The data agree with a dysploid reduction from x = 7 to x = 6 as the result of reciprocal translocations between three chromosomes of an ancestor with a diploid chromosome complement of 2n = 14. We recognize three different genomes in the genus: (1) the exclusively Mediterranean genome A based on x = 6, (2) the cosmopolitan genome B based on x = 7 and (3) a genome C based on x = 7 and with a distribution in the Mediterranean and the Middle East. Both auto- and allopolyploidy of genomes B and C are suggested for the formation of tetraploids. The chromosomal divergence observed in Phalaris can be explained by the occurrence of dysploidy, the emergence of three different genomes, and the chromosome rearrangements accompanied by karyotype change and polyploidization. Mapping the recognized karyotypes on the existing phylogenetic tree suggests that genomes A and C are restricted to sections Phalaris and Bulbophalaris, respectively, while genome B occurs across all taxa with x = 7.

  2. Karyotype evolution in Phalaris (Poaceae: The role of reductional dysploidy, polyploidy and chromosome alteration in a wide-spread and diverse genus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grit Winterfeld

    Full Text Available Karyotype characteristics can provide valuable information on genome evolution and speciation, in particular in taxa with varying basic chromosome numbers and ploidy levels. Due to its worldwide distribution, remarkable variability in morphological traits and the fact that ploidy change plays a key role in its evolution, the canary grass genus Phalaris (Poaceae is an excellent study system to investigate the role of chromosomal changes in species diversification and expansion. Phalaris comprises diploid species with two basic chromosome numbers of x = 6 and 7 as well as polyploids based on x = 7. To identify distinct karyotype structures and to trace chromosome evolution within the genus, we apply fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH of 5S and 45S rDNA probes in four diploid and four tetraploid Phalaris species of both basic numbers. The data agree with a dysploid reduction from x = 7 to x = 6 as the result of reciprocal translocations between three chromosomes of an ancestor with a diploid chromosome complement of 2n = 14. We recognize three different genomes in the genus: (1 the exclusively Mediterranean genome A based on x = 6, (2 the cosmopolitan genome B based on x = 7 and (3 a genome C based on x = 7 and with a distribution in the Mediterranean and the Middle East. Both auto- and allopolyploidy of genomes B and C are suggested for the formation of tetraploids. The chromosomal divergence observed in Phalaris can be explained by the occurrence of dysploidy, the emergence of three different genomes, and the chromosome rearrangements accompanied by karyotype change and polyploidization. Mapping the recognized karyotypes on the existing phylogenetic tree suggests that genomes A and C are restricted to sections Phalaris and Bulbophalaris, respectively, while genome B occurs across all taxa with x = 7.

  3. Possible mechanisms of chromosomal aberrations: VII. Comparative dynamics of sister chromatid disjunction and realization of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations during mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, L.I.; Akhmamet'eva, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    An increase in radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations during c-metaphase sister chromatid disjunction was demonstrated in murine bone marrow cells exposed to a total γ-irradiation at 0.5 Gy. Caffeine (Cf) treatment during mitosis partially suppressed the chromatid disjunction rate and increased the number of radiation-induced aberrations in this mitosis. Nalidixic acid (NA) treatment of c-metaphase cells completely suppressed chromatid disjunction and the realization of induced aberrations. Topoisomerase 2 was assumed to be involved during mitosis in both processes

  4. An improved method for chromosome counting in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, A

    1997-09-01

    An improved method for counting chromosomes in maize (Zea mays L.) is presented. Application of cold treatment (5C, 24 hr), heat treatment (42 C, 5 min) and a second cold treatment (5C, 24 hr) to root tips before fixation increased the number of condensed and dispersed countable metaphase chromosome figures. Fixed root tips were prepared by the enzymatic maceration-air drying method and preparations were stained with acetic orcein. Under favorable conditions, one preparation with 50-100 countable chromosome figures could be obtained in diploid maize using this method. Conditions affecting the dispersion of the chromosomes are described. This technique is especially useful for determining the somatic chromosome number in triploid and tetraploid maize lines.

  5. Energy Landscapes of Folding Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin

    The genome, the blueprint of life, contains nearly all the information needed to build and maintain an entire organism. A comprehensive understanding of the genome is of paramount interest to human health and will advance progress in many areas, including life sciences, medicine, and biotechnology. The overarching goal of my research is to understand the structure-dynamics-function relationships of the human genome. In this talk, I will be presenting our efforts in moving towards that goal, with a particular emphasis on studying the three-dimensional organization, the structure of the genome with multi-scale approaches. Specifically, I will discuss the reconstruction of genome structures at both interphase and metaphase by making use of data from chromosome conformation capture experiments. Computationally modeling of chromatin fiber at atomistic level from first principles will also be presented as our effort for studying the genome structure from bottom up.

  6. The analysis of distribution of the chromosome aberration breakpoints from medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qin; Li Jin; Tang Weisheng; Wang Zhiquan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the distribution of the chromosome aberration breakpoints from medical diagnostic x-ray workers. Methods: The breakpoints of lymphocyte chromosomes are analyzed using G-banding. Results: There are 146 breakpoints among 3545 metaphase in 37 cases of X-ray workers. There are statistically significant differences between observed values and expected values (χ 2 =42.82, df=23, P 0.05). Conclusion: The chromosome aberration breakpoints of medical diagnostic X-ray workers are non-random. The observed values of breakpoint numbers are higher than those of the expected values in 7 and 14 chromosomes (P<0.05)

  7. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Antonacci, R. (Instituto Anatomia Umana Normale, Modena (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Correspondence: chromosomal localization of uv-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berliner, J.; Mello, R.S.; Norman, A.

    1976-01-01

    We have measured the grain density - the number of grains per unit length - over the centromere and noncentromere regions of metaphase chromosomes in autoradiographs of human lymphocytes. When the chromosomes were labeled in G 0 by uv-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis, the grain density was two to four times larger over the centromere than over the noncentromere regions. When the labeling was done by scheduled DNA synthesis in S or unscheduled synthesis in M, the grain densities were approximately equal over both regions

  9. Cobalt chloride induces metaphase when topically applied to larvae and pupae of the stingless bee Melipona scutellaris (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueira-Vieira, C; Tavares, R R; Morelli, S; Pereira, B B; Silva, R P; Torres-Mariano, A R; Kerr, W E; Bonetti, A M

    2013-06-20

    In order to optimize preparations of bee metaphases, we tested cobalt chloride, which has been used as a metaphase inducer in other organisms, such as hamsters and fish. Four microliters of 65 mM cobalt chloride aqueous solution was topically applied to larval and pupal stages of the stingless bee Melipona scutellaris. The cerebral ganglion was removed after treatment and prepared for cytogenetic analysis. Identically manipulated untreated individuals were used as controls. The number of metaphases was increased 3-fold in treated individuals compared to controls. The micronucleus test showed no mutagenic effects of cobalt chloride on M. scutellaris cells. We concluded that cobalt chloride is a metaphase-inducing agent in M. scutellaris, thus being useful for cytogenetic analyses.

  10. Impact of various parameters in detecting chromosomal aberrations by FISH to describe radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, U.; Mueller, E.; Grabenbauer, G.; Sauer, R.; Distel, L.; Kuechler, A.; Liehr, T.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: analysis of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations is regarded as the ''gold standard'' for classifying individual radiosensitivity. A variety of different parameters can be used. The crucial question, however, is to explore which parameter is suited best to describe the differences between patients with increased radiosensitivity and healthy individuals. Patients and methods: in this study, five patients with severe radiation-induced late effects of at least grade 3, classified according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), and eleven healthy individuals were examined retrospectively. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with 0.7 Gy and 2.0 Gy prior to cultivation and stained by means of three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The detailed analysis was focused on the number of breaks per metaphase, on breaks from complex chromosomal rearrangements per metaphase, as well as on the percentage of translocations, dicentric chromosomes, breaks, and excess acentric fragments - each in comparison with the total number of mitoses analyzed. Results: using the number of breaks from complex chromosomal rearrangements after 2.0 Gy, radiosensitive patients as endpoint were clearly to be distinguished (p = 0.001) from healthy individuals. Translocations (p = 0.001) as well as breaks per metaphase (p = 0.002) were also suitable indicators for detecting differences between patients and healthy individuals. The parameters ''percentage of dicentric chromosomes'', ''breaks'', and ''excess acentric fragments'' in comparison to the total number of mitoses analyzed could neither serve as meaningful nor as significant criteria, since they showed a strong interindividual variability. Conclusion: to detect a difference in chromosomal aberrations between healthy and radiosensitive individuals, the parameters ''frequency of breaks per metaphase'', ''complex chromosomal rearrangements'', and ''translocations'' are most

  11. Microdissection and molecular manipulation of single chromosomes in woody fruit trees with small chromosomes using pomelo (Citrus grandis) as a model. I. Construction of single chromosomal DNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, D; Wu, W; Zhou, Y; Hu, Z; Lu, L

    2004-05-01

    Construction of single chromosomal DNA libraries by means of chromosome microdissection and microcloning will be useful for genomic research, especially for those species that have not been extensively studied genetically. Application of the technology of microdissection and microcloning to woody fruit plants has not been reported hitherto, largely due to the generally small sizes of metaphase chromosomes and the difficulty of chromosome preparation. The present study was performed to establish a method for single chromosome microdissection and microcloning in woody fruit species using pomelo as a model. The standard karyotype of a pomelo cultivar ( Citrus grandis cv. Guanxi) was established based on 20 prometaphase photomicrographs. According to the standard karyotype, chromosome 1 was identified and isolated with fine glass microneedles controlled by a micromanipulator. DNA fragments ranging from 0.3 kb to 2 kb were acquired from the isolated single chromosome 1 via two rounds of PCR mediated by Sau3A linker adaptors and then cloned into T-easy vectors to generate a DNA library of chromosome 1. Approximately 30,000 recombinant clones were obtained. Evaluation based on 108 randomly selected clones showed that the sizes of the cloned inserts varied from 0.5 kb to 1.5 kb with an average of 860 bp. Our research suggests that microdissection and microcloning of single small chromosomes in woody plants is feasible.

  12. Preparation of single rice chromosome for construction of a DNA library using a laser microbeam trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Haowei; Li, Yinmei; Tang, Yesheng; Liu, Yilei; Hu, Xin; Jia, Peixin; Ying, Kai; Feng, Qi; Guan, Jianping; Jin, Chaoqing; Zhang, Lei; Lou, Liren; Zhou, Zhuan; Han, Bin

    2004-04-29

    We report the development of a laser micromanipulation system and its application in the isolation of individual rice chromosomes directly from a metaphase cell. Microdissection and flow sorting are two major methods for the isolation of single chromosome. These methods are dependent on the techniques of chromosome spread and chromosome suspension, respectively. In the development of this system, we avoided using chromosome spread and cell suspension was used instead. The cell wall of metaphase rice cell was cut by optical scissors. The released single chromosome was captured by an optical trap and transported to an area without cell debris. The isolated single chromosome was then collected and specific library was constructed by linker adaptor PCR. The average insert size of the library was about 300 bp. Two hundred inserts of chromosome 4 library were sequenced, and 96.5% were aligned to the corresponding sequences of rice chromosome 4. These results suggest the possible application of this method for the preparation of other subcellular structures and for the cloning of single macromolecule through a laser microbeam trap.

  13. Radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in the lymphocytes of various species of mammals and the influence of coffeine during the G-2 phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, M.

    1983-01-01

    The cellular kinetics and the G0-radiation sensitivity of human, chimpanzee, swine and rabbit lymphocytes were investigated using the lymphocytes test system (Ham's F-10 Medium, PHA). Due to the integration of BrdU in the DNA (S-phase), the author was able to distinguish between first, second and third mitoses (M1, M2, M3) in accordance with the differential colouring of the metaphase chromosomes which took place according to the labelling pattern. When checking the G0-radiation sensitivity of the lymphocytes, the rates of chromosomal aberrations in the metaphases of the first and second mitoses were evaluated separately. The different radiation sensitivities are thought to be due to interspecies differences in the repair capacity of the lymphocytes. In the metaphases of second mitoses, the rate of dicentric chromosomes is approximately half of that in M1-metaphases. Ring chromosomes were nearly as frequent in M2-metaphases as in M1-metaphases. In the second experimental phase, the effects of coffein on the aberration rates after radiation exposure of the lymphocytes in the G2 phase was investigated. Achromatic lesions, open chromatide breaks, and translocations were evaluated. Aberration rates were found to increase with the radiation dose and to decrease with the cultivation time after radiation exposure. There was no marked effect of coffein on the aberration rates. The progress of the G2 phase was measured in terms of the rate of radioactively labelled metaphases, which increased with the cultivation time. This labelling index was lower in the exposed cultures than in the control cultures, suggesting a radiation-induced delay of the G2 phase. The labelling indexes of all cultures were enhanced after coffein treatment, suggesting a coffein-induced acceleration of the G2 phase. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Biological dosimetry of absorbed radiation by C-banding of interphase chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelias, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    In the present report a C-banding procedure, refined to avoid swelling and chromosome distortion of freshly prepared prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCCs) spreads, is used to identify aberrations in non-stimulated human lymphocytes. The method allows immediate banding of the centromeric regions and enables scoring of aberrations within a time interval (3-4h after blood sample withdrawal) that is only a fraction of that normally required when cells stimulated to proliferate are analysed at metaphase. The dose-response for dicentrics and centric rings measured in interphase lymphocytes was found to be similar to that obtained at metaphase. Measurement of dicentrics and centric rings in prematurely condensed chromosomes of human lymphocytes would provide valuable information on radiation dose estimates, especially in cases of extreme urgency. (Author)

  15. C-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization with rDNA sequences in chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Mariza Dortas Maffei

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea using C-banding, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH rDNA probes, and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining. The chromosome number was 2n = 18 + XX for females and 2n = 18 + Xy for males. The X chromosome was metacentric and the Y chromosome was very small. During meiosis, the karyotypic meioformula was n = 9 + Xy p, and sex chromosomes configured a parachute at metaphase I. At the beginning of pachytene, bivalents were still individualized, and sex chromosomes were associated end-to-end through the heteropycnotic region of the X chromosome. Later in pachytene, further condensation led to the formation of a pseudo-ring by the sex bivalent. All chromosomes showed pericentromeric heterochromatin. FISH and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining evidenced the location of the nucleolar organizer region in one pair of autosomes (at spermatogonial metaphase. During meiosis, these genes were mapped to a region outside the sex vesicle by FISH, although Xy p was deeply stained with silver at metaphase I. These results suggest that these argyrophilic substances are of a nucleolar protein nature, and seem to be synthesized by a pair of autosomes and imported during meiosis (prophase I to the sex pair, during the association of the sex chromosomes.

  16. Modeling Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  17. Chromosomal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and more. Stony Point, NY 10980 Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Chromosomal conditions Chromosomal conditions ... Disorders See also: Genetic counseling , Your family health history Last reviewed: February, 2013 ... labor & premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & ...

  18. The chromosomal distributions of Ty1-copia group retrotransposable elements in higher plants and their implications for genome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.S. (Pat) Heslop-Harrison; Andrea Brandes; Shin Taketa; Thomas Schmidt; Alexander V. Vershinin; Elena G. Alkhimova; Anette Kamm; Robert L. Doudrick; . [and others

    1997-01-01

    Retrotransposons make up a major fraction - sometimes more than 40% - of all plant genomes investigated so far. We have isolated the reverse transcriptase domains of theTyl-copia group elements from several species, ranging in genome size from some 100 Mbp to 23,000 Mbp, and determined the distribution patterns of these retrotransposons on metaphase chromosomes and...

  19. Repair of exogenous DNA double-strand breaks promotes chromosome synapsis in SPO11-mutant mouse meiocytes, and is altered in the absence of HORMAD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carofiglio, Fabrizia; Sleddens-Linkels, Esther; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Inagaki, Akiko; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Grootegoed, J Anton; Toth, Attila; Baarends, Willy M

    2018-03-01

    Repair of SPO11-dependent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via homologous recombination (HR) is essential for stable homologous chromosome pairing and synapsis during meiotic prophase. Here, we induced radiation-induced DSBs to study meiotic recombination and homologous chromosome pairing in mouse meiocytes in the absence of SPO11 activity (Spo11 YF/YF model), and in the absence of both SPO11 and HORMAD1 (Spo11/Hormad1 dko). Within 30 min after 5 Gy irradiation of Spo11 YF/YF mice, 140-160 DSB repair foci were detected, which specifically localized to the synaptonemal complex axes. Repair of radiation-induced DSBs was incomplete in Spo11 YF/YF compared to Spo11 +/YF meiocytes. Still, repair of exogenous DSBs promoted partial recovery of chromosome pairing and synapsis in Spo11 YF/YF meiocytes. This indicates that at least part of the exogenous DSBs can be processed in an interhomolog recombination repair pathway. Interestingly, in a seperate experiment, using 3 Gy of irradiation, we observed that Spo11/Hormad1 dko spermatocytes contained fewer remaining DSB repair foci at 48 h after irradiation compared to irradiated Spo11 knockout spermatocytes. Together, these results show that recruitment of exogenous DSBs to the synaptonemal complex, in conjunction with repair of exogenous DSBs via the homologous chromosome, contributes to homology recognition. In addition, the data suggest a role for HORMAD1 in DNA repair pathway choice in mouse meiocytes. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Assignment of CSF-1 to 5q33.1: evidence for clustering of genes regulating hematopoiesis and for their involvement in the deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5 in myeloid disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettenati, M.J.; Le Beau, M.M.; Lemons, R.S.; Shima, E.A.; Kawasaki, E.S.; Larson, R.A.; Sherr, C.J.; Diaz, M.O.; Rowley, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    The CSF-1 gene encodes a hematopoietic colony-stimulating factor (CSF) that promotes growth, differentiation, and survival of mononuclear phagocytes. By using somatic cell hybrids and in situ hybridization, the authors localized this gene to human chromosome 5 at bands q31 to q35, a chromosomal region that is frequently deleted [del(5q)] in patients with myeloid disorders. By in situ hybridization, the CSF-1 gene was found to be deleted in the 5q- chromosome of a patient with refractory anemia who had a del(5) (q15q33.3) and in that of a second patient with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia de novo who had a similar distal breakpoint [del(5)(q13q33.3)]. The gene was present in the deleted chromosome of a third patient, with therapy-related acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, who had a more proximal breakpoint in band q33 [del(5)(q22q33.1)]. Hybridization of the CSF-1 probe to metaphase cells of a fourth patient, with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia de novo, who had a rearrangement of chromosomes 5 and 21 resulted in labeling of the breakpoint junctions of both rearranged chromosomes; this suggested that CSF-1 is located at 5q33.1. Thus, a small segment of chromosome 5 contains GM-CSF (the gene encoding the granulocyte-macrophage CSF), CSF-1, and FMS, which encodes the CSF-1 receptor, in that order from the centromere; this cluster of genes may be involved in the altered hematopoiesis associated with a deletion of 5q

  1. Replication Banding Patterns in Human Chromosomes Detected Using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine Incorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Osamu; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    A novel technique using the incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into replicating DNA is described for the analysis of replicating banding patterns of human metaphase chromosomes. Human lymphocytes were synchronized with excess thymidine and treated with EdU during the late S phase of the cell cycle. The incorporated EdU was then detected in metaphase chromosomes using Alexa Fluor® 488 azides, through the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of organic azides with the terminal acetylene group of EdU. Chromosomes with incorporated EdU showed a banding pattern similar to G-banding of normal human chromosomes. Imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid conditions showed that the structure of the chromosomes was well preserved even after EdU treatment. Comparison between fluorescence microscopy and AFM images of the same chromosome 1 indicated the presence of ridges and grooves in the chromatid arm, features that have been previously reported in relation to G-banding. These results suggest an intimate relationship between EdU-induced replication bands and G- or R-bands in human chromosomes. This technique is thus useful for analyzing the structure of chromosomes in relation to their banding patterns following DNA replication in the S phase

  2. Retrospective dosimetry using chromosome painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasazzi, N.B.; Giorgio, M.D.; Taja, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome aberration frequency measured in peripheral lymphocytes of persons exposed to ionizing radiation has been used since 1960s for dose assessment. Suspected overexposure is usually evaluated by the frequency of dicentrics and centric rings using an appropriate in vitro calibration curve. However, these chromosome aberrations are unstable with time after exposure and dose reconstruction may encounter uncertainties when the time between the exposure and the analysis is considerable or even unknown. It appears that translocations persist with time after exposure and may be used as an indication of acute past overexposures. Moreover, they appear to accumulate the cytogenetical information, which correlates with the dose received under fractionated, chronic or even occupational exposure conditions. Translocations may be detected using G-banding, which allows to score the total amount of radiation induced translocations but it is a time consuming method, or by Chromosome Painting, a method base on the Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) technique, painting only some chromosome pairs with specific whole chromosome probes and then extrapolating the observed translocation frequencies to the full genome. The latter method allows a faster aberration scoring than G-banding and appears to be the most promissory tool for biodosimetry, particularly when it is necessary to assess low doses and consequently to score a large number of metaphases, e.g. radiation workers exposed within dose limits. As with the unstable chromosome aberration, it is necessary an in vitro calibration curve based on the frequency of stable chromosome aberrations to assess doses. Our laboratory performed calibration curves for Co 60 γ-rays based on the frequencies of unstable (dicentrics and centric rings detected by conventional Giemsa staining) and stable chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions, detected by G-banding). In order to minimize the interlaboratory variability, we

  3. Effects of x-rays on growth of plants and mitotic chromosomal aberrations of Lathyrus sativus Linn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, D.; Das, A.

    1985-01-01

    It has been found that the abnormalities of chromosome at different stages of mitosis show a linear dose relationship. From the detailed study of normal, abnormal phases of prophase, metaphase, anaphase and telophase, it is observed that the abnormality (per cent) in all stages of mitosis has increased with increase in dose. Under different doses, the observed characters of abnormality in chromosomes of Lathyrus sativus may exhibit the occurence of direct hit process. (M.N.)

  4. Chromosomal instability and double minute chromosomes in a breast cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalic, H.; Radosevic-Stasic, B.

    2004-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis was performed in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of a woman with ductal breast carcinoma, who as a hospital employee was exposed professionally for 15 years to low doses of ionizing radiation. The most important finding after the chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy was the presence of double minutes (DM) chromosomes, in combination with other chromosomal abnormalities (on 200 scored metaphases were found 2 chromatid breaks, 10 dicentrics, 11 acentric fragments, 2 gaps, and 3 double min chromosomes). In a repeated analysis (after 6 months), DM chromosomes were still present. To rule out the possibility that the patient was overexposed to ionizing radiation at work, her blood test was compared with a group of coworkers as well as with a group of professionally unexposed people. The data rejected this possibility, but the retroactive analysis showed that the patient even at the time of employment had a moderately increased number of chromosomal aberrations (3.5%) consisting of 3 isochromatids and 4 gaps, suggesting that her initial genomic instability enhanced the later development. The finding of a continuous presence of rare DM chromosomes in her PBL (4 and 10 months after radio-chemotherapy) was considered as an indicator of additional risk, which might have some prognostic significance. (author)

  5. Increased chromosome radiosensitivity during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricoul, Michelle; Sabatier, Laure; Dutrillaux, Bernard

    1997-01-01

    It was necessary to consider the risks of exposure of pregnant women, not only in relation to the child, but also in relation to their own hypersensitivity. We have demonstrated that pregnancy increases radiosensitivity of chromosome in the mouse at the end of gestation. This is of importance since it may have implications on radioprotection of pregnant women and give experimental guidelines to the problems of hypersensitivity to drugs and cancer aggravation during pregnancy. Blood obtained from women at various times of pregnancy was exposed to ionizing radiations. By comparison to non-pregnant women, an increase in chromosome breakage was observed in metaphases from lymphocytes, after short-term culture in the presence of the serum of the same donor. Immediately after delivery, this increase in radiosensitivity disappeared. In a prospective study, serial analyses showed a very strong correlation between the amount of pregnancy hormones, progesterone in particular, and the increase in radiosensitivity. Pregnant women may have an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation during the second half of their pregnancy. This study provides the first evidence in human that radiosensitivity may vary in relation to physiological conditions

  6. Sex differences in circadian food anticipatory activity are not altered by individual manipulations of sex hormones or sex chromosome copy number in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, Antonio; Martin, Camille S; Huddy, Timothy F; Ogawa-Okada, Maya; Adkins, Jamie L; Steele, Andrew D

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies in mice have demonstrated a sexual dimorphism in circadian entrainment to scheduled feeding. On a time restricted diet, males tend to develop food anticipatory activity (FAA) sooner than females and with a higher amplitude of activity. The underlying cause of this sex difference remains unknown. One study suggests that sex hormones, both androgens and estrogens, modulate food anticipatory activity in mice. Here we present results suggesting that the sex difference in FAA is unrelated to gonadal sex hormones. While a sex difference between males and females in FAA on a timed, calorie restricted diet was observed there were no differences between intact and gonadectomized mice in the onset or magnitude of FAA. To test other sources of the sex difference in circadian entrainment to scheduled feeding, we used sex chromosome copy number mutants, but there was no difference in FAA when comparing XX, XY-, XY-;Sry Tg, and XX;Sry Tg mice, demonstrating that gene dosage of sex chromosomes does not mediate the sex difference in FAA. Next, we masculinized female mice by treating them with 17-beta estradiol during the neonatal period; yet again, we saw no difference in FAA between control and masculinized females. Finally, we observed that there was no longer a sex difference in FAA for older mice, suggesting that the sex difference in FAA is age-dependent. Thus, our study demonstrates that singular manipulations of gonadal hormones, sex chromosomes, or developmental patterning are not able to explain the difference in FAA between young male and female mice.

  7. Microsatellite alteration and immunohistochemical expression profile of chromosome 9p21 in patients with sporadic renal cell carcinoma following surgical resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Mokadem, Ismail; Lim, Alison; Kidd, Thomas; Garret, Katherine; Pratt, Norman; Batty, David; Fleming, Stewart; Nabi, Ghulam

    2016-01-01

    Long-term prognostic significance of loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 9p21 for localized renal cell carcinoma following surgery remains unreported. The study assessed the frequency of deletions of different loci of chromosome 9p along with immunohistochemical profile of proteins in surgically resected renal cancer tissue and correlated this with long-term outcomes. DNA was extracted from renal tumours and corresponding normal kidney tissues in prospectively collected samples of 108 patients who underwent surgical resection for clinically localized disease between January 2001 and December 2005, providing a minimum of 9 years follow-up for each participant. After checking quality of DNA, amplified by PCR, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 9p was assessed using 6 microsatellite markers in 77 clear cell carcinoma. Only 5 of the markers showed LOH (D9S1814, D9S916, D9S974, D9S942, and D9S171). Protein expression of p15(INK4b), p16(INK4a), p14(ARF), CAIX, and adipose related protein (ADFP) were demonstrated by immunostaining in normal and cancer tissues. Loss of heterozygosity for microsatellite analysis was correlated with tumour characteristics, recurrence free, cancer specific, and overall survival, including significance of immunohistochemical profile of protein expressions. The main deletion was found at loci telomeric to CDKN2A region at D9S916. There was a significant correlation between frequency of LOH stage (p = 0.005) and metastases (p = 0.006) suggesting a higher LOH for advanced and aggressive renal cell carcinoma. Most commonly observed LOH in the 3 markers: D9S916, D9S974, and D9S942 were associated with poor survival, and were statistically significant on multivariate analysis. Immunohistochemical expression of p14, p15, and p16 proteins were either low or absent in cancer tissue compared to normal. Loss of heterozygosity of p921 chromosome is associated with aggressive tumours, and predicts cancer specific or recurrence free survival on

  8. Chromosome Territories

    OpenAIRE

    Cremer, Thomas; Cremer, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome territories (CTs) constitute a major feature of nuclear architecture. In a brief statement, the possible contribution of nuclear architecture studies to the field of epigenomics is considered, followed by a historical account of the CT concept and the final compelling experimental evidence of a territorial organization of chromosomes in all eukaryotes studied to date. Present knowledge of nonrandom CT arrangements, of the internal CT architecture, and of structural interactions wit...

  9. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yutaka

    1988-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G 2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G 2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G 2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G 1 phase. (author)

  10. Association of a Chromosomal Rearrangement Event with Mouse Posterior Polymorphous Corneal Dystrophy and Alterations in Csrp2bp, Dzank1, and Ovol2 Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Shen

    Full Text Available We have previously described a mouse model of human posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy (PPCD and localized the causative mutation to a 6.2 Mbp region of chromosome 2, termed Ppcd1. We now show that the gene rearrangement linked to mouse Ppcd1 is a 3.9 Mbp chromosomal inversion flanked by 81 Kbp and 542 bp deletions. This recombination event leads to deletion of Csrp2bp Exons 8 through 11, Dzank1 Exons 20 and 21, and the pseudogene Znf133. In addition, we identified translocation of novel downstream sequences to positions adjacent to Csrp2bp Exon 7 and Dzank1 Exon 20. Twelve novel fusion transcripts involving Csrp2bp or Dzank1 linked to downstream sequences have been identified. Eight are expressed at detectable levels in PPCD1 but not wildtype eyes. Upregulation of two Csrp2bp fusion transcripts, as well as upregulation of the adjacent gene, Ovol2, was observed. Absence of the PPCD1 phenotype in animals haploinsufficient for Csrp2bp or both Csrp2bp and Dzank1 rules out haploinsufficiency of these genes as a cause of mouse PPCD1. Complementation experiments confirm that PPCD1 embryonic lethality is due to disruption of Csrp2bp expression. The ocular expression pattern of Csrp2bp is consistent with a role for this protein in corneal development and pathogenesis of PPCD1.

  11. Expedited Radiation Biodosimetry by Automated Dicentric Chromosome Identification (ADCI) and Dose Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Ben; Li, Yanxin; Knoll, Joan H M; Rogan, Peter K

    2017-09-04

    Biological radiation dose can be estimated from dicentric chromosome frequencies in metaphase cells. Performing these cytogenetic dicentric chromosome assays is traditionally a manual, labor-intensive process not well suited to handle the volume of samples which may require examination in the wake of a mass casualty event. Automated Dicentric Chromosome Identifier and Dose Estimator (ADCI) software automates this process by examining sets of metaphase images using machine learning-based image processing techniques. The software selects appropriate images for analysis by removing unsuitable images, classifies each object as either a centromere-containing chromosome or non-chromosome, further distinguishes chromosomes as monocentric chromosomes (MCs) or dicentric chromosomes (DCs), determines DC frequency within a sample, and estimates biological radiation dose by comparing sample DC frequency with calibration curves computed using calibration samples. This protocol describes the usage of ADCI software. Typically, both calibration (known dose) and test (unknown dose) sets of metaphase images are imported to perform accurate dose estimation. Optimal images for analysis can be found automatically using preset image filters or can also be filtered through manual inspection. The software processes images within each sample and DC frequencies are computed at different levels of stringency for calling DCs, using a machine learning approach. Linear-quadratic calibration curves are generated based on DC frequencies in calibration samples exposed to known physical doses. Doses of test samples exposed to uncertain radiation levels are estimated from their DC frequencies using these calibration curves. Reports can be generated upon request and provide summary of results of one or more samples, of one or more calibration curves, or of dose estimation.

  12. Evaluation of rate of unstable chromosomal changes in human blood irradiated by X-rays: establishment of dose-response curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonça, J.C.G.; Mendes, M.E.; Melo, A.M.M.A.; Silva, L.M.; Andrade, A.M.G.; Hwang, S.F.; Lima, F.F.

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of ionizing radiation, and consequently of its properties, there has been an increasing in its use, which in turn has raised concerns about the biological damage that it could cause in exposed individuals. As a result, cytogenetic dosimetry has emerged: a method that can be used as a complement or, in the absence of physical dosimetry, relating the frequency of chromosomal changes found in the blood of the exposed individual and the dose absorbed through dose-response calibration curves. This work aimed to verify the frequencies of the unstable chromosomal changes in human blood lymphocytes irradiated by X-rays of 250 kVp with different absorbed doses and later establish the dose-response calibration curves. The irradiation was performed at the CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE, Brazil metrology service on a PANTAK X-ray machine, model HF 320. The blood samples had their lymphocytes cultured in culture media and, after the processing, the metaphases were obtained. The chromosomal alterations analyzed were chromosomes dicentric, ring and isolated actinic fragments. There was an increase in frequencies of all chromosomal changes with increased absorbed dose. The calibration curves of dicentric and dicentric + rings presented good adjustments with the values of the coefficients Y = 0.0013 + 0.0271D + 0.0556D 2 (X 2 = 10.36 / GL = 6) and Y = 0.0013 + 0.0263D + 0.0640D 2 (X 2 = 7.43 / GL = 6), respectively. The establishment of these curves enables the Laboratory of Biological Dosimetry of the CRCN/NE/CNEN-PE to estimate the dose absorbed by occupationally exposed individuals and in cases of radiological accidents

  13. Chromosome painting analysis of X-ray-induced aberrations in human lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, A.; Hayashi, M.; Yamazaki, N.; Sofuni, T.

    1994-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements in human lymphocytes induced by X-rays (0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gray) were analyzed using chromosome painting. DNA probes for human chromosomes 1, 3 or 4 alone, and a combination of 1 and 4, were used for analysis. The frequency of cells with rearrangements, i.e. reciprocal translocations, dicentrics, insertions, tricentrics and fragments, involving chromosome 4 increased with dose in both 48 and 72 h cultures. The number of translocations per cell also increased with dose at 48 and 72 h. Dicentrics increased with dose in 48 h but not in 72 h cultures. The estimated genomic frequency of aberrations per cell was comparable with results in banded cells. No difference was shown on the detection efficiency of chromosome rearrangements among the various DNA probes used. Since this technique does not necessarily require well-spread metaphases for analysis, it is possible to increase the number of analyzable metaphases compared with the banding technique. Chromosome painting is a simpler, more objective and practical method for detecting chromosome rearrangements than conventional banding analyses. (Author)

  14. Comparative Genomic Hybridization of Human Malignant Gliomas Reveals Multiple Amplification Sites and Nonrandom Chromosomal Gains and Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schròck, Evelin; Thiel, Gundula; Lozanova, Tanka; du Manoir, Stanislas; Meffert, Marie-Christine; Jauch, Anna; Speicher, Michael R.; Nürnberg, Peter; Vogel, Siegfried; Janisch, Werner; Donis-Keller, Helen; Ried, Thomas; Witkowski, Regine; Cremer, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Nine human malignant gliomas (2 astrocytomas grade III and 7 glioblastomas) were analyzed using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). In addition to the amplification of the EGFR gene at 7p12 in 4 of 9 cases, six new amplification sites were mapped to 1q32, 4q12, 7q21.1, 7q21.2-3, 12p, and 22q12. Nonrandom chromosomal gains and losses were identified with overrepresentation of chromosome 7 and underrepresentation of chromosome 10 as the most frequent events (1 of 2 astrocytomas, 7 of 7 glioblastomas). Gain of a part or the whole chromosome 19 and losses of chromosome bands 9pter-23 and 22q13 were detected each in five cases. Loss of chromosome band 17p13 and gain of chromosome 20 were revealed each in three cases. The validity of the CGH data was confirmed using interphase cytogenetics with YAC clones, chromosome painting in tumor metaphase spreads, and DNA fingerprinting. A comparison of CGH data with the results of chromosome banding analyses indicates that metaphase spreads accessible in primary tumor cell cultures may not represent the clones predominant in the tumor tissue ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 6 PMID:8203461

  15. Metaphase II oocytes from human unilaminar follicles grown in a multi-step culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, M; Albertini, D F; Wallace, W H B; Anderson, R A; Telfer, E E

    2018-03-01

    Can complete oocyte development be achieved from human ovarian tissue containing primordial/unilaminar follicles and grown in vitro in a multi-step culture to meiotic maturation demonstrated by the formation of polar bodies and a Metaphase II spindle? Development of human oocytes from primordial/unilaminar stages to resumption of meiosis (Metaphase II) and emission of a polar body was achieved within a serum free multi-step culture system. Complete development of oocytes in vitro has been achieved in mouse, where in vitro grown (IVG) oocytes from primordial follicles have resulted in the production of live offspring. Human oocytes have been grown in vitro from the secondary/multi-laminar stage to obtain fully grown oocytes capable of meiotic maturation. However, there are no reports of a culture system supporting complete growth from the earliest stages of human follicle development through to Metaphase II. Ovarian cortical biopsies were obtained with informed consent from women undergoing elective caesarean section (mean age: 30.7 ± 1.7; range: 25-39 years, n = 10). Laboratory setting. Ovarian biopsies were dissected into thin strips, and after removal of growing follicles were cultured in serum free medium for 8 days (Step 1). At the end of this period secondary/multi-laminar follicles were dissected from the strips and intact follicles 100-150 μm in diameter were selected for further culture. Isolated follicles were cultured individually in serum free medium in the presence of 100 ng/ml of human recombinant Activin A (Step 2). Individual follicles were monitored and after 8 days, cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) were retrieved by gentle pressure on the cultured follicles. Complexes with complete cumulus and adherent mural granulosa cells were selected and cultured in the presence of Activin A and FSH on membranes for a further 4 days (Step 3). At the end of Step 3, complexes containing oocytes >100 μm diameter were selected for IVM in SAGE medium (Step 4) then

  16. Drifter technique: a new method to obtain metaphases in Hep-2 cell line cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonidas Moura Lima

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The Hep-2 cell line is derived from laryngeal carcinoma cells and is often utilized as a model in carcinogenesis and mutagenesis tests. To evaluate the proliferative potential of this line, we developed a cytogenetic methodology (drifter technique to obtain metaphases from cells that loose cellular adhesion when they underwent mitosis in culture. By this procedure, 2000 cells were counted, resulting in a mitotic index (MI of 22.2%. Although this MI was not statistically different from the one obtained using either a classical cytogenetic method or a cell synchronization technique, the drifter technique has the advantage of not requiring the use of some reagents for the obtention of metaphases and also of diminishing the consumption of maintenance reagents for this cell line.A linhagem celular Hep-2 é formada por células de carcinoma da laringe e é muito utilizada em modelos de carcinogênese e mutagenêse. Para avaliar o potencial proliferativo desta linhagem, desenvolvemos uma metodologia citogenética (técnica do sobrenadante para obtenção de metáfases a partir de células que, ao entrarem em mitose, perdem adesão celular, ficando em suspensão no meio de cultura. Através deste procedimento, foram contadas 2000 células, correspondendo a um índice mitótico (IM de 22.2% . Apesar de o IM obtido por esta técnica não ter sido estatisticamente diferente do IM obtido por outras metodologias citogenéticas clássicas, a técnica do sobrenadante é vantajosa porque elimina o uso de alguns reagentes utilizados na obtenção de metáfases e também diminui o consumo de reagentes de manutenção desta linhagem.

  17. Using 3-color chromosome painting to decide between chromosome aberration models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, J.N.; Sachs, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation produces chromosome aberrations when DNA double strand breaks (DSB) interact pairwise. For more than 30 years there have been two main, competing theories of such binary DSB interactions. The classical theory asserts that an unrepaired DSB makes two ends which separate, with each end subsequently able to join any similar (non-telomeric) end. The exchange theory asserts that the two DSB ends remain associated until repair or a reciprocal chromosome exchange involving a second DSB occurs. The authors conducted an experiment to test these models, using 3-color chromosome painting. After in vitro irradiation of resting human lymphocytes, they observed cells with three-color triplets at first metaphase: three derivative chromosomes having permuted colors, as if three broken chromosomes had played musical chairs. On the exchange model in its standard form such 3-color triplets cannot occur. On the classical model the expected frequency can be calculated. They report data and computer calculations which exclude the exchange model and favor the classical model

  18. [Frequency of chromosome aberrations in residents of the Semipalatinsk Oblast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubitskaia, E G; Akhmatullina, N B; Vsevolodov, E B; Bishnevskaia, S S; Sharipov, I K; Cherednichenko, O G

    1999-06-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of the population of the Beskaragai district of the Semipalatinsk oblast adjacent to the territory of the nuclear test site was conducted by means of an ecological genetic questionnaire and cytogenetic examination of metaphase chromosomes. An increase in the total mutation level in the region was observed. The frequency of chromosome aberrations among the population of the Beskaragai district (3.2%) was statistically significantly (about 1.5 times) higher than the background levels in the clear regions (from 1 to 2%). Furthermore, the frequency of aberrations in adolescents was comparable with that in the adults. The spectrum of chromosome aberrations pointed to a significant contribution of radiation component to the mutagenesis.

  19. The hippocampi of children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have localized anterior alterations that predict severity of anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Julia A; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi; Kalish, Kristopher; Lee, Aaron; Hunsaker, Michael R; Schumann, Cynthia M; Carmichael, Owen T; Simon, Tony J

    2016-04-01

    Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have an elevated risk for schizophrenia, which increases with history of childhood anxiety. Altered hippocampal morphology is a common neuroanatomical feature of 22q11.2DS and idiopathic schizophrenia. Relating hippocampal structure in children with 22q11.2DS to anxiety and impaired cognitive ability could lead to hippocampus-based characterization of psychosis-proneness in this at-risk population. We measured hippocampal volume using a semiautomated approach on MRIs collected from typically developing children and children with 22q11.2DS. We then analyzed hippocampal morphology with Localized Components Analysis. We tested the modulating roles of diagnostic group, hippocampal volume, sex and age on local hippocampal shape components. Lastly, volume and shape components were tested as covariates of IQ and anxiety. We included 48 typically developing children and 69 children with 22q11.2DS in our study. Hippocampal volume was reduced bilaterally in children with 22q11.2DS, and these children showed greater variation in the shape of the anterior hippocampus than typically developing children. Children with 22q11.2DS had greater inward deformation of the anterior hippocampus than typically developing children. Greater inward deformation of the anterior hippocampus was associated with greater severity of anxiety, specifically fear of physical injury, within the 22q11.2DS group. Shape alterations are not specific to hippocampal subfields. Alterations in the structure of the anterior hippocampus likely affect function and may impact limbic circuitry. We suggest these alterations potentially contribute to anxiety symptoms in individuals with 22q11.2DS through modulatory pathways. Altered hippocampal morphology may be uniquely linked to anxiety risk factors for schizophrenia, which could be a powerful neuroanatomical marker of schizophrenia risk and hence protection.

  20. Radiation-induced cytogenetic damage in relation to changes in interphase chromosome conformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelias, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    The premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to study several factors that determine the yield of chromosome fragments as observed in interphase cells after irradiation. In addition to absorbed dose and the extent of chromosome condensation at the time of irradiation, changes in chromosome conformation as cells progressed through the cell cycle after irradiation affected dramatically the yield of chromosome fragments observed. As a test of the effect of chromosome decondensation, irradiated metaphase Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were allowed to divide, and the prematurely condensed chromosomes in the daughter cells were analyzed in their G1 phase. The yield of chromosome fragments increased as the daughter cells progressed toward S phase and chromosome decondensation occurred. When early G1 CHO cells were irradiated and analyzed at later times in G1 phase, an increase in chromosome fragmentation again followed the gradual increase in chromosome decondensation. As a test of the effect of chromosome condensation, G0 human lymphocytes were irradiated and analyzed at various times after fusion with mitotic CHO cells, i.e., as condensation proceeded. The yield of fragments observed was directly related to the amount of chromosome condensation allowed to take place after irradiation and inversely related to the extent of chromosome condensation at the time of irradiation. It can be concluded that changes in chromosome conformation interfered with rejoining processes. In contrast, resting chromosomes (as in G0 lymphocytes irradiated before fusion) showed efficient rejoining. These results support the hypothesis that cytogenetic lesions become observable chromosome breaks when chromosome condensation or decondensation occurs during the cell cycle

  1. Chromosome orientation and sterility in gamma-ray induced interchanges in chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, O.A.; Panda, R.C.; Rao, K.G.R.

    1986-01-01

    After gamma irradiation (30 Kr) of seeds of Capsicum annuum cultivar cerasiformis (2 n = 24) two plants were recorded each carrying two interchanges. The nucleolus organiser chromosome appeared not to be involved. The interchange heterozygotes were weak and meiosis was irregular. At least one multivalent association per PMC was recorded. At metaphase I the predominant orientation was adjacent. The probable reasons for anaphase I and other meiotic irregularities and the incidence of high pollen sterility are discussed. (author)

  2. [Acute transformation of chronic myeloid leukemia: disappearance of the Philadelphia chromosome after autograft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiffers, J; David, B; Bernard, P; Vezon, G; Marit, G; Moulinier, J; Broustet, A

    1984-04-12

    Two patients with chronic granulocytic leukemia (C.G.L.) undergoing transformation were treated by high dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation followed by autografting of hematopoietic stem cells collected and cryo-preserved at the time of diagnosis. Recovery of hematopoiesis was characterized by disappearance of the Philadelphia chromosome in most metaphases. A new approach of the management of C.G.L. is discussed.

  3. Induction of chromosome damage by ultraviolet light and caffeine: correlation of cytogenetic evaluation and flow karyotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, C.; Cremer, T.; Gray, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Asynchronously growing cells of a M3-1 Chinese hamster line were ultraviolet (UV) irradiated (lambda . 254 nm) with UV fluences up to 7.5 J/m(2). After irradiation cells were incubated with or without 2 mM caffeine for 20 hr, then mitotic cells were selected by mechanical shaking. Their chromosomes were isolated, stained with Hoechst 33258 and chromomycin A3, and measured flow cytometrically. While the fluorescence distributions of chromosomes (flow karyo-types) from cells treated with UV alone or with caffeine alone were very similar to those of untreated controls, the flow karyo-types of UV + caffeine-treated cells showed a debris continuum that increased with increasing UV fluence suggesting an increased number of chromosome fragments. Visual evaluation of metaphase plates revealed that the percentage of cells with chromosome damage also increased steadily with increasing UV fluence. A high degree of correlation was observed between the relative magnitude of the debris level from flow karyotypes and the percentage of cells with chromosome damage and with generalized chromosomes shattering, respectively, as determined from metaphase spreads

  4. The alpha-spectrin gene is on chromosome 1 in mouse and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, K; Palumbo, A P; Isobe, M; Kozak, C A; Monaco, S; Rovera, G; Croce, C M; Curtis, P J

    1985-06-01

    By using alpha-spectrin cDNA clones of murine and human origin and somatic cell hybrids segregating either mouse or human chromosomes, the gene for alpha-spectrin has been mapped to chromosome 1 in both species. This assignment of the mouse alpha-spectrin gene to mouse chromosome 1 by DNA hybridization strengthens the previous identification of the alpha-spectrin locus in mouse with the sph locus, which previously was mapped by linkage analysis to mouse chromosome 1, distal to the Pep-3 locus. By in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes, the human alpha-spectrin gene has been localized to 1q22-1q25; interestingly, the locus for a non-Rh-linked form of elliptocytosis has been provisionally mapped to band 1q2 by family linkage studies.

  5. Effect of x-rays on the somatic chromosomes of the exotic fish, Tilapia mossambica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manna, G.K.; Som, R.C. (Kalyani Univ. (India). Dept. of Zoology)

    1982-03-01

    Male and female T. mossambica were x-rayed with 100 r and the metaphase chromosome aberrations in their gill epithelia were studied at 13 different intervals against suitable control. The chromosomes of males appeared more radio-sensitive than those of females. Among the diploid complement of 44 chromosomes, the individual type aberrations were non-random in both sexes. The longest pair of chromosomes, taken as the marker pair, was found very highly radio-sensitive, while the remaining 21 pairs as non-markers were somewhat resistant to x-radiation when the observed and the expected numbers were subjected to statistical analysis. The break in the marker chromosome was also non-randomly distributed as the distal half had a significantly large number of breaks.

  6. Abnormally banded chromosomal regions in doxorubicin-resistant B16-BL6 murine melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovak, M L; Hoeltge, G A; Ganapathi, R

    1986-08-01

    B16-BL6 murine melanoma cells were selected for cytogenetic evaluation during the stepwise development of increasing resistance in vitro to the antitumor antibiotic, doxorubicin (DOX). Karyotypic studies demonstrated extensive heteroploidy with both numerical and structural abnormalities which were not present in the parental DOX-sensitive B16-BL6 cells. Trypsin-Giemsa banding revealed the presence of several marker chromosomes containing abnormally banding regions (ABRs) in the 44-fold B16-BL6 DOX-resistant subline. These ABRs appeared to be more homogeneously staining at the higher DOX concentrations. Length measurements (ABR index) in seven banded metaphases indicated a direct correlation with increasing DOX concentration. When the DOX-resistant cells were grown in drug-free medium for 1 yr, the drug-resistant phenotype gradually declined in parallel with the level of resistance and the ABR index. DOX-induced cytogenetic damage examined by sister chromatid exchange methodology in parental B16-BL6 cells indicated a linear sister chromatid exchange:DOX dose-response relationship. However, after continuous treatment of parental B16-BL6 cells with DOX (0.01 microgram/ml) for 30 days, sister chromatid exchange scores were found to return to base-line values. The B16-BL6 resistant cells demonstrated a cross-resistant phenotype with N-trifluoroacetyladriamycin-14-valerate, actinomycin D, and the Vinca alkaloids but not with 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine. The results suggest that ABR-containing chromosomes in DOX-resistant sublines may represent cytogenetic alterations of specific amplified genes involved in the expression of DOX resistance. Further studies are required to identify and define the possible gene products and to correlate their relationship to the cytotoxic action of doxorubicin.

  7. ATM promotes the obligate XY crossover and both crossover control and chromosome axis integrity on autosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Barchi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiosis in most sexually reproducing organisms, recombination forms crossovers between homologous maternal and paternal chromosomes and thereby promotes proper chromosome segregation at the first meiotic division. The number and distribution of crossovers are tightly controlled, but the factors that contribute to this control are poorly understood in most organisms, including mammals. Here we provide evidence that the ATM kinase or protein is essential for proper crossover formation in mouse spermatocytes. ATM deficiency causes multiple phenotypes in humans and mice, including gonadal atrophy. Mouse Atm-/- spermatocytes undergo apoptosis at mid-prophase of meiosis I, but Atm(-/- meiotic phenotypes are partially rescued by Spo11 heterozygosity, such that ATM-deficient spermatocytes progress to meiotic metaphase I. Strikingly, Spo11+/-Atm-/- spermatocytes are defective in forming the obligate crossover on the sex chromosomes, even though the XY pair is usually incorporated in a sex body and is transcriptionally inactivated as in normal spermatocytes. The XY crossover defect correlates with the appearance of lagging chromosomes at metaphase I, which may trigger the extensive metaphase apoptosis that is observed in these cells. In addition, control of the number and distribution of crossovers on autosomes appears to be defective in the absence of ATM because there is an increase in the total number of MLH1 foci, which mark the sites of eventual crossover formation, and because interference between MLH1 foci is perturbed. The axes of autosomes exhibit structural defects that correlate with the positions of ongoing recombination. Together, these findings indicate that ATM plays a role in both crossover control and chromosome axis integrity and further suggests that ATM is important for coordinating these features of meiotic chromosome dynamics.

  8. Focal accumulation of preribosomes outside the nucleolus during metaphase-anaphase in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriggi, Giulia; Gaspar, Sonia G; Nieto, Blanca; Bustelo, Xosé R; Dosil, Mercedes

    2017-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains one nucleolus that remains intact in the mother-cell side of the nucleus throughout most of mitosis. Based on this, it is assumed that the bulk of ribosome production during cell division occurs in the mother cell. Here, we show that the ribosome synthesis machinery localizes not only in the nucleolus but also at a center that is present in the bud side of the nucleus after the initiation of mitosis. This center can be visualized by live microscopy as a punctate body located in close proximity to the nuclear envelope and opposite to the nucleolus. It contains ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and precursors of both 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits. Proteins that actively participate in ribosome synthesis, but not functionally defective variants, accumulate in that site. The formation of this body occurs in the metaphase-to-anaphase transition when discrete regions of rDNA occasionally exit the nucleolus and move into the bud. Collectively, our data unveil the existence of a previously unknown mechanism for preribosome accumulation at the nuclear periphery in budding yeast. We propose that this might be a strategy to expedite the delivery of ribosomes to the growing bud. © 2017 Moriggi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  9. Effect of vitamin E on preovulatory stage irradiated female mouse expressed as chromosomal abnormalities in generated embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimi, M.; Mozdarani, H.

    2006-01-01

    The present study has been carried out to investigate the effects of preovulatory stage gamma-irradiation of female mice in the absence or presence of vitamin E on numerical chromosome abnormalities in 8-cell embryos after mating with non- irradiated males. Materials and Methods: The 8-11 weeks adult female NMRl mice were whole body irradiated at preovulatory stage (post PMSG injection and about 12-18 hours before Injecting HCG) with 4 Gy gamma-rays generated from a cobalt-60 source alone or in combination with 200 IU/kg vitamin E, intraperitoneally administered one hour prior to irradiation. Soon after HCG injection super ovulated irradiated females were mated with non-irradiated males. About 68-h post coitus (p.c), 8-cell embryos were flushed from the oviducts of pregnant mice and were fixed on slides using standard methods in order to screen for metaphase spreads and numerical chromosome abnormalities. Results: In control embryos, 8% of metaphase plates were aneuploidy whereas in preovulatory stage irradiated female mice, about 50% of metaphase plates of embryos showed numerical chromosome aberrations (P nd meiotic division. Reduction of the frequency of chromosome aberrations in the presence of vitamin E is probably due to antioxidant effects of this vitamin, and scavenging free radicals induced by gamma-rays in mice oocytes' environment

  10. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose- effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Achkar, W.

    2002-01-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, blood from eight healthy people were studied. Samples were irradiated in tubes with 0.15-2.5 gray of gamma ray.Irradiated and control samples were incubated for cell cultures. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics+ rings and total numbers of breaks were drawn. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  11. GTPase Ran strongly accumulates at the kinetochores of somatic chromosomes in the spermatogonial mitoses of Acricotopus lucidus (Diptera, Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiber, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Unequal chromosome segregation and spindle formation occurs in the last gonial mitosis in the germ line of the chironomid Acricotopus lucidus. During this differential mitosis, all germ line-limited chromosomes (=Ks) migrate undivided to only one pole of the cell, while the somatic chromosomes (=Ss) first remain in the metaphase plane, and with the arrival of the Ks at the pole, they then separate equally. The evolutionarily conserved GTPase Ran plays a crucial role in many cellular processes. This includes the regulation of microtubule nucleation and stabilisation at kinetochores and of spindle assembly during mitosis, which is promoted by a RanGTP concentration gradient that forms around the mitotic chromosomes (Kalab et al. in Science 295:2452-2456, 2002, Nature 440:697-701, 2006). In the present study, a strong accumulation of Ran was detected by immunofluorescence at the kinetochores of the Ss in normal gonial and differential gonial mitoses of males of A. lucidus. In contrast, no Ran accumulation was observed at the kinetochores of the Ss in the metaphases of brain ganglia mitoses or of aberrant spermatocytes or in metaphases I and II of spermatocyte meiotic divisions. Likewise, there was no accumulation at the kinetochores of Drosophila melanogaster mitotic chromosomes from larval brains. The specific accumulation of Ran at the kinetochores of the Ss in differential gonial mitoses of A. lucidus strongly suggests that Ran is involved in a mechanism acting in this exceptional mitosis, which retains the Ss at the metaphase plane and prevents a premature separation and unequal segregation of the Ss during monopolar migration of the Ks.

  12. Chromosomal mosaicism in mouse two-cell embryos after paternal exposure to acrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Lowe, Xiu; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2008-10-14

    Chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos is a common cause ofspontaneous abortions, however, our knowledge of its etiology is limited. We used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) painting to investigate whether paternally-transmitted chromosomal aberrations result in mosaicism in mouse 2-cell embryos. Paternal exposure to acrylamide, an important industrial chemical also found in tobacco smoke and generated during the cooking process of starchy foods, produced significant increases in chromosomally defective 2-cell embryos, however, the effects were transient primarily affecting the postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis. Comparisons with our previous study of zygotes demonstrated similar frequencies of chromosomally abnormal zygotes and 2-cell embryos suggesting that there was no apparent selection against numerical or structural chromosomal aberrations. However, the majority of affected 2-cell embryos were mosaics showing different chromosomal abnormalities in the two blastomeric metaphases. Analyses of chromosomal aberrations in zygotes and 2-cell embryos showed a tendency for loss of acentric fragments during the first mitotic division ofembryogenesis, while both dicentrics and translocations apparently underwent propersegregation. These results suggest that embryonic development can proceed up to the end of the second cell cycle of development in the presence of abnormal paternal chromosomes and that even dicentrics can persist through cell division. The high incidence of chromosomally mosaic 2-cell embryos suggests that the first mitotic division of embryogenesis is prone to missegregation errors and that paternally-transmitted chromosomal abnromalities increase the risk of missegregation leading to embryonic mosaicism.

  13. Diagnostic yield by supplementing prenatal metaphase karyotyping with MLPA for microdeletion syndromes and subtelomere imbalances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, S; Sundberg, K; Jørgensen, F S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to retrospectively assess the relevance of using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for detection of selected microdeletion syndromes (22q11, Prader-Willi/Angelman, Miller-Dieker, Smith-Magenis, 1p-, Williams), the reciprocal microduplication syndrome...... and imbalance at the subtelomere regions of chromosomes in a routine prenatal setting....

  14. Chromosomal Behavior during Meiosis in the Progeny of Triticum timopheevii × Hexaploid Wild Oat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhou An

    Full Text Available The meiotic behavior of pollen mother cells (PMCs of the F2 and F3 progeny from Triticum timopheevii × hexaploid wild oat was investigated by cytological analysis and sequential C-banding-genomic in situ hybridization (GISH in the present study. A cytological analysis showed that the chromosome numbers of the F2 and F3 progeny ranged from 28 to 41. A large number of univalents, lagging chromosomes, chromosome bridges and micronuclei were found at the metaphase I, anaphase I, anaphase II and tetrad stages in the F2 and F3 progeny. The averages of univalents were 3.50 and 2.73 per cell, and those of lagging chromosomes were 3.37 and 1.87 in the F2 and F3 progeny, respectively. The PMC meiotic indices of the F2 and F3 progeny were 12.22 and 20.34, respectively, indicating considerable genetic instability. A sequential C-banding-GISH analysis revealed that some chromosomes and fragments from the hexaploid wild oat were detected at metaphase I and anaphase I in the progeny, showing that the progeny were of true intergeneric hybrid origin. The alien chromosomes 6A, 7A, 3C and 2D were lost during transmission from F2 to F3. In addition, partial T. timopheevii chromosomes appeared in the form of univalents or lagging chromosomes, which might result from large genome differences between the parents, and the wild oat chromosome introgression interfered with the wheat homologues' normally pairing.

  15. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose-effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Achkar, W.

    2001-09-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, experimentally gamma ray induced chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes from eight healthy people were studied. Samples from 4 males and 4 females were irradiated in tubes with 0.15, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 gray of gamma ray (Co 60 at dose rate 0.3 Gy/min). Irradiated and control samples were incubated in 37 centigrade for 48 hours cell cultures. Cell cultures then were stopped and metaphases spread, Giemsa stained to score the induced chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics + rings and total numbers of breaks in cell for each individual or for all people were drawn. An increase of all chromosomal aberrations types with the elevation of the doses was observed. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  16. Centralspindlin and Chromosomal Passenger Complex Behavior During Normal and Rappaport Furrow Specification in Echinoderm Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argiros, Haroula; Henson, Lauren; Holguin, Christiana; Foe, Victoria; Shuster, Charles Bradley

    2014-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger (CPC) and Centralspindlin complexes are essential for organizing the anaphase central spindle and providing cues that position the cytokinetic furrow between daughter nuclei. However, echinoderm zygotes are also capable of forming “Rappaport furrows” between asters positioned back-to-back without intervening chromosomes. To understand how these complexes contribute to normal and Rappaport furrow formation, we studied the localization patterns of Survivin and mitotic-kinesin-like-protein1 (MKLP1), members respectively of the CPC and the Centralspindlin complex, and the effect of CPC inhibition on cleavage in mono- and binucleate echinoderm zygotes. In zygotes, Survivin initially localized to metaphase chromosomes, upon anaphase onset relocalized to the central spindle and then, together with MKLP1 spread towards the equatorial cortex in an Aurora-dependent manner. Inhibition of Aurora kinase activity resulted in disruption of central spindle organization and furrow regression, although astral microtubule elongation and furrow initiation were normal. In binucleate cells containing two parallel spindles MKLP1 and Survivin localized to the plane of the former metaphase plate, but were not observed in the secondary cleavage plane formed between unrelated spindle poles, except when chromosomes were abnormally present there. However, the secondary furrow was sensitive to Aurora inhibition, indicating that Aurora kinase may still contribute to furrow ingression without chromosomes nearby. Our results provide insights that reconcile classic micromanipulation studies with current molecular understanding of furrow specification in animal cells. PMID:22887753

  17. Dynein Light Intermediate Chain 2 Facilitates the Metaphase to Anaphase Transition by Inactivating the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar P Mahale

    Full Text Available The multi-functional molecular motor cytoplasmic dynein performs diverse essential roles during mitosis. The mechanistic importance of the dynein Light Intermediate Chain homologs, LIC1 and LIC2 is unappreciated, especially in the context of mitosis. LIC1 and LIC2 are believed to exist in distinct cytoplasmic dynein complexes as obligate subunits. LIC1 had earlier been reported to be required for metaphase to anaphase progression by inactivating the kinetochore-microtubule attachment-sensing arm of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC. However, the functional importance of LIC2 during mitosis remains elusive. Here we report prominent novel roles for the LIC2 subunit of cytoplasmic dynein in regulating the spindle assembly checkpoint. LIC2 depletion in mammalian cells led to prolonged metaphase arrest in the presence of an active SAC and also to stretched kinetochores, thus implicating it in SAC inactivation. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy of SAC components revealed accumulation of both attachment- and tension-sensing checkpoint proteins at metaphase kinetochores upon LIC2 depletion. These observations support a stronger and more diverse role in checkpoint inactivation for LIC2 in comparison to its close homolog LIC1. Our study uncovers a novel functional hierarchy during mitotic checkpoint inactivation between the closely related but homologous LIC subunits of cytoplasmic dynein. These subtle functional distinctions between dynein subpopulations could be exploited to study specific aspects of the spindle assembly checkpoint, which is a key mediator of fidelity in eukaryotic cell division.

  18. Chromosome engineering: power tools for plant genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Simon W L

    2010-12-01

    The term "chromosome engineering" describes technologies in which chromosomes are manipulated to change their mode of genetic inheritance. This review examines recent innovations in chromosome engineering that promise to greatly increase the efficiency of plant breeding. Haploid Arabidopsis thaliana have been produced by altering the kinetochore protein CENH3, yielding instant homozygous lines. Haploid production will facilitate reverse breeding, a method that downregulates recombination to ensure progeny contain intact parental chromosomes. Another chromosome engineering success is the conversion of meiosis into mitosis, which produces diploid gametes that are clones of the parent plant. This is a key step in apomixis (asexual reproduction through seeds) and could help to preserve hybrid vigor in the future. New homologous recombination methods in plants will potentiate many chromosome engineering applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Somatic association of telocentric chromosomes carrying homologous centromeres in common wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello-Sampayo, T

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of distances between telocentric chromosomes, either homologous or representing the opposite arms of a metacentric chromosome (complementary telocentrics), were made at metaphase in root tip cells of common wheat carrying two homologous pairs of complementary telocentrics of chromosome 1 B or 6 B (double ditelosomic 1 B or 6 B). The aim was to elucidate the relative locations of the telocentric chromosomes within the cell. The data obtained strongly suggest that all four telocentrics of chromosome 1 B or 6 B are spacially and simultaneously co-associated. In plants carrying two complementary (6 B (S) and 6 B (L)) and a non-related (5 B (L)) telocentric, only the complementary chromosomes were found to be somatically associated. It is thought, therefore, that the somatic association of chromosomes may involve more than two chromosomes in the same association and, since complementary telocentrics are as much associated as homologous, that the homology between centromeres (probably the only homologous region that exists between complementary telocentrics) is a very important condition for somatic association of chromosomes. The spacial arrangement of chromosomes was studied at anaphase and prophase and the polar orientation of chromosomes at prophase was found to resemble anaphase orientation. This was taken as good evidence for the maintenance of the chromosome arrangement - the Rabl orientation - and of the peripheral location of the centromere and its association with the nuclear membrane. Within this general arrangement homologous telocentric chromosomes were frequently seen to have their centromeres associated or directed towards each other. The role of the centromere in somatic association as a spindle fibre attachment and chromosome binder is discussed. It is suggested that for non-homologous chromosomes to become associated in root tips, the only requirement needed should be the homology of centromeres such as exists between complementary

  20. Sequence analysis of the MYC oncogene involved in the t(8;14)(q24;q11) chromosome translocation in a human leukemia T-cell line indicates that putative regulatory regions are not altered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finver, S.N.; Nishikura, K.; Finger, L.R.; Haluska, F.G.; Finan, J.; Nowell, P.C.; Croce, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    The authors cloned the translocation-associated and homologous normal MYC alleles from SKW-3, a leukemia T-cell line with the t(8; 14)(q24; q11) translocation, and determined the sequence of the MYC oncogene first exon and flanking 5' putative regulatory regions. S1 nuclease protection experiments utilizing a MYC first exon probe demonstrated transcriptional deregulation of the MYC gene associated with the T-cell receptor α locus on the 8q + chromosome of SKW-3 cells. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the translocation-associated (8q +) MYC allele identified a single base substitution within the upstream flanking region; the homologous nontranslocated allele contained an additional substitution and a two-base deletion. None of the deletions or substitutions localized to putative 5' regulatory regions. The MYC first exon sequence was germ line in both alleles. These results demonstrate that alterations within the putative 5' MYC regulatory regions are not necessarily involved in MYC deregulation in T-cell leukemias, and they show that juxtaposition of the T-cell receptor α locus to a germ-line MYC oncogene results in MYC deregulation

  1. Low-level chromosome 12 amplification in a primary lipoma of the lung: evidence for a pathogenetic relationship with common adipose tissue tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, J A; Roberts, C A; Degenhardt, J; Walker, C; Lackner, R; Linder, J

    1998-02-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of a primary lipoma of the lung removed from a 56-year-old woman revealed the presence of a supernumerary marker chromosome in all metaphase cells analyzed; namely, 47,XX,+mar. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first cytogenetic description of a primary lipoma of lung. Genetic analysis of intramuscular lipoma, atypical lipoma, and well-differentiated liposarcoma have revealed the presence of one to three supernumerary ring or giant marker chromosomes composed of chromosome 12 segments as the characteristic anomaly. The marker chromosome in the present case was shown to be composed entirely of chromosome 12 material by subsequent analysis with a chromosome 12-specific paint probe and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Thus, analogous to intramuscular lipoma, atypical lipoma, and well-differentiated liposarcoma, extra chromosome 12 material is present. These findings support a pathogenetic relationship between this lipoma of unusual anatomic location and common adipose tissue tumors.

  2. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camats, Nuria; Garcia, Francisca; Parrilla, Juan Jose; Calaf, Joaquim; Martin, Miguel; Caldes, Montserrat Garcia

    2008-01-01

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal cells

  3. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, Nuria [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Francisca [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, Juan Jose [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Calaf, Joaquim [Servei de Ginecologia i Obstetricia, Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Martin, Miguel [Departament de Pediatria, d' Obstetricia i Ginecologia i de Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caldes, Montserrat Garcia [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es

    2008-04-02

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p {<=} 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p {<=} 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal

  4. Cell survival and radiation induced chromosome aberrations. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauchinger, M.; Schmid, E.; Braselmann, H.

    1986-01-01

    Human peripheral lymphocytes were irradiated in whole blood with 0.5-4.0 Gy of 220 kVp X-rays and the frequency of chromosome aberrations was determined in 1st or 2nd division metaphases discriminated by fluorescence plus giemsa staining. Using the empirical distributions of aberrations among cells, cell survival and transmission of aberrations were investigated. Considering both daughter cells, we found that 20% of fragments and 55% of dicentrics or ring chromosomes are lost during the 1st cell division; i.e. cell survival rate from 1st to 2nd generation is mainly influenced by anaphase bridging of these two-hit aberrations. Cell survival to 2nd mitosis was calculated considering this situation and compared with the survival derived from the fraction of M1 cells without unstable aberrations. The resulting shouldered survival curves showed significantly different slopes, indicating that cell reproductive death is overestimated in the latter approach. (orig.)

  5. The effect of X-irradiation on the fertility and on the induction of meiotic chromosome rearrangements in mice and their first generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savkovic, N.; Pecevski, J.; Maric, N.; Radivojevic, D.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of whole-body or local irradiation with X-rays at a dose of 600 R on the induction of chromosomal translocations in the diakinesis metaphase I of the meiosis in treated and F 1 males has been examined along with their fertility. Our results show the high percentage of mortality in whole-body irradiated mice. The percentage of the fertility was 25% in whole-body, and 93.7% in locally irradiated males. The testis weight was also reduced. The percentage of chromosomal translocations in diakinesis, metaphase I, of the meiosis was higher after whole-body irradiation than after local irradiation. In F 1 males both types of irradiation induced chromosomal translocations. (orig.) [de

  6. The effect of X-irradiation on the fertility and the induction of meiotic chromosome rearrangements in mice and their first generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savkovic, N.; Pecevski, J.; Maric, N.; Radivojevic, D.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of whole-body and local irradiation with a dose of 600 X-rays on the induction of chromosomal translocations in Diakinesis-Metaphase I of meiosis in treated and F 1 males and their fertility have been examined. Our results showed the high percentage of mortality in whole-body irradiated mice. The percentage of fertility was 25% in whole-body, and 93,7% in locally irradiated males. The testis weight was also reduced. The percentage of chromosomal translocations in Diakinesis-Metaphase I of meiosis was greater after whole-body than after local irradiation. In F 1 males both types of irradiation induced chromosomal translocations. (orig.) [de

  7. Chromosome characterization of two varieties of Mangifera indica L.¹

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva Izabel Pierozzi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome studies were performed in two varieties of Mangifera indica L. (mango, 'IAC-140 Espadona' and in its progenitor 'Espada Stahl'. Both varieties showed 2n=40 chromosomes though the karyotype formulae were 8m + 10sm + 2sm s for 'Stahl' and 7m + 11sm + 2sm s for 'IAC-140'. The varieties showed moderate karyotype asymmetry which was estimated according to four different indices. Both varieties exhibited three chromosome pairs with silver impregnation after NOR-banding. The number of nucleoli within interphase cells varied from one, the commonest, to eight. The nucleolus persistent phenomenon was observed in more than 22% of metaphase cells of both varieties, seeing that in 'Stahl', up to two nucleoli were evidenced. This variety also showed one nucleolus in several anaphase cells. The studies were suitable for evidencing diversity at chromosomal level between these two varieties.

  8. Potent radio-protective effects of vitamins E and C on radiation induced DNA damage in gametes leading to lower frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei in subsequent embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossein Mozdarani

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: To compare the effects of parental and maternal exposure of NMRI mice with γ-rays on gametes in the absence or presence of vitamins E and C and subsequent cytogenetic damage in pre-implantation embryos generated from irradiated gametes. Materials and Methods: Male and female NMRI mice were whole body irradiated in the presence of 200 IU/Kg vitamin E and 100 μg/ml vitamin C. Various mating schemes were designed for mating of irradiated mice, e.g. mating irradiated male with non-irradiated female, irradiated female with non irradiated male or both male and female irradiated. About 68 h post coitus, 4-8-cell embryos were flushed out from oviducts and fixed on slides using standard methods in order to screen for chromosome abnormalities and micronuclei. Results: In control embryos, frequencies of abnormal metaphase and embryos with micronuclei was low and there was no significant difference between vitamins treated samples and controls. However there was an increase in both abnormal metaphases and micronuclei frequency in embryos generated after parental or maternal irradiation or both. Vitamin E effectively reduced the frequency of aneuploidy in all irradiated groups and vitamin C was very effective in reducing the frequencies of micronuclei. DRF calculated for both vitamins indicate that vitamin C is more potent than vitamin E in reducing clastogenic effects of gamma-rays in pre-implantation embryos. Conclusion: Data indicate that γ-irradiation affects spermatogenesis and preovulatory stage oocytes in male and female mice respectively. These effects might be due to DNA alterations in sperms and oocytes affecting meiotic segregations that may lead to chromosome abnormalities in subsequent embryos expressed as numerical chromosome abnormalities or micronuclei. Administration of vitamins E and C before irradiation effectively reduced the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities. The way these vitamins reduces genotoxic

  9. Tensor GSVD of Patient- and Platform-Matched Tumor and Normal DNA Copy-Number Profiles Uncovers Chromosome Arm-Wide Patterns of Tumor-Exclusive Platform-Consistent Alterations Encoding for Cell Transformation and Predicting Ovarian Cancer Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Preethi; Schomay, Theodore E.; Aiello, Katherine A.; Alter, Orly

    2015-01-01

    The number of large-scale high-dimensional datasets recording different aspects of a single disease is growing, accompanied by a need for frameworks that can create one coherent model from multiple tensors of matched columns, e.g., patients and platforms, but independent rows, e.g., probes. We define and prove the mathematical properties of a novel tensor generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD), which can simultaneously find the similarities and dissimilarities, i.e., patterns of varying relative significance, between any two such tensors. We demonstrate the tensor GSVD in comparative modeling of patient- and platform-matched but probe-independent ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma (OV) tumor, mostly high-grade, and normal DNA copy-number profiles, across each chromosome arm, and combination of two arms, separately. The modeling uncovers previously unrecognized patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent co-occurring copy-number alterations (CNAs). We find, first, and validate that each of the patterns across only 7p and Xq, and the combination of 6p+12p, is correlated with a patient’s prognosis, is independent of the tumor’s stage, the best predictor of OV survival to date, and together with stage makes a better predictor than stage alone. Second, these patterns include most known OV-associated CNAs that map to these chromosome arms, as well as several previously unreported, yet frequent focal CNAs. Third, differential mRNA, microRNA, and protein expression consistently map to the DNA CNAs. A coherent picture emerges for each pattern, suggesting roles for the CNAs in OV pathogenesis and personalized therapy. In 6p+12p, deletion of the p21-encoding CDKN1A and p38-encoding MAPK14 and amplification of RAD51AP1 and KRAS encode for human cell transformation, and are correlated with a cell’s immortality, and a patient’s shorter survival time. In 7p, RPA3 deletion and POLD2 amplification are correlated with DNA stability, and a longer survival. In Xq

  10. Tensor GSVD of patient- and platform-matched tumor and normal DNA copy-number profiles uncovers chromosome arm-wide patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent alterations encoding for cell transformation and predicting ovarian cancer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Sankaranarayanan

    Full Text Available The number of large-scale high-dimensional datasets recording different aspects of a single disease is growing, accompanied by a need for frameworks that can create one coherent model from multiple tensors of matched columns, e.g., patients and platforms, but independent rows, e.g., probes. We define and prove the mathematical properties of a novel tensor generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD, which can simultaneously find the similarities and dissimilarities, i.e., patterns of varying relative significance, between any two such tensors. We demonstrate the tensor GSVD in comparative modeling of patient- and platform-matched but probe-independent ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma (OV tumor, mostly high-grade, and normal DNA copy-number profiles, across each chromosome arm, and combination of two arms, separately. The modeling uncovers previously unrecognized patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent co-occurring copy-number alterations (CNAs. We find, first, and validate that each of the patterns across only 7p and Xq, and the combination of 6p+12p, is correlated with a patient's prognosis, is independent of the tumor's stage, the best predictor of OV survival to date, and together with stage makes a better predictor than stage alone. Second, these patterns include most known OV-associated CNAs that map to these chromosome arms, as well as several previously unreported, yet frequent focal CNAs. Third, differential mRNA, microRNA, and protein expression consistently map to the DNA CNAs. A coherent picture emerges for each pattern, suggesting roles for the CNAs in OV pathogenesis and personalized therapy. In 6p+12p, deletion of the p21-encoding CDKN1A and p38-encoding MAPK14 and amplification of RAD51AP1 and KRAS encode for human cell transformation, and are correlated with a cell's immortality, and a patient's shorter survival time. In 7p, RPA3 deletion and POLD2 amplification are correlated with DNA stability, and a longer survival

  11. Interchromosomal insertional translocation at Xq26.3 alters SOX3 expression in an individual with XX male sex reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Bryan; Hughes, James; Corbett, Mark; Shaw, Marie; Innes, Josie; Patel, Leena; Gecz, Jozef; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Thomas, Paul

    2015-05-01

    46,XX male sex reversal occurs in approximately 1: 20 000 live births and is most commonly caused by interchromosomal translocations of the Y-linked sex-determining gene, SRY. Rearrangements of the closely related SOX3 gene on the X chromosome are also associated with 46,XX male sex reversal. It has been hypothesized that sex reversal in the latter is caused by ectopic expression of SOX3 in the developing urogenital ridge where it triggers male development by acting as an analog of SRY. However, altered regulation of SOX3 in individuals with XX male sex reversal has not been demonstrated. Here we report a boy with SRY-negative XX male sex reversal who was diagnosed at birth with a small phallus, mixed gonads, and borderline-normal T. Molecular characterization of the affected individual was performed using array comparative genomic hybridization, fluorescent in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes, whole-genome sequencing, and RT-PCR expression analysis of lymphoblast cell lines. The affected male carries ∼774-kb insertion translocation from chromosome 1 into a human-specific palindromic sequence 82 kb distal to SOX3. Importantly, robust SOX3 expression was identified in cells derived from the affected individual but not from control XX or XY cells, indicating that the translocation has a direct effect on SOX3 regulation. This is the first demonstration of altered SOX3 expression in an individual with XX male sex reversal and suggests that SOX3 can substitute for SRY to initiate male development in humans.

  12. Studies on chromosome aberrations in workers occupationally exposed to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hyung; Oh, Hyeon Joo; Shim, Sun Bo; Roh, Hye Won; Lee, Hai Yong [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Soon Ja [Ewha Womens Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    Cytogenetic assays for unstable chromosomes were performed on 54 medical radiation workers who are occupationally exposed to radiation and 42 controls. A total of 15,577 metaphase cells were scored. The frequencies of dicentrics and acentric chromosomes on controls were 0.52*10{sup -3} and 0.82*10{sup -2}, respectively. On radiation workers those were 2.28*10{sup -3} and 1.34*10{sup -2}, respectively. Though the frequencies of all types of chromosome aberrations in the workers were higher than those in the controls, the only significant difference was found in the case of dicentrics (P < 0.01). When we considered exposure dose of recent one year, duration of employment and smoking habit in radiation worker, a slight increase was shown in frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations on these workers, but no statistical differences were observed (P > 0.05) except exposure dose of recent one year (P < 0.05). These results could indicate that low level exposure to ionizing radiation can induce unstable chromosome aberrations in blood lymphocytes.

  13. Identification of Y-Chromosome Sequences in Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Grecco, Roseane Lopes da; Trovó-Marqui, Alessandra Bernadete; Sousa, Tiago Alves de; Croce, Lilian Da; Balarin, Marly Aparecida Spadotto

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the presence of Y-chromosome sequences and determine their frequency in patients with Turner syndrome. The study included 23 patients with Turner syndrome from Brazil, who gave written informed consent for participating in the study. Cytogenetic analyses were performed in peripheral blood lymphocytes, with 100 metaphases per patient. Genomic DNA was also extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes, and gene sequences DYZ1, DYZ3, ZFY and SRY were amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction. The cytogenetic analysis showed a 45,X karyotype in 9 patients (39.2 %) and a mosaic pattern in 14 (60.8 %). In 8.7 % (2 out of 23) of the patients, Y-chromosome sequences were found. This prevalence is very similar to those reported previously. The initial karyotype analysis of these patients did not reveal Y-chromosome material, but they were found positive for Y-specific sequences in the lymphocyte DNA analysis. The PCR technique showed that 2 (8.7 %) of the patients with Turner syndrome had Y-chromosome sequences, both presenting marker chromosomes on cytogenetic analysis.

  14. Ultrastructural analysis of radiation induced chromosome breaks and rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.L.; Goyanes, V.J.; Campos, A.; Cajigal, D.

    1990-01-01

    Chinese Hamster chromosomes R-banded in vitro were gamma-irradiated and chromatid breaks and rearrangements examined by electron microscopy employing whole-mounting technique. Breaks were preferentially located at the point of transition between G- and R-bands where the chromosome showed an average diameter 71.65 % of the wide condensed R-bands. This result was similar to the average diameter of narrow G-bands. Three chromosomes which were thin sectioned presented their broken terminal end organized as a coil constituted by two 23 nm wide chromatin fibers coiling together. Coils diameter was 43.70 % of the mean chromatid diameter. The border of damage-breakage was analyzed in whole-mounted chromosomes where breaks were photoinduced in BrdU-substituted DNA. Measurements of the angle of the sharp border of damage with respect to the chromatid axis showed a tendency to be more perpendicular as condensation progressed. These results clearly correlate with the several levels of chromatin fiber organization of the metaphase chromosome. (author)

  15. Chromosome Characteristic of Peranakan Etawa (PE) Goat (Capra hircus Linn.) as Indonesian Local Breed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, A. R. I.; Ciptadi, G.; Warih, A. P.

    2018-02-01

    Chromosome characteristics of Peranakan Etawa (PE) goat needs to be analyzed because information about Indonesian goat races is very limited. The purpose of this research was to determine the characteristics of PE goat chromosome as basic data as one of the genetic local resources. Blood was collected from pair of PE goat at Sumber Sekar Field Laboratory, Faculty of Animal Husbandry, Brawijaya University, Malang. Blood cultured using standard cytogenetic technique and stained with G-Banding. Observations being done in metaphase cells and analyzed using Genus Cytovision Image. Chromosomes arranged and numbered by standard goat karyotype. The result of this research showed that PE goat had number of chromosomes 2n=60, consisting of 29 pairs of autosome and a pair of sex chromosomes. Female goat had average of total length (TL) of autosome ranged from 47.91 µm±6.46 to 22.12 µm±3.33. TL of chromosome X are 45.96 µm±4,59 and 44.45 µm±3,96. Centromeric index (Ci) of chromosome X, 31,74 and 32,80. PE goat had average of TL of autosome ranged from 58.20µm±6.72 to 18.97µm±2.82. TL of chromosome X is 56,42µm±7,38 and Y chromosome is 15,80 µm±3,24. Ci in chromosome X and Y are 19.34 and 46.84. These results concluded that the total of goat chromosome was 60 with types of autosomal chromosomes were acrocentric as many as 58 chromosomes and pair of sex chromosomes XX and XY, X classified as subtelocentric and Y submetacentric.

  16. Colchicine promotes a change in chromosome structure without loss of sister chromatid cohesion in prometaphase I-arrested bivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, E M; Parra, M T; Rufas, J S; Suja, J A

    2001-12-01

    In somatic cells colchicine promotes the arrest of cell division at prometaphase, and chromosomes show a sequential loss of sister chromatid arm and centromere cohesion. In this study we used colchicine to analyse possible changes in chromosome structure and sister chromatid cohesion in prometaphase I-arrested bivalents of the katydid Pycnogaster cucullata. After silver staining we observed that in colchicine-arrested prometaphase I bivalents, and in contrast to what was found in control bivalents, sister kinetochores appeared individualised and sister chromatid axes were completely separated all along their length. However, this change in chromosome structure occurred without loss of sister chromatid arm cohesion. We also employed the MPM-2 monoclonal antibody against mitotic phosphoproteins on control and colchicine-treated spermatocytes. In control metaphase I bivalents this antibody labelled the tightly associated sister kinetochores and the interchromatid domain. By contrast, in colchicine-treated prometaphase I bivalents individualised sister kinetochores appeared labelled, but the interchromatid domain did not show labelling. These results support the notion that MPM-2 phosphoproteins, probably DNA topoisomerase IIalpha, located in the interchromatid domain act as "chromosomal staples" associating sister chromatid axes in metaphase I bivalents. The disappearance of these chromosomal staples would induce a change in chromosome structure, as reflected by the separation of sister kinetochores and sister axes, but without a concomitant loss of sister chromatid cohesion.

  17. Chromosomal abnormalities in human glioblastomas: gain in chromosome 7p correlating with loss in chromosome 10q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, María del Mar; Fan, Xing; Muñoz, Jorge; Perot, Christine; Fauvet, Didier; Danglot, Giselle; Palacio, Ana; Madero, Pilar; Zazpe, Idoya; Portillo, Eduardo; Tuñón, Teresa; Martínez-Peñuela, José María; Alfaro, Jorge; Eiras, José; Bernheim, Alain; Castresana, Javier S

    2003-01-01

    Various genomic alterations have been detected in glioblastoma. Chromosome 7p, with the epidermal growth factor receptor locus, together with chromosome 10q, with the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted in chromosome 10 and deleted in malignant brain tumors-1 loci, and chromosome 9p, with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A locus, are among the most frequently damaged chromosomal regions in glioblastoma. In this study, we evaluated the genetic status of 32 glioblastomas by comparative genomic hybridization; the sensitivity of comparative genomic hybridization versus differential polymerase chain reaction to detect deletions at the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted in chromosome 10, deleted in malignant brain tumors-1, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A loci and amplifications at the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 locus; the frequency of genetic lesions (gain or loss) at 16 different selected loci (including oncogenes, tumor-suppressor genes, and proliferation markers) mapping on 13 different chromosomes; and the possible existence of a statistical association between any pair of molecular markers studied, to subdivide the glioblastoma entity molecularly. Comparative genomic hybridization showed that the most frequent region of gain was chromosome 7p, whereas the most frequent losses occurred on chromosomes 10q and 13q. The only statistically significant association was found for 7p gain and 10q loss. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Distamycin A/DAPI bands and the effects of 5-azacytidine on the chromosomes of the chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Haaf, T

    1984-01-01

    The chromosomes of the chimpanzee were stained with distamycin A/DAPI, which labels specific C-bands. Bright distamycin A/DAPI fluorescence was found in the heterochromatic regions of chromosomes 6, 11, 14 to 16, 18 to 20, and 23 and the Y. Lymphocyte cultures from chimpanzees were treated with low doses of 5-azacytidine during the last hours of culture. This cytosine analog induces highly distinct undercondensations in 28 heterochromatic regions of 19 chromosomes. These 5-azacytidine-sensitive regions are predominantly located in the terminal C-bands of the chromosomes. In vitro treatment with 5-azacytidine also preserves into the metaphase stage somatic pairings between the 5-azacytidine-sensitive heterochromatic regions in interphase nuclei. The homologies and differences regarding the chromosomal localization of distamycin A/DAPI-bright C-bands, 5-azacytidine-sensitive heterochromatin, 5-methylcytosine-rich DNA sequences, and satellite DNAs in the chimpanzee and man are discussed.

  19. Expression of a possible constitutional hot spot in sperm chromosomes of a patient treated for Wilms' tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genesca, A.; Miro, R.; Caballin, M.R.; Benet, J.; Navarro, J.; Templado, C.; Bonfill, X.; Egozcue, J.

    1987-01-01

    Sperm chromosomes were studied in a man who was treated for Wilms' tumor with radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) 18 years ago. Human pronuclear sperm chromosomes were obtained after penetration of zona-free hamster eggs. Eighty-nine sperm chromosome complements were analyzed; 12.4% of them showed structural anomalies. This percentage was statistically different from the one found in our laboratory for controls (p less than 0.05). Five of eleven structurally abnormal metaphases had the same aberration: fission of chromosome number1 with the breakpoint at or near the centromere. Breaks and rearrangements of chromosome number1, often involving the centromere region, are among the most frequent anomalies found in Wilms' tumor cells

  20. Comparative sequence analysis revealed altered chromosomal organization and a novel insertion sequence encoding DNA modification and potentially stress-related functions in an Escherichia coli O157:H7 foodborne isolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    We recently described the complete genome of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 strain NADC 6564, an isolate of strain 86-24 linked to the 1986 disease outbreak. In the current study, we compared the chromosomal sequence of NADC 6564 to the well-characterized chromosomal sequences of ...

  1. Morphological images analysis and chromosomic aberrations classification based on fuzzy logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Leonardo Peres

    2011-01-01

    This work has implemented a methodology for automation of images analysis of chromosomes of human cells irradiated at IEA-R1 nuclear reactor (located at IPEN, Sao Paulo, Brazil), and therefore subject to morphological aberrations. This methodology intends to be a tool for helping cytogeneticists on identification, characterization and classification of chromosomal metaphasic analysis. The methodology development has included the creation of a software application based on artificial intelligence techniques using Fuzzy Logic combined with image processing techniques. The developed application was named CHRIMAN and is composed of modules that contain the methodological steps which are important requirements in order to achieve an automated analysis. The first step is the standardization of the bi-dimensional digital image acquisition procedure through coupling a simple digital camera to the ocular of the conventional metaphasic analysis microscope. Second step is related to the image treatment achieved through digital filters application; storing and organization of information obtained both from image content itself, and from selected extracted features, for further use on pattern recognition algorithms. The third step consists on characterizing, counting and classification of stored digital images and extracted features information. The accuracy in the recognition of chromosome images is 93.9%. This classification is based on classical standards obtained at Buckton [1973], and enables support to geneticist on chromosomic analysis procedure, decreasing analysis time, and creating conditions to include this method on a broader evaluation system on human cell damage due to ionizing radiation exposure. (author)

  2. 6q deletion detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization using bacterial artificial chromosome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsass, Alessia; Mestichelli, Francesca; Ruggieri, Miriana; Gaspari, Paola; Pezzoni, Valerio; Vagnoni, Davide; Angelini, Mario; Angelini, Stefano; Bigazzi, Catia; Falcioni, Sadia; Troiani, Emanuela; Alesiani, Francesco; Catarini, Massimo; Attolico, Immacolata; Scortechini, Ilaria; Discepoli, Giancarlo; Galieni, Piero

    2013-07-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are known to occur at relatively low frequency (3-6%) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and they are more frequently observed in 6q21. Few data have been reported regarding other bands on 6q involved by cytogenetic alterations in CLL. The cytogenetic study was performed in nuclei and metaphases obtained after stimulation with a combination of CpG-oligonucleotide DSP30 and interleukin-2. Four bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones mapping regions in bands 6q16, 6q23, 6q25, 6q27 were used as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization in 107 CLL cases in order to analyze the occurrence and localization of 6q aberrations. We identified 11 cases (10.2%) with 6q deletion of 107 patients studied with CLL. The trends of survival curves and the treatment-free intervals (TFI) of patients with deletion suggest a better outcome than the other cytogenetic risk groups. We observed two subgroups with 6q deletion as the sole anomaly: two cases with 6q16 deletion, and three cases with 6q25.2-27 deletion. There were differences of age, stage, and TFI between both subgroups. By using BAC probes, we observed that 6q deletion has a higher frequency in CLL and is linked with a good prognosis. In addition, it was observed that the deletion in 6q16 appears to be the most frequent and, if present as the only abnormality, it could be associated with a most widespread disease. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Overexpression of eIF-5A2 in mice causes accelerated organismal aging by increasing chromosome instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Leilei

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amplification of 3q26 is one of the most frequent genetic alterations in many human malignancies. Recently, we isolated a novel oncogene eIF-5A2 within the 3q26 region. Functional study has demonstrated the oncogenic role of eIF-5A2 in the initiation and progression of human cancers. In the present study, we aim to investigate the physiological and pathological effect of eIF-5A2 in an eIF-5A2 transgenic mouse model. Methods An eIF-5A2 transgenic mouse model was generated using human eIF-5A2 cDNA. The eIF-5A2 transgenic mice were characterized by histological and immunohistochemistry analyses. The aging phenotypes were further characterized by wound healing, bone X-ray imaging and calcification analysis. Mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF were isolated to further investigate molecular mechanism of eIF-5A2 in aging. Results Instead of resulting in spontaneous tumor formation, overexpression of eIF-5A2 accelerated the aging process in adult transgenic mice. This included decreased growth rate and body weight, shortened life span, kyphosis, osteoporosis, delay of wound healing and ossification. Investigation of the correlation between cellular senescence and aging showed that cellular senescence is not required for the aging phenotypes in eIF-5A2 mice. Interestingly, we found that activation of eIF-5A2 repressed p19 level and therefore destabilized p53 in transgenic mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF cells. This subsequently allowed for the accumulation of chromosomal instability, such as errors in cell dividing during metaphase and anaphase. Additionally, a significantly increase in number of aneuploidy cells (p Conclusion These observations suggest that eIF-5A2 mouse models could accelerate organismal aging by increasing chromosome instability.

  4. Biological dosimetry by the triage dicentric chromosome assay - Further validation of international networking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, Ruth C., E-mail: Ruth.Wilkins@hc-sc.gc.ca [Health Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9 (Canada); Romm, Horst; Oestreicher, Ursula [Bundesamt fur Strahlenschutz, 38226 Salzgitter (Germany); Marro, Leonora [Health Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9 (Canada); Yoshida, Mitsuaki A. [Biological Dosimetry Section, Dept. of Dose Assessment, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, NIRS, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department Radiation Biology, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8564 (Japan); Suto, Y. [Biological Dosimetry Section, Dept. of Dose Assessment, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, NIRS, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Prasanna, Pataje G.S. [National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, Radiation Research Program, 6130 Executive Blvd., MSC 7440, Bethesda, MD 20892-7440 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Biological dosimetry is an essential tool for estimating radiation doses received to personnel when physical dosimetry is not available or inadequate. The current preferred biodosimetry method is based on the measurement of radiation-specific dicentric chromosomes in exposed individuals' peripheral blood lymphocytes. However, this method is labor-, time- and expertise-demanding. Consequently, for mass casualty applications, strategies have been developed to increase its throughput. One such strategy is to develop validated cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory networks, both national and international. In a previous study, the dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) was validated in our cytogenetic biodosimetry network involving five geographically dispersed laboratories. A complementary strategy to further enhance the throughput of the DCA among inter-laboratory networks is to use a triage DCA where dose assessments are made by truncating the labor-demanding and time-consuming metaphase spread analysis to 20 - 50 metaphase spreads instead of routine 500 - 1000 metaphase spread analysis. Our laboratory network also validated this triage DCA, however, these dose estimates were made using calibration curves generated in each laboratory from the blood samples irradiated in a single laboratory. In an emergency situation, dose estimates made using pre-existing calibration curves which may vary according to radiation type and dose rate and therefore influence the assessed dose. Here, we analyze the effect of using a pre-existing calibration curve on assessed dose among our network laboratories. The dose estimates were made by analyzing 1000 metaphase spreads as well as triage quality scoring and compared to actual physical doses applied to the samples for validation. The dose estimates in the laboratory partners were in good agreement with the applied physical doses and determined to be adequate for guidance in the treatment of acute radiation syndrome.

  5. Mitotic chromosome structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  6. Mitotic chromosome structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heermann, Dieter W., E-mail: heermann@tphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2012-07-15

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  7. Low grade mosaic for a complex supernumerary ring chromosome 18 in an adult patient with multiple congenital anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoogeboom A Jeannette M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cases have been reported of patients with a ring chromosome 18 replacing one of the normal chromosomes 18. Less common are patients with a supernumerary ring chromosomes 18. High resolution whole genome examination in patients with multiple congenital abnormalities might reveal cytogenetic abnormalities of an unexpected complexity. Results We report a 24 years old male patient with lower spinal anomalies, hypospadia, bifid scrotum, cryptorchism, anal atresia, kidney stones, urethra anomalies, radial dysplasia, and a hypoplastic thumb. Some of the anomalies overlap with the VACTERL association. Chromosome analysis of cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed an additional ring chromosome in 13% of the metaphases. Both parents had a normal karyotype, demonstrating the de novo origin of this ring chromosome. FISH analysis using whole chromosome paints showed that the additional chromosomal material was derived from chromosome 18. Chromosome analysis of cultured fibroblasts revealed only one cell with the supernumerary ring chromosome in the 400 analyzed. To characterize the ring chromosome in more detail peripheral blood derived DNA was analyzed using SNP-arrays. The array results indicated a 5 Mb gain of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 18q10-q11.2. FISH analysis using BAC-probes located in the region indicated the presence of 6 signals on the r(18 chromosome. In addition, microsatellite analysis demonstrated that the unique supernumerary ring chromosome was paternally derived and both normal copies showed biparental disomy. Conclusions We report on an adult patient with multiple congenital abnormalities who had in 13% of his cells a unique supernumerary ring chromosome 18 that was composed of 6 copies of the 5 Mb gene rich region of 18q11.

  8. Evaluation of rate of unstable chromosomal changes in human blood irradiated by X-rays: establishment of dose-response curve; Avaliação da taxa de alterações cromossômicas instáveis em sangue humano irradiado por Raios x: estabelecimento de curva dose-resposta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonça, J.C.G.; Mendes, M.E.; Melo, A.M.M.A., E-mail: july_cgm@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Silva, L.M.; Andrade, A.M.G.; Hwang, S.F.; Lima, F.F. [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Lab. de Dosimetria Biológica

    2017-07-01

    Since the discovery of ionizing radiation, and consequently of its properties, there has been an increasing in its use, which in turn has raised concerns about the biological damage that it could cause in exposed individuals. As a result, cytogenetic dosimetry has emerged: a method that can be used as a complement or, in the absence of physical dosimetry, relating the frequency of chromosomal changes found in the blood of the exposed individual and the dose absorbed through dose-response calibration curves. This work aimed to verify the frequencies of the unstable chromosomal changes in human blood lymphocytes irradiated by X-rays of 250 kVp with different absorbed doses and later establish the dose-response calibration curves. The irradiation was performed at the CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE, Brazil metrology service on a PANTAK X-ray machine, model HF 320. The blood samples had their lymphocytes cultured in culture media and, after the processing, the metaphases were obtained. The chromosomal alterations analyzed were chromosomes dicentric, ring and isolated actinic fragments. There was an increase in frequencies of all chromosomal changes with increased absorbed dose. The calibration curves of dicentric and dicentric + rings presented good adjustments with the values of the coefficients Y = 0.0013 + 0.0271D + 0.0556D{sup 2} (X{sup 2} = 10.36 / GL = 6) and Y = 0.0013 + 0.0263D + 0.0640D{sup 2} (X{sup 2} = 7.43 / GL = 6), respectively. The establishment of these curves enables the Laboratory of Biological Dosimetry of the CRCN/NE/CNEN-PE to estimate the dose absorbed by occupationally exposed individuals and in cases of radiological accidents.

  9. Detection of Alien Oryza punctata Kotschy Chromosomes in Rice, Oryza sativa L., by Genomic in situ Hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Yasui, Hideshi; Nonomura, Ken-ichi; Iwata, Nobuo; 安井, 秀; 野々村, 賢一; 岩田, 伸夫

    1997-01-01

    Genomic in situ hybridization (GIS H) using total Oryza punctata Kotschy genomic DNA as a probe was applied to detect alien chromosomes transferred from O. punctata (W1514: 2n=2x=24: BB) to O. sativa Japonica cultivar, Nipponbare (2n=2x=24: AA). Only 12 chromosomes in the interspecific hybrids (2n=3x=36: AAB) between autotetraploid of O. sativa cultivar Nipponbare and a diploid strain of O. punctata (W1514) showed intense staining by FITC in mitotic metaphase spreads. Only one homologous pair...

  10. When the genome plays dice: circumvention of the spindle assembly checkpoint and near-random chromosome segregation in multipolar cancer cell mitoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisselsson, David; Håkanson, Ulf; Stoller, Patrick; Marti, Dominik; Jin, Yuesheng; Rosengren, Anders H; Stewénius, Ylva; Kahl, Fredrik; Panagopoulos, Ioannis

    2008-04-02

    Normal cell division is coordinated by a bipolar mitotic spindle, ensuring symmetrical segregation of chromosomes. Cancer cells, however, occasionally divide into three or more directions. Such multipolar mitoses have been proposed to generate genetic diversity and thereby contribute to clonal evolution. However, this notion has been little validated experimentally. Chromosome segregation and DNA content in daughter cells from multipolar mitoses were assessed by multiphoton cross sectioning and fluorescence in situ hybridization in cancer cells and non-neoplastic transformed cells. The DNA distribution resulting from multipolar cell division was found to be highly variable, with frequent nullisomies in the daughter cells. Time-lapse imaging of H2B/GFP-labelled multipolar mitoses revealed that the time from the initiation of metaphase to the beginning of anaphase was prolonged and that the metaphase plates often switched polarity several times before metaphase-anaphase transition. The multipolar metaphase-anaphase transition was accompanied by a normal reduction of cellular cyclin B levels, but typically occurred before completion of the normal separase activity cycle. Centromeric AURKB and MAD2 foci were observed frequently to remain on the centromeres of multipolar ana-telophase chromosomes, indicating that multipolar mitoses were able to circumvent the spindle assembly checkpoint with some sister chromatids remaining unseparated after anaphase. Accordingly, scoring the distribution of individual chromosomes in multipolar daughter nuclei revealed a high frequency of nondisjunction events, resulting in a near-binomial allotment of sister chromatids to the daughter cells. The capability of multipolar mitoses to circumvent the spindle assembly checkpoint system typically results in a near-random distribution of chromosomes to daughter cells. Spindle multipolarity could thus be a highly efficient generator of genetically diverse minority clones in transformed cell

  11. When the genome plays dice: circumvention of the spindle assembly checkpoint and near-random chromosome segregation in multipolar cancer cell mitoses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gisselsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Normal cell division is coordinated by a bipolar mitotic spindle, ensuring symmetrical segregation of chromosomes. Cancer cells, however, occasionally divide into three or more directions. Such multipolar mitoses have been proposed to generate genetic diversity and thereby contribute to clonal evolution. However, this notion has been little validated experimentally. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chromosome segregation and DNA content in daughter cells from multipolar mitoses were assessed by multiphoton cross sectioning and fluorescence in situ hybridization in cancer cells and non-neoplastic transformed cells. The DNA distribution resulting from multipolar cell division was found to be highly variable, with frequent nullisomies in the daughter cells. Time-lapse imaging of H2B/GFP-labelled multipolar mitoses revealed that the time from the initiation of metaphase to the beginning of anaphase was prolonged and that the metaphase plates often switched polarity several times before metaphase-anaphase transition. The multipolar metaphase-anaphase transition was accompanied by a normal reduction of cellular cyclin B levels, but typically occurred before completion of the normal separase activity cycle. Centromeric AURKB and MAD2 foci were observed frequently to remain on the centromeres of multipolar ana-telophase chromosomes, indicating that multipolar mitoses were able to circumvent the spindle assembly checkpoint with some sister chromatids remaining unseparated after anaphase. Accordingly, scoring the distribution of individual chromosomes in multipolar daughter nuclei revealed a high frequency of nondisjunction events, resulting in a near-binomial allotment of sister chromatids to the daughter cells. CONCLUSION: The capability of multipolar mitoses to circumvent the spindle assembly checkpoint system typically results in a near-random distribution of chromosomes to daughter cells. Spindle multipolarity could thus be a highly efficient

  12. Direct kinetochore-spindle pole connections are not required for chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Magidson, Valentin; Steinman, Jonathan B; He, Jie; Le Berre, Maël; Tikhonenko, Irina; Ault, Jeffrey G; McEwen, Bruce F; Chen, James K; Sui, Haixin; Piel, Matthieu; Kapoor, Tarun M; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2014-07-21

    Segregation of genetic material occurs when chromosomes move to opposite spindle poles during mitosis. This movement depends on K-fibers, specialized microtubule (MT) bundles attached to the chromosomes' kinetochores. A long-standing assumption is that continuous K-fibers connect every kinetochore to a spindle pole and the force for chromosome movement is produced at the kinetochore and coupled with MT depolymerization. However, we found that chromosomes still maintained their position at the spindle equator during metaphase and segregated properly during anaphase when one of their K-fibers was severed near the kinetochore with a laser microbeam. We also found that, in normal fully assembled spindles, K-fibers of some chromosomes did not extend to the spindle pole. These K-fibers connected to adjacent K-fibers and/or nonkinetochore MTs. Poleward movement of chromosomes with short K-fibers was uncoupled from MT depolymerization at the kinetochore. Instead, these chromosomes moved by dynein-mediated transport of the entire K-fiber/kinetochore assembly. Thus, at least two distinct parallel mechanisms drive chromosome segregation in mammalian cells.

  13. Chromosomal analysis in mouse eggs fertilized in vitro with sperm exposed to ultraviolet light (UV) and methyl and ethyl methanesulfonate (MMS and EMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Tobari, I.

    1988-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations were analyzed at the first-cleavage metaphase of mouse eggs fertilized in vitro with sperm exposed to ultraviolet light (UV) as well as to methyl and ethyl methanesulfonate (MMS and EMS). The frequencies of chromosome aberrations markedly increased with dose of UV as well as with concentration of MMS and EMS. In the UV-irradiation group, the frequency of chromosome-type aberrations was much higher than that of chromatid-type aberrations. About 90% of chromosome aberrations observed in the eggs following MMS and EMS treatment to sperm were chromosome type in which the frequency of chromosome fragments was the highest. The effects of UV on the induction of chromosome aberrations were clearly potentiated by post-treatment incubation of fertilized eggs in the presence of Ara-C or caffeine, but the effects of MMS and EMS were not pronounced by post-treatment of Ara-C or caffeine. The results indicate a possibility that UV damage induced in mouse sperm DNA is reparable in the eggs during the period between the entry of sperm into the egg cytoplasm and the first-cleavage metaphase. 35 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs

  14. Development of a biological dosimeter for translocation scoring based on two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization of chromosome subsets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, S; Cremer, T [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Human Genetics and Anthropology

    1992-03-01

    Recently fluorescence in situ hybridization protocols have been developed which allow the paining of individual chromosomes using DNA-libraries from sorted human chromosomes. This approach has the particular advantage that radiation induced chromosome translocations can be easily detected, if chromosomes of distinctly different colors take part in the translocation event. To enhance the sensitivity of this approach two metaphase chromosome subsets A and B (A: chromosome 1, 2, 4, 8, 16; B: 3, 5, 9, 10, 13) were simultaneously painted in green and red color. Counterstaining of the chromosomes with DAPI resulted in a third subset which exhibited blue fluorescence only. Green-red, green-blue and red-blue translocation chromosomes could be easily detected after irradiation of lymphocyte cultures with {sup 137}Cs-{gamma}-rays. Analyses of painted chromosomes can be combined with conventional GTG-banding analyses. This new biological dosimeter should become useful to monitor both long term effects of single irradiation events and the cumulative effects of multiple or chronic irradiation exposure. In contrast to translocation scoring based on the analysis of banded chromosomes, this new approach has the particular advantage that a rapid, automated scoring of translocations can now be envisaged. (author).

  15. Aneuploidy in immortalized human mesenchymal stem cells with non-random loss of chromosome 13 in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Masao; Takeuchi, Kikuko; Ozawa, Yutaka; Kohara, Akihiro; Mizusawa, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Aneuploidy (an abnormal number of chromosomes) is commonly observed in most human cancer cells, highlighting the need to examine chromosomal instability in tumorigenesis. Previously, the immortalized human mesenchymal stem cell line UE6E7T-3 was shown to undergo a preferential loss of one copy of chromosome 13 after prolonged culture. Here, the loss of chromosome 13 was found to be caused by chromosome missegregation during mitosis, which involved unequal segregation, exclusion of the misaligned chromosome 13 on the metaphase plate, and trapping of chromosome 13 in the midbody region, as observed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Near-diploid aneuploidy, not tetraploidy, was the direct result. The loss of chromosome 13 was non-random, and was detected by analysis of microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphism-based loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Of the five microsatellite loci on chromosome 13, four loci showed microsatellite instability at an early stage in culture, and LOH was apparent at a late stage in culture. These results suggest that the microsatellite mutations cause changes in centromere integrity provoking loss of this chromosome in the UE6E7T-3 cell line. Thus, these results support the use of this cell line as a useful model for understanding the mechanism of aneuploid formation in cell cultures.

  16. Chromosome damage in Chinese hamster cells produced by 125I-UdR at the site of its incorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, W.L.; Weinblatt, A.C.; Prensky, W.

    1978-01-01

    Metaphase chromosomal aberrations were produced by 125 I-labeled iododeoxyuridine ( 125 I-UdR) incorporated into Chinese hamster Don cells at the end of the S-period of the cell cycle. Chromosome damage and the number of autoradiographic silver grains were recorded for whole cells, for chromosome pairs 4 and 5 and for the X and the Y chromosomes. The X and the Y chromosomes, which label late in S, were at least twice as heavily labeled as chromosome pairs 4 and 5 - two readily recognizable autosomes of similar size. The incidence of chromosome damage was at least six times that which would have been expected from equivalent doses of X-rays and the incidence of damage was directly related to the number of silver grains over each chromosome. It is estimated that it takes four to ten disintegrations to produce a visible chromosome aberration. The finding that chromosome damage is localized at the site of the 125 I decay is most readily explained by the high flux of low energy Auger electrons occurring at the site of the decay of the incorporated 125 I atom. (Auth.)

  17. Incidence of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei in cave tour guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilban, M; Bilban-Jakopin, C; Vrhovec, S

    2001-01-01

    An analysis of structural chromosomal aberrations (SCA) and micronucleus tests (MN) were performed in 38 subjects, cave tour guides and in appropriate control group. The dominant type of chromosomal aberrations in tourist guides were chromosomal breaks (0.013 per cell) and acentric fragments (0.011 per cell). In the control group, these aberrations were present up to 0.008 on cells. Considering the analysed cells of the guides in total (33,556), the incidence of dicentric and rings range is below 0.0008 on cells, even though three dicentric and ring chromosoms were found already in the first 1000 in vitro metaphases of some guides. Only 0.0003 dicentrics and neither other translocations were found in control group (ambiental exposure). The incidence of micronuclei in cytokinesis blocked lymphocytes ranged from 12-32 per 500 CB cells in the cave tour guides and from 4-11 per 500 CB cells in control group. Measurements of radon and its daughters were performed at different locations in the cave. Annual doses from 40-60 mSv were estimated per 2000 work hours for cave guides. The changes found in the genome of somatic cells may be related to the exposure doses of radon and its daughters, although smoking should not be ignored.

  18. Induction of chromosomal aberrations by neutron capture reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takaji

    1993-01-01

    Boron neutron capture reaction (B-NCR) has been practiced in the treatment of malignancies of the central nervous system and melanoma using a thermal neutron beam from the KUR. Because of the very large neutron absorption cross-section and high kinetic energy released, gadolinium (Gd-157) has been expected to be an another promising element for neutron capture therapy. The dose-response relationship was determined for the induction of chromosomal aberrations by neutron capture reactions by B-10 and Gd-157 in cultured mammalian cells. The cells were exposed to thermal neutron beam with and without B-10 enriched (97 atom %) boric acid or Gd-DTPA, and chromosome-type aberrations were analysed in the first metaphases following irradiation. The frequency of dicentrics and rings increased linearly with neutron fluence either in the presence or absence of B-10 boric acid, while the yield of chromosomal aberrations induced by Gd-NCR increased in a linear quadratic fashion as a function of dose as in γ-rayed cells. Survival curves for the cells exposed to thermal neutrons showed no shoulder irrespective of the loading of B-10, but Gd-NCR produced the survival curve with a small shoulder. The differential chromosomal response to B-NCR and Gd-NCR might reflect the difference in radiation quality generated from the two types of thermal neutron capture reaction. (J.P.N.)

  19. The use of premature chromosome condensation to study in interphase cells the influence of environmental factors on human genetic material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki I. Hatzi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is a constantly increasing concern regarding the mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of a variety of harmful environmental factors to which humans are exposed in their natural and anthropogenic environment. These factors exert their hazardous potential in humans' personal (diet, smoking, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and occupational environment that constitute part of the anthropogenic environment. It is well known that genetic damage due to these factors has dramatic implications for human health. Since most of the environmental genotoxic factors induce arrest or delay in cell cycle progression, the conventional analysis of chromosomes at metaphase may underestimate their genotoxic potential. Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC induced either by means of cell fusion or specific chemicals, enables the microscopic visualization of interphase chromosomes whose morphology depends on the cell cycle stage, as well as the analysis of structural and numerical aberrations at the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. The PCC has been successfully used in problems involving cell cycle analysis, diagnosis and prognosis of human leukaemia, assessment of interphase chromosome malformations resulting from exposure to radiation or chemicals, as well as elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the conversion of DNA damage into chromosomal damage. In this report, particular emphasis is given to the advantages of the PCC methodology used as an alternative to conventional metaphase analysis in answering questions in the fields of radiobiology, biological dosimetry, toxicogenetics, clinical cytogenetics and experimental therapeutics.

  20. Nucleoplasmic bridges are a sensitive measure of chromosome rearrangement in the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenech, M.; Umegaki, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We have performed experiments using the WIL2-NS human B-lymphoblastoid cell line and primary human lymphocytes to (a) determine the importance of including measurements of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) in the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay and (b) provide evidence that NPB originate from dicentric chromosomes and centric ring chromosomes. In addition we describe theoretical models that explain how dicentric chromosomes and centric ring chromosomes may result in the formation of NPB at anaphase. The results with WIL2-NS showed that it was possible to distinguish genotoxic effects induced by different oxidizing agents in terms of the NPB/micronucleus frequency ratio. The results with lymphocytes indicated a strong correlation (a) between NPB, centric ring chromosomes and dicentric chromosomes in metaphases (R>0.93, P 0.93, P<0.0001). The dose-response curves with gamma rays were very similar for NPB, ring chromosomes and dicentric chromosomes, as were the dose-responses for MNi, acentric rings and fragments. However, not all acentric chromosomes and dicentric chromosomes/centric rings were converted to MNi and NPB respectively, depending on the dose of radiation. Preliminary data, using FISH, suggests that NPB often represent DNA from a structural rearrangement involving only one or two homologous chromosomes. The results from this study validate the inclusion of NPB in the CBMN assay which provides a valuable measure of chromosome breakage/ rearrangement that was otherwise not available in the micronucleus assay. The CBMN assay allows NPB measurement to be achieved reliably because inhibition of cytokinesis prevents the loss of NPB that would otherwise occur if cells were allowed to divide

  1. An approach to automated chromosome analysis; Etudes pour une methode d'automatisation des analyses chromosomiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Go, Roland

    1972-05-03

    The methods of approach developed with a view to automatic processing of the different stages of chromosome analysis are described in this study divided into three parts. Part 1 relates the study of automated selection of metaphase spreads, which operates a decision process in order to reject ail the non-pertinent images and keep the good ones. This approach has been achieved by Computing a simulation program that has allowed to establish the proper selection algorithms in order to design a kit of electronic logical units. Part 2 deals with the automatic processing of the morphological study of the chromosome complements in a metaphase: the metaphase photographs are processed by an optical-to-digital converter which extracts the image information and writes it out as a digital data set on a magnetic tape. For one metaphase image this data set includes some 200 000 grey values, encoded according to a 16, 32 or 64 grey-level scale, and is processed by a pattern recognition program isolating the chromosomes and investigating their characteristic features (arm tips, centromere areas), in order to get measurements equivalent to the lengths of the four arms. Part 3 studies a program of automated karyotyping by optimized pairing of human chromosomes. The data are derived from direct digitizing of the arm lengths by means of a BENSON digital reader. The program supplies' 1/ a list of the pairs, 2/ a graphic representation of the pairs so constituted according to their respective lengths and centromeric indexes, and 3/ another BENSON graphic drawing according to the author's own representation of the chromosomes, i.e. crosses with orthogonal arms, each branch being the accurate measurement of the corresponding chromosome arm. This conventionalized karyotype indicates on the last line the really abnormal or non-standard images unpaired by the program, which are of special interest for the biologist. (author) [French] Ce travail expose les methodes d'approche etudiees en vue

  2. Chromosome aberration analysis in peripheral lymphocytes of Gulf war and Balkans war veterans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, H.; Heimers, A.; Frentzel-Beyme, R.; Schott, A.; Hoffmann, W

    2003-07-01

    Chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) were determined in standard peripheral lymphocyte metaphase preparations of 13 British Gulf War veterans, two veterans of the recent war in the Balkans, and one veteran of both wars. All 16 volunteers suspect exposures to depleted uranium while deployed at the two different theatres of war in 1990 and later on. The Bremen laboratory control served as a reference in this study. Compared with this control there was a statistically significant increase in the frequency of dicentric chromosomes (dic) and centric ring chromosomes (cR) in the veterans' group, indicating a previous exposure to ionising radiation. The statistically significant overdispersion of dic and cR indicates non-uniform irradiation as would be expected after non-uniform exposure and/or exposure to radiation with a high linear energy transfer. The frequency of SCEs was decreased when compared with the laboratory control. (author)

  3. Chromosome aberration analysis in peripheral lymphocytes of Gulf war and Balkans war veterans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, H.; Heimers, A.; Frentzel-Beyme, R.; Schott, A.; Hoffmann, W.

    2003-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) were determined in standard peripheral lymphocyte metaphase preparations of 13 British Gulf War veterans, two veterans of the recent war in the Balkans, and one veteran of both wars. All 16 volunteers suspect exposures to depleted uranium while deployed at the two different theatres of war in 1990 and later on. The Bremen laboratory control served as a reference in this study. Compared with this control there was a statistically significant increase in the frequency of dicentric chromosomes (dic) and centric ring chromosomes (cR) in the veterans' group, indicating a previous exposure to ionising radiation. The statistically significant overdispersion of dic and cR indicates non-uniform irradiation as would be expected after non-uniform exposure and/or exposure to radiation with a high linear energy transfer. The frequency of SCEs was decreased when compared with the laboratory control. (author)

  4. Nonrandom distribuion of chromosome breaks in cultured lymphocytes of normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayme, S.; Mattei, J.F.; Mattei, M.G.; Aurran, Y.; Giraud, F.

    1976-02-29

    Breakpoint distribution was studied from cultured lymphocytes on 7653 metaphases from 524 subjects whose karyotypes were normal. The mean break rate was 5% in both sexes. The frequency increased significantly after 40 years and varied during the year. The location of the breaks was very different from the expected random distribution. The break frequency for each chromosome was different according to the type of break (chromatid, simple chromosomal and chromosomal involving rearrangements). The location of the breaks was also studied according to the type of band and with respect to the centromere. A comparison between spontaneous breaks, x-ray induced breaks, breaks in Fanconi's anemia and in congenital rearrangements, show very significant differences.

  5. Chromosomal sensitivity to X-rays in lymphocytes from patients with Turner syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heras, J.G.; Coco, R.

    1986-01-01

    Lymphocytes from patients with Turner syndrome were irradiated with X-rays to determine the chromosomal aberration frequency in first-division metaphases. Five patients with 45,X karyotype; three 45,X/46,Xi(X)q mosaics; one 45,X/47,XXX mosaic and 9 female controls were studied. Patients with a 45,X karyotype exhibited a radioinduced chromosomal aberration frequency similar to controls. In the mosaics, 45,X cells has a mean frequency of 38.75 +- 2.16; 46,Xi(X)q cells a mean of 38 +- 2.16 and the control group a rate of 36.25 +- 4.32. No differences were observed between 45,X and 46,Xi(X)q cells, 45,X and normal cells or 46,Xi(X)q and normal cells. Apparently neither the X monosomy nor the Xq isochromosome influences the 'in vitro' X-ray-induced chromosomal damage in Turner syndrome lymphocytes. (Auth.)

  6. Chromosome investigations on persons whose mothers have been treated with ionizing radiations during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanebuth, P.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis reports on chromosome investigations on seven persons between 2 and 26 years of age who, during their prenatal life, have been exposed to ionizing radiation. The metaphase chromosomes from peripheral lymphocytes, obtained by standard cytogenic methods, have been scanned for numerical and structural aberrations after a culture period of two or three days. Comparison with non-irradiated specimens revealed a summarily slight increase in the occurrence of some structural aberrations in the irradiated material. The differences are smaller in number than the rate of deviation to be accounted to culturing techniques so that one cannot deduce a radiation-induced impairment from these results. As one of the persons investigated has been undergoing longterm therapy with anticonvulsive drugs, this case is discussed separately. In another case, new staining methods (G, C, or Q-bands) together with an investigation of material from the father, revealed a particularly small Y-chromosome. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Cyc17, a meiosis-specific cyclin, is essential for anaphase initiation and chromosome segregation in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guan-Xiong; Dang, Huai; Tian, Miao; Zhang, Jing; Shodhan, Anura; Ning, Ying-Zhi; Xiong, Jie; Miao, Wei

    2016-07-17

    Although the role of cyclins in controlling nuclear division is well established, their function in ciliate meiosis remains unknown. In ciliates, the cyclin family has undergone massive expansion which suggests that diverse cell cycle systems exist, and this warrants further investigation. A screen for cyclins in the model ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila showed that there are 34 cyclins in this organism. Only 1 cyclin, Cyc17, contains the complete cyclin core and is specifically expressed during meiosis. Deletion of CYC17 led to meiotic arrest at the diakinesis-like metaphase I stage. Expression of genes involved in DNA metabolism and chromosome organization (chromatin remodeling and basic chromosomal structure) was repressed in cyc17 knockout matings. Further investigation suggested that Cyc17 is involved in regulating spindle pole attachment, and is thus essential for chromosome segregation at meiosis. These findings suggest a simple model in which chromosome segregation is influenced by Cyc17.

  8. Localization of introduced genes on the chromosomes of transgenic barley, wheat and triticale by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C.; Zimny, J.; Becker, D.

    1997-01-01

    Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) we localized introduced genes on metaphase chromosomes of barley, wheat, and triticale transformed by microprojectile bombardment of microspores and scutellar tissue with the pDB1 plasmid containing the uidA and bar genes. Thirteen integration sites...... of single-copy integrations. There was a slight tendency towards the localization of transgenes in distal chromosome regions. Using the GAA-satellite sequence for chromosome banding, the chromosomes containing the inserted genes were identified in most cases. Two barley lines derived from the same...... transformant showed a totally different integration pattern. Southern analysis confirmed that the inserted genes were segregating independently, resulting in different integration patterns among the progeny lines. The application of the FISH technique for the analysis of transgenic plants is discussed....

  9. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...... to women having amniocentesis, although considered not to have any increased risk of fetal chromosome abnormality (1390 pregnancies, group B). They were also compared with 750 consecutive pregnancies in women 25-34 years of age, in whom all heritable diseases were excluded (group C). The risk of unbalanced...

  10. Direct kinetochore–spindle pole connections are not required for chromosome segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Magidson, Valentin; Steinman, Jonathan B.; He, Jie; Le Berre, Maël; Tikhonenko, Irina; Ault, Jeffrey G.; McEwen, Bruce F.; Chen, James K.; Sui, Haixin; Piel, Matthieu; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2014-01-01

    Segregation of genetic material occurs when chromosomes move to opposite spindle poles during mitosis. This movement depends on K-fibers, specialized microtubule (MT) bundles attached to the chromosomes′ kinetochores. A long-standing assumption is that continuous K-fibers connect every kinetochore to a spindle pole and the force for chromosome movement is produced at the kinetochore and coupled with MT depolymerization. However, we found that chromosomes still maintained their position at the spindle equator during metaphase and segregated properly during anaphase when one of their K-fibers was severed near the kinetochore with a laser microbeam. We also found that, in normal fully assembled spindles, K-fibers of some chromosomes did not extend to the spindle pole. These K-fibers connected to adjacent K-fibers and/or nonkinetochore MTs. Poleward movement of chromosomes with short K-fibers was uncoupled from MT depolymerization at the kinetochore. Instead, these chromosomes moved by dynein-mediated transport of the entire K-fiber/kinetochore assembly. Thus, at least two distinct parallel mechanisms drive chromosome segregation in mammalian cells. PMID:25023516

  11. Evaluation of chromosomal aberrations in radiologists and medical radiographers chronically exposed to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuba, V.; Rozgaj, R.; Jazbec, A.

    2005-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are fairly reliable indicators of damage induced by ionising radiation. This study included 180 radiologists and medical radiographers (technicians) and 90 controls who were not occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. All exposed subjects were routinely monitored with film badge, and none was exposed to a radiation dose exceeding the limit for occupational exposure recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Two hundred metaphases for each person were scored. The frequencies of acentric fragments, dicentrics, ring chromosomes and chromosomal exchanges were determined and compared to those obtained in the control group. Chromosome aberrations were analysed using Poisson regression for profession, age, sex, smoking and years of exposure. Age, smoking, diagnostic exposure to X-rays and occupation were found to correlate with the occurrence of acentric fragments. The influence of exposure duration on the frequency of acentric fragments was greater in medical radiographers than in radiologists. Smoking and sex were found to correlate with the occurrence of dicentric chromosomes, which were more common in men than in women. As chromosome aberrations exceeded the expected level with respect to the absorbed dose, our findings confirm the importance of chromosome analysis as a part of regular medical check-up of subjects occupationally exposed to ionising radiation.(author)

  12. Damage of chromosomes in mouse bone marrow cells after combined treatment with gamma radiation and cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupova, Ivanka

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Current approaches to successful management of malignancy include combined modalities of treatment with ionizing radiation and anticancer drugs. Together with tumor cells normal tissues and cells are also submitted to the damaging effect of these agents, creating thus a probability for development of secondary neoplastic processes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the rate of chromosome damage at different modalities of combined exposures to gamma irradiation and cyclophosphamide(CY) of mice. Chromosomal aberration frequency in metaphase bone marrow cells was used as a measure to evaluate the effect. Combination treatments with 3 Gy gamma irradiation and 20 mg/kg cyclophosphamide were given at different intervals - simultaneously or at 12 hr interval, in order to establish the conditions and factors influencing the rate of chromosome damage. The distribution of different types of chromosome aberrations, such as chromatid fragments, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments and chromosome exchanges was analyzed. The results showed a high synergistic effect at simultaneous treatment with both agents if assessed by the index of aberrations per cell (%). An attempt has been made to suggest a possible explanation of the effects at different combined treatments related to the type of induced chromosomal aberrations. (author)

  13. Cytogenetic analysis of quinoa chromosomes using nanoscale imaging and spectroscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangquanwei, Zhong; Neethirajan, Suresh; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2013-11-01

    Here we present a high-resolution chromosomal spectral map derived from synchrotron-based soft X-ray spectromicroscopy applied to quinoa species. The label-free characterization of quinoa metaphase chromosomes shows that it consists of organized substructures of DNA-protein complex. The analysis of spectra of chromosomes using the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) and its superposition of the pattern with the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images proves that it is possible to precisely locate the gene loci and the DNA packaging inside the chromosomes. STXM has been successfully used to distinguish and quantify the DNA and protein components inside the quinoa chromosomes by visualizing the interphase at up to 30-nm spatial resolution. Our study represents the successful attempt of non-intrusive interrogation and integrating imaging techniques of chromosomes using synchrotron STXM and AFM techniques. The methodology developed for 3-D imaging of chromosomes with chemical specificity and temporal resolution will allow the nanoscale imaging tools to emerge from scientific research and development into broad practical applications such as gene loci tools and biomarker libraries.

  14. An automatic system to search, acquire, and analyse chromosomal aberrations obtained using FISH technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Chromosomal aberrations (CA) analysis in peripheral blood lymphocytes is useful both in prenatal diagnoses and cancer cytogenetics, as well as in toxicology to determine the biologically significant dose of specific, both physical and chemical, genotoxic agents to which an individual is exposed. A useful cytogenetic technique for CAs analysis is Fluorescence-in-situ-Hybridization (FISH) which simplifies the automatic Identification and characterisation of aberrations, allowing the visualisation of chromosomes as bright signals on a dark background, and a fast analysis of stable aberrations, which are particularly interesting for late effects. The main limitation of CA analysis is the rarity with which these events occur, and therefore the time necessary to single out a statistically significant number of aberrant cells. In order to address this problem, a prototype system, capable of automatically searching, acquiring, and recognising chromosomal images of samples prepared using FISH, has been developed. The system is able to score large number of samples in a reasonable time using predefined search criteria. The system is based on the appropriately implemented and characterised automatic metaphase finder Metafer4 (MetaSystems), coupled with a specific module for the acquisition of high magnification metaphase images with any combination of fluorescence filters. These images are then analysed and classified using our software. The prototype is currently capable of separating normal metaphase images from presumed aberrant ones. This system is currently in use in our laboratories both by ourselves and by other researchers not involved in its development, in order to carry out analyses of CAs induced by ionising radiation. The prototype allows simple acquisition and management of large quantities of images and makes it possible to carry out methodological studies -such as the comparison of results obtained by different operators- as well as increasing the

  15. Human interphase chromosomes: a review of available molecular cytogenetic technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurov Yuri B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human karyotype is usually studied by classical cytogenetic (banding techniques. To perform it, one has to obtain metaphase chromosomes of mitotic cells. This leads to the impossibility of analyzing all the cell types, to moderate cell scoring, and to the extrapolation of cytogenetic data retrieved from a couple of tens of mitotic cells to the whole organism, suggesting that all the remaining cells possess these genomes. However, this is far from being the case inasmuch as chromosome abnormalities can occur in any cell along ontogeny. Since somatic cells of eukaryotes are more likely to be in interphase, the solution of the problem concerning studying postmitotic cells and larger cell populations is interphase cytogenetics, which has become more or less applicable for specific biomedical tasks due to achievements in molecular cytogenetics (i.e. developments of fluorescence in situ hybridization -- FISH, and multicolor banding -- MCB. Numerous interphase molecular cytogenetic approaches are restricted to studying specific genomic loci (regions being, however, useful for identification of chromosome abnormalities (aneuploidy, polyploidy, deletions, inversions, duplications, translocations. Moreover, these techniques are the unique possibility to establish biological role and patterns of nuclear genome organization at suprachromosomal level in a given cell. Here, it is to note that this issue is incompletely worked out due to technical limitations. Nonetheless, a number of state-of-the-art molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e multicolor interphase FISH or interpahase chromosome-specific MCB allow visualization of interphase chromosomes in their integrity at molecular resolutions. Thus, regardless numerous difficulties encountered during studying human interphase chromosomes, molecular cytogenetics does provide for high-resolution single-cell analysis of genome organization, structure and behavior at all stages of cell cycle.

  16. Non-random distribution of instability-associated chromosomal rearrangement breakpoints in human lymphoblastoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Stephen R.; Papworth, David; Grosovsky, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    Genomic instability is observed in tumors and in a large fraction of the progeny surviving irradiation. One of the best-characterized phenotypic manifestations of genomic instability is delayed chromosome aberrations. Our working hypothesis for the current study was that if genomic instability is in part attributable to cis mechanisms, we should observe a non-random distribution of chromosomes or sites involved in instability-associated rearrangements, regardless of radiation quality, dose, or trans factor expression. We report here the karyotypic examination of 296 instability-associated chromosomal rearrangement breaksites (IACRB) from 118 unstable TK6 human B lymphoblast, and isogenic derivative, clones. When we tested whether IACRB were distributed across the chromosomes based on target size, a significant non-random distribution was evident (p < 0.00001), and three IACRB hotspots (chromosomes 11, 12, and 22) and one IACRB coldspot (chromosome 2) were identified. Statistical analysis at the chromosomal band-level identified four IACRB hotspots accounting for 20% of all instability-associated breaks, two of which account for over 14% of all IACRB. Further, analysis of independent clones provided evidence within 14 individual clones of IACRB clustering at the chromosomal band level, suggesting a predisposition for further breaks after an initial break at some chromosomal bands. All of these events, independently, or when taken together, were highly unlikely to have occurred by chance (p < 0.000001). These IACRB band-level cluster hotspots were observed independent of radiation quality, dose, or cellular p53 status. The non-random distribution of instability-associated chromosomal rearrangements described here significantly differs from the distribution that was observed in a first-division post-irradiation metaphase analysis (p = 0.0004). Taken together, these results suggest that genomic instability may be in part driven by chromosomal cis mechanisms

  17. The Biological Effectiveness of Four Energies of Neon Ions for the Induction of Chromosome Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kerry; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to neon ions at energies of 64, 89, 142, or 267. The corresponding LET values for these energies of neon ranged from 38-103 keV/micrometers and doses delivered were in the 10 to 80 cGy range. Chromosome exchanges were assessed in metaphase and G2 phase cells at first division after exposure using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes and dose response curves were generated for different types of chromosomal exchanges. The yields of total chromosome exchanges were similar for the 64, 89, and 142 MeV exposures, whereas the 267 MeV/u neon with LET of 38 keV/micrometers produced about half as many exchanges per unit dose. The induction of complex type chromosome exchanges (exchanges involving three or more breaks and two or more chromosomes) showed a clear LET dependence for all energies. The ratio of simple to complex type exchanges increased with LET from 18 to 51%. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated from the initial slope of the dose response curve for chromosome damage with respect to gamma-rays. The RBE(sub max) values for total chromosome exchanges for the 64 MeV/u was around 30.

  18. Application of conventional chromosomal aberration and fluorescence in-situ hybridisation translocation in the assessment of occupationally derived irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samavat, H.; Seaward, M. R. D.; Gonzales, D. H.; Azizian, Gh.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Most of our current understanding of the biological effects of exposure to ionising radiation is based on conventional cytogenetic techniques, which enable our to determine the relationship between chromosomal aberration and dose received by radiation workers. However, conventional techniques have numerous limitations and chromosomal aberrations can be easily missed. Since fluorescence in situ hybridisation plays an important role in detecting chromosomal changes, this method was used to reassess data derived from previous studies employing conventional techniques. Materials and Methods: Two groups of radiographers were the subject of a study on conventional chromosomal aberration and fluorescence in situ hybridisation for translocation. The first group was chosen following an accidental contamination incident in a nuclear medicine department. The second group was composed of six radiographers working in an x-ray department with a previous record of overdose as recorded by film-badges; these workers had been the subjects of a previous chromosomal study. Coded blood samples from 11 radiographers and 11 controls were analysed for chromosomal aberration and by fluorescence in-situ hybridisation for translocation. 200 metaphases from the peripheral blood lymphocytes per subject were analysed to investigate possible frequencies of chromosome and chromatid type aberration and 2000 metaphases per subject were scored in fluorescence in-situ hybridisation method. Results: There was no significant difference between the radiographers and the control groups in conventional analysis; also there was no significant difference at the 95 % level of confidence in fluorescence in-situ hybridisation analysis. There was no correlation between levels of translocation and total lifetime doses from occupational ( according film-badge and TLD) and/or background irradiation. Conclusion: The overall conclusion is that the frequency of chromosomal damage in both groups of

  19. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  20. The dormant and the fully competent oocyte: comparing the transcriptome of human oocytes from primordial follicles and in metaphase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøndahl, Marie Louise; Borup, Rehannah; Vikeså, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Oocytes become enclosed in primordial follicles during fetal life and remain dormant there until activation followed by growth and meiotic resumption. Current knowledge about the molecular pathways involved in oogenesis is incomplete. This study identifies the specific transcriptome of the human...... oocyte in the quiescent state and at the pinnacle of maturity at ovulation. In silico bioinformatic comparisons were made between the transcriptome of human oocytes from dormant primordial follicles and that of human metaphase II (MII) oocytes and granulosa cells and unique gene expression profiles were...... identified as well as functional and pathway enrichments associated with the oocytes from the two developmental hallmarks. A total of 729 genes were highly enriched in oocytes from primodial follicles and 1456 genes were highly enriched in MII oocytes (>10-fold, P...

  1. Consequences of metaphase II oocyte cryopreservation on mRNA content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamayou, S; Bonaventura, G; Alecci, C; Tibullo, D; Di Raimondo, F; Guglielmino, A; Barcellona, M L

    2011-04-01

    We studied the consequences of freezing/thawing processes on mRNA contents in MII oocytes after slow-freezing/rapid thawing (SF/RT) and vitrification/warming (V/W) protocols, and compared the results to fresh MII oocytes. We quantified the nuclear transcript mRNA responsible for the translation of proteins belonging either to trans-regulatory protein family or to functional structural proteins such as proteins involved in DNA structural organization (NAP1L1, TOP1, H1F0H1), chromosomal structure maintenance (SMC, SCC3, RAD21, SMC1A, SMC1B, STAG3, REC8), mitochondrial energetic pathways (ATP5GJ, SDHC), cell cycle regulation and processes (CLTA, MAPK6, CKS2) and staminal cell potency-development competence stage (DPPA3, OCT4, FOXJ2). Surplus MII oocytes were donated from patients in IVF cycles and divided in three groups of 15 oocytes. Group 1 was comprised of non-cryopreserved oocytes and Groups 2 and 3 underwent SF/RT and V/W procedures, respectively. There was an overall decrease of mRNA extracted from cryopreserved oocytes compared to control group. Only 39.4% of mRNA content were preserved after SF/RT while 63.3% of mRNA content were maintained after V/W. Oocyte cryopreservation is associated with molecular injury associated with the decrease of stored mRNA. However the V/W protocol is more conservative than SF/RT resulting in a level of mRNA sufficient to maintain biologic functions in the subsequent fertilized oocyte. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ion microprobe imaging of 44Ca-labeled mammalian chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi-Setti, R.; Gavrilov, K.L.; Strissel, P.L.; Strick, R.

    2004-01-01

    In our previous investigation, we showed for the first time high-resolution analytical images of the cation composition of mammalian interphase and mitotic cells as well as of isolated metaphase chromosomes using the University of Chicago scanning ion microprobe (UC-SIM). In order to preserve the ionic integrity of the analyzed cells and prevent the well known occurrence of analytical artifacts due to the high diffusivity of cations in biological samples we used fast cryo-preservation methods (freeze-drying and freeze fracture), without any pre-fixations or washes. We identified the role of the cations in chromosome structure and maintenance using SIMS imaging and immunfluorescence methodologies. Importantly, we determined that the above cations are essential participants in chromosome condensation and maintenance of chromatin higher order structure, through their presumed function in DNA electrostatic neutralization and the direct interaction of Ca 2+ , in particular, with structural proteins. In addition, both Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ showed the same cell cycle regulation where during interphase both cations were enriched in the cytosol, particularly in organelles then at mitosis became specifically bound to chromatin. Our present research interest focuses on a more detailed analysis of the distribution of Ca 2+ throughout the different cell cycle stages, e.g. G1, G2 and mitosis. We have chosen the stable isotope 44 Ca as a tracer to follow Ca 2+ throughout the cell cycle. This nuclide occurs naturally in the ratio 44 Ca/ 40 Ca+ 44 Ca of 2.06%, so that incorporation at higher concentrations into chromatin or other cellular components should be easily detected by SIMS. Such incorporation can be obtained either by growing cells in a medium where ordinary Ca is replaced entirely by 44 Ca, or by replacing the cell culture medium with the 44 Ca medium for a gated time span (pulsing), after appropriate cell cycle stage synchronization. In this paper, we describe our

  3. Method of detecting genetic deletions identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas

    2013-11-26

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acids probes are typically of a complexity greater tha 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particlularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar ut genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  4. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  5. Mechanisms and consequences of paternally transmitted chromosomal abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, F; Wyrobek, A J

    2005-04-05

    Paternally transmitted chromosomal damage has been associated with pregnancy loss, developmental and morphological defects, infant mortality, infertility, and genetic diseases in the offspring including cancer. There is epidemiological evidence linking paternal exposure to occupational or environmental agents with an increased risk of abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also a large body of literature on germ cell mutagenesis in rodents showing that treatment of male germ cells with mutagens has dramatic consequences on reproduction producing effects such as those observed in human epidemiological studies. However, we know very little about the etiology, transmission and early embryonic consequences of paternally-derived chromosomal abnormalities. The available evidence suggests that: (1) there are distinct patterns of germ cell-stage differences in the sensitivity of induction of transmissible genetic damage with male postmeiotic cells being the most sensitive; (2) cytogenetic abnormalities at first metaphase after fertilization are critical intermediates between paternal exposure and abnormal reproductive outcomes; and, (3) there are maternally susceptibility factors that may have profound effects on the amount of sperm DNA damage that is converted into chromosomal aberrations in the zygote and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes.

  6. Survival and transmission of symmetrical chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, J.R.K.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction between the lesions to produce chromosomal structural changes may be either asymmetrical (A) or symmetrical (S). In A, one or more acentric fragments are always produced, and there may also be the mechanical separation problems resulting from bridges at anaphase, while S-changes never produce fragment, and pose no mechanical problem in cell division. If A and S events occur with equal frequency, it might be an indication that they are truly the alternative modes of lesion interaction. Unstimulated lymphocytes were irradiated with 2.68 Gy 250 kV X-ray, and metaphases were sampled at 50 h after the stimulation. Preparations were complete diploid cells, and any obvious second division cells were rejected. So far as dermal repair and fibroblast functions are concerned, aberration burden seems to have little consequence from the view-point of the long-term survival in vivo. Large numbers of aberrations (mainly S translocation and terminal deletion) were found in the samples taken up to 60 years after therapy. Skin biopsies were removed 1 day and 6 months after irradiation and cultured. In irradiated cells, reciprocal translocations dominated, followed by terminal deletions, then inversions, while no chromosome-type aberration was seen in the control cells. a) The relative occurrence of A : S changes, b) long-term survival in vivo, c) the possibility of in vivo repair, and d) some unusual features of translocation found in Syrian hamsters are reviewed. The relevance or importance of major S events is clearly dependent upon the cells, the tissues or the organisms in which they occur. (Yamashita, S.)

  7. [Chromosomal localization of foreign genes in transgenic mice using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dan; Gong, Xiu-li; Li, Wei; Guo, Xin-bing; Zhu, Yi-wen; Huang, Ying

    2008-02-01

    To establish a highly sensitive and specific dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (D-FISH) method used for chromosomal localization of foreign genes in double transgenic mice. Two strains of double transgenic mice were used in this experiment, one was integrated with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) and the enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP), the other was with the short hairpin RNA interference(RNAi) and beta(654). Splenic cells cultured in vitro were arrested in metaphase by colchicine and hybridized with digoxigenin-labeled and biotinylated DNA probes, then detected by rhodamine-conjugated avidin and FITC-conjugated anti-digoxigenin. Dual-color fluorescence signals were detected on the same metaphase in both transgenic mice strains. In HSV-tk/eGFP double transgenic mice, strong green fluorescence for HSV-tk and red for eGFP were observed and localized at 2E5-G3 and 8A2-A4 respectively. In beta(654)/RNAi mice, beta(654) was detected as red fluorescence on chromosome 7D3-E2, and RNAi showed random integration on chromosomes. It was detected as green fluorescence on chromosome 12B1 in one mouse, while on 1E2.3-1F and 3A3 in the other. Highly sensitive and specific D-FISH method was established using the self-prepared DNA probes, and chromosomal localization of the foreign genes was also performed in combination with G-banding in double transgenic mice. This technology will facilitate the researches in transgenic animals and gene therapy models.

  8. Intra-chromosomal aberrations observed after high-LET radiation exposure in vivo using a state-of-the-art cytogenetic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, C.R.; Geard, C.R.; Brenner, D.J.; Hande, P.; Azizova, T.V.; Burak, L.E.; Khokhryakov, V.F.; Vasienko, E.K.

    2003-01-01

    Multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) was used to investigate the presence of stable intra-chromosomal aberrations in chromosomes 1, 2 and 5 in a population of individuals exposed previously to low and/or high-LET radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were taken from healthy Russian nuclear workers occupationally exposed to plutonium α -particles, γ -rays or both at the Mayak complex from 1949 onwards. Metaphase spreads were produced and chromosomes hybridized with mBAND probes and scored for intra-chromosomal aberrations including inversions and deletions. A large difference between the intra-chromosomal aberration frequencies for the high-plutonium (∼1.1 Gy) and the high- γ exposed (∼1.5 Gy) individuals was observed in all three chromosomes studied (chromosome 1: 1.9 ± 0.5 % (n=7) vs. 0.1 ± 0.1% (n=5); chromosome 2: 1.7 ± 0.4% (n=7) vs. 0 [0 -0.3]% (n=6); chromosome 5: 3.7 ± 0.5 % (n=11) vs. 0.1 ± 0.1 % (n=11) (high-plutonium vs. high-γ exposure)). Controls (n=5) showed very few or no intra-chromosomal aberrations. Significantly fewer aberrations were observed in chromosomes 1 and 2 compared with chromosome 5, studied previously in this cohort, suggesting that intra-chromosomal changes involving chromosomes 1 and 2 may be more lethal to the cell than those involving chromosome 5. The dramatic differences in yields of intra-chromosomal aberrations in high-plutonium exposure relative to low may provide a means of discrimination to estimate both the dose and type of previous radiation exposure in populations

  9. Radiobiological application of atomic force microscopy. Analysis on human chromosomes in culture medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Makoto; Kinjo, Yasuhito

    1995-01-01

    We have proposed a 'Heterogeneous Chromatin Target Model' on the regulating mechanisms involved in chromosome mutation due to ionizing radiations. The heterogeneity of chromatin is derived from the highly condensed organization of chromatin segments that consist of hypersensitive and fragile sites in the fluctuating assembly of nucleosome clusters (superbeads). The above consideration is going to be subjected to a new experimental approach applying the atomic force microscope (AFM), one of the most promising members of a family of scanning probe microscope (SPM). The AFM can be operated in liquid as well as in air. A living specimen can be examined without any preparative procedures (for instance, fixation, staining, vecuum evaporation and so on). Micromanipulation of the isolated chromosome is also possible by the precise positional control of a cantilever on the nanometer scale. In the present report, the mitotic metaphase chromosomes released from living cells (human lymphocytes RPMI) were spread on the clean surface of distilled water filled in a trough. The spread surface film, in which the chromosomes were embedded, was picked up and adhered tightly on a specimen substrate made of silicon. The whole-mounted chromosome were submerged in a solution of culture medium and observed within a liquid immersion cell for AFM. We used an AFM system, SPA-300 made by Seiko Instruments. The particulate chromatin segments of nucleosome clusters (superbeads) were clearly observed within mitotic human chromosomes in a living hydrated condition. These findings support the heterogeneity of chromatin target in a living cell. (author)

  10. The origin of B chromosomes in yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis-Break rules but keep playing the game.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rajičić

    Full Text Available B chromosomes (Bs are known for more than hundred years but their origin, structure and pattern of evolution are not well understood. In the past few years new methodological approaches, involving isolation of Bs followed by whole DNA amplification, DNA probe generation, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH or the B chromosome DNA sequencing, has allowed detailed analysis of their origin and molecular structure in different species. In this study we explored the origin of Bs in the yellow-necked wood mouse, Apodemus flavicollis, using generation of microdissected DNA probes followed by FISH on metaphase chromosomes. Bs of A. flavicollis were successfully isolated and DNA was used as the template for B-specific probes for the first time. We revealed homology of DNA derived from the analyzed B chromosomes to the pericentromeric region (PR of sex chromosomes and subtelomeric region of two pairs of small autosomes, but lower homology to the rest of the Y chromosome. Moreover, all analysed Bs had the same structure regardless of their number per individual or the great geographic distance between examined populations from the Balkan Peninsula (Serbia and Eastern Europe (south region of Russia and central Belarus. Therefore, it was suggested that B chromosomes in A. flavicollis have a unique common origin from the PR of sex chromosomes, and/or similar evolutionary pattern.

  11. A high resolution chromosome image processor for study purposes, NIRS-1000:CHROMO STUDY, and algorithm developing to classify radiation induced aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, M; Hayata, I; Furuta, S

    1992-03-01

    Since 1989 we have promoted a project to develop an automated scoring system of radiation induced chromosome aberrations. As a first step, a high resolution image processing system for study purposes, NIRS-1000:CHROMO STUDY, has been developed. It is composed of: (1) CHROMO MARKER whose main purpose is to mark on images to make image data base, (2) CHROMO ALGO whose purpose is algorithm development, and (3) METAPHASE RANKER whose purposes are metaphase finding and ranking with a high power objective lens. However, METAPHASE RANKER is presently under development. The system utilizes a high definition video system so as to realize the best spatial resolution that is achievable with an optical microscope using an objective lens (x 100, numerical aperture 1.4). The video camera has 1024 effective scan lines to realize 0.1 microns sampling on a specimen. The system resolution achieved on the hard copy is less than 0.3 microns on a specimen. A preliminary algorithm has been developed to classify the aberrations on the system using projection information of gray level. The preliminary test results on excellent 10 metaphases show that the correct classification ratio is 92.7%, that the detection rate of the aberrations is 83.3% and that the false positive rate is 6.1%.

  12. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G; Baker, Robert J; Volleth, Marianne

    2017-10-13

    Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62). As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae), focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  13. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele G. Sotero-Caio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62. As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae, focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  14. Array based characterization of a terminal deletion involving chromosome subband 15q26.2: an emerging syndrome associated with growth retardation, cardiac defects and developmental delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkhem Gudrun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtelomeric regions are gene rich and deletions in these chromosomal segments have been demonstrated to account for approximately 2.5% of patients displaying mental retardation with or without association of dysmorphic features. However, cases that report de novo terminal deletions on chromosome arm 15q are rare. Methods In this study we present the first example of a detailed molecular genetic mapping of a de novo deletion in involving 15q26.2-qter, caused by the formation of a dicentric chromosome 15, using metaphase FISH and tiling resolution (32 k genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. Results After an initial characterization of the dicentric chromosome by metaphase FISH, array CGH analysis mapped the terminal deletion to encompass a 6.48 megabase (Mb region, ranging from 93.86–100.34 Mb on chromosome 15. Conclusion In conclusion, we present an additional case to the growing family of reported cases with 15q26-deletion, thoroughly characterized at the molecular cytogenetic level. In the deleted regions, four candidate genes responsible for the phenotype of the patient could be delineated: IGFR1, MEF2A, CHSY1, and TM2D3. Further characterization of additional patients harboring similar 15q-aberrations might hopefully in the future lead to the description of a clear cut clinically recognizable syndrome.

  15. Cell inactivation and chromosomal aberrations induced by X-rays and fast neutrons in cells of the Chinese hamster. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolkendorf, E.

    1979-01-01

    Asynchronously grown cultures of Chinese hamster cells V79-4 were irradiated in suspension with 180 kV X-rays and fast neutrons (average energy of 6.2 MeV). The damage was assessed by measuring cell survival and frequencies of chromosome aberrations in the first post-irradiation metaphases. The experimental data for survival and chromosome aberrations were fitted by computer programmes. From the fitted curves the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of fast neutrons was calculated. The RBE shows a similar dose dependence for killed and aberrant cells. The RBE decreases with increasing dose and amounts to approximately 5 for both effects for small neutron doses. The highest RBE is found for asymmetrical chromosomal exchanges and is dependent on the neutron dose, too. However, for isochromatid deletions the RBE is dose independent with a value of 3.6. (author)

  16. Research on Spontaneously Emerged Chromosomal Aberrations in the Periphery Blood Lymphocytes in Cattle (‘Buša’ Breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danica Hasanbašić

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of spontaneous aberrations, namely, of their frequency in non-irradiated cells is of paramount importance not only in cytogenetic research, but also in contemporary animal production.The paper deals with research on spontaneously emerged chromosomal aberrations in the peripheral blood lymphocytes in the cattle of ‘Buša’ breed.To obtain metaphase chromosomes the conventional method of lymphocyte cultivation was used, albeit slightly modified and adapted to the examined animals and the laboratory conditions.The research findings indicate that a certain percent of spontaneously emerged chromosomal aberrations of chromatid type (gap and break have been found in the peripheral blood lymphocytes in the cattle of ‘Buša’ breed.

  17. Deficiency in chromosome congression by the inhibition of Plk1 polo box domain-dependent recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sekine, Tomomi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Iwasaki, Jun-ichi; Imamoto, Naoko; Kawasaki, Hisashi; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-23

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is one of the key regulators of mitotic cell division. In addition to an N-terminal protein kinase catalytic domain, Plk1 possesses a phosphopeptide binding domain named polo box domain (PBD) at its C terminus. PBD is postulated to be essential for Plk1 localization and substrate targeting. Here, we developed a high-throughput screening system to identify inhibitors of PBD-dependent binding and screened a chemical library. We isolated a benzotropolone-containing natural compound derived from nutgalls (purpurogallin (PPG)) that inhibited PBD-dependent binding in vitro and in vivo. PPG not only delayed the onset of mitosis but also prolonged the progression of mitosis in HeLa cells. Although apparently normal bipolar spindles were formed even in the presence of PPG, the perturbation of chromosome alignment at metaphase plates activated the spindle assembly checkpoint pathway. These results demonstrate the predominant role of PBD-dependent binding on smooth chromosome congression at metaphase.

  18. Molecular cloning and chromosome mapping of the human gene encoding protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-Shimer, S.; Johnson, K.A.; Bruskin, A.; Green, N.R.; Hill, D.E.; Lawrence, J.B.; Johnson, C.

    1990-01-01

    The inactivation of growth suppressor genes appears to play a major role in the malignant process. To assess whether protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatases function as growth suppressors, the authors have isolated a cDNA clone encoding human protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B for structural and functional characterization. The translation product deduced from the 1,305-nucleotide open reading frame predicts a protein containing 435 amino acids and having a molecular mass of 49,966 Da. The amino-terminal 321 amino acids deduced from the cDNA sequence are identical to the empirically determined sequence of protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B. A genomic clone has been isolated and used in an in situ hybridization to banded metaphase chromosomes to determine that the gene encoding protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B maps as a single-copy gene to the long arm of chromosome 20 in the region q13.1-q13.2

  19. Nucleolar organizer regions in Sittasomus griseicapillus and Lepidocolaptes angustirostris (Aves, Dendrocolaptidae): Evidence of a chromosome inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Barbosa, Marcelo; da Silva, Rubens Rodrigues; de Sena Correia, Vanessa Carolina; Dos Santos, Luana Pereira; Garnero, Analía Del Valle; Gunski, Ricardo José

    2013-03-01

    Cytogenetic studies in birds are still scarce compared to other vertebrates. Woodcreepers (Dendrocolaptidae) are part of a highly specialized group within the Suboscines of the New World. They are forest birds exclusive to the Neotropical region and similar to woodpeckers, at a comparable evolutionary stage. This paper describes for the first time the karyotypes of the Olivaceous and the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper using conventional staining with Giemsa and silver nitrate staining of the nucleolar organizer regions (Ag-NORs). Metaphases were obtained by fibular bone marrow culture. The chromosome number of the Olivaceous Woodcreeper was 2n = 82 and of the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper, 2n = 82. Ag-NORs in the largest macrochromosome pair and evidence of a chromosome inversion are described herein for the first time for this group.

  20. Nucleolar organizer regions in Sittasomus griseicapillus and Lepidocolaptes angustirostris (Aves, Dendrocolaptidae: evidence of a chromosome inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Oliveira Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic studies in birds are still scarce compared to other vertebrates. Woodcreepers (Dendrocolaptidae are part of a highly specialized group within the Suboscines of the New World. They are forest birds exclusive to the Neotropical region and similar to woodpeckers, at a comparable evolutionary stage. This paper describes for the first time the karyotypes of the Olivaceous and the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper using conventional staining with Giemsa and silver nitrate staining of the nucleolar organizer regions (Ag-NORs. Metaphases were obtained by fibular bone marrow culture. The chromosome number of the Olivaceous Woodcreeper was 2n = 82 and of the Narrow-billed Woodcreeper, 2n = 82. Ag-NORs in the largest macrochromosome pair and evidence of a chromosome inversion are described herein for the first time for this group.

  1. Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation. Progress report, January 1-July 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowley, J.D.

    1986-08-01

    Two genes for colony stimulating factors (CSF) has been mapped on chromosome five of humans. These CSFs are a family of glycoproteins that are required for the growth and maturation of myeloid progenetor cells in vitro. They are classified according to their cell specificity; thus, M-CSF (CSF-1) and G-CSF primarily stimulate cells committed to the macrophage and granulocyte lineages, respectively. Recently, the genes for both of these factors have been cloned and probes for the clonal genes were used to map their location on normal human chromosomes. Localization of CSF-1 was performed by in situ hybridization of the probe pST-CSF-17 to normal human metaphase chromosomes. This resulted in specific labeling only of chromosome 5. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Fetal chromosome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, A; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...... to women having amniocentesis, although considered not to have any increased risk of fetal chromosome abnormality (1390 pregnancies, group B). They were also compared with 750 consecutive pregnancies in women 25-34 years of age, in whom all heritable diseases were excluded (group C). The risk of unbalanced...

  3. Hypermutability of mouse chromosome 2 during the development of x-ray-induced murine myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rithidech, K.; Bond, V.P.; Cronkite, E.P.; Thompson, M.H.; Bullis, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    In an effort to identify the precise role of a deletion at regions D-E of mouse chromosome 2 [del2(D-E)] during the development of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, we conducted a serial sacrifice study in which metaphase chromosomes were examined by the G-banding technique. Such metaphase cells were collected from x-irradiated mice during the period of transformation of some of the normal hematopoietic cells to the fully developed leukemic phenotype. A group of 250 CBA/Ca male mice (10-12 weeks old) were exposed to a single dose of 2 Gy of 250-kilovolt-peak x-rays; 42 age-matched male mice served as controls. Groups of randomly selected mice were sacrificed at 20 hr, 1 week, and then at intervals of 3 months up to 24 months after x-irradiation. Slides for cytogenetic, hematological, and histological examination were prepared for each animal at each sacrifice time. The majority of such lesions were translocations at 2F or 2H, strongly suggesting hyper mutability of these sites on mouse chromosome 2. No lesions were found in control mice. The finding leads to the possibility that genomic lesions close to 2D and 2E are aberrants associated with radiation leukemogenesis, whereas a single clone of cells with a del2(D-E) may lead directly to overt leukemia. The data also indicate that leukemic transformation arises from the cumulative effects of multiple genetic events on chromosome 2, reinforcing the thesis that multiple steps of mutation occur in the pathogenesis of cancer. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  4. Induction and persistence of multicentric chromosomes in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes following high-dose gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suto, Yumiko; Hirai, Momoki; Akiyama, Miho; Nakagawa, Takashi; Tominaga, Takako; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Sugiura, Nobuyuki; Yuki, Masanori; Nakayama, Fumiaki

    2012-01-01

    Among radiation-induced chromosome aberrations, multicentric chromosomes, as represented by dicentric chromosomes (dicentrics), are regarded as sensitive and specific biomarkers for assessing radiation dose in the 0 to 5 Gy range. The objective of this study was to characterize chromosome aberrations induced in vitro by a higher dose of radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed to 15 Gy gamma rays at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/min and harvested at 48, 50, 52, 54, 56 and 72 h. The first mitotic peak appeared at 52-54 h, showing about a 6 h mitotic delay as compared with nonirradiated control cultures. Cell-cycle analysis of parallel and simultaneous cultures by sister-chromatid differentiation staining suggests that metaphase cells examined in 48-56 h cultures were in the first mitosis after culture initiation. The mean dicentric equivalent counts ranged from 9.0 to 9.3 in consecutively harvested cultures with no significant differences among them. At 72 h, about 20% of dividing cells were tetraploid, persisting with faithfully replicated unstable chromosome aberrations. The non-random distribution of replicated chromosome pairs, deduced from multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, led us to surmise that the predominant mechanism underlying the induction of tetraploid cells is endoreduplication. These findings suggest that a high-dose in vitro irradiation applied to peripheral blood lymphocytes may affect on the replication process, in addition to structural chromosome damage. (author)

  5. Selective Somatic Elimination of NICOTIANA GLUTINOSA Chromosomes in the F(1) Hybrids of N. SUAVEOLENS and N. GLUTINOSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S B; Gupta, P

    1973-04-01

    The F(1) hybrids of Nicotiana suaveolens (subgenus Petunioides, 2n = 32) and N. glutinosa (subgenus Tabacum, 2n = 24), were examined during their development, from seedlings to mature plants. It was observed that in the hybrids, there was a progressive change of dominant N. glutinosa morphological characteristics towards those of N. suaveolens, in leaf shape, stem, flower color and branching pattern. A study of mitotic chromosomes in the root-tips and in very young anthers of the mature plants indicated a significantly high average frequency of aberrant mitotic anaphases (bridges and fragments, 12% and 11% respectively). As a consequence of this phenomenon, variability in the number and size of chromosomes was observed in the PMC's and in mitotic metaphases (29-24 chromosomes). In order to establish whether the N. glutinosa chromosomes were preferentially lost, a karyological study of the parents and their F(1) hybrids was carried out and it was established that the F(1) hybrids were losing N. glutinosa chromosomes preferentially. A mechanism was suggested for the loss of these chromosomes by means of a chromatid type of breakage-fusion-bridge cycle (b-f-b cycle) and initiation of the b-f-b cycle in the hybrid due to an interaction of the regulatory mechanism of DNA replication in the haploid genomes of the parental species. However, loss of these chromosomes owing to interaction of certain genes from the two parental species cannot be ruled out.

  6. Hexavalent chromium induces chromosome instability in human urothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Sandra S. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Liou, Louis [Department of Pathology, Boston University School of Medicine, 670 Albany St., Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Adam, Rosalyn M. [Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Wise, John Pierce Sr., E-mail: john.wise@louisville.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Cr(VI) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24 h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer, specifically, and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer, in general. - Highlights: • Hexavalent chromium is genotoxic to human urothelial cells. • Hexavalent chromium induces aneuploidy in human urothelial cells. • hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells model the effects seen in primary urothelial cells. • Hexavalent chromium has a strong likelihood of being carcinogenic for bladder tissue.

  7. Chromosomal aberrations in Sigmodon hispidus from a Superfund site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, B.; McBee, K.; Lochmiller, R.; Burks, S.; Qualls, C.

    1995-01-01

    Cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) were collected from an EPA Superfund site located on an abandoned oil refinery. Three trapping grids were located on the refinery and three similar grids were located at uncontaminated localities which served as reference sites. Bone marrow metaphase chromosome preparations were examined for chromosomal damage. For each individual, 50 cells were scored for six classes of chromosomal lesions. For the fall 1991 trapping period, mean number of aberrant cells per individual was 2.33, 0.85, and 1.50 for the three Superfund grids., Mean number of aberrant cells per individual was 2.55, 2.55, and 2.12 from the reference grids. Mean number of lesions per cell was 2.77, 0.86, and 1.9 from the Superfund grids, and 3.55, 2.77, and 2.50 from the reference grids. For the spring 1992 trapping period, more damage was observed in animals from both Superfund and reference sites; however, animals from Superfund grids had more damage than animals from reference grids. Mean number of aberrant cells per individual was 3.50, 3.25, and 3.70 from the Superfund grids, and 2.40, 2.11, and 1.40 from the reference grids. Mean number of lesions per cell was 4.80, 4.25, and 5.50 from the Superfund grids, and 2.60, 2.33, and 1.50 from the reference grids. These data suggest animals may be more susceptible to chromosomal damage during winter months, and animals from the Superfund grids appear to be more severely affected than animals from reference grids

  8. Test for Chemical Induction of Chromosome Aberration in Cultured Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) Cells With and Without Metabolic Activation. Test Article: N,N,N’,N’-tetramethyl Ethanediamine (TMEDA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-13

    the RCG and/or RMI: ill addition, the percentage of polyploid and endoreduplicated cells was also determined at each concentration. Both the solvent...percentage of polyploid and endoreduplicated cells was also determined at each concentration. The types of chromosome aberrations scored and the...not decipherable. Considered as a single aberration. Severely damaged cell - cell with 10 or more aberrations. Polyploid cells - metaphases with

  9. Ring chromosome 4 and Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) in a child with multiple anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sevim; Engiz, Ozlem; Aktaş, Dilek; Vargel, Ibrahim; Beksaç, M S; Mrasek, Kristin; Vermeesch, Joris; Liehr, Thomas

    2006-03-15

    We report on a 16-month-old male patient with ring chromosome 4 and deletion of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) region with multiple congenital anomalies including unilateral cleft lip and palate, iris coloboma, microcephaly, midgut malrotation, hypospadias, and double urethral orifices. Peripheral chromosome analysis of the patient showed 46,XY,r(4)(p16.3q35) de novo. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) study was also performed and according to multicolor banding (MCB) a r(4)(::p16.3 --> q34.3 approximately 35.1::) was found in all metaphases. Subtelomeric 4p region, subtelomeric 4q region, as well as, Wolf-Hirschhorn critical region were deleted in ring chromosome 4. Genomic microarray analysis was also performed to delineate the size of deletion. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hypoplastic corpus callosum, delayed myelinization, and frontal and occipital lobe atrophies. Both maternal and paternal chromosomal analyses were normal. We compare the phenotypic appearance of our patient with the previously reported 16 cases of ring chromosome 4 in the medical literature. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Chromosomal integrity of freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa after 137Cs γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusakabe, Hirokazu; Kamiguchi, Yujiroh

    2004-01-01

    This study demonstrated that freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa possess strong resistance to 137 Cs γ-ray irradiation at doses of up to 8 Gy. Freeze-dried mouse spermatozoa were rehydrated and injected into mouse oocytes with an intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) technique. Most oocytes can be activated after ICSI by using spermatozoa irradiated with γ-rays before and after freeze-drying. Sperm chromosome complements were analyzed at the first cleavage metaphase. Chromosome aberrations increased in a dose-dependent manner in the spermatozoa irradiated before freeze-drying. However, no increase in oocytes with chromosome aberrations was observed when fertilized by spermatozoa that had been irradiated after freeze-drying, as compared with freeze-dried spermatozoa that had not been irradiated. These results suggest that both the chromosomal integrity of freeze-dried spermatozoa, as well as their ability to activate oocytes, were protected from γ-ray irradiation at doses at which chromosomal damage is found to be strongly induced in spermatozoa suspended in solution

  11. Biodosimetry of ionizing radiation by selective painting of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Painting of interphase chromosomes can be useful for biodosimetric purposes in particular cases such as radiation therapy, accidental exposure to very high radiation doses and exposure to densely ionizing radiation, for example during space missions. Biodosimetry of charged-particle radiation is analyzed in the present paper. Target cells were human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with gamma rays, protons and iron ions. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated for different times to allow repair of radiation-induced damage and then fused to mitotic hamster cells to promote premature condensation in the interphase chromosomes. Chromosome spreads were then hybridized with whole-chromosome DNA probes labeled with fluorescent stains. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromatin fragments shortly after exposure, as well as the kinetics of rejoining and misrejoining, were not markedly dependent on linear energy transfer. However, after exposure to heavy ions, more aberrations were scored in the interphase cells after incubation for repair than in metaphase samples harvested at the first postirradiation mitosis. On the other hand, no significant differences were observed in the two samples after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation. These results suggest that interphase chromosome painting can be a useful tool for biodosimetry of particle radiation.

  12. Arabidopsis PCH2 Mediates Meiotic Chromosome Remodeling and Maturation of Crossovers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Lambing

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic chromosomes are organized into linear looped chromatin arrays by a protein axis localized along the loop-bases. Programmed remodelling of the axis occurs during prophase I of meiosis. Structured illumination microscopy (SIM has revealed dynamic changes in the chromosome axis in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica oleracea. We show that the axis associated protein ASY1 is depleted during zygotene concomitant with synaptonemal complex (SC formation. Study of an Atpch2 mutant demonstrates this requires the conserved AAA+ ATPase, PCH2, which localizes to the sites of axis remodelling. Loss of PCH2 leads to a failure to deplete ASY1 from the axes and compromizes SC polymerisation. Immunolocalization of recombination proteins in Atpch2 indicates that recombination initiation and CO designation during early prophase I occur normally. Evidence suggests that CO interference is initially functional in the mutant but there is a defect in CO maturation following designation. This leads to a reduction in COs and a failure to form COs between some homologous chromosome pairs leading to univalent chromosomes at metaphase I. Genetic analysis reveals that CO distribution is also affected in some chromosome regions. Together these data indicate that the axis remodelling defect in Atpch2 disrupts normal patterned formation of COs.

  13. Telomere-mediated chromosomal instability triggers TLR4 induced inflammation and death in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindra N Bhattacharjee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomeres are essential to maintain chromosomal stability. Cells derived from mice lacking telomerase RNA component (mTERC-/- mice display elevated telomere-mediated chromosome instability. Age-dependent telomere shortening and associated chromosome instability reduce the capacity to respond to cellular stress occurring during inflammation and cancer. Inflammation is one of the important risk factors in cancer progression. Controlled innate immune responses mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLR are required for host defense against infection. Our aim was to understand the role of chromosome/genome instability in the initiation and maintenance of inflammation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the function of TLR4 in telomerase deficient mTERC-/- mice harbouring chromosome instability which did not develop any overt immunological disorder in pathogen-free condition or any form of cancers at this stage. Chromosome instability was measured in metaphase spreads prepared from wildtype (mTERC+/+, mTERC+/- and mTERC-/- mouse splenocytes. Peritoneal and/or bone marrow-derived macrophages were used to examine the responses of TLR4 by their ability to produce inflammatory mediators TNFalpha and IL6. Our results demonstrate that TLR4 is highly up-regulated in the immune cells derived from telomerase-null (mTERC-/- mice and lipopolysaccharide, a natural ligand for TLR4 stabilises NF-kappaB binding to its promoter by down-regulating ATF-3 in mTERC-/- macrophages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings implied that background chromosome instability in the cellular level stabilises the action of TLR4-induced NF-kappaB action and sensitises cells to produce excess pro-inflammatory mediators. Chromosome/genomic instability data raises optimism for controlling inflammation by non-toxic TLR antagonists among high-risk groups.

  14. Revisiting Meiosis in Sugarcane: Chromosomal Irregularities and the Prevalence of Bivalent Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lucia C. Vieira

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum officinarum proved highly susceptible to diseases, and this led breeders to progress to interspecific crosses resulting in disease resistance. A backcrossing program to S. officinarum was then required to boost sucrose content. Clonal selection across generations and incorporation of other germplasm into cultivated backgrounds established the (narrow genetic base of modern cultivars (Saccharum spp., which have a man-made genome. The genome complexity has inspired several molecular studies that have elucidated aspects of sugarcane genome constitution, architecture, and cytogenetics. However, there is a critical shortage of information on chromosome behavior throughout meiosis in modern cultivars. In this study, we examined the microsporogenesis of a contemporary variety, providing a detailed analysis of the meiotic process and chromosome association at diakinesis, using FISH with centromeric probes. Chromosomal abnormalities were documented by examining high quality preparations of pollen mother cells (700 in total. Approximately 70% of the cells showed abnormalities, such as metaphase chromosomes not lined up at the plate, lagging chromosomes and chromosomal bridges, and tetrad cells with micronuclei. Some dyads with asynchronous behavior were also observed. Due to the hybrid composition of the sugarcane genome, we suggest that bivalent incomplete pairing may occur in the first prophase leading to univalency. The presence of rod bivalents showing the lagging tendency is consistent with a reduction in chiasma frequency. Finally, the presence of chromatin bridges indicates the indirect occurrence of chromosomal inversions, although chromosome fragments were not clearly recognized. Possible reasons for such meiotic abnormalities and the large prevalence of bivalent formation are discussed.

  15. A global, myosin light chain kinase-dependent increase in myosin II contractility accompanies the metaphase-anaphase transition in sea urchin eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Amy; Stack, Christianna; Bresnick, Anne R; Shuster, Charles B

    2006-09-01

    Myosin II is the force-generating motor for cytokinesis, and although it is accepted that myosin contractility is greatest at the cell equator, the temporal and spatial cues that direct equatorial contractility are not known. Dividing sea urchin eggs were placed under compression to study myosin II-based contractile dynamics, and cells manipulated in this manner underwent an abrupt, global increase in cortical contractility concomitant with the metaphase-anaphase transition, followed by a brief relaxation and the onset of furrowing. Prefurrow cortical contractility both preceded and was independent of astral microtubule elongation, suggesting that the initial activation of myosin II preceded cleavage plane specification. The initial rise in contractility required myosin light chain kinase but not Rho-kinase, but both signaling pathways were required for successful cytokinesis. Last, mobilization of intracellular calcium during metaphase induced a contractile response, suggesting that calcium transients may be partially responsible for the timing of this initial contractile event. Together, these findings suggest that myosin II-based contractility is initiated at the metaphase-anaphase transition by Ca2+-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity and is maintained through cytokinesis by both MLCK- and Rho-dependent signaling. Moreover, the signals that initiate myosin II contractility respond to specific cell cycle transitions independently of the microtubule-dependent cleavage stimulus.

  16. Chromosomal aberrations in mobile phone users in Tamilnadu, southern India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandar, V.; Lakshman Kumar, B.; Suresh, K.; Sangeetha, R.; Manikantan, P.; Sasikala, K.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Radiofrequency (RF) waves have long been used for different types of information exchange via the airwaves-wireless Morse code, radio, television, and wireless telephony. Increasingly larger numbers of people rely on mobile telephone technology, and health concerns about the associated RF exposure have been raised, particularly because the mobile phone handset operates in close proximity to the human body, and also because large numbers of base station antennas are required to provide widespread availability of service to large populations. In the present study chromosomal damage investigations were carried out on the peripheral blood lymphocytes of individuals using mobile phones, being exposed to MW frequency ranging from 800 to 2000 MHz. The aim of this study is to establish whether mobile phone use (n = 27) increases the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) in peripheral blood lymphocytes compared with controls (n = 27) in Tamilnadu, India. After signing a consent form, volunteers provided blood samples (5 ml) to establish cell cultures at 52 hrs. For CA analysis, 100 complete metaphase cells from each subject were evaluated. In the present study, in mobile phone users highly significant results were obtained when compared to control groups. These results highlight a correlation between mobile phone use (exposure to RFR) and genetic damage and require interim public health actions in the wake of widespread use of mobile telephony.

  17. Tailed nuclei and dicentric chromosomes in irradiated subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtsov, V.Yu.; Fedortseva, R.F.; Starkova, Ye.V.; Yartseva, N.M.; Nikiforov, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A study of peripheral blood smears from irradiated Chernobyl liquidators and other subjects has shown nuclei of some lymphocytes to have a protrusion into the cytoplasm. Such abnormal nuclei are called 'tailed' nuclei (TN). Sixteen main morphologic types, observed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, are described. The frequency of appearance of lymphocytes with TN in a group of Chernobyl liquidators was significantly higher than in control groups (p<0.001, in all cases). A positive correlation was found between the TN frequency in lymphocytes and dicentric chromosomes in lymphocytes cultured to metaphase (p<0.001). Elevated frequencies of dicentrics, higher than 0.1%, were found in 17 out of 22 subjects in whom the frequency of lymphocytes with TN was 0.8% and more. Abnormalities of the TN type in lymphocytes are likely to result from breakdown of chromosome bridges formed by dicentrics. The TN can be considered as a possible marker of irradiation and, therefore, their detailed study is important

  18. CHROMOSOMES OF WOODY SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio R Daviña

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome numbers of nine subtropical woody species collected in Argentina and Paraguay are reported. The counts tor Coutarea hexandra (2n=52, Inga vera subsp. affinis 2n=26 (Fabaceae and Chorisia speciosa 2n=86 (Bombacaceae are reported for the first time. The chromosome number given for Inga semialata 2n=52 is a new cytotype different from the previously reported. Somatic chromosome numbers of the other taxa studied are: Sesbania punicea 2n=12, S. virgata 2n=12 and Pilocarpus pennatifolius 2n=44 from Argentina

  19. Neocentric X-chromosome in a girl with Turner-like syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmat Morteza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neocentromeres are rare human chromosomal aberrations in which a new centromere has formed in a previously non-centromeric location. We report the finding of a structurally abnormal X chromosome with a neocentromere in a 15-year-old girl with clinical features suggestive of Turner syndrome, including short stature and primary amenorrhea. Result G-banded chromosome analysis revealed a mosaic female karyotype involving two abnormal cell lines. One cell line (84% of analyzed metaphases had a structurally abnormal X chromosome (duplication of the long arm and deletion of the short arm and a normal X chromosome. The other cell line (16% of cells exhibited monosomy X. C-banding studies were negative for the abnormal X chromosome. FISH analysis revealed lack of hybridization of the abnormal X chromosome with both the X centromere-specific probe and the “all human centromeres” probe, a pattern consistent with lack of the X chromosome endogenous centromere. A FISH study using an XIST gene probe revealed the presence of two XIST genes, one on each long arm of the iso(Xq, required for inactivation of the abnormal X chromosome. R-banding also demonstrated inactivation of the abnormal X chromosome. An assay for centromeric protein C (CENP-C was positive on both the normal and the abnormal X chromosomes. The position of CENP-C in the abnormal X chromosome defined a neocentromere, which explains its mitotic stability. The karyotype is thus designated as 46,X,neo(X(qter- > q12::q12- > q21.2- > neo- > q21.2- > qter[42]/45,X[8], which is consistent with stigmata of Turner syndrome. The mother of this patient has a normal karyotype; however, the father was not available for study. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first case of mosaic Turner syndrome involving an analphoid iso(Xq chromosome with a proven neocentromere among 90 previously described cases with a proven neocentromere.

  20. The Consequences of Chromosome Segregation Errors in Mitosis and Meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Potapova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mistakes during cell division frequently generate changes in chromosome content, producing aneuploid or polyploid progeny cells. Polyploid cells may then undergo abnormal division to generate aneuploid cells. Chromosome segregation errors may also involve fragments of whole chromosomes. A major consequence of segregation defects is change in the relative dosage of products from genes located on the missegregated chromosomes. Abnormal expression of transcriptional regulators can also impact genes on the properly segregated chromosomes. The consequences of these perturbations in gene expression depend on the specific chromosomes affected and on the interplay of the aneuploid phenotype with the environment. Most often, these novel chromosome distributions are detrimental to the health and survival of the organism. However, in a changed environment, alterations in gene copy number may generate a more highly adapted phenotype. Chromosome segregation errors also have important implications in human health. They may promote drug resistance in pathogenic microorganisms. In cancer cells, they are a source for genetic and phenotypic variability that may select for populations with increased malignance and resistance to therapy. Lastly, chromosome segregation errors during gamete formation in meiosis are a primary cause of human birth defects and infertility. This review describes the consequences of mitotic and meiotic errors focusing on novel concepts and human health.

  1. Analysis of complex-type chromosome exchanges in astronauts' lymphocytes after space flight as a biomarker of high-LET exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, K.; Wu, H.; Willingham, V.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    2002-01-01

    High-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation is moreefficient in producing complex-type chromosome exchanges than sparsely ionizing radiation, and this can potentially be used as a biomarker of radiation quality. To investigate if complex chromosome exchanges are induced by the high-LET component of space radiation exposure, damage was assessed in astronauts' blood lymphocytes before and after longduration missions of 3-4 months. The frequency of simple translocations increased significantly for most of the crewmembers studied. However, there were few complex exchanges detected and only one crewmember had a significant increase after flight. It has been suggested that the yield of complex chromosome damage could be underestimated when analyzing metaphase cellscollected at one time point after irradiation, andanalysis of chemically-induced premature chromosomecondensation (PCC) may be more accurate since problems with complicated cell-cycle delays are avoided.However, in this case the yields of chromosome damage were similar for metaphase and PCC analysis of astronauts' lymphocytes. It appears that the use of complex-type exchanges as biomarkerof radiation quality in vivo after low-dose chronicexposure in mixed radiation fields is hampered by statistical uncertainties. (author)

  2. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  3. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas-Pequignot, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs [fr

  4. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

    OpenAIRE

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G.; Baker, Robert J.; Volleth, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62). As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within d...

  5. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van't Hof, J.

    1987-01-01

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs

  6. Casein kinase 1 alpha regulates chromosome congression and separation during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    Full Text Available Casein kinase I alpha (CK1α is a member of serine/threonine protein kinase, generally present in all eukaryotes. In mammals, CK1α regulates the transition from interphase to metaphase in mitosis. However, little is known about its role in meiosis. Here we examined Ck1α mRNA and protein expression, as well as its subcellular localization in mouse oocytes from germinal vesicle to the late 1-cell stage. Our results showed that the expression level of CK1α was increased in metaphase. Immunostaining results showed that CK1α colocalized with condensed chromosomes during oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development. We used the loss-of-function approach by employing CK1α specific morpholino injection to block the function of CK1α. This functional blocking leads to failure of polar body 1 (PB1 extrusion, chromosome misalignment and MII plate incrassation. We further found that D4476, a specific and efficient CK1 inhibitor, decreased the rate of PB1 extrusion. Moreover, D4476 resulted in giant polar body extrusion, oocyte pro-MI arrest, chromosome congression failure and impairment of embryo developmental potential. In addition, we employed pyrvinium pamoate (PP, an allosteric activator of CK1α, to enhance CK1α activity in oocytes. Supplementation of PP induced oocyte meiotic maturation failure, severe congression abnormalities and misalignment of chromosomes. Taken together, our study for the first time demonstrates that CK1α is required for chromosome alignment and segregation during oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development.

  7. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kawamura, Ryo; Marko, John F

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed

  8. Human hereditary diseases associated with elevated frequency of chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejima, Yosuke

    1988-01-01

    Human recessive diseases collectively known as chromosome breakage syndromes include Fanconi's anemia, Bloom's syndrome and ataxia telangiectasia. Cells from these patients show chromosome instabilities both spontaneously and following treatments with radiations or certain chemicals, where defects in DNA metabolisms are supposed to be involved. Cells from patients with ataxia telangiectasia are hypersensitive to ionizing radiations, though DNA replication is less affected than in normal cells. Chromatid-type as well as chromosom-type aberrations are induced in cells irradiated in G 0 or G 1 phases. These unusual responses to radiations may provide clues for understanding the link between DNA replicative response and cellular radiosensitivity. Alterations in cellular radiosensitivity or spontaneous chromosome instabilities are observed in some patients with congenital chromosome anomalies or dominant diseases, where underlying defects may be different from those in recessive diseases. (author)

  9. Human hereditary diseases associated with elevated frequency of chromosome aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejima, Yosuke; Ikushima, Takaji (ed.)

    1988-07-01

    Human recessive diseases collectively known as chromosome breakage syndromes include Fanconi's anemia, Bloom's syndrome and ataxia telangiectasia. Cells from these patients show chromosome instabilities both spontaneously and following treatments with radiations or certain chemicals, where defects in DNA metabolisms are supposed to be involved. Cells from patients with ataxia telangiectasia are hypersensitive to ionizing radiations, though DNA replication is less affected than in normal cells. Chromatid-type as well as chromosom-type aberrations are induced in cells irradiated in G/sub 0/ or G/sub 1/ phases. These unusual responses to radiations may provide clues for understanding the link between DNA replicative response and cellular radiosensitivity. Alterations in cellular radiosensitivity or spontaneous chromosome instabilities are observed in some patients with congenital chromosome anomalies or dominant diseases, where underlying defects may be different from those in recessive diseases.

  10. Karyotypic evolution and phylogenetic relationships in the order Chiroptera as revealed by G-banding comparison and chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Lei; Mao, Xiuguang; Nie, Wenhui; Gu, Xiaoming; Feng, Qing; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Wang, Yingxiang; Volleth, Marianne; Yang, Fengtang

    2007-01-01

    Bats are a unique but enigmatic group of mammals and have a world-wide distribution. The phylogenetic relationships of extant bats are far from being resolved. Here, we investigated the karyotypic relationships of representative species from four families of the order Chiroptera by comparative chromosome painting and banding. A complete set of painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of Myotis myotis (family Vespertilionidae) were hybridized onto metaphases of Cynopterus sphinx (2n = 34, family Pteropodidae), Rhinolophus sinicus (2n=36, family Rhinolophidae) and Aselliscus stoliczkanus (2n=30, family Hipposideridae) and delimited 27, 30 and 25 conserved chromosomal segments in the three genomes, respectively. The results substantiate that Robertsonian translocation is the main mode of chromosome evolution in the order Chiroptera, with extensive conservation of whole chromosomal arms. The use of M. myotis (2n=44) probes has enabled the integration of C. sphinx, R. sinicus and A. stoliczkanus chromosomes into the previously established comparative maps between human and Eonycteris spelaea (2n=36), Rhinolophus mehelyi (2n=58), Hipposideros larvatus (2n=32), and M. myotis. Our results provide the first cytogenetic signature rearrangement that supports the grouping of Pteropodidae and Rhinolophoidea in a common clade (i.e. Pteropodiformes or Yinpterochiroptera) and thus improve our understanding on the karyotypic relationships and genome phylogeny of these bat species.

  11. Induction of chromosomal aberrations in human primary fibroblasts and immortalized cancer cells exposed to extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyyedi, S. S.; Mozdarani, H.; Rezaei Tavirani, M.; Heydari, S.

    2010-01-01

    Rapidly increasing possibilities of exposure to environmental extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields have become a topic of worldwide investigation. Epidemiological and laboratory studies suggest that exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields may increase cancer risk therefore assessment of chromosomal damage in various cell lines might be of predictive value for future risk estimation. Materials and Methods: Primary cultures of fibroblasts from human skin biopsy were exposed to continuous extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (3, 50 and 60 Hz, sinusoidal, 3h, and 4 m T). Also immortalized cell lines, SW480, MCF-7 and 1321N1 were exposed to continuous extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (50 Hz, sinusoidal, 3 h, 4 m T). Metaphase plates Were prepared according to standard methods and stained in 5% Giemsa solution. Chromosomal aberrations of both chromosome and chromatid types were scored to evaluate the effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on primary or established cell lines. Results: Results indicate that by increasing the frequency of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields, chromosomal aberrations were increased up to 7-fold above background levels in primary human fibroblast cells. In addition, continuous exposure to a 50 Hz electromagnetic field led to a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations in SW480, MCF-7 and 1321N1 cell lines compared to sham control. Conclusion: Results obtained indicate that extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields has the potential for induction of chromosomal aberrations in all cell types.

  12. Developing de novo human artificial chromosomes in embryonic stem cells using HSV-1 amplicon technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralli, Daniela; Monaco, Zoia L

    2015-02-01

    De novo artificial chromosomes expressing genes have been generated in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) and are maintained following differentiation into other cell types. Human artificial chromosomes (HAC) are small, functional, extrachromosomal elements, which behave as normal chromosomes in human cells. De novo HAC are generated following delivery of alpha satellite DNA into target cells. HAC are characterized by high levels of mitotic stability and are used as models to study centromere formation and chromosome organisation. They are successful and effective as gene expression vectors since they remain autonomous and can accommodate larger genes and regulatory regions for long-term expression studies in cells unlike other viral gene delivery vectors currently used. Transferring the essential DNA sequences for HAC formation intact across the cell membrane has been challenging for a number of years. A highly efficient delivery system based on HSV-1 amplicons has been used to target DNA directly to the ES cell nucleus and HAC stably generated in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) at high frequency. HAC were detected using an improved protocol for hESc chromosome harvesting, which consistently produced high-quality metaphase spreads that could routinely detect HAC in hESc. In tumour cells, the input DNA often integrated in the host chromosomes, but in the host ES genome, it remained intact. The hESc containing the HAC formed embryoid bodies, generated teratoma in mice, and differentiated into neuronal cells where the HAC were maintained. The HAC structure and chromatin composition was similar to the endogenous hESc chromosomes. This review will discuss the technological advances in HAC vector delivery using HSV-1 amplicons and the improvements in the identification of de novo HAC in hESc.

  13. Analysis of the frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes irradiated with 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, Julyanne C.G.; Mendes, Mariana E.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Santos, Neide

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of unstable chromosomal aberrations induced by gamma radiation from a 60 Co source at two different doses. Samples were obtained from a healthy donor and exposed to 60 Co source (Gammacel 220 ) located in the Department of Nuclear Energy of Pernambuco Federal University (DEN/UFPe/Brazil) with a rate of air Kerma to 3,277 Gy/h. Exposures resulted in absorbed dose 0.51 Gy and 0.77 Gy. Mitotic metaphases were obtained by culturing lymphocytes for chromosome analysis and the slides were stained with 5% Giemsa. Among the unstable chromosomal aberrations the dicentric chromosomes, ring chromosomes and acentric fragments were analyzed. To calculate the significance level the chi - square test was used, considering relevant differences between the frequencies when the value of p < 0.05. To calculate the significance level of the chi - square test was used, considering relevant differences between the frequencies when the value of p < 0.05. The results showed that there was significant difference of the frequencies of dicentric chromosomes (from 0.18 to 0.51 to 0.37 Gy to 0.77 Gy), however there was no statistically significant difference between the frequencies of acentric fragments ( 0.054 to 0, 51 Gy to 0.063 to 0.77 Gy) and ring chromosomes (0.001 to 0.51 Gy to 0.003 to 0.77 Gy). The low number of rings is found justified, considering that in irradiated human lymphocytes, its appearance is rare relative to dicentrics. The results confirm that dicentrics are the most reliable biomarkers in estimating dose after exposure to gamma radiation. These two points will make the calibration curve dose-response being built for Biological Dosimetry Laboratory of CRCN-NE/CNEN

  14. Analysis of chromosomal abnormalities: a study of partial exposure to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Aida M.G. de; Mendes, Mariana E.; Mendonça, Julyanne C.G.; Melo, Laís; Hwang, Suy; Santos, Neide; Lima, Fabiana F. de; Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares; Universidade Federal de Pernambuco

    2017-01-01

    Biological dosimetry is used in case of supposed accidental overexposure. The most commonly used biomarkers for assessing the absorbed dose are unstable chromosomal abnormalities. In a case of a partial body exposure, the frequencies of those abnormalities varies according to the area of the exposed body and may be substantially different from a total exposure of the body with an identical dose. The present study aimed to evaluate the frequency of chromosomal changes simulating, with blood samples, partial (25%, 50%) and full body irradiation (100%) in X-ray beam. The irradiation was performed at Metrology Service (CRCN-NE / CNEN) with a bundle of 250kVp X-rays, resulting in the absorbed dose of 1.0 Gy. Prior to obtain the metaphases, irradiated blood was mixed with non-irradiated blood, and then the mitotic metaphases for the chromosomal analyzes were obtained by culturing lymphocytes and the slides were stained with 5% Giemsa. It was observed that there was an increase in dicentric frequency when the dose percentage increases in both subjects (0.024 and 0.049 in subject 1 and 0.016 and 0.038 in subject 2) after irradiation. The cellular distribution was 'contaminated' only at dose 25% of the first individual who had a prolongation of the distribution. The Qdr and Dolphin methods were used to estimate partial absorbed dose, but the Qdr method was not efficient and whereas the Dolphin method was efficient when the individual had a prolonged cell distribution. It is necessary to increase the number of observations to be sure of the observed behaviors. (author)

  15. Analysis of chromosomal abnormalities: a study of partial exposure to X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Aida M.G. de; Mendes, Mariana E.; Mendonça, Julyanne C.G.; Melo, Laís; Hwang, Suy; Santos, Neide; Lima, Fabiana F. de, E-mail: aidamgandrade@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil); Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE),Recife (Brazil). Centro de Biociências. Departamento de Genética

    2017-11-01

    Biological dosimetry is used in case of supposed accidental overexposure. The most commonly used biomarkers for assessing the absorbed dose are unstable chromosomal abnormalities. In a case of a partial body exposure, the frequencies of those abnormalities varies according to the area of the exposed body and may be substantially different from a total exposure of the body with an identical dose. The present study aimed to evaluate the frequency of chromosomal changes simulating, with blood samples, partial (25%, 50%) and full body irradiation (100%) in X-ray beam. The irradiation was performed at Metrology Service (CRCN-NE / CNEN) with a bundle of 250kVp X-rays, resulting in the absorbed dose of 1.0 Gy. Prior to obtain the metaphases, irradiated blood was mixed with non-irradiated blood, and then the mitotic metaphases for the chromosomal analyzes were obtained by culturing lymphocytes and the slides were stained with 5% Giemsa. It was observed that there was an increase in dicentric frequency when the dose percentage increases in both subjects (0.024 and 0.049 in subject 1 and 0.016 and 0.038 in subject 2) after irradiation. The cellular distribution was 'contaminated' only at dose 25% of the first individual who had a prolongation of the distribution. The Qdr and Dolphin methods were used to estimate partial absorbed dose, but the Qdr method was not efficient and whereas the Dolphin method was efficient when the individual had a prolonged cell distribution. It is necessary to increase the number of observations to be sure of the observed behaviors. (author)

  16. Chromosomal organization of repetitive DNAs in Hordeum bogdanii and H. brevisubulatum (Poaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanwen Dou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular karyotypes of H. bogdanii Wilensky, 1918 (2n = 14, and H. brevisubulatum Link, 1844 ssp. brevisubulatum (2n = 28, were characterized by physical mapping of several repetitive sequences. A total of 18 repeats, including all possible di- or trinucleotide SSR (simple sequence repeat motifs and satellite DNAs, such as pAs1, 5S rDNA, 45S rDNA, and pSc119.2, were used as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization on root-tip metaphase chromosomes. Except for the SSR motifs AG, AT and GC, all the repeats we examined produced detectable hybridization signals on chromosomes of both species. A detailed molecular karyotype of the I genome of H. bogdanii is described for the first time, and each repetitive sequence is physically mapped. A high degree of chromosome variation, including aneuploidy and structural changes, was observed in H. brevisubulatum. Although the distribution of repeats in the chromosomes of H. brevisubulatum is different from that of H. bogdanii, similar patterns between the two species imply that the autopolyploid origin of H. brevisubulatum is from a Hordeum species with an I genome. A comparison of the I genome and the other Hordeum genomes, H, Xa and Xu, shows that colocalization of motifs AAC, ACT and CAT and colocalization of motifs AAG and AGG are characteristic of the I genome. In addition, we discuss the evolutionary significance of repeats in the genome during genome differentiation.

  17. Data Mining Empowers the Generation of a Novel Class of Chromosome-specific DNA Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Kwan, Johnson; Wang, Mei; O' Brien, Benjamin

    2011-03-08

    Probes that allow accurate delineation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in interphase or metaphase cell nuclei have become important clinical tools that deliver life-saving information about the gender or chromosomal make-up of a product of conception or the probability of an embryo to implant, as well as the definition of tumor-specific genetic signatures. Often such highly specific DNA probes are proprietary in nature and have been the result of extensive probe selection and optimization procedures. We describe a novel approach that eliminates costly and time consuming probe selection and testing by applying data mining and common bioinformatics tools. Similar to a rational drug design process in which drug-protein interactions are modeled in the computer, the rational probe design described here uses a set of criteria and publicly available bioinformatics software to select the desired probe molecules from libraries comprised of hundreds of thousands of probe molecules. Examples describe the selection of DNA probes for the human X and Y chromosomes, both with unprecedented performance, but in a similar fashion, this approach can be applied to other chromosomes or species.

  18. The hierarchically organized splitting of chromosome bands into sub-bands analyzed by multicolor banding (MCB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, H; Weise, A; Michel, S; Starke, H; Mrasek, K; Heller, A; Kuechler, A; Claussen, U; Liehr, T

    2004-01-01

    To clarify the nature of chromosome sub-bands in more detail, the multicolor banding (MCB) probe-set for chromosome 5 was hybridized to normal metaphase spreads of GTG band levels at approximately 850, approximately 550, approximately 400 and approximately 300. It could be observed that as the chromosomes became shorter, more of the initial 39 MCB pseudo-colors disappeared, ending with 18 MCB pseudo-colored bands at the approximately 300-band level. The hierarchically organized splitting of bands into sub-bands was analyzed by comparing the disappearance or appearance of pseudo-color bands of the four different band levels. The regions to split first are telomere-near, centromere-near and in 5q23-->q31, followed by 5p15, 5p14, and all GTG dark bands in 5q apart from 5q12 and 5q32 and finalized by sub-band building in 5p15.2, 5q21.2-->q21.3, 5q23.1 and 5q34. The direction of band splitting towards the centromere or the telomere could be assigned to each band separately. Pseudo-colors assigned to GTG-light bands were resistant to band splitting. These observations are in concordance with the recently proposed concept of chromosome region-specific protein swelling. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished...... chromosomes, we find a core set of 1269 encoded protein families for chromosome 1, and a core of 252 encoded protein families for chromosome 2. Many of these core proteins are also found in the draft genomes (although which chromosome they are located on is unknown.) Of the chromosome specific core protein...... families, 1169 and 153 are uniquely found in chromosomes 1 and 2, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) terms for each of the protein families were determined, and the different sets for each chromosome were compared. A total of 363 different "Molecular Function" GO categories were found for chromosome 1...

  20. Modulation of gamma ray induced chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by Hippophae rhammnoides leaf extract, SBL-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Anuradha; Madhu Bala

    2014-01-01

    Hippophae rhammnoides L. commonly known as seabuckthorn is a temperate shrub and native of Asia and Europe. It has high antioxidant potential and is known to the traditional Indian, Chinese and Tibetan medicinal system for treatment of multiple disorders viz., circulatory and digestive disorders, hepatic injuries, neoplasia etc. One time treatment with the standardized leaf extract from H. rhammnoides (SBL-1) before whole body irradiation with 60 Co (10 Gy), rendered more than 90% survival in non SBL-1 treated irradiated animals (J herbs, spices medi plants, 2009). Present study investigated the effects of SBL-1 treatment on chromosomal damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), with or without 60 Co-gamma-radiation. The lymphocytes were isolated from the blood drawn from different donors. The isolated lymphocytes were divided into several groups: Group 1-untreated control, Group 2-irradiated (2 Gy), Group 3, 4 and 5 were treated with different concentration of SBL-1, 30 min. after irradiation with 60 Co-gamma-rays (2 Gy). Group 6 was treated with the maximum concentration of SBL-1 used in the study. The metaphase spreading technique was used as per standard procedure to record chromosome breaks, dicentrics, acentrics and rings. The results were also recorded in terms of total aberrant metaphase and frequency of aberrant metaphase per 100 cells. In comparison to the untreated control, in the irradiated PBL culture, there was 8-fold increase in breaks, 211-folds in dicentrics, 75-folds in acentrics and 3-folds in rings (average data). SBL-1 alone at the highest concentration did not cause any significant change in number of breaks, dicentrics, acentrics and rings. The radiation induced aberrations decreased significantly by treatment with SBL-1 and the maximum decrease was observed when the cells were treated with 22μg/ml of SBL-1. These results demonstrated the anti-clastogenic activity of SBL-1 against gamma radiation induced damage. (author)

  1. Computer aided analysis of additional chromosome aberrations in Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia using a simplified computer readable cytogenetic notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohr Brigitte

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of complex cytogenetic databases of distinct leukaemia entities may help to detect rare recurring chromosome aberrations, minimal common regions of gains and losses, and also hot spots of genomic rearrangements. The patterns of the karyotype alterations may provide insights into the genetic pathways of disease progression. Results We developed a simplified computer readable cytogenetic notation (SCCN by which chromosome findings are normalised at a resolution of 400 bands. Lost or gained chromosomes or chromosome segments are specified in detail, and ranges of chromosome breakpoint assignments are recorded. Software modules were written to summarise the recorded chromosome changes with regard to the respective chromosome involvement. To assess the degree of karyotype alterations the ploidy levels and numbers of numerical and structural changes were recorded separately, and summarised in a complex karyotype aberration score (CKAS. The SCCN and CKAS were used to analyse the extend and the spectrum of additional chromosome aberrations in 94 patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and secondary chromosome anomalies. Dosage changes of chromosomal material represented 92.1% of all additional events. Recurring regions of chromosome losses were identified. Structural rearrangements affecting (pericentromeric chromosome regions were recorded in 24.6% of the cases. Conclusions SCCN and CKAS provide unifying elements between karyotypes and computer processable data formats. They proved to be useful in the investigation of additional chromosome aberrations in Ph-positive ALL, and may represent a step towards full automation of the analysis of large and complex karyotype databases.

  2. Residual chromosomal damage after radiochemotherapy with and without amifostine detected by 24-color FISH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuechler, A.; Wendt, T.G.; Dreidax, M.; Liehr, T.; Claussen, U.; Pigorsch, S.U.; Dunst, J.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Amifostine is a radioprotective drug applied to reduce acute radiation toxicity during a course of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. In the present study, amifostine was used in patients undergoing adjuvant radiochemotherapy for rectal cancer. It was described previously that additional application of amifostine led to less acute skin and bowel toxicity. The present study was aimed to determine whether amifostine has an influence on the amount of residual chromosomal damage. Material and Methods: Peripheral lymphocytes of twelve rectal cancer patients who had undergone postoperative radiochemotherapy 2-3 years ago were investigated for residual chromosomal damage using 24-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (24-color FISH). All twelve patients had received a total dose of 55.8 Gy in conventional fractionation of 1.8 Gy and a 120-h continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy (1,000 mg/m 2 per day) in the 1st and 5th week of irradiation. Seven out of twelve patients had been given additional amifostine on chemotherapy days (500 mg total dose as short i.v. infusion immediately prior to the daily radiation fraction). Cultivation of lymphocytes and 24-color FISH were performed according to standard protocols. 100 metaphases per patient were analyzed for chromosomal aberrations in a blind study. Results: Analysis of the average number of breaks per mitosis (B/M) revealed an increased amount of residual chromosomal damage in the group treated with amifostine (0.65 B/M [0.32-0.97]) as well as in those treated without amifostine (0.76 B/M [0.31-1.25]). Also the average number of cells containing aberrations per 100 analyzed metaphases was similar (with amifostine: 22.1 [13-32] vs. 24.4 [13-35] without amifostine). The aberration types, occurring as simple translocations, reciprocal translocations, breaks, dicentrics, inversions, rings and complex chromosomal rearrangements, did not show any specific accumulation in one or the other

  3. Unusual arrangement and behaviour of the sex chromosomes of Aphodius (Agolius abdominalis Bonelli, 1812, and comparison with A. (A. bonvouloiri Harold, 1860 (Coleoptera: Aphodiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Angus

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aphodius abdominalis Bonelli, 1812 is shown to have a karyotype comprising nine pairs of autosomes and sex chromosomes which are X0 (male, XX (female. At first metaphase of meiosis the X chromosome is linked to an autosomal bivalent by a darkly staining area of the cytoplasm, resembling the Xy p arrangement typical of Aphodius species, but giving nine, rather than 10, elements in the nucleus. C-banding, which shows the centromeres, confirms this unusual arrangement. A. bonvouloiri, the only other known species of subgenus Agolius Mulsant et Rey, 1869, has a male karyotype with nine pairs of autosomes and Xy sex chromosomes. No preparations of its meiosis are available.

  4. Potential control of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) with Piper aduncum L. (Piperaceae) extracts demonstrated by chromosomal biomarkers and toxic effects on interphase nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafael, M S; Hereira-Rojas, W J; Roper, J J; Nunomura, S M; Tadei, W P

    2008-01-01

    Dillapiol, a phenylpropanoid isolate from essential oils of leaves of Piper aduncum (Piperaceae), has insecticidal, fungicidal and antimicrobial activities. The insecticidal activity of dillapiol was tested in vivo on the larvae and pupae of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue. Specifically, the effect of dillapiol on the formation of micronuclei and chromosome aberrations was analyzed. Dillapiol treatments comprised two concentrations of 200 and 400 micro dissolved in well water, and a pure well water control used to rear four generations of mosquitoes. Micronuclei occurred in mitotic diploid and tetraploid chromosomes of larvae; nuclear abnormalities also occurred in interphase, metaphase, telophase, and single nucleus cells of pupae. Mortality, oviposition, chromosome breakage, and anaphase bridges were significantly greater in the extract treatments than in controls. The genotoxic effects of dillapiol described here suggest that this natural product may be a useful alternative for the control of A. aegypti.

  5. Chromosomal aberrations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia detected by conventional cytogenetics with DSP30 as a single agent: comparison with FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotkowska, Aleksandra; Wawrzyniak, Ewa; Blonski, Jerzy Z; Robak, Tadeusz; Korycka-Wolowiec, Anna

    2011-08-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate the usefulness for conventional cytogenetics (CC) of DSP30 as a single agent (CC-DSP30) for detecting the most important chromosomal aberrations revealed in CLL by FISH and to find other abnormalities possibly existing but undetected by FISH with standard probes. Using CC-DSP30, the metaphases suitable for analysis were obtained in 90% of patients. CC-DSP30 and FISH were similarly efficacious for detecting del(11)(q22) and trisomy 12, whereas FISH was more sensitive for del(13)(q14). Sole del(13)(q14) detected by FISH, in 50% of patients was associated with other aberrations revealed by CC-DSP30. Additionally, the most recurrent anomaly detected by CC-DSP30 were structural aberrations of chromosome 2. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Distribution of the various radiation-induced chromosomal rearrangements in relation to the dose and sampling time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutrillaux, B.; Viegas-Pequignot, E.; Prod'homme, M.; Sportes, M.

    1985-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of the chromosome rearrangements detected in 2128 R-banded metaphases, obtained from γ-irradiated human lymphocytes after 48 to 96 h in culture is reported. Depending on the culture time, and possibly on the dose of radiation (from 1 to 3 Gy), the most frequent type of rearrangement was either dicentrics or reciprocal translocations. In first generation mitoses, the frequency of cells without rearrangement ranged from 0.66 to 0.18, and the mean number of rearranged chromosomes per cell from 0.79 to 3.28. The dose-response curve follows a quadratic function for dicentric aberration yields, but not for other rearrangements. (Auth.)

  7. Genes on chromosomes 1 and 4 in the mouse are associated with repair of radiation-induced chromatin damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, M; Sanford, K K; Parshad, R; Tarone, R E; Price, F M; Mock, B; Huppi, K

    1988-04-01

    Early-passage skin fibroblasts from different inbred and congenic strains of mice were X-irradiated (1 Gy), and the number of chromatid breaks was determined at 2.0 h after irradiation. The cells from DBA/2N, C3H/HeN, STS/A, C57BL/6N, BALB/cJ, and AKR/N had 25 to 42 chromatid breaks per 100 metaphase cells (efficient repair phenotype). NZB/NJ had greater than 78 and BALB/cAn had 87 to 110 chromatid breaks per 100 cells (inefficient repair phenotype). Differences between BALB/cAn and BALB/c. DBA/2 congenic strains which carry less than 1% of the DBA/2 genome indicate that two genes, one on chromosome 1 linked to bcl-2-Pep-3 and the other on chromosome 4 closely linked to Fv-1, affect the efficiency with which the cells repair radiation-induced chromatin damage.

  8. Chromosomal aberrations of blood lymphocytes induced in vitro by radon-222 daughter α-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl-Rueling, J.; Lettner, H.; Hofmann, W.; Atzmueller, C; Eckl, P.; Haas, O.A.; Obe, G.; Grell-Buechtmann, I.; Van Buul, P.P.W.; Natarajan, A.T.; Schroeder-Kurth, T.; Sasaki, M.S.; Fischer, P.; Kubiak, R.

    2000-01-01

    Blood samples were irradiated in vitro with α-rays emitted from short-lived radon decay products dissolved in the culture medium at doses between 0.03 and 41.4 mGy. The data were collected from experiments conducted during the period 1984-1992 and comprise a total of about 64000 scored metaphases. For statistical reasons, only 60,022 metaphases were used for the subsequent analysis. The results for total chromosome aberrations and dicentrics indicate a linear dose dependence in the dose range above about 10 mGy, consistent with other experimental observations. At doses below about 10 mGy, aberration frequencies cannot be linearly extrapolated from higher doses, suggesting that there is no dependence on dose within a certain low-dose range. In addition, a statistically significant minimum has been observed at a dose of about 0.03 mGy, which is consistently lower than the related control values. The behavior of the aberration frequencies in the low-dose region seems to be influenced by the control values, which also depend on the environmental radiation burdens to the donors before blood sampling and thus were significantly affected by the Chernobyl fallout

  9. Delayed formation of chromosome aberrations in mouse pachytebne spermatocytes treated with triethylenemelamine (TEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generoso, W.M.; Krishna, M.; Sotomayor, R.E.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.

    1977-01-01

    Induction of chromosome aberrations in pachytene spermatocytes of mice by 2 mg/kg TEM was compared with induction by 400 R x rays. These doses induced comparably high dominant lethal effects in pachytene spermatocytes of mice. Cytological analysis at diakinesis-metaphase I stage showed that whereas 76.4% of the cells treated with x rays at pachytene stage had aberrations, the frequencies observed in two TEM experiments were only 0.8 and 2.2%. On the other hand, 5% of the progeny from TEM-treated pachytene spermatocytes were found to be translocation heterozygotes. This is the first report on the recovery of heritable translocations from treated spermatocytes of mice. The aberration frequencies observed for TEM in diakinesis-metaphase I were much too low to account for all the lethal mutations and heritable translocations. Thus, the formation of the bulk of aberrations induced by TEM in pachytene spermatocytes was delayed--a marked contrast to the more immediate formation of x-ray-induced aberrations. It is postulated that the formation of the bulk of TEM-induced aberrations in pachytene spermatocytes and in certain postmeiotic stages occurs sometime during spermiogenesis, and not through the operation of postfertilization pronuclear DNA synthesis

  10. [Chromosome banding analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated with IL2 and CpG oligonucleotide DSP30 in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stěpanovská, K; Vaňková, G; Némethová, V; Tomášiková, L; Smuhařová, P; Divíšková, E; Vallová, V; Kuglík, P; Plevová, K; Oltová, A; Doubek, M; Pospíšilová, S; Mayer, J

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations play an important role as prognostic factors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). These aberrations are mostly detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), as chromosomal banding analysis has been scarce due to low proliferative activity of malignant B-lymphocytes in vitro. In 2006, a new method using stimulation with IL-2 and CpG oligonucleotide DSP30 for metaphase generation in CLL was published [1]. The objective of our study was to verify the efficacy of stimulation and to evaluate if the method is suitable for routine diagnostics. In total, peripheral blood samples of 369 CLL patients were analyzed in parallel by chromosomal banding analysis and by FISH probes for 13q14, 11q22-23, CEP12 and 17p13. Out of 369 patients, 307 (83%) were successfully stimulated for metaphase generation. Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 243 (79%) out of 307 patients evaluated by chromosomal banding analysis. Other aberrations that are not included into standard FISH panel were detected in patients karyotypes, e.g. del(6q), del(14q), t(14;18)(q32;q21), t(11;14)(q13;q32) and t(18;22)(q21;q11). One hundred and three (42%) patients showed complex aberrant karyotype not detected by FISH analysis. Stimulation with IL-2 and oligonucleotide DSP30 is an efficient method how to induce proliferation of malignant B-lymphocytes and allows detection of a substantial number of chromosomal aberrations in addition to those detected by standard FISH panel. Using this method in routine diagnostics is helpful particularly in identification of patients with complex aberrant karyotype.

  11. Radioprotective effects of histamine H2 receptor antagonists famotidine and ranitidine on gamma ray induced chromosome damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    Histamine H2 receptor antagonist such as Cimetidine, Famotidine and Ranitidine are used in the clinical treatment of peptic ulcer. In vitro metaphase analysis and micronucleus assay were used to test the effects of famotidine and ranitidine on Cobalt 60 γ-ray induced clastogenic effects. Heparinised whole blood was obtained from healthy non-smoker volunteers. Blood samples were irradiated at a dose of 3Gy and incubated at 37 deg C for 1h. Lymphocyte cultures were initiated for metaphase chromosomes and cytochalasin B blocked micronucleus analysis. Aqueous solution of Famotidine (150 g/ml) and Ranitidine (500 g/ml) was added to the whole blood cultures at 0h and 24h. Cultures were harvested and processed at 48h and 72h for chromosome aberrations and micronucleus analysis respectively. Cultures treated with Famotidine at 0h and 24h after 3Gy γ-ray irradiation induce 60.90% and 56.52% inhibition in dicentrics, 48.70% and 43.61% inhibition in total aberrations. Ranitidine at 0h and 24h after 3Gy γ-ray irradiation induce 52.17% and 43.47% inhibition in dicentrics, 33.60% and 46.15% inhibition in total aberrations, when compared with 3Gy γ-ray irradiation alone. 43-54% inhibition in Binucleated cells with micronuclei and 47.72% inhibition in micronuclei at 0h treatment respectively. In conclusion radioprotective effects of Histamine H2 receptor antagonists famotidine and ranitidine on γ-ray induced chromosome damage is observed and the drugs effectively reduced the frequency of radiation induced chromosome aberrations and micronucleus. Famotidine was found to be more effective. The mechanism in which these drugs reduce clastogenic effect of γ-radiation is not fully understood. It might be due to their antioxidant and free radical-scavenging properties. (author)

  12. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... chromosomes that results in formation of derivative chromosomes with a mixed DNA sequence. The method currently used for their detection is Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization, which requires a use of expensive, fluorescently labeled probes that target the derivative chromosomes. We present here a double...... hybridization approach developed for label-free detection of the chromosome translocations. For specific translocation detection it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The electrochemical...

  13. Karyotyping and in situ chromosomal localization of rDNA sites in black cumin Bunium persicum (Boiss B. Fedtsch,1915 (Apiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Chahota

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH technique has been applied to somatic chromosomes in the medicinally important species, Bunium persicum, to elucidate its karyotypes. The bicolour FISH technique involving 18S-5.8S-26S and 5S ribosomal RNA genes as probes was used to assign physical localization and measurement of rDNA sites on homologous pairs of chromosomes. The two 18S-5.8S-26S rRNA gene sites were at the terminal regions of the short arms of the chromosomes 1 and 2 involving NOR region of chromosome 1. The 5S rDNA sites were found on subtelomeric region of the long arm of the chromosome number 5 and at interstitial regions of the short arm of chromosome 7. Based on direct visual analysis of chromosome length, morphology and position of FISH signals, a pioneer attempt has been made to construct metaphase karyotype in B. persicum, an endangered medicinal plant of North Western Himalayas.

  14. Mutations and chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihlman, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    The genetic changes of mutations and chromosomal aberrations are discussed. The consequences of both depend not only on the type of genetic change produced but also on the type of cell that is affected and on the development stage of the organism. (C.F.)

  15. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-01-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available

  16. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 3. Know Your Chromosomes The Strong Holds of Family Trees. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 3 March 1996 pp 30-38. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...

  18. Chromosome Damage and Cell Proliferation Rates in In Vitro Irradiated Whole Blood as Markers of Late Radiation Toxicity After Radiation Therapy to the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaton, Lindsay A., E-mail: Lindsay.Beaton@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Ferrarotto, Catherine; Marro, Leonora [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Samiee, Sara; Malone, Shawn; Grimes, Scott; Malone, Kyle [The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, 501 Smyth Rd, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Wilkins, Ruth C. [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: In vitro irradiated blood samples from prostate cancer patients showing late normal tissue damage were examined for lymphocyte response by measuring chromosomal aberrations and proliferation rate. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected from a randomized trial evaluating the optimal timing of dose-escalated radiation and short-course androgen deprivation therapy. Of 438 patients, 3% experienced grade 3 late radiation proctitis and were considered to be radiosensitive. Blood samples were taken from 10 of these patients along with 20 matched samples from patients with grade 0 proctitis. The samples were irradiated at 6 Gy and, along with control samples, were analyzed for dicentric chromosomes and excess fragments per cell. Cells in first and second metaphase were also enumerated to determine the lymphocyte proliferation rate. Results: At 6 Gy, there were statistically significant differences between the radiosensitive and control cohorts for 3 endpoints: the mean number of dicentric chromosomes per cell (3.26 ± 0.31, 2.91 ± 0.32; P=.0258), the mean number of excess fragments per cell (2.27 ± 0.23, 1.43 ± 0.37; P<.0001), and the proportion of cells in second metaphase (0.27 ± 0.10, 0.46 ± 0.09; P=.0007). Conclusions: These results may be a valuable indicator for identifying radiosensitive patients and for tailoring radiation therapy.

  19. Damage of chromosoms under irradiation of human blood lymphocytes and development of bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemetun, O V

    2016-12-01

    the research the distribution of radiation induced damages among chromosomes and their bands in irra diated in vitro human blood lymphocytes and in unirradiated bystander cells.Material and methods of research: cultivation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes by semi micromethod D.A. Hungerford, modeling of radiation induced bystander effect in mixed cultures consisting of irradiated in vitro and non irradiated blood lymphocytes from persons of different gender, GTG staining of metaphase chromosomes and their cytogenetic analysis. Break points in chromosomes under the formation of aberrations were identified in exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes in doses 0.25 Gy (95 breaks in 1248 cells) and 1.0 Gy (227 breaks in 726 cells) and in non irradiated bystander cells under their joint cultivation with irradiated in vitro human lymphocytes (51 breaks in 1137 cells at irradiation of adjacent populations of lymphocytes in dose 0.25 Gy and 75 breaks in 1321 cells at irradiation of adjacent population of lymphocytes in a dose 1.0 Gy). The distribution of injuries among the chromo somes and their bands was investigated. in radiation exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as in bystander cells the fre quency of damaged bands and number of breaks which localized in them exceeded the control value (p chromosomes were damaged according to their relative length. Location of bands with increasing number of breaks coincided with the «hot spots» of chromosome damage following irradiation and fragile sites. More sensitive to damage were G negative euchromatin chromosome bands, in which were localized 82 88 % breaks. Damageability of telomeric regions in the irradiated cells had no significant difference from the control, while in bystander cells was lower than control value (p < 0.05). O. V. Shemetun.

  20. FISH with whole chromosome and telomeric probes demonstrates huge karyotypic reorganization with ITS between two species of Oryzomyini (Sigmodontinae, Rodentia): Hylaeamys megacephalus probes on Cerradomys langguthi karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; O'Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; Pinto, Jamilly Amaral; Malcher, Stella Miranda; Pereira, Adenilson Leão; Rissino, Jorge das Dores; Mendes-Oliveira, Ana Cristina; Rossi, Rogério Vieira; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Rodentia comprises 42 % of living mammalian species. The taxonomic identification can be difficult, the number of species currently known probably being underestimated, since many species show only slight morphological variations. Few studies surveyed the biodiversity of species, especially in the Amazon region. Cytogenetic studies show great chromosomal variability in rodents, with diploid numbers ranging from 10 to 102, making it difficult to find chromosomal homologies by comparative G banding. Chromosome painting is useful, but only a few species of rodents have been studied by this technique. In this study, we sorted whole chromosome probes by fluorescence-activated cell sorting from two Hylaeamys megacephalus individuals, an adult female (2n = 54) and a fetus (2n = 50). We made reciprocal chromosome painting between these karyotypes and cross-species hybridization on Cerradomys langguthi (2n = 46). Both species belong to the tribe Oryzomyini (Sigmodontinae), which is restricted to South America and were collected in the Amazon region. Twenty-four chromosome-specific probes from the female and 25 from the fetus were sorted. Reciprocal chromosome painting shows that the karyotype of the fetus does not represent a new cytotype, but an unbalanced karyotype with multiple rearrangements. Cross-species hybridization of H. megacephalus probes on metaphases of C. langguthi shows that 11 chromosomes of H. megacephalus revealed conserved synteny, 10 H. megacephalus probes hybridized to two chromosomal regions and three hybridized to three regions. Associations were observed on chromosomes pairs 1-4 and 11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a telomeric probe revealed interstitial regions in three pairs (1, 3, and 4) of C. langguthi chromosomes. We discuss the genomic reorganization of the C. langguthi karyotype.

  1. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  2. Loss of Ubr2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, leads to chromosome fragility and impaired homologous recombinational repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Yan; Kwon, Yong Tae; An, Jee Young; Eller, Danny; Tsai, S.-C.; Diaz-Perez, Silvia; Troke, Joshua J.; Teitell, Michael A.; Marahrens, York

    2006-01-01

    The N-end rule pathway of protein degradation targets proteins with destabilizing N-terminal residues. Ubr2 is one of the E3 ubiquitin ligases of the mouse N-end rule pathway. We have previously shown that Ubr2 -/- male mice are infertile, owing to the arrest of spermatocytes between the leptotene/zygotene and pachytene of meiosis I, the failure of chromosome pairing, and subsequent apoptosis. Here, we report that mouse fibroblast cells derived from Ubr2 -/- embryos display genome instability. The frequency of chromosomal bridges and micronuclei were much higher in Ubr2 -/- fibroblasts than in +/+ controls. Metaphase chromosome spreads from Ubr2 -/- cells revealed a high incidence of spontaneous chromosomal gaps, indicating chromosomal fragility. These fragile sites were generally replicated late in S phase. Ubr2 -/- cells were hypersensitive to mitomycin C, a DNA cross-linking agent, but displayed normal sensitivity to gamma-irradiation. A reporter assay showed that Ubr2 -/- cells are significantly impaired in the homologous recombination repair of a double strand break. In contrast, Ubr2 -/- cells appeared normal in an assay for non-homologous end joining. Our results therefore unveil the role of the ubiquitin ligase Ubr2 in maintaining genome integrity and in homologous recombination repair

  3. Loss of Ubr2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, leads to chromosome fragility and impaired homologous recombinational repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Yan [Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Kwon, Yong Tae [Center for Pharmacogenetics and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); An, Jee Young [Center for Pharmacogenetics and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Eller, Danny [Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Tsai, S.-C. [Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Diaz-Perez, Silvia [Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Troke, Joshua J. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Teitell, Michael A. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Marahrens, York [Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)]. E-mail: ymarahrens@mednet.ucla.edu

    2006-04-11

    The N-end rule pathway of protein degradation targets proteins with destabilizing N-terminal residues. Ubr2 is one of the E3 ubiquitin ligases of the mouse N-end rule pathway. We have previously shown that Ubr2{sup -/-} male mice are infertile, owing to the arrest of spermatocytes between the leptotene/zygotene and pachytene of meiosis I, the failure of chromosome pairing, and subsequent apoptosis. Here, we report that mouse fibroblast cells derived from Ubr2{sup -/-} embryos display genome instability. The frequency of chromosomal bridges and micronuclei were much higher in Ubr2{sup -/-} fibroblasts than in +/+ controls. Metaphase chromosome spreads from Ubr2{sup -/-} cells revealed a high incidence of spontaneous chromosomal gaps, indicating chromosomal fragility. These fragile sites were generally replicated late in S phase. Ubr2{sup -/-} cells were hypersensitive to mitomycin C, a DNA cross-linking agent, but displayed normal sensitivity to gamma-irradiation. A reporter assay showed that Ubr2{sup -/-} cells are significantly impaired in the homologous recombination repair of a double strand break. In contrast, Ubr2{sup -/-} cells appeared normal in an assay for non-homologous end joining. Our results therefore unveil the role of the ubiquitin ligase Ubr2 in maintaining genome integrity and in homologous recombination repair.

  4. Aberrations of holokinetic chromosomes and associated lethality after X-irradiation of meiotic stages in Tetranychus urticae Koch (acari, tetranychidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempelaar, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    Chromosomes of the holokinetic organization type were irradiated with X-rays in various stages of meiosis in unfertillized eggs of Tetranychus urticae Koch. Visible cytological aberrations, lethality and sterility were investigated in subsequent generations. Chromosome fragments are the most frequently occuring light-microscopically visible chromosome aberrations; bridges are not formed. Contrary to expectations, the presence of fragments appears to be positively correlated with the occurrence of lethality; loss of fragments, missegregation and the measure of damage of the broken chromosome parts are involved. In contrast with monokinetic chromosomes the earliest lethality occurs only after about 10 divisions. The ratios between different embryonic lethality types (early vs. late) differ depending on the stage irradiated: in more compact chromatin, more serious damage (i.e. more early lethality syndromes) is induced than in less compact chromatin. In the progeny of the surviving males, neither translocations nor independent fragments are found; indirect evidence indicated the occasional presence of inversions. The presumtive inversions are induced more frequently in a chromatin-compact stage (metaphase I) than in a less compact one (telophase I). (Auth.)

  5. The Argonaute CSR-1 and its 22G-RNA cofactors are required for holocentric chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, Julie M; Batista, Pedro J; Pang, Ka Ming; Gu, Weifeng; Vasale, Jessica J; van Wolfswinkel, Josien C; Chaves, Daniel A; Shirayama, Masaki; Mitani, Shohei; Ketting, René F; Conte, Darryl; Mello, Craig C

    2009-10-02

    RNAi-related pathways regulate diverse processes, from developmental timing to transposon silencing. Here, we show that in C. elegans the Argonaute CSR-1, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase EGO-1, the Dicer-related helicase DRH-3, and the Tudor-domain protein EKL-1 localize to chromosomes and are required for proper chromosome segregation. In the absence of these factors chromosomes fail to align at the metaphase plate and kinetochores do not orient to opposing spindle poles. Surprisingly, the CSR-1-interacting small RNAs (22G-RNAs) are antisense to thousands of germline-expressed protein-coding genes. Nematodes assemble holocentric chromosomes in which continuous kinetochores must span the expressed domains of the genome. We show that CSR-1 interacts with chromatin at target loci but does not downregulate target mRNA or protein levels. Instead, our findings support a model in which CSR-1 complexes target protein-coding domains to promote their proper organization within the holocentric chromosomes of C. elegans.

  6. Sex chromosome repeats tip the balance towards speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Michael J; O'Neill, Rachel J

    2018-04-06

    Because sex chromosomes, by definition, carry genes that determine sex, mutations that alter their structural and functional stability can have immediate consequences for the individual by reducing fertility, but also for a species by altering the sex ratio. Moreover, the sex-specific segregation patterns of heteromorphic sex chromosomes make them havens for selfish genetic elements that not only create sub-optimal sex ratios, but can also foster sexual antagonism. Compensatory mutations to mitigate antagonism or return sex ratios to a Fisherian optimum can create hybrid incompatibility and establish reproductive barriers leading to species divergence. The destabilizing influence of these selfish elements is often manifest within populations as copy number variants (CNVs) in satellite repeats and transposable elements (TE) or as CNVs involving sex determining genes, or genes essential to fertility and sex chromosome dosage compensation. This review catalogs several examples of well-studied sex chromosome CNVs in Drosophilids and mammals that underlie instances of meiotic drive, hybrid incompatibility and disruptions to sex differentiation and sex chromosome dosage compensation. While it is difficult to pinpoint a direct cause/effect relationship between these sex chromosome CNVs and speciation, it is easy to see how their effects in creating imbalances between the sexes, and the compensatory mutations to restore balance, can lead to lineage splitting and species formation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular cytogenetic identification of a novel wheat-Agropyron elongatum chromosome translocation line with powdery mildew resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojun; Jiang, Xiaoling; Chen, Xiangdong; Song, Jie; Ren, Cuicui; Xiao, Yajuan; Gao, Xiaohui; Ru, Zhengang

    2017-01-01

    Agropyron elongatum (Host.) Neviski (synonym, Thinopyrum ponticum Podp., 2n = 70) has been used extensively as a valuable source for wheat breeding. Numerous chromosome fragments containing valuable genes have been successfully translocated into wheat from A. elongatum. However, reports on the transfer of powdery mildew resistance from A. elongatum to wheat are rare. In this study, a novel wheat-A. elongatum translocation line, 11-20-1, developed and selected from the progenies of a sequential cross between wheat varieties (Lankaoaizaoba, Keyu 818 and BainongAK 58) and A. elongatum, was evaluated for disease resistance and characterized using molecular cytogenetic methods. Cytological observations indicated that 11-20-1 had 42 chromosomes and formed 21 bivalents at meiotic metaphase I. Genomic in situ hybridization analysis using whole genomic DNA from A. elongatum as a probe showed that the short arms of a pair of wheat chromosomes were replaced by a pair of A. elongatum chromosome arms. Fluorescence in situ hybridization, using wheat D chromosome specific sequence pAs1 as a probe, suggested that the replaced chromosome arms of 11-20-1 were 5DS. This was further confirmed by wheat SSR markers specific for 5DS. EST-SSR and EST-STS multiple loci markers confirmed that the introduced A. elongatum chromosome arms belonged to homoeologous group 5. Therefore, it was deduced that 11-20-1 was a wheat-A. elongatum T5DL∙5AgS translocation line. Both resistance observation and molecular marker analyses using two specific markers (BE443538 and CD452608) of A. elongatum in a F2 population from a cross between line 11-20-1 and a susceptible cultivar Yannong 19 verified that the A. elongatum chromosomes were responsible for the powdery mildew resistance. This work suggests that 11-20-1 likely contains a novel resistance gene against powdery mildew. We expect this line to be useful for the genetic improvement of wheat.

  8. Critical target and dose and dose-rate responses for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoli, C. L.; Corcoran, J. J.; Milligan, J. R.; Ward, J. F.; Morgan, W. F.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the critical target, dose response and dose-rate response for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-substituted and unsubstituted GM10115 cells were exposed to a range of doses (0.1-10 Gy) and different dose rates (0.092-17.45 Gy min(-1)). The status of chromosomal stability was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization approximately 20 generations after irradiation in clonal populations derived from single progenitor cells surviving acute exposure. Overall, nearly 700 individual clones representing over 140,000 metaphases were analyzed. In cells unsubstituted with BrdU, a dose response was found, where the probability of observing delayed chromosomal instability in any given clone was 3% per gray of X rays. For cells substituted with 25-66% BrdU, however, a dose response was observed only at low doses (1.0 Gy), the incidence of chromosomal instability leveled off. There was an increase in the frequency and complexity of chromosomal instability per unit dose compared to cells unsubstituted with BrdU. The frequency of chromosomal instability appeared to saturate around approximately 30%, an effect which occurred at much lower doses in the presence of BrdU. Changing the gamma-ray dose rate by a factor of 190 (0.092 to 17.45 Gy min(-1)) produced no significant differences in the frequency of chromosomal instability. The enhancement of chromosomal instability promoted by the presence of the BrdU argues that DNA comprises at least one of the critical targets important for the induction of this end point of genomic instability.

  9. DNA content of cells with generalized chromosome shattering induced by ultraviolet light plus caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, C.; Gray, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Asynchronously growing Chinese hamster cells (M3-1) were UV-irradiated (lambda = 254 nm) and then incubated with/without caffeine (2 mM) for 20 h. Microscopic evaluation of metaphase spreads revealed that after UV-irradiation alone (5.0 J/m 2 ) and caffeine treatment alone, the percentage of cells with condensed chromatin appearing fragmented and/or pulverized ('GCS-like' cells; GCS, Generalized Chromosome Shattering) was very low while it was high following the combined treatment. Cytogenetic and flow cytometric analysis of cells obtained by mechanical shaking cultures treated with UV and caffeine indicated that 'GCS-like' cells have the same DNA content as untreated cells in G2 phase and mitosis. (orig.)

  10. Epidemiological study using the chromosome aberration technique in different population samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus Prieto, M.; Moreno, M.; Olivares, P.; Gomez, M.; Herranz, R.

    1997-01-01

    As far back as 10 years ago, the Gregorio Maranon General University Hospital (HGUGM) was equipped with a laboratory of biological dosimetry and has undertaken dosimetric estimations of individuals suspected with overexposure to ionizing radiation. For this purpose it was necessary to carry out studies on the basic frequency of chromosomal aberrations in a controlled (radiation exposed) population. A study was conducted on 72 individuals of the community of Madrid who had not been exposed to ionizing radiation. 500 metaphases per individual were examined and a basic frequency of 0.7 (dic)/1000 cells analysed. Parameters such as age, gender and cigarette consumption were considered and results show a linear dependency with age and consumption of cigarettes, but not with gender

  11. Chromosome aberrations in F1 from irradiated male mice studied by their synaptonemal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalikinskaya, E.I.; Kolomiets, O.L.; Shevchenko, V.A.; Bogdanov, Yu.F.

    1986-01-01

    Possible implications of surface-spread synaptonemal complex (SC) karyotyping in analysing the causes of sterility of F 1 from irradiated male mice are demonstrated in this work. After irradiation by 137 Cs γ-rays at a dose of 5 Gy the males were mated to unirradiated females and genetic analysis of fertility in the F 1 progeny was carried out. Males with abnormal fertility were examined for the presence of chromosome aberrations in diakinesis-metaphase I and in pachytene by the method of surface-spread SC karyotyping. In most cases, SC karyotyping provides additional information and permits the detection and analysis of aberrations that are not revealed in diakinesis. Two reciprocal translocations, one X autosomal and one nonreciprocal translocation were discovered in five F 1 males studied. It is concluded that the method is efficient in detecting translocations in pachytene in partially fertile F 1 hybrids of irradiated and normal mice. (orig.)

  12. Chromosome dosimetry: the influence of culture media on the proliferation of irradiated and unirradiated human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purrott, R.J.; Lloyd, D.C.; Vulpis, N.

    1981-01-01

    The proliferation of phytohaemagglutinin stimulated human lymphocytes in four types of synthetic culture medium has been studied using the fluorescence plus Giemsa staining technique to determine cell cycle status. 48 hour cultures of unirradiated cells containing Ham's F10 or RPMI 1640 media yielded significant numbers of second cycle metaphases. Cultures containing Eagle's MEM or TC 199 media, however, required longer incubation times to produce appreciable numbers of second division cells. Intrinsic differences between donors in the rate of proliferation had little effect on the relative ranking of the media. Radiation induced mitotic delay of about 1 hour per Gray was observed for each medium. The relevance of these results to the accuracy of radiation dose estimation by chromosome aberration analysis is discussed. (author)

  13. bcr-abl oncogene activation in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, A.; Gow, J.; Selleri, L.; von Lindern, M.; Hagemeijer, A.; Wiedemann, L. M.; Grosveld, G.

    1988-01-01

    Tumor-specific alterations in oncogenes are thought to play a central role in the development of cancer. An example is the consistent fusion of the bcr gene to the c-abl oncogene on the Ph chromosome in CML. The Ph chromosome can also be observed in ALL. About 50% of Ph+ ALL cases, in contrast to

  14. X-Inactivation: Xist RNA Uses Chromosome Contacts to Coat the X

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Karen N.; Panning, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which Xist RNA associates with the X chromosome to mediate alterations in chromatin structure remain mysterious. Recent genome-wide Xist RNA distribution studies suggest that this long noncoding RNA uses 3-dimensional chromosome contacts to move to its sites of action.

  15. X-inactivation: Xist RNA uses chromosome contacts to coat the X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Karen N; Panning, Barbara

    2014-01-20

    The mechanisms by which Xist RNA associates with the X chromosome to mediate alterations in chromatin structure remain mysterious. Recent genome-wide Xist RNA distribution studies suggest that this long noncoding RNA uses 3-dimensional chromosome contacts to move to its sites of action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The X chromosome in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégu, Teddy; Aeby, Eric; Lee, Jeannie T

    2017-06-01

    Extensive 3D folding is required to package a genome into the tiny nuclear space, and this packaging must be compatible with proper gene expression. Thus, in the well-hierarchized nucleus, chromosomes occupy discrete territories and adopt specific 3D organizational structures that facilitate interactions between regulatory elements for gene expression. The mammalian X chromosome exemplifies this structure-function relationship. Recent studies have shown that, upon X-chromosome inactivation, active and inactive X chromosomes localize to different subnuclear positions and adopt distinct chromosomal architectures that reflect their activity states. Here, we review the roles of long non-coding RNAs, chromosomal organizational structures and the subnuclear localization of chromosomes as they relate to X-linked gene expression.

  17. Synteny of human chromosomes 14 and 15 in the platyrrhines (Primates, Platyrrhini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the intra- and interspecific variability of the 14/15 association in Platyrrhini, we analyzed 15 species from 13 genera, including species that had not been described yet. The DNA libraries of human chromosomes 14 and 15 were hybridized to metaphases of Alouatta guariba clamitans, A. caraya, A. sara, Ateles paniscus chamek, Lagothrix lagothricha, Brachyteles arachnoides, Saguinus midas midas, Leontopithecus chrysomelas, Callimico goeldii, Callithrix sp., Cebus apella, Aotus nigriceps, Cacajao melanocephalus,Chiropotes satanas and Callicebus caligatus. The 14/15 hybridization pattern was present in 13 species, but not in Alouatta sara that showed a 14/15/14 pattern and Aotus nigriceps that showed a 15/14/15/14 pattern. In the majority of the species, the HSA 14 homologue retained synteny for the entire chromosome, whereas the HSA 15 homologue displayed fragmented segments. Within primates, the New World monkeys represent the taxon with the highest variability in chromosome number (2n = 16 to 62). The presence of the HSA 14/15 association in all species and subspecies studied herein confirms that this association is the ancestral condition for platyrrhines and that this association has been retained in most platyrrhines, despite the occurrence of extensive inter- and intrachromosomal rearrangements in this infraorder of Primates. PMID:21637455

  18. Chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes in subjects occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation or chemical clastogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalic, H.; Radosevic-Stasic, B.

    2002-01-01

    To get an insight into genotoxic risk in some occupations, in this study the chromosome aberration analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes was made in 20 physicians and nurses exposed to a low dose of ionizing radiation in a hospital, 12 individuals working with X-rays in a cement factory and 19 technicians working with some chemical toxic agents in the laboratories of a medical school. The control group consisted of 14 sex- and age-matched unexposed persons living in the same district area. The data showed that the total number of chromosome aberrations in 200 scored metaphases in all examined groups were almost the same and inside the low-permitted values. In hospital workers, however, the percentage of acentric and dicentric fragments (1.63 ± 0.28 vs 0.31 ± 0.21 and 0.47 ± 0.18 vs 0.0, respectively) increased predominantly in contrast to cement-factory employees and laboratory workers, where a higher incidence of minutes (0.58 ± 0.19 vs 0.31 ± 0.2) or gaps (2.21 ± 0.37 vs 1.15 ± 1.15) was noticed. Moreover, in groups exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation (hospital and factory), a positive correlation was found between the total number of chromosome aberrations and the 6-year absorption dose or working period, suggesting an effect of cumulative dosage. (author)

  19. Retrospective Dose Reconstruction for Medical Diagnostic X Ray Workers in China using Stable Chromosome Aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Liu, P.; Li, J.; Wang, Q.; Tang, S.; Sun, M.; Wang, L.; Aoyama, T.; Sugahara, T.

    1998-01-01

    The chromosome rearrangements in medical diagnostic X ray workers were analysed using the G-banding technique and evaluated collectively in accumulated doses. A total of 9102 metaphase spreads from 84 medical diagnostic X ray workers and 17 controls were scored. The results showed that: (1) the frequencies of translocation, stable chromosome aberration and total aberration in X ray workers were significantly higher than those of controls (P < 0.05 γ 0.005), unstable chromosome aberrations (including dicentric and acentric aberration) tended upwards; (2) the main aberration in stable aberrations was reciprocal translocation; (3) the stable aberration predominated strikingly in total aberrations. The medical diagnostic X ray workers were divided into three groups according to calendar year of entry. The data showed that the frequencies of translocation, stable aberration and total aberration increased with earlier year of entry, especially in two groups who started working before 1970. According to the equation recommended by Straume et al, linear coefficient (α) in the linear quadratic model provided by Fernandez's experiment, their collective accumulation doses calculated were 0.53, 0.26 and 0.06 Gy for calendar year of entry before 1960, 1960-1969, and after 1970, in X ray workers, respectively. (author)

  20. Synteny of human chromosomes 14 and 15 in the platyrrhines (Primates, Platyrrhini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifalli-Iughetti, Cristiani; Koiffmann, Célia P

    2009-10-01

    In order to study the intra- and interspecific variability of the 14/15 association in Platyrrhini, we analyzed 15 species from 13 genera, including species that had not been described yet. The DNA libraries of human chromosomes 14 and 15 were hybridized to metaphases of Alouatta guariba clamitans, A. caraya, A. sara, Ateles paniscus chamek, Lagothrix lagothricha, Brachyteles arachnoides, Saguinus midas midas, Leontopithecus chrysomelas, Callimico goeldii, Callithrix sp., Cebus apella, Aotus nigriceps, Cacajao melanocephalus,Chiropotes satanas and Callicebus caligatus. The 14/15 hybridization pattern was present in 13 species, but not in Alouatta sara that showed a 14/15/14 pattern and Aotus nigriceps that showed a 15/14/15/14 pattern. In the majority of the species, the HSA 14 homologue retained synteny for the entire chromosome, whereas the HSA 15 homologue displayed fragmented segments. Within primates, the New World monkeys represent the taxon with the highest variability in chromosome number (2n = 16 to 62). The presence of the HSA 14/15 association in all species and subspecies studied herein confirms that this association is the ancestral condition for platyrrhines and that this association has been retained in most platyrrhines, despite the occurrence of extensive inter- and intrachromosomal rearrangements in this infraorder of Primates.

  1. Chromosomal sensitivity to X-rays in lymphocytes from patients with Turner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heras, J G; Coco, R

    1986-03-01

    Lymphocytes from patients with Turner syndrome were irradiated with X-rays to determine the chromosomal aberration frequency in first-division metaphases. Five patients with 45,X karyotype; three 45,X/46,Xi(X)q mosaics; one 45,X/47,XXX mosaic and 9 female controls were studied. Patients with a 45,X karyotype exhibited a radioinduced chromosomal aberration frequency similar to controls. In the mosaics, 45,X cells has a mean frequency of 38.75 +- 2.16; 46,Xi(X)q cells a mean of 38 +- 2.16 and the control group a rate of 36.25 +- 4.32. No differences were observed between 45,X and 46,Xi(X)q cells, 45,X and normal cells or 46,Xi(X)q and normal cells. Apparently neither the X monosomy nor the Xq isochromosome influences the in vitro X-ray-induced chromosomal damage in Turner syndrome lymphocytes. (Auth.). 29 references, 4 tables.

  2. Synteny of human chromosomes 14 and 15 in the platyrrhines (Primates, Platyrrhini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiani Gifalli-Iughetti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the intra- and interspecific variability of the 14/15 association in Platyrrhini, we analyzed 15 species from 13 genera, including species that had not been described yet. The DNA libraries of human chromosomes 14 and 15 were hybridized to metaphases of Alouatta guariba clamitans, A. caraya, A. sara, Ateles paniscus chamek, Lagothrix lagothricha, Brachyteles arachnoides, Saguinus midas midas, Leontopithecus chrysomelas, Callimico goeldii, Callithrix sp., Cebus apella, Aotus nigriceps, Cacajao melanocephalus, Chiropotes satanas and Callicebus caligatus. The 14/15 hybridization pattern was present in 13 species, but not in Alouatta sara that showed a 14/15/14 pattern and Aotus nigriceps that showed a 15/14/15/14 pattern. In the majority of the species, the HSA 14 homologue retained synteny for the entire chromosome, whereas the HSA 15 homologue displayed fragmented segments. Within primates, the New World monkeys represent the taxon with the highest variability in chromosome number (2n = 16 to 62. The presence of the HSA 14/15 association in all species and subspecies studied herein confirms that this association is the ancestral condition for platyrrhines and that this association has been retained in most platyrrhines, despite the occurrence of extensive inter- and intrachromosomal rearrangements in this infraorder of Primates.

  3. Dependence of Early and Late Chromosomal Aberrations on Radiation Quality and Cell Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Krieger, Stephanie; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Goss, Rosalin; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to radiation induces different types of DNA damage, increases mutation and chromosome aberration rates, and increases cellular transformation in vitro and in vivo. The susceptibility of cells to radiation depends on genetic background and growth condition of cells, as well as types of radiation. Mammalian cells of different tissue types and with different genetic background are known to have different survival rate and different mutation rate after cytogenetic insults. Genomic instability, induced by various genetic, metabolic, and environmental factors including radiation, is the driving force of tumorigenesis. Accurate measurements of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is important for estimating radiation-related risks. To further understand genomic instability induced by charged particles and their RBE, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblast AG1522, human mammary epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10), and bone marrow cells isolated from CBA/CaH(CBA) and C57BL/6 (C57) mice to high energy protons and Fe ions. Normal human fibroblasts AG1522 have apparently normal DNA damage response and repair mechanisms, while mammary epithelial cells (M10) are deficient in the repair of DNA DSBs. Mouse strain CBA is radio-sensitive while C57 is radio-resistant. Metaphase chromosomes at different cell divisions after radiation exposure were collected and chromosome aberrations were analyzed as RBE for different cell lines exposed to different radiations at various time points up to one month post irradiation.

  4. Clathrin heavy chain 1 is required for spindle assembly and chromosome congression in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Wang, Lu; Zhou, Hong-Xia; Liu, Li; Lu, Angeleem; Li, Guang-Peng; Schatten, Heide; Liang, Cheng-Guang

    2013-10-01

    Clathrin heavy chain 1 (CLTC) has been considered a “moonlighting protein” which acts in membrane trafficking during interphase and in stabilizing spindle fibers during mitosis. However, its roles in meiosis, especially in mammalian oocyte maturation, remain unclear. This study investigated CLTC expression and function in spindle formation and chromosome congression during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. Our results showed that the expression level of CLTC increased after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and peaked in the M phase. Immunostaining results showed CLTC distribution throughout the cytoplasm in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Appearance and disappearance of CLTC along with β-tubulin (TUBB) could be observed during spindle dynamic changes. To explore the relationship between CLTC and microtubule dynamics, oocytes at metaphase were treated with taxol or nocodazole. CLTC colocalized with TUBB at the enlarged spindle and with cytoplasmic asters after taxol treatment; it disassembled and distributed into the cytoplasm along with TUBB after nocodazole treatment. Disruption of CLTC function using stealth siRNA caused a decreased first polar body extrusion rate and extensive spindle formation and chromosome congression defects. Taken together, these results show that CLTC plays an important role in spindle assembly and chromosome congression through a microtubule correlation mechanism during mouse oocyte maturation.

  5. In-situ fluorescence hybridization applied to biological dosimetry: contribution of automation to the counting of radio-induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germain Thomas Roy, Laurence

    1999-01-01

    The frequency of chromosome aberrations on peripheral blood lymphocytes is a dose indicator in the case of ionizing radiations over-exposure. Stable chromosome aberrations (translocations, insertions) are visualized after labelling of some chromosomes using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). The study of the use of the FISH technique in biological dosimetry is done with dose-effect curves. It seems that a bias is introduced during the observation of chromosome aberrations involving only 3 pairs of chromosomes. In order to avoid this bias, it would be useful to test the feasibility of using the multi-FISH technique in biological dosimetry. Moreover, this type of chromosome aberration changes with the type of irradiation. It is thus important to define the aberrations to be considered when the FISH technique is used. In order to reduce the time of image analysis, the CYTOGEN system, developed by IMSTAR company (Paris, France) has been adapted to the needs of biological dosimetry. This system allows to localize automatically the metaphases on the slide, which reduces the observation time by 2 or 4. An automatic detection protocol for chromosome aberrations has been implemented. It comprises the image capture, the contours detection and the classification of some chromosome aberrations. The different steps of this protocol have been tested in order to check that no bias is introduced by the automation. However, because radio-induced aberrations are rare events, it seems that a totally automatic system is not foreseeable. A semi-automatic analysis is more suitable. The use of the Slit-Scan technology (Laboratory of applied physics, Heidelberg, Germany) in biological dosimetry has been studied too. This technique allows to analyze rapidly a huge number of chromosomes. A good correlation has been observed between the dicentric frequency measured automatically and by manual counting. The system is under development and should be adapted to the detection of

  6. In vitro maturation, fertilization, embryo development & clinical outcome of human metaphase-I oocytes retrieved from stimulated intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Álvarez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The major cause of fertilisation failure after ICSI is failure of the oocyte to initiate the biochemical processes necessary for activation. This inability could be ascribed to cytoplasmic immaturity of those gametes even if they had reached nuclear maturity. The activation of a mature oocyte is characterised by release from metaphase II (MII arrest and extrusion of the second polar body, followed by pro-nuclear formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fate of in vitro matured (IVM metaphase I (MI oocytes subjected to intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI at different time intervals after extrusion of the first polar body (1PB in in vitro fertilization (IVF cycles. Methods: A total of 8030 oocytes were collected from 1400 ICSI cycles, 5504 MII at the time of cumulus retrieval. Four hundred eight metaphase II (MII (27.1% matured to MII after in vitro culture for 2-26 h and 5389 sibling MII in the moment of oocyte denudation were injected. On the other hand, 49 ICSI cycles containing only MI oocytes at retrieval were injected at three different time intervals after reaching the MII. The intervals were as follows: 2-6 h (n=10, 8-11 h (n=4 and 23-26 h (n=10. Fertilization and development potential were evaluated in both studies. Results: Fertilization, embryo cleavage and quality were significantly lower in IVM MI compared to MII at time of denudation. Pregnancy rate was higher in group MII. Pregnancy was achieved in three embryo transfers when ICSI was performed within 2-6 h (group I and 8-11 h (group II after PB extrusion. One pregnancy was obtained in group I and a healthy neonate was born. Interpretation & conclusions: Immature oocytes from women whose ovaries have been stimulated could be matured, fertilized by ICSI, cleaved in vitro and to give rise to a live birth. However, the developmental competence of embryos derived from immature oocytes is reduced, compared with sibling in vivo matured oocytes

  7. Transient and Partial Nuclear Lamina Disruption Promotes Chromosome Movement in Early Meiotic Prophase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Jana; Paouneskou, Dimitra; Velkova, Maria; Daryabeigi, Anahita; Laos, Triin; Labella, Sara; Barroso, Consuelo; Pacheco Piñol, Sarai; Montoya, Alex; Kramer, Holger; Woglar, Alexander; Baudrimont, Antoine; Markert, Sebastian Mathias; Stigloher, Christian; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Dammermann, Alexander; Alsheimer, Manfred; Zetka, Monique; Jantsch, Verena

    2018-04-23

    Meiotic chromosome movement is important for the pairwise alignment of homologous chromosomes, which is required for correct chromosome segregation. Movement is driven by cytoplasmic forces, transmitted to chromosome ends by nuclear membrane-spanning proteins. In animal cells, lamins form a prominent scaffold at the nuclear periphery, yet the role lamins play in meiotic chromosome movement is unclear. We show that chromosome movement correlates with reduced lamin association with the nuclear rim, which requires lamin phosphorylation at sites analogous to those that open lamina network crosslinks in mitosis. Failure to remodel the lamina results in delayed meiotic entry, altered chromatin organization, unpaired or interlocked chromosomes, and slowed chromosome movement. The remodeling kinases are delivered to lamins via chromosome ends coupled to the nuclear envelope, potentially enabling crosstalk between the lamina and chromosomal events. Thus, opening the lamina network plays a role in modulating contacts between chromosomes and the nuclear periphery during meiosis. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comprehensive preimplantation genetic screening and sperm deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation from three males carrying balanced chromosome rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Laia; Daina, Gemma; Del Rey, Javier; Ribas-Maynou, Jordi; Fernández-Encinas, Alba; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Boada, Montserrat; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2015-09-01

    To assess whether preimplantation genetic screening can successfully identify cytogenetically normal embryos in couples carrying balanced chromosome rearrangements in addition to increased sperm DNA fragmentation. Comprehensive preimplantation genetic screening was performed on three couples carrying chromosome rearrangements. Sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed for each patient. Academic center. One couple with the male partner carrying a chromosome 2 pericentric inversion and two couples with the male partners carrying a Robertsonian translocation (13:14 and 14:21, respectively). A single blastomere from each of the 18 cleavage-stage embryos obtained was analysed by metaphase comparative genomic hybridization. Single- and double-strand sperm DNA fragmentation was determined by the alkaline and neutral Comet assays. Single- and double-strand sperm DNA fragmentation values and incidence of chromosome imbalances in the blastomeres were analyzed. The obtained values of single-strand sperm DNA fragmentation were between 47% and 59%, and the double-strand sperm DNA fragmentation values were between 43% and 54%. No euploid embryos were observed in the couple showing the highest single-strand sperm DNA fragmentation. However, euploid embryos were observed in the other two couples: embryo transfer was performed, and pregnancy was achieved by the couple showing the lowest sperm DNA fragmentation values. Preimplantation genetic screening enables the detection of euploid embryos in couples affected by balanced chromosome rearrangements and increased sperm DNA fragmentation. Even though sperm DNA fragmentation may potentially have clinical consequences on fertility, comprehensive preimplantation genetic screening allows for the identification and transfer of euploid embryos. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Condensin suppresses recombination and regulates double-strand break processing at the repetitive ribosomal DNA array to ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Jin, Hui; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, homologues are linked by crossover, which is required for bipolar chromosome orientation before chromosome segregation at anaphase I. The repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) array, however, undergoes little or no meiotic recombination. Hyperrecombination can cause chromosome missegregation and rDNA copy number instability. We report here that condensin, a conserved protein complex required for chromosome organization, regulates double-strand break (DSB) formation and repair at the rDNA gene cluster during meiosis in budding yeast. Condensin is highly enriched at the rDNA region during prophase I, released at the prophase I/metaphase I transition, and reassociates with rDNA before anaphase I onset. We show that condensin plays a dual role in maintaining rDNA stability: it suppresses the formation of Spo11-mediated rDNA breaks, and it promotes DSB processing to ensure proper chromosome segregation. Condensin is unnecessary for the export of rDNA breaks outside the nucleolus but required for timely repair of meiotic DSBs. Our work reveals that condensin coordinates meiotic recombination with chromosome segregation at the repetitive rDNA sequence, thereby maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25103240

  10. Differential effects of treatment with UV-light (365 nm) and 8-methoxypsoralen on chromosomes of healthy persons and psoriatic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeber, G.; Kittler, L.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP, 5 x 10 -5 M), near UV-light of 365 nm wavelength (UVA, 1.5 J/cm 2 ) and the combination of both (PUVA treatment) were studied on lymphocytes in vitro taken from healthy persons and patients with psoriasis vulgaris and psoriasis arthritis (psoriasis arthropathica). Chromosomes isolated from cell nuclei were visualized by means of Giemsa staining technique and analyzed for induction of chromosomal defects, i.e. premature centromere division (PCD), major coiling (MC), and formation of gaps and fragile sites. Exposure of nonpsoriatic lymphocytes to 8-MOP, UVA or PUVA increased the rate of PCD or MC generation. In experiments with psoriatic lymphocytes a much weaker effect was found, with a moderate increase of PCD and MC after UVA or PUVA treatment in the case of psoriasis vulgaris, and of MC after UVA treatment of psoriasis arthritis. On the average the number of chromosomes per metaphase plate displaying PCD did not exceed 10. No indication was obtained for the preference of certain chromosome groups or the appearance of 'fragile sites'. Under all experimental conditions the number of chromosome gaps ranged in the order of their spontaneous induction. The findings suggest PCD and MC investigations as possible sensitive tools for diagnosing latent psoriasis and for refined analysis of psoriatic cells or chromosomes. (author)

  11. Multipolar spindle pole coalescence is a major source of kinetochore mis-attachment and chromosome mis-segregation in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William T Silkworth

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells display a CIN (Chromosome Instability phenotype, by which they exhibit high rates of chromosome loss or gain at each cell cycle. Over the years, a number of different mechanisms, including mitotic spindle multipolarity, cytokinesis failure, and merotelic kinetochore orientation, have been proposed as causes of CIN. However, a comprehensive theory of how CIN is perpetuated is still lacking. We used CIN colorectal cancer cells as a model system to investigate the possible cellular mechanism(s underlying CIN. We found that CIN cells frequently assembled multipolar spindles in early mitosis. However, multipolar anaphase cells were very rare, and live-cell experiments showed that almost all CIN cells divided in a bipolar fashion. Moreover, fixed-cell analysis showed high frequencies of merotelically attached lagging chromosomes in bipolar anaphase CIN cells, and higher frequencies of merotelic attachments in multipolar vs. bipolar prometaphases. Finally, we found that multipolar CIN prometaphases typically possessed gamma-tubulin at all spindle poles, and that a significant fraction of bipolar metaphase/early anaphase CIN cells possessed more than one centrosome at a single spindle pole. Taken together, our data suggest a model by which merotelic kinetochore attachments can easily be established in multipolar prometaphases. Most of these multipolar prometaphase cells would then bi-polarize before anaphase onset, and the residual merotelic attachments would produce chromosome mis-segregation due to anaphase lagging chromosomes. We propose this spindle pole coalescence mechanism as a major contributor to chromosome instability in cancer cells.

  12. A dominant negative mutant of TLK1 causes chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy in normal breast epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Briana

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Arabidopsis thaliana, the gene Tousled encodes a protein kinase of unknown function, but mutations in the gene lead to flowering and leaf morphology defects. We have recently cloned a mammalian Tousled-Like Kinase (TLK1B and found that it phosphorylates specifically histone H3, in vitro and in vivo. We now report the effects that overexpression of a kinase-dead mutant of TLK1B mediates in a normal diploid cell line. Results Expression of a kinase-dead mutant resulted in reduction of phosphorylated histone H3, which could have consequences in mitotic segregation of chromosomes. When analyzed by FACS and microscopy, these cells displayed high chromosome number instability and aneuploidy. This phenomenon was accompanied by less condensed chromosomes at mitosis; failure of a number of chromosomes to align properly on the metaphase plate; failure of some chromosomes to attach to microtubules; and the occasional presentation of two bipolar spindles. We also used a different method (siRNA to reduce the level of endogenous TLK1, but in this case, the main result was a strong block of cell cycle progression suggesting that TLK1 may also play a role in progression from G1. This block in S phase progression could also offer a different explanation of some of the later mitotic defects. Conclusions TLK1 has a function important for proper chromosome segregation and maintenance of diploid cells at mitosis in mammalian cells that could be mediated by reduced phosphorylation of histone H3 and condensation of chromosomes, although other explanations to the phenotype are possible.

  13. Allocation of the S-genome chromosomes of Aegilops variabilis Eig. carrying powdery mildew resistance in triticale (× Triticosecale Wittmack).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatek, M; Belter, J; Majka, M; Wiśniewska, H

    2016-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that the powdery mildew adult plant resistance (APR) controlled by the Pm13 gene in Aegilops longissima Schweinf. & Muschl. (S(l)S(l)) has been evolutionary transferred to Aegilops variabilis Eig. (UUSS). The molecular marker analysis and the visual evaluation of powdery mildew symptoms in Ae. variabilis and the Ae. variabilis × Secale cereale amphiploid forms (2n = 6x = 42, UUSSRR) showed the presence of product that corresponded to Pm13 marker and the lower infection level compared to susceptible model, respectively. This study also describes the transfer of Ae. variabilis Eig. (2n = 4x = 28, U(v)U(v)S(v)S(v)) chromosomes, carrying powdery mildew resistance, into triticale (× Triticosecale Wittm., 2n = 6x = 42, AABBRR) using Ae. variabilis × S. cereale amphiploid forms. The individual chromosomes of Ae. variabilis, triticale 'Lamberto' and hybrids were characterized by genomic and fluorescence in situ hybridization (GISH/FISH). The chromosome configurations of obtained hybrid forms were studied at first metaphase of meiosis of pollen mother cells (PMCs) using GISH. The statistical analysis showed that the way of S-genome chromosome pairing and transmission to subsequent hybrid generations was diploid-like and had no influence on chromosome pairing of triticale chromosomes. The cytogenetic study of hybrid forms were supported by the marker-assisted selection using Pm13 marker and visual evaluation of natural infection by Blumeria graminis, that allowed to select the addition or substitution lines of hybrids carrying chromosome 3S(v) which were tolerant to the powdery mildew infection.

  14. Premature chromosome condensation and cell separation studies in biopsies from head and neck tumors for radiosensitivity prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begg, Adrian C.; Sprong, Debbie; Balm, Alfons; Coco Martin, Jose M.

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: Intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumor cells from biopsies, assayed by colony formation after in vitro irradiation, has shown significant correlations with outcome after radiotherapy. Alternatives to the colony assay have been sought due to its long and cumbersome nature. We have previously shown good correlations between colony formation and radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human tumor cell lines. In addition, we and others have shown on cell lines that premature chromosome condensation (PCC) induced with phosphatase inhibitors can be used to aid rapid assessment of aberrations in interphase cells, reducing the selection problem with metaphases. The purpose of this study was to translate the in vitro results to human cancer, with the aim of developing a rapid assay for intrinsic radiosensitivity. Methods and results: The problem of admixtures of normal and malignant cells in biopsies was addressed using magnetic bead separation (MACS) employing antibodies to human fibroblasts. This proved to be a reliable and efficient method, enriching mean tumor cell fractions from 20 to almost 80%. PCC could be induced in human normal and tumor cell lines, and in sorted or unsorted suspensions from biopsies, with the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A. Maximum PCCs were achieved after 1-week culture of biopsy-derived cells. Mean fractions of aneuploid tumor cell PCCs were, however, less than 1%. PCCs were predominantly from S and G2 phase, of which only G2 were scorable for aberrations. Almost no G1 PCCs were found. More scorable PCCs were found after 1 h of calyculin A than metaphases after 5 h of colcemid, but these were calculated to be too few to yield reliable estimates of chromosome damage after radiation. Conlcusions: Tumor cells can be satisfactorily separated from fibroblasts in fresh suspensions from cancer biopsies, but poor growth of tumor cells in short term culture and low yields of PCCs combine to prevent the routine use of such

  15. Molecular fundamentals of chromosomal mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganassi, E.Eh.; Zaichkina, S.I.; Malakhova, L.V.

    1987-01-01

    Precise quantitative correlation between the yield of chromosome structure damages and the yield of DNA damages is shown when comparing data on molecular and cytogenetic investigations carried out in cultural Mammalia cells. As the chromosome structure damage is to be connected with the damage of its carcass structure, then it is natural that DNA damage in loop regions is not to affect considerably the structure, while DNA damage lying on the loop base and connected with the chromosome carcass is to play a determining role in chromosomal mutagenesis. This DNA constitutes 1-2% from the total quantity of nuclear DNA. If one accepts that damages of these regions of DNA are ''hot'' points of chromosomal mutagenesis, then it becomes clear why 1-2% of preparation damages in a cell are realized in chromosome structural damages

  16. Intraspecific chromosome variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dubinin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available (Editorial preface. The publication is presented in order to remind us of one of dramatic pages of the history of genetics. It re-opens for the contemporary reader a comprehensive work marking the priority change from plant cytogenetics to animal cytogenetics led by wide population studies which were conducted on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The year of the publication (1937 became the point of irretrievable branching between the directions of Old World and New World genetics connected with the problems of chromosome variability and its significance for the evolution of the species. The famous book of T. Dobzhansky (1937 was published by Columbia University in the US under the title “Genetics and the origin of species”, and in the shadow of this American ‘skybuilding’ all other works grew dim. It is remarkable that both Dobzhansky and Dubinin come to similar conclusions about the role of chromosomes in speciation. This is not surprising given that they both might be considered as representatives of the Russian genetic school, by their birth and education. Interestingly, Dobzhansky had never referred to the full paper of Dubinin et al. (1937, though a previous short communication in Nature (1936 was included together with all former papers on the related subject. In full, the volume of the original publication printed in the Biological Journal in Moscow comprised 47 pages, in that number 41 pages of the Russian text accompanied by 16 Figs, a table and reference list, and, above all, 6 pages of the English summary. This final part in English is now reproduced in the authors’ version with the only addition being the reference list in the originally printed form.

  17. Stage specificity and dose-response relationships for chromosome aberrations induced in mouse primary spermatocytes following X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Y.; Tobari, I.; Utsugi, T.

    1986-05-01

    In this study, dose-response relationships were examined for chromosome aberrations observed at diakinesis-metaphase I of spermatocytes with X-irradiation at various stages of meiosis (diplotene, mid-pachytene, zygotene and leptotene). The frequencies of cells with X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations increased with dose at all stages in the applied range of 0.5-3.0 Gy and tended to increase as the irradiated stages descended after leptotene stage. In three stages, the frequencies increased exponentially with dose, but the rates of induction of chromosome breaks were markedly different depending on the stages at which spermatocytes were irradiated with X-rays. The rate of induction was the highest at diplotene and the lowest at leptotene, suggesting that diplotene spermatocytes had the highest radiosensitivity to the induction of chromosome breaks, followed by pachytene, zygotene and leptotene spermatocytes in that order. The dose-response relationships fitted well to linear equations for deletion-type aberrations at each stage, and to linear-quadratic equations for exchange-type aberrations at all stages except for leptotene. At leptotene, the chromatid exchanges were hardly observed, the aberrations being mainly consisted of iso-chromatid fragments. On the contrary, chromatid exchanges and iso-chromatide deletions were mainly observed at later stages (zygotene-diplotene).

  18. Chromosomal aberrations induced by 12C6+ ions and 6Co γ-rays in mouse immature oocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong; Duan Xin; Yuan Zhigang; Li Wenjian; Zhou Guangming; Zhou Qingming; Bing Liu; Min Fengling; Li Xiaoda; Xie Yi

    2006-01-01

    The ovaries of Kun-Ming strain mice (3 weeks) were irradiated with different doses of 12 C 6+ ion or 6 Co γ-ray. Chromosomal aberrations were analyzed in metaphase II oocytes at 7 weeks after irradiation. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 12 C 6+ ion was calculated with respect to 6 Co γ-ray for the induction of chromosomal aberrations. The 12 C 6+ ion and 6 Co γ-ray dose-response relationships for chromosomal aberrations were plotted by linear quadratic models. The data showed that there was a dose-related increase in frequency of chromosomal aberrations in all the treated groups compared to controls. The RBE values for 12 C 6+ ions relative to 6 Co γ-rays were 2.49, 2.29, 1.57, 1.42 or 1.32 for the doses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 or 6.0 Gy, respectively. Moreover, a different distribution of the various types of aberrations has been found for 12 C 6+ ion and 6 Co γ-ray irradiations. The dose-response relationships for 12 C 6+ ion and 6 Co γ-ray exhibited positive correlations. The results from the present study may be helpful for assessing genetic damage following exposure of immature oocytes to ionizing radiation

  19. Studies on chromosomal aberrations and dominant lethal mutations induced by x irradiation in germ cells of male mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xianli; Wang Mingdong; Wang Bin; Sun Shuqing

    1992-01-01

    After male mice irradiated by 2 Gy X rays mated to normal virginal females superovulated with PMSG and HCG, pronuclei chromosome spreading of first-cleavage embryos were prepared and chromosomal aberrations of paternal pronuclei were observed. The results showed that the frequency of chromosomal aberrations was highest irradiated at spermatic stage among different stages of spermatogenesis. The sequence of radiosensitivity in spermatogenesis was as follows: spermatids > mature sperm > spermatocyte > spermatogonia and stem spermatogonia. The frequencies of paternal chromosomal aberrations resulted from irradiation at spermatids and mature sperms were significantly higher than that in control. The reciprocal translocations of stem spermatogonia induced by 2 Gy X rays in those male mice were also examined in the preparations of diakinesis-metaphase I. The frequency of reciprocal translocations were 0.0429 per cell and significantly higher than that in control. The proportion of unbalanced gametes, resulting in lethal embryos after fertilization, was 0.02145 to be predicted. At the same time, the dominant lethality induced by X rays in stem spermatogonia was measured, being 0.0371. The frequency of dead fetuses in irradiation group was about twice as in control. The regression analysis was found that the reciprocal translocations was markedly related to the dominant lethality

  20. The Induction of Chromosome Aberrations and Micronuclei in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes at Low Doses of Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shmakova, N L; Krasavin, E A; Melnikova, L A; Fadeeva, T A

    2003-01-01

    The chromosome damage induced by the low doses of gamma-irradiation with ^{60}Co and X-rays in peripheral blood lymphocytes has been studied using different cytogenetic assays. Isolated lymphocytes were exposed to 0.01-1.0 Gy, simulated by PHA, and analysed for chromosome aberrations by the metaphase and the anaphase methods, by the micronucleus assay. Despite the quantitative differences in the amount of chromosome damage revealed by different methods, all of them demonstrated complex nonlinear dose dependence of the frequency of aberrant cells and aberrations. At the dose range of 0.01-0.05 Gy the cells showed the highest radiosensitivity; at 0.05-0.5 Gy the dose-independent induction of chromosome damage was revealed. At the doses of 0.5-1.0 Gy the dose-effect curves became linear with the decreased slope compared with the initial one (by a factor of 5 to 10 for different criteria) reflecting a higher radioresistance of the cells. These data confirm the idea that the direct linear extrapolation of high-dos...

  1. The influence of chromosome density variations on the increase in nuclear disorder strength in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Soo; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Backman, Vadim; Szleifer, Igal

    2011-01-01

    Microscopic structural changes have long been observed in cancer cells and used as a marker in cancer diagnosis. Recent development of an optical technique, partial-wave spectroscopy (PWS), enabled more sensitive detection of nanoscale structural changes in early carcinogenesis in terms of the disorder strength related to density variations. These nanoscale alterations precede the well-known microscopic morphological changes. We investigate the influence of nuclear density variations due to chromosome condensation on changes of disorder strength by computer simulations of model chromosomes. Nuclear configurations with different degrees of chromosome condensation are realized from simulations of decondensing chromosomes and the disorder strength is calculated for these nuclear configurations. We found that the disorder strength increases significantly for configurations with slightly more condensed chromosomes. Coupled with PWS measurements, the simulation results suggest that the chromosome condensation and the resulting spatial density inhomogeneity may represent one of the earliest events in carcinogenesis

  2. X chromosome and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, L M; Zouk, H; Himmelman, C; Turecki, G

    2011-02-01

    Suicide completion rates are significantly higher in males than females in most societies. Although gender differences in suicide rates have been partially explained by environmental and behavioral factors, it is possible that genetic factors, through differential expression between genders, may also help explain gender moderation of suicide risk. This study investigated X-linked genes in suicide completers using a two-step strategy. We first took advantage of the genetic structure of the French-Canadian population and genotyped 722 unrelated French-Canadian male subjects, of whom 333 were suicide completers and 389 were non-suicide controls, using a panel of 37 microsatellite markers spanning the entire X chromosome. Nine haplotype windows and several individual markers were associated with suicide. Significant results aggregated primarily in two regions, one in the long arm and another in the short arm of chromosome X, limited by markers DXS8051 and DXS8102, and DXS1001 and DXS8106, respectively. The second stage of the study investigated differential brain expression of genes mapping to associated regions in Brodmann areas 8/9, 11, 44 and 46, in an independent sample of suicide completers and controls. Six genes within these regions, Rho GTPase-activating protein 6, adaptor-related protein complex 1 sigma 2 subunit, glycoprotein M6B, ribosomal protein S6 kinase 90  kDa polypeptide 3, spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase 1 and THO complex 2, were found to be differentially expressed in suicide completers.

  3. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  4. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... chromosomes are evolutionary consequences of that func- tion. Given sufficient ... (for a review, see Charlesworth et al. 2005). ... In the present paper, I review sex deter- mination .... part had apparently been exchanged against the homologous ... age group III-Y chromosomes were successful while in well-.

  5. Pure chromosome-specific PCR libraries from single sorted chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanDevanter, D. R.; Choongkittaworn, N. M.; Dyer, K. A.; Aten, J. A.; Otto, P.; Behler, C.; Bryant, E. M.; Rabinovitch, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    Chromosome-specific DNA libraries can be very useful in molecular and cytogenetic genome mapping studies. We have developed a rapid and simple method for the generation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences that relies on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a single flow-sorted

  6. Effect of post-treatments with caffeine during G2 on the frequencies of chromosome-type aberrations produced by X-rays in human lymphocytes during G0 and G1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzarella, C.; De Salvia, R.; Degrassi, F.; Palitti, F.; Andersson, H.C.; Hansson, K.; Kihlman, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Human lymphocytes were irradiated with X-rays in G 0 and G 1 , grown in the presence of 5-bromodeoxyuridine, and harvested at different times from 48 to 80 h after stimulation. Some cultures were exposed to 2.5-5 mM caffeine during the last 3 h before harvesting. The frequencies of chromosome-type aberrations were scored in first division (M 1 ) metaphases. The post-treatment with caffeine increased the frequencies of mitoses and chromosome-type aberrations in irradiated cultures. The results suggest that cells carrying chromosome-type aberrations are delayed in G 2 and that caffeine increases the frequencies of aberrations in dividing cells by removing this G 2 -block. (author)

  7. Cytogenetic analysis of CpG-oligonucleotide DSP30 plus Interleukin-2-Stimulated canine B-Cell lymphoma cells reveals the loss of one X Chromosome as the sole abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann-Berg, N; Murua Escobar, H; Kiefer, Y; Mischke, R; Willenbrock, S; Eberle, N; Nolte, I; Bullerdiek, J

    2011-01-01

    Human and canine lymphoid neoplasms are characterized by non-random cytogenetic abnormalities. However, due to the low mitotic activity of the B cells, cytogenetic analyses of B-cell lymphoid proliferations are difficult to perform. In the present study we stimulated canine B-cell lymphoma cells with the immunostimulatory CpG-oligonucleotide DSP30 in combination with interleukin-2 (IL-2) and obtained an adequate number of metaphases. Cytogenetic analyses revealed the loss of one X chromosome as the sole cytogenetic aberration. Chromosome analysis of the corresponding blood showed a normal female karyotype. Monosomy X as the sole clonal chromosomal abnormality is found in human hematopoietic malignancies as well, thus the dog may serve as a promising animal model. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Multiple chromosome aberrations among newborns from high level natural radiation area and normal level natural radiation area of south west coast of Kerala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soren, D.C.; Ramachandran, E.N.; Karuppasamy, C.V.; Cheriyan, V.D.; Anil Kumar, V.; Koya, P.K.M.; Seshadri, M.

    2010-01-01

    Cord blood samples were collected in heparin vials and microculture techniques employed to obtain good metaphase chromosome spreads. In cytogenetic studies on newborns cells with multiple aberrations were recorded in 57 from a total of 27285 newborns (1266972 cells). Of these 17294 newborns (964140 cells) were from High Level Natural Radiation Area (HLNRA) and 9991 newborns (302832 cells) from Normal Level Natural Radiation Area (NLNRA). Cells with multiple aberrations were observed in 38 and 19 newborns from High and Normal Level Natural Radiation Area respectively. On an average one cell with multiple aberrations was observed among 479 newborns. Cells with multiple aberrations were observed in newborns from HLNRA as well as NLNRA in both males and females. Gender difference of newborns, maternal age group and background radiation levels did not seem to have any influence in the occurrence of Multiple chromosome aberrations

  9. Structural and functional organization of the HF.10 human zinc finger gene (ZNF35) located on chromosome 3p21-p22

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanfrancone, L; Pengue, G; Pandolfi, P P

    1992-01-01

    We report the structural and functional characterization of the HF.10 zinc finger gene (ZNF35) in normal human cells, as well as a processed pseudogene. The HF.10 gene spans about 13 kb and it is interrupted by three introns. All 11 zinc finger DNA-binding domains are contiguously encoded within...... and partial nucleotide sequencing of the HF.10 pseudogene indicated that it has arisen by retroposition of spliced HF.10 mRNA. In situ hybridization experiments revealed that both the functional locus and the pseudogene map to chromosome 3p21p22, a region that is frequently deleted in small cell lung...... and renal carcinomas. Hybridization of the HF.10 gene and the HF.10 pseudogene DNA probes to metaphases from a small cell lung carcinoma cell line with the 3p deletion revealed that both loci are part of the deleted chromosome region....

  10. Engineering of Systematic Elimination of a Targeted Chromosome in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Kato, Hiroki; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Masuda, Keiji; Nguyen, Huong Thi Nguyen; Pham, Thanh Thi Mai; Han, Xu; Hirofuji, Yuta; Nonaka, Kazuaki

    2017-01-01

    Embryonic trisomy leads to abortion or congenital genetic disorders in humans. The most common autosomal chromosome abnormalities are trisomy of chromosomes 13, 18, and 21. Although alteration of gene dosage is thought to contribute to disorders caused by extra copies of chromosomes, genes associated with specific disease phenotypes remain unclear. To generate a normal cell from a trisomic cell as a means of etiological analysis or candidate therapy for trisomy syndromes, we developed a system to eliminate a targeted chromosome from human cells. Chromosome 21 was targeted by integration of a DNA cassette in HeLa cells that harbored three copies of chromosome 21. The DNA cassette included two inverted loxP sites and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene. This system causes missegregation of chromosome 21 after expression of Cre recombinase and subsequently enables the selection of cells lacking the chromosome by culturing in a medium that includes ganciclovir (GCV). Cells harboring only two copies of chromosome 21 were efficiently induced by transfection of a Cre expression vector, indicating that this approach is useful for eliminating a targeted chromosome.

  11. Engineering of Systematic Elimination of a Targeted Chromosome in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sato

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic trisomy leads to abortion or congenital genetic disorders in humans. The most common autosomal chromosome abnormalities are trisomy of chromosomes 13, 18, and 21. Although alteration of gene dosage is thought to contribute to disorders caused by extra copies of chromosomes, genes associated with specific disease phenotypes remain unclear. To generate a normal cell from a trisomic cell as a means of etiological analysis or candidate therapy for trisomy syndromes, we developed a system to eliminate a targeted chromosome from human cells. Chromosome 21 was targeted by integration of a DNA cassette in HeLa cells that harbored three copies of chromosome 21. The DNA cassette included two inverted loxP sites and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk gene. This system causes missegregation of chromosome 21 after expression of Cre recombinase and subsequently enables the selection of cells lacking the chromosome by culturing in a medium that includes ganciclovir (GCV. Cells harboring only two copies of chromosome 21 were efficiently induced by transfection of a Cre expression vector, indicating that this approach is useful for eliminating a targeted chromosome.

  12. Chromosomal Speciation Revisited: Modes of Diversification in Australian Morabine Grasshoppers (Vandiemenella, viatica Species Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. B. Cooper

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal rearrangements can alter the rate and patterns of gene flow within or between species through a reduction in the fitness of chromosomal hybrids or by reducing recombination rates in rearranged areas of the genome. This concept, together with the observation that many species have structural variation in chromosomes, has led to the theory that the rearrangements may play a direct role in promoting speciation. Australian morabine grasshoppers (genus Vandiemenella, viatica species group are an excellent model for studying the role of chromosomal rearrangement in speciation because they show extensive chromosomal variation, parapatric distribution patterns, and narrow hybrid zones at their boundaries. This species group stimulated development of one of the classic chromosomal speciation models, the stasipatric speciation model proposed by White in 1968. Our population genetic and phylogeographic analyses revealed extensive non-monophyly of chromosomal races along with historical and on-going gene introgression between them. These findings suggest that geographical isolation leading to the fixation of chromosomal variants in different geographic regions, followed by secondary contact, resulted in the present day parapatric distributions of chromosomal races. The significance of chromosomal rearrangements in the diversification of the viatica species group can be explored by comparing patterns of genetic differentiation between rearranged and co-linear parts of the genome.

  13. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, Christian H., E-mail: christian.haering@embl.de [Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg (Germany); Jessberger, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.jessberger@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  14. Sex chromosomes in Ephestia kuehniella

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marec, František; Sahara, K.; Traut, W.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2001), s. 131 ISSN 0003-3995. [European Cytogenetics Conference /3./. 07.07.2001-10.07.2001, Paris] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Telomere * sex chromosomes * chromosome fragments Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  15. Slit scan flow cytometry of isolated chromosomes following fluorescence hybridization: an approach of online screening for specific chromosomes and chromosome translocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausmann, M.; Dudin, G.; Aten, J. A.; Heilig, R.; Diaz, E.; Cremer, C.

    1991-01-01

    The recently developed methods of non radioactive in situ hybridization of chromosomes offer new aspects for chromosome analysis. Fluorescent labelling of hybridized chromosomes or chromosomal subregions allows to facilitate considerably the detection of specific chromosomal abnormalities. For many

  16. The spatio-temporal dynamics of PKA activity profile during mitosis and its correlation to chromosome segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandame, Pauline; Spriet, Corentin; Trinel, Dave; Gelaude, Armance; Caillau, Katia; Bompard, Coralie; Biondi, Emanuele; Bodart, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate dependent kinase protein (PKA) controls a variety of cellular processes including cell cycle regulation. Here, we took advantages of genetically encoded FRET-based biosensors, using an AKAR-derived biosensor to characterize PKA activity during mitosis in living HeLa cells using a single-cell approach. We measured PKA activity changes during mitosis. HeLa cells exhibit a substantial increase during mitosis, which ends with telophase. An AKAREV T>A inactive form of the biosensor and H89 inhibitor were used to ascertain for the specificity of the PKA activity measured. On a spatial point of view, high levels of activity near to chromosomal plate during metaphase and anaphase were detected. By using the PKA inhibitor H89, we assessed the role of PKA in the maintenance of a proper division phenotype. While this treatment in our hands did not impaired cell cycle progression in a drastic manner, inhibition of PKA leads to a dramatic increase in chromososme misalignement on the spindle during metaphase that could result in aneuploidies. Our study emphasizes the insights that can be gained with genetically encoded FRET-based biosensors, which enable to overcome the shortcomings of classical methologies and unveil in vivo PKA spatiotemporal profiles in HeLa cells. PMID:25485503

  17. The spatio-temporal dynamics of PKA activity profile during mitosis and its correlation to chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandame, Pauline; Spriet, Corentin; Trinel, Dave; Gelaude, Armance; Caillau, Katia; Bompard, Coralie; Biondi, Emanuele; Bodart, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate dependent kinase protein (PKA) controls a variety of cellular processes including cell cycle regulation. Here, we took advantages of genetically encoded FRET-based biosensors, using an AKAR-derived biosensor to characterize PKA activity during mitosis in living HeLa cells using a single-cell approach. We measured PKA activity changes during mitosis. HeLa cells exhibit a substantial increase during mitosis, which ends with telophase. An AKAREV T>A inactive form of the biosensor and H89 inhibitor were used to ascertain for the specificity of the PKA activity measured. On a spatial point of view, high levels of activity near to chromosomal plate during metaphase and anaphase were detected. By using the PKA inhibitor H89, we assessed the role of PKA in the maintenance of a proper division phenotype. While this treatment in our hands did not impaired cell cycle progression in a drastic manner, inhibition of PKA leads to a dramatic increase in chromososme misalignement on the spindle during metaphase that could result in aneuploidies. Our study emphasizes the insights that can be gained with genetically encoded FRET-based biosensors, which enable to overcome the shortcomings of classical methologies and unveil in vivo PKA spatiotemporal profiles in HeLa cells.

  18. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Morris, M. A. [Univ. of Geneva School of Medicine, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  19. Evaluation of chromosome aberration frequency instable in individual groups residents at the municipality of Monte Alegre, Para, Brazil, exposed to radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunes, Samira Nogarol

    2010-01-01

    The municipality of Monte Alegre is a region that presents natural radiation high due to the presence of the radionuclide uranium ( 238 U) in its soil, which through its decay gives rise to element Rn, a gas. The radioactivity of the rocks has become a problem for the population of Monte Alegre, from the moment when the radioactive material began to be used in the construction of houses and paving of streets. Among all bio markers related to environmental exposures and its biological effects, the chromosomal aberrations are considered good bio markers as predictors of the risk of cancer. Studies suggest that the frequency of chromosomal aberrations may be related to the genetic instability individual and/or exposure to ionizing radiation. Our work aimed to evaluate the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in individuals in the region of high natural radioactivity in Monte Alegre-PA. As well as to correlate the cytogenetic analysis made in this study with the results of analysis of frequency of polymorphisms of genes of DNA repair carried out in another study that resulted in other dissertation. In accordance with the distribution of the data obtained in characterizing environmental radiological and in the calculation of dose, were chosen residents of homes with more and less exposure to radiation. The samples of peripheral blood of 85 individuals of the resident population of the region of Monte Alegre - PA were collected and examine provided two slides for individual was performed to verify the quality of the sample. Through this evaluation we decide that 33% of the material collected, or is, samples of 28 individuals were in suitable conditions for analysis of the frequency of chromosomal aberrations. After the collections lymphocytes present in the sample were cultivated in accordance with the methodology proposed for obtaining of cells in metaphase. were analyzed 6,177 metaphases of 28 individuals among which were found dicentric chromosomes 4 and 19 fragments

  20. Comparison of type and frequency of chromosome aberrations by conventional and G-staining methods in Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaki, Kazuo; Shimba, Hachiro; Sofuni, Toshio; Awa, A.A.

    1982-07-01

    Somatic chromosomes derived from cultured lymphocytes of 23 atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima were analyzed to determine the type and frequency of radiation-induced structural aberrations, using in sequence the ordinary staining method (O-method) and the trypsin G-banding method (G-method). Of 896 cells examined, 342 were found to contain induced aberrations, including 31 cells in which the precise identification of the type of aberrations was not possible even by the G-method. The number of chromosome aberrations observed was 376 in the 311 cells where aberrant precise identification was possible. The majority (288 or 76.6%) were intra- or inter-chromosomal symmetric exchanges due to a two-break event, while only 24 were found to be asymmetric exchanges (dicentrics, rings, and interstitial deletions). Further, there were 28 aberrations showing acentric fragments and terminal deletions, and the remaining 36 were complex intra- and inter-chromosomal exchanges involving three or more breaks which result in insertions and double translocations. A comparative karyotype analysis of the same metaphases examined by the sequential 0- And G-methods was carried out independently on 361 aberrations, mostly of the symmetric type. It was found that 78 (21.6%) of the 361 were detected only by the G-method; among these were 14 paracentric inversions, 48 reciprocal interchanges of chromosome segments with either equal length (11) or unequal length (37), 14 minor deletions and 2 complex rearrangements, all of which were nevertheless judged to fall within the normal range of variation by theO-method. In contrast, 25 aberrations detected in O-method chromosomes which were overcontracted or twisted, were shown to have normal banding patterns by the G-method. (author)

  1. Distinct genetic alterations in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ashktorab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colon cancer (CRC development often includes chromosomal instability (CIN leading to amplifications and deletions of large DNA segments. Epidemiological, clinical, and cytogenetic studies showed that there are considerable differences between CRC tumors from African Americans (AAs and Caucasian patients. In this study, we determined genomic copy number aberrations in sporadic CRC tumors from AAs, in order to investigate possible explanations for the observed disparities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied genome-wide array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH using a 105k chip to identify copy number aberrations in samples from 15 AAs. In addition, we did a population comparative analysis with aCGH data in Caucasians as well as with a widely publicized list of colon cancer genes (CAN genes. There was an average of 20 aberrations per patient with more amplifications than deletions. Analysis of DNA copy number of frequently altered chromosomes revealed that deletions occurred primarily in chromosomes 4, 8 and 18. Chromosomal duplications occurred in more than 50% of cases on chromosomes 7, 8, 13, 20 and X. The CIN profile showed some differences when compared to Caucasian alterations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Chromosome X amplification in male patients and chromosomes 4, 8 and 18 deletions were prominent aberrations in AAs. Some CAN genes were altered at high frequencies in AAs with EXOC4, EPHB6, GNAS, MLL3 and TBX22 as the most frequently deleted genes and HAPLN1, ADAM29, SMAD2 and SMAD4 as the most frequently amplified genes. The observed CIN may play a distinctive role in CRC in AAs.

  2. Chromosome aberrations in workers of ignalina nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griciene, B.; Januskeviciute, I.; Mierauskiene, J.; Slapsyte, G. [Vilnius Univ. (Lithuania)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (I.N.P.P.) workers and outside workers including visitors constitute the largest occupational group exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in Lithuania. In 2004, the annual collective dose to these workers (4392 persons) was 6,83 man Sv. The maximum annual individual dose of I.N.P.P. workers was 19,16 mSv, and of outside workers was 29,41 mSv. However, according to calculations performed by the Lithuanian Radiation Protection Centre, the decommissioning of I.N.P.P. (the I.N.P.P. is to be shut down by 2009) will result in collective dose of 35 man Sv. Therefore, a special attention should be given to implementation of radiation protection programme. The importance of cytogenetic studies in the medical surveillance of radiation-exposed persons is generally acknowledged. The aim of the present study was to analyse chromosome aberration frequencies in lymphocytes of I.N.P.P. workers. The blood sampling of 27 male workers was performed in October 2004, after planned outage of I.N.P.P.. It was estimated that outages of I.N.P.P. Units contributed 84% to all annual occupational collective dose. Average cumulative dose of 18 workers was 290,7 mSv (group A), and of 9 workers - 71,7 mSv (group B). The mean annual doses averaged over the three-year-period were 15,2 mSv and 0,76 mSv, respectively. None of the exposed workers had ever exceeded the permissible dose limit. The average age of group A workers was 45,2 years, and group B 48,2 years. A questionnaire form with details on age, occupational history, smoking habit and alcohol intake, medication, history of recent illness was completed for each person at the time of blood collection. 64 non-exposed male donors approximately matched by age were used as controls (group C). Heparinized venous blood samples were taken and cultures were initiated within 24 h according to the standard procedures. At least 500 first cycle metaphases were analysed from each

  3. Chromosome aberrations in workers of ignalina nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griciene, B.; Januskeviciute, I.; Mierauskiene, J.; Slapsyte, G.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (I.N.P.P.) workers and outside workers including visitors constitute the largest occupational group exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in Lithuania. In 2004, the annual collective dose to these workers (4392 persons) was 6,83 man Sv. The maximum annual individual dose of I.N.P.P. workers was 19,16 mSv, and of outside workers was 29,41 mSv. However, according to calculations performed by the Lithuanian Radiation Protection Centre, the decommissioning of I.N.P.P. (the I.N.P.P. is to be shut down by 2009) will result in collective dose of 35 man Sv. Therefore, a special attention should be given to implementation of radiation protection programme. The importance of cytogenetic studies in the medical surveillance of radiation-exposed persons is generally acknowledged. The aim of the present study was to analyse chromosome aberration frequencies in lymphocytes of I.N.P.P. workers. The blood sampling of 27 male workers was performed in October 2004, after planned outage of I.N.P.P.. It was estimated that outages of I.N.P.P. Units contributed 84% to all annual occupational collective dose. Average cumulative dose of 18 workers was 290,7 mSv (group A), and of 9 workers - 71,7 mSv (group B). The mean annual doses averaged over the three-year-period were 15,2 mSv and 0,76 mSv, respectively. None of the exposed workers had ever exceeded the permissible dose limit. The average age of group A workers was 45,2 years, and group B 48,2 years. A questionnaire form with details on age, occupational history, smoking habit and alcohol intake, medication, history of recent illness was completed for each person at the time of blood collection. 64 non-exposed male donors approximately matched by age were used as controls (group C). Heparinized venous blood samples were taken and cultures were initiated within 24 h according to the standard procedures. At least 500 first cycle metaphases were analysed from each

  4. The Relationship between the (In-)Stability of NORs and Their Chromosomal Location: The Example of Cercopithecidae and a Short Review of Other Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbault-Seureau, Michèle; Cacheux, Lauriane; Dutrillaux, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Amongst Cercopithecidae, the species of the Cercopithecini tribe underwent a very active chromosome evolution, principally by fissions, which increased their chromosome number up to 72. In contrast, all the species of Papionini have fairly similar karyotypes with 42 chromosomes. In animals, nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) are generally considered as instable structures, which frequently vary in size, number, and location at both infra- and interspecific levels. Although in Cercopithecinae the NORs, involved in breaks, exchanges, and translocations, behave like fragile sites in somatic cells, their number and location appear to be very stable between species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of a 28S rDNA probe on metaphase chromosomes displayed a unique interstitial location in either an acrocentric pair (in 12 species of Cercopithecini) or a metacentric pair (in 6 species of Papionini). A non-exhaustive survey of literature data on NOR location in other primates shows that numerical variations of the NORs principally depend on their location: most multiple NORs are in terminal positions, while almost all unique NORs are in interstitial positions. We propose that this correlation is the consequence of the selection against gametic imbalances involving the chromosomal material distal to the NORs, which is effective when they are interstitially, but not terminally, located. Thus, the consequences of the interstitial NOR instability for reproduction are essentially limited to their size variations, as observed in Cercopithecidae. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  6. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  7. Monoamine oxidase deficiency in males with an X chromosome deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, K B; de la Chapelle, A; Norio, R; Sankila, E M; Hsu, Y P; Rinehart, W B; Corey, T J; Ozelius, L; Powell, J F; Bruns, G

    1989-01-01

    Mapping of the human MAOA gene to chromosomal region Xp21-p11 prompted our study of two affected males in a family previously reported to have Norrie disease resulting from a submicroscopic deletion in this chromosomal region. In this investigation we demonstrate in these cousins deletion of the MAOA gene, undetectable levels of MAO-A and MAO-B activities in their fibroblasts and platelets, respectively, loss of mRNA for MAO-A in fibroblasts, and substantial alterations in urinary catecholamine metabolites. The present study documents that a marked deficiency of MAO activity is compatible with life and that genes for MAO-A and MAO-B are near each other in this Xp chromosomal region. Some of the clinical features of these MAO deletion patients may help to identify X-linked MAO deficiency diseases in humans.

  8. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a limited time. The accuracy of the process is remarkable, otherwise genetic abnormalities and disorders would be more ... begins to divide is a po~sible mispairing of bases during DNA ... The basic change is an alteration in one base pair, a C:G to T:A .... development but with malformations and mental retardation, a.

  9. Asexual Reproduction Does Not Apparently Increase the Rate of Chromosomal Evolution: Karyotype Stability in Diploid and Triploid Clonal Hybrid Fish (Cobitis, Cypriniformes, Teleostei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majtánová, Zuzana; Choleva, Lukáš; Symonová, Radka; Ráb, Petr; Kotusz, Jan; Pekárik, Ladislav; Janko, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization, polyploidization and transitions from sexuality to asexuality considerably affect organismal genomes. Especially the last mentioned process has been assumed to play a significant role in the initiation of chromosomal rearrangements, causing increased rates of karyotype evolution. We used cytogenetic analysis and molecular dating of cladogenetic events to compare the rate of changes of chromosome morphology and karyotype in asexually and sexually reproducing counterparts in European spined loach fish (Cobitis). We studied metaphases of three sexually reproducing species and their diploid and polyploid hybrid clones of different age of origin. The material includes artificial F1 hybrid strains, representatives of lineage originated in Holocene epoch, and also individuals of an oldest known age to date (roughly 0.37 MYA). Thereafter we applied GISH technique as a marker to differentiate parental chromosomal sets in hybrids. Although the sexual species accumulated remarkable chromosomal rearrangements after their speciation, we observed no differences in chromosome numbers and/or morphology among karyotypes of asexual hybrids. These hybrids possess chromosome sets originating from respective parental species with no cytogenetically detectable recombinations, suggesting their integrity even in a long term. The switch to asexual reproduction thus did not provoke any significant acceleration of the rate of chromosomal evolution in Cobitis. Asexual animals described in other case studies reproduce ameiotically, while Cobitis hybrids described here produce eggs likely through modified meiosis. Therefore, our findings indicate that the effect of asexuality on the rate of chromosomal change may be context-dependent rather than universal and related to particular type of asexual reproduction.

  10. Asexual Reproduction Does Not Apparently Increase the Rate of Chromosomal Evolution: Karyotype Stability in Diploid and Triploid Clonal Hybrid Fish (Cobitis, Cypriniformes, Teleostei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Majtánová

    Full Text Available Interspecific hybridization, polyploidization and transitions from sexuality to asexuality considerably affect organismal genomes. Especially the last mentioned process has been assumed to play a significant role in the initiation of chromosomal rearrangements, causing increased rates of karyotype evolution. We used cytogenetic analysis and molecular dating of cladogenetic events to compare the rate of changes of chromosome morphology and karyotype in asexually and sexually reproducing counterparts in European spined loach fish (Cobitis. We studied metaphases of three sexually reproducing species and their diploid and polyploid hybrid clones of different age of origin. The material includes artificial F1 hybrid strains, representatives of lineage originated in Holocene epoch, and also individuals of an oldest known age to date (roughly 0.37 MYA. Thereafter we applied GISH technique as a marker to differentiate parental chromosomal sets in hybrids. Although the sexual species accumulated remarkable chromosomal rearrangements after their speciation, we observed no differences in chromosome numbers and/or morphology among karyotypes of asexual hybrids. These hybrids possess chromosome sets originating from respective parental species with no cytogenetically detectable recombinations, suggesting their integrity even in a long term. The switch to asexual reproduction thus did not provoke any significant acceleration of the rate of chromosomal evolution in Cobitis. Asexual animals described in other case studies reproduce ameiotically, while Cobitis hybrids described here produce eggs likely through modified meiosis. Therefore, our findings indicate that the effect of asexuality on the rate of chromosomal change may be context-dependent rather than universal and related to particular type of asexual reproduction.

  11. Alterações cromossômicas causadas pela radiação dos monitores de vídeo de computadores Chromosome abnormalities caused by computer video display monitors' radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Roberto Higino Estécio

    2002-06-01

    aberrations were investigated in 2,000 first cell cycle metaphases obtained after 48-hour cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes drawn from 10 individuals occupationally exposed to VDM radiation (group E and 10 controls (group C. Cell cycle kinetics was studied using the mitotic index (MI and cellular proliferation index (CPI. RESULTS: Statistical analysis showed significantly higher frequencies of anomalous metaphases (E=5.9%; C=3.7% and anomaly/cell (E=0.066±0.026; C= 0.040±0.026 in individuals exposed to VDM radiation. The most common cytogenetic alterations seen were chromatid breaks at frequencies of 0.034±0.016 in group E and 0.016±0.015 in group C. There was no significant difference between MI and CPI frequencies in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The study findings suggest genotoxic effects of EMF emissions revealed by the higher frequency of chromatid breaks in individuals exposed to VDM radiation. However, there is a need of further studies on EMF genetic effects using other investigation methods.

  12. Gametocidal chromosomes enhancing chromosome aberration in common wheat induced by 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, W-Y; Cong, W-W; Shu, Y-J; Wang, D; Xu, G-H; Guo, C-H

    2013-07-08

    The gametocidal (Gc) chromosome from Aegilops spp induces chromosome mutation, which is introduced into common wheat as a tool of chromosome manipulation for genetic improvement. The Gc chromosome functions similar to a restriction-modification system in bacteria, in which DNA methylation is an important regulator. We treated root tips of wheat carrying Gc chromosomes with the hypomethylation agent 5-azacytidine; chromosome breakage and micronuclei were observed in these root tips. The frequency of aberrations differed in wheat containing different Gc chromosomes, suggesting different functions inducing chromosome breakage. Gc chromosome 3C caused the greatest degree of chromosome aberration, while Gc chromosome 3C(SAT) and 2C caused only slight chromosome aberration. Gc chromosome 3C induced different degrees of chromosome aberration in wheat varieties Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring and Norin 26, demonstrating an inhibition function in common wheat.

  13. Chromosome studies on bone marrow cells of chinese hamsters fed a radiosterilized diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renner, H.W.

    1977-01-01

    Metaphase preparations of chromosomes from bone marrow cells of Chinese hamsters were examined for mutagenic effects following the feeding of a radiosterilized diet. No increase in the incidence of structural chromosomal aberrations was observed. As far as numerical aberrations were concerned, the proportion of cells with polyploidy increased to between 4 to 5 times the control level, irrespective of the moisture content of the diet. This polyploidy effect occurred very early, being detectable within 24 h, if the diet fed had been irradiated with an absorbed dose of 4.5x10 6 rad. The incidence of polyploidy remained below 0.5%, however, nor did it rise with higher radiation doses. When the feeding of the irradiated diet was stopped, the proportion of polyploid cells returned to the control level within a maximum of 6 weeks. If the diet was stored (initially) for 6 weeks following irradiation before being fed to the animals no increase in the number of polyploid cells was noted. These results are not interpreted as a mutagenic effect of the irradiated diet. (author)

  14. Studies on chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by very low-dose exposure to tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, T.; Moriya, Junko; Nakai, Sayaka

    1978-01-01

    Assessment of potential hazard from environmental tritium to man becomes very important with increasing the development of nuclear-power industry. However, little data are available as to the determination on the genetic effect of tritium especially at the low levels. The object of the present study is to obtain quantitative data for chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes, as an indicator for genetic risk estimation, induced by tritium at very low dose levels. Leukocyte cultures of human peripheral blood were chronically exposed for 48h to tritiated water and 3 H-thymidine using a wide range of tritium doses, and aberrations in lymphocyte chromosomes at the first metaphases were examined. In the experimental conditions, the types of aberrations induced by radiation emitted from both tritiated water and 3 H-thymidine were mostly chromatid types, such as chromatid gaps and deletions. The dose-response relations for chromatid breaks per cell exhibited unusual dose-dependency in both cases. It was demonstrated that at higher dose range the yields of chromatid breaks increased linearly with dose, while those at lower dose range were significantly higher than would be expected by a downward extraporation from the linear relation. Partial-hit or partial-target kinetics events appeared at very low dose exposure. (author)

  15. Comparative cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations and premature centromere division in persons exposed to radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovicic, D.; Rakic, B.; Vukov, T.; Pajic, J.; Milacic, S.; Kovacevic, R.; Stevanovic, M.; Drakulic, D.; Bukvic, N.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research was to determine the presence of correlation between the frequency of premature centromere division (PCD) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in metaphases in persons professionally exposed to radionuclides. Biological dosimetry was performed by conventional cytogenetic technique. The presence of PCD was confirmed by Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The L1.84 probe (specific for centromeric region of chromosome 18) was used. The analysis included 50 subjects employed in the Clinical Center of Serbia (C) (the average age of 45.24 ± 1.18 and the average exposition time 17.96 ± 1.15) and 40 subjects in control group (K) (the average age of 44.40 ± 0.98 and the average years of employment 19.67 ± 0.98 years) which were not exposed to genotoxic agents in their workplaces. The results showed that frequencies of CA and PCD were statistically significantly higher in subjects exposed to radionuclides than in the control group (Mann-Whitney U test, P [sr

  16. Chromosome aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes induced by single or fractionated X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.; Leonard, A.; Deknyudt, G.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated is the effect of single (125 and 250 R) and fractionated (2x125 R) irradiation on the output of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of human peripheral blood kept between irradiations at the temperature of 5 deg C. The single irradiation is carried out immediately after vein-puncture. In the case of fractionated irradiation the first dose of 125R is given after vein-puncture, the second, in the interval of 2, 8 and 24 hours. Blood is cultivated immediately after two irradiations in order to prepare metaphase plates for cytogenic analysis. Repair processes in cell heritage structures are not realised in blood irradiated by fractions which is kept at 5 deg C between irradiations. On the contrary, chromosome fragments, interstitial deletions, aberrant cells and cell breaks are found in a large amount in blood irradiated by fractions. They have appeared with the authentically high statistic difference as compared with the cells irradiated one time with the same dose. This effect is probably attained due to blood preservation

  17. Studies on radiation-induced chromosome damage in humans: Semi-annual progress report, October 1, 1986-March 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlefield, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes recent research to determine and report the frequency of somatic cell chromosome aberrations in approximately 200 lymphocyte metaphases from each of 200 control patients or persons who received radiation for enlarged thymus, and from an additional 475 irradiated and control subjects selected by NCI from populations exposed to therapeutic ionizing radiation during the period 1930 to 1970. The priority of populations to be studied will be determined by NCI in consultation with the contractor and with advice from NCI consultants. Additional research will determine and report dose response curves among the several populations, to determine how differences with respect to radiation dose, quality of radiation, fractionation, sex and age within and among groups affect the ''dose-response relationship.'' 7 tabs

  18. Effect of 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG) on the radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in the bone marrow of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uma, D.P.; Gupta, R.

    1984-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of MPG, a SH compound used clinically as detoxicating agent, was investigated in vivo on adult whole-body exposed mice to 3 Gy of 60 Co radiation 15 to 20 min after a single i.p. injection of MPG. Animals pretreated with colchicine were autopsied at various intervals from 2 to 28 days and bone marrow metaphases were scored. Significantly less number of cells were found to carry aberrations in the MPG-treated animals at 24 hr as compared to the non-drug treated irradiated ones. However, at all the other earlier and later intervals, both groups of animals showed approximately the same frequency of aberrant cells. It appears that MPG protection to the chromosome is at the reparation stage rather than at the initial stage of breakage. (author)

  19. Rumex acetosa Y chromosomes: constitutive or facultative heterochromatin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosiołek, Magdalena; Pasierbek, Paweł; Malarz, Janusz; Moś, Maria; Joachimiak, Andrzej J

    2005-01-01

    Condensed Y chromosomes in Rumex acetosa L. root-tip nuclei were studied using 5-azaC treatment and immunohistochemical detection of methylated histones. Although Y chromosomes were decondensed within root meristem in vivo, they became condensed and heteropycnotic in roots cultured in vitro. 5-azacytidine (5-azaC) treatment of cultured roots caused transitional dispersion of their Y chromosome bodies, but 7 days after removal of the drug from the culture medium, Y heterochromatin recondensed and again became visible. The response of Rumex sex chromatin to 5-azaC was compared with that of condensed segments of pericentromeric heterochromatin in Rhoeo spathacea (Sw.) Steam roots. It was shown that Rhoeo chromocentres, composed of AT-rich constitutive heterochromatin, did not undergo decondensation after 5-azaC treatment. The Y-bodies observed within male nuclei of R. acetosa were globally enriched with H3 histone, demethylated at lysine 4 and methylated at lysine 9. This is the first report of histone tail-modification in condensed sex chromatin in plants. Our results suggest that the interphase condensation of Y chromosomes in Rumex is facultative rather than constitutive. Furthermore, the observed response of Y-bodies to 5-azaC may result indirectly from demethylation and the subsequent altered expression of unknown genes controlling tissue-specific Y-inactivation as opposed to the global demethylation of Y-chromosome DNA.

  20. Sex chromosome aneuploidy in cytogenetic findings of referral patients from south of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Jouyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chromosome abnormality (CA including Sex chromosomes abnormality (SCAs is one of the most important causes of disordered sexual development and infertility. SCAs formed by numerical or structural alteration in X and Y chromosomes, are the most frequently CA encountered at both prenatal diagnosis and at birth. Objective: This study describes cytogenetic findings of cases suspected with CA referred for cytogenetic study. Materials and Methods: Blood samples of 4151 patients referred for cytogenetic analysis were cultured for chromosome preparation. Karyotypes were prepared for all samples and G-Banded chromosomes were analyzed using x100 objective lens. Sex chromosome aneuploidy cases were analyzed and categorized in two groups of Turners and Klinefelter’s syndrome (KFS. Results: Out of 230 (5.54% cases with chromosomally abnormal karyotype, 122 (30% cases suspected of sexual disorder showed SCA including 46% Turner’s syndrome, 46% KFS and the remaining other sex chromosome abnormalities. The frequency of classic and mosaic form of Turner’s syndrome was 33% and 67%, this was 55% and 45% for KFS, respectively. Conclusion: This study shows a relatively high sex chromosome abnormality in this region and provides cytogenetic data to assist clinicians and genetic counselors to determine the priority of requesting cytogenetic study. Differences between results from various reports can be due to different genetic background or ethnicity.

  1. Plk1 is essential for proper chromosome segregation during meiosis I/meiosis II transition in pig oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zixiao; Chen, Changchao; Ma, Liying; Yu, Qiuchen; Li, Shuai; Abbasi, Benazir; Yang, Jiayi; Rui, Rong; Ju, Shiqiang

    2017-08-29

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), as a characteristic regulator in meiosis, organizes multiple biological events of cell division. Although Plk1 has been implicated in various functions in somatic cell mitotic processes, considerably less is known regarding its function during the transition from metaphase I (MI) to metaphase II (MII) stage in oocyte meiotic progression. In this study, the possible role of Plk1 during the MI-to-MII stage transition in pig oocytes was addressed. Initially, the spatiotemporal expression and subcellular localization pattern of Plk1 were revealed in pig oocytes from MI to MII stage using indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy imaging techniques combined with western blot analyses. Moreover, a highly selective Plk1 inhibitor, GSK461364, was used to determine the potential role of Plk1 during this MI-to-MII transition progression. Upon expression, Plk1 exhibited a specific dynamic intracellular localization, and co-localization of Plk1 with α-tubulin was revealed in the meiotic spindle of pig oocyte during the transition from MI to MII stage. GSK461364 treatment significantly blocked the first polar body (pbI) emission in a dose-dependent manner and resulted in a failure of meiotic maturation, with a larger percentage of the GSK461364-treated oocytes arresting in the anaphase-telophase I (ATI) stage. Further subcellular structure examination results showed that inhibition of Plk1 with GSK461364 had no visible effect on spindle assembly but caused a significantly higher proportion of the treated oocytes to have obvious defects in homologous chromosome segregation at ATI stage. Thus, these results indicate that Plk1 plays an essential role during the meiosis I/meiosis II transition in porcine oocytes, and the regulation is associated with Plk1's effects on homologous chromosome segregation in the ATI stage.

  2. Biological dosimetry of heavy ion induced chromosome lesions in human peripheral blood lymphocytes of different healthy donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groesser, T.; Rydberg, B.; Ritter, S.; Hessel, P.; Kraft, G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In the presented work the effect of sparsely ionizing X-rays or densely ionizing carbon ions on human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy donors regarding the fluctuations in radiosensitivity within the same donor and between different donors was examined. This is not only of special interest for physicians and radiation biologists but also plays an important role in space flights because such fluctuations in the radiation response would reduce the accuracy of the biological dosimetry. In this context, biological changes in the aberration rate of metaphase cells as well as in cell proliferation and the mitotic index were measured. Since chromosome analyses are presently the most powerful biological method to quantify radiation exposure, the study focused on the measurements of chromosome aberrations in first-metaphase cells. The investigations showed that the aberration yield after 400 MeV/u carbon ion exposure (LET = 11 keV/micrometer) was higher than after X-irradiation. The aberration yield in first mitotic cells as well as the proportion of damaged cells was stable over the examined period up to 72h after exposure to X-rays or carbon ions. Furthermore, the results of the presented work revealed pronounced fluctuations in the measured parameters in the same donor as well as between different donors. If the dose effect curves of such parameters were used as calibration curves for radiation dose assessment these fluctuations will decrease their potential of use for dose estimation. This demonstrates that a general calibration curve for dose assessment might not be sufficiently precise and individual calibration curves might improve the accuracy of the biological dosimetry

  3. Chromosome fragility in Freemartin cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barbieri

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to verify chromosome fragility in freemartin cattle using chromosome aberration (CA and sister chromatid exchange (SCE tests. A total of eighteen co-twins were investigated. Fourteen animals were identified as cytogenetically chimeric (2n=60, XX/XY while 4 were classified as normal. Freemartin cattle showed a higher percentage of aneuploid cells (18.64% and highly significant statistical differences (P < 0.001 in mean values of gaps (4.53 ± 2.05, chromatid breaks (0.26 ± 0.51, and significant statistical differences (P < 0.005 in mean values of chromosome breaks (0.12 ± 0.43 when compared to 10 control animals from single births (aneuploid cells, 11.20%; gaps, 2.01 ± 1.42; chromatid breaks, 0.05 ± 0.22; chromosome breaks, 0.02 ± 0.14.

  4. Are There Knots in Chromosomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Siebert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments have for the first time allowed the determination of three-dimensional structures of individual chromosomes and genomes in nuclei of single haploid mouse embryonic stem (ES cells based on Hi–C chromosome conformation contact data. Although these first structures have a relatively low resolution, they provide the first experimental data that can be used to study chromosome and intact genome folding. Here we further analyze these structures and provide the first evidence that G1 phase chromosomes are knotted, consistent with the fact that plots of contact probability vs sequence separation show a power law dependence that is intermediate between that of a fractal globule and an equilibrium structure.

  5. Flow cytogenetics and chromosome sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, L S

    1990-06-01

    This review of flow cytogenetics and chromosome sorting provides an overview of general information in the field and describes recent developments in more detail. From the early developments of chromosome analysis involving single parameter or one color analysis to the latest developments in slit scanning of single chromosomes in a flow stream, the field has progressed rapidly and most importantly has served as an important enabling technology for the human genome project. Technological innovations that advanced flow cytogenetics are described and referenced. Applications in basic cell biology, molecular biology, and clinical investigations are presented. The necessary characteristics for large number chromosome sorting are highlighted. References to recent review articles are provided as a starting point for locating individual references that provide more detail. Specific references are provided for recent developments.

  6. Algorithm for sorting chromosomal aberrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ida; Lund, Najaaraq; Rasmussen, Steen

    2018-01-01

    Prenatal diagnostic methods and screening procedures change rapidly in these years. Years ago only karyotyping was performed prenatally, and we monitored only Down syndrome(1) . Since then the diagnostic possibilities have increased to QF-PCR, FISH, MLPA and chromosomal microarray.......Prenatal diagnostic methods and screening procedures change rapidly in these years. Years ago only karyotyping was performed prenatally, and we monitored only Down syndrome(1) . Since then the diagnostic possibilities have increased to QF-PCR, FISH, MLPA and chromosomal microarray....

  7. Formation and Expansion of Leukemia-Specific Chromosome Aberrations in Hematopoietic Cells of X-ray Irradiated Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, N.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T.

    2004-01-01

    C3H/He mice develop acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after whole-body irradiation, and typical chromosome 2 deletions are found in the leukemia cells. To investigate a process of the formation and the expansion of the AML-specific deletions, we have examined its frequency in primitive hematopoietic cells that could be the target of the leukemogenesis. Male C3H/He mice were exposed to 3Gy x-rays and sacrificed after certain periods of time. Bone marrow cells were collected from the femora and a single-cell suspension from each animal was divided into two parts. One part of the cell suspension was cultured in methylcellulose medium and metaphase spreads were prepared from each growing colony. The other part was sorted to obtain Lin+ and Lin Scal cells and those cells were scored with FISH for the AML-specific deletions. Karyotyping of the cultured cells detected signs of the delayed chromosomal instability, but an aberration involving chromosome 2 has not been found so far. FISH to the sorted cells, however, revealed the ANL-specific deletions could be produced in the primitive hematopoietic cells as an early event of radiation exposure. (Author) 16 refs

  8. Chromosomal Rearrangements in Post-Chernobyl Papillary Thyroid Carcinomas: Evaluation by Spectral Karyotyping and Automated Interphase FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig Hieber

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural genomic rearrangements are frequent findings in human cancers. Therefore, papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs were investigated for chromosomal aberrations and rearrangements of the RET proto-oncogene. For this purpose, primary cultures from 23 PTC have been established and metaphase preparations were analysed by spectral karyotyping (SKY. In addition, interphase cell preparations of the same cases were investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH for the presence of RET/PTC rearrangements using RET-specific DNA probes. SKY analysis of PTC revealed structural aberrations of chromosome 11 and several numerical aberrations with frequent loss of chromosomes 20, 21, and 22. FISH analysis for RET/PTC rearrangements showed prevalence of this rearrangement in 72% (16 out of 22 of cases. However, only subpopulations of tumour cells exhibited this rearrangement indicating genetic heterogeneity. The comparison of visual and automated scoring of FISH signals revealed concordant results in 19 out of 22 cases (87% indicating reliable scoring results using the optimised scoring parameter for RET/PTC with the automated Metafer4 system. It can be concluded from this study that genomic rearrangements are frequent in PTC and therefore important events in thyroid carcinogenesis.

  9. Chromosome r(10(p15.3q26.12 in a newborn child: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonasson Jon

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ring chromosome 10 is a rare cytogenetic finding. Of the less than 10 reported cases we have found in the literature, none was characterized using high-resolution microarray analysis. Ring chromosomes are frequently unstable due to sister chromatid exchanges and mitotic failures. When mosaicism is present, the interpretation of genotype-phenotype correlations becomes extremely difficult. Results We report on a newborn girl with growth retardation, microcephaly, congenital heart defects, dysmorphic features and psychomotor retardation. Karyotyping revealed a non-mosaic apparently stable ring chromosome 10 replacing one of the normal homologues in all analyzed metaphases. High-resolution oligonucleotide microarray analysis showed a de novo approximately 12.5 Mb terminal deletion 10q26.12 -> qter and a corresponding 285 kb terminal deletion of 10pter -> p15.3. Conclusion This case demonstrates that an increased nuchal translucency thickness detected by early ultrasonography should preferably lead to not only QF-PCR for the diagnosis of Down syndrome but also karyotyping. In the future, microarray analysis, which needs further evaluation, might become the method of choice. The clinical phenotype of our patient was in agreement with that of patients with a terminal 10q deletion. For the purpose of genotype-phenotype analysis, there seems to be no need for a "ring syndrome" concept.

  10. Diagnostic radiation and chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.R.; Hecht, F.; Lubs, H.A.; Kimberling, W.; Brown, J.; Gerald, P.S.; Summitt, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Some evidence is presented suggesting that diagnostic X-rays may be important in the origin of a new chromosomal abnormality other than Down syndrome. Chromosome analyses have been carried out on 4342 children, seven or eight years old. Maternal diagnostic irradiation in the year before conception and up to third lunar month of the index pregnancy was recorded, before the chromosome study began, together with a large amount of family and clinical data. Information on X-ray exposure was supplied by the mothers, s o radiation dosage could not be estimated. 21 children (including a pair of twins and a pair of siblings) born to 19 mothers had chromosomal aberrations. The mothers of six children with inherited translocations, rearrangements and XYY karyotypes were excluded, and 3 (23%) of the remaining 13 mothers had received abdominal and pelvic X-ray exposures. In the whole sample, however, only 6% of the mothers had diagnostic irradiation. Two of these mothers, aged sixteen and twenty, gave birth to a child each with de-novo autosomal translocations, and the third mother, aged thirty-two, had a child with a complex mosaicism involving one X chromosome. Although the sample size of the mothers with chromosomally abnormal children is small, the results are significant. (U.K.)

  11. Diagnostic radiation and chromosome aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, S R; Hecht, F [Dept. of Pediatrics, Child Development and Rehabilitation Center, Univ. of Oregon Health Sciences Center, Portland, Oregon (USA); Lubs, H A; Kimberling, W; Brown, J; Gerald, P S; Summitt, R L

    1977-01-15

    Some evidence is presented suggesting that diagnostic X-rays may be important in the origin of a new chromosomal abnormality other than Down syndrome. Chromosome analyses have been carried out on 4342 children, seven or eight years old. Maternal diagnostic irradiation in the year before conception and up to third lunar month of the index pregnancy was recorded, before the chromosome study began, together with a large amount of family and clinical data. Information on X-ray exposure was supplied by the mothers, so radiation dosage could not be estimated. 21 children (including a pair of twins and a pair of siblings) born to 19 mothers had chromosomal aberrations. The mothers of six children with inherited translocations, rearrangements and XYY karyotypes were excluded, and 3 (23%) of the remaining 13 mothers had received abdominal and pelvic X-ray exposures. In the whole sample, however, only 6% of the mothers had diagnostic irradiation. Two of these mothers, aged sixteen and twenty, gave birth to a child each with de-novo autosomal translocations, and the third mother, aged thirty-two, had a child with a complex mosaicism involving one X chromosome. Although the sample size of the mothers with chromosomally abnormal children is small, the results are significant.

  12. Designing of plant artificial chromosome (PAC) by using the Chlorella smallest chromosome as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noutoshi, Y; Arai, R; Fujie, M; Yamada, T

    1997-01-01

    As a model for plant-type chromosomes, we have been characterizing molecular organization of the Chlorella vulgaris C-169 chromosome I. To identify chromosome structural elements including the centromeric region and replication origins, we constructed a chromosome I specific cosmid library and aligned each cosmid clones to generate contigs. So far, more than 80% of the entire chromosome I has been covered. A complete clonal physical reconstitution of chromosome I provides information on the structure and genomic organization of plant genome. We propose our strategy to construct an artificial chromosome by assembling the functional chromosome structural elements identified on Chrorella chromosome I.

  13. Epilepsy and ring chromosome 20: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Marleide da Mota

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the clinical, electroencephalographic, neuroimaging (brain magnetic resonance image - MRI and spectroscopy by MRI and cytogenetic findings of a young male patient with a rare cytogenetic anomaly characterised by a de novo 46,XY,r(20(p13q13.3 karyotype. He presents with mental retardation, emotional liability, and strabismus, without any other significant dysmorphies. There are brain anomalies characterised by corpus callosum, uvula, nodule and cerebellum pyramid hypoplasias, besides arachnoid cysts in the occipital region. He had seizures refractory to pharmacotherapy and long period of confusional status with or without a motor component. The authors recognised that the EEG pattern was not fixed but changed over time, specially for bursts of slow waves with great amplitude accompanied or not by sharp components, and bursts of theta waves sharply contoured. Previously, epilepsy solely has been assigned to region 20q13. However, the important structural cerebral alterations present in our case has not been reported associated to such chromosomal abnormality and may indicate possible new chromosomal sites where such atypical neurological characteristics could be mapped.

  14. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Analysis of Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Samuelsson, Johanna K.; Alonso, Sergio; Yamamoto, Fumiichiro; Perucho, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Genetic somatic alterations are fundamental hallmarks of cancer. In addition to point and other small mutations targeting cancer genes, solid tumors often exhibit aneuploidy as well as multiple chromosomal rearrangements of large fragments of the genome. Whether somatic chromosomal alterations and aneuploidy are a driving force or a mere consequence of tumorigenesis remains controversial. Recently it became apparent that not only genetic but also epigenetic alterations play a major role in ca...

  16. Chromosomal aberrations in the bone marrow cells of mice induced by accelerated {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Xiaofei [Department of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang Hong, E-mail: zhangh@impac.ac.cn [Department of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang Zhenhua; Min Xianhua; Liu Yang; Wu Zhenhua [Department of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Sun Chao [Department of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Medicine of Gansu Province, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Hu Bitao [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: {yields} 220 MeV/u {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions is 1.5 times more effective than X-rays in inducing chromosomal aberration in bone marrow cell. {yields} The ratio of dose averaged liner energy transfer is approach the RBE. {yields} {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions could induce severe mitosis delay. {yields} The cell cycle is not recovered 72 h following irradiation. - Abstract: The whole bodies of 6-week-old male Kun-Ming mice were exposed to different doses of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions or X-rays. Chromosomal aberrations of the bone marrow (gaps, terminal deletions and breaks, fragments, inter-chromosomal fusions and sister-chromatid union) were scored in metaphase 9 h after exposure, corresponding to cells exposed in the G{sub 2}-phase of the first mitosis cycle. Dose-response relationships for the frequency of chromosomal aberrations were plotted both by linear and linear-quadratic equations. The data showed that there was a dose-related increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in all treated groups compared to controls. Linear-quadratic equations were a good fit for both radiation types. The compound theory of dual radiation action was applied to decipher the bigger curvature (D{sup 2}) of the dose-response curves of X-rays compared to those of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions. Different distributions of the five types of aberrations and different degrees of homogeneity were found between {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion and X-ray irradiation and the possible underlying mechanism for these phenomena were analyzed according to the differences in the spatial energy deposition of both types of radiation.

  17. Identification of two new repetitive elements and chromosomal mapping of repetitive DNA sequences in the fish Gymnothorax unicolor (Anguilliformes: Muraenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Coluccia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Muraenidae is a species-rich family, with relationships among genera and species and taxonomy that have not been completely clarified. Few cytogenetic studies have been conducted on this family, and all of them showed the same diploid chromosome number (2n=42 but with conspicuous karyotypic variation among species. The Mediterranean moray eel Gymnothorax unicolor was previously cytogenetically studied using classical techniques that allowed the characterization of its karyotype structure and the constitutive heterochromatin and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (Ag-NORs distribution pattern. In the present study, we describe two new repetitive elements (called GuMboI and GuDdeI obtained from restricted genomic DNA of G. unicolor that were characterized by Southern blot and physically localized by in situ hybridization on metaphase chromosomes. As they are highly repetitive DNA sequences, they map in heterochromatic regions. However, while GuDdeI was localized in the centromeric regions, the GuMboI fraction was distributed on some centromeres and was co-localized with the nucleolus organizer region (NOR. Comparative analysis with other Mediterranean species such as Muraena helena pointed out that these DNA fractions are species-specific and could potentially be used for species discrimination. As a new contribution to the karyotype of this species, we found that the major ribosomal genes are localized on acrocentric chromosome 9 and that the telomeres of each chromosome are composed of a tandem repeat derived from a poly-TTAGGG DNA sequence, as it occurs in most vertebrate species. The results obtained add new information useful in comparative genomics at the chromosomal level and contribute to the cytogenetic knowledge regarding this fish family, which has not been extensively studied.

  18. Initial damage in human interphase chromosomes from alpha particles with linear energy transfers relevant to radon exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loucas, B.D.; Geard, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    To determine the efficiency at which α particles at LETs chosen to simulate exposure to radon progeny break chromosomes, the premature chromosome condensation technique was used to measure breaks soon after irradiation. Noncycling human fibroblasts were irradiated with graded doses of monoenergetic α particles accelerated to produce LETs of 90, 120, 150, 180 and 200 keV/pm at the midpoint of the cell nuclei. Premature chromosome condensation was initiated immediately after irradiation and cells were scored for the total number of prematurely condensed chromosomes and fragments per cell. Similar experiments were conducted with 250 kVp X rays for comparison. Irradiation with α particles produced 8.6 to 13.1 excess fragments per gray, while X rays produced 5.8 excess fragments, resulting in RBEs around 2. Calculations of the number of breaks produced on average by a single particle traversal of a cell nucleus indicated that at the LETs tested more than one break was produced by each traversal, the maximum being that produced by 180 keV/μm α particles. When chromosome aberrations are scored at metaphase after high-LET irradiation, RBEs considerably greater than those recorded here have been reported. These results showing relatively small differences in initial break levels for α particles in the LET range of the radon progeny relative to X rays indicate that the great aberration frequencies are not due principally to an increase in breakage efficiency, but interactions between breaks along the same particle track are important. 16 refs., 4 figs

  19. Genetic integrity of the human Y chromosome exposed to groundwater arsenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sher

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is a known human carcinogen reported to cause chromosomal deletions and genetic anomalies in cultured cells. The vast human population inhabiting the Ganges delta in West Bengal, India and Bangladesh is exposed to critical levels of arsenic present in the groundwater. The genetic and physiological mechanism of arsenic toxicity in the human body is yet to be fully established. In addition, lack of animal models has made work on this line even more challenging. Methods Human male blood samples were collected with their informed consent from 5 districts in West Bengal having groundwater arsenic level more than 50 μg/L. Isolation of genomic DNA and preparation of metaphase chromosomes was done using standard protocols. End point PCR was performed for established sequence tagged sites to ascertain the status of recombination events. Single nucleotide variants of candidate genes and amplicons were carried out using appropriate restriction enzymes. The copy number of DYZ1 array per haploid genome was calculated using real time PCR and its chromosomal localization was done by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH. Results We studied effects of arsenic exposure on the human Y chromosome in males from different areas of West Bengal focusing on known recombination events (P5-P1 proximal; P5-P1 distal; gr/gr; TSPY-TSPY, b1/b3 and b2/b3, single nucleotide variants (SNVs of a few candidate Y-linked genes (DAZ, TTY4, BPY2, GOLGA2LY and the amplicons of AZFc region. Also, possible chromosomal reorganization of DYZ1 repeat arrays was analyzed. Barring a few microdeletions, no major changes were detected in blood DNA samples. SNV analysis showed a difference in some alleles. Similarly, DYZ1 arrays signals detected by FISH were found to be affected in some males. Conclusions Our Y chromosome analysis suggests that the same is protected from the effects of arsenic by some unknown mechanisms maintaining its structural and functional

  20. High chromosomal instability in workers occupationally exposed to solvents and paint removers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba-Campos, Mónica; Chuaire-Noack, Lilian; Sánchez-Corredor, Magda Carolina; Rondón-Lagos, Milena

    2016-01-01

    Painters are exposed to an extensive variety of harmful substances like aromatic hydrocarbons used as solvents and paint removers, some of which have shown clastogenic activity. These substances constitute a complex mixture of chemicals which contain well-known genotoxicants, such as Benzene, Toluene and Xylene. Thus, chronic occupational exposure to such substances may be considered to possess genotoxic risk. In Colombia the information available around the genotoxic damage (Chromosomal and DNA damage) in car paint shop workers is limited and the knowledge of this damage could contribute not only to a better understanding of the carcinogenic effect of this kind of substances but also could be used as biomarkers of occupational exposure to genotoxic agents. In this study, the genotoxic effect of aromatic hydrocarbons was assessed in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 24 workers occupationally exposed and 24 unexposed donors, by using Cytogenetic analysis and comet assay. A high frequency of Chromosomal alterations was found in the exposed group in comparison with those observed in the unexposed group. Among the total of CAs observed in the exposed group, fragilities were most frequently found (100 %), followed by chromosomal breaks (58 %), structural (41.2 %) and numerical chromosomal alterations (21 %). Numerical chromosomal alterations, fragilities and chromosomal breaks showed significant differences between exposed and unexposed groups. Among the fragilities, fra(9)(q12) was the most frequently observed. DNA damage index was also significantly higher in the exposed group compared to the unexposed group (p car paint shops workers and are also indicative of high chromosomal instability. The high frequency of both Chromosomal Alterations and DNA Damage Index observed in this study indicates an urgent need of intervention not only to prevent the increased risk of developing cancer but also to the application of strict health control and motivation to the use of

  1. Radiation-induced genomic instability driven by de novo chromosomal rearrangement hot spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; Allen, R.N.; Moore, S.R.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability has become generally recognized as a critical contributor to tumor progression by generating the necessary number of genetic alterations required for expression of a clinically significant malignancy. Our study of chromosomal instability investigates the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in instability acting predominantly in cis. Here we present an analysis of the karyotypic distribution of instability associated chromosomal rearrangements in TK6 and derivative human lymphoblasts. Karyotypic analysis performed on a total of 455 independent clones included 183 rearrangements distributed among 100 separate unstable clones. The results demonstrate that the breakpoints of chromosomal rearrangements in unstable clones are non-randomly distributed throughout the genome. This pattern is statistically significant, and incompatible with expectations for random breakage associated with loss or alteration of a trans-acting factor. Furthermore, specific chromosomal breakage hot spots associated with instability have been identified; these occur in several independent unstable clones and are often repeatedly broken and rejoined during the outgrowth of an individual clone. In complimentary studies, genomic instability was generated without any exposure to a DNA-damaging agent, but rather by transfection with alpha heterochromatin DNA. In a prospective analysis, human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11 were transfected with heterochromatic alpha DNA repeats and clones were analyzed by chromosome 11 painting. Transfection with alpha DNA was associated with karyotypic heterogeneity in 40% of clones examined; control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic heterogeneity

  2. Transmission of chromosomal and instability via a chromosome irradiated with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji; Tanabe, Masateru; Shiraishi, Kazunori; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    We examined the stability of the transferred chromosome in 5 and 12 microcell hybrids including unirradiated human chromosomes 6 and 8, respectively, and 6 and 19 microcell hybrids including 4 Gy-irradiated human chromosomes 6 and 8, respectively. The transferred chromosome was structurally stable in most microcell hybrids transferred with the unirradiated chromosomes 6 and 8. In contrast, the 4 Gy-irradiated human chromosomes were unstable in 3 out of 6 hybrids (50%) with chromosome 6 and 3 out of 19 hybrids (16%) with chromosome 8, showing multiple aberrations in high frequencies (35∼98%). To know the cause of delayed chromosomal instability, intrachromosomal rearrangements of the human chromosome is investigated by subtelomere FISH in 17 microcell hybrids transferred with chromosomes 6 and 8. We found frequent intrachromosomal in 7 microcell hybrids (41%). However, no clear correlation was observed between the intrachromosomal rearrangements and the induction of delayed chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation

  3. Phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) influences spindle assembly and chromosome segregation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfang; Beauchemin, Myriam; Bertrand, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Functional analysis of a series of phosphorylation mutants reveals that Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) influences cell entry into anaphase and mitotic exit in taxol-exposed cells compared with cells expressing wild-type Bcl-xL or a series of other phosphorylation mutants, an effect that appears to be independent of its anti-apoptotic activity. During normal mitosis progression, Bcl-xL(Ser62) is strongly phosphorylated by PLK1 and MAPK14/SAPKp38α at the prometaphase, metaphase, and the anaphase boundaries, while it is de-phosphorylated at telophase and cytokinesis. Phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) localizes in centrosomes with γ-tubulin and in the mitotic cytosol with some spindle-assembly checkpoint signaling components, including PLK1, BubR1, and Mad2. In taxol- and nocodazole-exposed cells, phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) also binds to Cdc20- Mad2-, BubR1-, and Bub3-bound complexes, while Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) does not. Silencing Bcl-xL expression and expressing the phosphorylation mutant Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) lead to an increased number of cells harboring mitotic spindle defects including multipolar spindle, chromosome lagging and bridging, aneuploidy with micro-, bi-, or multi-nucleated cells, and cells that fail to resolve undergo mitosis within 6 h. Together, the data indicate that during mitosis, Bcl-xL(Ser62) phosphorylation impacts on spindle assembly and chromosome segregation, influencing chromosome stability. Observations of mitotic cells harboring aneuploidy with micro-, bi-, or multi-nucleated cells, and cells that fail to resolve undergo mitosis within 6 h were also made with cells expressing the phosphorylation mutant Bcl-xL(Ser49Ala) and dual mutant Bcl-xL(Ser49/62Ala).

  4. An unusual haplotype structure on human chromosome 8p23 derived from the inversion polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Libin; Zhang, Yuezheng; Kang, Jian; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Hongbin; Gao, Yang; Li, Chaohua; Pan, Hao; Tang, Xiaoli; Wang, Dunmei; Niu, Tianhua; Yang, Huanming; Zeng, Changqing

    2008-10-01

    Chromosomal inversion is an important type of genomic variations involved in both evolution and disease pathogenesis. Here, we describe the refined genetic structure of a 3.8-Mb inversion polymorphism at chromosome 8p23. Using HapMap data of 1,073 SNPs generated from 209 unrelated samples from CEPH-Utah residents with ancestry from northern and western Europe (CEU); Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigeria (YRI); and Asian (ASN) samples, which were comprised of Han Chinese from Beijing, China (CHB) and Japanese from Tokyo, Japan (JPT)-we successfully deduced the inversion orientations of all their 418 haplotypes. In particular, distinct haplotype subgroups were identified based on principal component analysis (PCA). Such genetic substructures were consistent with clustering patterns based on neighbor-joining tree reconstruction, which revealed a total of four haplotype clades across all samples. Metaphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in a subset of 10 HapMap samples verified their inversion orientations predicted by PCA or phylogenetic tree reconstruction. Positioning of the outgroup haplotype within one of YRI clades suggested that Human NCBI Build 36-inverted order is most likely the ancestral orientation. Furthermore, the population differentiation test and the relative extended haplotype homozygosity (REHH) analysis in this region discovered multiple selection signals, also in a population-specific manner. A positive selection signal was detected at XKR6 in the ASN population. These results revealed the correlation of inversion polymorphisms to population-specific genetic structures, and various selection patterns as possible mechanisms for the maintenance of a large chromosomal rearrangement at 8p23 region during evolution. In addition, our study also showed that haplotype-based clustering methods, such as PCA, can be applied in scanning for cryptic inversion polymorphisms at a genome-wide scale.

  5. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baeyens, A

    2002-12-02

    The chromosomal radiosensitivity of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was investigated and compared to a group of healthy women. The chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed with the G2 and the G0-micronucleus assay. For the G2 assay lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with a dose of 0.4 Gy (60)Co gamma-rays after 71 h incubation, and chromatid breaks were scored in 50 metaphases. For the micronucleus assay lymphocytes were exposed in vitro to 3.5 Gy (60)Co gamma-rays at a high dose rate or low dose rate. 70 h post-irradiation cultures were arrested and micronuclei were scored in 1000 binucleate cells. The results demonstrated that the group of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was on the average more radiosensitive than a population of healthy women, and this with the G2 as well as with the high dose rate and low dose rate micronucleus assay. With the G2 assay 43% of the patients were found to be radiosensitive. A higher proportion of the patients were radiosensitive with the micronucleus assay (45% with high dose rate and 61% with low dose rate). No correlation was found between the G2 and the G0-micronucleus chromosomal radiosensitivity. Out of the different subgroups considered, the group of the young breast cancer patients without family history showed the highest percentage of radiosensitive cases in the G2 (50%) as well as in the micronucleus assay (75-78%).

  6. Molecular structure and chromosome distribution of three repetitive DNA families in Anemone hortensis L. (Ranunculaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlinarec, Jelena; Chester, Mike; Siljak-Yakovlev, Sonja; Papes, Drazena; Leitch, Andrew R; Besendorfer, Visnja

    2009-01-01

    The structure, abundance and location of repetitive DNA sequences on chromosomes can characterize the nature of higher plant genomes. Here we report on three new repeat DNA families isolated from Anemone hortensis L.; (i) AhTR1, a family of satellite DNA (stDNA) composed of a 554-561 bp long EcoRV monomer; (ii) AhTR2, a stDNA family composed of a 743 bp long HindIII monomer and; (iii) AhDR, a repeat family composed of a 945 bp long HindIII fragment that exhibits some sequence similarity to Ty3/gypsy-like retroelements. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) to metaphase chromosomes of A. hortensis (2n = 16) revealed that both AhTR1 and AhTR2 sequences co-localized with DAPI-positive AT-rich heterochromatic regions. AhTR1 sequences occur at intercalary DAPI bands while AhTR2 sequences occur at 8-10 terminally located heterochromatic blocks. In contrast AhDR sequences are dispersed over all chromosomes as expected of a Ty3/gypsy-like element. AhTR2 and AhTR1 repeat families include polyA- and polyT-tracks, AT/TA-motifs and a pentanucleotide sequence (CAAAA) that may have consequences for chromatin packing and sequence homogeneity. AhTR2 repeats also contain TTTAGGG motifs and degenerate variants. We suggest that they arose by interspersion of telomeric repeats with subtelomeric repeats, before hybrid unit(s) amplified through the heterochromatic domain. The three repetitive DNA families together occupy approximately 10% of the A. hortensis genome. Comparative analyses of eight Anemone species revealed that the divergence of the A. hortensis genome was accompanied by considerable modification and/or amplification of repeats.

  7. Chromosomal damage after Iodine-131 treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer: in vivo dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, V.K.; Nguyen, X.P.; Truong, Q.X.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Although it is well known that radiation induces chromosomal aberrations, there is a lack of information on the in- vivo dose-effect relationship in patients receiving Iodine-131 treatment and the results of previous studies are controversial. In this study, the dicentric chromosomal aberrations (DCA) analysis method was employed to investigate acute and late chromosomal damage (CD) in the peripheral lymphocytes of 58 differentiated thyroid cancer patients who received dose 1,1 GBq of Iodine-131 (group A), and 34 patients who received dose 3,7 GBq of Iodine- 131 (group B). The mean 100 metaphase spreads were scored for each subject. The DCA frequencies in cultured peripheral lymphocytes were determined before treatment to assess basal DCA frequencies, on the 3rd day to assess acute DCA frequencies and 6 months later to assess late DCA frequencies. The basal, acute and late DCA frequencies were divided into two groups: 0,18%, 2,14% and 0,53% (group A) and 0,18%, 2,12 % and 0,89% (group B), respectively, and these values differed significantly at various time after treatment (p 2 = 0,987), and group B as Y= 32,71 + 0,189 X. (r = 0,9381, R 2 = 0,880). However, there was an interesting difference in comparison with in- vitro studies, in that we found the coefficient β to have a negative value, suggesting the disappearance of damaged lymphocytes from peripheral circulation in a dose- dependent manner following Iodine-131 treatment. Further studies are therefore needed to clarify the effect of the negative β value on biological dosimetry approach in continuous internal low LET radiation, as in the case of Iodine-131 treatment. (author)

  8. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/μm) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  9. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eZamariola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved.

  10. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homolka, David; Ivánek, Robert; Čapková, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 10 (2007), s. 1431-1437 ISSN 1088-9051 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR GA301/06/1334; GA ČR GA301/07/1383 Grant - others:Howard Hughes Medical Institute(US) HHMI 55000306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromosomal translocations * meiotic X chromosome inactivation * spermatogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.224, year: 2007

  11. Characterization and prognostic implication of 17 chromosome abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Castro, Judit; Marco-Betés, Víctor; Gómez-Arbonés, Xavier; Arenillas, Leonor; Valcarcel, David; Vallespí, Teresa; Costa, Dolors; Nomdedeu, Benet; Jimenez, María José; Granada, Isabel; Grau, Javier; Ardanaz, María T; de la Serna, Javier; Carbonell, Félix; Cervera, José; Sierra, Adriana; Luño, Elisa; Cervero, Carlos J; Falantes, José; Calasanz, María J; González-Porrás, José R; Bailén, Alicia; Amigo, M Luz; Sanz, Guillermo; Solé, Francesc

    2013-07-01

    The prognosis of chromosome 17 (chr17) abnormalities in patients with primary myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) remains unclear. The revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R) includes these abnormalities within the intermediate cytogenetic risk group. This study assessed the impact on overall survival (OS) and risk of acute myeloid leukemia transformation (AMLt) of chr17 abnormalities in 88 patients with primary MDS. We have compared this group with 1346 patients with primary MDS and abnormal karyotype without chr17 involved. The alterations of chr17 should be considered within group of poor prognosis. The different types of alterations of chromosome 17 behave different prognosis. The study confirms the intermediate prognostic impact of the i(17q), as stated in IPSS-R. The results of the study, however, provide valuable new information on the prognostic impact of alterations of chromosome 17 in complex karyotypes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chromosomal rearrangements in Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Debes, Nanette Mol; Hjermind, Lena E

    2013-01-01

    , and identification of susceptibility genes through linkage and association studies has been complicated due to inherent difficulties such as no clear mode of inheritance, genetic heterogeneity, and apparently incomplete penetrance. Positional cloning through mapping of disease-related chromosome rearrangements has...... been an efficient tool for the cloning of disease genes in several Mendelian disorders and in a number of complex disorders. Through cytogenetic investigation of 205 TS patients, we identified three possibly disease-associated chromosome rearrangements rendering this approach relevant in chasing TS...

  13. Chromosomal instability determines taxane response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swanton, C.; Nicke, B.; Schuett, M.

    2009-01-01

    chromosomal instability (CIN). Silencing 22/50 of these gen