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Sample records for altered longevity-assurance activity

  1. Drosophila Longevity Assurance Conferred by Reduced Insulin Receptor Substrate Chico Partially Requires d4eBP.

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    Hua Bai

    Full Text Available Mutations of the insulin/IGF signaling (IIS pathway extend Drosophila lifespan. Based on genetic epistasis analyses, this longevity assurance is attributed to downstream effects of the FOXO transcription factor. However, as reported FOXO accounts for only a portion of the observed longevity benefit, suggesting there are additional outputs of IIS to mediate aging. One candidate is target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1. Reduced TORC1 activity is reported to slow aging, whereas reduced IIS is reported to repress TORC1 activity. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein (4E-BP is repressed by TORC1, and activated 4E-BP is reported to increase Drosophila lifespan. Here we use genetic epistasis analyses to test whether longevity assurance mutants of chico, the Drosophila insulin receptor substrate homolog, require Drosophila d4eBP to slow aging. In chico heterozygotes, which are robustly long-lived, d4eBP is required but not sufficient to slow aging. Remarkably, d4eBP is not required or sufficient for chico homozygotes to extend longevity. Likewise, chico heterozygote females partially require d4eBP to preserve age-dependent locomotion, and both chico genotypes require d4eBP to improve stress-resistance. Reproduction and most measures of growth affected by either chico genotype are always independent of d4eBP. In females, chico heterozygotes paradoxically produce more rather than less phosphorylated 4E-BP (p4E-BP. Altered IRS function within the IIS pathway of Drosophila appears to have partial, conditional capacity to regulate aging through an unconventional interaction with 4E-BP.

  2. Altered myoelectric activity in the experimental blind loop syndrome.

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    Justus, P G; Fernandez, A; Martin, J L; King, C E; Toskes, P P; Mathias, J R

    1983-09-01

    Nutrient malabsorption and diarrhea are characteristic of the blind loop syndrome. Alterations in motility have been implicated as a cause of bacterial overgrowth, but the possibility that altered motility may result from alterations in the flora has not been explored. The purpose of this study was to characterize the myoelectric activity of the small intestine in the blind loop rat model. Eight groups of rats were studied: rats with self-filling blind loops, which develop bacterial overgrowth; rats with self-emptying blind loops, which are surgical controls that do not develop overgrowth; unoperated litter mates; rats with self-filling blind loops and unoperated controls treated with chloramphenicol, 200 mg/d i.p.; rats with surgically removed self-filling blind loops; operated control rats; and gnotobiotic rats with self-filling blind loops. In the untreated rats with self-filling blind loops, there was altered myoelectric activity characterized by an increased percentage of slow waves occupied by action potentials and by organized activity similar to the migrating action potential complex. Migrating action potential complex activity and percentage of slow waves occupied by action potentials were significantly decreased with chloramphenicol therapy; that decrease correlated with a decrease in aerobes and anaerobes. Migrating action potential complex activity was abolished in rats with surgically removed self-filling blind loops; they also showed a significant decrease in percentage of slow waves occupied by action potentials. Gnotobiotic rats with self-filling blind loops showed no alteration in myoelectric activity. These data indicate: (a) bacterial overgrowth is associated with a significant increase in percentage of slow waves occupied by action potentials and migrating action potential complex activity; (b) chloramphenicol significantly reduced both percentage of slow waves occupied by action potentials and migrating action potential complex activity; and (c

  3. Myelin alters the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages by activating PPARs

    OpenAIRE

    Bogie, Jeroen; Jorissen, Winde; Mailleux, Jo; Vanmierlo, Tim; van Horssen, Jack; Hellings, Niels; Stinissen, Piet; Hendriks, J. J. A.; Nijland, Philip G.; Zelcer, Noam

    2013-01-01

    Background Foamy macrophages, containing myelin degradation products, are abundantly found in active multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. Recent studies have described an altered phenotype of macrophages after myelin internalization. However, mechanisms by which myelin affects the phenotype of macrophages and how this phenotype influences lesion progression remain unclear. Results We demonstrate that myelin as well as phosphatidylserine (PS), a phospholipid found in myelin, reduce nitri...

  4. Alterations in HIV-1 LTR promoter activity during AIDS progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV-1 variants evolving in AIDS patients frequently show increased replicative capacity compared to those present during early asymptomatic infection. It is known that late stage HIV-1 variants often show an expanded coreceptor tropism and altered Nef function. In the present study we investigated whether enhanced HIV-1 LTR promoter activity might also evolve during disease progression. Our results demonstrate increased LTR promoter activity after AIDS progression in 3 of 12 HIV-1-infected individuals studied. Further analysis revealed that multiple alterations in the U3 core-enhancer and in the transactivation-response (TAR) region seem to be responsible for the enhanced functional activity. Our findings show that in a subset of HIV-1-infected individuals enhanced LTR transcription contributes to the increased replicative potential of late stage virus isolates and might accelerate disease progression

  5. Human activities change marine ecosystems by altering predation risk.

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    Madin, Elizabeth M P; Dill, Lawrence M; Ridlon, April D; Heithaus, Michael R; Warner, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    In ocean ecosystems, many of the changes in predation risk - both increases and decreases - are human-induced. These changes are occurring at scales ranging from global to local and across variable temporal scales. Indirect, risk-based effects of human activity are known to be important in structuring some terrestrial ecosystems, but these impacts have largely been neglected in oceans. Here, we synthesize existing literature and data to explore multiple lines of evidence that collectively suggest diverse human activities are changing marine ecosystems, including carbon storage capacity, in myriad ways by altering predation risk. We provide novel, compelling evidence that at least one key human activity, overfishing, can lead to distinct, cascading risk effects in natural ecosystems whose magnitude exceeds that of presumed lethal effects and may account for previously unexplained findings. We further discuss the conservation implications of human-caused indirect risk effects. Finally, we provide a predictive framework for when human alterations of risk in oceans should lead to cascading effects and outline a prospectus for future research. Given the speed and extent with which human activities are altering marine risk landscapes, it is crucial that conservation and management policy considers the indirect effects of these activities in order to increase the likelihood of success and avoid unfortunate surprises. PMID:26448058

  6. Activated oxygen alters cerebral microvascular responses in newborn pigs

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    Leffler, C.W.; Busiia, D.W.; Armstead, W.M.; Mirro, R.; Thelin, O. (Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis (United States))

    1990-02-26

    In piglets, cerebral ischemia/reperfusion blocks prostanoid dependent cerebral vasodilation to hypercapnia (CO{sub 2}) and hypotension but not prostanoid independent dilation to isoproterenol (Isu) or constriction to norepinephrine (NE). Ischemia/reperfusion increases activated-O{sub 2} production by piglet brains. Using cranial windows in piglets, the authors investigated the hypothesis that activated oxygen can block prostanoid dependent cerebral vasodilator responses to CO{sub 2} and hypotension without altering responses to Isu and NE. Exposure to an activated oxygen generating system of xanthine oxidase, hypoxanthine, and Fe that made about 3 times the activated-O{sub 2} on the brain surface as ischemia/reperfusion caused reversible pial arteriolar dilation. After exposure, pial arteriolar dilation was reduced to CO{sub 2} and hypotension but not to Isu. NE constrictor responses were also unaltered. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + Fe caused constriction followed by reversible dilation. After exposure, pial arteriolar dilation in response to CO{sub 2} and hypotension was not altered. However, addition of xanthine oxidase and hypoxanthine with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Fe totally eliminated pial arteriolar dilator responses to CO{sub 2} and hypotension but did not decrease dilation caused by Isu or constriction caused by NE. The authors conclude that activated oxygen could produce the altered prostanoid dependent pial arteriolar responses observed following ischemia in piglets.

  7. Environmental noise alters gastric myoelectrical activity: Effect of age

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    James S Castle; Jin-Hong Xing; Mark R Warner; Mark A Korsten

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of age and acoustic stress on gastric myoelectrical activity (GMA) and autonomic nervous system function,METHODS: Twenty-one male subjects (age range 22-71years, mean 44 years) were recruited and exposed, in random order, to three auditory stimuli (Hospital noise,conversation babble and traffic noise) after a 20-min baseline. All periods lasted 20 min and were interspersed with a 10 min of recovery. GMA was obtained using a Synectics Microdigitrapper. Autonomic nerve function was assessed by monitoring blood pressure and heart rate using an automatic recording device.RESULTS: Dominant power tended to decrease with increase of age (P<0.05). The overall percentage of three cycle per minute (CPM) activity decreased during exposure to hospital noise (12.0%, P < 0.05), traffic noise (13.9%, P < 0.05), and conversation babble(7.1%). The subjects in the younger group (< 50 years)showed a consistent reduction in the percentage of 3CPM activity during hospital noise (22.9%, P < 0.05),traffic noise (19.0%, P < 0.05), and conversation babble(15.5%). These observations were accompanied by a significant increase in bradygastria: hospital noise (P< 0.05) and traffic noise (P < 0.05). In contrast, the subjects over 50 years of age did not exhibit a significant decrease in 3 CPM activity. Regardless of age, noise did not alter blood pressure or heart rate.CONCLUSION: GMA changes with age. Loud noise can alter GMA, especially in younger individuals. Our data indicate that even short-term exposure to noise may alter the contractility of the stomach.

  8. Altered brain activity for phonological manipulation in dyslexic Japanese children

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    Yamamoto, Hisako; Oba, Kentaro; Terasawa, Yuri; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Uchiyama, Hitoshi; Seki, Ayumi; Koeda, Tatsuya; Inagaki, Masumi

    2013-01-01

    Because of unique linguistic characteristics, the prevalence rate of developmental dyslexia is relatively low in the Japanese language. Paradoxically, Japanese children have serious difficulty analysing phonological processes when they have dyslexia. Neurobiological deficits in Japanese dyslexia remain unclear and need to be identified, and may lead to better understanding of the commonality and diversity in the disorder among different linguistic systems. The present study investigated brain activity that underlies deficits in phonological awareness in Japanese dyslexic children using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We developed and conducted a phonological manipulation task to extract phonological processing skills and to minimize the influence of auditory working memory on healthy adults, typically developing children, and dyslexic children. Current experiments revealed that several brain regions participated in manipulating the phonological information including left inferior and middle frontal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, and bilateral basal ganglia. Moreover, dyslexic children showed altered activity in two brain regions. They showed hyperactivity in the basal ganglia compared with the two other groups, which reflects inefficient phonological processing. Hypoactivity in the left superior temporal gyrus was also found, suggesting difficulty in composing and processing phonological information. The altered brain activity shares similarity with those of dyslexic children in countries speaking alphabetical languages, but disparity also occurs between these two populations. These are initial findings concerning the neurobiological impairments in dyslexic Japanese children. PMID:24052613

  9. Altered brain activity for phonological manipulation in dyslexic Japanese children.

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    Kita, Yosuke; Yamamoto, Hisako; Oba, Kentaro; Terasawa, Yuri; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Uchiyama, Hitoshi; Seki, Ayumi; Koeda, Tatsuya; Inagaki, Masumi

    2013-12-01

    Because of unique linguistic characteristics, the prevalence rate of developmental dyslexia is relatively low in the Japanese language. Paradoxically, Japanese children have serious difficulty analysing phonological processes when they have dyslexia. Neurobiological deficits in Japanese dyslexia remain unclear and need to be identified, and may lead to better understanding of the commonality and diversity in the disorder among different linguistic systems. The present study investigated brain activity that underlies deficits in phonological awareness in Japanese dyslexic children using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We developed and conducted a phonological manipulation task to extract phonological processing skills and to minimize the influence of auditory working memory on healthy adults, typically developing children, and dyslexic children. Current experiments revealed that several brain regions participated in manipulating the phonological information including left inferior and middle frontal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, and bilateral basal ganglia. Moreover, dyslexic children showed altered activity in two brain regions. They showed hyperactivity in the basal ganglia compared with the two other groups, which reflects inefficient phonological processing. Hypoactivity in the left superior temporal gyrus was also found, suggesting difficulty in composing and processing phonological information. The altered brain activity shares similarity with those of dyslexic children in countries speaking alphabetical languages, but disparity also occurs between these two populations. These are initial findings concerning the neurobiological impairments in dyslexic Japanese children.

  10. Thalidomide combined with irradiation alters the activity of two proteases.

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    Şimşek, Ece; Aydemir, Esra; Korcum, Aylin Fidan; Fişkın, Kayahan

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of thalidomide, a drug known for its anti‑angiogenic and antitumor properties, at its cytotoxic dose previously determined as 40 µg/ml (according to four cytotoxic test results). The effect of the drug alone and in combination with radiotherapy using Cobalt 60 (60Co) at 45 Gy on the enzymatic activity of substance‑P degrading A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)10 and neprilysin (NEP) was investigated in the mouse breast cancer cell lines 4T1 and 4T1 heart metastases post‑capsaicin (4THMpc). Thalidomide (40 µg/ml) exerted differing effects on the activities of ADAM10 and NEP enzymes. In 4T1 cells, 40 µg/ml thalidomide alone did not alter ADAM10 enzyme activity. 60Co irradiation at 45 Gy alone caused a 42% inhibition in ADAM10 activity, however, the inhibition increased to 89% when combined therapy was used. By contrast, in the 4THMpc cell line, 40 µg/ml thalidomide alone induced a 66.6% increase in ADAM10 enzyme activity. Radiotherapy alone and thalidomide with 60Co combined therapy caused a 33.3 and 40% inhibition of ADAM10 activity, respectively. In 4T1 cells, thalidomide alone caused a 40.9% increase in NEP activity. Radiation therapy alone or in combination with the drug caused a 40.7% increase in NEP activity. In more aggressive 4THMpc cells, thalidomide alone caused a 26.6% increase in NEP activity. Radiotherapy alone and combined therapy caused a 33.3 and 37% increase in enzyme activity, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that thalidomide alone or in combination with radiotherapy exhibits significant cytotoxic effects on 4T1 and 4THMpc mouse breast cancer cell lines indicating that this drug affects the enzymatic activity of ADAM10 and NEP in vitro.

  11. Delayed and accelerated aging share common longevity assurance mechanisms

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    B. Schumacher; I. van der Pluijm; M.J. Moorhouse; T. Kosteas; A.R. Robinson; Y. Suh; T.M. Breit; H. van Steeg; L.J. Niedernhofer; W. van IJcken; A. Bartke; S.R. Spindler; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers; G.T.J. van der Horst; G.A. Garinis

    2008-01-01

    Mutant dwarf and calorie-restricted mice benefit from healthy aging and unusually long lifespan. In contrast, mouse models for DNA repair-deficient progeroid syndromes age and die prematurely. To identify mechanisms that regulate mammalian longevity, we quantified the parallels between the genome-wi

  12. Low HDL cholesterol, aggression and altered central serotonergic activity.

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    Buydens-Branchey, L; Branchey, M; Hudson, J; Fergeson, P

    2000-03-01

    Many studies support a significant relation between low cholesterol levels and poor impulse, aggression and mood control. Evidence exists also for a causal link between low brain serotonin (5-HT) activity and these behaviors. Mechanisms linking cholesterol and hostile or self-destructive behavior are unknown, but it has been suggested that low cholesterol influences 5-HT function. This study was designed to explore the relationship between plasma cholesterol, measures of impulsivity and aggression, and indices of 5-HT function in personality disordered cocaine addicts. Thirty-eight hospitalized male patients (age 36.8+/-7.1) were assessed with the DSM-III-R, the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI), the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and the Brown-Goodwin Assessment for Life History of Aggression. Fasting basal cholesterol (total, LDL and HDL) was determined 2 weeks after cocaine discontinuation. On the same day 5-HT function was assessed by neuroendocrine (cortisol and prolactin) and psychological (NIMH and 'high' self-rating scales) responses following meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP) challenges. Reduced neuroendocrine responses, 'high' feelings and increased 'activation-euphoria' following m-CPP have been interpreted as indicating 5-HT alterations in a variety of psychiatric conditions. Significantly lower levels of HDL cholesterol were found in patients who had a history of aggression (P=0.005). Lower levels of HDL cholesterol were also found to be significantly associated with more intense 'high' and 'activation-euphoria' responses as well as with blunted cortisol responses to m-CPP (P=0.033, P=0.025 and P=0.018, respectively). This study gives further support to existing evidence indicating that in some individuals, the probability of exhibiting impulsive and violent behaviors may be increased when cholesterol is low. It also suggests that low cholesterol and alterations in 5-HT activity may be causally related.

  13. A homolog of the yeast longevity assurance gene LAG1 in the parasitic protist Trichomonas vaginalis%原生动物阴道毛滴虫的酵酶长寿保障基因LAG1同源基因克隆和序列分析

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    傅玉才; 徐虹; 刘红; 张可浩; 林晖榕

    2004-01-01

    为了探讨寄生性原虫阴道毛滴虫细胞生长和衰老相关基因,作者从阴道毛滴虫的cDNA表达文库中分离出一具910碱基对的cDNA克隆,其编码框长834 bp,推测蛋白质序列有277个氨基酸.序列分析显示该克隆与酵酶长寿保障基因LAG1同源性最高,其氨基酸序列中含有LAG1及其同源基因保守的Lag1结构域和TLC结构域以及6个跨膜螺旋区和一个C-未端的内质网保留信号域.因此推测该克隆系酵酶LAG1的同源基因,该基因可能参与阴道毛滴虫的神经酰胺生物合成以及调解细胞的生命期或细胞衰老.该基因的基因组DNA与其cDNA序列一致,提示该基因序列中可能无内含子.%In an effort to search and analyze cell growth and senescence-related genes of the parasitic protist Trichomonas vaginalis, we launched an EST program and isolated a cDNA clone with a length of 910 basepairs from a T.vaginalis cDNA library.The sequence analysis revealed that this cDNA clone contains an open reading frame of 834 bp.The deduced amino acid sequence has 277 residues and is most homologous to the longevity-assurance gene 1(LAG1)proteins.A predicted Lag1 motif and a TLC domain conserved in Lag1 proteins were detected in the amino acid sequence.The secondary structure analysis demonstrated that this protein possesses six predicted transmembrane domains and a membrane retention signal of endoplasmic reticulum.These data suggest that this clone is probably a LAG1 homolog,which may participate in the regulation of ceramide biosynthesis and in determining life span or cell senescence of the protozoan.The genomic DNA of this gene is also cloned and sequenced.The DNA sequence is identical to that of cDNA,suggesting it may be a intronless gene of the protozoan.

  14. Alteration of biophysical activity of pulmonary surfactant by aluminosilicate nanoparticles.

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    Kondej, Dorota; Sosnowski, Tomasz R

    2013-02-01

    The influence of five different types of aluminosilicate nanoparticles (NPs) on the dynamic surface activity of model pulmonary surfactant (PS) (Survanta) was studied experimentally using oscillating bubble tensiometry. Bentonite, halloysite and montmorillonite (MM) NPs, which are used as fillers of polymer composites, were characterized regarding the size distribution, morphology and surface area. Particle doses applied in the studies were estimated based on the inhalation rate and duration, taking into account the expected aerosol concentration and deposition efficiency after penetration of NPs into the alveolar region. The results indicate that aluminosilicate NPs at concentrations in the pulmonary liquid above 0.1 mg cm(-3) are capable of promoting alterations of the original dynamic biophysical activity of the PS. This effect is indicated by deviation of the minimum surface tension, stability index and the size of surface tension hysteresis. Such response is dependent on the type of NPs present in the system and is stronger when particle concentration increases. It is suggested that interactions between NPs and the PS must be related to the surfactant adsorption on the suspended particles, while in the case of surface-modified clay NPs the additional washout of surface-active components may be expected. It is speculated that observed changes in surface properties of the surfactant may be associated with undesired health effects following extensive inhalation of aluminosilicate NPs in the workplace. PMID:23363039

  15. Pseudorabies virus infection alters neuronal activity and connectivity in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M McCarthy

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-herpesviruses, including human herpes simplex virus 1 & 2, varicella zoster virus and the swine pseudorabies virus (PRV, infect the peripheral nervous system of their hosts. Symptoms of infection often include itching, numbness, or pain indicative of altered neurological function. To determine if there is an in vitro electrophysiological correlate to these characteristic in vivo symptoms, we infected cultured rat sympathetic neurons with well-characterized strains of PRV known to produce virulent or attenuated symptoms in animals. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made at various times after infection. By 8 hours of infection with virulent PRV, action potential (AP firing rates increased substantially and were accompanied by hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials and spikelet-like events. Coincident with the increase in AP firing rate, adjacent neurons exhibited coupled firing events, first with AP-spikelets and later with near identical resting membrane potentials and AP firing. Small fusion pores between adjacent cell bodies formed early after infection as demonstrated by transfer of the low molecular weight dye, Lucifer Yellow. Later, larger pores formed as demonstrated by transfer of high molecular weight Texas red-dextran conjugates between infected cells. Further evidence for viral-induced fusion pores was obtained by infecting neurons with a viral mutant defective for glycoprotein B, a component of the viral membrane fusion complex. These infected neurons were essentially identical to mock infected neurons: no increased AP firing, no spikelet-like events, and no electrical or dye transfer. Infection with PRV Bartha, an attenuated circuit-tracing strain delayed, but did not eliminate the increased neuronal activity and coupling events. We suggest that formation of fusion pores between infected neurons results in electrical coupling and elevated firing rates, and that these processes may contribute to the altered neural

  16. Physical activity alters antioxidant status in exercising elderly subjects.

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    Rousseau, Anne-Sophie; Margaritis, Irène; Arnaud, Josiane; Faure, Henri; Roussel, Anne-Marie

    2006-07-01

    Nutritional adequacy and physical activity are two aspects of a health-promoting lifestyle. Not much is known about antioxidant nutrient requirements for exercising elderly (EE) subjects. The question of whether exercise training alters the status of antioxidant vitamins as well as trace elements in elderly subjects and fails to balance the age-related increase in oxidative stress is addressed in this study. There were 18 EE (68.1+/-3.1 years), 7 sedentary elderly (SE; 70.4+/-5.0 years), 17 exercising young (EY; 31.2+/-7.1 years) and 8 sedentary young (SY; 27.1+/-5.8 years) subjects who completed 7-day food and activity records. Each subject's blood was sampled on Day 8. A similar selenium (Se) status but a higher erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity were found in EE subjects as compared with EY and SE subjects. Blood oxidized glutathione was higher and plasma total thiol was lower in EE subjects as compared with EY subjects. Mean vitamin C (167 vs. 106 mg/day), vitamin E (11.7 vs. 8.3 mg/day) and beta-carotene (4 vs. 2.4 mg/day) intakes were higher in EE subjects as compared with EY subjects. However, EE subjects exhibited the lowest plasma carotenoid concentrations, especially in beta-carotene, which was not related to intakes. Despite high intakes of antioxidant micronutrients, no adaptive mechanism able to counteract the increased oxidative stress in aging was found in EE subjects. Results on GSH-Px activity illustrate that the nature of the regulation of this biomarker of Se status is different in response to training and aging. These data also strongly suggest specific antioxidant requirements for athletes with advancing age, with a special attention to carotenoids.

  17. Regulation of prolactin in mice with altered hypothalamic melanocortin activity.

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    Dutia, Roxanne; Kim, Andrea J; Mosharov, Eugene; Savontaus, Eriika; Chua, Streamson C; Wardlaw, Sharon L

    2012-09-01

    This study used two mouse models with genetic manipulation of the melanocortin system to investigate prolactin regulation. Mice with overexpression of the melanocortin receptor (MC-R) agonist, α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (Tg-MSH) or deletion of the MC-R antagonist agouti-related protein (AgRP KO) were studied. Male Tg-MSH mice had lower blood prolactin levels at baseline (2.9±0.3 vs. 4.7±0.7ng/ml) and after restraint stress (68±6.5 vs. 117±22ng/ml) vs. WT (pprolactin content was not different. Blood prolactin was also decreased in male AgRP KO mice at baseline (4.2±0.5 vs. 7.6±1.3ng/ml) and after stress (60±4.5 vs. 86.1±5.7ng/ml) vs. WT (pprolactin content was lower in male AgRP KO mice (4.3±0.3 vs. 6.7±0.5μg/pituitary, pprolactin levels were observed in female AgRP KO mice vs. WT. Hypothalamic dopamine activity was assessed as the potential mechanism responsible for changes in prolactin levels. Hypothalamic tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA was measured in both genetic models vs. WT mice and hypothalamic dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) content were measured in male AgRP KO and WT mice but neither were significantly different. However, these results do not preclude changes in dopamine activity as dopamine turnover was not directly investigated. This is the first study to show that baseline and stress-induced prolactin release and pituitary prolactin content are reduced in mice with genetic alterations of the melanocortin system and suggests that changes in hypothalamic melanocortin activity may be reflected in measurements of serum prolactin levels.

  18. Alteration of swelling clay minerals by acid activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steudel, A.; Batenburg, L.F.; Fischer, H.R.; Weidler, P.G.; Emmerich, K.

    2009-01-01

    The bulk material of six dioctahedral and two trioctahedral swellable clay minerals was leached in H2SO4 and HCl at concentrations of 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 M at 80 °C for several hours. Alteration of the clay mineral structures was dependent on the individual character of each mineral (chemical composit

  19. High physical activity in young children suggests positive effects by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity.

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    Carlsson, E; Ludvigsson, J; Huus, K; Faresjö, M

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity in children is associated with several positive health outcomes such as decreased cardiovascular risk factors, improved lung function, enhanced motor skill development, healthier body composition, and also improved defense against inflammatory diseases. We examined how high physical activity vs a sedentary lifestyle in young children influences the immune response with focus on autoimmunity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, collected from 55 5-year-old children with either high physical activity (n = 14), average physical activity (n = 27), or low physical activity (n = 14), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort, were stimulated with antigens (tetanus toxoid and beta-lactoglobulin) and autoantigens (GAD65 , insulin, HSP60, and IA-2). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), C-peptide and proinsulin were analyzed. Children with high physical activity showed decreased immune activity toward the autoantigens GAD65 (IL-5, P < 0.05), HSP60 and IA-2 (IL-10, P < 0.05) and also low spontaneous pro-inflammatory immune activity (IL-6, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and CCL2 (P < 0.05)) compared with children with an average or low physical activity. High physical activity in young children seems to have positive effects on the immune system by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity. PMID:25892449

  20. Altered Erythrocyte Glycolytic Enzyme Activities in Type-II Diabetes.

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    Mali, Aniket V; Bhise, Sunita S; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar V; Katyare, Surendra S

    2016-07-01

    The activity of enzymes of glycolysis has been studied in erythrocytes from type-II diabetic patients in comparison with control. RBC lysate was the source of enzymes. In the diabetics the hexokinase (HK) activity increased 50 % while activities of phosphoglucoisomerase (PGI), phosphofructokinase (PFK) and aldolase (ALD) decreased by 37, 75 and 64 % respectively but were still several folds higher than that of HK. Hence, it is possible that in the diabetic erythrocytes the process of glycolysis could proceed in an unimpaired or in fact may be augmented due to increased levels of G6P. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was comparatively high in both the groups; the diabetic group showed 85 % increase. In control group the HK, PFK and ALD activities showed strong positive correlation with blood sugar level while PGI activity did not show any correlation. In the diabetic group only PFK activity showed positive correlation. The LDH activity only in the control group showed positive correlation with marginal increase with increasing concentrations of glucose. PMID:27382204

  1. Heparin alters viral serpin, serp-1, anti-thrombolytic activity to anti-thrombotic activity.

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    Li, Xing; Schneider, Heather; Peters, Andrew; Macaulay, Colin; King, Elaine; Sun, Yunming; Liu, Liying; Dai, Erbin; Davids, Jennifer A; McFadden, Grant; Lucas, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) regulate coagulation and inflammation. Heparin, a glycosaminoglycan, is an important cofactor for modulation of the inhibitory function of mammalian serpins. The secreted myxoma viral serpin, Serp-1 exerts profound anti-inflammatory activity in a wide range of animal models. Serp-1 anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic activity is dependent upon inhibition of the uPA / uPA receptor thrombolytic complex. We demonstrate here that heparin binds to Serp-1 and enhances Serp-1 inhibition of thrombin, a human pro-thrombotic serine protease, in vitro, altering inhibitory activity to a more predominant anti-thrombotic activity. Heparin also facilitates the simultaneous thrombin-mediated cleavage of Serp-1 and prevents formation of a serpin-typical SDS-resistant complex, implying mutual neutralization of Serp-1 and thrombin. In a cell-based assay, heparin facilitates Serp-1 reversal of cellular activation by stabilizing cellular membrane fluidity in thrombin-activated monocytes. In conclusion, heparin and other GAGs serve as cofactors enhancing Serp-1 regulation of local thrombotic and inflammatory pathways. PMID:18949070

  2. Amygdala kindling alters protein kinase C activity in dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S J; Desai, M A; Klann, E; Winder, D G; Sweatt, J D; Conn, P J

    1992-11-01

    Kindling is a use-dependent form of synaptic plasticity and a widely used model of epilepsy. Although kindling has been widely studied, the molecular mechanisms underlying induction of this phenomenon are not well understood. We determined the effect of amygdala kindling on protein kinase C (PKC) activity in various regions of rat brain. Kindling stimulation markedly elevated basal (Ca(2+)-independent) and Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation of an endogenous PKC substrate (which we have termed P17) in homogenates of dentate gyrus, assayed 2 h after kindling stimulation. The increase in P17 phosphorylation appeared to be due at least in part to persistent PKC activation, as basal PKC activity assayed in vitro using an exogenous peptide substrate was increased in kindled dentate gyrus 2 h after the last kindling stimulation. A similar increase in basal PKC activity was observed in dentate gyrus 2 h after the first kindling stimulation. These results document a kindling-associated persistent PKC activation and suggest that the increased activity of PKC could play a role in the induction of the kindling effect.

  3. Altered glutamyl-aminopeptidase activity and expression in renal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in the knowledge of renal neoplasms have demonstrated the implication of several proteases in their genesis, growth and dissemination. Glutamyl-aminopeptidase (GAP) (EC. 3.4.11.7) is a zinc metallopeptidase with angiotensinase activity highly expressed in kidney tissues and its expression and activity have been associated wtih tumour development. In this prospective study, GAP spectrofluorometric activity and immunohistochemical expression were analysed in clear-cell (CCRCC), papillary (PRCC) and chromophobe (ChRCC) renal cell carcinomas, and in renal oncocytoma (RO). Data obtained in tumour tissue were compared with those from the surrounding uninvolved kidney tissue. In CCRCC, classic pathological parameters such as grade, stage and tumour size were stratified following GAP data and analyzed for 5-year survival. GAP activity in both the membrane-bound and soluble fractions was sharply decreased and its immunohistochemical expression showed mild staining in the four histological types of renal tumours. Soluble and membrane-bound GAP activities correlated with tumour grade and size in CCRCCs. This study suggests a role for GAP in the neoplastic development of renal tumours and provides additional data for considering the activity and expression of this enzyme of interest in the diagnosis and prognosis of renal neoplasms

  4. Repression and activation by multiprotein complexes that alter chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, R E; Bunker, C A; Imbalzano, A N

    1996-04-15

    Recent studies have provided strong evidence that macromolecular complexes are used in the cell to remodel chromatin structure during activation and to create an inaccessible structure during repression, Although there is not yet any rigorous demonstration that modification of chromatin structure plays a direct, causal role in either activation or repression, there is sufficient smoke to indicate the presence of a blazing inferno nearby. It is clear that complexes that remodel chromatin are tractable in vitro; hopefully this will allow the establishment of systems that provide a direct analysis of the role that remodeling might play in activation. These studies indicate that establishment of functional systems to corroborate the elegant genetic studies on repression might also be tractable. As the mechanistic effects of these complexes are sorted out, it will become important to understand how the complexes are regulated. In many of the instances discussed above, the genes whose products make up these complexes were identified in genetic screens for effects on developmental processes. This implies a regulation of the activity of these complexes in response to developmental cues and further implies that the work to fully understand these complexes will occupy a generation of scientists.

  5. Silver and Gold Nanoparticles Alter Cathepsin Activity In vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speshock, Janice L.; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; Szymanski, Eric R.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2011-12-01

    Nanomaterials are being incorporated into many biological applications for use as therapeutics, sensors, or labels. Silver nanomaterials are being utilized for biological implants and wound dressings as an antiviral material, whereas gold nanomaterials are being used as biological labels or sensors due to their surface properties and biocompatibility. Cytotoxicity data of these materials are becoming more prevalent; however, little research has been performed to understand how the introduction of these materials into cells affects cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the impact that silver and gold nanoparticles have on cathepsin activity in vitro. Cathepsins are important cellular proteases that are imperative for proper immune system function. We have selected to examine gold and silver nanoparticles due to the increased use of these materials in biological applications. This manuscript depicts how both of these types of nanomaterials affect cathepsin activity, which could impact the host's immune system and its ability to respond to pathogens. Cathepsin B activity decreases in a dose-dependent manner with all nanoparticles tested. Alternatively, the impact of nanoparticles on cathepsin L activity depends greatly on the type and size of the material.

  6. Altered Error-Related Activity in Patients with Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Kathrin; Wagner, Gerd; Schultz, Christoph; Schachtzabel, Claudia; Nenadic, Igor; Axer, Martina; Reichenbach, Jurgen R.; Sauer, Heinrich; Schlosser, Ralf G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Deficits in working memory (WM) and executive cognitive control are core features of schizophrenia. However, findings regarding functional activation strengths are heterogeneous, partly due to differences in task demands and behavioral performance. Previous investigators proposed integrating these heterogeneous findings into a comprehensive model…

  7. ALTERED ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY OF LYSOZYMES BOUND TO VARIOUSLY SULFATED CHITOSANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-wei Wang; Lin Yuan; Tie-liang Zhao; He Huang; Hong Chen; Di Wu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effects of the variously sulfated chitosans on lysozyme activity and structure.It was shown that the specific enzymatic activity of lysozyme remained almost similar to the native protein after being bound to 6-O-sulfated chitosan (6S-chitosan) and 3,6-O-sulfated chitosan (3,6S-chitosan),but decreased greatly after being bound to 2-N-6-O-sulfated chitosan (2,6S-chitosan).Meanwhile,among these sulfated chitosans,2,6S-chitosan induced the greatest conformational change in lysozyme as indicated by the fluorescence spectra.These findings demonstrated that when sulfated chitosans of different structures bind to lysozyme,lysozyme undergoes conformational change of different magnitudes,which results in corresponding levels of lysozyme activity.Further study on the interaction of sulfated chitosans with lysozyme by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) suggested that their affinities might be determined by their molecular structures.

  8. Postnatal foraging demands alter adrenocortical activity and psychosocial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, D M; Kim, S; Schatzberg, A F; Levine, S

    1998-05-01

    Mother squirrel monkeys stop carrying infants at earlier ages in high-demand (HD) conditions where food is difficult to find relative to low-demand (LD) conditions. To characterize these transitions in psychosocial development, from 10- to 21-weeks postpartum we collected measures of behavior, adrenocortical activity, and social transactions coded for initiator (mother or infant), goal (make-contact or break-contact), and outcome (success or failure). Make-contact attempts were most often initiated by HD infants, but mothers often opposed these attempts and less than 50% were successful. Break-contact attempts were most often initiated by LD infants, but mothers often opposed these attempts and fewer LD than HD infant break-contact attempts were successful. Plasma levels of cortisol were significantly higher in HD than LD mothers, but differences in adrenocortical activity were less consistent in their infants. HD and LD infants also spent similar amounts of time nursing on their mothers and feeding on solid foods. By rescheduling some transitions in development (carry-->self-transport), and not others (nursing-->self-feeding), mothers may have partially protected infants from the immediate impact of an otherwise stressful foraging task. PMID:9589217

  9. Altered Activities of Antioxidant Enzymes in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Vávrová

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome (MetS, an increase of oxidative stress could play an important role which is closely linked with insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and chronic inflammation. The aim of our study was to assess several parameters of the antioxidant status in MetS. Methods: 40 subjects with MetS and 40 age- and sex-matched volunteers without MetS were examined for activities of superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1, glutathione reductase (GR, paraoxonase1 (PON1, concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH, and conjugated dienes in low-density lipoprotein (CD-LDL. Results: Subjects with MetS had higher activities of CuZnSOD (p Conclusions: Our results implicated an increased oxidative stress in MetS and a decreased antioxidative defense that correlated with some laboratory (triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and clinical (waist circumference, blood pressure components of MetS.

  10. Alterations in electrodermal activity and cardiac parasympathetic tone during hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekecs, Zoltán; Szekely, Anna; Varga, Katalin

    2016-02-01

    Exploring autonomic nervous system (ANS) changes during hypnosis is critical for understanding the nature and extent of the hypnotic phenomenon and for identifying the mechanisms underlying the effects of hypnosis in different medical conditions. To assess ANS changes during hypnosis, electrodermal activity and pulse rate variability (PRV) were measured in 121 young adults. Participants either received hypnotic induction (hypnosis condition) or listened to music (control condition), and both groups were exposed to test suggestions. Blocks of silence and experimental sound stimuli were presented at baseline, after induction, and after de-induction. Skin conductance level (SCL) and high frequency (HF) power of PRV measured at each phase were compared between groups. Hypnosis decreased SCL compared to the control condition; however, there were no group differences in HF power. Furthermore, hypnotic suggestibility did not moderate ANS changes in the hypnosis group. These findings indicate that hypnosis reduces tonic sympathetic nervous system activity, which might explain why hypnosis is effective in the treatment of disorders with strong sympathetic nervous system involvement, such as rheumatoid arthritis, hot flashes, hypertension, and chronic pain. Further studies with different control conditions are required to examine the specificity of the sympathetic effects of hypnosis.

  11. Alterations in electrodermal activity and cardiac parasympathetic tone during hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekecs, Zoltán; Szekely, Anna; Varga, Katalin

    2016-02-01

    Exploring autonomic nervous system (ANS) changes during hypnosis is critical for understanding the nature and extent of the hypnotic phenomenon and for identifying the mechanisms underlying the effects of hypnosis in different medical conditions. To assess ANS changes during hypnosis, electrodermal activity and pulse rate variability (PRV) were measured in 121 young adults. Participants either received hypnotic induction (hypnosis condition) or listened to music (control condition), and both groups were exposed to test suggestions. Blocks of silence and experimental sound stimuli were presented at baseline, after induction, and after de-induction. Skin conductance level (SCL) and high frequency (HF) power of PRV measured at each phase were compared between groups. Hypnosis decreased SCL compared to the control condition; however, there were no group differences in HF power. Furthermore, hypnotic suggestibility did not moderate ANS changes in the hypnosis group. These findings indicate that hypnosis reduces tonic sympathetic nervous system activity, which might explain why hypnosis is effective in the treatment of disorders with strong sympathetic nervous system involvement, such as rheumatoid arthritis, hot flashes, hypertension, and chronic pain. Further studies with different control conditions are required to examine the specificity of the sympathetic effects of hypnosis. PMID:26488759

  12. Altered behavior in spotted hyenas associated with increased human activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydston, Erin E.; Kapheim, Karen M.; Watts, Heather E.; Szykman, Micaela; Holekamp, Kay E.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate how anthropogenic activity might affect large carnivores, we studied the behaviour of spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) during two time periods. From 1996 to 1998, we documented the ecological correlates of space utilization patterns exhibited by adult female hyenas defending a territory at the edge of a wildlife reserve in Kenya. Hyenas preferred areas near dense vegetation but appeared to avoid areas containing the greatest abundance of prey, perhaps because these were also the areas of most intensive livestock grazing. We then compared hyena behaviour observed in 1996–98 with that observed several years earlier and found many differences. Female hyenas in 1996–98 were found farther from dens, but closer to dense vegetation and to the edges of their territory, than in 1988–90. Recent females also had larger home ranges, travelled farther between consecutive sightings, and were more nocturnal than in 1988–90. Finally, hyenas occurred in smaller groups in 1996–98 than in 1988–90. We also found several changes in hyena demography between periods. We next attempted to explain differences observed between time periods by testing predictions of hypotheses invoking prey abundance, climate, interactions with lions, tourism and livestock grazing. Our data were consistent with the hypothesis that increased reliance on the reserve for livestock grazing was responsible for observed changes. That behavioural changes were not associated with decreased hyena population density suggests the behavioural plasticity typical of this species may protect it from extinction.

  13. Altered behaviour in spotted hyenas associated with increased human activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydston, E.E.; Kapheim, K.M.; Watts, H.E.; Szykman, M.; Holekamp, K.E.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate how anthropogenic activity might affect large carnivores, we studied the behaviour of spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) during two time periods. From 1996 to 1998, we documented the ecological correlates of space utilization patterns exhibited by adult female hyenas defending a territory at the edge of a wildlife reserve in Kenya. Hyenas preferred areas near dense vegetation but appeared to avoid areas containing the greatest abundance of prey, perhaps because these were also the areas of most intensive livestock grazing. We then compared hyena behaviour observed in 1996-98 with that observed several years earlier and found many differences. Female hyenas in 1996-98 were found farther from dens, but closer to dense vegetation and to the edges of their territory, than in 1988-90. Recent females also had larger home ranges, travelled farther between consecutive sightings, and were more nocturnal than in 1988-90. Finally, hyenas occurred in smaller groups in 1996-98 than in 1988-90. We also found several changes in hyena demography between periods. We next attempted to explain differences observed between time periods by testing predictions of hypotheses invoking prey abundance, climate, interactions with lions, tourism and livestock grazing. Our data were consistent with the hypothesis that increased reliance on the reserve for livestock grazing was responsible for observed changes. That behavioural changes were not associated with decreased hyena population density suggests the behavioural plasticity typical of this species may protect it from extinction. ?? 2003 The Zoological Society of London.

  14. Influenza matrix protein 2 alters CFTR expression and function through its ion channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londino, James D; Lazrak, Ahmed; Jurkuvenaite, Asta; Collawn, James F; Noah, James W; Matalon, Sadis

    2013-05-01

    The human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cyclic AMP-activated chloride (Cl(-)) channel in the lung epithelium that helps regulate the thickness and composition of the lung epithelial lining fluid. We investigated whether influenza M2 protein, a pH-activated proton (H(+)) channel that traffics to the plasma membrane of infected cells, altered CFTR expression and function. M2 decreased CFTR activity in 1) Xenopus oocytes injected with human CFTR, 2) epithelial cells (HEK-293) stably transfected with CFTR, and 3) human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-) expressing native CFTR. This inhibition was partially reversed by an inhibitor of the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1. Next we investigated whether the M2 inhibition of CFTR activity was due to an increase of secretory organelle pH by M2. Incubation of Xenopus oocytes expressing CFTR with ammonium chloride or concanamycin A, two agents that alkalinize the secretory pathway, inhibited CFTR activity in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of M2- and CFTR-expressing oocytes with the M2 ion channel inhibitor amantadine prevented the loss in CFTR expression and activity; in addition, M2 mutants, lacking the ability to transport H(+), did not alter CFTR activity in Xenopus oocytes and HEK cells. Expression of an M2 mutant retained in the endoplasmic reticulum also failed to alter CFTR activity. In summary, our data show that M2 decreases CFTR activity by increasing secretory organelle pH, which targets CFTR for destruction by the ubiquitin system. Alteration of CFTR activity has important consequences for fluid regulation and may potentially modify the immune response to viral infection.

  15. Alternative complement pathway and factor B activities in rats with altered blood levels of thyroid hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitencourt, C.S. [Departamento de Análises Clínicas, Toxicológicas e Bromatológicas, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Duarte, C.G.; Azzolini, A.E.C.S.; Assis-Pandochi, A.I. [Departamento de Física e Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-02

    Evaluating the activity of the complement system under conditions of altered thyroid hormone levels might help elucidate the role of complement in triggering autoimmune processes. Here, we investigated alternative pathway (AP) activity in male Wistar rats (180 ± 10 g) after altering their thyroid hormone levels by treatment with triiodothyronine (T3), propylthiouracil (PTU) or thyroidectomy. T3 and thyroxine (T4) levels were determined by chemiluminescence assays. Hemolytic assays were performed to evaluate the lytic activity of the AP. Factor B activity was evaluated using factor B-deficient serum. An anti-human factor B antibody was used to measure factor B levels in serum by radial immunodiffusion. T3 measurements in thyroidectomized animals or animals treated with PTU demonstrated a significant reduction in hormone levels compared to control. The results showed a reduction in AP lytic activity in rats treated with increasing amounts of T3 (1, 10, or 50 µg). Factor B activity was also decreased in the sera of hyperthyroid rats treated with 1 to 50 µg T3. Additionally, treating rats with 25 µg T3 significantly increased factor B levels in their sera (P < 0.01). In contrast, increased factor B concentration and activity (32%) were observed in hypothyroid rats. We conclude that alterations in thyroid hormone levels affect the activity of the AP and factor B, which may in turn affect the roles of AP and factor B in antibody production.

  16. Altered lower leg muscle activation patterns in patients with cerebral palsy during cycling on an ergometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Pinto, Ana; Blumenstein, Tobias; Turova, Varvara; Lampe, Renée

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cycling on a recumbent ergometer constitutes one of the most popular rehabilitation exercises in cerebral palsy (CP). However, no control is performed on how muscles are being used during training. Given that patients with CP present altered muscular activity patterns during cycling or walking, it is possible that an incorrect pattern of muscle activation is being promoted during rehabilitation cycling. This study investigated patterns of muscular activation during cycling on a recumbent ergometer in patients with CP and whether those patterns are determined by the degree of spasticity and of mobility. Methods Electromyographic (EMG) recordings of lower leg muscle activation during cycling on a recumbent ergometer were performed in 14 adult patients diagnosed with CP and five adult healthy participants. EMG recordings were done with an eight-channel EMG system built in the laboratory. The activity of the following muscles was recorded: Musculus rectus femoris, Musculus biceps femoris, Musculus tibialis anterior, and Musculus gastrocnemius. The degree of muscle spasticity and mobility was assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale and the Gross Motor Function Classification System, respectively. Muscle activation patterns were described in terms of onset and duration of activation as well as duration of cocontractions. Results Muscle activation in CP was characterized by earlier onsets, longer periods of activation, a higher occurrence of agonist–antagonist cocontractions, and a more variable cycling tempo in comparison to healthy participants. The degree of altered muscle activation pattern correlated significantly with the degree of spasticity. Conclusion This study confirmed the occurrence of altered lower leg muscle activation patterns in patients with CP during cycling on a recumbent ergometer. There is a need to develop feedback systems that can inform patients and therapists of an incorrect muscle activation during cycling and support the training

  17. Platelet Activation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Patients Is Not Altered with Cocaine Abuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Kiebala

    Full Text Available Recent work has indicated that platelets, which are anucleate blood cells, significantly contribute to inflammatory disorders. Importantly, platelets also likely contribute to various inflammatory secondary disorders that are increasingly associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV infection including neurological impairments and cardiovascular complications. Indeed, HIV infection is often associated with increased levels of platelet activators. Additionally, cocaine, a drug commonly abused by HIV-infected individuals, leads to increased platelet activation in humans. Considering that orchestrated signaling mechanisms are essential for platelet activation, and that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB inhibitors can alter platelet function, the role of NF-κB signaling in platelet activation during HIV infection warrants further investigation. Here we tested the hypothesis that inhibitory kappa B kinase complex (IKK activation would be central for platelet activation induced by HIV and cocaine. Whole blood from HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals, with or without cocaine abuse was used to assess platelet activation via flow cytometry whereas IKK activation was analyzed by performing immunoblotting and in vitro kinase assays. We demonstrate that increased platelet activation in HIV patients, as measured by CD62P expression, is not altered with reported cocaine use. Furthermore, cocaine and HIV do not activate platelets in whole blood when treated ex vivo. Finally, HIV-induced platelet activation does not involve the NF-κB signaling intermediate, IKKβ. Platelet activation in HIV patients is not altered with cocaine abuse. These results support the notion that non-IKK targeting approaches will be better suited for the treatment of HIV-associated inflammatory disorders.

  18. Skeletal muscle plasticity: cellular and molecular responses to altered physical activity paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kenneth M.; Haddad, Fadia

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine our current understanding of the chain of events known to be involved in the adaptive process whereby specific genes and their protein products undergo altered expression; specifically, skeletal muscle adaptation in response to altered loading states will be discussed, with a special focus on the regulation of the contractile protein, myosin heavy chain gene expression. This protein, which is both an important structural and regulatory protein comprising the contractile apparatus, can be expressed as different isoforms, thereby having an impact on the functional diversity of the muscle. Because the regulation of the myosin gene family is under the control of a complex set of processes including, but not limited to, activity, hormonal, and metabolic factors, this protein will serve as a cellular "marker" for studies of muscle plasticity in response to various mechanical perturbations in which the quantity and type of myosin isoform, along with other important cellular proteins, are altered in expression.

  19. Non-enzymatic Glycation of Almond Cystatin Leads to Conformational Changes and Altered Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Azad A; Sohail, Aamir; Bhat, Sheraz A; Rehman, Md T; Bano, Bilqees

    2015-01-01

    The non-enzymatic reaction between proteins and reducing sugars, known as glycation, leads to the formation of inter and intramolecular cross-links of proteins. Stable end products called as advanced Maillard products or advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have received tremendous attention since last decades. It was suggested that the formation of AGEs not only modify the conformation of proteins but also induces altered biological activity. In this study, cystatin purified from almond was incubated with three different sugars namely D-ribose, fructose and lactose to monitor the glycation process. Structural changes induced in cystatin on glycation were studied using UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, CD and FTIR techniques. Glycated cystatin was found to migrate slower on electrophoresis as compared to control cystatin. Biological activity data of glycated cystatin showed that D-ribose was most effective in inducing conformational changes with maximum altered activity.

  20. Cortisol's effects on hippocampal activation in depressed patients are related to alterations in memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, Heather C; Jahn, Allison L; Davidson, Richard J; Kern, Simone; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Halverson, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Many investigators have hypothesized that brain response to cortisol is altered in depression. However, neural activation in response to exogenously manipulated cortisol elevations has not yet been directly examined in depressed humans. Animal research shows that glucocorticoids have robust effects on hippocampal function, and can either enhance or suppress neuroplastic events in the hippocampus depending on a number of factors. We hypothesized that depressed individuals would show 1) altered hippocampal response to exogenous administration of cortisol, and 2) altered effects of cortisol on learning. In a repeated-measures design, 19 unmedicated depressed and 41 healthy individuals completed two fMRI scans. Fifteen mg oral hydrocortisone (i.e., cortisol) or placebo (order randomized and double-blind) was administered 1 h prior to encoding of emotional and neutral words during fMRI scans. Data analysis examined the effects of cortisol administration on 1) brain activation during encoding, and 2) subsequent free recall for words. Cortisol affected subsequent recall performance in depressed but not healthy individuals. We found alterations in hippocampal response to cortisol in depressed women, but not in depressed men (who showed altered response to cortisol in other regions, including subgenual prefrontal cortex). In both depressed men and women, cortisol's effects on hippocampal function were positively correlated with its effects on recall performance assessed days later. Our data provide evidence that in depressed compared to healthy women, cortisol's effects on hippocampal function are altered. Our data also show that in both depressed men and women, cortisol's effects on emotional memory formation and hippocampal function are related.

  1. Evidence for altered amygdala activation in schizophrenia in an adaptive emotion recognition task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mier, Daniela; Lis, Stefanie; Zygrodnik, Karina; Sauer, Carina; Ulferts, Jens; Gallhofer, Bernd; Kirsch, Peter

    2014-03-30

    Deficits in social cognition seem to present an intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia, and are known to be associated with an altered amygdala response to faces. However, current results are heterogeneous with respect to whether this altered amygdala response in schizophrenia is hypoactive or hyperactive in nature. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate emotion-specific amygdala activation in schizophrenia using a novel adaptive emotion recognition paradigm. Participants comprised 11 schizophrenia outpatients and 16 healthy controls who viewed face stimuli expressing emotions of anger, fear, happiness, and disgust, as well as neutral expressions. The adaptive emotion recognition approach allows the assessment of group differences in both emotion recognition performance and associated neuronal activity while also ensuring a comparable number of correctly recognized emotions between groups. Schizophrenia participants were slower and had a negative bias in emotion recognition. In addition, they showed reduced differential activation during recognition of emotional compared with neutral expressions. Correlation analyses revealed an association of a negative bias with amygdala activation for neutral facial expressions that was specific to the patient group. We replicated previous findings of affected emotion recognition in schizophrenia. Furthermore, we demonstrated that altered amygdala activation in the patient group was associated with the occurrence of a negative bias. These results provide further evidence for impaired social cognition in schizophrenia and point to a central role of the amygdala in negative misperceptions of facial stimuli in schizophrenia.

  2. Prenatal immune activation alters hippocampal place cell firing characteristics in adult animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Amy R; Bilkey, David K

    2015-08-01

    Prenatal maternal immune activation (MIA) is a risk factor for several developmental neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Adults with these disorders display alterations in memory function that may result from changes in the structure and function of the hippocampus. In the present study we use an animal model to investigate the effect that a transient prenatal maternal immune activation episode has on the spatially-modulated firing activity of hippocampal neurons in adult animals. MIA was induced in pregnant rat dams with a single injection of the synthetic cytokine inducer polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) on gestational day 15. Control dams were given a saline equivalent. Firing activity and local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded from the CA1 region of the adult male offspring of these dams as they moved freely in an open arena. Most neurons displayed characteristic spatially-modulated 'place cell' firing activity and while there was no between-group difference in mean firing rate between groups, place cells had smaller place fields in MIA-exposed animals when compared to control-group cells. Cells recorded in MIA-group animals also displayed an altered firing-phase synchrony relationship to simultaneously recorded LFPs. When the floor of the arena was rotated, the place fields of MIA-group cells were more likely to shift in the same direction as the floor rotation, suggesting that local cues may have been more salient for these animals. In contrast, place fields in control group cells were more likely to shift firing position to novel spatial locations suggesting an altered response to contextual cues. These findings show that a single MIA intervention is sufficient to change several important characteristics of hippocampal place cell activity in adult offspring. These changes could contribute to the memory dysfunction that is associated with MIA, by altering the encoding of spatial context and by

  3. Alteration and modulation of protein activity by varying post-translational modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David N; Reed, David W; Thompson, Vicki S; Lacey, Jeffrey A; Apel, William A

    2015-03-03

    Embodiments of the invention include methods of altering the enzymatic activity or solubility of an extremophilic enzyme or post-translationally modifying a protein of interest via using isolated or partially purified glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, extracts of cells comprising glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, and/or in cells comprising one or more glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins.

  4. Alteration and modulation of protein activity by varying post-translational modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David N.; Reed, David W.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Apel, William A.

    2016-07-12

    Embodiments of the invention include methods of altering the enzymatic activity or solubility of an extremophilic enzyme or post-translationally modifying a protein of interest via using isolated or partially purified glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, extracts of cells comprising glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, and/or in cells comprising one or more glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins.

  5. Fecal Protease Activity Is Associated with Compositional Alterations in the Intestinal Microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Ian M.; Ringel-Kulka, Tamar; Ferrier, Laurent; Wu, Michael C.; Siddle, Jennica P.; Bueno, Lionel; Ringel, Yehuda

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Intestinal proteases carry out a variety of functions in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Studies have reported that elevated enteric proteases in patients with GI disease can alter intestinal physiology, however the origin (human vs. microbial) of elevated proteases in patients with GI disease is unclear. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between protease activity and the microbiota in human fecal samples. Design: In order to capture a wide range of fec...

  6. Altering the activation mechanism in Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjold-Jørgensen, Jakob; Vind, Jesper; Svendsen, Allan;

    2014-01-01

    , and enhanced calcium independence. The rational design was based on the lid residue composition in Aspergillus niger ferulic acid esterase (FAEA). Five constructs included lipase variants containing the full FAEA lid, a FAEA-like lid, an intermediate lid of FAEA and TlL character, and the entire lid region...... solution. Together, these studies report on the successful alteration of the activation mechanism in TlL by rational design creating novel lipases with new, intriguing functionalities....

  7. Alterations in Neuronal Activity in Basal Ganglia-Thalamocortical Circuits in the Parkinsonian State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana eGalvan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In patients with Parkinson’s disease and in animal models of this disorder, neurons in the basal ganglia and related regions in thalamus and cortex show changes that can be recorded by using electrophysiologic single-cell recording techniques, including altered firing rates and patterns, pathologic oscillatory activity and increased inter-neuronal synchronization. In addition, changes in synaptic potentials or in the joint spiking activities of populations of neurons can be monitored as alterations in local field potentials, electroencephalograms or electrocorticograms. Most of the mentioned electrophysiologic changes are probably related to the degeneration of diencephalic dopaminergic neurons, leading to dopamine loss in the striatum and other basal ganglia nuclei, although degeneration of non-dopaminergic cell groups may also have a role. The altered electrical activity of the basal ganglia and associated nuclei may contribute to some of the motor signs of the disease. We here review the current knowledge of the electrophysiologic changes at the single cell level, the level of local populations of neural elements, and the level of the entire basal ganglia-thalamocortical network in parkinsonism, and discuss the possible use of this information to optimize treatment approaches to Parkinson’s disease, such as deep brain stimulation therapy.

  8. Alteration of human hepatic drug transporter activity and expression by cigarette smoke condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyed, Katia; Vee, Marc Le; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Jouan, Elodie; Stieger, Bruno; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Fardel, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Smoking is well-known to impair pharmacokinetics, through inducing expression of drug metabolizing enzymes. In the present study, we demonstrated that cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) also alters activity and expression of hepatic drug transporters, which are now recognized as major actors of hepatobiliary elimination of drugs. CSC thus directly inhibited activities of sinusoidal transporters such as OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OCT1 and NTCP as well as those of canalicular transporters like P-glycoprotein, MRP2, BCRP and MATE1, in hepatic transporters-overexpressing cells. CSC similarly counteracted constitutive OATP, NTCP and OCT1 activities in human highly-differentiated hepatic HepaRG cells. In parallel, CSC induced expression of BCRP at both mRNA and protein level in HepaRG cells, whereas it concomitantly repressed mRNA expression of various transporters, including OATP1B1, OATP2B1, OAT2, NTCP, OCT1 and BSEP, and enhanced that of MRP4. Such changes in transporter gene expression were found to be highly correlated to those caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, a reference activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway, and were counteracted, for some of them, by siRNA-mediated AhR silencing. This suggests that CSC alters hepatic drug transporter levels via activation of the AhR cascade. Importantly, drug transporter expression regulations as well as some transporter activity inhibitions occurred for a range of CSC concentrations similar to those required for inducing drug metabolizing enzymes and may therefore be hypothesized to be relevant for smokers. Taken together, these data established human hepatic transporters as targets of cigarette smoke, which could contribute to known alteration of pharmacokinetics and some liver adverse effects caused by smoking. PMID:27450509

  9. The impacts of altered tropical cyclone activity on climate mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, J. P.; Hurtt, G. C.; LePage, Y.; Patel, P.; Chini, L. P.; Thomson, A. M.; Clarke, L.; Calvin, K. V.; Wise, M.; Chambers, J. Q.; Negron Juarez, R. I.

    2012-12-01

    There is growing evidence that anthropogenic climate change may alter patterns of tropical cyclone frequency, intensity and spatial distribution, which in turn will alter the carbon balance of terrestrial systems in the large regions impacted by these storms. Recent studies project up to a doubling of major storms (Saffir-Simpson Scale 3-5) over the next century. Single large storms have been shown to be capable of causing committed carbon emissions equivalent to the annual U.S. carbon sink. These changes have the potential to affect climate mitigation strategies, most of which rely on maintaining or enhancing the terrestrial carbon sink to restrain the accumulation of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Altered patterns of disturbances and the resulting changes to the carbon balance of terrestrial systems could impact the magnitude of emissions to mitigate, the economic value of ecosystem carbon storage, and thus future land-use patterns, food prices and energy technology. Here we investigate the potential consequences of altered tropical cyclone activity on climate mitigation strategies using a fully integrated model (iED) that links advanced ecological and socio-economic models. The model combines the regional integrated assessment algorithms of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), with the climate- sensitive ecosystem and carbon modeling in the Ecosystem Demography (ED) model, and the land-use mapping algorithms of the Global Land-use Model (GLM). We explore a range of scenarios of altered future tropical cyclone frequency, intensity and spatial pattern, the resulting effects on the terrestrial carbon balance, and the coupled effects on the food and energy sector under a range of future climate mitigation goals.

  10. Repeated Episodes of Heroin Cause Enduring Alterations of Circadian Activity in Protracted Abstinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Stinus

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Opiate withdrawal is followed by a protracted abstinence syndrome consisting of craving and physiological changes. However, few studies have been dedicated to both the characterization and understanding of these long-term alterations in post-dependent subjects. The aim of the present study was to develop an opiate dependence model, which induces long-lasting behavioral changes in abstinent rats. Here, we first compared the effects of several protocols for the induction of opiate dependence (morphine pellets, repeated morphine or heroin injections on the subsequent response to heroin challenges (0.25 mg/kg at different time points during abstinence (3, 6, 9 and 18 weeks. In a second set of experiments, rats were exposed to increasing doses of heroin and subsequently monitored for general circadian activity up to 20 weeks of abstinence. Results show that heroin injections rather than the other methods of opiate administration have long-term consequences on rats’ sensitivity to heroin with its psychostimulant effects persisting up to 18 weeks of abstinence. Moreover, intermittent episodes of heroin dependence rather than a single exposure produce enduring alteration of the basal circadian activity both upon heroin cessation and protracted abstinence. Altogether, these findings suggest that the induction of heroin dependence through intermittent increasing heroin injections is the optimal method to model long-term behavioral alterations during protracted abstinence in rats. This animal model would be useful in further characterizing long-lasting changes in post-dependent subjects to help understand the prolonged vulnerability to relapse.

  11. Repeated episodes of heroin cause enduring alterations of circadian activity in protracted abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinus, Luis; Cador, Martine; Caille, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Opiate withdrawal is followed by a protracted abstinence syndrome consisting of craving and physiological changes. However, few studies have been dedicated to both the characterization and understanding of these long-term alterations in post-dependent subjects. The aim of the present study was to develop an opiate dependence model, which induces long-lasting behavioral changes in abstinent rats. Here, we first compared the effects of several protocols for the induction of opiate dependence (morphine pellets, repeated morphine or heroin injections) on the subsequent response to heroin challenges (0.25 mg/kg) at different time points during abstinence (3, 6, 9 and 18 weeks). In a second set of experiments, rats were exposed to increasing doses of heroin and subsequently monitored for general circadian activity up to 20 weeks of abstinence. Results show that heroin injections rather than the other methods of opiate administration have long-term consequences on rats' sensitivity to heroin with its psychostimulant effects persisting up to 18 weeks of abstinence. Moreover, intermittent episodes of heroin dependence rather than a single exposure produce enduring alteration of the basal circadian activity both upon heroin cessation and protracted abstinence. Altogether, these findings suggest that the induction of heroin dependence through intermittent increasing heroin injections is the optimal method to model long-term behavioral alterations during protracted abstinence in rats. This animal model would be useful in further characterizing long-lasting changes in post-dependent subjects to help understand the prolonged vulnerability to relapse. PMID:24961201

  12. Complete denture base assessments using holograms: dimensional alterations after different activation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dughir, Ciprian; Popovschi, Ana Maria; Cojocariu, Andreea Codruta; Topala, Florin Ionel; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; de Sabata, Aldo; Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2016-03-01

    Holography is a well-developed method with a large range of applications, including dentistry. This study uses holographic methods for the study of total dental prosthesis. The issue is that the transformation of wax denture base in polymethylacrylate causes dimensional alterations and retractions in the final dental constructs. These could cause the failure of the stability of the complete denture in the oral cavity. Thus, the aim of this study is to determine and to compare using holography, total prosthesis obtained using three different manufacturing methods: pressing, injection, and polymerization. Each of the three types of dentures thus produced were recorded over the previously wax complete base holographic plates. The dimensional alterations that appear after using the different activation methods were thus determined. The most significant modification was remarked in the custom press technology, while the smallest variations were detected in the injection alternative.

  13. Alteration of membrane phospholipid methylation by adenosine analogs does not affect T lymphocyte activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane phospholipid methylation has been described during activation of various immune cells. Moreover recent data indicated modulation of immune cells functions by adenosine. As S-adenosyl-methionine and S-adenosyl-homocysteine are adenosine analogs and modulators of transmethylation reactions, the effects of SAH and SAM were investigated on membrane phospholipid methylation and lymphocyte activation. SAM was shown to induce the membrane phospholipid methylation as assessed by the 3Hmethyl-incorporation in membrane extract. This effect was inhibited by SAH. In contrast SAM and SAH did not affect the phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferative response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. SAH neither modified the early internalization of membrane CD3 antigens nor did it prevent the late expression of HLA-DR antigens on lymphocytes activated by phytohemagglutinin. These results indicate that in vitro alteration of phospholipid methylation does not affect subsequent steps of human T lymphocyte activation and proliferation

  14. Altered cognition-related brain activity and interactions with acute pain in migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vani A. Mathur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the effect of migraine on neural cognitive networks. However, cognitive dysfunction is increasingly being recognized as a comorbidity of chronic pain. Pain appears to affect cognitive ability and the function of cognitive networks over time, and decrements in cognitive function can exacerbate affective and sensory components of pain. We investigated differences in cognitive processing and pain–cognition interactions between 14 migraine patients and 14 matched healthy controls using an fMRI block-design with two levels of task difficulty and concurrent heat (painful and not painful stimuli. Across groups, cognitive networks were recruited in response to a difficult cognitive task, and a pain–task interaction was found in the right (contralateral to pain stimulus posterior insula (pINS, such that activity was modulated by decreasing the thermal pain stimulus or by engaging the difficult cognitive task. Migraine patients had less task-related deactivation within the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and left dorsal anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC compared to controls. These regions have been reported to have decreased cortical thickness and cognitive-related deactivation within other pain populations, and are also associated with pain regulation, suggesting that the current findings may reflect altered cognitive function and top-down regulation of pain. During pain conditions, patients had decreased task-related activity, but more widespread task-related reductions in pain-related activity, compared to controls, suggesting cognitive resources may be diverted from task-related to pain-reduction-related processes in migraine. Overall, these findings suggest that migraine is associated with altered cognitive-related neural activity, which may reflect altered pain regulatory processes as well as broader functional restructuring.

  15. Altered muscular activation during prone hip extension in women with and without low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arab Amir M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Altered movement pattern has been associated with the development of low back pain (LBP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity pattern of the ipsilateral erector spinae (IES and contralateral erectorspinae (CES, gluteus maximus (GM and hamstring (HAM muscles during prone hip extension (PHE test in women with and without LBP. A cross-sectional non-experimental design was used. Methods Convenience sample of 20 female participated in the study. Subjects were categorized into two groups: with LBP (n = 10 and without LBP (n = 10. The electromyography (EMG signal amplitude of the tested muscles during PHE (normalized to maximum voluntary electrical activity (MVE was measured in the dominant lower extremity in all subjects. Results Statistical analysis revealed greater normalized EMG signal amplitude in women with LBP compared to non-LBP women. There was significant difference in EMG activity of the IES (P = 0.03 and CES (P = 0.03 between two groups. However, no significant difference was found in EMG signals of the GM (P = 0.11 and HAM (P = 0.14 among two groups. Conclusion The findings of this study demonstrated altered activation pattern of the lumbo-pelvic muscles during PHE in the women with chronic LBP. This information is important for investigators using PHE as either an evaluation tool or a rehabilitation exercise.

  16. Mutations in the catalytic loop HRD motif alter the activity and function of Drosophila Src64.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor C Strong

    Full Text Available The catalytic loop HRD motif is found in most protein kinases and these amino acids are predicted to perform functions in catalysis, transition to, and stabilization of the active conformation of the kinase domain. We have identified mutations in a Drosophila src gene, src64, that alter the three HRD amino acids. We have analyzed the mutants for both biochemical activity and biological function during development. Mutation of the aspartate to asparagine eliminates biological function in cytoskeletal processes and severely reduces fertility, supporting the amino acid's critical role in enzymatic activity. The arginine to cysteine mutation has little to no effect on kinase activity or cytoskeletal reorganization, suggesting that the HRD arginine may not be critical for coordinating phosphotyrosine in the active conformation. The histidine to leucine mutant retains some kinase activity and biological function, suggesting that this amino acid may have a biochemical function in the active kinase that is independent of its side chain hydrogen bonding interactions in the active site. We also describe the phenotypic effects of other mutations in the SH2 and tyrosine kinase domains of src64, and we compare them to the phenotypic effects of the src64 null allele.

  17. Changes in stomatal function and water use efficiency in potato plants with altered sucrolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Werner C; Provart, Nicholas J; Williams, Thomas C R; Loureiro, Marcelo E

    2012-04-01

    As water availability for agriculture decreases, breeding or engineering of crops with improved water use efficiency (WUE) will be necessary. As stomata are responsible for controlling gas exchange across the plant epidermis, metabolic processes influencing solute accumulation in guard cells are potential targets for engineering. In addition to its role as an osmoticum, sucrose breakdown may be required for synthesis of other osmotica or generation of the ATP needed for solute uptake. Thus, alterations in partitioning of sucrose between storage and breakdown may affect stomatal function. In agreement with this hypothesis, potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants expressing an antisense construct targeted against sucrose synthase 3 (SuSy3) exhibited decreased stomatal conductance, a slight reduction in CO(2) fixation and increased WUE. Conversely, plants with increased guard cell acid invertase activity caused by the introduction of the SUC2 gene from yeast had increased stomatal conductance, increased CO(2) fixation and decreased WUE. (14)CO(2) feeding experiments indicated that these effects cannot be attributed to alterations in photosynthetic capacity, and most likely reflect alterations in stomatal function. These results highlight the important role that sucrose breakdown may play in guard cell function and indicate the feasibility of manipulating plant WUE through engineering of guard cell sucrose metabolism.

  18. Plant adaptation to extreme environments: the example of Cistus salviifolius of an active geothermal alteration field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Giacomo; Bottega, Stefania; Forino, Laura M C; Ciccarelli, Daniela; Spanò, Carmelina

    2014-02-01

    Cistus salviifolius is able to colonise one of the most extreme active geothermal alteration fields in terms of both soil acidity and hot temperatures. The analyses of morpho-functional and physiological characters, investigated in leaves of plants growing around fumaroles (G leaves) and in leaves developed by the same plants after transfer into growth chamber under controlled conditions (C leaves) evidenced the main adaptive traits developed by this pioneer plant in a stressful environment. These traits involved leaf shape and thickness, mesophyll compactness, stomatal and trichome densities, chloroplast size. Changes of functional and physiological traits concerned dry matter content, peroxide and lipid peroxidation, leaf area, relative water and pigment contents. A higher reducing power and antioxidant enzymatic activity were typical of G leaves. Though the high levels of stress parameters, G leaves showed stress-induced specific morphogenic and physiological responses putatively involved in their surviving in active geothermal habitats.

  19. Altered gene expression in highly purified enterocytes from patients with active coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson John

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coeliac disease is a multifactorial inflammatory disorder of the intestine caused by ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Genes within the HLA-DQ locus are considered to contribute some 40% of the genetic influence on this disease. However, information on other disease causing genes is sparse. Since enterocytes are considered to play a central role in coeliac pathology, the aim of this study was to examine gene expression in a highly purified isolate of these cells taken from patients with active disease. Epithelial cells were isolated from duodenal biopsies taken from five coeliac patients with active disease and five non-coeliac control subjects. Contaminating T cells were removed by magnetic sorting. The gene expression profile of the cells was examined using microarray analysis. Validation of significantly altered genes was performed by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results Enterocyte suspensions of high purity (98–99% were isolated from intestinal biopsies. Of the 3,800 genes investigated, 102 genes were found to have significantly altered expression between coeliac disease patients and controls (p Conclusion This study provides a profile of the molecular changes that occur in the intestinal epithelium of coeliac patients with active disease. Novel candidate genes were revealed which highlight the contribution of the epithelial cell to the pathogenesis of coeliac disease.

  20. The crowded sea: incorporating multiple marine activities in conservation plans can significantly alter spatial priorities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Mazor

    Full Text Available Successful implementation of marine conservation plans is largely inhibited by inadequate consideration of the broader social and economic context within which conservation operates. Marine waters and their biodiversity are shared by a host of stakeholders, such as commercial fishers, recreational users and offshore developers. Hence, to improve implementation success of conservation plans, we must incorporate other marine activities while explicitly examining trade-offs that may be required. In this study, we test how the inclusion of multiple marine activities can shape conservation plans. We used the entire Mediterranean territorial waters of Israel as a case study to compare four planning scenarios with increasing levels of complexity, where additional zones, threats and activities were added (e.g., commercial fisheries, hydrocarbon exploration interests, aquaculture, and shipping lanes. We applied the marine zoning decision support tool Marxan to each planning scenario and tested a the ability of each scenario to reach biodiversity targets, b the change in opportunity cost and c the alteration of spatial conservation priorities. We found that by including increasing numbers of marine activities and zones in the planning process, greater compromises are required to reach conservation objectives. Complex plans with more activities incurred greater opportunity cost and did not reach biodiversity targets as easily as simplified plans with less marine activities. We discovered that including hydrocarbon data in the planning process significantly alters spatial priorities. For the territorial waters of Israel we found that in order to protect at least 10% of the range of 166 marine biodiversity features there would be a loss of ∼15% of annual commercial fishery revenue and ∼5% of prospective hydrocarbon revenue. This case study follows an illustrated framework for adopting a transparent systematic process to balance biodiversity goals and

  1. Heparin Alters Viral Serpin, Serp-1, Anti-Thrombolytic Activity to Anti-Thrombotic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xing; Schneider, Heather; Peters, Andrew; Macaulay, Colin; King, Elaine; Sun, Yunming; Liu, Liying; Dai, Erbin; Davids, Jennifer A; McFadden, Grant; Lucas, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) regulate coagulation and inflammation. Heparin, a glycosaminoglycan, is an important cofactor for modulation of the inhibitory function of mammalian serpins. The secreted myxoma viral serpin, Serp-1 exerts profound anti-inflammatory activity in a wide range of animal models. Serp-1 anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic activity is dependent upon inhibition of the uPA / uPA receptor thrombolytic complex. We demonstrate here that heparin binds to Serp-1 and...

  2. Anabolic steroids alter the physiological activity of aggression circuits in the lateral anterior hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, T R; Sikes, R W; Melloni, R H

    2016-02-19

    Syrian hamsters exposed to anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence consistently show increased aggressive behavior across studies. Although the behavioral and anatomical profiles of AAS-induced alterations have been well characterized, there is a lack of data describing physiological changes that accompany these alterations. For instance, behavioral pharmacology and neuroanatomical studies show that AAS-induced changes in the vasopressin (AVP) neural system within the latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH) interact with the serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) systems to modulate aggression. To characterize the electrophysiological profile of the AAS aggression circuit, we recorded LAH neurons in adolescent male hamsters in vivo and microiontophoretically applied agonists and antagonists of aggressive behavior. The interspike interval (ISI) of neurons from AAS-treated animals correlated positively with aggressive behaviors, and adolescent AAS exposure altered parameters of activity in regular firing neurons while also changing the proportion of neuron types (i.e., bursting, regular, irregular). AAS-treated animals had more responsive neurons that were excited by AVP application, while cells from control animals showed the opposite effect and were predominantly inhibited by AVP. Both DA D2 antagonists and 5HT increased the firing frequency of AVP-responsive cells from AAS animals and dual application of AVP and D2 antagonists doubled the excitatory effect of AVP or D2 antagonist administration alone. These data suggest that multiple DA circuits in the LAH modulate AAS-induced aggressive responding. More broadly, these data show that multiple neurochemical interactions at the neurophysiological level are altered by adolescent AAS exposure. PMID:26691962

  3. Exercise in rats does not alter hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ulrika; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Nielsen, Jakob Nis;

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the hypothalamus is involved in the regulation of food intake. Because exercise is known to influence appetite and cause substrate depletion, it may also influence AMPK in the hypothalamus. Male rats that either rested...

  4. Simulated microgravity alters multipotential differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells in association with reduced telomerase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lianwen; Gan, Bo; Fan, Yubo; Xie, Tian; Hu, Qinghua; Zhuang, Fengyuan

    Microgravity is one of the most important characteristics in space flight. Exposure to microgravity results in extensive physiological changes in humans. Bone loss is one of the changes with serious consequences; however, the mechanism retains unclear. As the origin of osteoprogenitors, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may play an important role in it. After cultured under simulated microgravity (in a rotary cell culture system, RCCS), MSCs were stained using oil red O to identify adipocytes. The mRNA level of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) γ2 was determined by RT-PCR. Otherwise, MSCs were induced to osteogenic differentiation after microgravity culture, and then the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was determined by PNPP and the content of osteocalcin (OC) by ELISA. Furthermore, the telomerase activity in MSCs was measured by TRAP. The results showed that simulated microgravity inhibited osteoblastic differentiation and induced adipogenic differentiation accompanied by the change of gene expression of BMP-2 and PPARγ2 in MSCs. Meanwhile, the telomerase activity decreased significantly in MSCs under simulated microgravity. The reduced bone formation in space flight may partly be due to the altered potential differentiation of MSCs associated with telomerase activity which plays a key role in regulating the lifespan of cell proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, telomerase activation/replacement may act as a potential countermeasure for microgravity-induced bone loss.

  5. Altered Brain Activities Associated with Neural Repetition Effects in Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Li, Rui; Jiang, Yang; Broster, Lucas S; Li, Juan

    2016-05-11

    Older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) manifest impaired explicit memory. However, studies on implicit memory such as repetition effects in persons with MCI have been limited. In the present study, 17 MCI patients and 16 healthy normal controls (NC) completed a modified delayed-match-to-sample task while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. We aim to examine the neural basis of repetition; specifically, to elucidate whether and how repetition-related brain responses are altered in participants with MCI. When repeatedly rejecting distracters, both NC and MCI showed similar behavioral repetition effects; however, in both whole-brain and region-of-interest analyses of functional data, persons with MCI showed reduced repetition-driven suppression in the middle occipital and middle frontal gyrus. Further, individual difference analysis found that activation in the left middle occipital gyrus was positively correlated with rejecting reaction time and negatively correlated with accuracy rate, suggesting a predictor of repetition behavioral performance. These findings provide new evidence to support the view that neural mechanisms of repetition effect are altered in MCI who manifests compensatory repetition-related brain activities along with their neuropathology. PMID:27176074

  6. Vitamin D3 alters microglia immune activation by an IL-10 dependent SOCS3 mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boontanrart, Mandy; Hall, Samuel D; Spanier, Justin A; Hayes, Colleen E; Olson, Julie K

    2016-03-15

    Microglia become activated immune cells during infection or disease in the central nervous system (CNS). However, the mechanisms that downregulate activated microglia to prevent immune-mediated damage are not completely understood. Vitamin D3 has been suggested to have immunomodulatory affects, and high levels of vitamin D3 have been correlated with a decreased risk for developing some neurological diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated the synthesis of active vitamin D3, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, within the CNS, but its cellular source and neuroprotective actions remain unknown. Therefore, we wanted to determine whether microglia can respond to vitamin D3 and whether vitamin D3 alters immune activation of microglia. We have previously shown that microglia become activated by IFNγ or LPS or by infection with virus to express pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and effector molecules. In this study, activated microglia increased the expression of the vitamin D receptor and Cyp27b1, which encodes the enzyme for converting vitamin D3 into its active form, thereby enhancing their responsiveness to vitamin D3. Most importantly, the activated microglia exposed to vitamin D3 had reduced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-12, and TNFα, and increased expression of IL-10. The reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokines was dependent on IL-10 induction of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3). Therefore, vitamin D3 increases the expression of IL-10 creating a feedback loop via SOCS3 that downregulates the pro-inflammatory immune response by activated microglia which would likewise prevent immune mediated damage in the CNS.

  7. Fecal protease activity is associated with compositional alterations in the intestinal microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Carroll

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Intestinal proteases carry out a variety of functions in the gastrointestinal (GI tract. Studies have reported that elevated enteric proteases in patients with GI disease can alter intestinal physiology, however the origin (human vs. microbial of elevated proteases in patients with GI disease is unclear. AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between protease activity and the microbiota in human fecal samples. DESIGN: In order to capture a wide range of fecal protease (FP activity stool samples were collected from 30 IBS patients and 24 healthy controls. The intestinal microbiota was characterized using 454 high throughput pyro-sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The composition and diversity of microbial communities were determined and compared using the Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology (QIIME pipeline. FP activity levels were determined using an ELISA-based method. FP activity was ranked and top and bottom quartiles (n=13 per quartile were identified as having high and low FP activity, respectively. RESULTS: The overall diversity of the intestinal microbiota displayed significant clustering separation (p = 0.001 between samples with high vs. low FP activity. The Lactobacillales, Lachnospiraceae, and Streptococcaceae groups were positively associated with FP activity across the entire study population, whilst the Ruminococcaceae family and an unclassified Coriobacteriales family were negatively associated with FP activity. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate significant associations between specific intestinal bacterial groups and fecal protease activity and provide a basis for further causative studies investigating the role of enteric microbes and GI diseases.

  8. Regulation and activity of secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI) is altered in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Megan; Bauer, Rebecca N; Letang, Blanche D; Brighton, Luisa; Thompson, Elizabeth; Simmen, Rosalia C M; Bonner, James; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-02-01

    A hallmark of cigarette smoking is a shift in the protease/antiprotease balance, in favor of protease activity. However, it has recently been shown that smokers have increased expression of a key antiprotease, secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI), yet the mechanisms involved in SLPI transcriptional regulation and functional activity of SLPI remain unclear. We examined SLPI mRNA and protein secretion in differentiated nasal epithelial cells (NECs) and nasal lavage fluid (NLF) from nonsmokers and smokers and demonstrated that SLPI expression is increased in NECs and NLF from smokers. Transcriptional regulation of SLPI expression was confirmed using SLPI promoter reporter assays followed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. The role of STAT1 in regulating SLPI expression was further elucidated using WT and stat1(-/-) mice. Our data demonstrate that STAT1 regulates SLPI transcription in epithelial cells and slpi protein in the lungs of mice. Additionally, we reveal that NECs from smokers have increased STAT1 mRNA/protein expression. Finally, we demonstrate that SLPI contained in the nasal mucosa of smokers is proteolytically cleaved but retains functional activity against neutrophil elastase. These results demonstrate that smoking enhances expression of SLPI in NECs in vitro and in vivo, and that this response is regulated by STAT1. In addition, despite posttranslational cleavage of SLPI, antiprotease activity against neutrophil elastase is enhanced in smokers. Together, our findings show that SLPI regulation and activity is altered in the nasal mucosa of smokers, which could have broad implications in the context of respiratory inflammation and infection.

  9. The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田允; 黄继云; 王锐; 陶蓉蓉; 卢应梅; 廖美华; 陆楠楠; 李静; 芦博; 韩峰

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impaired social interaction and communication. However, the role of synaptic dysfunction during development of autism remains unclear. In the present study, we address the alterations of biochemical signaling in hippocampal network following induction of the autism in experimental animals. Here, the an- imal disease model and DNA array being used to investigate the differences in transcriptome or- ganization between autistic and normal brain by gene co--expression network analysis.

  10. Altered activity of the medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala during acquisition and extinction of an active avoidance task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xilu eJiao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Altered medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and amygdala function is associated with anxiety-related disorders. While the mPFC-amygdala pathway has a clear role in fear conditioning, these structures are also involved in active avoidance. Given that avoidance perseveration represents a core symptom of anxiety disorders, the neural substrate of avoidance, especially its extinction, requires better understanding. The present study was designed to investigate the activity of mPFC and amygdala neurons during acquisition and extinction of lever-press avoidance in rats. In particular, neural activity was examined in the mPFC, intercalated cell clusters (ITCs, lateral (LA, basal (BA and central (CeA amygdala, at various time points during acquisition and extinction, using induction of the immediate early gene product, c-Fos. Neural activity was greater in the mPFC, LA, BA, and ITC during the extinction phase as compared to the acquisition phase. In contrast, the CeA was the only region that was more activated during acquisition than during extinction. Our results indicate that elevated activity in the mPFC, BA, LA and ITCs, and reduced CeA activity is associated with extinction of active avoidance. Moreover, inhibitory neurons are activated differently in the mPFC and BA during early and late phase of acquisition and extinction, suggesting their dynamic involvement in the development of avoidance response. Together, these data start to identify the key brain regions important in active avoidance behavior, areas that could be associated with avoidance perseveration in anxiety disorders.

  11. Psychoneuroendocrine immunology: perception of stress can alter body temperature and natural killer cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, R N; Solvason, H B; Hsueh, C M; Rogers, C F; Demissie, S; Hiramoto, N S; Gauthier, D K; Lorden, J F; Ghanta, V K

    1999-01-01

    Psychoimmunology has been credited with using the mind as a way to alter immunity. The problem with this concept is that many of the current psychoimmunology techniques in use are aimed at alleviating stress effects on the immune system rather than at direct augmentation of immunity by the brain. Studies in animals provide a model that permits us to approach the difficulties associated with gaining an understanding of the CNS-immune system connection. A particular advantage of using animals over humans is that psychological and social contributions play a less prominent role for animals than for human subjects, since the animals are all inbred and reared under identical controlled conditions. If the insightful information provided by animal studies is correct, then psychotherapy for the treatment of diseases might be made more effective if some aspect of this knowledge is included in the design of the treatment. We emphasize conditioning as a regimen and an acceptable way to train the brain to remember an output pathway to raise immunity. We propose that a specific drug or perception (mild stress, represented by rotation, total body heating or handling) could substitute and kindle the same output pathway without the need for conditioning. If this view is correct, then instead of using conditioning, it may be possible to use an antigen to activate desired immune cells, and substitute a drug or an external environmental sensory stimulus (perception) to energize the output pathway to these cells. Alternatively, monitoring alterations of body temperature in response to a drug or perception might allow us to follow how effectively the brain is performing in altering immunity. Studies with animals suggest that there are alternative ways to use the mind to raise natural or acquired immunity in man.

  12. Leptin in nucleus of the solitary tract alters the cardiovascular responses to aortic baroreceptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriello, John

    2013-06-01

    Recent data suggests that neurons expressing the long form of the leptin receptor form at least two distinct groups within the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS): a group within the lateral NTS (Slt) and one within the medial (Sm) and gelantinosa (Sg) NTS. Discrete injections of leptin into Sm and Sg, a region that receives chemoreceptor input, elicit increases in arterial pressure (AP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). However, the effect of microinjections of leptin into Slt, a region that receives baroreceptor input is unknown. Experiments were done in the urethane-chloralose anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated Wistar or Zucker obese rat to determine leptin's effect in Slt on heart rate (HR), AP and RSNA during electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN). Depressor sites within Slt were first identified by the microinjection of l-glutamate (Glu; 0.25M; 10nl) followed by leptin microinjections. In the Wistar rat leptin microinjection (50ng; 20nl) into depressor sites within the lateral Slt elicited increases in HR and RSNA, but no changes in AP. Additionally, leptin injections into Slt prior to Glu injections at the same site or to stimulation of the ADN were found to attenuate the decreases in HR, AP and RSNA to both the Glu injection and ADN stimulation. In Zucker obese rats, leptin injections into NTS depressor sites did not elicit cardiovascular responses, nor altered the cardiovascular responses elicited by stimulation of ADN. Those data suggest that leptin acts at the level of NTS to alter the activity of neurons that mediate the cardiovascular responses to activation of the aortic baroreceptor reflex. PMID:23535030

  13. Altered default mode network activity in patient with anxiety disorders: An fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Xiaohu [Imaging Department of Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China) and Bio-X lab, Department of Physics, Zhe Jiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: xhzhao999@263.net; Wang Peijun [Imaging Department of Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: tongjipjwang@vip.sina.com; Li Chunbo [Department of Psychiatry, Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: licb@mail.tongji.edu.cn; Hu Zhenghui [Department of Electrical and Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: eezhhu@ust.hk; Xi Qian [Imaging Department of Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: 96125007@sina.com.cn; Wu Wenyuan [Department of Psychiatry, Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200065 (China)], E-mail: wuwy@mail.tongji.edu.cn; Tang Xiaowei [Bio-X lab, Department of Physics, Zhe Jiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: tangxw@zju.edu.cn

    2007-09-15

    Anxiety disorder, a common mental disorder in our clinical practice, is characterized by unprovoked anxiety. Medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), which closely involved in emotional processing, are critical regions in the default mode network. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether default mode network activity is altered in patients with anxiety disorder. Ten anxiety patients and 10 healthy controls underwent fMRI while listening to emotionally neutral words alternating with rest (Experiment 1) and threat-related words alternating with emotionally neutral words (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, regions of deactivation were observed in patients and controls. In Experiment 2, regions of deactivation were observed only in patients. The observed deactivation patterns in the two experiments, which included MPFC, PCC, and inferior parietal cortex, were similar and consistent with the default model network. Less deactivation in MPFC and greater deactivation in PCC were observed for patients group comparing to controls in Experiment 1. Our observations suggest that the default model network is altered in anxiety patients and dysfunction in MPFC and PCC may play an important role in anxiety psychopathology.

  14. Fluvoxamine alters the activity of energy metabolism enzymes in the brain

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    Gabriela K. Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Several studies support the hypothesis that metabolism impairment is involved in the pathophysiology of depression and that some antidepressants act by modulating brain energy metabolism. Thus, we evaluated the activity of Krebs cycle enzymes, the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and creatine kinase in the brain of rats subjected to prolonged administration of fluvoxamine. Methods: Wistar rats received daily administration of fluvoxamine in saline (10, 30, and 60 mg/kg for 14 days. Twelve hours after the last administration, rats were killed by decapitation and the prefrontal cortex, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum were rapidly isolated. Results: The activities of citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and complexes I, II-III, and IV were decreased after prolonged administration of fluvoxamine in rats. However, the activities of complex II, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase were increased. Conclusions: Alterations in activity of energy metabolism enzymes were observed in most brain areas analyzed. Thus, we suggest that the decrease in citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and complexes I, II-III, and IV can be related to adverse effects of pharmacotherapy, but long-term molecular adaptations cannot be ruled out. In addition, we demonstrated that these changes varied according to brain structure or biochemical analysis and were not dose-dependent.

  15. Guanidination of notexin alters its membrane-damaging activity in response to sphingomyelin and cholesterol

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pei-Hsiu Kao; Yi-Ling Chiou; Shinne-Ren Lin; Long-Sen Chang

    2010-12-01

    To elucidate the contribution of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity of notexin to its ability to perturb membranes, comparative studies on the interaction of notexin and guanidinated notexin (Gu-notexin) with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC), EYPC/egg yolk sphingomyelin (EYSM) and EYPC/EYSM/cholesterol vesicles were conducted. EYSM notably reduced the membrane-damaging activity of notexin against EYPC vesicles, but had an insignificant influence on that of Gu-notexin. Unlike the effects noted with notexin, inactivation of PLA2 activity by EDTA led to a reduction in the ability of Gu-notexin to induce EYPC/EYSM vesicle leakage and to increase Gu-notexin-induced membrane permeability of EYPC/EYSM/cholesterol vesicles. The geometrical arrangement of notexin and Gu-notexin in contact with either EYPC/EYSM vesicles or EYPC/EYSM/cholesterol vesicles differed. Moreover, global conformation of notexin and Gu-notexin differed in either Ca2+-bound or metal-free states. These results indicate that notexin and Gu-notexin could induce membrane permeability without the involvement of PLA2 activity, and suggest that guanidination alters the membrane-bound mode of notexin on damaging phospholipid vesicles containing sphingomyelin and cholesterol.

  16. Acrylamide alters glycogen content and enzyme activities in the liver of juvenile rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Renata; Rajkovic, Vesna; Koledin, Ivana; Matavulj, Milica

    2015-10-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is spontaneously formed in carbohydrate-rich food during high-temperature processing. It is neurotoxic and potentially cancer causing chemical. Its harmful effects on the liver, especially in a young organism, are still to be elucidated. The study aimed to examine main liver histology, its glycogen content and enzyme activities in juvenile rats treated with 25 or 50mg/kg bw of AA for 3 weeks. Liver samples were fixed in formalin, routinely processed for paraffin embedding, sectioning and histochemical staining. Examination of haematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections showed an increase in the volume of hepatocytes, their nuclei and cytoplasm in both AA-treated groups compared to the control. In Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-stained sections in low-dose group was noticed glycogen reduction, while in high-dose group was present its accumulation compared to the control, respectively. Serum analysis showed increased activity of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and decreased activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in both AA-treated groups, while the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was increased in low-dose, but decreased in high-dose group compared to the control, respectively. Present results suggest a prominent hepatotoxic potential of AA which might alter the microstructural features and functional status in hepatocytes of immature liver.

  17. Whole Blood Activation Results in Altered T Cell and Monocyte Cytokine Production Profiles by Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Sams, Clarence F.

    2001-01-01

    An excellent monitor of the immune balance of peripheral circulating cells is to determine their cytokine production patterns in response to stimuli. Using flow cytometry, a positive identification of cytokine producing cells in a mixed culture may be achieved. Recently, the ability to assess cytokine production following a whole-blood activation culture has been described. In this study, whole blood activation was compared to traditional PBMC activation and the individual cytokine secretion patterns for both T cells, T cell subsets and monocytes was determined by flow cytometry. RESULTS: For T cell cytokine assessment (IFNg/IL-10 and IL-21/L-4) following PMA +ionomycin activation: (1) a Significantly greater percentages of T cells producing IFNgamma and IL-2 were observed following whole-blood culture and (2) altered T cell cytokine production kinetics were observed by varying whole blood culture times. Four-color analysiS was used to allow assessment of cytokine production by specific T cell subsets. It was found that IFNgamma production was significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8+ T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8- population following five hours of whole blood activation. Conversely, IL-2 and IL-10 production were Significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8- T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8+ population. Monocyte cytokine production was assessed in both culture systems following LPS activation for 24 hours. A three-color flow cytometric was used to assess two cytokines (IL-1a/IL-12 and TNFa/IL-10) in conjunction with CD14. Nearly all monocytes were stimulated to produce IL-1a, IL-12 and TNFa. equally well in both culture systems, however monocyte production of IL-10 was significantly elevated in whole blood culture as compared to PBMC culture. IL-12 producing monocytes appeared to be a distinct subpopulation of the IL-1a producing set, whereas IL-10 and TNFa producing monocytes were largely mutually exclusive. IL-10 and TNFa producing

  18. NF-Y activates genes of metabolic pathways altered in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, Paolo; Chiaramonte, Maria Luisa; Lorenzo, Mariangela; Hartley, John A; Hochhauser, Daniel; Gnesutta, Nerina; Mantovani, Roberto; Imbriano, Carol; Dolfini, Diletta

    2016-01-12

    The trimeric transcription factor NF-Y binds to the CCAAT box, an element enriched in promoters of genes overexpressed in tumors. Previous studies on the NF-Y regulome identified the general term metabolism as significantly enriched. We dissect here in detail the targeting of metabolic genes by integrating analysis of NF-Y genomic binding and profilings after inactivation of NF-Y subunits in different cell types. NF-Y controls de novo biosynthetic pathways of lipids, teaming up with the master SREBPs regulators. It activates glycolytic genes, but, surprisingly, is neutral or represses mitochondrial respiratory genes. NF-Y targets the SOCG (Serine, One Carbon, Glycine) and Glutamine pathways, as well as genes involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and purines. Specific cancer-driving nodes are generally under NF-Y control. Altogether, these data delineate a coherent strategy to promote expression of metabolic genes fuelling anaerobic energy production and other anabolic pathways commonly altered in cancer cells.

  19. Prenatal stress is a vulnerability factor for altered morphology and biological activity of microglia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna eŚlusarczyk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence suggest that the dysregulation of the immune system is an important factor in the development of depression. Microglia are the resident macrophages of the central nervous system and a key player in innate immunity of the brain. We hypothesized that prenatal stress (an animal model of depression as a priming factor could affect microglial cells and might lead to depressive-like disturbances in adult male rat offspring. We investigated the behavioral changes (sucrose preference test, Porsolt test, the expression of C1q and CD40 mRNA and the level of microglia (Iba1 positive in 3 month old control and prenatally stressed male offspring rats. In addition, we characterized the morphological and biochemical parameters of potentially harmful (NO, iNOS, IL-1β, IL-18, IL-6, TNF-α, CCL2, CXCL12, CCR2, CXCR4 and beneficial (IGF-1, BDNF phenotypes in cultures of microglia obtained from the cortices of 1-2 days old control and prenatally stressed pups. The adult prenatally stressed rats showed behavioral (anhedonic- and depression-like disturbances, enhanced expression of microglial activation markers and an increased number of Iba1-immunopositive cells in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. The morphology of glia was altered in cultures from prenatally stressed rats, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Moreover, in these cultures, we observed enhanced expression of CD40 and MHC II and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-18, TNF-α and IL-6. Prenatal stress significantly up-regulated levels of the chemokines CCL2, CXCL12 and altered expression of their receptors, CCR2 and CXCR4 while IGF-1 production was suppressed in cultures of microglia from prenatally stressed rats.Our results suggest that prenatal stress may lead to excessive microglia activation and contribute to the behavioral changes observed in depression in adulthood.

  20. Altered Insula Activity during Visceral Interoception in Weight-Restored Patients with Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Kara L; Moseman, Scott E; Avery, Jason A; Bodurka, Jerzy; Zucker, Nancy L; Simmons, W Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a devastating psychiatric illness that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Aberrant visceral interoceptive processing within the insula has been hypothesized to be an important mechanism in AN's pathophysiology due to the theoretical link between interoception and emotional experience. We therefore utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine whether altered insula functioning underlies visceral interoception in AN. Fifteen females with restricting-type AN and 15 healthy control females underwent fMRI while performing an interoceptive attention task during which they focused on sensations in their heart, stomach, and bladder. Participants also performed an anxious rumination task while in the scanner. AN participants were weight-restored and free of psychotropic medications. Two distinct regions of the insula-anterior insula and dorsal mid-insula-exhibited a significant (p<0.05) interaction between group and interoceptive modality. The post hoc analyses revealed that in the dorsal mid-insula the interaction was driven by group differences during stomach interoception (p=0.002, Bonferroni corrected), whereas in the anterior insula the interaction was driven by group differences during heart interoception (p=0.03, Bonferroni corrected). In addition, individuals with AN displayed increased activation during anxious rumination in the dorsal mid-insula, and activation in this region during stomach interoception was correlated with measures of anxiety and psychopathology. This relationship between altered visceral interoception and clinical symptoms in AN suggests an important mechanism for the disorder. Additional research is needed to examine whether interventions targeting visceral interoception may increase the efficacy of treatments for AN. PMID:26084229

  1. Exogenous Alpha-Synuclein Alters Pre- and Post-Synaptic Activity by Fragmenting Lipid Rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuele, Marco; Esposito, Alessandro; Camerini, Serena; Antonucci, Flavia; Ferrara, Silvia; Seghezza, Silvia; Catelani, Tiziano; Crescenzi, Marco; Marotta, Roberto; Canale, Claudio; Matteoli, Michela; Menna, Elisabetta; Chieregatti, Evelina

    2016-05-01

    Alpha-synuclein (αSyn) interferes with multiple steps of synaptic activity at pre-and post-synaptic terminals, however the mechanism/s by which αSyn alters neurotransmitter release and synaptic potentiation is unclear. By atomic force microscopy we show that human αSyn, when incubated with reconstituted membrane bilayer, induces lipid rafts' fragmentation. As a consequence, ion channels and receptors are displaced from lipid rafts with consequent changes in their activity. The enhanced calcium entry leads to acute mobilization of synaptic vesicles, and exhaustion of neurotransmission at later stages. At the post-synaptic terminal, an acute increase in glutamatergic transmission, with increased density of PSD-95 puncta, is followed by disruption of the interaction between N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and PSD-95 with ensuing decrease of long term potentiation. While cholesterol loading prevents the acute effect of αSyn at the presynapse; inhibition of casein kinase 2, which appears activated by reduction of cholesterol, restores the correct localization and clustering of NMDARs.

  2. Interleukin-15 modulates adipose tissue by altering mitochondrial mass and activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole G Barra

    Full Text Available Interleukin-15 (IL-15 is an immunomodulatory cytokine that affects body mass regulation independent of lymphocytes; however, the underlying mechanism(s involved remains unknown. In an effort to investigate these mechanisms, we performed metabolic cage studies, assessed intestinal bacterial diversity and macronutrient absorption, and examined adipose mitochondrial activity in cultured adipocytes and in lean IL-15 transgenic (IL-15tg, overweight IL-15 deficient (IL-15-/-, and control C57Bl/6 (B6 mice. Here we show that differences in body weight are not the result of differential activity level, food intake, or respiratory exchange ratio. Although intestinal microbiota differences between obese and lean individuals are known to impact macronutrient absorption, differing gut bacteria profiles in these murine strains does not translate to differences in body weight in colonized germ free animals and macronutrient absorption. Due to its contribution to body weight variation, we examined mitochondrial factors and found that IL-15 treatment in cultured adipocytes resulted in increased mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased lipid deposition. Lastly, IL-15tg mice have significantly elevated mitochondrial activity and mass in adipose tissue compared to B6 and IL-15-/- mice. Altogether, these results suggest that IL-15 is involved in adipose tissue regulation and linked to altered mitochondrial function.

  3. Exogenous Alpha-Synuclein Alters Pre- and Post-Synaptic Activity by Fragmenting Lipid Rafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Emanuele

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-synuclein (αSyn interferes with multiple steps of synaptic activity at pre-and post-synaptic terminals, however the mechanism/s by which αSyn alters neurotransmitter release and synaptic potentiation is unclear. By atomic force microscopy we show that human αSyn, when incubated with reconstituted membrane bilayer, induces lipid rafts' fragmentation. As a consequence, ion channels and receptors are displaced from lipid rafts with consequent changes in their activity. The enhanced calcium entry leads to acute mobilization of synaptic vesicles, and exhaustion of neurotransmission at later stages. At the post-synaptic terminal, an acute increase in glutamatergic transmission, with increased density of PSD-95 puncta, is followed by disruption of the interaction between N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR and PSD-95 with ensuing decrease of long term potentiation. While cholesterol loading prevents the acute effect of αSyn at the presynapse; inhibition of casein kinase 2, which appears activated by reduction of cholesterol, restores the correct localization and clustering of NMDARs.

  4. Spaceflight alters expression of microRNA during T-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie; Chang, Tammy T; Martinez, Emily M; Li, Chai-Fei

    2015-12-01

    Altered immune function has been demonstrated in astronauts during spaceflights dating back to Apollo and Skylab; this could be a major barrier to long-term space exploration. We tested the hypothesis that spaceflight causes changes in microRNA (miRNA) expression. Human leukocytes were stimulated with mitogens on board the International Space Station using an onboard normal gravity control. Bioinformatics showed that miR-21 was significantly up-regulated 2-fold during early T-cell activation in normal gravity, and gene expression was suppressed under microgravity. This was confirmed using quantitative real-time PCR (n = 4). This is the first report that spaceflight regulates miRNA expression. Global microarray analysis showed significant (P < 0.05) suppression of 85 genes under microgravity conditions compared to normal gravity samples. EGR3, FASLG, BTG2, SPRY2, and TAGAP are biologically confirmed targets and are co-up-regulated with miR-21. These genes share common promoter regions with pre-mir-21; as the miR-21 matures and accumulates, it most likely will inhibit translation of its target genes and limit the immune response. These data suggest that gravity regulates T-cell activation not only by transcription promotion but also by blocking translation via noncoding RNA mechanisms. Moreover, this study suggests that T-cell activation itself may induce a sequence of gene expressions that is self-limited by miR-21. PMID:26276131

  5. Ablation of p120-Catenin Altering the Activity of Small GTPase in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan LIU

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective p120-catenin (p120ctn, a member of the Armadillo gene family, has emerged as an important modulator of small GTPase activities. Therefore, it plays novel roles in tumor malignant phenotype, such as invasion and metastasis, whose mechanism are not well clarified yet. The aim of this study is to explore the roles of p120ctn on the regulation of small GTP family members in lung cancer and the effects to lung cancer invasions andmetastasis. Methods After p120ctn was knocked down by siRNA, in vivo and in vitro analysis was applied to investigate the role and possible mechanism of p120ctn in lung cancer, such as Western Blot, pull-down analysis, and nude mice models. Results p120ctn depletion inactivated RhoA, with the the activity of Cdc42 and Rac1 increased, the invasiveness of lung cancer cells was promoted both in vitro and in vivo . Conclusion p120ctn gene knockdown enhances the metastasis of lung cancer cells, probably by altering expression of small GTPase, such as inactivation of RhoA and activation of Cdc42/Rac1.

  6. Field Trip Guide to Serpentinite, Silica-Carbonate Alteration, and Related Hydrothermal Activity in the Clear Lake Region, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser Goff; George Guthrie

    1999-06-01

    This guide is designed to familiarize scientists with the geology, structure, alteration, and fluids typical of California serpentinites for purposes of carbon dioxide sequestration (Lackner et al., 1995). Goff et al. (1997) and Goff and Lackner (1998) describe the geology and geochemistry of some of the serpentinites from this area. Mechanisms of silica-carbonate alteration were outlined by Barnes et al. (1973). Donnelly-Nolan et al. (1993) most recently reviewed relations between regional hydrothermal alteration and Quarternary volcanic activity. Stanley et al. (1998) summarized geophysical characteristics of the region.

  7. Altered frontocingulate activation during aversive interoceptive processing in young adults transitioning to problem stimulant use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lorraine Stewart

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Problems associated with stimulant use have been linked to frontocingulate, insular, and thalamic dysfunction during decision-making and alterations in interoceptive processing. However, little is known about how interoception and decision-making interact and contribute to dysfunctions that promote the transition from recreational drug use to abuse or dependence. Here, we investigate brain activation in response to reward, punishment, and uncertainty during an aversive interoceptive challenge in current and former stimulant (cocaine and amphetamine users using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Young adults previously identified as recreational users (n=184 were followed up three years later. Of these, 18 individuals progressed to problem stimulant use (PSU, whereas 15 desisted stimulant use (DSU. PSU, DSU, and 14 healthy comparison subjects (CTL performed a two-choice prediction task at three fixed error rates (20%=reward, 50%=uncertainty, 80%=punishment during which they anticipated and experienced episodes of inspiratory breathing load. Although groups did not differ in insula activation or subjective breathing load ratings, PSU exhibited lower right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG and bilateral anterior cingulate (ACC activation than DSU and CTL during aversive interoceptive processing as well as lower right IFG in response to decision making involving uncertainty. However, PSU exhibited greater bilateral IFG activation than DSU and CTL while making choices within the context of punishing feedback, and both PSU and DSU showed lower thalamic activation during breathing load than CTL. Findings suggest that frontocingulate attenuation, reflecting reduced resources devoted to goal maintenance and action selection in the presence of uncertainty and interoceptive perturbations, may be a biomarker for susceptibility to problem stimulant use.

  8. Alteration of phospholipase D activity in the rat tissues by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to phosphatidic acid (PA) and choline. Recently, PLD has been drawing much attentions and considered to be associated with cancer process since it is involved in cellular signal transduction. In this experiment, oleate-PLD activities were measured in various tissues of the living rats after whole body irradiation. The reaction mixture for the PLD assay contained 0.1μCi 1,2-di[1-14C]palmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, 0.5mM phosphatidylcholine, 5mM sodium oleate, 0.2% taurodeoxycholate, 50mM HEPES buffer(pH 6.5), 10mM CaCl2, and 25mM KF. phosphatidic acid, the reaction product, was separated by TLC and its radioactivity was measured with a scintillation counter. The whole body irradiation was given to the female Wistar rats via Cobalt 60 Teletherapy with field size of 10cm x 10cm and an exposure of 2.7Gy per minute to the total doses of 10Gy and 25Gy. Among the tissues examined, PLD activity in lung was the highest one and was followed by kidney, skeletal muscle, brain, spleen, bone marrow, thymus, and liver. Upon irradiation, alteration of PLD activity was observed in thymus, spleen, lung, and bone marrow. Especially PLD activities of the spleen and thymus revealed the highest sensitivity toward γ-ray with more than two times amplification in their activities. In contrast, the PLD activity of bone marrow appears to be reduced to nearly 30%. Irradiation effect was hardly detected in liver which showed the lowest PLD activity. The PLD activities affected most sensitively by the whole-body irradiation seem to be associated with organs involved in immunity and hematopoiesis. This observation strongly indicates that the PLD is closely related to the physiological function of these organs. Furthermore, radiation stress could offer an important means to explore the phenomena covering from cell proliferation to cell death on these organs. (author)

  9. Alteration of phospholipase D activity in the rat tissues by irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, M. S. [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Cho, Y. J. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Choi, M. U. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Natural Sciences

    1997-09-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to phosphatidic acid (PA) and choline. Recently, PLD has been drawing much attentions and considered to be associated with cancer process since it is involved in cellular signal transduction. In this experiment, oleate-PLD activities were measured in various tissues of the living rats after whole body irradiation. The reaction mixture for the PLD assay contained 0.1{mu}Ci 1,2-di[1-{sup 14}C]palmitoyl phosphatidylcholine, 0.5mM phosphatidylcholine, 5mM sodium oleate, 0.2% taurodeoxycholate, 50mM HEPES buffer(pH 6.5), 10mM CaCl{sub 2}, and 25mM KF. phosphatidic acid, the reaction product, was separated by TLC and its radioactivity was measured with a scintillation counter. The whole body irradiation was given to the female Wistar rats via Cobalt 60 Teletherapy with field size of 10cm x 10cm and an exposure of 2.7Gy per minute to the total doses of 10Gy and 25Gy. Among the tissues examined, PLD activity in lung was the highest one and was followed by kidney, skeletal muscle, brain, spleen, bone marrow, thymus, and liver. Upon irradiation, alteration of PLD activity was observed in thymus, spleen, lung, and bone marrow. Especially PLD activities of the spleen and thymus revealed the highest sensitivity toward {gamma}-ray with more than two times amplification in their activities. In contrast, the PLD activity of bone marrow appears to be reduced to nearly 30%. Irradiation effect was hardly detected in liver which showed the lowest PLD activity. The PLD activities affected most sensitively by the whole-body irradiation seem to be associated with organs involved in immunity and hematopoiesis. This observation strongly indicates that the PLD is closely related to the physiological function of these organs. Furthermore, radiation stress could offer an important means to explore the phenomena covering from cell proliferation to cell death on these organs. (author).

  10. Altered left ventricular performance in aging physically active mice with an ankle sprain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Michael J; Guderian, Sophie; Wikstrom, Erik A; Huot, Joshua R; Peck, Bailey D; Arthur, Susan T; Marino, Joseph S; Hubbard-Turner, Tricia

    2016-02-01

    We assessed the impact of differing physical activity levels throughout the lifespan, using a musculoskeletal injury model, on the age-related changes in left ventricular (LV) parameters in active mice. Forty male mice (CBA/J) were randomly placed into one of three running wheel groups (transected CFL group, transected ATFL/CFL group, SHAM group) or a SHAM Sedentary group (SHAMSED). Before surgery and every 6 weeks after surgery, LV parameters were measured under 2.5 % isoflurane inhalation. Group effects for daily distance run was significantly greater for the SHAM and lesser for the ATLF/CFL mice (p = 0.013) with distance run decreasing with age for all mice (p < 0.0001). Beginning at 6 months of age, interaction (group × age) was noted with LV posterior wall thickness-to-radius ratios (h/r) where h/r increased with age in the ATFL/CFL and SHAMSED mice while the SHAM and CFL mice exhibited decreased h/r with age (p = 0.0002). Passive filling velocity (E wave) was significantly greater in the SHAM mice and lowest for the ATFL/CFL and SHAMSED mice (p < 0.0001) beginning at 9 months of age. Active filling velocity (A wave) was not different between groups (p = 0.10). Passive-to-active filling velocity ratio (E/A ratio) was different between groups (p < 0.0001), with higher ratios for the SHAM mice and lower ratios for the ATFL/CFL and SHAMSED mice in response to physical activity beginning at 9 months of age. Passive-to-active filling velocity ratio decreased with age (p < 0.0001). Regular physical activity throughout the lifespan improved LV structure, passive filling velocity, and E/A ratio by 6 to 9 months of age and attenuated any negative alterations throughout the second half of life. The diastolic filling differences were found to be significantly related to the amount of activity performed by 9 months and at the end of the lifespan. PMID:26803818

  11. Alterations of T cell activation signalling and cytokine production by postmenopausal estrogen levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Douglas D

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunosenescence is an age-associated disorder occurring primarily in T cell compartments, including altered subset composition, functions, and activation. In women, evidence implicates diminished estrogen in the postmenopausal period as a contributing factor to diminished T cell responsiveness. Since hypoestrogenism is present in postmenopausal women, our objective focused on whether T cell activation, defined as signalling molecule expressions and activation, and function, identified as IL-2 production, were affected by low estrogen. Methods Using Jurkat 6.1 T cells, consequences of 4 pg/ml (corresponding to postmenopausal levels or 40 pg/ml (premenopausal levels of estradiol (E2 were analyzed on signalling proteins, CD3-zeta, JAK2, and JAK3, determined by Western immunoblotting. These consequences were correlated with corresponding gene expressions, quantified by real time-polymerase chain reaction. Tyrosine phosphorylation of CD3-zeta was defined by immunoprecipitation and western immunoblotting following activation by T cell receptor (TcR cross-linking. CD3-zeta expression and modulation was also confirmed in T cells from pre- and postmenopausal women. To assess functional consequences, IL-2 production, induced by PMA and ionomycin, was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay (ELISpot. Results At 40 pg/ml E2, the level of signalling protein CD3-zeta was elevated 1.57-fold, compared with cells exposed to 4 pg/ml E2. The CD3-zeta proteins also exhibited altered levels of activation-induced phosphorylation in the presence of 40 pg/ml E2 versus 4 pg/ml: 23 kD phosphorylated form increased 2.64-fold and the 21 kD form was elevated 2.95-fold. Examination of kinases associated with activation signalling also demonstrated that, in the presence of 40 pg/ml E2, JAK2 protein expression was increased 1.64-fold (p 2 (2.39, 2.01, and 2.21 fold, respectively versus 4 pg/ml. These findings were confirmed in vivo, since T

  12. Reproductive experience alters neural and behavioural responses to acute oestrogen receptor α activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, E M; Casey, K; Carini, L M; Bridges, R S

    2013-12-01

    demonstrate that reproductive experience alters the behavioural response to acute ERα activation. Moreover, the findings suggest that central regulation of the hypothalamic-adrenal-pituitary axis is modified as a consequence of reproductive experience.

  13. Altered polymorphonuclear leukocyte Fc gamma R expression contributes to decreased candicidal activity during intraabdominal sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the effects of untreated intraabdominal sepsis on polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) candicidal activity. Two groups of swine were studied. Group I (n=6) underwent sham laparotomy, group II (n=7) underwent cecal ligation and incision. Untreated intraabdominal sepsis resulted in a progressive decrease in PMN candicidal activity. Concomitant rosetting and phagocytosis assays demonstrated a decrease in both the attachment and phagocytosis of Candida albicans opsonized with both normal and septic swine serum by PMNs in group II. Iodine 125-labeled swine immunoglobulin G (IgG) and fluorescein isothioalanate (FITC)-labeled swine IgG were used to investigate Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions. Scatchard analyses demonstrated a progressive decline in both the binding affinity constant and number of IgG molecules bound per PMN. Stimulation of the oxidative burst markedly reduced 125I-labeled IgG binding in both group I and group II, with a greater decrement being seen in animals with intraabdominal sepsis. Further, in group II, PMN recycling of the Fc gamma receptor to the cell surface after generation of the oxidative burst was reduced by postoperative day 4. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to Fc gamma receptor II, but not Fc gamma receptor I/III markedly reduced intracellular candicidal activity. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a homogeneous pattern of FITC-IgG uptake by nearly all group I PMNs, whereas by postoperative day 8 a substantial number of PMNs from group II failed to internalize the FITC-IgG. These studies suggest that untreated intraabdominal sepsis reduces PMN candicidal activity and that this is due, in part, to altered PMN Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions

  14. Altered polymorphonuclear leukocyte Fc gamma R expression contributes to decreased candicidal activity during intraabdominal sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simms, H.H.; D' Amico, R.; Monfils, P.; Burchard, K.W. (Rhode Island Hospital, Providence (USA))

    1991-03-01

    We investigated the effects of untreated intraabdominal sepsis on polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) candicidal activity. Two groups of swine were studied. Group I (n=6) underwent sham laparotomy, group II (n=7) underwent cecal ligation and incision. Untreated intraabdominal sepsis resulted in a progressive decrease in PMN candicidal activity. Concomitant rosetting and phagocytosis assays demonstrated a decrease in both the attachment and phagocytosis of Candida albicans opsonized with both normal and septic swine serum by PMNs in group II. Iodine 125-labeled swine immunoglobulin G (IgG) and fluorescein isothioalanate (FITC)-labeled swine IgG were used to investigate Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions. Scatchard analyses demonstrated a progressive decline in both the binding affinity constant and number of IgG molecules bound per PMN. Stimulation of the oxidative burst markedly reduced 125I-labeled IgG binding in both group I and group II, with a greater decrement being seen in animals with intraabdominal sepsis. Further, in group II, PMN recycling of the Fc gamma receptor to the cell surface after generation of the oxidative burst was reduced by postoperative day 4. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to Fc gamma receptor II, but not Fc gamma receptor I/III markedly reduced intracellular candicidal activity. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a homogeneous pattern of FITC-IgG uptake by nearly all group I PMNs, whereas by postoperative day 8 a substantial number of PMNs from group II failed to internalize the FITC-IgG. These studies suggest that untreated intraabdominal sepsis reduces PMN candicidal activity and that this is due, in part, to altered PMN Fc gamma receptor ligand interactions.

  15. Lingual muscle activity across sleep-wake states in rats with surgically altered upper airway

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    Irma eRukhadze

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients have increased upper airway muscle activity, including such lingual muscles as the genioglossus (GG, geniohyoid (GH and hyoglossus (HG. This adaptation partially protects their upper airway against obstructions. Rodents are used to study the central neural control of sleep and breathing but they do not naturally exhibit OSA. We investigated whether, in chronically instrumented, behaving rats, disconnecting the GH and HG muscles from the hyoid (H apparatus would result in a compensatory increase of other upper airway muscle activity (EMG and/or other signs of upper airway instability. We first determined that, in intact rats, lingual (GG and intrinsic muscles maintained stable activity levels when quantified based on 2 h-long recordings conducted on days 6 through 22 after instrumentation. We then studied 5 rats in which the tendons connecting the GH and HG muscles to the H apparatus were experimentally severed. When quantified across all recording days, lingual EMG during SWS was modestly but significantly increased in rats with surgically altered upper airway (8.6% ±0.7(SE vs. 6.2% ±0.7 of the mean during wakefulness; p=0.012. Respiratory modulation of lingual EMG occurred mainly during SWS and was similarly infrequent in both groups, and the incidence of sighs and central apneas also was similar. Thus, a weakened action of selected lingual muscles did not produce sleep-disordered breathing but resulted in a relatively elevated activity in other lingual muscles during SWS. These results encourage more extensive surgical manipulations with the aim to obtain a rodent model with collapsible upper airway.

  16. The impact of initiation: Early onset marijuana smokers demonstrate altered Stroop performance and brain activation

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    K.A. Sagar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Marijuana (MJ use is on the rise, particularly among teens and emerging adults. This poses serious public health concern, given the potential deleterious effects of MJ on the developing brain. We examined 50 chronic MJ smokers divided into early onset (regular MJ use prior to age 16; n = 24 and late onset (age 16 or later; n = 26, and 34 healthy control participants (HCs. All completed a modified Stroop Color Word Test during fMRI. Results demonstrated that MJ smokers exhibited significantly poorer performance on the Interference subtest of the Stroop, as well as altered patterns of activation in the cingulate cortex relative to HCs. Further, early onset MJ smokers exhibited significantly poorer performance relative to both HCs and late onset smokers. Additionally, earlier age of MJ onset as well as increased frequency and magnitude (grams/week of MJ use were predictive of poorer Stroop performance. fMRI results revealed that while late onset smokers demonstrated a more similar pattern of activation to the control group, a different pattern was evident in the early onset group. These findings underscore the importance of assessing age of onset and patterns of MJ use and support the need for widespread education and intervention efforts among youth.

  17. Altered protoxin activation by midgut enzymes from a Bacillus thuringiensis resistant strain of Plodia interpunctella.

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    Oppert, B; Kramer, K J; Johnson, D E; MacIntosh, S C; McGaughey, W H

    1994-02-15

    Processing of Bacillus thuringiensis protoxins to toxins by midgut proteinases from a strain of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hubner), resistant to B. thuringiensis subspecies entomocidus (HD-198) was slower than that by midgut proteinases from the susceptible parent strain or a strain resistant to B. thuringiensis subspecies kurstaki (HD-1, Dipel). Midgut extracts from entomocidus-resistant insects exhibited five-fold lower activity toward the synthetic substrate alpha-N-benzoyl-DL-arginine rho-nitroanilide than extracts from susceptible or kurstaki-resistant insects. Midgut enzymes from susceptible or kurstaki-resistant insects converted the 133 kDa CryIA(c) protoxin to 61-63 kDa proteins, while incubations with entomocidus-resistant enzymes resulted in predominantly products of intermediate size, even with increased amounts of midgut extract. The 61-63 kDa proteins were only produced by entomocidus-resistant midgut extracts after long term incubations with the protoxin. The data suggest that altered protoxin activation by midgut proteinases is involved in some types of insect resistance to B. thuringiensis.

  18. Theory of mind network activity is altered in subjects with familial liability for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohnke, Sebastian; Erk, Susanne; Schnell, Knut; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Schmierer, Phöbe; Romund, Lydia; Garbusow, Maria; Wackerhagen, Carolin; Ripke, Stephan; Grimm, Oliver; Haller, Leila; Witt, Stephanie H; Degenhardt, Franziska; Tost, Heike; Heinz, Andreas; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Walter, Henrik

    2016-02-01

    As evidenced by a multitude of studies, abnormalities in Theory of Mind (ToM) and its neural processing might constitute an intermediate phenotype of schizophrenia. If so, neural alterations during ToM should be observable in unaffected relatives of patients as well, since they share a considerable amount of genetic risk. While behaviorally, impaired ToM function is confirmed meta-analytically in relatives, evidence on aberrant function of the neural ToM network is sparse and inconclusive. The present study therefore aimed to further explore the neural correlates of ToM in relatives of schizophrenia. About 297 controls and 63 unaffected first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia performed a ToM task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Consistent with the literature relatives exhibited decreased activity of the medial prefrontal cortex. Additionally, increased recruitment of the right middle temporal gyrus and posterior cingulate cortex was found, which was related to subclinical paranoid symptoms in relatives. These results further support decreased medial prefrontal activation during ToM as an intermediate phenotype of genetic risk for schizophrenia. Enhanced recruitment of posterior ToM areas in relatives might indicate inefficiency mechanisms in the presence of genetic risk. PMID:26341902

  19. Enhanced carotid body chemosensory activity and the cardiovascular alterations induced by intermittent hypoxia

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    Rodrigo eIturriaga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The carotid body (CB plays a main role in the maintenance of the oxygen homeostasis. The hypoxic stimulation of the CB increases the chemosensory discharge, which in turn elicits reflex sympathetic, cardiovascular and ventilatory adjustments. An exacerbate carotid chemosensory activity has been associated with human sympathetic-mediated diseases such as hypertension, insulin resistance, heart failure and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Indeed, the CB chemosensory discharge becomes tonically hypereactive in experimental models of OSA and heart failure. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH, a main feature of OSA, enhances CB chemosensory baseline discharges in normoxia and in response to hypoxia, inducing sympathetic overactivity and hypertension. Oxidative stress, increased levels of ET-1, Angiotensin II and pro-inflammatory cytokines, along with a reduced production of NO in the CB, have been associated with the enhanced carotid chemosensory activity. In this review, we will discuss new evidence supporting a main role for the CB chemoreceptor in the autonomic and cardiorespiratory alterations induced by intermittent hypoxia, as well as the molecular mechanisms involved in the CB chemosensory potentiation.

  20. Paracetamol Supplementation Does Not Alter The Antitumor Activity and Lung Toxicity of Bleomycin

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    Ghada M. Suddek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleomycin (BLM is well known by its antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. However, pulmonary fibrosis has been considered the dose limiting toxicity of the drug. Hyperpyrexia following injection of BLM was reported thus, paracetamol is sometimes administered with BLM as antipyretic drug. Actually, paracetamol was found to interfere with cytotoxicity of some drugs. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of paracetamol administration on the antitumor and lung toxicity of BLM. The antitumor activity was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC cells. Paracetamol did not alter the antitumor effect of BLM in vitro or in vivo. The lung toxicity of BLM was evidenced by decrease in the body weight, increase in the lung/body weight ratio, decrease in the response of pulmonary arterial rings to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT and increase in the contractility of tracheal smooth muscles induced by acetylcholine (ACh. The toxicity was also confirmed biochemically by marked increases in hydroxyproline and lipid peroxidation in rat lung and the decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH level. Pretreatment with paracetamol did not significantly change lipid peroxidation, GSH level, percent survival of rats or the response of pulmonary arterial rings and tracheal smooth muscles to 5-HT and ACh respectively. The results of the present study indicated that paracetamol neither modified the antitumor effect of BLM nor changed drug-induced lung toxicity.

  1. Altered regional and circuit resting-state activity associated with unilateral hearing loss.

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    Xingchao Wang

    Full Text Available The deprivation of sensory input after hearing damage results in functional reorganization of the brain including cross-modal plasticity in the sensory cortex and changes in cognitive processing. However, it remains unclear whether partial deprivation from unilateral auditory loss (UHL would similarly affect the neural circuitry of cognitive processes in addition to the functional organization of sensory cortex. Here, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate intrinsic activity in 34 participants with UHL from acoustic neuroma in comparison with 22 matched normal controls. In sensory regions, we found decreased regional homogeneity (ReHo in the bilateral calcarine cortices in UHL. However, there was an increase of ReHo in the right anterior insular cortex (rAI, the key node of cognitive control network (CCN and multimodal sensory integration, as well as in the left parahippocampal cortex (lPHC, a key node in the default mode network (DMN. Moreover, seed-based resting-state functional connectivity analysis showed an enhanced relationship between rAI and several key regions of the DMN. Meanwhile, lPHC showed more negative relationship with components in the CCN and greater positive relationship in the DMN. Such reorganizations of functional connectivity within the DMN and between the DMN and CCN were confirmed by a graph theory analysis. These results suggest that unilateral sensory input damage not only alters the activity of the sensory areas but also reshapes the regional and circuit functional organization of the cognitive control network.

  2. 3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) induces apoptosis and alters metabolic enzyme activity in human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anti-HIV drug 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) is the drug of choice for preventing maternal-fetal HIV transmission during pregnancy. Our aim was to assess the cytotoxic effects of AZT on human placenta in vitro. The mechanisms of AZT-induced effects were investigated using JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells and primary explant cultures from term and first-trimester human placentas. Cytotoxicity measures included trypan blue exclusion, MTT, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays. Apoptosis was measured with an antibody specific to cleaved caspase-3 and by rescue of cells by the general caspase inhibitor Boc-D-FMK. The effect of AZT on the activities of glutathione-S-transferase, β-glucuronidase, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A, and CYP reductase (CYPR) in the placenta was assessed using biochemical assays and immunoblotting. AZT increased ROS levels, decreased cellular proliferation rates, was toxic to mitochondria, and initiated cell death by a caspase-dependent mechanism in the human placenta in vitro. In the absence of serum, the effects of AZT were amplified in all the models used. AZT also increased the amounts of activity of GST, β-glucuronidase, and CYP1A, whereas UGT and CYPR were decreased. We conclude that AZT causes apoptosis in the placenta and alters metabolizing enzymes in human placental cells. These findings have implications for the safe administration of AZT in pregnancy with respect to the maintenance of integrity of the maternal-fetal barrier

  3. Activated Ras alters lens and corneal development through induction of distinct downstream targets

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    Reneker Lixing

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian Ras genes regulate diverse cellular processes including proliferation and differentiation and are frequently mutated in human cancers. Tumor development in response to Ras activation varies between different tissues and the molecular basis for these variations are poorly understood. The murine lens and cornea have a common embryonic origin and arise from adjacent regions of the surface ectoderm. Activation of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling pathway induces the corneal epithelial cells to proliferate and the lens epithelial cells to exit the cell cycle. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the differential responses of these two related tissues have not been defined. We have generated transgenic mice that express a constitutively active version of human H-Ras in their lenses and corneas. Results Ras transgenic lenses and corneal epithelial cells showed increased proliferation with concomitant increases in cyclin D1 and D2 expression. This initial increase in proliferation is sustained in the cornea but not in the lens epithelial cells. Coincidentally, cdk inhibitors p27Kip1 and p57Kip2 were upregulated in the Ras transgenic lenses but not in the corneas. Phospho-Erk1 and Erk2 levels were elevated in the lens but not in the cornea and Spry 1 and Spry 2, negative regulators of Ras-Raf-Erk signaling, were upregulated more in the corneal than in the lens epithelial cells. Both lens and corneal differentiation programs were sensitive to Ras activation. Ras transgenic embryos showed a distinctive alteration in the architecture of the lens pit. Ras activation, though sufficient for upregulation of Prox1, a transcription factor critical for cell cycle exit and initiation of fiber differentiation, is not sufficient for induction of terminal fiber differentiation. Expression of Keratin 12, a marker of corneal epithelial differentiation, was reduced in the Ras transgenic corneas. Conclusions Collectively, these

  4. Leukocyte activity is altered in a ground based murine model of microgravity and proton radiation exposure.

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    Jenine K Sanzari

    Full Text Available Immune system adaptation during spaceflight is a concern in space medicine. Decreased circulating leukocytes observed during and after space flight infer suppressed immune responses and susceptibility to infection. The microgravity aspect of the space environment has been simulated on Earth to study adverse biological effects in astronauts. In this report, the hindlimb unloading (HU model was employed to investigate the combined effects of solar particle event-like proton radiation and simulated microgravity on immune cell parameters including lymphocyte subtype populations and activity. Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell critical for adaptive immune responses and T lymphocytes are regulators of cell-mediated immunity, controlling the entire immune response. Mice were suspended prior to and after proton radiation exposure (2 Gy dose and total leukocyte numbers and splenic lymphocyte functionality were evaluated on days 4 or 21 after combined HU and radiation exposure. Total white blood cell (WBC, lymphocyte, neutrophil, and monocyte counts are reduced by approximately 65%, 70%, 55%, and 70%, respectively, compared to the non-treated control group at 4 days after combined exposure. Splenic lymphocyte subpopulations are altered at both time points investigated. At 21 days post-exposure to combined HU and proton radiation, T cell activation and proliferation were assessed in isolated lymphocytes. Cell surface expression of the Early Activation Marker, CD69, is decreased by 30% in the combined treatment group, compared to the non-treated control group and cell proliferation was suppressed by approximately 50%, compared to the non-treated control group. These findings reveal that the combined stressors (HU and proton radiation exposure result in decreased leukocyte numbers and function, which could contribute to immune system dysfunction in crew members. This investigation is one of the first to report on combined proton radiation and

  5. The time course of altered brain activity during 7-day simulated microgravity

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    Yang eLiao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity causes multiple changes in physical and mental levels in humans, which can induce performance deficiency among astronauts. Studying the variations in brain activity that occur during microgravity would help astronauts to deal with these changes. In the current study, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI was used to observe the variations in brain activity during a 7-day head down tilt (HDT bed rest, which is a common and reliable model for simulated microgravity. The amplitudes of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF of twenty subjects were recorded pre-head down tilt (pre-HDT, during a bed rest period (HDT0, and then each day in the HDT period (HDT1–HDT7. One-way analysis of variance of the ALFF values over these 8 days was used to test the variation across time period (P<0.05, corrected. Compared to HDT0, subjects presented lower ALFF values in the posterior cingulate cortex and higher ALFF values in the anterior cingulate cortex during the HDT period, which may partially account for the lack of cognitive flexibility and alterations in autonomic nervous system seen among astronauts in microgravity. Additionally, the observed improvement in function in CPL during the HDT period may play a compensatory role to the functional decline in the paracentral lobule to sustain normal levels of fine motor control for astronauts in a microgravity environment. Above all, those floating brain activities during 7 days of simulated microgravity may indicate that the brain self-adapts to help astronauts adjust to the multiple negative stressors encountered in a microgravity environment.

  6. Regulation of calpain activity in rat brain with altered Ca2+ homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averna, Monica; Stifanese, Roberto; De Tullio, Roberta; Passalacqua, Mario; Defranchi, Enrico; Salamino, Franca; Melloni, Edon; Pontremoli, Sandro

    2007-01-26

    Activation of calpain occurs as an early event in correlation with an increase in [Ca2+]i induced in rat brain upon treatment with a high salt diet for a prolonged period of time. The resulting sequential events have been monitored in the brain of normal and hypertensive rats of the Milan strain, diverging for a constitutive alteration in the level of [Ca2+]i found to be present in nerve cells of hypertensive animals. After 2 weeks of treatment, the levels of the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase and of native calpastatin are profoundly decreased. These degradative processes, more pronounced in the brain of hypertensive rats, are progressively and efficiently compensated in the brain of both rat strains by different incoming mechanisms. Along with calpastatin degradation, 15-kDa still-active inhibitory fragments are accumulated, capable of efficiently replacing the loss of native inhibitor molecules. A partial return to a more efficient control of Ca2+ homeostasis occurs in parallel, assured by an early increase in the expression of Ca2+-ATPase and of calpastatin, both producing, after 12 weeks of a high salt (sodium) diet, the restoration of almost original levels of the Ca2+ pump and of significant amounts of native inhibitor molecules. Thus, conservative calpastatin fragmentation, associated with an increased expression of Ca2+-ATPase and of the calpain natural inhibitor, has been demonstrated to occur in vivo in rat brain. This represents a sequential adaptive response capable of overcoming the effects of calpain activation induced by a moderate long term elevation of [Ca2+]i.

  7. Frequency of climbing behavior as a predictor of altered motor activity in rat forced swimming test.

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    Vieira, Cíntia; De Lima, Thereza C M; Carobrez, Antonio de Pádua; Lino-de-Oliveira, Cilene

    2008-11-14

    Previous work has shown that the frequency of climbing behavior in rats submitted to the forced swimming test (FST) correlated to the section's crosses in the open field test, which suggest it might be taken as a predictor of motor activity in rat FST. To investigate this proposal, the frequency, duration, as well as the ratio duration/frequency for each behavior expressed in the FST (immobility, swimming and climbing) were compared in animals treated with a motor stimulant, caffeine (CAF), and the antidepressant, clomipramine (CLM). Male Wistar rats were submitted to 15min of forced swimming (pre-test) and 24h later received saline (SAL, 1ml/kg, i.p.) or CAF (6.5mg/kg, i.p.) 30min prior a 5-min session (test) of FST. To validate experimental procedures, an additional group of rats received three injections of SAL (1ml/kg, i.p.) or clomipramine (CLM, 10mg/kg, i.p.) between the pre-test and test sessions. The results of the present study showed that both drugs, CLM and CAF, significantly reduced the duration of immobility and significantly increased the duration of swimming. In addition, CAF significantly decreased the ratio of immobility, and CLM significantly increased the ratio of swimming and climbing. Moreover, CLM significantly increased the duration of climbing but only CAF increased the frequency of climbing. Thus, it seems that the frequency of climbing could be a predictor of altered motor activity scored directly in the FST. Further, we believe that this parameter could be useful for fast and reliable discrimination between antidepressant drugs and stimulants of motor activity.

  8. Removal of visual feedback alters muscle activity and reduces force variability during constant isometric contractions.

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    Baweja, Harsimran S; Patel, Bhavini K; Martinkewiz, Julie D; Vu, Julie; Christou, Evangelos A

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare force accuracy, force variability and muscle activity during constant isometric contractions at different force levels with and without visual feedback and at different feedback gains. In experiment 1, subjects were instructed to accurately match the target force at 2, 15, 30, 50, and 70% of their maximal isometric force with abduction of the index finger and maintain their force even in the absence of visual feedback. Each trial lasted 22 s and visual feedback was removed from 8-12 to 16-20 s. Each subject performed 6 trials at each target force, half with visual gain of 51.2 pixels/N and the rest with a visual gain of 12.8 pixels/N. Force error was calculated as the root mean square error of the force trace from the target line. Force variability was quantified as the standard deviation and coefficient of variation (CVF) of the force trace. The EMG activity of the agonist (first dorsal interosseus; FDI) was measured with bipolar surface electrodes placed distal to the innervation zone. Independent of visual gain and force level, subjects exhibited lower force error with the visual feedback condition (2.53 +/- 2.95 vs. 2.71 +/- 2.97 N; P FDI muscle was higher during the visual feedback condition and this difference increased especially at higher force levels (70%: 370 +/- 149 vs. 350 +/- 143 microV, P high (0.057 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.095 +/- 0.05 N). However, force variability was not affected by the vastly distinct feedback gains at this force, which supported and extended the findings from experiment 1. Our findings demonstrate that although removal of visual feedback amplifies force error, it can reduce force variability during constant isometric contractions due to an altered activation of the primary agonist muscle most likely at moderate force levels in young adults.

  9. A rare myelin protein zero (MPZ variant alters enhancer activity in vitro and in vivo.

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    Anthony Antonellis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myelin protein zero (MPZ is a critical structural component of myelin in the peripheral nervous system. The MPZ gene is regulated, in part, by the transcription factors SOX10 and EGR2. Mutations in MPZ, SOX10, and EGR2 have been implicated in demyelinating peripheral neuropathies, suggesting that components of this transcriptional network are candidates for harboring disease-causing mutations (or otherwise functional variants that affect MPZ expression. METHODOLOGY: We utilized a combination of multi-species sequence comparisons, transcription factor-binding site predictions, targeted human DNA re-sequencing, and in vitro and in vivo enhancer assays to study human non-coding MPZ variants. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our efforts revealed a variant within the first intron of MPZ that resides within a previously described SOX10 binding site is associated with decreased enhancer activity, and alters binding of nuclear proteins. Additionally, the genomic segment harboring this variant directs tissue-relevant reporter gene expression in zebrafish. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first reported MPZ variant within a cis-acting transcriptional regulatory element. While we were unable to implicate this variant in disease onset, our data suggests that similar non-coding sequences should be screened for mutations in patients with neurological disease. Furthermore, our multi-faceted approach for examining the functional significance of non-coding variants can be readily generalized to study other loci important for myelin structure and function.

  10. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Isaac; Soriano, Jordi; Orlandi, Javier G.; Torrent, Roger; Richaud-Patin, Yvonne; Jiménez-Delgado, Senda; Merlin, Simone; Follenzi, Antonia; Consiglio, Antonella; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel; Raya, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration. PMID:26411903

  11. Mild blast events alter anxiety, memory, and neural activity patterns in the anterior cingulate cortex.

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    Kun Xie

    Full Text Available There is a general interest in understanding of whether and how exposure to emotionally traumatizing events can alter memory function and anxiety behaviors. Here we have developed a novel laboratory-version of mild blast exposure comprised of high decibel bomb explosion sound coupled with strong air blast to mice. This model allows us to isolate the effects of emotionally fearful components from those of traumatic brain injury or bodily injury typical associated with bomb blasts. We demonstrate that this mild blast exposure is capable of impairing object recognition memory, increasing anxiety in elevated O-maze test, and resulting contextual generalization. Our in vivo neural ensemble recording reveal that such mild blast exposures produced diverse firing changes in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region processing emotional memory and inhibitory control. Moreover, we show that these real-time neural ensemble patterns underwent post-event reverberations, indicating rapid consolidation of those fearful experiences. Identification of blast-induced neural activity changes in the frontal brain may allow us to better understand how mild blast experiences result in abnormal changes in memory functions and excessive fear generalization related to post-traumatic stress disorder.

  12. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks

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    Isaac Canals

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration.

  13. Alteration of transcriptional networks in the entorhinal cortex after maternal immune activation and adolescent cannabinoid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollins, Sharon L; Zavitsanou, Katerina; Walker, Frederick Rohan; Cairns, Murray J

    2016-08-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) and adolescent cannabinoid exposure (ACE) have both been identified as major environmental risk factors for schizophrenia. We examined the effects of these two risk factors alone, and in combination, on gene expression during late adolescence. Pregnant rats were exposed to the viral infection mimic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C) on gestational day (GD) 15. Adolescent offspring received daily injections of the cannabinoid HU210 for 14days starting on postnatal day (PND) 35. Gene expression was examined in the left entorhinal cortex (EC) using mRNA microarrays. We found prenatal treatment with poly I:C alone, or HU210 alone, produced relatively minor changes in gene expression. However, following combined treatments, offspring displayed significant changes in transcription. This dramatic and persistent alteration of transcriptional networks enriched with genes involved in neurotransmission, cellular signalling and schizophrenia, was associated with a corresponding perturbation in the expression of small non-coding microRNA (miRNA). These results suggest that a combination of environmental exposures during development leads to significant genomic remodeling that disrupts maturation of the EC and its associated circuitry with important implications as the potential antecedents of memory and learning deficits in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26923065

  14. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Isaac; Soriano, Jordi; Orlandi, Javier G; Torrent, Roger; Richaud-Patin, Yvonne; Jiménez-Delgado, Senda; Merlin, Simone; Follenzi, Antonia; Consiglio, Antonella; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel; Raya, Angel

    2015-10-13

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration.

  15. Nerve growth factor alters the sensitivity of rat masseter muscle mechanoreceptors to NMDA receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hayes; Dong, Xu-Dong; Cairns, Brian E

    2014-11-01

    Intramuscular injection of nerve growth factor (NGF) into rat masseter muscle induces a local mechanical sensitization that is greater in female than in male rats. The duration of NGF-induced sensitization in male and female rats was associated with an increase in peripheral N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor expression by masseter muscle afferent fibers that began 3 days postinjection. Here, we investigated the functional consequences of increased NMDA expression on the response properties of masseter muscle mechanoreceptors. In vivo extracellular single-unit electrophysiological recordings of trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the masseter muscle were performed in anesthetized rats 3 days after NGF injection (25 μg/ml, 10 μl) into the masseter muscle. Mechanical activation threshold was assessed before and after intramuscular injection of NMDA. NMDA injection induced mechanical sensitization in both sexes that was increased significantly following NGF injection in the male rats but not in the female rats. However, in female but not male rats, further examination found that preadministration of NGF induced a greater sensitization in slow Aδ-fibers (2-7 m/s) than fast Aδ-fibers (7-12 m/s). This suggests that preadministration of NGF had a different effect on slowly conducting mechanoreceptors in the female rats compared with the male rats. Although previous studies have found an association between estrogenic tone and NMDA activity, no correlation was observed between NMDA-evoked mechanical sensitization and plasma estrogen level. This study suggests NGF alters NMDA-induced mechanical sensitization in the peripheral endings of masseter mechanoreceptors in a sexually dimorphic manner.

  16. Does changing from a first generation antipsychotic (perphenazin) to a second generation antipsychotic (risperidone) alter brain activation and motor activity? A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Berle, Jan Øystein; Løberg, Else-Marie; Fasmer, Ole Bernt

    2013-01-01

    Background: In patients with schizophrenia, altered brain activation and motor activity levels are central features, reflecting cognitive impairments and negative symptoms, respectively. Newer studies using nonlinear methods have addressed the severe disturbances in neurocognitive functioning that is regarded as one of the core features of schizophrenia. Our aim was to compare brain activation and motor activity in a patient during pharmacological treatment that was switched fr...

  17. Altered cardiovascular autonomic regulation in overweight children engaged in regular physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucini, Daniela; de Giacomi, Gaia; Tosi, Fabio; Malacarne, Mara; Respizzi, Stefano; Pagani, Massimo

    2013-03-01

    Overweight (OW) and obesity in children are important forerunners of cardiovascular risk, possibly through autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysregulation, while physical exercise exerts a beneficial influence. In this observational study we hypothesise that OW might influence ANS profile even in a population performing high volume of supervised exercise. We study 103 young soccer players, homogeneous in terms of gender (all male), cultural background, school, age (11.2 ± 1 years) and exercise routine, since they all belong to the same soccer club, thus guaranteeing equality of supervised training and similar levels of competitiveness. ANS is evaluated by autoregressive spectral analysis of heart rate and systolic arterial pressure (SAP) variabilities. We estimate also the accumulated weekly Metabolic Equivalents and time spent in sedentary activities. We subdivide the entire population in two subgroups (normal weight and OW) based on the International Obesity Task Force criteria. In OW soccer players (10.7% of total group) we observe an altered profile of autonomic cardiovascular regulation, characterised by higher values of SAP (113 ± 4 vs 100 ± 1 mm Hg, 39.7 ± 3 vs 66.2 ± 10%), higher Low Frequency variability power of SAP (an index of vasomotor sympathetic regulation) (12 ± 3 vs 4.5 mm Hg(2)) and smaller spontaneous baroreflex gain (an index of cardiac vagal regulation) (19 ± 3 vs 33 ± 3 ms/mm Hg) (all (p < 0.02)). Moreover Correlation analysis on the entire study population shows a significant link between anthropometric and autonomic indices. These data show that OW is associated to a clear autonomic impairment even in children subjected to an intense aerobic training. PMID:23086975

  18. Gut Taste Stimulants Alter Brain Activity in Areas Related to Working Memory: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Christin Meyer-Gerspach

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Taste perception is one of the most important primary oral reinforcers, driving nutrient and energy intake as well as toxin avoidance. Taste receptors in the gastrointestinal tract might as well impact appetitive or aversive behavior and thus influence learning tasks and a close relation of neural taste processing and working memory networks seems plausible. Methods: In the present pilot study, we determined the effects of five taste qualities “bitter” (quinine, “sweet” (glucose, “sour” (citric acid, “salty” (NaCl and “umami” (monosodium glutamate, MSG on working memory processing using functional MRI and their effect on plasma insulin and glucose levels. On six separate occasions, subjects received one of the following test substances dissolved in 200 mL tap water via a nasogastric tube (to circumvent the oral cavity: 1 2g citric acid corresponding to 52 mM, 2 2g NaCl; 171 mM, 3 0.017g quinine; 0.26 mM, 4 1g monosodium glutamate; 30 mM, 5 25g glucose; 694 mM and 6 200 mL tap water (placebo. Results: The taste qualities “bitter” and “umami” significantly altered brain activation patterns in the primary gustatory cortex as well as in subcortical structures, previously reported to be involved in emotional learning and memory. In contrast, glucose did not reveal any statistically significant brain activation difference. Working memory performance was not different over the six treatments. Plasma insulin and glucose levels were not affected by the different taste substances (MSG, quinine, NaCl and citric acid. Conclusions: in this pilot trial, we demonstrate that acute intragastric administration of different taste substances does not affect working memory performance in humans. However, “umami” and “bitter” have effects on brain areas involved in neural working memory, overpowering the effects of “sweet”, “salty” and “sour” reception.

  19. Methoxychlor induces atresia by altering Bcl2 factors and inducing caspase activity in mouse ovarian antral follicles in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S; Karman, Bethany N; Wang, Wei; Gupta, Rupesh K; Flaws, Jodi A

    2012-12-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide widely used in many countries against various species of insects that attack crops and domestic animals. MXC reduces fertility by increasing atresia (death) of antral follicles in vivo. MXC also induces atresia of antral follicles after 96 h in vitro. The current work tested the hypothesis that MXC induces morphological atresia at early time points (24 and 48 h) by altering pro-apoptotic (Bax, Bok, Casp3, and caspase activity) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl2 and Bcl-xL) factors in the follicles. The results indicate that at 24 h, MXC increased Bcl-xL and Bax mRNA levels and increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl2. At 48-96 h, MXC induced morphological atresia. At 24-96 h, MXC increased caspase activities. These data suggest that MXC may induce atresia by altering Bcl2 factors and inducing caspase activities in antral follicles.

  20. Activation of protein kinase A alters subnuclear distribution pattern of human steroidogenic factor 1 in living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei刘伟; FAN Wu-qiang范吴强; Toshihiko Yanase; Masayuki Saitoh; WU Yin吴茵

    2004-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify the subnuclear distribution pattern of human orphan nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) in living cells with and without the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) signal pathway, and thus try to explain the unknown mechanism by which PKA potentiates SF-1 transactivation. Methods Full-length cDNAs of wild type and a naturally occurring mutant (G35E) human SF-1 were cloned and fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP). Subcellular distribution pattern of human SF-1 in living cells, whose PKA signaling was either activated or not, was studied by laser confocal microscopy after the validity of the gene sequence was confirmed.Results The transactivation ability of the GFP-SF-1 chimeric protein was highly conserved. Wild type human SF-1 diffused homogeneously within the nuclei of cells when PKA was not active, and converged to clear foci when PKA was activated. Mutant SF-1 diffused within the nuclei even in the presence of PKA activation, surprisingly aggregating as fluorescent dots inside the nucleoli, a phenomenon not altered by PKA.Conclusions Activation of PKA causes wild type, but not mutant SF-1 to alter its subnuclear distribution pattern to a transactivationally active form (foci formation). This finding may throw new light on the mechanism by which PKA activates the orphan nuclear receptor.

  1. Exposure to Forced Swim Stress Alters Local Circuit Activity and Plasticity in the Dentate Gyrus of the Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouna Maroun

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that, depending on its severity and context, stress can affect neural plasticity. Most related studies focused on synaptic plasticity and long-term potentiation (LTP of principle cells. However, evidence suggests that following high-frequency stimulation, which induces LTP in principal cells, modifications also take place at the level of complex interactions with interneurons within the dentate gyrus, that is, at the local circuit level. So far, the possible effects of stress on local circuit activity and plasticity were not studied. Therefore, we set out to examine the possible alterations in local circuit activity and plasticity following exposure to stress. Local circuit activity and plasticity were measured by using frequency dependant inhibition (FDI and commissural modulation protocols following exposure to a 15 minute-forced swim trial. Exposure to stress did not alter FDI. The application of theta-burst stimulation (TBS reduced FDI in both control and stressed rats, but this type of plasticity was greater in stressed rats. Commissural-induced inhibition was significantly higher in stressed rats both before and after applying theta-burst stimulation. These findings indicate that the exposure to acute stress affects aspects of local circuit activity and plasticity in the dentate gyrus. It is possible that these alterations underlie some of the behavioral consequences of the stress experience.

  2. Exposure to forced swim stress alters local circuit activity and plasticity in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarom, Orli; Maroun, Mouna; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown that, depending on its severity and context, stress can affect neural plasticity. Most related studies focused on synaptic plasticity and long-term potentiation (LTP) of principle cells. However, evidence suggests that following high-frequency stimulation, which induces LTP in principal cells, modifications also take place at the level of complex interactions with interneurons within the dentate gyrus, that is, at the local circuit level. So far, the possible effects of stress on local circuit activity and plasticity were not studied. Therefore, we set out to examine the possible alterations in local circuit activity and plasticity following exposure to stress. Local circuit activity and plasticity were measured by using frequency dependant inhibition (FDI) and commissural modulation protocols following exposure to a 15 minute-forced swim trial. Exposure to stress did not alter FDI. The application of theta-burst stimulation (TBS) reduced FDI in both control and stressed rats, but this type of plasticity was greater in stressed rats. Commissural-induced inhibition was significantly higher in stressed rats both before and after applying theta-burst stimulation. These findings indicate that the exposure to acute stress affects aspects of local circuit activity and plasticity in the dentate gyrus. It is possible that these alterations underlie some of the behavioral consequences of the stress experience.

  3. Alteration of non-swelling clay minerals and magadiite by acid activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steudel, A.; Batenburg, L.F.; Fischer, H.R.; Weidler, P.G.; Emmerich, K.

    2009-01-01

    The bulk material of three kaolins, a sepiolite, an illite and one magadiite were treated with 1, 5 and 10 M H2SO4 at 80 °C for several hours. The alteration of the non-swelling clay mineral structures was controlled by the individual character of each mineral (chemical composition and initial parti

  4. Impaired APP activity and altered Tau splicing in embryonic stem cell-derived astrocytes obtained from an APPsw transgenic minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane; Lindblad, Maiken Marie; Jakobsen, Jannik E.;

    2015-01-01

    analyze in vitro-produced stem cells and their derivatives from a large mammalian model of the disease created by overexpression of a single mutant human gene (APPsw). We produced hemizygous and homozygous radial glial-like cells following culture and differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs......) isolated from embryos obtained from mated hemizygous minipigs. These cells were confirmed to co-express varying neural markers, including NES, GFAP and BLBP, typical of type one radial glial cells (RGs) from the subgranular zone. These cells had altered expression of CCND1 and NOTCH1 and decreased...... expression of several ribosomal RNA genes. We found that these cells were able to differentiate into astrocytes upon directed differentiation. The astrocytes produced had decreased α- and β-secretase activity, increased γ-secretase activity and altered splicing of tau. This indicates novel aspects of early...

  5. Lack of SOD1 gene mutations and activity alterations in two Italian families with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestri, D; Cecchi, C; Tedde, A; Latorraca, S; Orlacchio, A; Grassi, E; Massaro, A M; Liguri, G; St George-Hyslop, P H; Sorbi, S

    2000-08-11

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal disorder, which results from the degeneration of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. Approximately 20% of the inherited autosomal dominant cases are due to mutations within the gene coding for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a cytosolic homodimeric enzyme that catalyzes the dismutation of toxic superoxide anion. We investigated the presence of SOD1 gene mutations and activity alterations in two unrelated families of ALS patients from Elba, an island of central Italy. No mutation in SOD1 exon 1 to 5 and no activity alteration were observed in all members of the two analyzed ALS families (FALS). These data show an apparent heterogeneous distribution of ALS patients with SOD1 gene mutations among different populations and suggest that another genetic locus could be involved in the disease. PMID:10961653

  6. Differential Larval Toxicity and Oviposition Altering Activity of Some Indigenous Plant Extracts against Dengue and Chikungunya Vector Aedes albopictus.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruchi Yadav; Varun Tyagi; Tikar, Sachin N; Sharma, Ajay K.; Murlidhar J Mendki; Jain, Ashok K; Devanathan Sukumaran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mosquitoes are well known as vectors of several disease causing pathogens. The extensive use of synthetic insecticides in the mosquito control strategies resulted to the development of pesticide resistance and fostered environmental deterioration. Hence in recent years plants become alternative source of mosquito control agents. The present study assessed the larvicidal and oviposition altering activity of six different plants species-Alstonia scholaris, Callistemon viminalis, Hyp...

  7. Prenatal Immune Activation Induces Maturation-Dependent Alterations in the Prefrontal GABAergic Transcriptome

    OpenAIRE

    Richetto, J; Calabrese, F; M.A. RIVA; Meyer, U.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal dysfunctions in the cortical GABAergic system have been widely documented in neuropsychiatric disorders with prenatal infectious etiologies, including schizophrenia. At least some of these abnormalities may stem from transcriptional impairments in the GABAergic transcriptome. However, the extent to which prenatal exposure to immune challenge can induce long-term alterations in GABAergic gene transcription remains largely elusive. Here, we use an established mouse model of prenatal im...

  8. The Activity of Major Faults and the Hydrothermal Alteration Zone at Tianchi Volcano of Changbaishan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Mingjun; Gu Menglin; Sun Zhenguo; Wei Haiquan; Jin Bolu

    2004-01-01

    It is found by field investigation that the near horizontal top surface of the brown or brick-red hydrothermal alteration zone varies obviously in elevation at different sections of the same layer on the caldera's inner wall of Tianchi, with that at the north section near the Tianwen Peak about 110 m higher than that at the south near the Jiangjun Peak in Korea. The top surface of the hydrothermal alteration zone can be taken as key horizon to tectonic movement. The difference indicates that the total uplift height of the NW wall of the Liudaogou-TianchiJingfengshan fault, the principal fault trending NE at Tianchi, is bigger than that of the SE wall ever since the occurrence of hydrothermal alteration. This also explains why the topography in the northwest side of Tianchi is steeper and with more developed river system than in the southeast. The uplifting of the northeastern wall is bigger than that of the southwest along the principal NW-trend fault, namely, the Baishanzhen-Tianchi-Jince fault. It is observed from characters of hydrothermal alteration and the palaeoresiduum, that the recent vertical movement rate along the principal NE-trend fault is larger than that of the principal NW-trend fault. The two faults intersect at Tianchi, dividing the volcano into 4 blocks, with the uplift magnitudes decreasing successively in the order of the north, the west, the east and the south block. The biggest uplift of the north block corresponds well to the shallow magma batch in the north of Tianchi observed by DSS and telluric electromagnetic sounding, and etc.and they may be related with the causes.

  9. Alterations of metabolic activity in human osteoarthritic osteoblasts by lipid peroxidation end product 4-hydroxynonenal

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Qin; Vaillancourt, France; Côté, Véronique; Fahmi, Hassan; Lavigne, Patrick; Afif, Hassan; Di Battista, John A.; Fernandes, Julio C; Benderdour, Mohamed

    2006-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE), a lipid peroxidation end product, is produced abundantly in osteoarthritic (OA) articular tissues, but its role in bone metabolism is ill-defined. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that alterations in OA osteoblast metabolism are attributed, in part, to increased levels of HNE. Our data showed that HNE/protein adduct levels were higher in OA osteoblasts compared to normal and when OA osteoblasts were treated with H2O2. Investigating osteoblast markers, we found t...

  10. Central muscarinic cholinergic activation alters interaction between splenic dendritic cell and CD4+CD25- T cells in experimental colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peris Munyaka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP is based on vagus nerve (VN activity that regulates macrophage and dendritic cell responses in the spleen through alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR signaling. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients present dysautonomia with decreased vagus nerve activity, dendritic cell and T cell over-activation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether central activation of the CAP alters the function of dendritic cells (DCs and sequential CD4+/CD25-T cell activation in the context of experimental colitis. METHODS: The dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of experimental colitis in C57BL/6 mice was used. Central, intracerebroventricular infusion of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist McN-A-343 was used to activate CAP and vagus nerve and/or splenic nerve transection were performed. In addition, the role of α7nAChR signaling and the NF-kB pathway was studied. Serum amyloid protein (SAP-A, colonic tissue cytokines, IL-12p70 and IL-23 in isolated splenic DCs, and cytokines levels in DC-CD4+CD25-T cell co-culture were determined. RESULTS: McN-A-343 treatment reduced colonic inflammation associated with decreased pro-inflammatory Th1/Th17 colonic and splenic cytokine secretion. Splenic DCs cytokine release was modulated through α7nAChR and the NF-kB signaling pathways. Cholinergic activation resulted in decreased CD4+CD25-T cell priming. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of central cholinergic activation was abolished in mice with vagotomy or splenic neurectomy. CONCLUSIONS: Suppression of splenic immune cell activation and altered interaction between DCs and T cells are important aspects of the beneficial effect of brain activation of the CAP in experimental colitis. These findings may lead to improved therapeutic strategies in the treatment of IBD.

  11. Impaired APP activity and altered Tau splicing in embryonic stem cell-derived astrocytes obtained from an APPsw transgenic minipig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa J. Hall

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of familial juvenile onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD often fail to produce diverse pathological features of the disease by modification of single gene mutations that are responsible for the disease. They can hence be poor models for testing and development of novel drugs. Here, we analyze in vitro-produced stem cells and their derivatives from a large mammalian model of the disease created by overexpression of a single mutant human gene (APPsw. We produced hemizygous and homozygous radial glial-like cells following culture and differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs isolated from embryos obtained from mated hemizygous minipigs. These cells were confirmed to co-express varying neural markers, including NES, GFAP and BLBP, typical of type one radial glial cells (RGs from the subgranular zone. These cells had altered expression of CCND1 and NOTCH1 and decreased expression of several ribosomal RNA genes. We found that these cells were able to differentiate into astrocytes upon directed differentiation. The astrocytes produced had decreased α- and β-secretase activity, increased γ-secretase activity and altered splicing of tau. This indicates novel aspects of early onset mechanisms related to cell renewal and function in familial AD astrocytes. These outcomes also highlight that radial glia could be a potentially useful population of cells for drug discovery, and that altered APP expression and altered tau phosphorylation can be detected in an in vitro model of the disease. Finally, it might be possible to use large mammal models to model familial AD by insertion of only a single mutation.

  12. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments. PMID:27729845

  13. Alterations of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase activities in Eriocheir japonicus in response to water pollution.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishizuka, M; Hoshi, H.; Minamoto, N; Masuda, M; Kazusaka, A; Fujita, S.

    1996-01-01

    Eriocheir japonicus, fresh-water crabs inhabiting rivers and estuaries in Japan, were investigated for cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent drug-metabolizing enzyme activities to see if these activities reflect the river pollution gradient. From the laboratory dose-response experiments, we found that the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) 3-methylcholanthrene induced total CYP contents, ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase activity, and bunitrolol 4-hydroxylase activity in crab hepatopancreas. In the fi...

  14. Altered neuronal activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus: An electrophysiological study in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiwen; Xie, Jinlu; Wang, Xuenan; Wang, Xiusong; Zhang, Xiao; Hou, Yabing; Lei, Chengdong; Li, Min; Qu, Qingyang; He, Tingting; Han, Hongyu; Yao, Xiaomeng; Wang, Min

    2016-05-15

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a new deep brain stimulation target for treating Parkinson's disease (PD). But the alterations of the PPN electrophysiological activities in PD are still debated. To investigate these potential alterations, extracellular single unit and local field potential (LFP) activities in the PPN were recorded in unilateral hemispheric 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rats and in control rats, respectively. The spike activity results revealed two types of neurons (Type I and Type II) with distinct electrophysiological characteristics in the PPN. Both types of neurons had increased firing rate and changed firing pattern in lesioned rats when compared to control rats. Specifically, Type II neurons showed an increased firing rate when the rat state was switched from rest to locomotion. The LFP results demonstrated that lesioned rats had lower LFP power at 0.7-12Hz and higher power at 12-30Hz than did control animals in either resting or locomotor state. These findings provide a better understanding of the effects of 6-OHDA lesion on neuronal activities in the PPN and also provide a proof of the link between this structure and locomotion, which contributes to better understanding the mechanisms of the PPN functioning in the pathophysiology of PD. PMID:26924016

  15. Altered Hub Functioning and Compensatory Activations in the Connectome: A Meta-Analysis of Functional Neuroimaging Studies in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Nicolas A.; Mechelli, Andrea; Ginestet, Cedric; Rubinov, Mikail; Bullmore, Edward T.; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background: Functional neuroimaging studies of schizophrenia have identified abnormal activations in many brain regions. In an effort to interpret these findings from a network perspective, we carried out a meta-analysis of this literature, mapping anatomical locations of under- and over-activation to the topology of a normative human functional connectome. Methods: We included 314 task-based functional neuroimaging studies including more than 5000 patients with schizophrenia and over 5000 controls. Coordinates of significant under- or over-activations in patients relative to controls were mapped to nodes of a normative connectome defined by a prior meta-analysis of 1641 functional neuroimaging studies of task-related activation in healthy volunteers. Results: Under-activations and over-activations were reported in a wide diversity of brain regions. Both under- and over-activations were significantly more likely to be located in hub nodes that constitute the “rich club” or core of the normative connectome. In a subset of 121 studies that reported both under- and over-activations in the same patients, we found that, in network terms, these abnormalities were located in close topological proximity to each other. Under-activation in a peripheral node was more frequently associated specifically with over-activation of core nodes than with over-activation of another peripheral node. Conclusions: Although schizophrenia is associated with altered brain functional activation in a wide variety of regions, abnormal responses are concentrated in hubs of the normative connectome. Task-specific under-activation in schizophrenia is accompanied by over-activation of topologically central, less functionally specialized network nodes, which may represent a compensatory response. PMID:26472684

  16. Supramammillary serotonin reduction alters place learning and concomitant hippocampal, septal, and supramammillar theta activity in a Morris water maze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pérez, J. Jesús; Gutiérrez-Guzmán, Blanca E.; López-Vázquez, Miguel Á.; Olvera-Cortés, María E.

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal theta activity is related to spatial information processing, and high-frequency theta activity, in particular, has been linked to efficient spatial memory performance. Theta activity is regulated by the synchronizing ascending system (SAS), which includes mesencephalic and diencephalic relays. The supramamillary nucleus (SUMn) is located between the reticularis pontis oralis and the medial septum (MS), in close relation with the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PHn), all of which are part of this ascending system. It has been proposed that the SUMn plays a role in the modulation of hippocampal theta-frequency; this could occur through direct connections between the SUMn and the hippocampus or through the influence of the SUMn on the MS. Serotonergic raphe neurons prominently innervate the hippocampus and several components of the SAS, including the SUMn. Serotonin desynchronizes hippocampal theta activity, and it has been proposed that serotonin may regulate learning through the modulation of hippocampal synchrony. In agreement with this hypothesis, serotonin depletion in the SUMn/PHn results in deficient spatial learning and alterations in CA1 theta activity-related learning in a Morris water maze. Because it has been reported that SUMn inactivation with lidocaine impairs the consolidation of reference memory, we asked whether changes in hippocampal theta activity related to learning would occur through serotonin depletion in the SUMn, together with deficiencies in memory. We infused 5,7-DHT bilaterally into the SUMn in rats and evaluated place learning in the standard Morris water maze task. Hippocampal (CA1 and dentate gyrus), septal and SUMn EEG were recorded during training of the test. The EEG power in each region and the coherence between the different regions were evaluated. Serotonin depletion in the SUMn induced deficient spatial learning and altered the expression of hippocampal high-frequency theta activity. These results provide evidence in

  17. Supplemental feeding for ecotourism reverses diel activity and alters movement patterns and spatial distribution of the southern stingray, Dasyatis americana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Corcoran

    Full Text Available Southern stingrays, Dasyatis americana, have been provided supplemental food in ecotourism operations at Stingray City Sandbar (SCS, Grand Cayman since 1986, with this site becoming one of the world's most famous and heavily visited marine wildlife interaction venues. Given expansion of marine wildlife interactive tourism worldwide, there are questions about the effects of such activities on the focal species and their ecosystems. We used a combination of acoustic telemetry and tag-recapture efforts to test the hypothesis that human-sourced supplemental feeding has altered stingray activity patterns and habitat use at SCS relative to wild animals at control sites. Secondarily, we also qualitatively estimated the population size of stingrays supporting this major ecotourism venue. Tag-recapture data indicated that a population of at least 164 stingrays, over 80% female, utilized the small area at SCS for prolonged periods of time. Examination of comparative movements of mature female stingrays at SCS and control sites revealed strong differences between the two groups: The fed animals demonstrated a notable inversion of diel activity, being constantly active during the day with little movement at night compared to the nocturnally active wild stingrays; The fed stingrays utilized significantly (p<0.05 smaller 24 hour activity spaces compared to wild conspecifics, staying in close proximity to the ecotourism site; Fed stingrays showed a high degree of overlap in their core activity spaces compared to wild stingrays which were largely solitary in the spaces utilized (72% vs. 3% overlap respectively. Supplemental feeding has strikingly altered movement behavior and spatial distribution of the stingrays, and generated an atypically high density of animals at SCS which could have downstream fitness costs for individuals and potentially broader ecosystem effects. These findings should help environmental managers plan mitigating measures for existing

  18. Short-term withdrawal from developmental exposure to cocaine activates the glucocorticoid receptor and alters spine dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffino, Lucia; Giannotti, Giuseppe; Malpighi, Chiara; Racagni, Giorgio; Fumagalli, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    Although glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) contribute to the action of cocaine, their role following developmental exposure to the psychostimulant is still unknown. To address this issue, we exposed adolescent male rats to cocaine (20mg/kg/day) from post-natal day (PND) 28 to PND 42 and sacrificed them at PND 45 or 90. We studied the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a brain region that is still developing during adolescence. In PND 45 rats we found enhanced GR transcription and translation as well as increased trafficking toward the nucleus of the receptor, with no alteration in plasma corticosterone levels. We also showed reduced expression of the GR co-chaperone FKBP51, that normally keeps the receptor in the cytoplasm, and increased expression of Src1, which cooperates in the activation of GR transcriptional activity, revealing that short withdrawal alters the finely tuned mechanisms regulating GR action. Since activation of GRs regulate dendritic spine morphology, we next investigated spine dynamics in cocaine-withdrawn rats. We found that PSD95, cofilin and F-actin, molecules regulating spine actin network, are reduced in the mPFC of PND 45 rats suggesting reduced spine density, confirmed by confocal imaging. Further, formation of filopodia, i.e. the inactive spines, is enhanced suggesting the formation of non-functional spines. Of note, no changes were found in molecules related to GR machinery or spine dynamics following long-term abstinence, i.e. in adult rats (PND 90). These findings demonstrate that short withdrawal promotes plastic changes in the developing brain via the dysregulation of the GR system and alterations in the spine network. PMID:26004981

  19. Minocycline treatment inhibits microglial activation and alters spinal levels of endocannabinoids in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasti, Leonardo; Richardson, Denise; Jhaveri, Maulik; Eldeeb, Khalil; Barrett, David; Elphick, Maurice R; Alexander, Stephen P H; Kendall, David; Michael, Gregory J; Chapman, Victoria

    2009-07-01

    Activation of spinal microglia contributes to aberrant pain responses associated with neuropathic pain states. Endocannabinoids (ECs) are present in the spinal cord, and inhibit nociceptive processing; levels of ECs may be altered by microglia which modulate the turnover of endocannabinoids in vitro. Here, we investigate the effect of minocycline, an inhibitor of activated microglia, on levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and the related compound N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA), in neuropathic spinal cord. Selective spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats resulted in mechanical allodynia and the presence of activated microglia in the ipsilateral spinal cord. Chronic daily treatment with minocycline (30 mg/kg, ip for 14 days) significantly reduced the development of mechanical allodynia at days 5, 10 and 14 post-SNL surgery, compared to vehicle-treated SNL rats (P pain states.

  20. Minocycline treatment inhibits microglial activation and alters spinal levels of endocannabinoids in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elphick Maurice R

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Activation of spinal microglia contributes to aberrant pain responses associated with neuropathic pain states. Endocannabinoids (ECs are present in the spinal cord, and inhibit nociceptive processing; levels of ECs may be altered by microglia which modulate the turnover of endocannabinoids in vitro. Here, we investigate the effect of minocycline, an inhibitor of activated microglia, on levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG, and the related compound N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA, in neuropathic spinal cord. Selective spinal nerve ligation (SNL in rats resulted in mechanical allodynia and the presence of activated microglia in the ipsilateral spinal cord. Chronic daily treatment with minocycline (30 mg/kg, ip for 14 days significantly reduced the development of mechanical allodynia at days 5, 10 and 14 post-SNL surgery, compared to vehicle-treated SNL rats (P P P P P

  1. Highly active modulators of indole signaling alter pathogenic behaviors in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minvielle, Marine J; Eguren, Kristen; Melander, Christian

    2013-12-16

    Indole is a universal signal that regulates various bacterial behaviors, such as biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. To generate mechanistic probes of indole signaling and control indole-mediated pathogenic phenotypes in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, we have investigated the use of desformylflustrabromine (dFBr) derivatives to generate highly active indole mimetics. We have developed non-microbicidal dFBr derivatives that are 27-2000 times more active than indole in modulating biofilm formation, motility, acid resistance, and antibiotic resistance. The activity of these analogues parallels indole, because they are dependent on temperature, the enzyme tryptophanase TnaA, and the transcriptional regulator SdiA. This investigation demonstrates that molecules based on the dFBr scaffold can alter pathogenic behaviors by mimicking indole-signaling pathways.

  2. Altered Theta Oscillations and Aberrant Cortical Excitatory Activity in the 5XFAD Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Elisabeth Siwek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impairment of memory function. The 5XFAD mouse model was analyzed and compared with wild-type (WT controls for aberrant cortical excitability and hippocampal theta oscillations by using simultaneous video-electroencephalogram (EEG monitoring. Seizure staging revealed that 5XFAD mice exhibited cortical hyperexcitability whereas controls did not. In addition, 5XFAD mice displayed a significant increase in hippocampal theta activity from the light to dark phase during nonmotor activity. We also observed a reduction in mean theta frequency in 5XFAD mice compared to controls that was again most prominent during nonmotor activity. Transcriptome analysis of hippocampal probes and subsequent qPCR validation revealed an upregulation of Plcd4 that might be indicative of enhanced muscarinic signalling. Our results suggest that 5XFAD mice exhibit altered cortical excitability, hippocampal dysrhythmicity, and potential changes in muscarinic signaling.

  3. Differential Larval Toxicity and Oviposition Altering Activity of Some Indigenous Plant Extracts against Dengue and Chikungunya Vector Aedes albopictus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Yadav

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes are well known as vectors of several disease causing pathogens. The extensive use of synthetic insecticides in the mosquito control strategies resulted to the development of pesticide resistance and fostered environmental deterioration. Hence in recent years plants become alternative source of mosquito control agents. The present study assessed the larvicidal and oviposition altering activity of six different plants species-Alstonia scholaris, Callistemon viminalis, Hyptis suaveolens, Malvastrum coromandelianum, Prosopis juliflora, Vernonia cinerea against Aedes albopictus mosquito in laboratory.Leaf extracts of all the six plants species in five different solvents of various polarities were used in the range of 20-400ppm for larval bioassay and 50,100 and 200ppm for cage bioassay (for the study of oviposition behavior against Ae. albopictus. The larval mortality data were recorded after 24 h and subjected to Probit analysis to determine the lethal concentrations (LC50, while OAI (Oviposition activity index was calculated for oviposition altering activity of the plant extracts.Vernonia cinerea extract in acetone and C. viminalis extract in isopropanol were highly effective against Aedes albopictus larvae with LC50 value 64.57, 71.34ppm respectively. Acetone extract of P. juliflora found to be strong oviposition-deterrent which inhibited >2 fold egg laying (OAI-0.466 at 100ppm.Vernonia cinerea and C. viminallis leaf extracts have the potential to be used as larvicide and P. juliflora as an oviposition-deterrent for the control of Ae. albopictus mosquito.

  4. Supplemental feeding for ecotourism reverses diel activity and alters movement patterns and spatial distribution of the southern stingray, Dasyatis americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Mark J; Wetherbee, Bradley M; Shivji, Mahmood S; Potenski, Matthew D; Chapman, Demian D; Harvey, Guy M

    2013-01-01

    Southern stingrays, Dasyatis americana, have been provided supplemental food in ecotourism operations at Stingray City Sandbar (SCS), Grand Cayman since 1986, with this site becoming one of the world's most famous and heavily visited marine wildlife interaction venues. Given expansion of marine wildlife interactive tourism worldwide, there are questions about the effects of such activities on the focal species and their ecosystems. We used a combination of acoustic telemetry and tag-recapture efforts to test the hypothesis that human-sourced supplemental feeding has altered stingray activity patterns and habitat use at SCS relative to wild animals at control sites. Secondarily, we also qualitatively estimated the population size of stingrays supporting this major ecotourism venue. Tag-recapture data indicated that a population of at least 164 stingrays, over 80% female, utilized the small area at SCS for prolonged periods of time. Examination of comparative movements of mature female stingrays at SCS and control sites revealed strong differences between the two groups: The fed animals demonstrated a notable inversion of diel activity, being constantly active during the day with little movement at night compared to the nocturnally active wild stingrays; The fed stingrays utilized significantly (pecotourism site; Fed stingrays showed a high degree of overlap in their core activity spaces compared to wild stingrays which were largely solitary in the spaces utilized (72% vs. 3% overlap respectively). Supplemental feeding has strikingly altered movement behavior and spatial distribution of the stingrays, and generated an atypically high density of animals at SCS which could have downstream fitness costs for individuals and potentially broader ecosystem effects. These findings should help environmental managers plan mitigating measures for existing operations, and develop precautionary policies regarding proposed feeding sites.

  5. Supplemental feeding for ecotourism reverses diel activity and alters movement patterns and spatial distribution of the southern stingray, Dasyatis americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Mark J; Wetherbee, Bradley M; Shivji, Mahmood S; Potenski, Matthew D; Chapman, Demian D; Harvey, Guy M

    2013-01-01

    Southern stingrays, Dasyatis americana, have been provided supplemental food in ecotourism operations at Stingray City Sandbar (SCS), Grand Cayman since 1986, with this site becoming one of the world's most famous and heavily visited marine wildlife interaction venues. Given expansion of marine wildlife interactive tourism worldwide, there are questions about the effects of such activities on the focal species and their ecosystems. We used a combination of acoustic telemetry and tag-recapture efforts to test the hypothesis that human-sourced supplemental feeding has altered stingray activity patterns and habitat use at SCS relative to wild animals at control sites. Secondarily, we also qualitatively estimated the population size of stingrays supporting this major ecotourism venue. Tag-recapture data indicated that a population of at least 164 stingrays, over 80% female, utilized the small area at SCS for prolonged periods of time. Examination of comparative movements of mature female stingrays at SCS and control sites revealed strong differences between the two groups: The fed animals demonstrated a notable inversion of diel activity, being constantly active during the day with little movement at night compared to the nocturnally active wild stingrays; The fed stingrays utilized significantly (pecotourism site; Fed stingrays showed a high degree of overlap in their core activity spaces compared to wild stingrays which were largely solitary in the spaces utilized (72% vs. 3% overlap respectively). Supplemental feeding has strikingly altered movement behavior and spatial distribution of the stingrays, and generated an atypically high density of animals at SCS which could have downstream fitness costs for individuals and potentially broader ecosystem effects. These findings should help environmental managers plan mitigating measures for existing operations, and develop precautionary policies regarding proposed feeding sites. PMID:23527144

  6. Altered spontaneous brain activity in patients with acute spinal cord injury revealed by resting-state functional MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhu

    Full Text Available Previous neuroimaging studies have provided evidence of structural and functional reorganization of brain in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI. However, it remains unknown whether the spontaneous brain activity changes in acute SCI. In this study, we investigated intrinsic brain activity in acute SCI patients using a regional homogeneity (ReHo analysis based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.A total of 15 patients with acute SCI and 16 healthy controls participated in the study. The ReHo value was used to evaluate spontaneous brain activity, and voxel-wise comparisons of ReHo were performed to identify brain regions with altered spontaneous brain activity between groups. We also assessed the associations between ReHo and the clinical scores in brain regions showing changed spontaneous brain activity.Compared with the controls, the acute SCI patients showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary motor cortex/primary somatosensory cortex, bilateral supplementary motor area/dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral caudate; and increased ReHo in bilateral precuneus, the left inferior parietal lobe, the left brainstem/hippocampus, the left cingulate motor area, bilateral insula, bilateral thalamus and bilateral cerebellum. The average ReHo values of the left thalamus and right insula were negatively correlated with the international standards for the neurological classification of spinal cord injury motor scores.Our findings indicate that acute distant neuronal damage has an immediate impact on spontaneous brain activity. In acute SCI patients, the ReHo was prominently altered in brain regions involved in motor execution and cognitive control, default mode network, and which are associated with sensorimotor compensatory reorganization. Abnormal ReHo values in the left thalamus and right insula could serve as potential biomarkers for

  7. Masked Priming Effects in Aphasia: Evidence of Altered Automatic Spreading Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silkes, JoAnn P.; Rogers, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research has suggested that impairments of automatic spreading activation may underlie some aphasic language deficits. The current study further investigated the status of automatic spreading activation in individuals with aphasia as compared with typical adults. Method: Participants were 21 individuals with aphasia (12 fluent, 9…

  8. Binding among Select Episodic Elements Is Altered via Active Short-Term Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Donna J.; Voss, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Of the many elements that comprise an episode, are any disproportionately bound to the others? We tested whether active short-term retrieval selectively increases binding. Individual objects from multiobject displays were retrieved after brief delays. Memory was later tested for the other objects. Cueing with actively retrieved objects facilitated…

  9. Plant location and extraction procedure strongly alter the antimicrobial activity of murta extracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shene, Carolina; Reyes, Agnes K.; Villarroel, Mario;

    2009-01-01

    activity of the extract. The higher antimicrobial activity of leaves extracts compared to the fruits could be attributed to flavan-3-ols and other flavonol glycosides. Quercetin glucuronide, myricetin xyloside and flavan-3-ols in polymeric form were tentatively identified for the first time in murta...

  10. Consecutive bouts of diverse contractile activity alter acute responses in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coffey, Vernon G; Pilegaard, Henriette; Garnham, Andrew P;

    2009-01-01

    -activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha mRNA did not reveal an order effect. We conclude that acute responses to diverse bouts of contractile activity are modified by the exercise order. Moreover, undertaking divergent exercise in close proximity influences the acute molecular profile and likely exacerbates...

  11. Altered activity of plasma hemopexin in patients with minimal change disease in relapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, WW; van Dael, CML; Pierik, LJWM; van Wijk, JAE; Nauta, J; Borghuis, T; Kapojos, JJ

    2005-01-01

    Since an active isoform of plasma hemopexin (Hx) has been proposed to be a potential effector molecule in minimal change disease (MCD), we tested plasma and urine samples from subjects with MCD in relapse (n =18) or in remission (n =23) (after treatment with prednisolone) for presence or activity of

  12. Molecular kinetics. Ras activation by SOS: allosteric regulation by altered fluctuation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Lars; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Lin, Wan-Chen; Christensen, Sune M; Abel, Steven M; Iwig, Jeff; Wu, Hung-Jen; Gureasko, Jodi; Rhodes, Christopher; Petit, Rebecca S; Hansen, Scott D; Thill, Peter; Yu, Cheng-Han; Stamou, Dimitrios; Chakraborty, Arup K; Kuriyan, John; Groves, Jay T

    2014-07-01

    Activation of the small guanosine triphosphatase H-Ras by the exchange factor Son of Sevenless (SOS) is an important hub for signal transduction. Multiple layers of regulation, through protein and membrane interactions, govern activity of SOS. We characterized the specific activity of individual SOS molecules catalyzing nucleotide exchange in H-Ras. Single-molecule kinetic traces revealed that SOS samples a broad distribution of turnover rates through stochastic fluctuations between distinct, long-lived (more than 100 seconds), functional states. The expected allosteric activation of SOS by Ras-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) was conspicuously absent in the mean rate. However, fluctuations into highly active states were modulated by Ras-GTP. This reveals a mechanism in which functional output may be determined by the dynamical spectrum of rates sampled by a small number of enzymes, rather than the ensemble average.

  13. Negative stereotype activation alters interaction between neural correlates of arousal, inhibition and cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Chad E; Cox, Christine L; Schmader, Toni; Ryan, Lee

    2012-10-01

    Priming negative stereotypes of African Americans can bias perceptions toward novel Black targets, but less is known about how these perceptions ultimately arise. Examining how neural regions involved in arousal, inhibition and control covary when negative stereotypes are activated can provide insight into whether individuals attempt to downregulate biases. Using fMRI, White egalitarian-motivated participants were shown Black and White faces at fast (32 ms) or slow (525 ms) presentation speeds. To create a racially negative stereotypic context, participants listened to violent and misogynistic rap (VMR) in the background. No music (NM) and death metal (DM) were used as control conditions in separate blocks. Fast exposure of Black faces elicited amygdala activation in the NM and VMR conditions (but not DM), that also negatively covaried with activation in prefrontal regions. Only in VMR, however, did amygdala activation for Black faces persist during slow exposure and positively covary with activation in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex while negatively covarying with activation in orbitofrontal cortex. Findings suggest that contexts that prime negative racial stereotypes seem to hinder the downregulation of amygdala activation that typically occurs when egalitarian perceivers are exposed to Black faces. PMID:21954239

  14. Low-dose photon irradiation alters cell differentiation via activation of hIK channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Bastian; Gibhardt, Christine S; Becker, Patrick; Gebhardt, Manuela; Knoop, Jan; Fournier, Claudia; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    To understand the impact of ionizing irradiation from diagnostics and radiotherapy on cells, we examined K(+) channel activity before and immediately after exposing cells to X-rays. Already, low dose in the cGy range caused in adenocarcinoma A549 cells within minutes a hyperpolarization following activation of the human intermediate-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (hIK). The response was specific for cells, which functionally expressed hIK channels and in which hIK activity was low before irradiation. HEK293 cells, which do not respond to X-ray irradiation, accordingly develop a sensitivity to this stress after heterologous expression of hIK channels. The data suggest that hIK activation involves a Ca(2+)-mediated signaling cascade because channel activation is suppressed by a strong cytosolic Ca(2+) buffer. The finding that an elevation of H2O2 causes an increase in the concentration of cytosolic Ca(2+) suggests that radicals, which emerge early in response to irradiation, trigger this Ca(2+) signaling cascade. Inhibition of hIK channels by specific blockers clotrimazole and TRAM-34 slowed cell proliferation and migration in "wound" scratch assays; ionizing irradiation, in turn, stimulated the latter process presumably via its activation of the hIK channels. These data stress an indirect radiosensitivity of hIK channels with an impact on cell differentiation. PMID:25277267

  15. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C-C; Cole, S W

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1-4 (EGR1-4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators. PMID:27219347

  16. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C -C; Cole, S W

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1–4 (EGR1–4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators. PMID:27187237

  17. An Activated Form of UFO Alters Leaf Development and Produces Ectopic Floral and Inflorescence Meristems

    OpenAIRE

    Eddy Risseeuw; Prakash Venglat; Daoquan Xiang; Kristina Komendant; Tim Daskalchuk; Vivijan Babic; William Crosby; Raju Datla

    2013-01-01

    Plants are unique in their ability to continuously produce new meristems and organ primordia. In Arabidopsis, the transcription factor LEAFY (LFY) functions as a master regulator of a gene network that is important for floral meristem and organ specification. UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) is a co-activator of LEAFY and is required for proper activation of APETALA3 in the floral meristem during the specification of stamens and petals. The ufo mutants display defects in other parts of the flower ...

  18. Altered Spontaneous Brain Activity in Cortical and Subcortical Regions in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The present study aimed to explore the changes of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF at rest in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD. Methods. Twenty-four PD patients and 22 healthy age-matched controls participated in the study. ALFF was measured on the whole brain of all participants. A two-sample t-test was then performed to detect the group differences with age, gender, education level, head motion, and gray matter volume as covariates. Results. It was showed that PD patients had significantly decreased ALFF in the left thalamus/caudate and right insula/inferior prefrontal gyrus, whereas they had increased ALFF in the right medial prefrontal cortex (BA 8/6 and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 9/10. Conclusions. Our results indicated that significant alterations of ALFF in the subcortical regions and prefrontal cortex have been detected in PD patients, independent of age, gender, education, head motion, and structural atrophy. The current findings further provide insights into the biological mechanism of the disease.

  19. Altered Spontaneous Brain Activity in Cortical and Subcortical Regions in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jie; Jia, Xiuqin; Li, Huizhuo; Qin, Jiawei; Li, Kuncheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The present study aimed to explore the changes of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) at rest in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. Twenty-four PD patients and 22 healthy age-matched controls participated in the study. ALFF was measured on the whole brain of all participants. A two-sample t-test was then performed to detect the group differences with age, gender, education level, head motion, and gray matter volume as covariates. Results. It was showed that PD patients had significantly decreased ALFF in the left thalamus/caudate and right insula/inferior prefrontal gyrus, whereas they had increased ALFF in the right medial prefrontal cortex (BA 8/6) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 9/10). Conclusions. Our results indicated that significant alterations of ALFF in the subcortical regions and prefrontal cortex have been detected in PD patients, independent of age, gender, education, head motion, and structural atrophy. The current findings further provide insights into the biological mechanism of the disease.

  20. Altered Spontaneous Brain Activity in Cortical and Subcortical Regions in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jie; Jia, Xiuqin; Li, Huizhuo; Qin, Jiawei; Liang, Peipeng; Li, Kuncheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The present study aimed to explore the changes of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) at rest in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. Twenty-four PD patients and 22 healthy age-matched controls participated in the study. ALFF was measured on the whole brain of all participants. A two-sample t-test was then performed to detect the group differences with age, gender, education level, head motion, and gray matter volume as covariates. Results. It was showed that PD patients had significantly decreased ALFF in the left thalamus/caudate and right insula/inferior prefrontal gyrus, whereas they had increased ALFF in the right medial prefrontal cortex (BA 8/6) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 9/10). Conclusions. Our results indicated that significant alterations of ALFF in the subcortical regions and prefrontal cortex have been detected in PD patients, independent of age, gender, education, head motion, and structural atrophy. The current findings further provide insights into the biological mechanism of the disease.

  1. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI.

  2. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI. PMID:26939033

  3. Physiological alterations of maximal voluntary quadriceps activation by changes of knee joint angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, R; Awiszus, F

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of different angles of the knee joint on voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle, estimating the ability of a subject to activate a muscle maximally by means of voluntary contraction. Isometric torque measurement was performed on 6 healthy subjects in 5 degrees intervals between 30 degrees and 90 degrees of knee joint flexion. Superimposed twitches at maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and at a level of 60% and 40% of the MVC were applied and the voluntary activation estimated. At between 30 degrees and 75 degrees of knee flexion, the maximal extension torque increased at an average rate of 2.67 +/- 0.6 Nm/degree, followed by a decline with further flexion. However, throughout the joint-angle range tested, voluntary activation increased on average by 0.37%/degree with a maximum at 90 degrees of flexion. Due to the influence of joint position it is not possible to generalize results obtained at the knee joint angle of 90 degrees of flexion, which is usually used for the quadriceps twitch-interpolation technique. Consequently, it is useful to investigate voluntary activation deficits in knee joint disorders at a range of knee joint angles that includes, in particular, the more extended joint angles used frequently during daily activity.

  4. Widespread alterations in the synaptic proteome of the adolescent cerebral cortex following prenatal immune activation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Györffy, Balázs A; Gulyássy, Péter; Gellén, Barbara; Völgyi, Katalin; Madarasi, Dóra; Kis, Viktor; Ozohanics, Olivér; Papp, Ildikó; Kovács, Péter; Lubec, Gert; Dobolyi, Árpád; Kardos, József; Drahos, László; Juhász, Gábor; Kékesi, Katalin A

    2016-08-01

    An increasing number of studies have revealed associations between pre- and perinatal immune activation and the development of schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Accordingly, neuroimmune crosstalk has a considerably large impact on brain development during early ontogenesis. While a plethora of heterogeneous abnormalities have already been described in established maternal immune activation (MIA) rodent and primate animal models, which highly correlate to those found in human diseases, the underlying molecular background remains obscure. In the current study, we describe the long-term effects of MIA on the neocortical pre- and postsynaptic proteome of adolescent rat offspring in detail. Molecular differences were revealed in sub-synaptic fractions, which were first thoroughly characterized using independent methods. The widespread proteomic examination of cortical samples from offspring exposed to maternal lipopolysaccharide administration at embryonic day 13.5 was conducted via combinations of different gel-based proteomic techniques and tandem mass spectrometry. Our experimentally validated proteomic data revealed more pre- than postsynaptic protein level changes in the offspring. The results propose the relevance of altered synaptic vesicle recycling, cytoskeletal structure and energy metabolism in the presynaptic region in addition to alterations in vesicle trafficking, the cytoskeleton and signal transduction in the postsynaptic compartment in MIA offspring. Differing levels of the prominent signaling regulator molecule calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the postsynapse was validated and identified specifically in the prefrontal cortex. Finally, several potential common molecular regulators of these altered proteins, which are already known to be implicated in schizophrenia and ASD, were identified and assessed. In summary, unexpectedly widespread changes in the synaptic molecular machinery in MIA rats were demonstrated which

  5. Epimorphin alters the inhibitory effects of SOX9 on Mmp13 in activated hepatic stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Pritchett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Liver fibrosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. It is characterised by excessive extracellular matrix (ECM deposition from activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs. Although potentially reversible, treatment remains limited. Understanding how ECM influences the pathogenesis of the disease may provide insight into novel therapeutic targets for the disease. The extracellular protein Epimorphin (EPIM has been implicated in tissue repair mechanisms in several tissues, partially, through its ability to manipulate proteases. In this study, we have identified that EPIM modulates the ECM environment produced by activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs, in part, through down-regulation of pro-fibrotic Sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9. METHODS: Influence of EPIM on ECM was investigated in cultured primary rat HSCs. Activated HSCs were treated with recombinant EPIM or SOX9 siRNA. Core fibrotic factors were evaluated by immunoblotting, qPCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP. RESULTS: During HSC activation EPIM became significantly decreased in contrast to pro-fibrotic markers SOX9, Collagen type 1 (COL1, and α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA. Treatment of activated HSCs with recombinant EPIM caused a reduction in α-SMA, SOX9, COL1 and Osteopontin (OPN, while increasing expression of the collagenase matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13. Sox9 abrogation in activated HSCs increased EPIM and MMP13 expression. CONCLUSION: These data provide evidence for EPIM and SOX9 functioning by mutual negative feedback to regulate attributes of the quiescent or activated state of HSCs. Further understanding of EPIM's role may lead to opportunities to modulate SOX9 as a therapeutic avenue for liver fibrosis.

  6. Bovine growth hormone transgenic mice display alterations in locomotor activity and brain monoamine neurochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderpalm, B; Ericson, M; Bohlooly, M; Engel, J A; Törnell, J

    1999-12-01

    Recent clinical and experimental data indicate a role for GH in mechanisms related to anhedonia/hedonia, psychic energy, and reward. In the present study we have investigated whether bovine GH (bGH) transgenic mice and nontransgenic controls differ in spontaneous locomotor activity, a behavioral response related to brain dopamine (DA) and reward mechanisms, as well as in locomotor activity response to drugs of abuse known to interfere with brain DA systems. The animals were tested for locomotor activity once a week for 4 weeks. When first exposed to the test apparatus, bGH transgenic animals displayed significantly more locomotor activity than controls during the entire registration period (1 h). One week later, after acute pretreatment with saline, the two groups did not differ in locomotor activity, whereas at the third test occasion, bGH mice were significantly more stimulated by d-amphetamine (1 mg/kg, ip) than controls. At the fourth test, a tendency for a larger locomotor stimulatory effect of ethanol (2.5 g/kg, ip) was observed in bGH transgenic mice. bGH mice displayed increased tissue levels of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in several brain regions, decreased DA levels in the brain stem, and decreased levels of the DA metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in the mesencephalon and diencephalon, compared with controls. In conclusion, bGH mice display more spontaneous locomotor activity than nontransgenic controls in a novel environment and possibly also a disturbed habituation process. The finding that bGH mice were also more sensitive to d-amphetamine-induced locomotor activity may suggest that the behavioral differences observed are related to differences in brain DA systems, indicating a hyperresponsiveness of these systems in bGH transgenic mice. These findings may constitute a neurochemical basis for the reported psychic effects of GH in humans. PMID:10579325

  7. Prenatal drug exposure to illicit drugs alters working memory-related brain activity and underlying network properties in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Julie B; Riggins, Tracy; Liang, Xia; Gallen, Courtney; Kurup, Pradeep K; Ross, Thomas J; Black, Maureen M; Nair, Prasanna; Salmeron, Betty Jo

    2015-01-01

    The persistence of effects of prenatal drug exposure (PDE) on brain functioning during adolescence is poorly understood. We explored neural activation to a visuospatial working memory (VSWM) versus a control task using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in adolescents with PDE and a community comparison group (CC) of non-exposed adolescents. We applied graph theory metrics to resting state data using a network of nodes derived from the VSWM task activation map to further explore connectivity underlying WM functioning. Participants (ages 12-15 years) included 47 adolescents (27 PDE and 20 CC). All analyses controlled for potentially confounding differences in birth characteristics and postnatal environment. Significant group by task differences in brain activation emerged in the left middle frontal gyrus (BA 6) with the CC group, but not the PDE group, activating this region during VSWM. The PDE group deactivated the culmen, whereas the CC group activated it during the VSWM task. The CC group demonstrated a significant relation between reaction time and culmen activation, not present in the PDE group. The network analysis underlying VSWM performance showed that PDE group had lower global efficiency than the CC group and a trend level reduction in local efficiency. The network node corresponding to the BA 6 group by task interaction showed reduced nodal efficiency and fewer direct connections to other nodes in the network. These results suggest that adolescence reveals altered neural functioning related to response planning that may reflect less efficient network functioning in youth with PDE.

  8. An altered intestinal mucosal microbiome in HIV-1 infection is associated with mucosal and systemic immune activation and endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, S M; Lee, E J; Kotter, C V; Austin, G L; Dong, Z; Hecht, D K; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, D M; Landay, A L; Robertson, C E; Frank, D N; Wilson, C C

    2014-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection disrupts the intestinal immune system, leading to microbial translocation and systemic immune activation. We investigated the impact of HIV-1 infection on the intestinal microbiome and its association with mucosal T-cell and dendritic cell (DC) frequency and activation, as well as with levels of systemic T-cell activation, inflammation, and microbial translocation. Bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing was performed on colon biopsies and fecal samples from subjects with chronic, untreated HIV-1 infection and uninfected control subjects. Colon biopsies of HIV-1-infected subjects had increased abundances of Proteobacteria and decreased abundances of Firmicutes compared with uninfected donors. Furthermore at the genus level, a significant increase in Prevotella and decrease in Bacteroides was observed in HIV-1-infected subjects, indicating a disruption in the Bacteroidetes bacterial community structure. This HIV-1-associated increase in Prevotella abundance was associated with increased numbers of activated colonic T cells and myeloid DCs. Principal coordinates analysis demonstrated an HIV-1-related change in the microbiome that was associated with increased mucosal cellular immune activation, microbial translocation, and blood T-cell activation. These observations suggest that an important relationship exists between altered mucosal bacterial communities and intestinal inflammation during chronic HIV-1 infection. PMID:24399150

  9. Alterations of N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid-activated K2P channels in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gorm; Wandall-Frostholm, Christine; Sadda, Veeranjaneyulu;

    2013-01-01

    in pulmonary vasorelaxation and that alterations of channel expression are pathophysiologically linked to pulmonary hypertension. Expression of PUFA-activated K2P in the murine lung was investigated by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry (IHC), by patch...... clamp (PC) and myography. K2P -gene expression was examined in chronic hypoxic mice. qRT-PCR showed that the K2P 2.1 and K2P 6.1 were the predominantly expressed K2P in the murine lung. IHC revealed protein expression of K2P 2.1 and K2P 6.1 in the endothelium of pulmonary arteries and of K2P 6...... relaxations that were resistant to endothelial removal and inhibition of NO and prostacyclin synthesis and to a cocktail of blockers of calcium-activated K(+) channels but were abolished by high extracellular (30 mM) K(+) -concentration. Gene expression and protein of K2P 2.1 were not altered in chronic...

  10. Comparison of hematological alterations and markers of B-cell activation in workers exposed to benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassig, Bryan A; Zhang, Luoping; Vermeulen, Roel; Tang, Xiaojiang; Li, Guilan; Hu, Wei; Guo, Weihong; Purdue, Mark P; Yin, Songnian; Rappaport, Stephen M; Shen, Min; Ji, Zhiying; Qiu, Chuangyi; Ge, Yichen; Hosgood, H Dean; Reiss, Boris; Wu, Banghua; Xie, Yuxuan; Li, Laiyu; Yue, Fei; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Blair, Aaron; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Hanlin; Smith, Martyn T; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Benzene, formaldehyde (FA) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are ubiquitous chemicals in workplaces and the general environment. Benzene is an established myeloid leukemogen and probable lymphomagen. FA is classified as a myeloid leukemogen but has not been associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), whereas TCE has been associated with NHL but not myeloid leukemia. Epidemiologic associations between FA and myeloid leukemia, and between benzene, TCE and NHL are, however, still debated. Previously, we showed that these chemicals are associated with hematotoxicity in cross-sectional studies of factory workers in China, which included extensive personal monitoring and biological sample collection. Here, we compare and contrast patterns of hematotoxicity, monosomy 7 in myeloid progenitor cells (MPCs), and B-cell activation biomarkers across these studies to further evaluate possible mechanisms of action and consistency of effects with observed hematologic cancer risks. Workers exposed to benzene or FA, but not TCE, showed declines in cell types derived from MPCs, including granulocytes and platelets. Alterations in lymphoid cell types, including B cells and CD4+ T cells, and B-cell activation markers were apparent in workers exposed to benzene or TCE. Given that alterations in myeloid and lymphoid cell types are associated with hematological malignancies, our data provide biologic insight into the epidemiological evidence linking benzene and FA exposure with myeloid leukemia risk, and TCE and benzene exposure with NHL risk. PMID:27207665

  11. Substitution of Val72 residue alters the enantioselectivity and activity of Penicillium expansum lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lianghua; Su, Min; Zhu, Ling; Chi, Liying; Zhang, Junling; Zhou, Qiong

    2013-01-01

    Error-prone PCR was used to create more active or enantioselective variants of Penicillium expansum lipase (PEL). A variant with a valine to glycine substitution at residue 72 in the lid structure exhibited higher activity and enantioselectivity than those of wild-type PEL. Site-directed saturation mutagenesis was used to explore the sequence-function relationship and the substitution of Val72 of P. expansum lipase changed both catalytic activity and enantioselectivity greatly. The variant V72A, displayed a highest enantioselectivity enhanced to about twofold for the resolution of (R, S)-naproxen (E value increased from 104 to 200.7 for wild-type PEL and V72A variant, respectively). In comparison to PEL, the variant V72A showed a remarkable increase in specific activity towards p-nitrophenyl palmitate (11- and 4-fold increase at 25 and 35 °C, respectively) whereas it had a decreased thermostability. The results suggest that the enantioselective variant V72A could be used for the production of pharmaceutical drugs such as enantiomerically pure (S)-naproxen and the residue Val 72 of P. expansum lipase plays a significant role in the enantioselectivity and activity of this enantioselective lipase. PMID:22972595

  12. Gliadin-mediated proliferation and innate immune activation in celiac disease are due to alterations in vesicular trafficking.

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    M Vittoria Barone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Damage to intestinal mucosa in celiac disease (CD is mediated both by inflammation due to adaptive and innate immune responses, with IL-15 as a major mediator of the innate immune response, and by proliferation of crypt enterocytes as an early alteration of CD mucosa causing crypts hyperplasia. We have previously shown that gliadin peptide P31-43 induces proliferation of cell lines and celiac enterocytes by delaying degradation of the active epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR due to delayed maturation of endocytic vesicles. IL-15 is increased in the intestine of patients affected by CD and has pleiotropic activity that ultimately results in immunoregulatory cross-talk between cells belonging to the innate and adaptive branches of the immune response. Aims of this study were to investigate the role of P31-43 in the induction of cellular proliferation and innate immune activation. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cell proliferation was evaluated by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation both in CaCo-2 cells and in biopsies from active CD cases and controls. We used real-time PCR to evaluate IL-15 mRNA levels and FACS as well as ELISA and Western Blot (WB analysis to measure protein levels and distribution in CaCo-2 cells. Gliadin and P31-43 induce a proliferation of both CaCo-2 cells and CD crypt enterocytes that is dependent on both EGFR and IL-15 activity. In CaCo-2 cells, P31-43 increased IL-15 levels on the cell surface by altering intracellular trafficking. The increased IL-15 protein was bound to IL15 receptor (IL-15R alpha, did not require new protein synthesis and functioned as a growth factor. CONCLUSION: In this study, we have shown that P31-43 induces both increase of the trans-presented IL-15/IL5R alpha complex on cell surfaces by altering the trafficking of the vesicular compartments as well as proliferation of crypt enterocytes with consequent remodelling of CD mucosa due to a cooperation of IL-15 and EGFR.

  13. Effects of active immunisation with myelin basic protein and myelin-derived altered peptide ligand on pain hypersensitivity and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Chamini J; Lees, Justin G; Duffy, Samuel S; Makker, Preet G S; Fivelman, Brett; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Moalem-Taylor, Gila

    2015-09-15

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Specific myelin basic protein (MBP) peptides are encephalitogenic, and myelin-derived altered peptide ligands (APLs) are capable of preventing and ameliorating EAE. We investigated the effects of active immunisation with a weakly encephalitogenic epitope of MBP (MBP87-99) and its mutant APL (Cyclo-87-99[A(91),A(96)]MBP87-99) on pain hypersensitivity and neuroinflammation in Lewis rats. MBP-treated rats exhibited significant mechanical and thermal pain hypersensitivity associated with infiltration of T cells, MHC class II expression and microglia activation in the spinal cord, without developing clinical signs of paralysis. Co-immunisation with APL significantly decreased pain hypersensitivity and neuroinflammation emphasising the important role of neuroimmune crosstalk in neuropathic pain.

  14. Methionine-choline deprivation alters liver and brain acetylcholinesterase activity in C57BL6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vučević, Danijela B; Cerović, Ivana B; Mladenović, Dušan R; Vesković, Milena N; Stevanović, Ivana; Jorgačević, Bojan Z; Ješić Vukićević, Rada; Radosavljević, Tatjana S

    2016-07-01

    Choline and methionine are precursors of acetylcholine, whose hydrolysis is catalyzed by acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Considering the possibility of their common deficiency, we investigated the influence of methionine-choline deprivation on AChE activity in liver and various brain regions (hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebral cortex and striatum) in mice fed with methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet. Male C57BL/6 mice (n = 28) were randomly and equally divided into following groups: control group fed with standard diet for 6 weeks (C) and groups fed with MCD diet for 2 weeks (MCD2), 4 weeks (MCD4) and for 6 weeks (MCD6). After the diet, mice were sacrificied and AChE activity in liver and brain was determined spectrophotometrically. Hepatic AChE activity was higher in MCD2, MCD4 and MCD6 compared to control (p methionine-choline deprivation.

  15. Limiting prothrombin activation to meizothrombin is compatible with survival but significantly alters hemostasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Maureen A; Kombrinck, Keith W; McElhinney, Kathryn E; Sweet, David R; Flick, Matthew J; Palumbo, Joseph S; Cheng, Mei; Esmon, Naomi L; Esmon, Charles T; Brill, Alexander; Wagner, Denisa D; Degen, Jay L; Mullins, Eric S

    2016-08-01

    Thrombin-mediated proteolysis is central to hemostatic function but also plays a prominent role in multiple disease processes. The proteolytic conversion of fII to α-thrombin (fIIa) by the prothrombinase complex occurs through 2 parallel pathways: (1) the inactive intermediate, prethrombin; or (2) the proteolytically active intermediate, meizothrombin (fIIa(MZ)). FIIa(MZ) has distinct catalytic properties relative to fIIa, including diminished fibrinogen cleavage and increased protein C activation. Thus, fII activation may differentially influence hemostasis and disease depending on the pathway of activation. To determine the in vivo physiologic and pathologic consequences of restricting thrombin generation to fIIa(MZ), mutations were introduced into the endogenous fII gene, resulting in expression of prothrombin carrying 3 amino acid substitutions (R157A, R268A, and K281A) to limit activation events to yield only fIIa(MZ) Homozygous fII(MZ) mice are viable, express fII levels comparable with fII(WT) mice, and have reproductive success. Although in vitro studies revealed delayed generation of fIIa(MZ) enzyme activity, platelet aggregation by fII(MZ) is similar to fII(WT) Consistent with prior analyses of human fIIa(MZ), significant prolongation of clotting times was observed for fII(MZ) plasma. Adult fII(MZ) animals displayed significantly compromised hemostasis in tail bleeding assays, but did not demonstrate overt bleeding. More notably, fII(MZ) mice had 2 significant phenotypic advantages over fII(WT) animals: protection from occlusive thrombosis after arterial injury and markedly diminished metastatic potential in a setting of experimental tumor metastasis to the lung. Thus, these novel animals will provide a valuable tool to assess the role of both fIIa and fIIa(MZ) in vivo. PMID:27252233

  16. Altered Cortical Activation in Adolescents With Acute Migraine: A Magnetoencephalography Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jing; deGrauw, Xinyao; Korostenskaja, Milena; Korman, Abraham M.; O’Brien, Hope L.; Kabbouche, Marielle A.; Powers, Scott W.; Hershey, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    To quantitatively assess cortical dysfunction in pediatric migraine, 31 adolescents with acute migraine and age- and gender-matched controls were studied using a magnetoencephalography (MEG) system at a sampling rate of 6,000 Hz. Neuromagnetic brain activation was elicited by a finger-tapping task. The spectral and spatial signatures of magnetoencephalography data in 5 to 2,884 Hz were analyzed using Morlet wavelet and beamformers. Compared with controls, 31 migraine subjects during their headache attack phases (ictal) showed significantly prolonged latencies of neuromagnetic activation in 5 to 30 Hz, increased spectral power in 100 to 200 Hz, and a higher likelihood of neuromagnetic activation in the supplementary motor area, the occipital and ipsilateral sensorimotor cortices, in 2,200 to 2,800 Hz. Of the 31 migraine subjects, 16 migraine subjects during their headache-free phases (interictal) showed that there were no significant differences between interictal and control MEG data except that interictal spectral power in 100 to 200 Hz was significantly decreased. The results demonstrated that migraine subjects had significantly aberrant ictal brain activation, which can normalize interictally. The spread of abnormal ictal brain activation in both low- and high-frequency ranges triggered by movements may play a key role in the cascade of migraine attacks. Perspective This is the first study focusing on the spectral and spatial signatures of cortical dysfunction in adolescents with migraine using MEG signals in a frequency range of 5 to 2,884 Hz. This analyzing aberrant brain activation may be important for developing new therapeutic interventions for migraine in the future. PMID:23792072

  17. Altered cortical activation patterns associated with baroreflex unloading following 24 h of physical deconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, J K; Usselman, C W; Rothwell, A; Wong, S W

    2012-12-01

    Cardiovascular arousal is associated with patterned cortical activity changes. Head-down-tilt bed rest (HDBR) dimishes the baroreflex-mediated cardiac control. The present study tested the hypothesis that HDBR deconditioning would modify the forebrain organization for heart rate (HR) control during baroreflex unloading. Heart rate variability (HRV), blood pressure and plasma hormones were analysed at rest, whereas HR and cortical autonomic activation patterns (functional magnetic resonance imaging) were measured during graded and randomly assigned lower body negative pressure treatments (LBNP, -15 and -35 mmHg) both before (Pre) and after (Post) a 24 h HDBR protocol (study 1; n = 8). An additional group was tested before and following diuretic-induced hypovolaemia (study 2; n = 9; spironolactone, 100 mg day(-1) for 3 days) that mimicked the plasma volume lost during HDBR (-15% in both studies; P development of the following changes: (i) enhanced activation within the genual anterior cingulate cortex and the right anterior insular cortex; and (ii) deactivation patterns within the subgenual regions of the anterior cingulate cortex. Diuretic treatment (without HDBR) did not affect baseline HR and mean arterial pressure, but did reduce resting HRV and elevated circulating noradrenaline and plasma renin activity (P impact of diuretic treatment on baseline autonomic and cardiovascular variables. The findings also indicate that despite the similar augmentation of HR responses to LBNP and despite similar pre-intervention cortical activation patterns, HDBR and diuretic treatment produced different effects on the cortical responses, with HDBR affecting anterior cingulate cortex and right insula regions, whereas diuretic treatment affected primarily the right insula alone, but in a direction that was opposite to HDBR. The data indicate that physical deconditioning can induce rapid functional changes within the cortical circuitry associated with baroreflex unloading, changes

  18. Altered brain activity during reward anticipation in pathological gambling and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Seok Choi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pathological gambling (PG and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD are conceptualized as a behavioral addiction, with a dependency on repetitive gambling behavior and rewarding effects following compulsive behavior, respectively. However, no neuroimaging studies to date have examined reward circuitry during the anticipation phase of reward in PG compared with in OCD while considering repetitive gambling and compulsion as addictive behaviors. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To elucidate the neural activities specific to the anticipation phase of reward, we performed event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in young adults with PG and compared them with those in patients with OCD and healthy controls. Fifteen male patients with PG, 13 patients with OCD, and 15 healthy controls, group-matched for age, gender, and IQ, participated in a monetary incentive delay task during fMRI scanning. Neural activation in the ventromedial caudate nucleus during anticipation of both gain and loss decreased in patients with PG compared with that in patients with OCD and healthy controls. Additionally, reduced activation in the anterior insula during anticipation of loss was observed in patients with PG compared with that in patients with OCD which was intermediate between that in OCD and healthy controls (healthy controls < PG < OCD, and a significant positive correlation between activity in the anterior insula and South Oaks Gambling Screen score was found in patients with PG. CONCLUSIONS: Decreased neural activity in the ventromedial caudate nucleus during anticipation may be a specific neurobiological feature for the pathophysiology of PG, distinguishing it from OCD and healthy controls. Correlation of anterior insular activity during loss anticipation with PG symptoms suggests that patients with PG fit the features of OCD associated with harm avoidance as PG symptoms deteriorate. Our findings have identified functional disparities and

  19. Albinism-causing mutations in recombinant human tyrosinase alter intrinsic enzymatic activity.

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    Monika B Dolinska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tyrosinase (TYR catalyzes the rate-limiting, first step in melanin production and its gene (TYR is mutated in many cases of oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1, an autosomal recessive cause of childhood blindness. Patients with reduced TYR activity are classified as OCA1B; some OCA1B mutations are temperature-sensitive. Therapeutic research for OCA1 has been hampered, in part, by the absence of purified, active, recombinant wild-type and mutant human enzymes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The intra-melanosomal domain of human tyrosinase (residues 19-469 and two OCA1B related temperature-sensitive mutants, R422Q and R422W were expressed in insect cells and produced in T. ni larvae. The short trans-membrane fragment was deleted to avoid potential protein insolubility, while preserving all other functional features of the enzymes. Purified tyrosinase was obtained with a yield of >1 mg per 10 g of larval biomass. The protein was a monomeric glycoenzyme with maximum enzyme activity at 37°C and neutral pH. The two purified mutants when compared to the wild-type protein were less active and temperature sensitive. These differences are associated with conformational perturbations in secondary structure. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The intramelanosomal domains of recombinant wild-type and mutant human tyrosinases are soluble monomeric glycoproteins with activities which mirror their in vivo function. This advance allows for the structure - function analyses of different mutant TYR proteins and correlation with their corresponding human phenotypes; it also provides an important tool to discover drugs that may improve tyrosinase activity and treat OCA1.

  20. Maternal immune activation by LPS selectively alters specific gene expression profiles of interneuron migration and oxidative stress in the fetus without triggering a fetal immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Oskvig, Devon B.; Elkahloun, Abdel G.; Johnson, Kory R.; Phillips, Terry M.; Herkenham, Miles

    2012-01-01

    Maternal immune activation (MIA) is a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia and autism. Infections during pregnancy activate the mother’s immune system and alter the fetal environment, with consequential effects on CNS function and behavior in the offspring, but the cellular and molecular links between infection-induced altered fetal development and risk for neuropsychiatric disorders are unknown. We investigated the immunological, molecular, and behavioral effects of MIA in the of...

  1. Expression of p21-activated kinases 1 and 3 is altered in the brain of subjects with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsova, Beata; Alvarez Juliá, Anabel; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Frasch, Alberto Carlos; Pandey, Ghanshyam N

    2016-10-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) of group I are the main effectors for the small Rho GTPases, critically involved in neurodevelopment, plasticity and maturation of the nervous system. Moreover, the neuronal complexity controlled by PAK1/PAK3 signaling determines the postnatal brain size and synaptic properties. Stress induces alterations at the level of structural and functional synaptic plasticity accompanied by reductions in size and activity of the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). These abnormalities are likely to contribute to the pathology of depression and, in part, reflect impaired cytoskeleton remodeling pointing to the role of Rho GTPase signaling. Thus, the present study assessed the expression of the group I PAKs and their activators in the brain of depressed subjects. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), mRNA levels and coexpression of the group I PAKs: PAK1, PAK2, and PAK3 as well as of their activators: RAC1, CDC42 and ARHGEF7 were examined in postmortem samples from the PFC (n=25) and the hippocampus (n=23) of subjects with depression and compared to control subjects (PFC n=24; hippocampus n=21). Results demonstrated that mRNA levels of PAK1 and PAK3, are significantly reduced in the brain of depressed subjects, with PAK1 being reduced in the PFC and PAK3 in the hippocampus. No differences were observed for the ubiquitously expressed PAK2. Following analysis of gene coexpression demonstrated disruption of coordinated gene expression in the brain of subjects with depression. Abnormalities in mRNA expression of PAK1 and PAK3 as well as their altered coexpression patterns were detected in the brain of subjects with depression. PMID:27474226

  2. An activated form of UFO alters leaf development and produces ectopic floral and inflorescence meristems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risseeuw, Eddy; Venglat, Prakash; Xiang, Daoquan; Komendant, Kristina; Daskalchuk, Tim; Babic, Vivijan; Crosby, William; Datla, Raju

    2013-01-01

    Plants are unique in their ability to continuously produce new meristems and organ primordia. In Arabidopsis, the transcription factor LEAFY (LFY) functions as a master regulator of a gene network that is important for floral meristem and organ specification. UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) is a co-activator of LEAFY and is required for proper activation of APETALA3 in the floral meristem during the specification of stamens and petals. The ufo mutants display defects in other parts of the flower and the inflorescence, suggestive of additional roles. Here we show that the normal determinacy of the developing Arabidopsis leaves is affected by the expression of a gain-of-function UFO fusion protein with the VP16 transcriptional activator domain. In these lines, the rosette and cauline leaf primordia exhibit reiterated serration, and upon flowering produce ectopic meristems that develop into flowers, bract leaves and inflorescences. These striking phenotypes reveal that developing leaves maintain the competency to initiate flower and inflorescence programs. Furthermore, the gain-of-function phenotypes are dependent on LFY and the SEPALLATA (SEP) MADS-box transcription factors, indicative of their functional interactions with UFO. The findings of this study also suggest that UFO promotes the establishment of the lateral meristems and primordia in the peripheral zone of the apical and floral meristems by enhancing the activity of LFY. These novel phenotypes along with the mutant phenotypes of UFO orthologs in other plant species suggest a broader function for UFO in plants. PMID:24376756

  3. An activated form of UFO alters leaf development and produces ectopic floral and inflorescence meristems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risseeuw, Eddy; Venglat, Prakash; Xiang, Daoquan; Komendant, Kristina; Daskalchuk, Tim; Babic, Vivijan; Crosby, William; Datla, Raju

    2013-01-01

    Plants are unique in their ability to continuously produce new meristems and organ primordia. In Arabidopsis, the transcription factor LEAFY (LFY) functions as a master regulator of a gene network that is important for floral meristem and organ specification. UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) is a co-activator of LEAFY and is required for proper activation of APETALA3 in the floral meristem during the specification of stamens and petals. The ufo mutants display defects in other parts of the flower and the inflorescence, suggestive of additional roles. Here we show that the normal determinacy of the developing Arabidopsis leaves is affected by the expression of a gain-of-function UFO fusion protein with the VP16 transcriptional activator domain. In these lines, the rosette and cauline leaf primordia exhibit reiterated serration, and upon flowering produce ectopic meristems that develop into flowers, bract leaves and inflorescences. These striking phenotypes reveal that developing leaves maintain the competency to initiate flower and inflorescence programs. Furthermore, the gain-of-function phenotypes are dependent on LFY and the SEPALLATA (SEP) MADS-box transcription factors, indicative of their functional interactions with UFO. The findings of this study also suggest that UFO promotes the establishment of the lateral meristems and primordia in the peripheral zone of the apical and floral meristems by enhancing the activity of LFY. These novel phenotypes along with the mutant phenotypes of UFO orthologs in other plant species suggest a broader function for UFO in plants.

  4. An activated form of UFO alters leaf development and produces ectopic floral and inflorescence meristems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Risseeuw

    Full Text Available Plants are unique in their ability to continuously produce new meristems and organ primordia. In Arabidopsis, the transcription factor LEAFY (LFY functions as a master regulator of a gene network that is important for floral meristem and organ specification. UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO is a co-activator of LEAFY and is required for proper activation of APETALA3 in the floral meristem during the specification of stamens and petals. The ufo mutants display defects in other parts of the flower and the inflorescence, suggestive of additional roles. Here we show that the normal determinacy of the developing Arabidopsis leaves is affected by the expression of a gain-of-function UFO fusion protein with the VP16 transcriptional activator domain. In these lines, the rosette and cauline leaf primordia exhibit reiterated serration, and upon flowering produce ectopic meristems that develop into flowers, bract leaves and inflorescences. These striking phenotypes reveal that developing leaves maintain the competency to initiate flower and inflorescence programs. Furthermore, the gain-of-function phenotypes are dependent on LFY and the SEPALLATA (SEP MADS-box transcription factors, indicative of their functional interactions with UFO. The findings of this study also suggest that UFO promotes the establishment of the lateral meristems and primordia in the peripheral zone of the apical and floral meristems by enhancing the activity of LFY. These novel phenotypes along with the mutant phenotypes of UFO orthologs in other plant species suggest a broader function for UFO in plants.

  5. Altered cortical activation during action observation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a parametric functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Haiqing; Li, Yuxin; Yin, Bo; Tang, Weijun; Yu, Xiangrong; Geng, Daoying [Huashan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Yan [Fudan University, Department of Neurology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Huang, Weiyuan [People' s Hospital of Hainan Province, Department of Radiology, Haikou, Hainan Province (China); Zhang, Biyun [Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Department of radiotherapy, Affiliated Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China)

    2015-09-15

    To investigate functional cerebral abnormalities in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during action observation. Thirty patients with ALS and 30 matched healthy controls underwent fMRI with an experimental paradigm while observing a video of repetitive flexion-extension of the fingers at three frequency levels or three complexity levels, alternated with periods of a static hand. A parametric analysis was applied to determine the effects of each of the two factors. Action observation activated similar neural networks as the research on execution of action in the ALS patients and healthy subjects in several brain regions related to the mirror-neuron system (MNS). In the ALS patients, in particular, the dorsal lateral premotor cortex (dPMC), inferior parietal gyrus (IPG), and SMA, were more activated compared with the activation in the controls. Increased activation within the primary motor cortex (M1), dPMC, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and superior parietal gyrus (SPG) mainly correlated with hand movement frequency/complexity in the videos in the patients compared with controls. The findings indicated an ongoing compensatory process occurring within the higher order motor-processing system of ALS patients, likely to overcome the loss of function. (orig.)

  6. Protein kinase C gamma mutations in spinocerebellar ataxia 14 increase kinase activity and alter membrane targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, D. S.; Knight, M. A.; Harmison, G. G.; Fischbeck, K. H.; Howell, B. W.

    2005-01-01

    The protein kinase C gamma (PKCgamma) gene is mutated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14). In this study, we investigated the effects of two SCA14 missense mutations, G118D and C150F, on PKCgamma function. We found that these mutations increase the intrinsic activity of PKCgamma. Direct visual

  7. Long-term heavy ketamine use is associated with spatial memory impairment and altered hippocampal activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia J A Morgan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, is rising in popularity as a drug of abuse. Preliminary evidence suggests that chronic, heavy ketamine use may have profound effects on spatial memory but the mechanism of these deficits is as yet unclear. This study aimed to examine the neural mechanism by which heavy ketamine use impairs spatial memory processing. In a sample of 11 frequent ketamine users and 15 polydrug controls, matched for IQ, age and years in education. We used fMRI utilising an ROI approach to examine the neural activity of three regions known to support successful navigation; the hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus and the caudate nucleus during a virtual reality task of spatial memory. Frequent ketamine users displayed spatial memory deficits, accompanied by and related to, reduced activation in both the right hippocampus and left parahippocampal gyrus during navigation from memory, and in the left caudate during memory updating, compared to controls. Ketamine users also exhibited schizotypal and dissociative symptoms that were related to hippocampal activation. Impairments in spatial memory observed in ketamine users are related to changes in medial temporal lobe activation. Disrupted medial temporal lobe function may be a consequence of chronic ketamine abuse and may relate to schizophrenia-like symptomatology observed in ketamine users.

  8. Slowly digestible starch diets alter proximal glucosidase activity and glucose absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucrase-isomaltase (Si) and maltase-glucoamylase (Mgam) are mucosal glucosidases required for digestion of starch to glucose. Ablation of maltase-Mgam reduces in vivo starch digestion. We tested whether slowly digestible starch diets induce changes in glucosidase activities. Rice starch was encaps...

  9. Evidence of altered corticomotor excitability following targeted activation of gluteus maximus training in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Beth E; Southam, Anna C; Kuo, Yi-Ling; Lee, Ya-Yun; Powers, Christopher M

    2016-04-13

    It has been proposed that strengthening and skill training of gluteus maximus (GM) may be beneficial in treating various knee injuries. Given the redundancy of the hip musculature and the small representational area of GM in the primary motor cortex (M1), learning to activate this muscle before prescribing strength exercises and modifying movement strategy would appear to be important. This study aimed to determine whether a short-term activation training program targeting the GM results in neuroplastic changes in M1. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were obtained in 12 healthy individuals at different stimulation intensities while they performed a double-leg bridge. Participants then completed a home exercise program for ∼1 h/day for 6 days that consisted of a single exercise designed to selectively target the GM. Baseline and post-training input-output curves (IOCs) were generated by graphing average MEP amplitudes and cortical silent period durations against corresponding stimulation intensities. Following the GM activation training, the linear slope of both the MEP IOC and cortical silent period IOC increased significantly. Short-term GM activation training resulted in a significant increase in corticomotor excitability as well as changes in inhibitory processes of the GM. We propose that the observed corticomotor plasticity will enable better utilization of the GM in the more advanced stages of a rehabilitation/training program. PMID:26981714

  10. ALTERED HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS AND AMYGDALAR NEURONAL ACTIVITY IN ADULT MICE WITH REPEATED EXPERIENCE OF AGGRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy eSmagin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The repeated experience of winning in a social conflict setting elevates levels of aggression and may lead to violent behavioral patterns. Here we use a paradigm of repeated aggression and fighting deprivation to examine changes in behavior, neurogenesis, and neuronal activity in mice with positive fighting experience. We show that for males, repeated positive fighting experience induces persistent demonstration of aggression and stereotypic behaviors in daily agonistic interactions, enhances aggressive motivation, and elevates levels of anxiety. When winning males are deprived of opportunities to engage in further fights, they demonstrate increased levels of aggressiveness. Positive fighting experience results in increased levels of progenitor cell proliferation and production of young neurons in the hippocampus. This increase is not diminished after a fighting deprivation period. Furthermore, repeated winning experience decreases the number of activated (c-fos positive cells in the basolateral amygdala and increases the number of activated cells in the hippocampus; a subsequent no-fight period restores the number of c-fos-positive cells. Our results indicate that extended positive fighting experience in a social conflict heightens aggression, increases proliferation of neuronal progenitors and production of young neurons in the hippocampus, and decreases neuronal activity in the amygdala; these changes can be modified by depriving the winners of the opportunity for further fights.

  11. Altered cortical activation during action observation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a parametric functional MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate functional cerebral abnormalities in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during action observation. Thirty patients with ALS and 30 matched healthy controls underwent fMRI with an experimental paradigm while observing a video of repetitive flexion-extension of the fingers at three frequency levels or three complexity levels, alternated with periods of a static hand. A parametric analysis was applied to determine the effects of each of the two factors. Action observation activated similar neural networks as the research on execution of action in the ALS patients and healthy subjects in several brain regions related to the mirror-neuron system (MNS). In the ALS patients, in particular, the dorsal lateral premotor cortex (dPMC), inferior parietal gyrus (IPG), and SMA, were more activated compared with the activation in the controls. Increased activation within the primary motor cortex (M1), dPMC, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and superior parietal gyrus (SPG) mainly correlated with hand movement frequency/complexity in the videos in the patients compared with controls. The findings indicated an ongoing compensatory process occurring within the higher order motor-processing system of ALS patients, likely to overcome the loss of function. (orig.)

  12. Expansion of highly activated invariant natural killer T cells with altered phenotype in acute dengue infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaladasa, A; Wickramasinghe, N; Adikari, T N; Gomes, L; Shyamali, N L A; Salio, M; Cerundolo, V; Ogg, G S; Malavige, G Neelika

    2016-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are capable of rapid activation and production of cytokines upon recognition of antigenic lipids presented by CD1d molecules. They have been shown to play a significant role in many viral infections and were observed to be highly activated in patients with acute dengue infection. In order to characterize further their role in dengue infection, we investigated the proportion of iNKT cells and their phenotype in adult patients with acute dengue infection. The functionality of iNKT cells in patients was investigated by both interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 ex-vivo enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays following stimulation with alpha-galactosyl-ceramide (αGalCer). We found that circulating iNKT cell proportions were significantly higher (P = 0·03) in patients with acute dengue when compared to healthy individuals and were predominantly of the CD4(+) subset. iNKT cells of patients with acute dengue had reduced proportions expressing CD8α and CD161 when compared to healthy individuals. The iNKT cells of patients were highly activated and iNKT activation correlated significantly with dengue virus-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody levels. iNKT cells expressing Bcl-6 (P = 0·0003) and both Bcl-6 and inducible T cell co-stimulator (ICOS) (P = 0·006) were increased significantly in patients when compared to healthy individuals. Therefore, our data suggest that in acute dengue infection there is an expansion of highly activated CD4(+) iNKT cells, with reduced expression of CD161 markers. PMID:26874822

  13. Hibiscus sabdariffa extractivities on cadmium-mediated alterations of human U937 cell viability and activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tebekeme Okoko; Diepreye Ere

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of the anthocyanin-rich extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa (H. sabdariffa) calyx on the viability of cadmium-treated U937 cells and cadmium-mediated activation of U937-derived macrophages. Methods:The macrophage cell line U937 was treated with cadmium (0.1μmol/L) and later incubated with the anthocyanin-rich extract and cell viability was assessed via trypan blue staining. In the other experiment, the U937 cells were transformed to the macrophage form by treatment with phorbol 12, myristate 13, and acetate and incubated with cadmium (10μmol/L). The anthocyanin-rich extract was added to the cells later and subsequently, the supernatant of each cell culture was analysed for the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), nitric oxide, and catalase activity as indices for the activation of macrophages. Results:It revealed that the anthocynanin-rich extract significantly (P <0.05) increased the viability of the cells which was suppressed by cadmium when compared to quercetin dihydrate. The extract also reduced the cadmium-mediated production of the markers of macrophage-activation when compared to quercetin dihydrate. In both experiments, the activity of the extract was concentration-dependent (P <0.05). Conclusion:The findings show that H. sabdariffa possesses significant immunoprotective effect. These corroborate the immense reported antioxidant and medicinal potential of the calyces of the plant which could be exploited for pharmacological and neutraceutical advantages.

  14. Herpes simplex virus virion host shutoff (vhs) activity alters periocular disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T J; Ackland-Berglund, C E; Leib, D A

    2000-04-01

    During lytic infection, the virion host shutoff (vhs) protein of herpes simplex virus (HSV) mediates the rapid degradation of RNA and shutoff of host protein synthesis. In mice, HSV type 1 (HSV-1) mutants lacking vhs activity are profoundly attenuated. HSV-2 has significantly higher vhs activity than HSV-1, eliciting a faster and more complete shutoff. To examine further the role of vhs activity in pathogenesis, we generated an intertypic recombinant virus (KOSV2) in which the vhs open reading frame of HSV-1 strain KOS was replaced with that of HSV-2 strain 333. KOSV2 and a marker-rescued virus, KOSV2R, were characterized in cell culture and tested in an in vivo mouse eye model of latency and pathogenesis. The RNA degradation kinetics of KOSV2 was identical to that of HSV-2 333, and both showed vhs activity significantly higher than that of KOS. This demonstrated that the fast vhs-mediated degradation phenotype of 333 had been conferred upon KOS. The growth of KOSV2 was comparable to that of KOS, 333, and KOSV2R in cell culture, murine corneas, and trigeminal ganglia and had a reactivation frequency similar to those of KOS and KOSV2R from explanted latently infected trigeminal ganglia. There was, however, significantly reduced blepharitis and viral replication within the periocular skin of KOSV2-infected mice compared to mice infected with either KOS or KOSV2R. Taken together, these data demonstrate that heightened vhs activity, in the context of HSV-1 infection, leads to increased viral clearance from the skin of mice and that the replication of virus in the skin is a determining factor for blepharitis. These data also suggest a role for vhs in modulating host responses to HSV infection.

  15. AMP Kinase Activation Alters Oxidant-Induced Stress Granule Assembly by Modulating Cell Signaling and Microtubule Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboubi, Hicham; Koromilas, Antonis E; Stochaj, Ursula

    2016-10-01

    Eukaryotic cells assemble stress granules (SGs) when translation initiation is inhibited. Different cell signaling pathways regulate SG production. Particularly relevant to this process is 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which functions as a stress sensor and is transiently activated by adverse physiologic conditions. Here, we dissected the role of AMPK for oxidant-induced SG formation. Our studies identified multiple steps of de novo SG assembly that are controlled by the kinase. Single-cell analyses demonstrated that pharmacological AMPK activation prior to stress exposure changed SG properties, because the granules became more abundant and smaller in size. These altered SG characteristics correlated with specific changes in cell survival, cell signaling, cytoskeletal organization, and the abundance of translation initiation factors. Specifically, AMPK activation increased stress-induced eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2α phosphorylation and reduced the concentration of eIF4F complex subunits eIF4G and eIF4E. At the same time, the abundance of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) was diminished. This loss of HDAC6 was accompanied by increased acetylation of α-tubulin on Lys40. Pharmacological studies further confirmed this novel AMPK-HDAC6 interplay and its importance for SG biology. Taken together, we provide mechanistic insights into the regulation of SG formation. We propose that AMPK activation stimulates oxidant-induced SG formation but limits their fusion into larger granules. PMID:27430620

  16. Altered LKB1/CREB-regulated transcription co-activator (CRTC) signaling axis promotes esophageal cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y; Lin, S; Li, J-L; Nakagawa, H; Chen, Z; Jin, B; Tian, L; Ucar, D A; Shen, H; Lu, J; Hochwald, S N; Kaye, F J; Wu, L

    2012-01-26

    LKB1 is a tumor susceptibility gene for the Peutz-Jeghers cancer syndrome and is a target for mutational inactivation in sporadic human malignancies. LKB1 encodes a serine/threonine kinase that has critical roles in cell growth, polarity and metabolism. A novel and important function of LKB1 is its ability to regulate the phosphorylation of CREB-regulated transcription co-activators (CRTCs) whose aberrant activation is linked with oncogenic activities. However, the roles and mechanisms of LKB1 and CRTC in the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer have not been previously investigated. In this study, we observed altered LKB1-CRTC signaling in a subset of human esophageal cancer cell lines and patient samples. LKB1 negatively regulates esophageal cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro. Mechanistically, we determined that CRTC signaling becomes activated because of LKB1 loss, which results in the transcriptional activation of specific downstream targets including LYPD3, a critical mediator for LKB1 loss-of-function. Our data indicate that de-regulated LKB1-CRTC signaling might represent a crucial mechanism for esophageal cancer progression.

  17. Alterations in Lipoxygenase and Cyclooxygenase-2 Catalytic Activity and mRNA Expression in Prostate Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott B. Shappell

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in prostate tissues and especially cell lines have suggested roles for arachidonic acid (AA metabolizing enzymes in prostate adenocarcinoma (Pca development or progression. The goal of this study was to more fully characterize lipoxygenase (LOX and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 gene expression and AA metabolism in benign and malignant prostate using snap-frozen tissues obtained intraoperatively and mRNA analyses and enzyme assays. Formation of 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE was detected in 23/29 benign samples and 15-LOX-2 mRNA was detected in 21/25 benign samples. In pairs of pure benign and Pca from the same patients, 15-HETE production and 15-LOX-2 mRNA were reduced in Pca versus benign in 9/14 (P=.04 and 14/17 (P=.002, respectively. Under the same conditions, neither 5HETE nor 12-HETE formation was detectable in 29 benign and 24 tumor samples; with a more sensitive assay, traces were detected in some samples, but there was no clear association with tumor tissue. COX-2 mRNA was detected by nuclease protection assay in 7/16 benign samples and 5/16 tumors. In benign and tumor pairs from 10 patients, COX-2 was higher in tumor versus benign in only 2, with similar results by in situ hybridization. Paraffin immunoperoxidase for COX2 was performed in whole mount sections from 87 additional radical prostatectomy specimens, with strong expression in ejaculatory duct as a positive control and corroboration with in situ hybridization. No immunostaining was detected in benign prostate or tumor in 45% of cases. Greater immunostaining in tumor versus benign was present in only 17% of cases, and correlated with high tumor grade (Gleason score 8 and 9 vs. 5 to 7. In conclusion, reduced 15-LOX-2 expression and 15-HETE formation is the most characteristic alteration of AA metabolism in Pca. Increased 12-HETE and 5-HETE formation in Pca were not discernible. Increased COX-2 expression is not a typical abnormality in Pca in general, but

  18. Changes at an activated sludge sewage treatment plant alter the numbers of airborne aerobic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Nadeesha L; Fedorak, Phillip M

    2005-11-01

    In 1976, the activated sludge sewage treatment plant in Edmonton, Canada, was surveyed to determine the numbers of culturable airborne microorganisms. Many changes have been made at the plant to reduce odors and improve treatment efficiency, so in 2004 another survey was done to determine if these changes had reduced the bioaerosols. Covering the grit tanks and primary settling tanks greatly reduced the numbers of airborne microbes. Changing the design and operation of indoor automated sampling taps and sinks also reduced bioaerosols. The secondary was expanded and converted from a conventional activated sludge process using coarse bubble aeration to a biological nutrient removal system using fine bubble aeration. Although the surface area of the secondary more than doubled, the average number of airborne microorganisms in this part of the plant in 2004 was about 1% of that in 1976.

  19. Visual Learning Alters the Spontaneous Activity of the Resting Human Brain: An fNIRS Study

    OpenAIRE

    Haijing Niu; Hao Li; Li Sun; Yongming Su; Jing Huang; Yan Song

    2014-01-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) has been widely used to investigate spontaneous brain activity that exhibits correlated fluctuations. RSFC has been found to be changed along the developmental course and after learning. Here, we investigated whether and how visual learning modified the resting oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO) functional brain connectivity by using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). We demonstrate that after five days of training on an orientation discrimina...

  20. Low temperature alters plasma membrane lipid composition and ATPase activity of pineapple fruit during blackheart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuchan; Pan, Xiaoping; Qu, Hongxia; Underhill, Steven J R

    2014-02-01

    Plasma membrane (PM) plays central role in triggering primary responses to chilling injury and sustaining cellular homeostasis. Characterising response of membrane lipids to low temperature can provide important information for identifying early causal factors contributing to chilling injury. To this end, PM lipid composition and ATPase activity were assessed in pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus) in relation to the effect of low temperature on the development of blackheart, a form of chilling injury. Chilling temperature at 10 °C induced blackheart development in concurrence with increase in electrolyte leakage. PM ATPase activity was decreased after 1 week at low temperature, followed by a further decrease after 2 weeks. The enzyme activity was not changed during 25 °C storage. Loss of total PM phospholipids was found during postharvest senescence, but more reduction was shown from storage at 10 °C. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were the predominant PM phospholipid species. Low temperature increased the level of phosphatidic acid but decreased the level of phosphatidylinositol. Both phospholipid species were not changed during storage at 25 °C. Postharvest storage at both temperatures decreased the levels of C18:3 and C16:1, and increased level of C18:1. Low temperature decreased the level of C18:2 and increased the level of C14:0. Exogenous application of phosphatidic acid was found to inhibit the PM ATPase activity of pineapple fruit in vitro. Modification of membrane lipid composition and its effect on the functional property of plasma membrane at low temperature were discussed in correlation with their roles in blackheart development of pineapple fruit.

  1. Exercise alters liver mitochondria phospholipidomic profile and mitochondrial activity in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Inês O; Maciel, Elisabete; Passos, Emanuel; Torrella, Joan R.; Rizo, David; Viscor, Ginés; Rocha-Rodrigues, Silvia; Santos-Alves, Estela; Domingues, Maria R.; Oliveira, Paulo J; Ascensão, António; Magalhães, José

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane lipid composition is a critical factor in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Exercise is the most prescribed therapeutic strategy against NASH and a potential modulator of lipid membrane. Thus, we aimed to analyze whether physical exercise exerted preventive (voluntary physical activity – VPA) and therapeutic (endurance training – ET) effect on NASH-induced mitochondrial membrane changes. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 36) were divided into standard-diet sedentary (SS, n =...

  2. Altered plasmodial surface anion channel activity and in vitro resistance to permeating antimalarial compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Lisk, Godfrey; Pain, Margaret; Sellers, Morgan; Gurnev, Philip A.; Pillai, Ajay D.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Desai, Sanjay A.

    2010-01-01

    Erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites have increased permeability to various solutes. These changes may be mediated by an unusual small conductance ion channel known as the plasmodial surface anion channel (PSAC). While channel activity benefits the parasite by permitting nutrient acquisition, it can also be detrimental because water-soluble antimalarials may more readily access their parasite targets via this channel. Recently, two such toxins, blasticidin S and leupeptin, were used t...

  3. The relationship between active ghrelin levels and human obesity involves alterations in resting energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzullo, Paolo; Verti, Barbara; Savia, Giulio; Walker, Gillian E; Guzzaloni, Gabriele; Tagliaferri, Mariantonella; Di Blasio, Annamaria; Liuzzi, Antonio

    2004-02-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that exerts a stimulatory effect on appetite and fat accumulation. Ser(3) octanoylation is regarded as a prerequisite for ghrelin biological activity, although des-octanoylated forms may retain biological functions in vitro. Circulating ghrelin levels are usually low in obesity and in states of positive energy balance. Hence, the aim of our study was to analyze plasma active and serum total ghrelin levels in 20 obese (ages, 22-42 yr; body mass index, 41.3 +/- 1.1 kg/m(2)) and 20 lean subjects (ages, 22-43 yr; body mass index, 22.4 +/- 0.6 kg/m(2)) as well as their relationship to measures of glucose homeostasis, body fat, and resting energy expenditure (REE). The measured/predicted REE percentage ratio was calculated to subdivide groups into those with positive (> or = 100% ) and negative (abnormal energy profit adds new evidence to the relationship between ghrelin activity and energy balance in obesity. PMID:14764817

  4. Melamine Alters Glutamatergic Synaptic Transmission of CA3-CA1 Synapses Presynaptically Through Autophagy Activation in the Rat Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Hui; Xiao, Xi; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Melamine is an industrial chemical that can cause central nervous system disorders including excitotoxicity and cognitive impairment. Its illegal use in powdered baby formula was the focus of a milk scandal in China in 2008. One of our previous studies showed that melamine impaired glutamatergic transmission in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. However, the underlying mechanism of action of melamine is unclear, and it is unknown if the CA3-CA1 pathway is directly involved. In the present study, a whole-cell patch-clamp technique was employed to investigate the effect of melamine on the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway in vitro. Both the evoked excitatory postsynaptic current (eEPSC) and the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) were recorded. Furthermore, we examined whether autophagy was involved in glutamatergic transmission alterations induced by melamine. Our data showed that melamine significantly increased the amplitude of eEPSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor did not prevent the increase in eEPSC amplitude. In addition, the PPR was remarkably decreased by a melamine concentration of 5 × 10(-5) g/mL. It was found that autophagy could be activated by melamine and an autophagy inhibitor, 3-MA, prevented the melamine-induced increase in eEPSC amplitude. Overall, our results show that melamine presynaptically alters glutamatergic synaptic transmission of hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses in vitro and this is likely associated with autophagy alteration. PMID:26530910

  5. Pharmacological PPARα activation markedly alters plasma turnover of the amino acids glycine, serine and arginine in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Ericsson

    Full Text Available The current study extends previously reported PPARα agonist WY 14,643 (30 µmol/kg/day for 4 weeks effects on circulating amino acid concentrations in rats fed a 48% saturated fat diet. Steady-state tracer experiments were used to examine in vivo kinetic mechanisms underlying altered plasma serine, glycine and arginine levels. Urinary urea and creatinine excretion were measured to assess whole-body amino acid catabolism. WY 14,643 treated animals demonstrated reduced efficiency to convert food consumed to body weight gain while liver weight was increased compared to controls. WY 14,643 raised total amino acid concentration (38%, largely explained by glycine, serine and threonine increases. 3H-glycine, 14C-serine and 14C-arginine tracer studies revealed elevated rates of appearance (Ra for glycine (45.5 ± 5.8 versus 17.4 ± 2.7 µmol/kg/min and serine (21.0 ± 1.4 versus 12.0 ± 1.0 in WY 14,643 versus control. Arginine was substantially decreased (-62% in plasma with estimated Ra reduced from 3.1 ± 0.3 to 1.2 ± 0.2 µmol/kg/min in control versus WY 14,643. Nitrogen excretion over 24 hours was unaltered. Hepatic arginase activity was substantially decreased by WY 14,643 treatment. In conclusion, PPARα agonism potently alters metabolism of several specific amino acids in the rat. The changes in circulating levels of serine, glycine and arginine reflected altered fluxes into the plasma rather than changes in clearance or catabolism. This suggests that PPARα has an important role in modulating serine, glycine and arginine de novo synthesis.

  6. Cellular hyper-excitability caused by mutations that alter the activation process of voltage-gated sodium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed-Yassine eAMAROUCH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav are widely expressed as macro-molecular complexes in both excitable and non-excitable tissues. In excitable tissues, the upstroke of the action potential is the result of the passage of a large and rapid influx of sodium ions through these channels. NaV dysfunction has been associated with an increasingly wide range of neurological, muscular and cardiac disorders. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recently identified sodium channel mutations that are linked to hyper-excitability phenotypes and associated with the alteration of the activation process of voltage gated sodium channels. Indeed, several clinical manifestations that demonstrate an alteration of tissue excitability were recently shown to be strongly associated with the presence of mutations that affect the activation process of the voltage-gated sodium channels. These emerging genotype-phenotype correlations have expanded the clinical spectrum of sodium channelopathies to include disorders which feature a hyper-excitability phenotype that may or may not be associated with a cardiomyopathy. The p.I141V mutation in SCN4A and SCN5A, as well as its homologous p.I136V mutation in SCN9A, are interesting examples of mutations that have been linked to inherited hyperexcitability myotonia, exercise-induced polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias and erythromelalgia, respectively. Regardless of which sodium channel isoform is investigated, the substitution of the isoleucine to valine in the locus 141 induces similar modifications in the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated sodium channels by shifting the voltage-dependence of steady state activation towards more negative potentials.

  7. In vivo hydroquinone exposure alters circulating neutrophil activities and impairs LPS-induced lung inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, André Luiz Teroso; Shimada, Ana Lúcia Borges; Hebeda, Cristina Bichels; de Oliveira, Tiago Franco; de Melo Loureiro, Ana Paula; Filho, Walter Dos Reis Pereira; Santos, Alcinéa Meigikos Dos Anjos; de Lima, Wothan Tavares; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2011-10-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) is an environmental contaminant which causes immune toxicity. In this study, the effects of exposure to low doses of HQ on neutrophil mobilization into the LPS-inflamed lung were investigated. Male Swiss mice were exposed to aerosolized vehicle (control) or 12.5, 25 or 50ppm HQ (1h/day for 5 days). One hour later, oxidative burst, cell cycle, DNA fragmentation and adhesion molecules expressions in circulating neutrophils were determined by flow cytometry, and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured by HPLC. Also, 1h later the last exposures, inflammation was induced by LPS inhalation (0.1mg/ml/10min) and 3h later, the numbers of leukocytes in peripheral blood and in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined using a Neubauer chamber and stained smears; adhesion molecules expressed on lung microvessel endothelial cells were quantified by immunohistochemistry; myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was measured in the lung tissue by colorimetric assay; and cytokines in the BALF were determined by ELISA. In vivo HQ exposure augmented plasma MDA levels and oxidative activity of neutrophils, but did not cause alterations in cell cycle and DNA fragmentation. Under these conditions, the number of circulating leukocytes was not altered, but HQ exposure reduced LPS-induced neutrophil migration into the alveolar space, as these cells remained in the lung tissue. The impaired neutrophil migration into BALF may not be dependent on reduced cytokines secretions in the BALF and lung endothelial adhesion molecules expressions. However, HQ exposure increased the expression of β(2) and β(3) integrins and platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) in neutrophils, which were not further enhanced by fMLP in vitro stimulation, indicating that HQ exposure activates circulating neutrophils, impairing further stimulatory responses. Therefore, it has been shown, for the first time, that neutrophils are target of lower levels of in vivo HQ

  8. Overexpression of plastidial thioredoxins f and m differentially alters photosynthetic activity and response to oxidative stress in tobacco plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal eREY

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants display a remarkable diversity of thioredoxins (Trxs, reductases controlling the thiol redox status of proteins. The physiological function of many of them remains elusive, particularly for plastidial Trxs f and m, which are presumed based on biochemical data to regulate photosynthetic reactions and carbon metabolism. Recent reports revealed that Trxs f and m participate in vivo in the control of starch metabolism and cyclic photosynthetic electron transfer around photosystem I, respectively. To further delineate their in planta function, we compared the photosynthetic characteristics, the level and/or activity of various Trx targets and the responses to oxidative stress in transplastomic tobacco plants overexpressing either Trx f or Trx m. We found that plants overexpressing Trx m specifically exhibit altered growth, reduced chlorophyll content, impaired photosynthetic linear electron transfer and decreased pools of glutathione and ascorbate. In both transplastomic lines, activities of two enzymes involved in carbon metabolism, NADP-malate dehydrogenase and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase are markedly and similarly altered. In contrast, plants overexpressing Trx m specifically display increased capacity for methionine sulfoxide reductases, enzymes repairing damaged proteins by regenerating methionine from oxidized methionine. Finally, we also observed that transplastomic plants exhibit distinct responses when exposed to oxidative stress conditions generated by methyl viologen or exposure to high light combined with low temperature, the plants overexpressing Trx m being notably more tolerant than Wt and those overexpressing Trx f. Altogether, these data indicate that Trxs f and m fulfill distinct physiological functions. They prompt us to propose that the m type is involved in key processes linking photosynthetic activity, redox homeostasis and antioxidant mechanisms in the chloroplast.

  9. Effect of alcoholic extracts of Indian medicinal plants on the altered enzymatic activities of diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaram E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In present study, the effect of alcoholic extract of Momordica charantia, Aegle marmelos and Eugenia jambolana was studied on serum glutamic oxaloacetate transminase and serum glutamic pyruvate transminase activities and on serum urea, total protein and albumin concentrations of streptozotocin diabetic rats. Diabetes in rats was induced by single dose of streptozotocin (30 mg/kg i. p.. On confirming the diabetes after 48 h of injection, alcoholic extracts of three plants were administered orally in doses of 250 mg and 500 mg/kg/d for 30 d. Glibenclamide (300 µg/kg/d was used as a reference drug for comparison. Streptozotocin diabetic rats showed a significant increase in serum glutamic oxaloacetate transminase and serum glutamic pyruvate transminase activities and serum urea concentration but a significant decrease in serum total protein and albumin concentrations and albumin/globulin ratio. Oral administration of alcoholic extract of Momordica charantia, Aegle marmelos and Eugenia jambolana in daily doses of 250 mg and 500 mg/kg for a period of 1 mo produced dose- and duration-dependent decrease in serum glutamic oxaloacetate transminase and serum glutamic pyruvate transminase activities as well as decrease in serum urea concentration and restored the serum total protein and albumin concentration and albumin/globulin ratio to a great extent in streptozotocin diabetic rats. The beneficial effects of these plants in 500 mg/kg dose in streptozotocin diabetic rats were comparable to that of glibenclamide (300 µg/kg, a standard oral hypoglycaemic drug used in clinical practice.

  10. Social status alters defeat-induced neural activation in Syrian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, K E; Curry, D W; Cooper, M A

    2012-05-17

    Although exposure to social stress leads to increased depression-like and anxiety-like behavior, some individuals are more vulnerable than others to these stress-induced changes in behavior. Prior social experience is one factor that can modulate how individuals respond to stressful events. In this study, we investigated whether experience-dependent resistance to the behavioral consequences of social defeat was associated with a specific pattern of neural activation. We paired weight-matched male Syrian hamsters in daily aggressive encounters for 2 weeks, during which they formed a stable dominance relationship. We also included control animals that were exposed to an empty cage each day for 2 weeks. Twenty-four hours after the final pairing or empty cage exposure, half of the subjects were socially defeated in 3, 5-min encounters, whereas the others were not socially defeated. Twenty-four hours after social defeat, animals were tested for conditioned defeat in a 5-min social interaction test with a non-aggressive intruder. We collected brains after social defeat and processed the tissue for c-Fos immunoreactivity. We found that dominants were more likely than subordinates to counter-attack the resident aggressor during social defeat, and they showed less submissive and defensive behavior at conditioned defeat testing compared with subordinates. Also, social status was associated with distinct patterns of defeat-induced neural activation in select brain regions, including the amygdala, prefrontal cortex, hypothalamus, and lateral septum. Our results indicate that social status is an important form of prior experience that predicts both initial coping style and the degree of resistance to social defeat. Further, the differences in defeat-induced neural activation suggest possible brain regions that may control resistance to conditioned defeat in dominant individuals.

  11. Brain Activation During Working Memory Is Altered in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes During Hypoglycemia

    OpenAIRE

    McCartney, Richard L.; Flores, Veronica; Bolo, Nicolas R.; Musen, Gail; Jacobson, Alan Marc; Weinger, Katie; Renshaw, Perry Franklin; Simonson, Donald Craig

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of acute hypoglycemia on working memory and brain function in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Using blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging during euglycemic (5.0 mmol/L) and hypoglycemic (2.8 mmol/L) hyperinsulinemic clamps, we compared brain activation response to a working-memory task (WMT) in type 1 diabetic subjects (n = 16) with that in age-matched nondiabetic control subjects (n = 16). Beh...

  12. Lack of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Attenuates Experimental Food Allergy but Not Its Metabolic Alterations regarding Adipokine Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Nathália Vieira; Fonseca, Roberta Cristelli; Perez, Denise; Pereira, Rafaela Vaz Sousa; de Lima Alves, Juliana; Pinho, Vanessa; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Cara, Denise Carmona

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is known to be an important mediator of anaphylaxis. However, there is a lack of information in the literature about the role of PAF in food allergy. The aim of this work was to elucidate the participation of PAF during food allergy development and the consequent adipose tissue inflammation along with its alterations. Our data demonstrated that, both before oral challenge and after 7 days receiving ovalbumin (OVA) diet, OVA-sensitized mice lacking the PAF receptor (PAFR) showed a decreased level of anti-OVA IgE associated with attenuated allergic markers in comparison to wild type (WT) mice. Moreover, there was less body weight and adipose tissue loss in PAFR-deficient mice. However, some features of inflamed adipose tissue presented by sensitized PAFR-deficient and WT mice after oral challenge were similar, such as a higher rate of rolling leukocytes in this tissue and lower circulating levels of adipokines (resistin and adiponectin) in comparison to nonsensitized mice. Therefore, PAF signaling through PAFR is important for the allergic response to OVA but not for the adipokine alterations caused by this inflammatory process. Our work clarifies some effects of PAF during food allergy along with its role on the metabolic consequences of this inflammatory process. PMID:27314042

  13. Dynamic alterations of serotonergic metabolism and receptors during social isolation of low- and high-active mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilke, O; Freier, D; Jähkel, M; Oehler, J

    1998-04-01

    Alterations induced by social isolation (1 day to 18 weeks) in low- and high-active mice (LAM and HAM) were studied in respect to serotonin metabolism, [3H]-8-OH-DPAT binding of presynaptic (midbrain), postsynaptic (hippocampus) 5-HT1A receptors and [3H]-ketanserin binding of cortical 5-HT2A receptors. Individual housing of mice was associated with reduction of serotonin metabolism, depending on isolation time and brain structure. Whereas a transient decrease in the striatum and cortex was detected between 1 week and 6 weeks, reduction of cerebellar and hippocampal serotonin metabolism was found later (12-18 weeks). Serotonergic systems of HAM were found to be more reactive to environmental disturbances, and their serotonin metabolism was more affected by social isolation. Isolation-induced upregulation of cortical 5-HT2A receptors was measured only in HAM. Densities of postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors in the hippocampus did differ either in grouped or isolated mice. However, there were significant differences in hippocampal 5-HT1A receptor affinity, especially between 1 day and 3 weeks. Transient downregulation of presynaptic 5-HT1A receptors in the midbrain was found in isolated mice between 3 and 6 weeks. These results are discussed in terms of interactions between serotonergic alterations and isolation-induced aggression.

  14. Sex alters impact of repeated bouts of sprint exercise on neuromuscular activity in trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaut, François; Smith, Kurt

    2009-08-01

    This study characterized the effect of sex on neuromuscular activity during repeated bouts of sprint exercise. Thirty-three healthy male and female athletes performed twenty 5-s cycle sprints separated by 25 s of rest. Mechanical work and integrated electromyograhs (iEMG) of 4 muscles of the dominant lower limb were calculated in every sprint. The iEMG signals from individual muscles were summed to represent overall electrical activity of these muscles (sum-iEMG). Neuromuscular efficiency (NME) was calculated as the ratio of mechanical work and sum-iEMG for every sprint. Arterial oxygen saturation was estimated (SpO2) with pulse oximetry throughout the protocol. The sprint-induced work decrement (18.9% vs. 29.6%; p women than for the men. However, the sprints decreased NME (10.1%; p men, R2 = 0.87; women, R2 = 0.91; all p sprint exercise is not likely to be explained by a difference in muscle contractility impairment in men and women, but may be due to a sex difference in muscle recruitment strategy. We speculate that women would be less sensitive to arterial O2 desaturation than men, which may trigger lower neuromuscular adjustments to exhaustive exercise.

  15. Altered sensorimotor activation patterns in idiopathic dystonia-an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional brain imaging studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Annemette; Herz, Damian M; Haagensen, Brian N;

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements or postures. Functional neuroimaging studies have yielded abnormal task-related sensorimotor activation in dystonia, but the results appear to be rather variable across studies....... Hum Brain Mapp 37:547-557, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  16. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y; Manning, Sara A; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J; Samuels, Amanda N; Sniegowski, Paul D; Goulian, Mark; Kohli, Rahul M

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role in

  17. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y; Manning, Sara A; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J; Samuels, Amanda N; Sniegowski, Paul D; Goulian, Mark; Kohli, Rahul M

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role in

  18. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y.; Manning, Sara A.; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J.; Samuels, Amanda N.; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Goulian, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role

  19. Altered activation of the diaphragm in late-onset Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Barbara K; Corti, Manuela; Martin, A Daniel; Fuller, David D; Byrne, Barry J

    2016-02-01

    Pompe disease is an inherited neuromuscular disorder that affects respiratory function and leads to dependence on external ventilatory support. We studied the activation of the diaphragm using bilateral phrenic magnetic stimulation and hypothesized that diaphragm compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude and evoked transdiaphragmatic pressure (Twitch PDI) would correlate to disease severity. Eight patients with late onset Pompe disease (LOPD, aged 14-48 years) and four healthy control subjects completed the tests. Maximal Twitch PDI responses were progressively reduced in patients with LOPD compared to control subjects (1.4-17.1cm H2O, pCMAP amplitude (mA) was lower in the patients who used nighttime or fulltime ventilatory support, when compared to controls and patients who used no ventilatory support (pCMAP responses were similar between patients and controls. This suggests a loss of functional phrenic motor units in patients, with normal recruitment of remaining motor units. PMID:26612101

  20. Altered Spontaneous Activity in Patients with Persistent Somatoform Pain Disorder Revealed by Regional Homogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tianming; Zhao, Zhiyong; Yan, Chao; Lu, Jing; Li, Xuzhou; Tang, Chaozheng; Fan, Mingxia; Luo, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Persistent somatoform pain disorder (PSPD) is a mental disorder un-associated with any somatic injury and can cause severe somatosensory and emotional impairments in patients. However, so far, the neuro-pathophysiological mechanism of the functional impairments in PSPD is still unclear. The present study assesses the difference in regional spontaneous activity between PSPD and healthy controls (HC) during a resting state, in order to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying PSPD. Resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging data were obtained from 13 PSPD patients and 23 age- and gender-matched HC subjects in this study. Kendall's coefficient of concordance was used to measure regional homogeneity (ReHo), and a two-sample t-test was subsequently performed to investigate the ReHo difference between PSPD and HC. Additionally, the correlations between the mean ReHo of each survived area and the clinical assessments were further analyzed. Compared with the HC group, patients with PSPD exhibited decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary somatosensory cortex, posterior cerebellum, and occipital lobe, while increased ReHo in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and default mode network (including the medial PFC, right inferior parietal lobe (IPL), and left supramarginal gyrus). In addition, significant positive correlations were found between the mean ReHo of both right IPL and left supramarginal gyrus and participants' Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) scores, and between the mean ReHo of the left middle frontal gyrus and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores. Our results suggest that abnormal spontaneous brain activity in specific brain regions during a resting state may be associated with the dysfunctions in pain, memory and emotional processing commonly observed in patients with PSPD. These findings help us to understand the neural mechanisms underlying PSPD and suggest that the ReHo metric could be used as a clinical marker for PSPD. PMID:26977802

  1. Altered Spontaneous Activity in Patients with Persistent Somatoform Pain Disorder Revealed by Regional Homogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianming Huang

    Full Text Available Persistent somatoform pain disorder (PSPD is a mental disorder un-associated with any somatic injury and can cause severe somatosensory and emotional impairments in patients. However, so far, the neuro-pathophysiological mechanism of the functional impairments in PSPD is still unclear. The present study assesses the difference in regional spontaneous activity between PSPD and healthy controls (HC during a resting state, in order to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying PSPD. Resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging data were obtained from 13 PSPD patients and 23 age- and gender-matched HC subjects in this study. Kendall's coefficient of concordance was used to measure regional homogeneity (ReHo, and a two-sample t-test was subsequently performed to investigate the ReHo difference between PSPD and HC. Additionally, the correlations between the mean ReHo of each survived area and the clinical assessments were further analyzed. Compared with the HC group, patients with PSPD exhibited decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary somatosensory cortex, posterior cerebellum, and occipital lobe, while increased ReHo in the prefrontal cortex (PFC and default mode network (including the medial PFC, right inferior parietal lobe (IPL, and left supramarginal gyrus. In addition, significant positive correlations were found between the mean ReHo of both right IPL and left supramarginal gyrus and participants' Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS scores, and between the mean ReHo of the left middle frontal gyrus and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS scores. Our results suggest that abnormal spontaneous brain activity in specific brain regions during a resting state may be associated with the dysfunctions in pain, memory and emotional processing commonly observed in patients with PSPD. These findings help us to understand the neural mechanisms underlying PSPD and suggest that the ReHo metric could be used as a clinical marker for PSPD.

  2. Truncating PREX2 mutations activate its GEF activity and alter gene expression regulation in NRAS-mutant melanoma

    KAUST Repository

    Lissanu Deribe, Yonathan

    2016-03-01

    PREX2 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate-dependent Rac-exchange factor 2) is a PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) binding protein that is significantly mutated in cutaneous melanoma and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Here, genetic and biochemical analyses were conducted to elucidate the nature and mechanistic basis of PREX2 mutation in melanoma development. By generating an inducible transgenic mouse model we showed an oncogenic role for a truncating PREX2 mutation (PREX2E824*) in vivo in the context of mutant NRAS. Using integrative cross-species gene expression analysis, we identified deregulated cell cycle and cytoskeleton organization as significantly perturbed biological pathways in PREX2 mutant tumors. Mechanistically, truncation of PREX2 activated its Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, abolished binding to PTEN and activated the PI3K (phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase)/Akt signaling pathway. We further showed that PREX2 truncating mutations or PTEN deletion induces down-regulation of the tumor suppressor and cell cycle regulator CDKN1C (also known as p57KIP2). This down-regulation occurs, at least partially, through DNA hypomethylation of a differentially methylated region in chromosome 11 that is a known regulatory region for expression of the CDKN1C gene. Together, these findings identify PREX2 as a mediator of NRAS-mutant melanoma development that acts through the PI3K/PTEN/Akt pathway to regulate gene expression of a cell cycle regulator.

  3. Leptin signaling in the nucleus of the solitary tract alters the cardiovascular responses to activation of the chemoreceptor reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriello, John; Moreau, Jason M

    2012-10-01

    Circulating levels of leptin are elevated in individuals suffering from chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). Systemic and central administration of leptin elicits increases in sympathetic nervous activity (SNA), arterial pressure (AP), and heart rate (HR), and it attenuates the baroreceptor reflex, cardiovascular responses that are similar to those observed during CIH as a result of activation of chemoreceptors by the systemic hypoxia. Therefore, experiments were done in anesthetized Wistar rats to investigate the effects of leptin in nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) on AP and HR responses, and renal SNA (RSNA) responses during activation of NTS neurons and the chemoreceptor reflex. Microinjection of leptin (5-100 ng; 20 nl) into caudal NTS pressor sites (l-glutamate; l-Glu; 0.25 M; 10 nl) elicited dose-related increases in AP, HR, and RSNA. Leptin microinjections (5 ng; 20 nl) into these sites potentiated the increase in AP and HR elicited by l-Glu. Additionally, bilateral injections of leptin (5 ng; 100 nl) into NTS potentiated the increase in AP and attenuated the bradycardia to systemic activation of the chemoreflex. In the Zucker obese rat, leptin injections into NTS neither elicited cardiovascular responses nor altered the cardiovascular responses to activation of the chemoreflex. Taken together, these data indicate that leptin exerts a modulatory effect on neuronal circuits within NTS that control cardiovascular responses elicited during the reflex activation of arterial chemoreceptors and suggest that increased AP and SNA observed in individuals with CIH may be due, in part, by leptin's effects on the chemoreflex at the level of NTS.

  4. Altered Circadian Food Anticipatory Activity Rhythms in PACAP Receptor 1 (PAC1) Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Jens; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Light signals from intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) entrain the circadian clock and regulate negative masking. Two neurotransmitters, glutamate and Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP), found in the ipRGCs transmit light signals to the brain via glutamate receptors and the specific PACAP type 1 (PAC1) receptor. Light entrainment occurs during the twilight zones and has little effect on clock phase during daytime. When nocturnal animals have access to food only for a few hours during the resting phase at daytime, they adapt behavior to the restricted feeding (RF) paradigm and show food anticipatory activity (FAA). A recent study in mice and rats demonstrating that light regulates FAA prompted us to investigate the role of PACAP/PAC1 signaling in the light mediated regulation of FAA. PAC1 receptor knock out (PAC1-/-) and wild type (PAC1+/+) mice placed in running wheels were examined in a full photoperiod (FPP) of 12:12 h light/dark (LD) and a skeleton photoperiod (SPP) 1:11:1:11 h L:DD:L:DD at 300 and 10 lux light intensity. Both PAC1-/- mice and PAC1+/+ littermates entrained to FPP and SPP at both light intensities. However, when placed in RF with access to food for 4-5 h during the subjective day, a significant change in behavior was observed in PAC1-/- mice compared to PAC1+/+ mice. While PAC1-/- mice showed similar FAA as PAC1+/+ animals in FPP at 300 lux, PAC1-/- mice demonstrated an advanced onset of FAA with a nearly 3-fold increase in amplitude compared to PAC1+/+ mice when placed in SPP at 300 lux. The same pattern of FAA was observed at 10 lux during both FPP and SPP. The present study indicates a role of PACAP/PAC1 signaling during light regulated FAA. Most likely, PACAP found in ipRGCs mediating non-image forming light information to the brain is involved.

  5. Altered Circadian Food Anticipatory Activity Rhythms in PACAP Receptor 1 (PAC1 Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Hannibal

    Full Text Available Light signals from intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs entrain the circadian clock and regulate negative masking. Two neurotransmitters, glutamate and Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP, found in the ipRGCs transmit light signals to the brain via glutamate receptors and the specific PACAP type 1 (PAC1 receptor. Light entrainment occurs during the twilight zones and has little effect on clock phase during daytime. When nocturnal animals have access to food only for a few hours during the resting phase at daytime, they adapt behavior to the restricted feeding (RF paradigm and show food anticipatory activity (FAA. A recent study in mice and rats demonstrating that light regulates FAA prompted us to investigate the role of PACAP/PAC1 signaling in the light mediated regulation of FAA. PAC1 receptor knock out (PAC1-/- and wild type (PAC1+/+ mice placed in running wheels were examined in a full photoperiod (FPP of 12:12 h light/dark (LD and a skeleton photoperiod (SPP 1:11:1:11 h L:DD:L:DD at 300 and 10 lux light intensity. Both PAC1-/- mice and PAC1+/+ littermates entrained to FPP and SPP at both light intensities. However, when placed in RF with access to food for 4-5 h during the subjective day, a significant change in behavior was observed in PAC1-/- mice compared to PAC1+/+ mice. While PAC1-/- mice showed similar FAA as PAC1+/+ animals in FPP at 300 lux, PAC1-/- mice demonstrated an advanced onset of FAA with a nearly 3-fold increase in amplitude compared to PAC1+/+ mice when placed in SPP at 300 lux. The same pattern of FAA was observed at 10 lux during both FPP and SPP. The present study indicates a role of PACAP/PAC1 signaling during light regulated FAA. Most likely, PACAP found in ipRGCs mediating non-image forming light information to the brain is involved.

  6. Perfluorinated chemicals: Differential toxicity, inhibition of aromatase activity and alteration of cellular lipids in human placental cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorrochategui, Eva; Pérez-Albaladejo, Elisabet [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Casas, Josefina [Department of Biomedicinal Chemistry, IQAC–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Lacorte, Sílvia, E-mail: slbqam@cid.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Porte, Cinta, E-mail: cinta.porte@cid.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    The cytotoxicity of eight perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), namely, perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was assessed in the human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3. Only the long chain PFCs – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – showed significant cytotoxicity in JEG-3 cells with EC50 values in the range of 107 to 647 μM. The observed cytotoxicity was to some extent related to a higher uptake of the longer chain PFCs by cells (PFDoA > PFOS ≫ PFNA > PFOA > PFHxA). Moreover, this work evidences a high potential of PFOS, PFOA and PFBS to act as aromatase inhibitors in placental cells with IC50s in the range of 57–80 μM, the inhibitory effect of PFBS being particularly important despite the rather low uptake of the compound by cells. Finally, exposure of JEG-3 cells to a mixture of the eight PFCs (0.6 μM each) led to a relative increase (up to 3.4-fold) of several lipid classes, including phosphatidylcholines (PCs), plasmalogen PC and lyso plasmalogen PC, which suggests an interference of PFCs with membrane lipids. Overall, this work highlights the ability of the PFC mixture to alter cellular lipid pattern at concentrations well below those that generate toxicity, and the potential of the short chain PFBS, often considered a safe substitute of PFOS, to significantly inhibit aromatase activity in placental cells. - Highlights: • Eight perfluorinated chemicals of different chain lengths have been selected. • Long chain ones – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – were cytotoxic in placenta cells. • The uptake of long chain perfluorinated chemicals by cells was comparatively higher. • PFOS, PFOA and the short chain PFBS significantly inhibited aromatase activity. • A mixture of perfluorinated chemicals significantly altered placenta cell

  7. SNPs altering ammonium transport activity of human Rhesus factors characterized by a yeast-based functional assay.

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    Aude Deschuyteneer

    Full Text Available Proteins of the conserved Mep-Amt-Rh family, including mammalian Rhesus factors, mediate transmembrane ammonium transport. Ammonium is an important nitrogen source for the biosynthesis of amino acids but is also a metabolic waste product. Its disposal in urine plays a critical role in the regulation of the acid/base homeostasis, especially with an acid diet, a trait of Western countries. Ammonium accumulation above a certain concentration is however pathologic, the cytotoxicity causing fatal cerebral paralysis in acute cases. Alteration in ammonium transport via human Rh proteins could have clinical outcomes. We used a yeast-based expression assay to characterize human Rh variants resulting from non synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs with known or unknown clinical phenotypes and assessed their ammonium transport efficiency, protein level, localization and potential trans-dominant impact. The HsRhAG variants (I61R, F65S associated to overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (OHSt, a disease affecting erythrocytes, proved affected in intrinsic bidirectional ammonium transport. Moreover, this study reveals that the R202C variant of HsRhCG, the orthologue of mouse MmRhcg required for optimal urinary ammonium excretion and blood pH control, shows an impaired inherent ammonium transport activity. Urinary ammonium excretion was RHcg gene-dose dependent in mouse, highlighting MmRhcg as a limiting factor. HsRhCG(R202C may confer susceptibility to disorders leading to metabolic acidosis for instance. Finally, the analogous R211C mutation in the yeast ScMep2 homologue also impaired intrinsic activity consistent with a conserved functional role of the preserved arginine residue. The yeast expression assay used here constitutes an inexpensive, fast and easy tool to screen nsSNPs reported by high throughput sequencing or individual cases for functional alterations in Rh factors revealing potential causal variants.

  8. ALTERATIONS IN THE ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN THE BRAIN OF ALBINO MICE EXPOSED TO ACEPHATE

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    M. SIVA PRASAD

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acephate (AP, a widely available organophosphorus (OP insecticide, has low mammalian toxicity and isconsidered non-phytotoxic on many crop plants and therefore it is preferred in agricultural crops. In plants andinsects, AP is metabolized extensively to methamidophos (MP, a more potent OP insecticide. The limitedmammalian metabolism of AP to MP has been studied in laboratory rat models and suggests that initial formationof MP from AP may inhibit further formation. Hence in the present investigation we have studied the effect of anAP in cholinergic mechanisms in the different regions of brain. For the present study the male mice were exposedto 1/10th LD50 of AP via oral gavage (i.e. 40.5mg/kg body weight. Our results indicate a steady decline of AChEactivity in all the regions of the brain of Acephate exposed animals. As expected an increase in ACh activity wasnoticed in all the regions of the AP exposed animals. We suggest that cholinergic system is seriously affected bythe intoxication of Acephate and the effect was more effective in 30 days when compared to 10 days

  9. Activity of soil microbial biomass altered by land use in the southwestern Amazon

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    André Mancebo Mazzetto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The increasing demand for food creates environmental problems, mainly due to the removal of native vegetation cover for agriculture expansion in Brazil. These changes in land use lead to changes in the soil organic matter dynamics. Microorganisms represent the most biological and physiological diversity in soil, as well as are responsible for more than 95% of the decomposition and nutrient cycling processes. The objective in this research was to check if there is difference of patterns in activity of soil microbial biomass under varied natural vegetation, pastures in use and agricultural systems recently established. The area covered by this study corresponds to the states of Rondônia and Mato Grosso. Canonical variate analysis was used in physical, chemical and microbiological factors in each ecoregion and land use, looking for patterns and variables that can differentiate them. The native areas showed distinct patterns in the dynamics of microbiological attributes mainly related to the amount of litter in each biome studied. For the disturbed areas, there were similar results between pastures and native areas, significantly different from the results obtained in agricultural areas, which, due to differences in management and kind of cultures analyzed, showed a great variability in the final result. The results support the recommendation for use of microbiological attributes as indicators of land use change, combined with chemical and physical factors of the soil.

  10. Atrazine and its main metabolites alter the locomotor activity of larval zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Wang, Yueyi; Zhu, Zhihong; Yang, Enlu; Feng, Xiayan; Fu, Zhengwei; Jin, Yuanxiang

    2016-04-01

    Atrazine (ATZ) and its main chlorometabolites, i.e., diaminochlorotriazine (DACT), deisopropylatrazine (DIP), and deethylatrazine (DE), have been widely detected in aquatic systems near agricultural fields. However, their possible effects on aquatic animals are still not fully understood. In this study, it was observed that several developmental endpoints such as the heart beat, hatchability, and morphological abnormalities were influenced by ATZ and its metabolites in different developmental stages. In addition, after 5 days of exposure to 30, 100, 300 μg L(-1) ATZ and its main chlorometabolites, the swimming behaviors of larval zebrafish were significantly disturbed, and the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were consistently inhibited. Our results also demonstrate that ATZ and its main chlorometabolites are neuroendocrine disruptors that impact the expression of neurotoxicity-related genes such as Ache, Gap43, Gfap, Syn2a, Shha, Mbp, Elavl3, Nestin and Ngn1 in early developmental stages of zebrafish. According to our results, it is possible that not only ATZ but also its metabolites (DACT, DIP and DE) have the same or even more toxic effects on different endpoints of the early developmental stages of zebrafish.

  11. Nanosuspension delivery of paclitaxel to xenograft mice can alter drug disposition and anti-tumor activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Po-Chang; Gould, Stephen; Nannini, Michelle; Qin, Ann; Deng, Yuzhong; Arrazate, Alfonso; Kam, Kimberly R.; Ran, Yingqing; Wong, Harvey

    2014-04-01

    Paclitaxel is a common chemotherapeutic agent that is effective against various cancers. The poor aqueous solubility of paclitaxel necessitates a large percentage of Cremophor EL:ethanol (USP) in its commercial formulation which leads to hypersensitivity reactions in patients. We evaluate the use of a crystalline nanosuspension versus the USP formulation to deliver paclitaxel to tumor-bearing xenograft mice. Anti-tumor efficacy was assessed following intravenous administration of three 20 mg/kg doses of paclitaxel. Paclitaxel pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution were evaluated, and differences were observed between the two formulations. Plasma clearance and tissue to plasma ratio of mice that were dosed with the nanosuspension are approximately 33- and 11-fold higher compared to those of mice that were given the USP formulation. Despite a higher tumor to plasma ratio for the nanosuspension treatment group, absolute paclitaxel tumor exposure was higher for the USP group. Accordingly, a higher anti-tumor effect was observed in the xenograft mice that were dosed with the USP formulation (90% versus 42% tumor growth inhibition). This reduction in activity of nanoparticle formulation appeared to result from a slower than anticipated dissolution in vivo. This study illustrates a need for careful consideration of both dose and systemic solubility prior utilizing nanosuspension as a mode of intravenous delivery.

  12. What's Special about the Ethical Challenges of Studying Disorders with Altered Brain Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassaday, Helen J

    2015-01-01

    Where there is no viable alternative, studies of neuronal activity are conducted on animals. The use of animals, particularly for invasive studies of the brain, raises a number of ethical issues. Practical or normative ethics are enforced by legislation, in relation to the dominant welfare guidelines developed in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. Guidelines have typically been devised to cover all areas of biomedical research using animals in general, and thus lack any specific focus on neuroscience studies at the level of the ethics, although details of the specific welfare recommendations are different for invasive studies of the brain. Ethically, there is no necessary distinction between neuroscience and other biomedical research in that the brain is a final common path for suffering, irrespective of whether this involves any direct experience of pain. One exception arises in the case of in vitro studies, which are normally considered as an acceptable replacement for in vivo studies. However, to the extent sentience is possible, maintaining central nervous system tissue outside the body naturally raises ethical questions. Perhaps the most intractable challenge to the ethical use of animals in order to model neuronal disorder is presented by the logical impasse in the argument that the animal is similar enough to justify the validity of the experimental model, but sufficiently different in sentience and capacity for suffering, for the necessary experimental procedures to be permissible. PMID:25205325

  13. A hyperpolarization-activated inward current alters swim frequency of the pteropod mollusk Clione limacina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirtle, Thomas J; Willingham, Kyle; Satterlie, Richard A

    2010-12-01

    The pteropod mollusk, Clione limacina, exhibits behaviorally relevant swim speed changes that occur within the context of the animal's ecology. Modulation of C. limacina swimming speed involves changes that occur at the network and cellular levels. Intracellular recordings from interneurons of the swim central pattern generator show the presence of a sag potential that is indicative of the hyperpolarization-activated inward current (I(h)). Here we provide evidence that I(h) in primary swim interneurons plays a role in C. limacina swimming speed control and may be a modulatory target. Recordings from central pattern generator swim interneurons show that hyperpolarizing current injection produces a sag potential that lasts for the duration of the hyperpolarization, a characteristic of cells possessing I(h). Following the hyperpolarizing current injection, swim interneurons also exhibit postinhibitory rebound (PIR). Serotonin enhances the sag potential of C. limacina swim interneurons while the I(h) blocker, ZD7288, reduces the sag potential. Furthermore, a negative correlation was found between the amplitude of the sag potential and latency to PIR. Because latency to PIR was previously shown to influence swimming speed, we hypothesize that I(h) has an effect on swimming speed. The I(h) blocker, ZD7288, suppresses swimming in C. limacina and inhibits serotonin-induced acceleration, evidence that supports our hypothesis.

  14. Decreased catalytic activity and altered activation properties of PDE6C mutants associated with autosomal recessive achromatopsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau, Tanja; Artemyev, Nikolai O; Rosenberg, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of the cone photoreceptor phosphodiesterase (PDE6C) have been recently reported in patients with autosomal recessive inherited achromatopsia (ACHM) and early-onset cone photoreceptor dysfunction. Here we present the results of a comprehensive...... characterization of six missense mutations applying the baculovirus system to express recombinant mutant and wildtype chimeric PDE6C/PDE5 proteins in Sf9 insect cells. Purified proteins were analyzed using Western blotting, phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity measurements as well as inhibition assays by zaprinast...

  15. Early and later life stress alter brain activity and sleep in rats.

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    Jelena Mrdalj

    Full Text Available Exposure to early life stress may profoundly influence the developing brain in lasting ways. Neuropsychiatric disorders associated with early life adversity may involve neural changes reflected in EEG power as a measure of brain activity and disturbed sleep. The main aim of the present study was for the first time to characterize possible changes in adult EEG power after postnatal maternal separation in rats. Furthermore, in the same animals, we investigated how EEG power and sleep architecture were affected after exposure to a chronic mild stress protocol. During postnatal day 2-14 male rats were exposed to either long maternal separation (180 min or brief maternal separation (10 min. Long maternally separated offspring showed a sleep-wake nonspecific reduction in adult EEG power at the frontal EEG derivation compared to the brief maternally separated group. The quality of slow wave sleep differed as the long maternally separated group showed lower delta power in the frontal-frontal EEG and a slower reduction of the sleep pressure. Exposure to chronic mild stress led to a lower EEG power in both groups. Chronic exposure to mild stressors affected sleep differently in the two groups of maternal separation. Long maternally separated offspring showed more total sleep time, more episodes of rapid eye movement sleep and higher percentage of non-rapid eye movement episodes ending in rapid eye movement sleep compared to brief maternal separation. Chronic stress affected similarly other sleep parameters and flattened the sleep homeostasis curves in all offspring. The results confirm that early environmental conditions modulate the brain functioning in a long-lasting way.

  16. Retinol induces morphological alterations and proliferative focus formation through free radicalmediated activation of multiple signaling pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel Pens GELAIN; Matheus Augusto de Bittencourt PASQUALI; Fernanda Freitas CAREGNATO; Mauro Antonio Alves CASTRO; José Claudio Fonseca MOREIRA

    2012-01-01

    Aim:Toxicity of retinol (vitamin A)has been previously associated with apoptosis and/or cell malignant transformation.Thus,we investigated the pathways involved in the induction of proliferation,deformation and proliferative focus formation by retinol in cultured Sertoli cells of rats.Methods:Sertoli cells were isolated from immature rats and cultured.The cells were subjected to a 24-h treatment with different concentrations of retinol.Parameters of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity were analyzed.The effects of the p38 inhibitor SB203580(10 μmol/L),the JNK inhibitor SP600125 (10 μmol/L),the Akt inhibitor LY294002 (10 μmol/L),the ERK inhibitor U0126 (10 μmol/L)the pan-PKC inhibitor G(O)6983 (10 μmol/L)and the PKA inhibitor H89 (1 μmol/L)on morphological and proliferative/transformationassociated modifications were studied.Results:Retinol (7 and 14 μmol/L)significantly increases the reactive species production in Sertoli cells,inhibition of p38,JNK,ERK1/2,Akt,and PKA suppressed retinol-induced[3H]dT incorporation into the cells,while PKC inhibition had no effect.ERK1/2 and p38 inhibition also blocked retinol-induced proliferative focus formation in the cells,while Akt and JNK inhibition partially decreased focus formation.ERK1/2 and p38 inhibition hindered transformation-associated deformation in retinol-treated cells,while other treatments had no effect.Conclusion:Our results suggest that activation of multiple kinases is responsible for morphological and proliferative changes associated to malignancy development in Sertoli cells by retinol at the concentrations higher than physiological level.

  17. Azospirillum Inoculation Alters Nitrate Reductase Activity and Nitrogen Uptake in Wheat Plant under Water Deficit Conditions

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    N. Aliasgharzad N. Aliasgharzad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water deficit stress usually diminishes nitrogen uptake by plants. There are evidences that some nitrogen fixing bacteria can alleviate this stress by supplying nitrogen and improving its metabolism in plants. Four Azospirillum strains, A. lipoferum AC45-II, A. brasilense AC46-I, A. irakense AC49-VII and A. irakense AC51-VI were tested for nitrate reductase activity (NRA. In a pot culture experiment using a sandy loam soil, wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Sardari were inoculated with these bacterial strains and three ranges of soil water potential (W1: -10 to -20, W2: -40 to -50 and W3: -65 to -75 kPa were applied to the pots. All strains were positive in NRA test and the highest (7.63mg NO2-N.L-1.48h-1 was recorded for AC49-VII and the least (0.23mg NO2-N.L-1.48h-1 was belong to AC51-VI. Leaf and root NRA, root and shoot nitrogen concentrations, and dry weights of root and shoot decreased by increasing water deficit stress. All four bacterial strains caused a significant enhancement in root NRA and in each water deficit level, the higher root NRA was recorded in AC46-I and AC49-VII inoculated plants. The highest leaf NRA was achieved by AC49-VII. The mean increment of root NRA by bacterial strains was 171% compared to the non-bacterial plants. Moreover, at the highest level of water deficit stress, the highest dry weight and nitrogen concentration in root and shoot were obtained by AC46-I and AC49-VII treatments.

  18. Projected near-future CO2 levels increase activity and alter defensive behaviours in the tropical squid Idiosepius pygmaeus

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    Blake L. Spady

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 levels projected to occur in the oceans by the end of this century cause a range of behavioural effects in fish, but whether other highly active marine organisms, such as cephalopods, are similarly affected is unknown. We tested the effects of projected future CO2 levels (626 and 956 µatm on the behaviour of male two-toned pygmy squid, Idiosepius pygmaeus. Exposure to elevated CO2 increased the number of active individuals by 19–25% and increased movement (number of line-crosses by nearly 3 times compared to squid at present-day CO2. Squid vigilance and defensive behaviours were also altered by elevated CO2 with >80% of individuals choosing jet escape responses over defensive arm postures in response to a visual startle stimulus, compared with 50% choosing jet escape responses at control CO2. In addition, more escape responses were chosen over threat behaviours in body pattern displays at elevated CO2 and individuals were more than twice as likely to use ink as a defence strategy at 956 µatm CO2, compared with controls. Increased activity could lead to adverse effects on energy budgets as well as increasing visibility to predators. A tendency to respond to a stimulus with escape behaviours could increase survival, but may also be energetically costly and could potentially lead to more chases by predators compared with individuals that use defensive postures. These results demonstrate that projected future ocean acidification affects the behaviours of a tropical squid species.

  19. Quercus infectoria galls possess antioxidant activity and abrogates oxidative stress-induced functional alterations in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Athar, Mohammad; Alam, M Sarwar

    2008-02-15

    The present study reports the antioxidant activity of ethanolic extract of Quercus infectoria galls. The antioxidant potency of galls was investigated employing several established in vitro model systems. Their protective efficacy on oxidative modulation of murine macrophages was also explored. Gall extract was found to contain a large amount of polyphenols and possess a potent reducing power. HPTLC analysis of the extract suggested it to contain 19.925% tannic acid (TA) and 8.75% gallic acid (GA). The extract potently scavenged free radicals including DPPH (IC(50)~0.5 microg/ml), ABTS (IC(50)~1 microg/ml), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) (IC(50)~2.6 microg/ml) and hydroxyl (*OH) radicals (IC(50)~6 microg/ml). Gall extract also chelated metal ions and inhibited Fe(3+) -ascorbate-induced oxidation of protein and peroxidation of lipids. Exposure of rat peritoneal macrophages to tertiary butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH) induced oxidative stress in them and altered their phagocytic functions. These macrophages showed elevated secretion of lysosomal hydrolases, and attenuated phagocytosis and respiratory burst. Activity of macrophage mannose receptor (MR) also diminished following oxidant exposure. Pretreatment of macrophages with gall extract preserved antioxidant armory near to control values and significantly protected against all the investigated functional mutilations. MTT assay revealed gall extract to enhance percent survival of tBOOH exposed macrophages. These results indicate that Q. infectoria galls possess potent antioxidant activity, when tested both in chemical as well as biological models. PMID:18076871

  20. Catalase activity in Smicridea McLachlan, 1871 (Insecta, Trichoptera collected from natural and altered/impacted streams

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    Cristiane Biasus

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We compare catalase activity in SmicrideaMcLachlan, 1871 (Insecta, Trichoptera collected in natural and agricultural streams and correlates the enzyme pattern with metal content in the water.MethodsOrganisms were collected in sites classified as natural (riparian vegetation in buffer zone and altered/impacted (agricultural land use in drainage area environments, located at Cravo River and Campo River sub-basins (RS, Brazil. Next the collected larvae were identified and used to proteins quantification and catalase activity measure. The concentration of Mg, Cr, Cu, Pb and Cd in the water was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry.ResultsCatalase activity in Smicridea ranged from 1.5 to 6 U, with mean values about 2.63 ± 0.096 U (SEM. The presence of metals was higher in the streams located at agricultural drainage area, except for Mg at the Cravo sub-basin and Cu at the Campo sub-basin. Catalase was higher in Smicridea collected in natural streams as compared to that agriculture streams and was correlated with Pb and Cd levels.ConclusionsThe data showed the potential of this biomarker as a useful tool for complementation of water quality biomonitoring studies using Smicridea as bioindicator.

  1. Age-related alteration of arginase activity impacts on severity of leishmaniasis.

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    Ingrid Müller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The leishmaniases are a group of vector-borne parasitic diseases that represent a major international public health problem; they belong to the most neglected tropical diseases and have one of the highest rates of morbidity and mortality. The clinical outcome of infection with Leishmania parasites depends on a variety of factors such as parasite species, vector-derived products, genetics, behaviour, and nutrition. The age of the infected individuals also appears to be critical, as a significant proportion of clinical cases occur in children; this age-related higher prevalence of disease is most remarkable in visceral leishmaniasis. The mechanisms resulting in this higher incidence of clinical disease in children are poorly understood. We have recently revealed that sustained arginase activity promotes uncontrolled parasite growth and pathology in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that arginase-mediated L-arginine metabolism differs with age. METHODOLOGY: The age distribution of patients with visceral or cutaneous leishmaniasis was determined in cohorts of patients in our clinics in endemic areas in Ethiopia. To exclude factors that are difficult to control in patients, we assessed the impact of ageing on the manifestations of experimental leishmaniasis. We determined parasite burden, T cell responses, and macrophage effector functions in young and aged mice during the course of infection. RESULTS: Our results show that younger mice develop exacerbated lesion pathology and higher parasite burdens than aged mice. This aggravated disease development in younger individuals does not correlate with a change in T helper cytokine profile. To address the underlying mechanisms responsible for the more severe infections in younger mice, we investigated macrophage effector functions. Our results show that macrophages from younger mice do not have an impaired capacity to kill parasites; however, they express significantly higher levels of

  2. Factor XI Deficiency Alters the Cytokine Response and Activation of Contact Proteases during Polymicrobial Sepsis in Mice.

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    Charles E Bane

    Full Text Available Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, is often accompanied by abnormalities of blood coagulation. Prior work with a mouse model of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP suggested that the protease factor XIa contributed to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC and to the cytokine response during sepsis. We investigated the importance of factor XI to cytokine and coagulation responses during the first 24 hours after CLP. Compared to wild type littermates, factor XI-deficient (FXI-/- mice had a survival advantage after CLP, with smaller increases in plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-10 and delayed IL-1β and IL-6 responses. Plasma levels of serum amyloid P, an acute phase protein, were increased in wild type mice 24 hours post-CLP, but not in FXI-/- mice, supporting the impression of a reduced inflammatory response in the absence of factor XI. Surprisingly, there was little evidence of DIC in mice of either genotype. Plasma levels of the contact factors factor XII and prekallikrein were reduced in WT mice after CLP, consistent with induction of contact activation. However, factor XII and PK levels were not reduced in FXI-/- animals, indicating factor XI deficiency blunted contact activation. Intravenous infusion of polyphosphate into WT mice also induced changes in factor XII, but had much less effect in FXI deficient mice. In vitro analysis revealed that factor XIa activates factor XII, and that this reaction is enhanced by polyanions such polyphosphate and nucleic acids. These data suggest that factor XI deficiency confers a survival advantage in the CLP sepsis model by altering the cytokine response to infection and blunting activation of the contact (kallikrein-kinin system. The findings support the hypothesis that factor XI functions as a bidirectional interface between contact activation and thrombin generation, allowing the two processes to influence each other.

  3. Early Life Manipulations of the Nonapeptide System Alter Pair Maintenance Behaviors and Neural Activity in Adult Male Zebra Finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Nicole M; Tomaszycki, Michelle L; Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Adult zebra finches (T. guttata) form socially monogamous pair bonds characterized by proximity, vocal communication, and contact behaviors. In this experiment, we tested whether manipulations of the nonapeptide hormone arginine vasotocin (AVT, avian homolog of vasopressin) and the V1a receptor (V1aR) early in life altered species-typical pairing behavior in adult zebra finches of both sexes. Although there was no effect of treatment on the tendency to pair in either sex, males in different treatments exhibited profoundly different profiles of pair maintenance behavior. Following a brief separation, AVT-treated males were highly affiliative with their female partner but sang very little compared to Controls. In contrast, males treated with a V1aR antagonist sang significantly less than Controls, but did not differ in affiliation. These effects on behavior in males were also reflected in changes in the expression of V1aR and immediate early gene activity in three brain regions known to be involved in pairing behavior in birds: the medial amygdala, medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and the lateral septum. AVT males had higher V1aR expression in the medial amygdala than both Control and antagonist-treated males and immediate early gene activity of V1aR neurons in the medial amygdala was positively correlated with affiliation. Antagonist treated males showed decreased activity in the medial amygdala. In addition, there was a negative correlation between the activity of V1aR cells in the medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and singing. Treatment also affected the expression of V1aR and activity in the lateral septum, but this was not correlated with any behaviors measured. These results provide evidence that AVT and V1aR play developmental roles in specific pair maintenance behaviors and the neural substrate underlying these behaviors in a bird. PMID:27065824

  4. Early Life Manipulations of the Nonapeptide System Alter Pair Maintenance Behaviors and Neural Activity in Adult Male Zebra Finches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. Baran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adult zebra finches (T. guttata form socially monogamous pair bonds characterized by proximity, vocal communication, and contact behaviors. In this experiment, we tested whether manipulations of the nonapeptide hormone arginine vasotocin (AVT, avian homologue of vasopressin and the V1a receptor (V1aR early in life altered species-typical pairing behavior in adult zebra finches of both sexes. Although there was no effect of treatment on the tendency to pair in either sex, males in different treatments exhibited profoundly different profiles of pair maintenance behavior. Following a brief separation, AVT-treated males were highly affiliative with their female partner but sang very little compared to Controls. In contrast, males treated with a V1aR antagonist sang significantly less than Controls, but did not differ in affiliation. These effects on behavior in males were also reflected in changes in the expression of V1aR and immediate early gene activity in three brain regions known to be involved in pairing behavior in birds: the medial amygdala, medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and the lateral septum. AVT males had higher V1aR expression in the medial amygdala than both Control and antagonist-treated males and immediate early gene activity of V1aR neurons in the medial amygdala was positively correlated with affiliation. Antagonist treated males showed decreased activity in the medial amygdala. In addition, there was a negative correlation between the activity of V1aR cells in the medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and singing. Treatment also affected the expression of V1aR and activity in the lateral septum, but this was not correlated with any behaviors measured. These results provide evidence that AVT and V1aR play developmental roles in specific pair maintenance behaviors and the neural substrate underlying these behaviors in a bird.

  5. Expression of the Salmonella spp. virulence factor SifA in yeast alters Rho1 activity on peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinh, Dani B N; Ko, Dennis C; Rachubinski, Richard A; Aitchison, John D; Miller, Samuel I

    2010-10-15

    The Salmonella typhimurium effector protein SifA regulates the assembly and tubulation of the Salmonella phagosome. SifA localizes to the phagosome and interacts with the membrane via its prenylated tail. SifA is a structural homologue of another bacterial effector that acts as a GTP-exchange factor for Rho family GTPases and can bind GDP-RhoA. When coexpressed with a bacterial lipase that is activated by RhoA, SifA can induce tubulation of mammalian endosomes. In an effort to develop a genetic system to study SifA function, we expressed SifA and characterized its activity in yeast. GFP-SifA predominantly localized to yeast peroxisomal membranes. Under peroxisome-inducing conditions, GFP-SifA reduced the number of free peroxisomes and promoted the formation of large peroxisomes with membrane invaginations. GFP-SifA activity depended on the recruitment to peroxisomes of wild-type Rho1p and Pex25p, a receptor for Rho1p. GFP-SifA could also rescue the actin organization defects in pex25Δ and rho1 mutants, suggesting that SifA may recruit and potentiate Rho1p activity. We reexamined the distribution of GFP-SifA in mammalian cells and found the majority colocalizing with LAMP1-positive compartment and not with the peroxisomal marker PMP70. Together, these data suggest that SifA may use a similar mode of action via Rho proteins to alter yeast peroxisomal and mammalian endosomal membranes. Further definition of SifA activity on yeast peroxisomes could provide more insight into its role in regulating host membrane dynamics and small GTPases.

  6. Altered autonomic nervous system activity as a potential etiological factor of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Tatsuya

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Premenstrual syndrome (PMS encompasses a wide variety of cyclic and recurrent physical, emotional, and behavioral symptoms occurring during the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and abating shortly following the beginning of menses. Although PMS is widely recognized, its etiopathogenesis is not yet understood. The present study investigates whether the activity of the autonomic nervous system, which plays a vital role in orchestrating physiological homeostasis within the human body, is altered during the menstrual cycle of women with different degrees of premenstrual symptomatology. Methods Sixty-two women in their 20s to 40s with regular menstrual cycles participated in this study. All subjects were examined during the follicular and late luteal phases. Cycle phase was determined by the onset of menstruation and oral temperature and was verified by concentrations of ovarian hormones, estrone, and pregnanediol in a urine sample taken early in the morning. Autonomic nervous system activity was assessed by means of heart-rate variability (HRV power spectral analysis during supine rest. The Menstrual Distress Questionnaire was used to evaluate physical, emotional, and behavioral symptoms accompanying the menstrual cycle of the subjects. The subjects were categorized in three groups, Control, PMS, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD groups, depending on the severity of premenstrual symptomatology. Results No intramenstrual cycle difference in any of the parameters of HRV was found in the Control group, which had no or a small increase in premenstrual symptoms. In contrast, Total power and high frequency power, which reflect overall autonomic and parasympathetic nerve activity, respectively, significantly decreased in the late luteal phase from the follicular phase in the PMS group. As for the PMDD group, which had more severe symptoms premenstrually, heart-rate fluctuation as well as all components of the power

  7. Levodopa replacement therapy alters enzyme activities in striatum and neuropeptide content in striatal output regions of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engber, T M; Susel, Z; Kuo, S; Gerfen, C R; Chase, T N

    1991-06-21

    The effects of striatal dopamine denervation and levodopa replacement therapy on neuronal populations in the rat striatum were assessed by measurement of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activities in the striatum, dynorphin and substance P concentrations in the substantia nigra, and enkephalin concentration in the globus pallidus. Rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway were treated for 21 days with levodopa (100 mg/kg/day, i.p., with 25 mg/kg benserazide) on either an intermittent (b.i.d.) or continuous (osmotic pump infusion) regimen and sacrificed following a three day drug washout. In saline-treated control rats, striatal GAD activity and globus pallidus enkephalin content were elevated and nigral substance P content was reduced ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion. Intermittent levodopa treatment further increased GAD activity, decreased CAT activity, restored substance P to control levels, markedly increased dynorphin content, and had no effect on enkephalin. In contrast, continuous levodopa elevated globus pallidus enkephalin beyond the levels occurring with denervation, but had no effect on any of the other neurochemical measures. These results indicate that striatal neuronal populations are differentially affected by chronic levodopa therapy and by the continuous or intermittent nature of the treatment regimen. With the exception of substance P, levodopa did not reverse the effects of the 6-OHDA lesion but, rather, either exacerbated the lesion-induced changes (e.g. GAD and enkephalin) or altered neurochemical markers which had been unaffected by the lesion (e.g. CAT and dynorphin).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1717109

  8. Extensive evolutionary changes in regulatory element activity during human origins are associated with altered gene expression and positive selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Shibata

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular basis for phenotypic differences between humans and other primates remains an outstanding challenge. Mutations in non-coding regulatory DNA that alter gene expression have been hypothesized as a key driver of these phenotypic differences. This has been supported by differential gene expression analyses in general, but not by the identification of specific regulatory elements responsible for changes in transcription and phenotype. To identify the genetic source of regulatory differences, we mapped DNaseI hypersensitive (DHS sites, which mark all types of active gene regulatory elements, genome-wide in the same cell type isolated from human, chimpanzee, and macaque. Most DHS sites were conserved among all three species, as expected based on their central role in regulating transcription. However, we found evidence that several hundred DHS sites were gained or lost on the lineages leading to modern human and chimpanzee. Species-specific DHS site gains are enriched near differentially expressed genes, are positively correlated with increased transcription, show evidence of branch-specific positive selection, and overlap with active chromatin marks. Species-specific sequence differences in transcription factor motifs found within these DHS sites are linked with species-specific changes in chromatin accessibility. Together, these indicate that the regulatory elements identified here are genetic contributors to transcriptional and phenotypic differences among primate species.

  9. Celecoxib treatment does not alter recruitment and activation of osteoclasts in the initial phase of experimental tooth movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho-Filho, E.P.; Stabile, A.C.; Ervolino, E.; Stuani, M.B.S.; Iyomasa, M.M.; Rocha, M.J.A.

    2012-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that the short-term treatment with celecoxib, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) attenuates the activation of brain structures related to nociception and does not interfere with orthodontic incisor separation in rats. The conclusion was that celecoxib could possibly be prescribed for pain in orthodontic patients. However, we did not analyze the effects of this drug in periodontium. The aim of this follow-up study was to analyze effects of celecoxib treatment on recruitment and activation of osteoclasts and alveolar bone resorption after inserting an activated orthodontic appliance between the incisors in our rat model. Twenty rats (400–420 g) were pretreated through oral gavage with celecoxib (50 mg/kg) or vehicle (carboxymethyl-cellulose 0.4%). After 30 min, they received an activated (30 g) orthodontic appliance, set not to cause any palate disjunction. In sham animals, the appliance was immediately removed after introduction. All animals received ground food and, every 12 h, celecoxib or vehicle. After 48 h, they were anesthetized and transcardiacally perfused through the aorta with 4% formaldehyde. Subsequently, maxillae were removed, post-fixed and processed for histomorphometry or immunohistochemical analyses. As expected, incisor distalization induced an inflammatory response with certain histological changes, including an increase in the number of active osteoclasts at the compression side in group treated with vehicle (appliance:32.2±2.49 vs sham: 4.8±1.79, P<0.05) and celecoxib (appliance: 31.0±1.45 vs sham: 4.6±1.82, P<0.05). The treatment with celecoxib did not modify substantially the histological alterations and the number of active osteoclasts after activation of orthodontic appliance. Moreover, we did not see any difference between the groups with respect to percentage of bone resorption area. Taken together with our previous results we conclude that short-term treatment with celecoxib can indeed be

  10. Altered oscillation and synchronization of default-mode network activity in mild Alzheimer's disease compared to mild cognitive impairment: an electrophysiological study.

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    Fu-Jung Hsiao

    Full Text Available Some researchers have suggested that the default mode network (DMN plays an important role in the pathological mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD. To examine whether the cortical activities in DMN regions show significant difference between mild AD from mild cognitive impairment (MCI, electrophysiological responses were analyzed from 21 mild Alzheimer's disease (AD and 21 mild cognitive impairment (MCI patients during an eyes closed, resting-state condition. The spectral power and functional connectivity of the DMN were estimated using a minimum norm estimate (MNE combined with fast Fourier transform and imaginary coherence analysis. Our results indicated that source-based EEG maps of resting-state activity showed alterations of cortical spectral power in mild AD when compared to MCI. These alterations are characteristic of attenuated alpha or beta activities in the DMN, as are enhanced delta or theta activities in the medial temporal, inferior parietal, posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus. With regard to altered synchronization in AD, altered functional interconnections were observed as specific connectivity patterns of connection hubs in the precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and medial temporal regions. Moreover, posterior theta and alpha power and altered connectivity in the medial temporal lobe correlated significantly with scores obtained on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE. In conclusion, EEG is a useful tool for investigating the DMN in the brain and differentiating early stage AD and MCI patients. This is a promising finding; however, further large-scale studies are needed.

  11. Influenza virus-induced alterations of cytochrome P-450 enzyme activities following exposure of mice to coal and diesel particulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabovsky, J; Judy, D J; Rodak, D J; Petersen, M

    1986-06-01

    We have investigated a relationship between two detoxication systems, metabolic detoxication through the cytochrome P-450 (P-450) pathway and resistance to infection through interferon (IFN), in mice infected with influenza virus following exposure to coal dust (CD) and diesel exhaust (DE) particulates. Mice were exposed by inhalation to filtered air (FA; control), CD, or DE for 1 month and then inoculated intranasally (IN) with influenza virus. During infection, 7-ethoxycoumarin deethylase (7ECdeEt'ase) and ethylmorphine demethylase (EMdeMe'ase) (monooxygenases), and NADPH cytochrome c reductase (NADPH c red'ase) were measured in liver microsomes. Temporal patterns of enzyme activities were observed with control animals. EMdeMe'ase and NADPH c red'ase exhibited peak values at Day 4 postinfection (27.6 and 482 nmole/min/mg protein, respectively), compared to initial activities (9.1 and 307 nmole/min/mg protein, respectively). 7ECdeEt'ase activity decreased between Days 1-3 postvirus infection and thereafter returned to the original value (1.7 nmole/min/mg protein). When the mice were first exposed to CD or DE particulates for 1 month prior to influenza infection, changes in enzyme temporal patterns were observed. The increased EMdeMe'ase activity at Day 4 was not observed in mice exposed to CD and was reduced in mice exposed to DE. Preexposure to either particulate resulted in the abolition of the increased Day 4 activity of NADPH c red'ase. The 7ECdeEt'ase postinfection temporal pattern was not affected by a preexposure to either particulate. Estimates of the enzyme activities after the 1-month exposure to FA, CD, or DE but before virus infection indicated no changes due to particulate exposure alone. Under these conditions of particulate exposure and virus infection, serum IFN levels in the mice used in this study peaked at Days 4-5 and were unaffected by the 1-month preexposure to CD or DE (Hahon et al., (1985). The data suggest the relationship that exists

  12. Secretory activity and cell cycle alteration of alveolar type II cells in the early and late phase after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Type II cells and the surfactant system have been proposed to play a central role in pathogenesis of radiation pneumonitis. We analyzed the secretory function and proliferation parameters of alveolar type II cells in the early (until 24 h) and late phase (1-5 weeks) after irradiation (RT) in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: Type II cells were isolated from rats according to the method of Dobbs. Stimulation of secretion was induced with terbutaline, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) for a 2-h period. Determination of secretion was performed using 3H-labeled phosphatidylcholine. For the early-phase analysis, freshly isolated and adherent type II cells were irradiated in vitro with 9-21 Gy (stepwise increase of 3 Gy). Secretion stimulation was initiated 1, 6, 24, and 48 h after RT. For late-phase analysis, type II cells were isolated 1-5 weeks after 18 Gy whole lung or sham RT. Each experiment was repeated at least fivefold. Flow cytometry was used to determine cell cycle distribution and proliferating cell nuclear antigen index. Results: During the early-phase (in vitro) analysis, we found a normal stimulation of surfactant secretion in irradiated, as well as unirradiated, cells. No change in basal secretion and no dose effect were seen. During the late phase, 1-5 weeks after whole lung RT, we observed enhanced secretory activity for all secretagogues and a small increase in basal secretion in Weeks 3 and 4 (pneumonitis phase) compared with controls. The total number of isolated type II cells, as well as the rate of viable cells, decreased after the second post-RT week. Cell cycle alterations suggesting an irreversible G2/M block occurred in the second post-RT week and did not resolve during the observation period. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen index of type II cells from irradiated rats did not differ from that of controls. Conclusion: In contrast to literature data, we observed no direct effect

  13. Mindfulness training alters emotional memory recall compared to active controls: support for an emotional information processing model of mindfulness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug eRoberts-Wolfe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigating the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e. memory biases in relation to both clinical symptomatology and well-being in comparison to active control conditions.Methods: Fifty-eight university students (28 female, age = 20.1 ± 2.7 years participated in either a 12-week course containing a "meditation laboratory" or an active control course with similar content or experiential practice laboratory format (music. Participants completed an emotional word recall task and self-report questionnaires of well-being and clinical symptoms before and after the 12-week course.Results: Meditators showed greater increases in positive word recall compared to controls F(1, 56 = 6.6, p = .02. The meditation group increased significantly more on measures of well-being [F(1, 56 = 6.6, p = .01], with a marginal decrease in depression and anxiety [(F(1, 56 = 3.0, p = .09] compared to controls. Increased positive word recall was associated with increased psychological well-being [r = 0.31, p = .02] and decreased clinical symptoms [r = -0.29, p = .03].Conclusion: Mindfulness training was associated with greater improvements in processing efficiency for positively valenced stimuli than active control conditions. This change in emotional information processing was associated with improvements in psychological well-being and less depression and anxiety. These data suggest that mindfulness training may improve well-being via changes in emotional information processing.

  14. Mechano-growth factor induces migration of rat mesenchymal stem cells by altering its mechanical properties and activating ERK pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jiamin; Wu, Kewen; Lin, Feng; Luo, Qing; Yang, Li; Shi, Yisong [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Song, Guanbin, E-mail: song@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Sung, Kuo-Li Paul [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0412 (United States)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •MGF induced the migration of rat MSC in a concentration-dependent manner. •MGF enhanced the mechanical properties of rMSC in inducing its migration. •MGF activated the ERK 1/2 signaling pathway of rMSC in inducing its migration. •rMSC mechanics may synergy with ERK 1/2 pathway in MGF-induced rMSC migration. -- Abstract: Mechano-growth factor (MGF) generated by cells in response to mechanical stimulation has been identified as a mechano effector molecule, playing a key role in regulating mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) function, including proliferation and migration. However, the mechanism(s) underlying how MGF-induced MSC migration occurs is still unclear. In the present study, MGF motivated migration of rat MSCs (rMSCs) in a concentration-dependent manner and optimal concentration of MGF at 50 ng/mL (defined as MGF treatment in this paper) was demonstrated. Notably, enhancement of mechanical properties that is pertinent to cell migration, such as cell traction force and cell stiffness were found to respond to MGF treatment. Furthermore, MGF increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), ERK inhibitor (i.e., PD98059) suppressed ERK phosphorylation, and abolished MGF-induced rMSC migration were found, demonstrating that ERK is involved molecule for MGF-induced rMSC migration. These in vitro evidences of MGF-induced rMSC migration and its direct link to altering rMSC mechanics and activating the ERK pathway, uncover the underlying biomechanical and biological mechanisms of MGF-induced rMSC migration, which may help find MGF-based application of MSC in clinical therapeutics.

  15. Mutations in MAP3K7 that Alter the Activity of the TAK1 Signaling Complex Cause Frontometaphyseal Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Emma M; Daniel, Philip B; Jenkins, Zandra A; McInerney-Leo, Aideen; Leo, Paul; Morgan, Tim; Addor, Marie Claude; Adès, Lesley C; Bertola, Debora; Bohring, Axel; Carter, Erin; Cho, Tae-Joon; Duba, Hans-Christoph; Fletcher, Elaine; Kim, Chong A; Krakow, Deborah; Morava, Eva; Neuhann, Teresa; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Veenstra-Knol, Irma; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wilson, Louise C; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J; Strom, Tim M; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Brown, Matthew A; Duncan, Emma L; Markie, David M; Robertson, Stephen P

    2016-08-01

    Frontometaphyseal dysplasia (FMD) is a progressive sclerosing skeletal dysplasia affecting the long bones and skull. The cause of FMD in some individuals is gain-of-function mutations in FLNA, although how these mutations result in a hyperostotic phenotype remains unknown. Approximately one half of individuals with FMD have no identified mutation in FLNA and are phenotypically very similar to individuals with FLNA mutations, except for an increased tendency to form keloid scars. Using whole-exome sequencing and targeted Sanger sequencing in 19 FMD-affected individuals with no identifiable FLNA mutation, we identified mutations in two genes-MAP3K7, encoding transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-activated kinase (TAK1), and TAB2, encoding TAK1-associated binding protein 2 (TAB2). Four mutations were found in MAP3K7, including one highly recurrent (n = 15) de novo mutation (c.1454C>T [ p.Pro485Leu]) proximal to the coiled-coil domain of TAK1 and three missense mutations affecting the kinase domain (c.208G>C [p.Glu70Gln], c.299T>A [p.Val100Glu], and c.502G>C [p.Gly168Arg]). Notably, the subjects with the latter three mutations had a milder FMD phenotype. An additional de novo mutation was found in TAB2 (c.1705G>A, p.Glu569Lys). The recurrent mutation does not destabilize TAK1, or impair its ability to homodimerize or bind TAB2, but it does increase TAK1 autophosphorylation and alter the activity of more than one signaling pathway regulated by the TAK1 kinase complex. These findings show that dysregulation of the TAK1 complex produces a close phenocopy of FMD caused by FLNA mutations. Furthermore, they suggest that the pathogenesis of some of the filaminopathies caused by FLNA mutations might be mediated by misregulation of signaling coordinated through the TAK1 signaling complex. PMID:27426733

  16. The surfactant protein C mutation A116D alters cellular processing, stress tolerance, surfactant lipid composition, and immune cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarbock Ralf

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant protein C (SP-C is important for the function of pulmonary surfactant. Heterozygous mutations in SFTPC, the gene encoding SP-C, cause sporadic and familial interstitial lung disease (ILD in children and adults. Mutations mapping to the BRICHOS domain located within the SP-C proprotein result in perinuclear aggregation of the proprotein. In this study, we investigated the effects of the mutation A116D in the BRICHOS domain of SP-C on cellular homeostasis. We also evaluated the ability of drugs currently used in ILD therapy to counteract these effects. Methods SP-CA116D was expressed in MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells. We assessed in vitro the consequences for cellular homeostasis, immune response and effects of azathioprine, hydroxychloroquine, methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Results Stable expression of SP-CA116D in MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells resulted in increased intracellular accumulation of proSP-C processing intermediates. SP-CA116D expression further led to reduced cell viability and increased levels of the chaperones Hsp90, Hsp70, calreticulin and calnexin. Lipid analysis revealed decreased intracellular levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC and increased lyso-PC levels. Treatment with methylprednisolone or hydroxychloroquine partially restored these lipid alterations. Furthermore, SP-CA116D cells secreted soluble factors into the medium that modulated surface expression of CCR2 or CXCR1 receptors on CD4+ lymphocytes and neutrophils, suggesting a direct paracrine effect of SP-CA116D on neighboring cells in the alveolar space. Conclusions We show that the A116D mutation leads to impaired processing of proSP-C in alveolar epithelial cells, alters cell viability and lipid composition, and also activates cells of the immune system. In addition, we show that some of the effects of the mutation on cellular homeostasis can be antagonized by application of pharmaceuticals commonly applied in ILD therapy

  17. Age-Related Alterations of Plasma Lipid Peroxidation and Erythrocyte Superoxide Dismutase Activity in Different Ethnic Groups of Gorgan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjani, Abdoljalal; Mansourian, Azad Reza; Veghari, Gholam Reza; Rabiee, Mohammad Reza

    Free radicals have been proposed as important causative agents of ageing. The free radical theory of ageing postulates that ageing is caused by free radical reactions. These highly reactive species can cause oxidative damage in the cell. The purposive of this study was to investigate the alteration in plasma lipid peroxidation and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity in 2 different ethnic groups of Fars and Turkmen healthy people. We measured plasma lipid peroxidation levels (lipid peroxidation expressed as malondialdehyde) and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity. Study include 350 (175 Fars and 175 Turkmen male) apparently healthy individuals. Erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activities were determined in 2 different ethnic groups of Fars and Turkmen consisting of healthy individuals between 26-60 years of age {26-30 (n = 30), 3-35 (n = 30), 36-40 (n = 30), 41-45 (n = 30), 46-50 (n = 25), 51-55 (n = 15) and 56-60 (n = 15)}, respectively. The data was analyzed by Student` t-test. Erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and plasma lipid peroxidation levels in Fars and Turkmen people with 41-45 ages (group 4) and 36-40 ages (group 3) were significantly lower and higher than in the other age groups (Fars groups 1, 2 and 3, Turkmen groups 1, 2), respectively (p0.05). There were no significant relation between the age groups 3 (Turkmen people) and the age groups 4, 5, 6 and 7 (p>0.05). We found age-related differences in erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity and plasma lipid peroxidation levels. The results indicate that the balance between antioxidant and prooxidant factors in free radical metabolism shifts towards increased lipid peroxidation with advancing age in 2 ethnic groups. This situation maybe begin in Turkmen people earlier than Fars people. The ethnic origin, diet, heavy working and life style factors of the two populations may explain this differences. Therefore we propose that older Fars and Turkmen people may have elevated requirement for

  18. Creatine and pyruvate prevent the alterations caused by tyrosine on parameters of oxidative stress and enzyme activities of phosphoryltransfer network in cerebral cortex of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Rodrigo Binkowski; Gemelli, Tanise; Rojas, Denise Bertin; Bonorino, Narielle Ferner; Costa, Bruna May Lopes; Funchal, Cláudia; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo; Wannmacher, Clovis Milton Duval

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine accumulates in inborn errors of tyrosine catabolism, especially in tyrosinemia type II. In this disease caused by tyrosine aminotransferase deficiency, eyes, skin, and central nervous system disturbances are found. In the present study, we investigated the chronic effect of tyrosine methyl ester (TME) and/or creatine plus pyruvate on some parameters of oxidative stress and enzyme activities of phosphoryltransfer network in cerebral cortex homogenates of 21-day-old Wistar. Chronic administration of TME induced oxidative stress and altered the activities of adenylate kinase and mitochondrial and cytosolic creatine kinase. Total sulfhydryls content, GSH content, and GPx activity were significantly diminished, while DCFH oxidation, TBARS content, and SOD activity were significantly enhanced by TME. On the other hand, TME administration decreased the activity of CK from cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions but enhanced AK activity. In contrast, TME did not affect the carbonyl content and PK activity in cerebral cortex of rats. Co-administration of creatine plus pyruvate was effective in the prevention of alterations provoked by TME administration on the oxidative stress and the enzymes of phosphoryltransfer network, except in mitochondrial CK, AK, and SOD activities. These results indicate that chronic administration of TME may stimulate oxidative stress and alter the enzymes of phosphoryltransfer network in cerebral cortex of rats. In case this also occurs in the patients affected by these disorders, it may contribute, along with other mechanisms, to the neurological dysfunction of hypertyrosinemias, and creatine and pyruvate supplementation could be beneficial to the patients.

  19. Effect of IL-4 on altered expression of complement activation regulators in rat pancreatic cells during severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Zhang; Chun-Lin Ge; Ren-Xuan Guo; San-Guang He

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of IL-4 on the altered expression of complement activation regulators in pancreas and pancreatic necrosis during experimental severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).METHODS: SAP model of rats was established by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (1 mL/kg)into the pancreatic duct. We immunohistochemically assayed the expression of three complement activation regulators: decay accelerating factor (DAF; CD55), 20ku homologous restriction factor (HRF20; CD59) and membrane cofactor protein (MCP; CD46), in the pancreatic acinar cells of rats at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h after the induction of SAP model. Meanwhile the levels of amylase and lipase were determined, and morphological examination was performed. Then, 61 rats were randomly divided into three groups. Group A (n = 21) received notreatment after the SAP model was established; group B (n = 20) was given IL-4 (8 μg/animal) intraperitoneally 0.5 h before the SAP model was established; group C (n = 20) was given IL-4 (8 μg/animal) intraperitoneally 0.5 h after the SAP model was established. Plasma amylase and lipase, extent of pancreatic necrosis and expression of complement activation regulators were investigated 6 h after the induction of SAP model.RESULTS: Three complement activation regulators were all expressed in pancreatic acinar cells. MCP was not found on the basolateral surface as reported. Contrary to the gradually increasing plasma level of amylase and lipase, expression of complement activation regulators decreased after SAP model was set up. At the same time, the severity of pancreatic necrosis was enhanced.A strong negative correlation was found between the expression of MCP, DAF, CD59 in pancreatic acinar cells and the severity of pancreatic necrosis (r = -0.748, -0.827,-0.723; P<0.01). In the second series of experiments,no matter when the treatment of IL-4 was given (before or after the induction of SAP model), the serum level of amylase or lipase Was decreased

  20. Higher high density lipoprotein cholesterol associated with moderate alcohol consumption is not related to altered plasma lecithin : cholesterol acyltransferase and lipid transfer protein activity levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, SC; vanTol, A; Hoogenberg, K; vanGent, T; Scheek, LM; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    1997-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) are important factors involved in HDL metabolism. Altered plasma activity levels of these factors could play a role in the increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL) choles

  1. Unlocking the Sporicidal Potential of Ethanol: Induced Sporicidal Activity of Ethanol against Clostridium difficile and Bacillus Spores under Altered Physical and Chemical Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Nerandzic

    Full Text Available Due to their efficacy and convenience, alcohol-based hand sanitizers have been widely adopted as the primary method of hand hygiene in healthcare settings. However, alcohols lack activity against bacterial spores produced by pathogens such as Clostridium difficile and Bacillus anthracis. We hypothesized that sporicidal activity could be induced in alcohols through alteration of physical or chemical conditions that have been shown to degrade or allow penetration of spore coats.Acidification, alkalinization, and heating of ethanol induced rapid sporicidal activity against C. difficile, and to a lesser extent Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus subtilis. The sporicidal activity of acidified ethanol was enhanced by increasing ionic strength and mild elevations in temperature. On skin, sporicidal ethanol formulations were as effective as soap and water hand washing in reducing levels of C. difficile spores.These findings demonstrate that novel ethanol-based sporicidal hand hygiene formulations can be developed through alteration of physical and chemical conditions.

  2. Alterations in Central Nervous System Serotonergic and Dopaminergic Synaptic Activity in Adulthood after Prenatal or Neonatal Chlorpyrifos Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Aldridge, Justin E; Meyer, Armando; Seidler, Frederic J; Slotkin, Theodore A.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to chlorpyrifos (CPF) alters neuronal development of serotonin (5HT) and dopamine systems, and we recently found long-term alterations in behaviors related to 5HT function. To characterize the synaptic mechanisms underlying these effects, we exposed developing rats to CPF regimens below the threshold for systemic toxicity, in three treatment windows: gestational days (GD) 17–20, postnatal days (PN) 1–4, or PN11–14. In early adulthood (PN60), we assessed basal neurotransmitter content...

  3. Do Biomarkers of Inflammation, Monocyte Activation, and Altered Coagulation Explain Excess Mortality Between HIV Infected and Uninfected People?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Janet P.; Chang, Chung-Chou H.; Butt, Adeel A.; Gerschenson, Mariana; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Leaf, David; Rimland, David; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Samet, Jeffrey H.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Deeks, Steven G.; Crothers, Kristina; Tracy, Russell P.; Crane, Heidi M.; Sajadi, Mohammad M.; Tindle, Hilary A.; Justice, Amy C.; Freiberg, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: HIV infection and biomarkers of inflammation [measured by interleukin-6 (IL-6)], monocyte activation [soluble CD14 (sCD14)], and coagulation (D-dimer) are associated with morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that these immunologic processes mediate (explain) some of the excess risk of mortality among HIV infected (HIV+) versus uninfected people independently of comorbid diseases. Methods: Among 2350 (1521 HIV+) participants from the Veterans Aging Cohort Study Biomarker Cohort (VACS BC), we investigated whether the association between HIV and mortality was altered by adjustment for IL-6, sCD14, and D-dimer, accounting for confounders. Participants were followed from date of blood draw for biomarker assays (baseline) until death or July 25, 2013. Analyses included ordered logistic regression and Cox Proportional Hazards regression. Results: During 6.9 years (median), 414 deaths occurred. The proportional odds of being in a higher quartile of IL-6, sCD14, or D-dimer were 2–3 fold higher for viremic HIV+ versus uninfected people. Mortality rates were higher among HIV+ compared with uninfected people [incidence rate ratio (95% CI): 1.31 (1.06 to 1.62)]. Mortality risk increased with increasing quartiles of IL-6, sCD14, and D-dimer regardless of HIV status. Adjustment for IL-6, sCD14, and D-dimer partially attenuated mortality risk among HIV+ people with unsuppressed viremia (HIV-1 RNA ≥10,000 copies per milliliter) compared with uninfected people—hazard ratio (95% CI) decreased from 2.18 (1.60 to 2.99) to 2.00 (1.45 to 2.76). Conclusions: HIV infection is associated with elevated IL-6, sCD14, and D-dimer, which are in turn associated with mortality. Baseline measures of these biomarkers partially mediate excess mortality risk among HIV+ versus uninfected people. PMID:26885807

  4. Altered activation of innate immunity associates with white matter volume and diffusion in first-episode psychosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu Mäntylä

    altered activation of innate immunity may contribute to WM damage in psychotic disorders.

  5. Altered brain activation in a reversal learning task unmasks adaptive changes in cognitive control in writer's cramp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeuner, Kirsten E; Knutzen, Arne; Granert, Oliver; Sablowsky, Simone; Götz, Julia; Wolff, Stephan; Jansen, Olav; Dressler, Dirk; Schneider, Susanne A; Klein, Christine; Deuschl, Günther; van Eimeren, Thilo; Witt, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Previous receptor binding studies suggest dopamine function is altered in the basal ganglia circuitry in task-specific dystonia, a condition characterized by contraction of agonist and antagonist muscles while performing specific tasks. Dopamine plays a role in reward-based learning. Using fMRI, this study compared 31 right-handed writer's cramp patients to 35 controls in reward-based learning of a probabilistic reversal-learning task. All subjects chose between two stimuli and indicated their response with their left or right index finger. One stimulus response was rewarded 80%, the other 20%. After contingencies reversal, the second stimulus response was rewarded in 80%. We further linked the DRD2/ANKK1-TaqIa polymorphism, which is associated with 30% reduction of the striatal dopamine receptor density with reward-based learning and assumed impaired reversal learning in A + subjects. Feedback learning in patients was normal. Blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in controls increased with negative feedback in the insula, rostral cingulate cortex, middle frontal gyrus and parietal cortex (pFWE negative feedback in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (BA32). The genetic status was not correlated with the BOLD activity. The Brodmann area 32 (BA32) is part of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) that plays an important role in coordinating and integrating information to guide behavior and in reward-based learning. The dACC is connected with the basal ganglia-thalamo-loop modulated by dopaminergic signaling. This finding suggests disturbed integration of reinforcement history in decision making and implicate that the reward system might contribute to the pathogenesis in writer's cramp. PMID:26702397

  6. Epigenetic Profiling of H3K4Me3 Reveals Herbal Medicine Jinfukang-Induced Epigenetic Alteration Is Involved in Anti-Lung Cancer Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoli; Shen, Tingting; Ma, Chao; Wu, Jun; Kong, Hualei; Tian, Jing; Shao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Xiaodong; Xu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine Jinfukang (JFK) has been clinically used for treating lung cancer. To examine whether epigenetic modifications are involved in its anticancer activity, we performed a global profiling analysis of H3K4Me3, an epigenomic marker associated with active gene expression, in JFK-treated lung cancer cells. We identified 11,670 genes with significantly altered status of H3K4Me3 modification following JFK treatment (P JFK. Collectively, these findings provide the first evidence that the anticancer activity of JFK involves modulation of histone modification at many cancer-related gene loci. PMID:27087825

  7. Epigenetic Profiling of H3K4Me3 Reveals Herbal Medicine Jinfukang-Induced Epigenetic Alteration Is Involved in Anti-Lung Cancer Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoli; Shen, Tingting; Ma, Chao; Wu, Jun; Kong, Hualei; Tian, Jing; Shao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Xiaodong; Xu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine Jinfukang (JFK) has been clinically used for treating lung cancer. To examine whether epigenetic modifications are involved in its anticancer activity, we performed a global profiling analysis of H3K4Me3, an epigenomic marker associated with active gene expression, in JFK-treated lung cancer cells. We identified 11,670 genes with significantly altered status of H3K4Me3 modification following JFK treatment (P JFK. Collectively, these findings provide the first evidence that the anticancer activity of JFK involves modulation of histone modification at many cancer-related gene loci.

  8. Increased dopamine D2 receptor activity in the striatum alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area

    OpenAIRE

    Krabbe, Sabine; Duda, Johanna; Schiemann, Julia; Poetschke, Christina; Schneider, Gaby; Kandel, Eric R.; Liss, Birgit; Roeper, Jochen; Simpson, Eleanor H.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia suffer from cognitive and negative deficits that are largely resistant to current therapeutic strategies. Here, using a genetic mouse model that displays phenotypes similar to these cognitive and negative symptoms, we found that increased postsynaptic D2 receptor (D2R) activity in the striatum leads to changes in the firing pattern of presynaptic dopamine (DA) neurons of the midbrain. These alterations occur in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the midbrain, but ...

  9. Altered brain activation and functional connectivity in working memory related networks in patients with type 2 diabetes: An ICA-based analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Zhang; Shan Lu; Chunlei Liu; Huimei Zhang; Xuanhe Zhou; Changlin Ni; Wen Qin; Quan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) can cause multidimensional cognitive deficits, among which working memory (WM) is usually involved at an early stage. However, the neural substrates underlying impaired WM in T2DM patients are still unclear. To clarify this issue, we utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and independent component analysis to evaluate T2DM patients for alterations in brain activation and functional connectivity (FC) in WM networks and to determine their associati...

  10. Placental restriction of fetal growth reduces size at birth and alters postnatal growth, feeding activity, and adiposity in the young lamb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Blasio, Miles J; Gatford, Kathryn L; Robinson, Jeffrey S; Owens, Julie A

    2007-02-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with accelerated growth after birth. Together, IUGR and accelerated growth after birth predict reduced lean tissue mass and increased obesity in later life. Although placental insufficiency is a major cause of IUGR, whether it alters growth and adiposity in early postnatal life is not known. We hypothesized that placental restriction (PR) in the sheep would reduce size at birth and increase postnatal growth rate, fat mass, and feeding activity in the young lamb. PR reduced survival rate and size at birth, with soft tissues reduced to a greater extent than skeletal tissues and relative sparing of head width (P fit for age vs. parameter size from birth to 45 days of age) but increased neonatal fractional growth rates (absolute growth rate relative to size at birth) for body weight (+24%), tibia (+15%) and metatarsal (+18%) lengths, hindlimb (+23%) and abdominal (+19%) circumferences, and fractional growth rates for current weight (P visceral adiposity in absolute and relative terms. PR also altered feeding activity, which increased with decreasing size at birth and was predictive of increased postnatal growth and adiposity. In conclusion, PR reduced size at birth and induced catch-up growth postnatally, normalizing weight and length but increasing adiposity in early postnatal life. Increased feeding activity may contribute to these alterations in growth and body composition following prenatal restraint and, if they persist, may lead to adverse metabolic and cardiovascular outcomes in later life. PMID:17023666

  11. Soy Isoflavone Supplementation Does Not Alter Distribution of Circulating Lymphocytes or Natural Killer Cell Activity in Postmenopausal Women

    OpenAIRE

    Girmes-Grieco, Nicolin Katleen

    2001-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that soy isoflavone consumption may protect against the development of various chronic diseases. This defense could be linked to isoflavone-induced alterations in immune function. However, to date, no study has examined the effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on human immunity in vivo. Establishing whether isoflavones affect immunity in aging adults is particularly relevant since compromised immune function has been observed in this population....

  12. Mindfulness Training Alters Emotional Memory Recall Compared to Active Controls: Support for an Emotional Information Processing Model of Mindfulness

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts-Wolfe, Douglas; Sacchet, Matthew D.; Hastings, Elizabeth; Roth, Harold; Britton, Willoughby

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e., m...

  13. Mindfulness training alters emotional memory recall compared to active controls: support for an emotional information processing model of mindfulness

    OpenAIRE

    Doug eRoberts-Wolfe; Matthew eSacchet; Elizabeth eHastings; Harold eRoth; Willoughby eBritton

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigating the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e. ...

  14. Twenty-four-hour exposure to altered blood flow modifies endothelial Ca2+-activated K+ channels in rat mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilgers, Rob H P; Janssen, Ger M J; Fazzi, Gregorio E;

    2010-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that changes in arterial blood flow modify the function of endothelial Ca2+-activated K+ channels [calcium-activated K+ channel (K(Ca)), small-conductance calcium-activated K+ channel (SK3), and intermediate calcium-activated K+ channel (IK1)] before arterial structural...

  15. Alteration of starch hydrolyzing enzyme inhibitory properties, antioxidant activities, and phenolic profile of clove buds (Syzygium aromaticum L.) by cooking duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefegha, Stephen A; Oboh, Ganiyu; Oyeleye, Sunday I; Osunmo, Kolawole

    2016-03-01

    This study assessed the effect of cooking duration on starch hydrolyzing enzyme (α-amylase and α-glucosidase) activities, antioxidant (1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl [DPPH*], hydroxyl [OH*] radicals scavenging abilities and reducing power) properties, and phenolic profile of clove buds. Clove buds (raw) were cooked for 10 (SC 10) and 20 min (SC 20) and subsequently, their effects were assessed on enzyme activities, antioxidant properties, and phenolic profile. Inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities and radicals scavenging abilities were altered by cooking in the trend; raw SC 20, with IC 50 values ranging from 0.25 to 0.52 mg/mL and 0.10 to 1.50 mg/mL respectively. HPLC phenolic profile of the clove buds revealed significant (P < 0.05) changes in the amount of chlorogenic acid, quercitrin, quercetin, and kaempferol at different cooking duration. Thus, cooking duration may alter the phenolic compositions and nutraceutical potentials of clove bud by activation and/or deactivation of redox-active metabolites. PMID:27004114

  16. Belowground carbon allocation by trees drives seasonal patterns of extracellular enzyme activities by altering microbial community composition in a beech forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Christina; Koranda, Marianne; Kitzler, Barbara; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Schnecker, Jörg; Schweiger, Peter; Rasche, Frank; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Sessitsch, Angela; Richter, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    *Plant seasonal cycles alter carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) availability for soil microbes, which may affect microbial community composition and thus feed back on microbial decomposition of soil organic material and plant N availability. The temporal dynamics of these plant-soil interactions are, however, unclear. *Here, we experimentally manipulated the C and N availability in a beech forest through N fertilization or tree girdling and conducted a detailed analysis of the seasonal pattern of microbial community composition and decomposition processes over 2 yr. *We found a strong relationship between microbial community composition and enzyme activities over the seasonal course. Phenoloxidase and peroxidase activities were highest during late summer, whereas cellulase and protease peaked in late autumn. Girdling, and thus loss of mycorrhiza, resulted in an increase in soil organic matter-degrading enzymes and a decrease in cellulase and protease activity. *Temporal changes in enzyme activities suggest a switch of the main substrate for decomposition between summer (soil organic matter) and autumn (plant litter). Our results indicate that ectomycorrhizal fungi are possibly involved in autumn cellulase and protease activity. Our study shows that, through belowground C allocation, trees significantly alter soil microbial communities, which may affect seasonal patterns of decomposition processes.

  17. GABA-A receptor-mediated signaling alters the structure of spontaneous activity in the developing retina

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chih-Tien; Blankenship, Aaron G.; Anishchenko, Anastasia; Elstrott, Justin; Fikhman, Michael; Nakanishi, Shigetada; Feller, Marla B

    2007-01-01

    Ambient GABA modulates firing patterns in adult neural circuits by tonically activating extrasynaptic GABA-A receptors. Here, we demonstrate that during a developmental period when activation of GABA-A receptors causes membrane depolarization, tonic activation of GABA-A receptors blocks all spontaneous activity recorded in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and starburst amacrine cells (SACs). Bath application of the GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol blocked spontaneous correlated increases in intr...

  18. A kinematic comparison of alterations to knee and ankle angles from resting measures to active pedaling during a graded exercise protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peveler, Willard W; Shew, Brandy; Johnson, Samantha; Palmer, Thomas G

    2012-11-01

    Saddle height is one of the most researched areas of bike fit. The current accepted method for adjusting saddle height involves the use of a goniometer to adjust saddle height so that a knee angle between 25° and 35° is obtained. This measurement is taken while the cyclist maintains a static position with the pedal at the 6-o'-clock position. However, the act of pedaling is dynamic, and angles may alter during movement. The purpose of this study was to examine the alterations to knee and ankle angle occurring from static measures to active pedaling across intensities experienced by cyclists during a graded exercise protocol. Thirty-four recreational to highly trained cyclists were evaluated using 2D analysis of stationary position and 3 active levels (level 1, respiratory exchange ratio of 1.00, and max). Dependent measures were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance (p = 0.05). When examining the results, it is evident that significant alterations to pedal stroke occur from stationary measures to active pedaling and as intensity increases toward maximal. Plantar flexion increased when moving from stationary measures to active pedaling, which resulted in an increase in knee angle. Although still greater than stationary measures, less plantar flexion occurred at higher intensities when compared with lower intensity cycling. Less plantar flexion at higher intensities is most likely a result of application of a larger downward torque occurring because of greater power requirements at higher intensities. There appeared to be greater variability in angle when examining novice cyclists in relation to more experienced cyclists. Although stationary measures are where a bike fit session will begin, observation during the pedal cycle may be needed to fine-tune the riders' fit.

  19. Epigenetic Profiling of H3K4Me3 Reveals Herbal Medicine Jinfukang-Induced Epigenetic Alteration Is Involved in Anti-Lung Cancer Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine Jinfukang (JFK has been clinically used for treating lung cancer. To examine whether epigenetic modifications are involved in its anticancer activity, we performed a global profiling analysis of H3K4Me3, an epigenomic marker associated with active gene expression, in JFK-treated lung cancer cells. We identified 11,670 genes with significantly altered status of H3K4Me3 modification following JFK treatment (P<0.05. Gene Ontology analysis indicates that these genes are involved in tumor-related pathways, including pathway in cancer, basal cell carcinoma, apoptosis, induction of programmed cell death, regulation of transcription (DNA-templated, intracellular signal transduction, and regulation of peptidase activity. In particular, we found that the levels of H3K4Me3 at the promoters of SUSD2, CCND2, BCL2A1, and TMEM158 are significantly altered in A549, NCI-H1975, NCI-H1650, and NCI-H2228 cells, when treated with JFK. Collectively, these findings provide the first evidence that the anticancer activity of JFK involves modulation of histone modification at many cancer-related gene loci.

  20. Does the Presence of Detached Root Border Cells of Zea mays Alter the Activity of the Pathogenic Nematode Meloidogyne incognita?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, S; Bengough, A G; Griffiths, B S; Stubbs, V; Young, I M

    2003-09-01

    ABSTRACT The root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita is a major pathogen of a range of important crops. Currently, control is typically achieved by the use of nematicides. However, recent work suggests that manipulating the ability of roots to slough off border cells, which then act as a decoy to the nematode, can significantly decrease damage to the roots. We investigated the attractiveness of border cells to M. incognita and the response of the nematode to border cells in close proximity. We found very limited attraction, in that nematodes did not preferentially alter direction to move toward the border cells, but a large and significant increase in nematode speed was observed once they were in the immediate vicinity of border cells. We discuss the results in the context of physical and biological mechanisms in relation to the control of pathogenic nematodes.

  1. Altered Patterns of Reward Activation in a Large Cohort of Antipsychotic Naïve First Episode Schizophrenia Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard; Rostrup, Egill; Wulff, Sanne;

    2014-01-01

    not have been caught by the focused analyses. By using a multivariate approach we want to confirm previous findings in a smaller group of patients, and further we expect this method to reveal other important alterations in reward processing. METHODS 53 antipsychotic-naïve first-episode patients...... with schizophrenia and 48 age and gender matched healthy controls were included in a large first episode study. Among several other examinations, the participants went through a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) while playing a monetary reward task. The functional images were analyzed using...... parts of striatum and medial and dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex LV 4 described a widespread network with group difference related the period right after the action applied to target when the outcome was uncertain. LV 5 defined among others small areas in medial prefrontal and anterior cingulated cortex...

  2. Lipopolysaccharide Increases Immune Activation and Alters T Cell Homeostasis in SHIVB'WHU Chronically Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Gao-Hong Zhang; Run-Dong Wu; Hong-Yi Zheng; Xiao-Liang Zhang; Ming-Xu Zhang; Ren-Rong Tian; Guang-Ming Liu; Wei Pang; Yong-Tang Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation plays a significant role in the disease progression of HIV. Microbial products, especially bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), contribute to immune activation. Increasing evidence indicates that T lymphocyte homeostasis disruptions are associated with immune activation. However, the mechanism by which LPS affects disruption of immune response is still not fully understood. Chronically SHIVB’WHU-infected Chinese rhesus macaques received 50 μg/kg body weight LPS in this study....

  3. Opiate antinociception is altered by immunemodification: the effect of interferon, cyclosporine and radiation-induced immune suppression upon acute and long-term morphine activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has recently been demonstrated that various forms of immune modification result in a profound attenuation of the opiate withdrawal syndrome. Herein we investigate the extent to which some of the immune modifiers active in withdrawal attenuation affect other opiate related behaviors, namely antinociception and the development of tolerance to this effect. The observations demonstrate that immune modification by cyclosporine and irradiation exposure result in an alteration of the acute antinociceptive effect of morphine; while none of these treatments modify the development of tolerance to this property of morphine. (Auth.)

  4. Mutations in Tau Gene Exon 10 Associated with FTDP-17 Alter the Activity of an Exonic Splicing Enhancer to Interact with Tra2β*

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Zhihong; Tang, Hao; Havlioglu, Necat; Zhang, Xiaochun; Stamm, Stefan; Yan, Riqiang; Jane Y Wu

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the human tau gene leading to aberrant splicing have been identified in FTDP-17, an autosomal dominant hereditary neurodegenerative disorder. Molecular mechanisms by which such mutations cause tau aberrant splicing were not understood. We characterized two mutations in exon 10 of the tau gene, N279K and Del280K. Our results revealed an exonic splicing enhancer element located in exon 10. The activity of this AG-rich splicing enhancer was altered by N279K and Del280K mutations. Th...

  5. Mutation in the Pro-Peptide Region of a Cysteine Protease Leads to Altered Activity and Specificity—A Structural and Biochemical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sruti; Choudhury, Debi; Roy, Sumana; Dattagupta, Jiban Kanti; Biswas, Sampa

    2016-01-01

    Papain-like proteases contain an N-terminal pro-peptide in their zymogen form that is important for correct folding and spatio-temporal regulation of the proteolytic activity of these proteases. Catalytic removal of the pro-peptide is required for the protease to become active. In this study, we have generated three different mutants of papain (I86F, I86L and I86A) by replacing the residue I86 in its pro-peptide region, which blocks the specificity determining S2-subsite of the catalytic cleft of the protease in its zymogen form with a view to investigate the effect of mutation on the catalytic activity of the protease. Steady-state enzyme kinetic analyses of the corresponding mutant proteases with specific peptide substrates show significant alteration of substrate specificity—I86F and I86L have 2.7 and 29.1 times higher kcat/Km values compared to the wild-type against substrates having Phe and Leu at P2 position, respectively, while I86A shows lower catalytic activity against majority of the substrates tested. Far-UV CD scan and molecular mass analyses of the mature form of the mutant proteases reveal similar CD spectra and intact masses to that of the wild-type. Crystal structures of zymogens of I86F and I86L mutants suggest that subtle reorganization of active site residues, including water, upon binding of the pro-peptide may allow the enzyme to achieve discriminatory substrate selectivity and catalytic efficiency. However, accurate and reliable predictions on alteration of substrate specificity require atomic resolution structure of the catalytic domain after zymogen activation, which remains a challenging task. In this study we demonstrate that through single amino acid substitution in pro-peptide, it is possible to modify the substrate specificity of papain and hence the pro-peptide of a protease can also be a useful target for altering its catalytic activity/specificity. PMID:27352302

  6. Mutation in the Pro-Peptide Region of a Cysteine Protease Leads to Altered Activity and Specificity-A Structural and Biochemical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sruti; Choudhury, Debi; Roy, Sumana; Dattagupta, Jiban Kanti; Biswas, Sampa

    2016-01-01

    Papain-like proteases contain an N-terminal pro-peptide in their zymogen form that is important for correct folding and spatio-temporal regulation of the proteolytic activity of these proteases. Catalytic removal of the pro-peptide is required for the protease to become active. In this study, we have generated three different mutants of papain (I86F, I86L and I86A) by replacing the residue I86 in its pro-peptide region, which blocks the specificity determining S2-subsite of the catalytic cleft of the protease in its zymogen form with a view to investigate the effect of mutation on the catalytic activity of the protease. Steady-state enzyme kinetic analyses of the corresponding mutant proteases with specific peptide substrates show significant alteration of substrate specificity-I86F and I86L have 2.7 and 29.1 times higher kcat/Km values compared to the wild-type against substrates having Phe and Leu at P2 position, respectively, while I86A shows lower catalytic activity against majority of the substrates tested. Far-UV CD scan and molecular mass analyses of the mature form of the mutant proteases reveal similar CD spectra and intact masses to that of the wild-type. Crystal structures of zymogens of I86F and I86L mutants suggest that subtle reorganization of active site residues, including water, upon binding of the pro-peptide may allow the enzyme to achieve discriminatory substrate selectivity and catalytic efficiency. However, accurate and reliable predictions on alteration of substrate specificity require atomic resolution structure of the catalytic domain after zymogen activation, which remains a challenging task. In this study we demonstrate that through single amino acid substitution in pro-peptide, it is possible to modify the substrate specificity of papain and hence the pro-peptide of a protease can also be a useful target for altering its catalytic activity/specificity. PMID:27352302

  7. Altered quantities and in vivo activities of cholinesterase from Daphnia magna in sub-lethal exposure to organophosphorus insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongcui; Yuan, Bingqiang; Li, Shaonan

    2012-06-01

    For investigating relationship between activity of cholinesterase (ChE) and ambient concentration of anticholinesterases, Daphnia magna had been exposed for 21 day to sub-lethal concentrations, i.e. 1/6 EC(50), 1/36 EC(50), and 1/216 EC(50), of either triazophos or chlorpyrifos. Samples were taken at different points of time for measuring total activity and immunoreactive content of ChE and actual concentrations of the anticholinesterases. A type of antigen formerly developed by immunizing mice with purified ChE was utilized in this study to establish an indirect non-competitive ELISA for measuring immunoreactive content of ChE in Daphnia. Studies showed that for apparent activity, i.e. activity that was scaled with total protein, the insecticides caused 5.2-6.9 percent inhibition and 17.0-17.7 percent inductions during the 21 d exposure, whereas for inherent activity, i.e. activity that was scaled with immunoreactive protein, no induction was detected during the exposure. Accompanied by up to 65.9 percent and 68.0 percent promotion in terms of the immunoreactive content, up to 42.8 percent and 44.6 percent inhibition in terms of the inherent activity was indicated, respectively, for triazophos and chlopyrifos. Judged by measured concentrations, the inherent activity recovered faster than the rate of dissipation of the anticholinesterases. Result of the study suggested that the inherent activity was more sensitive than the apparent one in predicting sub-lethal and/or long-term stress of anticholinesterases. It also suggested that apart from promotion in terms of content of the ChE, the Daphnia developed capacities to block bio-concentration of anticholinesterases, and these capacities would make it liable to underestimate ambient concentration of anticholinesterases along with the time of exposure.

  8. Huntingtons Disease Mice Infected with Toxoplasma gondii Demonstrate Early Kynurenine Pathway Activation, Altered CD8+ T-Cell Responses, and Premature Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donley, David W.; Olson, Andrew R.; Raisbeck, Merl F.; Fox, Jonathan H.; Gigley, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine-repeat expansion in the huntingtin protein. Activation of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation is implicated in the pathogenesis of HD. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) catalyzes the oxidation of tryptophan to kynurenine, the first step in this pathway. The prevalent, neuroinvasive protozoal pathogen Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) results in clinically silent life-long infection in immune-competent individuals. T. gondii infection results in activation of IDO which provides some protection against the parasite by depleting tryptophan which the parasite cannot synthesize. The kynurenine pathway may therefore represent a point of synergism between HD and T. gondii infection. We show here that IDO activity is elevated at least four-fold in frontal cortex and striata of non-infected N171-82Q HD mice at 14-weeks corresponding to early–advanced HD. T. gondii infection at 5 weeks resulted in elevation of cortical IDO activity in HD mice. HD-infected mice died significantly earlier than wild-type infected and HD control mice. Prior to death, infected HD mice demonstrated decreased CD8+ T-lymphocyte proliferation in brain and spleen compared to wild-type infected mice. We demonstrate for the first time that HD mice have an altered response to an infectious agent that is characterized by premature mortality, altered immune responses and early activation of IDO. Findings are relevant to understanding how T. gondii infection may interact with pathways mediating neurodegeneration in HD. PMID:27611938

  9. Huntingtons Disease Mice Infected with Toxoplasma gondii Demonstrate Early Kynurenine Pathway Activation, Altered CD8+ T-Cell Responses, and Premature Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donley, David W; Olson, Andrew R; Raisbeck, Merl F; Fox, Jonathan H; Gigley, Jason P

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine-repeat expansion in the huntingtin protein. Activation of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation is implicated in the pathogenesis of HD. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) catalyzes the oxidation of tryptophan to kynurenine, the first step in this pathway. The prevalent, neuroinvasive protozoal pathogen Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) results in clinically silent life-long infection in immune-competent individuals. T. gondii infection results in activation of IDO which provides some protection against the parasite by depleting tryptophan which the parasite cannot synthesize. The kynurenine pathway may therefore represent a point of synergism between HD and T. gondii infection. We show here that IDO activity is elevated at least four-fold in frontal cortex and striata of non-infected N171-82Q HD mice at 14-weeks corresponding to early-advanced HD. T. gondii infection at 5 weeks resulted in elevation of cortical IDO activity in HD mice. HD-infected mice died significantly earlier than wild-type infected and HD control mice. Prior to death, infected HD mice demonstrated decreased CD8+ T-lymphocyte proliferation in brain and spleen compared to wild-type infected mice. We demonstrate for the first time that HD mice have an altered response to an infectious agent that is characterized by premature mortality, altered immune responses and early activation of IDO. Findings are relevant to understanding how T. gondii infection may interact with pathways mediating neurodegeneration in HD. PMID:27611938

  10. Precocious alterations of brain oscillatory activity in Alzheimer’s disease: A window of opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine eHAMM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common form of neurodegenerative dementia accounting for 50% to 80% of all age-related dementia. This pathology is characterized by the progressive and irreversible alteration of cognitive functions, such as memory, leading inexorably to the loss of autonomy for patients with AD. The pathology is linked with aging and occurs most commonly around 65 years old. Its prevalence (5% over 65 years of age and 20% after 80 years constitutes an economic and social burden for AD patients and their family. At the present, there is still no cure for AD, actual treatments being moderately effective only in early stages of the pathology. A lot of efforts have been deployed with the aim of defining new AD biomarkers. Successful early detection of mild cognitive impairment (MCI linked to AD requires the identification of biomarkers capable of distinguishing individuals with early stages of AD from other pathologies impacting cognition such as depression. In this article, we will review recent evidence suggesting that electroencephalographic (EEG recordings, coupled with behavioral assessments, could be a useful approach and easily implementable for a precocious detection of AD.

  11. Altered hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal and sympatho-adrenomedullary activities in rats bred for high anxiety: central and peripheral correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomé, Nicolas; Viltart, Odile; Lesage, Jean; Landgraf, Rainer; Vieau, Didier; Laborie, Christine

    2006-07-01

    Wistar rats have been selectively bred for high (HABs) or low (LABs) anxiety-related behavior based on results obtained in the elevated-plus maze. They also display robust behavioral differences in a variety of additional anxiety tests. The present study was undertaken to further characterize physiological substrates that contribute to the expression of this anxious trait. We report changes in brain and peripheral structures involved in the regulation of both the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and sympatho-adrenal systems. Following exposure to a mild stressor, HABs displayed a hyper-reactivity of the HPA axis associated with a hypo-reactivity of the sympatho-adrenal system and a lower serotonin turnover in the lateral septum and amygdala. At rest, HABs showed a higher adrenal weight and lower tyrosine hydroxylase and phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase mRNAs expression in their adrenals than LABs. In the anterior pituitary, HABs also exhibited increased proopiomelanocortin and decreased vasopressin V1b receptor mRNAs expression, whereas glucocorticoid receptor mRNA levels remained unchanged. These results indicate that the behavioral phenotype of HABs is associated with peripheral and central alterations of endocrine mechanisms involved in stress response regulation. Data are discussed in relation to coping strategies adopted to manage stressful situations. In conclusion, HABs can be considered as an useful model to study the etiology and pathophysiology of stress-related disorders and their neuroendocrine substrates. PMID:16632209

  12. THE MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN MUSCLE SPINDLES AND ALTERATIONS IN CELL ACTIVITY OF THE RATS' RED NUCLEUS AFTER 2 WEEKS' SIMULATED WEIGHTLESSNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Yongjin; Fan Xiaoli; Wu Sudi; Li Qiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the morphological changes of soleus muscle spindle and electrical activity of neurons in Red Nucleus(RN) of the rat after 2 weeks' simulated weightlessness, and to reveal the interaction between proprioceptive inputs of muscle spindles and reciprocal alterations in RN under simulated weightlessness. Methods Twenty female rats were exposed to weightlessness simulated by tail-suspension for 14 days (SW-14d). Body weight(200-220g) matched female rats were control group(Con). The morphological changes in isolated muscle spindle of soleus muscle, the discharges of red nucleus neurons were observed after 14d tail-suspensions by silver staining and extracellular recording respectively. Results Compared with control group ,the nerve ending of muscle spindle in SW-14d was distorted, degenerated and dissolved; the diameters of intrafusal fibers and capsule in equatorial region of soleus muscle spindles were diminished(P<0.05). The spontaneous cell activity and discharge of RN neurons (spikes/s) induced by afferent firing from muscle spindles after injection of succinylcholine were reduced after 2 weeks' simulated weightlessness respectively (18.44±5.96 vs. 10.19±6.88, 32.50±8.08 vs. 16.86±5.97, P<0.01). Conclusion The degeneration of muscle spindle induced by simulated weightlessness may be one of the causes that led to alterations in discharges of RN.

  13. Genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease alters the five-year trajectory of semantic memory activation in cognitively intact elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Stephen M; Bonner-Jackson, Aaron; Nielson, Kristy A; Seidenberg, Michael; Smith, J Carson; Woodard, John L; Durgerian, Sally

    2015-05-01

    Healthy aging is associated with cognitive declines typically accompanied by increased task-related brain activity in comparison to younger counterparts. The Scaffolding Theory of Aging and Cognition (STAC) (Park and Reuter-Lorenz, 2009; Reuter-Lorenz and Park, 2014) posits that compensatory brain processes are responsible for maintaining normal cognitive performance in older adults, despite accumulation of aging-related neural damage. Cross-sectional studies indicate that cognitively intact elders at genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) demonstrate patterns of increased brain activity compared to low risk elders, suggesting that compensation represents an early response to AD-associated pathology. Whether this compensatory response persists or declines with the onset of cognitive impairment can only be addressed using a longitudinal design. The current prospective, 5-year longitudinal study examined brain activation in APOE ε4 carriers (N=24) and non-carriers (N=21). All participants, ages 65-85 and cognitively intact at study entry, underwent task-activated fMRI, structural MRI, and neuropsychological assessments at baseline, 18, and 57 months. fMRI activation was measured in response to a semantic memory task requiring participants to discriminate famous from non-famous names. Results indicated that the trajectory of change in brain activation while performing this semantic memory task differed between APOE ε4 carriers and non-carriers. The APOE ε4 group exhibited greater activation than the Low Risk group at baseline, but they subsequently showed a progressive decline in activation during the follow-up periods with corresponding emergence of episodic memory loss and hippocampal atrophy. In contrast, the non-carriers demonstrated a gradual increase in activation over the 5-year period. Our results are consistent with the STAC model by demonstrating that compensation varies with the severity of underlying neural damage and can be exhausted with the onset

  14. Urethane anesthesia depresses activities of thalamocortical neurons and alters its response to nociception in terms of dual firing modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeowool eHuh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetics are often used to characterize the activity of single neurons in-vivo for its advantages such as reduced noise level and convenience in noxious stimulations. Of the anesthetics, urethane had been widely used in some thalamic studies under the assumption that sensory signals are still relayed to the thalamus under urethane anesthesia and that thalamic response would therefore reflect the response of the awake state. We tested whether this assumption stands by comparing thalamic activity in terms of tonic and burst firing modes during ‘the awake state’ or under ‘urethane anesthesia’ utilizing the extracellular single unit recording technique. First we have tested how thalamic relay neurons respond to the introduction of urethane and then tested how urethane influences thalamic discharges under formalin-induced nociception. Urethane significantly depressed overall firing rates of thalamic relay neurons, which was sustained despite the delayed increase of burst activity over the 4 hour recording period. Thalamic response to nociception under anesthesia was also similar overall except for the slight and transient increase of burst activity. Overall, results demonstrated that urethane suppresses the activity of thalamic relay neurons and that, despite the slight fluctuation of burst firing, formalin-induced nociception cannot significantly change the firing pattern of thalamic relay neurons that was caused by urethane.

  15. Reversible dissociation of active octamer of cyanase to inactive dimer promoted by alteration of the sulfhydryl group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, P M; Johnson, W V; Korte, J J; Xiong, X F; Sung, Y C; Fuchs, J A

    1988-04-25

    Cyanase is an inducible enzyme in Escherichia coli that catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate resulting in the decomposition of cyanate to ammonia and bicarbonate. In this study, the role of the single sulfhydryl group in each of the eight identical subunits of cyanase was investigated. Tetranitromethane, methyl methanethiosulfonate, N-ethylmaleimide, and Hg2+ all reacted with the sulfhydryl group to give derivatives which had reduced activities and which dissociated reversibly to inactive dimer. Association of inactive dimer to active octamer was facilitated by the presence of azide (cyanate analog) and bicarbonate, increased temperature and enzyme concentration, and presence of phosphate. Nitration of tyrosine residues by tetranitromethane occurred only in the absence of azide and bicarbonate, suggesting that at least some of the tyrosine residues become exposed when octamer dissociates to dimer. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to prepare a mutant enzyme in which serine was substituted for cysteine. The mutant enzyme was catalytically active and had properties very similar to native enzyme, except that it was less stable to treatment with urea and to high temperatures. These results establish that in native cyanase the sulfhydryl group per se is not required for catalytic activity, but it may play a role in stabilizing octameric structure, and that octameric structure is required for catalytic activity.

  16. Elevated temperature altered photosynthetic products in wheat seedlings and organic compounds and biological activity in rhizopshere soil under cadmium stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xia; Zhao, Yonghua; Wang, Wenke; He, Yunhua

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of slightly elevated atmospheric temperature in the spring on photosynthetic products in wheat seedlings and on organic compounds and biological activity in rhizosphere soil under cadmium (Cd) stress. Elevated temperature was associated with increased soluble sugars, reducing sugars, starch, and total sugars, and with decreased amino acids in wheat seedlings under Cd stress. Elevated temperature improved total soluble sugars, free amino acids, soluble phenolic acids, and organic acids in rhizosphere soil under Cd stress. The activity of amylase, phenol oxidase, invertase, β-glucosidase, and L-asparaginase in rhizosphere soil was significantly improved by elevated temperature under Cd stress; while cellulase, neutral phosphatase, and urease activity significantly decreased. Elevated temperature significantly improved bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, and total microorganisms abundance and fluorescein diacetate activity under Cd stress. In conclusion, slightly elevated atmospheric temperature in the spring improved the carbohydrate levels in wheat seedlings and organic compounds and biological activity in rhizosphere soil under Cd stress in the short term. In addition, elevated atmospheric temperature in the spring stimulated available Cd by affecting pH, DOC, phenolic acids, and organic acids in rhizosphere soil, which resulted in the improvement of the Cd uptake by wheat seedlings.

  17. Experimental study on alteration of adrenergic receptors activity in neuronal membranes protein of cerebral cortex following brain trauma in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xin-wei; XU Ru-xiang; QI Yi-long; CHEN Chang-cai

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To define the course of changes taken by α1 and β adrenergic receptors (AR) activity after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore the approach for secondary brain injury (SBI) management. Methods: The neuronal membrane protein of cortex were extracted from the rats subject to traumatic brain injury, and the changes of α1- and β-AR activities in the neuronal membranes were examined by radio ligand binding assay (RLBA). Results: α1- and β-AR activities underwent obvious changes, reaching their peak values at 24 h after TBI. α1-AR binding density (Bmax) reduced by 22.6%while the ligand affinity increased by 66.7%, and for β-AR, however, Bmax increased by 116.9% and the ligand affinity reduced by 50.7%. Their antagonists could counteract the changes ofα1- and β-AR activity. Conclusion: The patterns of changes varies between α1- and β-AR activity after TBI, suggesting their different roles in the neuronal membranes after brain trauma, and timely administration of AR antagonists is potentially beneficial in TBI management.

  18. Stress-restress evokes sustained iNOS activity and altered GABA levels and NMDA receptors in rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvey, Brian H; Oosthuizen, Frasia; Brand, Linda;

    2004-01-01

    RATIONALE: Stress-related glucocorticoid and glutamate release have been implicated in hippocampal atrophy evident in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Glutamatergic mechanisms activate nitric oxide synthase (NOS), while gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) may inhibit both glutamat......RATIONALE: Stress-related glucocorticoid and glutamate release have been implicated in hippocampal atrophy evident in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Glutamatergic mechanisms activate nitric oxide synthase (NOS), while gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) may inhibit both...... glutamatergic and nitrergic transmission. Animal studies support a role for NOS in stress. OBJECTIVES: We have studied the role of NOS and glucocorticoids, as well as inhibitory and excitatory transmitters, in a putative animal model of PTSD that emphasizes repeated trauma. METHODS: Hippocampal NOS activity, N...... activation. CONCLUSIONS: Stress-restress-mediated glucocorticoid release activates iNOS, followed by a reactive downregulation of hippocampal NMDA receptors and dysregulation of inhibitory GABA pathways. The role of NO in neuronal toxicity, and its regulation by glutamate and GABA has important implications...

  19. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  20. Altered bone marrow activity: potential cause of flase-positive indium-111-labeled leukocyte image patterns in complicated cases of suspected osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper determines the frequency with which altered bone marrow distribution might cause false-positive In-111-labeled white blood cell (In-111 WBC) localization patterns at suspected sits of osteomyelitis. Bone/bone marrow cultures were used in each of 74 patients to establish the presence of infection. Thirty-eight patients had nonunited fractures, 26 had painful prostheses, and 10 had prior osteomyelitis. Tc-99 m albumin colloid (Tc-99 m AC) bone marrow imaging was done in 18 patients initially considered to have osteomyelitis by In-111 WBC/Tc-99 m MDP imaging. All 18 had undergone prior internal fixation, bone grafting, or prosthesis removal. Studies were defined positive for osteomyelitis when In-111 WBC activity exceeded Tc-99 m AC activity in extent or focal intensity (discordant)

  1. Defective mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced AP endonuclease 1 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Alzheimer's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Hejl, Anne-Mette; Dinh, Tran Thuan Son;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are badly needed. Recent reports suggest that dysfunctional mitochondria and DNA damage are associated with AD development. In this report, we measured various cellular parameters, related to mitochondrial bioenergetics...... as possible. We measured glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration fluxes using the Seahorse Bioscience flux analyzer, mitochondrial ROS production using flow cytometry, dNTP levels by way of a DNA polymerization assay, DNA strand breaks using the Fluorometric detection of Alkaline DNA Unwinding (FADU) assay...... on adjustments for gender and/or age. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals impaired mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced DNA repair activity in PBMCs of AD patients, thus suggesting that these biochemical activities may be useful as biomarkers for AD....

  2. Altered baseline brain activity with 72 h of simulated microgravity--initial evidence from resting-state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yang; Zhang, Jinsong; Huang, Zhiping; Xi, Yibin; Zhang, Qianru; Zhu, Tianli; Liu, Xufeng

    2012-01-01

    To provide the basis and reference to further insights into the neural activity of the human brain in a microgravity environment, we discuss the amplitude changes of low-frequency brain activity fluctuations using a simulated microgravity model. Twelve male participants between 24 and 31 years old received resting-state fMRI scans in both a normal condition and after 72 hours in a -6° head down tilt (HDT). A paired sample t-test was used to test the amplitude differences of low-frequency brain activity fluctuations between these two conditions. With 72 hours in a -6° HDT, the participants showed a decreased amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in the left thalamus compared with the normal condition (a combined threshold of Pmicrogravity environment. PMID:23285086

  3. Arsenite induces apoptosis in human mesenchymal stem cells by altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by activating intrinsic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Environmental exposure to arsenic is an important public health issue. The effects of arsenic on different tissues and organs have been intensively studied. However, the effects of arsenic on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have not been reported. This study is designed to investigate the cell death process caused by arsenite and its related underlying mechanisms on MSCs. The rationale is that absorbed arsenic in the blood circulation can reach to the bone marrow and may affect the cell survival of MSCs. Methods: MSCs of passage 1 were purchased from Tulane University, grown till 70% confluency level and plated according to the experimental requirements followed by treatment with arsenite at various concentrations and time points. Arsenite (iAsIII) induced cytotoxic effects were confirmed by cell viability and cell cycle analysis. For the presence of canonic apoptosis markers; DNA damage, exposure of intramembrane phosphotidylserine, protein and m-RNA expression levels were analyzed. Results: iAsIII induced growth inhibition, G2-M arrest and apoptotic cell death in MSCs, the apoptosis induced by iAsIII in the cultured MSCs was, via altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by involving intrinsic pathway. Conclusion: iAsIII can induce apoptosis in bone marrow-derived MSCs via Bcl-2 family proteins, regulating intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Due to the multipotency of MSC, acting as progenitor cells for a variety of connective tissues including bone, adipose, cartilage and muscle, these effects of arsenic may be important in assessing the health risk of the arsenic compounds and understanding the mechanisms of arsenic-induced harmful effects.

  4. Prenatal alcohol exposure alters synaptic activity of adult hippocampal dentate granule cells under conditions of enriched environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajimoto, Kenta; Valenzuela, C Fernando; Allan, Andrea M; Ge, Shaoyu; Gu, Yan; Cunningham, Lee Anna

    2016-08-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) results in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), which is characterized by a wide range of cognitive and behavioral deficits that may be linked to impaired hippocampal function and adult neurogenesis. Preclinical studies in mouse models of FASD indicate that PAE markedly attenuates enrichment-mediated increases in the number of adult-generated hippocampal dentate granule cells (aDGCs), but whether synaptic activity is also affected has not been studied. Here, we utilized retroviral birth-dating coupled with whole cell patch electrophysiological recordings to assess the effects of PAE on enrichment-mediated changes in excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity as a function of DGC age. We found that exposure to an enriched environment (EE) had no effect on baseline synaptic activity of 4- or 8-week-old aDGCs from control mice, but significantly enhanced the excitatory/inhibitory ratio of synaptic activity in 8-week-old aDGCs from PAE mice. In contrast, exposure to EE significantly enhanced the excitatory/inhibitory ratio of synaptic activity in older pre-existing DGCs situated in the outer dentate granule cell layer (i.e., those generated during embryonic development; dDGCs) in control mice, an effect that was blunted in PAE mice. These findings indicate distinct electrophysiological responses of hippocampal DGCs to behavioral challenge based on cellular ontogenetic age, and suggest that PAE disrupts EE-mediated changes in overall hippocampal network activity. These findings may have implications for future therapeutic targeting of hippocampal dentate circuitry in clinical FASD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27009742

  5. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Plays a Vital Role in Regulation of Rice Seed Vigor via Altering NADPH Oxidase Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Liu; Jun Zhou; Da Xing

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) has been reported to be important in normal plant growth and stress responses. In this study, it was verified that PI3K played a vital role in rice seed germination through regulating NADPH oxidase activity. Suppression of PI3K activity by inhibitors wortmannin or LY294002 could abate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which resulted in disturbance to the seed germination. And then, the signal cascades that PI3K promoted the ROS liberation was al...

  6. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in Drinking Water Causes Alterations in Locomotor Activity and Decreases Striatal mRNA for the D2 Dopamine Receptor in CD1 Male Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Ávila, Claudia Leticia; Limón-Pacheco, Jorge H.; Giordano., Magda; Rodríguez, Verónica M.

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with sensory, motor, memory, and learning alterations in humans and alterations in locomotor activity, behavioral tasks, and neurotransmitters systems in rodents. In this study, CD1 mice were exposed to 0.5 or 5.0 mg As/L of drinking water for 6 months. Locomotor activity, aggression, interspecific behavior and physical appearance, monoamines levels, and expression of the messenger for dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were assessed. Arsenic exposure produced h...

  7. A systematic analysis of the complement pathways in patients with neuromyelitis optica indicates alteration but no activation during remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veszeli, Nóra; Füst, György; Csuka, Dorottya;

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune demyelinating inflammatory disorder, mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies against aquaporin 4 (AQP4), the main water channel of the central nervous system (CNS). NMO is characterized by local IgG deposition and complement activation within the CNS...

  8. Carboxy-terminal mutations of bile acid CoA:N-acyltransferase alter activity and substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, Nathan A; Shonsey, Erin M; Falany, Josie L; Guidry, Amber L; Barnes, Stephen; Falany, Charles N

    2016-07-01

    Bile acid CoA:amino acid N-acyltransferase (BAAT) is the terminal enzyme in the synthesis of bile salts from cholesterol and catalyzes the conjugation of taurine or glycine to bile acid CoA thioesters to form bile acid N-acylamidates. BAAT has a dual localization to the cytosol and peroxisomes, possibly due to an inefficient carboxy-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS), -serine-glutamine-leucine (-SQL). Mutational analysis was used to define the role of the carboxy terminus in peroxisomal localization and kinetic activity. Amidation activity of BAAT and BAAT lacking the final two amino acids (AAs) (BAAT-S) were similar, whereas the activity of BAAT with a canonical PTS sequence (BAAT-SKL) was increased >2.5-fold. Kinetic analysis of BAAT and BAAT-SKL showed that BAAT-SKL had a lower Km for taurine and glycine as well as a greater Vmax There was no difference in the affinity for cholyl-CoA. In contrast to BAAT, BAAT-SKL forms bile acid N-acylamidates with β-alanine. BAAT-S immunoprecipitated when incubated with peroxisomal biogenesis factor 5 (Pex5) and rabbit anti-Pex5 antibodies; however, deleting the final 12 AAs prevented coimmunoprecipitation with Pex5, indicating the Pex5 interaction involves more than the -SQL sequence. These results indicate that even small changes in the carboxy terminus of BAAT can have significant effects on activity and substrate specificity. PMID:27230263

  9. Disruption of ATCSLD5 results in reduced growth, reduced xylan and homogalacturonan synthase activity and altered xylan occurrence in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal Giraldo, Adriana Jimena; Jensen, Jacob Krüger; Harholt, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    labelling indicated a reduction in the level of xylan in stems, and in vitro GT assays using microsomes from stems revealed that ATCSLD5 knock-out plants also had reduced xylan and homogalacturonan synthase activity. Expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of ATCSLD5 and ATCSLD3, fluorescently tagged at either...

  10. Gestational exposure to cadmium alters crucial offspring rat brain enzyme activities: the role of cadmium-free lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapi, Charis; Stolakis, Vasileios; Zarros, Apostolos; Zissis, Konstantinos M; Botis, John; Al-Humadi, Hussam; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2013-11-01

    The present study aimed to shed more light on the effects of gestational (in utero) exposure to cadmium (Cd) on crucial brain enzyme activities of Wistar rat offspring, as well as to assess the potential protective/restorative role that a Cd-free lactation might have on these effects. In contrast to earlier findings of ours regarding the pattern of effects that adult-onset exposure to Cd has on brain AChE, Na(+),K(+)- and Mg(2+)-ATPase activities, as well as in contrast to similar experimental approaches implementing the sacrificing mode of anaesthesia, in utero exposure to Cd-chloride results in increased AChE and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activities in the newborn rat brain homogenates that were ameliorated through a Cd-free lactation (as assessed in the brain of 21-day-old offspring). Mg(2+)-ATPase activity was not found to be significantly modified under the examined experimental conditions. These findings could provide the basis for a further evaluation of the herein discussed neurotoxic effects of in utero exposure to Cd, in a brain region-specific manner.

  11. Genetic analysis of central carbon metabolism unveils an amino acid substitution that alters maize NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengyi Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Central carbon metabolism (CCM is a fundamental component of life. The participating genes and enzymes are thought to be structurally and functionally conserved across and within species. Association mapping utilizes a rich history of mutation and recombination to achieve high resolution mapping. Therefore, applying association mapping in maize (Zea mays ssp. mays, the most diverse model crop species, to study the genetics of CCM is a particularly attractive system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a maize diversity panel to test the CCM functional conservation. We found heritable variation in enzyme activity for every enzyme tested. One of these enzymes was the NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH, E.C. 1.1.1.41, in which we identified a novel amino-acid substitution in a phylogenetically conserved site. Using candidate gene association mapping, we identified that this non-synonymous polymorphism was associated with IDH activity variation. The proposed mechanism for the IDH activity variation includes additional components regulating protein level. With the comparison of sequences from maize and teosinte (Zea mays ssp. Parviglumis, the maize wild ancestor, we found that some CCM genes had also been targeted for selection during maize domestication. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate the efficacy of association mapping for dissecting natural variation in primary metabolic pathways. The considerable genetic diversity observed in maize CCM genes underlies heritable phenotypic variation in enzyme activities and can be useful to identify putative functional sites.

  12. Altered baseline brain activities before food intake in obese men: a resting state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Tian, Derun; Yu, Chunshui; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Xiao; von Deneen, Karen M; Zang, Yufeng; Walter, Martin; Liu, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Obesity as a chronic disease has become a global epidemic. However, why obese individuals eat more still remains unclear. Recent functional neuroimaging studies have found abnormal brain activations in obese people. In the present study, we used resting state functional MRI to observe spontaneous blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations during both hunger and satiety states in 20 lean and 20 obese men. Using a regional homogeneity (ReHo) analysis method, we measured temporal homogeneity of the regional BOLD signals. We found that, before food intake, obese men had significantly increased synchronicity of activity in the left putamen relative to lean men. Decreased synchronicity of activity was found in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and medial prefrontal cortex(MPFC) in the obese subjects. And, the ratings of hunger of the obese subjects were higher than those of the lean subjects before food intake. After food intake, we did not find the significant differences between the obese men and the lean men. In all participations, synchronicity of activity increased from the fasted to the satiated state in the OFC. The results indicated that OFC plays an important role in feeding behavior, and OFC signaling may be disordered in obesity. Obese men show less inhibitory control during fasting state. This study has provided strong evidence supporting the hypothesis that there is a hypo-functioning reward circuitry in obese individuals, in which the frontal cortex may fail to inhibit the striatum, and consequently lead to overeating and obesity. PMID:25459293

  13. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase plays a vital role in regulation of rice seed vigor via altering NADPH oxidase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K has been reported to be important in normal plant growth and stress responses. In this study, it was verified that PI3K played a vital role in rice seed germination through regulating NADPH oxidase activity. Suppression of PI3K activity by inhibitors wortmannin or LY294002 could abate the reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, which resulted in disturbance to the seed germination. And then, the signal cascades that PI3K promoted the ROS liberation was also evaluated. Diphenylene iodonium (DPI, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, suppressed most of ROS generation in rice seed germination, which suggested that NADPH oxidase was the main source of ROS in this process. Pharmacological experiment and RT-PCR demonstrated that PI3K promoted the expression of Os rboh9. Moreover, functional analysis by native PAGE and the measurement of the 2, 3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazo-lium-5- carboxanilide (XTT formazan concentration both showed that PI3K promoted the activity of NADPH oxidase. Furthermore, the western blot analysis of OsRac-1 demonstrated that the translocation of Rac-1 from cytoplasm to plasma membrane, which was known as a key factor in the assembly of NADPH oxidase, was suppressed by treatment with PI3K inhibitors, resulting in the decreased activity of NADPH oxidase. Taken together, these data favored the novel conclusion that PI3K regulated NADPH oxidase activity through modulating the recruitment of Rac-1 to plasma membrane and accelerated the process of rice seed germination.

  14. Altered activity and functional connectivity of superior temporal gyri in anxiety disorders: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prior functional MRI studies have demonstrated significantly abnormal activity in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG) of anxiety patients. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine whether the abnormal activity in these regions was related to a loss of functional connectivity between these regions. Ten healthy controls and 10 anxiety patients underwent noninvasive fMRI while actively listening to emotionally neutral words alternated by silence (Task 1) or threat-related words (Task 2). The participants were instructed to silently make a judgment of each word's valence (i.e., unpleasant, pleasant, or neutral). A coherence analysis was applied to the functional MRI data to examine the functional connectivity between the left and the right STG, which was selected as the primary region of interest on the basis of our prior results. The data demonstrated that the anxiety patients exhibited significantly increased activation in the bilateral STG than the normal controls. The functional connectivity analysis indicated that the patient group showed significantly decreased degree of connectivity between the bilateral STG during processing Task 2 compared to Task 1 (t = 2.588, p = 0.029). In addition, a significantly decreased connectivity was also observed in the patient group compared to the control group during processing Task 2 (t = 2.810, p = 0.012). Anxiety patients may exhibit increased activity of the STG but decreased functional connectivity between the left and right STG, which may reflect the underlying neural abnormality of anxiety disorder, and this will provide new insights into this disease.

  15. Altered activity and functional connectivity of superior temporal gyri in anxiety disorders: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xiaohu; Xi, Qian; Wang, Peijun; Li, Chunbo [Tong Ji Hospital of Tong Ji University, Shanghai (China); He, Hongjian [Bio-X lab, Dept. of Physics, Zhe Jiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-08-15

    The prior functional MRI studies have demonstrated significantly abnormal activity in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG) of anxiety patients. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine whether the abnormal activity in these regions was related to a loss of functional connectivity between these regions. Ten healthy controls and 10 anxiety patients underwent noninvasive fMRI while actively listening to emotionally neutral words alternated by silence (Task 1) or threat-related words (Task 2). The participants were instructed to silently make a judgment of each word's valence (i.e., unpleasant, pleasant, or neutral). A coherence analysis was applied to the functional MRI data to examine the functional connectivity between the left and the right STG, which was selected as the primary region of interest on the basis of our prior results. The data demonstrated that the anxiety patients exhibited significantly increased activation in the bilateral STG than the normal controls. The functional connectivity analysis indicated that the patient group showed significantly decreased degree of connectivity between the bilateral STG during processing Task 2 compared to Task 1 (t = 2.588, p = 0.029). In addition, a significantly decreased connectivity was also observed in the patient group compared to the control group during processing Task 2 (t = 2.810, p = 0.012). Anxiety patients may exhibit increased activity of the STG but decreased functional connectivity between the left and right STG, which may reflect the underlying neural abnormality of anxiety disorder, and this will provide new insights into this disease.

  16. Modulating the RNA processing and decay by the exosome: altering Rrp44/Dis3 activity and end-product.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa P Reis

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, the exosome plays a central role in RNA maturation, turnover, and quality control. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the core exosome is composed of nine catalytically inactive subunits constituting a ring structure and the active nuclease Rrp44, also known as Dis3. Rrp44 is a member of the ribonuclease II superfamily of exoribonucleases which include RNase R, Dis3L1 and Dis3L2. In this work we have functionally characterized three residues located in the highly conserved RNB catalytic domain of Rrp44: Y595, Q892 and G895. To address their precise role in Rrp44 activity, we have constructed Rrp44 mutants and compared their activity to the wild-type Rrp44. When we mutated residue Q892 and tested its activity in vitro, the enzyme became slightly more active. We also showed that when we mutated Y595, the final degradation product of Rrp44 changed from 4 to 5 nucleotides. This result confirms that this residue is responsible for the stacking of the RNA substrate in the catalytic cavity, as was predicted from the structure of Rrp44. Furthermore, we also show that a strain with a mutation in this residue has a growth defect and affects RNA processing and degradation. These results lead us to hypothesize that this residue has an important biological role. Molecular dynamics modeling of these Rrp44 mutants and the wild-type enzyme showed changes that extended beyond the mutated residues and helped to explain these results.

  17. Balancing bilateral sensory activity: callosal processing modulates sensory transmission through the contralateral thalamus by altering the response threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Ebner, Ford F

    2006-07-01

    Rats tactually explore a nearly spherical space field around their heads with their whiskers. The information sampled by the two sets of whiskers is integrated bilaterally at the cortical level in an activity dependent manner via the corpus callosum. We have recently shown that sensory activity in one barrel field cortex (BFC) modulates the processing of incoming sensory information to the other BFC. Whether interhemispheric integration is dynamically linked with corticothalamic modulation of incoming sensory activity is an important hypothesis to test, since subcortical relay neurons are directly modulated by cortical neurons through top-down processes. In the present study, we compared the direct sensory responses of single thalamic relay neurons under urethane anesthesia before and after inactivating the BFC contralateral to a thalamic neuron. The data show that silencing one BFC reduces response magnitude in contralateral thalamic relay neurons, significantly and reversibly, in response to test stimuli applied to the principal whisker at two times response threshold (2T) intensity for each unit. Neurons in the ventral posterior medial (VPM) nucleus and the medial division of the posterior nucleus (POm) react in a similar manner, although POm neurons are more profoundly depressed by inactivation of the contralateral BFC than VPM neurons. The results support the novel idea that the subcortical relay of sensory information to one hemisphere is strongly modulated by activity levels in the contralateral as well as in the ipsilateral SI cortex. The mechanism of the modulation appears to be based on shifting the stimulus-response curves of thalamic neurons, thereby rendering them more or less sensitive to sensory stimuli. We conclude that global sensory processing is created by combining activity in each cerebral hemisphere and continually balancing the flow of information to cortex by adjusting the responsiveness of ascending sensory pathways.

  18. Treatment with rhDNase in patients with cystic fibrosis alters in-vitro CHIT-1 activity of isolated leucocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckmann, M; Schultheiss, C; Hollaender, A; Bobis, I; Rupp, J; Kopp, M V

    2016-09-01

    Recent data suggest a possible relationship between cystic fibrosis (CF) pharmacotherapy, Aspergillus fumigatus colonization (AC) and/or allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). The aim of this study was to determine if anti-fungal defence mechanisms are influenced by CF pharmacotherapy, i.e. if (1) neutrophils form CF and non-CF donors differ in their ability to produce chitotriosidase (CHIT-1); (2) if incubation of isolated neutrophils with azithromycin, salbutamol, prednisolone or rhDNase might influence the CHIT-1 activity; and (3) if NETosis and neutrophil killing efficiency is influenced by rhDNase. Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of CF patients (n = 19; mean age 26·8 years or healthy, non-CF donors (n = 20; 38·7 years) and stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), azithromycin, salbutamol, prednisolone or rhDNase. CHIT-1 enzyme activity was measured with a fluorescent substrate. NETosis was induced by PMA and neutrophil killing efficiency was assessed by a hyphae recovery assay. Neutrophil CHIT-1 activity was comparable in the presence or absence of PMA stimulation in both CF and non-CF donors. PMA stimulation and preincubation with rhDNase increased CHIT-1 activity in culture supernatants from non-CF and CF donors. However, this increase was significant in non-CF donors but not in CF patients (P < 0·05). RhDNase reduced the number of NETs in PMA-stimulated neutrophils and decreased the killing efficiency of leucocytes in our in-vitro model. Azithromycin, salbutamol or prednisolone had no effect on CHIT-1 activity. Stimulation of isolated leucocytes with PMA and treatment with rhDNase interfered with anti-fungal defence mechanisms. However, the impact of our findings for treatment in CF patients needs to be proved in a clinical cohort. PMID:27324468

  19. Costimulation of resting B lymphocytes alters the IL-4-activated IRS2 signaling pathway in a STAT6 independent manner: implications for cell survival and proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    IL-4 is an important B cell survival and growth factor.IL-4 induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS2 in resting B lymphocytes and in LPS- or CD40L-activated blasts.Phosphorylated IRS2 coprecipitated with the p85 subunit of PI 3' kinase in both resting and activated cells.By contrast,association of phosphorylated IRS2 with GRB2 was not detected in resting B cells after IL-4 treatment although both proteins were expressed.However,IL-4 induced association of IRS2 with GRB2 in B cell blasts.The pattern of IL-4-induced recruitment of p85 and GRB2 to IRS2 observed in B cells derived from STAT6 null mice was identical to that observed for normal mice.While IL-4 alone does not induce activation of MEK,a MEK1 inhibitor suppressed the IL-4-induced proliferative response of LPS-activated B cell blasts.These results demonstrate that costimulation of splenic B cells alters IL-4-induced signal transduction independent of STAT6 leading to proliferation.Furthermore,proliferation induced by IL-4 in LPS-activated blasts is dependent upon the MAP kinase pathway.

  20. Oridonin induces apoptosis of HeLa cells via altering expres sion of Bcl-2/Bax and activating caspase-3/ICAD pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-ling ZHANG; Li-jun WU; Shin-ichi TASHIRO; Satoshi ONODERA; Takashi IKEJIMA

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanisms by which oridonin inhibited HeLa cell growth in vitro. METHODS: Viability of oridonin-induced HeLa cells was measured by MTT assay. Apoptotic cells with condensed nuclei were visualized by phase contrast microscopy. Nucleosomal DNA fragmentation was assayed by agarose gel electrophoresis.Caspase activity was assayed using fiuorometric protease assay. ICAD, Bcl-2, and Bax proteins expression were detected by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Oridonin induced oligonucleosomal fragmentation of DNA and increased caspase-3 activity, on the other hand, reduced the expression of inhibitor of caspase-3-activated DNase (ICAD), a caspase-3 substrate, at 12 h in HeLa cells. Oridonin-induced DNA fragmentation, caspase-3 activation and down-regulation of ICAD expression were effectively inhibited by a caspase-3 inhibitor, z-DEVD-fmk (z-AspGlu-Val-Asp-fmk). However, pretreatment with an inhibitor of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), 3, 4-dihydro5-[4-(1-piperidinyl)butoxy]-1 (2H)-isoquinolinone (DPQ), did not suppress oridonin-induced HeLa cell death. In addition, oridonin-induced apoptosis was associated with an increase in the expression of the apoptosis inducer Bax, and a significant reduction in expression of the apoptosis suppressor Bcl-2 in mitochondria. CONCLUSION:Oridonin induces HeLa cells apoptosis by altering balance of Bcl-2 and Bax protein expression and activation of caspase-3/ICAD pathway.

  1. α2-Null mutant mice have altered levels of neuronal activity in restricted midbrain and limbic brain regions during nicotine withdrawal as demonstrated by cfos expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Montana; Lotfipour, Shahrdad

    2015-10-15

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the primary binding sites for nicotine within the brain. Using alpha(α)2 nAChR subunit-null mutant mice, the current study evaluates whether the absence of this gene product during mecamylamine-precipitated nicotine withdrawal eliminates neuronal activity within selective midbrain and limbic brain regions, as determined by the expression of the immediate early gene, cfos. Our results demonstrate that nicotine withdrawal enhances neuronal activity within the interpeduncular nucleus and dorsal hippocampus, which is absent in mice null for α2-containing nAChRs. In contrast, we observe that α2-null mutant mice exhibit a suppression of neuronal activity in the dentate gyrus in mice undergoing nicotine withdrawal. Interestingly, α2-null mutant mice display potentiated neuronal activity specifically within the stratum lacunosum moleculare layer of the hippocampus, independent of nicotine withdrawal. Overall, our findings demonstrate that α2-null mutant mice have altered cfos expression in distinct populations of neurons within selective midbrain and limbic brain structures that mediate baseline and nicotine withdrawal-induced neuronal activity.

  2. Influenza virus-induced alterations of cytochrome P-450 enzyme activities following exposure of mice to coal and diesel particulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabovsky, J.; Judy, D.J.; Rodak, D.J.; Petersen, M.

    1986-06-01

    We have investigated a relationship between two detoxication systems, metabolic detoxication through the cytochrome P-450 (P-450) pathway and resistance to infection through interferon (IFN), in mice infected with influenza virus following exposure to coal dust (CD) and diesel exhaust (DE) particulates. Mice were exposed by inhalation to filtered air (FA; control), CD, or DE for 1 month and then inoculated intranasally (IN) with influenza virus. During infection, 7-ethoxycoumarin deethylase (7ECdeEt'ase) and ethylmorphine demethylase (EMdeMe'ase) (monooxygenases), and NADPH cytochrome c reductase (NADPH c red'ase) were measured in liver microsomes. Temporal patterns of enzyme activities were observed with control animals. EMdeMe'ase and NADPH c red'ase exhibited peak values at Day 4 postinfection (27.6 and 482 nmole/min/mg protein, respectively), compared to initial activities (9.1 and 307 nmole/min/mg protein, respectively). 7ECdeEt'ase activity decreased between Days 1-3 postvirus infection and thereafter returned to the original value (1.7 nmole/min/mg protein). When the mice were first exposed to CD or DE particulates for 1 month prior to influenza infection, changes in enzyme temporal patterns were observed. The increased EMdeMe'ase activity at Day 4 was not observed in mice exposed to CD and was reduced in mice exposed to DE. Preexposure to either particulate resulted in the abolition of the increased Day 4 activity of NADPH c red'ase. The 7ECdeEt'ase postinfection temporal pattern was not affected by a preexposure to either particulate. Estimates of the enzyme activities after the 1-month exposure to FA, CD, or DE but before virus infection indicated no changes due to particulate exposure alone. Under conditions of particulate exposure and virus infection, serum IFN levels peaked at Days 4-5 and were unaffected by the 1-month preexposure to CD or DE.

  3. Alterations in locomotor activity after microinjections of GBR-12909, selective dopamine antagonists or neurotensin into the medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, R A; Erwin, V G

    1996-06-01

    It has been postulated that increased dopamine (DA) activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) exerts an inhibitory influence over DA release in the nucleus accumbens and, thus, also over locomotor activity. Experiments were designed to examine the role of mPFC DA and neurotensin (NT), a neuropeptide which interacts with DA, in spontaneous locomotor activity. LS/IBG mice were injected bilaterally with either GBR-12909, a selective DA uptake blocker, the DA D1 receptor antagonist R-(+)-SCH-23390, the DA D2 receptor antagonist epidepride, NT or a combination of drugs. GBR-12909 produced a U-shaped dose-response curve with a maximum inhibition of 47% of control. Postmortem tissue levels of DA, 5-hydroxytryptamine, norepinephrine and their major metabolites were determined after microinjections of GBR-12909. Tissue levels of these compounds were not significantly affected by GBR-12909. However, the ratios of homovanilic acid/DA and homovanilic acid + 3,4-dihyroxyphenylacetic acid/DA were significantly decreased, whereas the 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid/5-hydroxytryptamine ratio was not affected by GBR-12909, suggesting a selective effect on DAergic processes. By itself, R-(+)-SCH-23390 had no effect on locomotor activity except at a very high dose which caused locomotor inhibition (49% of control). Epidepride caused a dose-dependent inhibition of locomotor activity with a maximum inhibition of 49% of control. When coinjected with an inhibitory dose of GBR-12909, both epidepride and R-(+)-SCH-23390 attenuated the GBR-12909 effect in a dose-dependent manner. A broad range of doses of NT was found to have no consistent effect on locomotor activity. However, when coinjected with an inhibitory dose of GBR-12909, NT attenuated the GBR-12909-induced inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. The results suggest that stimulation of DA receptors in the mPFC, both DA D1 and DA D2 receptors mediates locomotor inhibition. Furthermore, stimulation of NT receptors appears to

  4. Alterations in seedling vigour and antioxidant enzyme activities in Catharanthus roseus under seed priming with native diazotrophs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, B.; Jaleel, C.A.; Gopi, R.; Deiveekasundaram, M.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment was conducted on Catharanthus roseus to study the effect of seed treatments with native diazotrophs on its seedling growth and antioxidant enzyme activities. The treatments had significant influence on various seedling parameters. There is no significant influence on dry matter production with the diazotrophs, Azospirillum and Azotobacter. However, the vital seedling parameters such as germination percentage and vigour index were improved. Azotobacter treatment influenced maximum of 50% germination, whereas Azospirillum and Azotobacter were on par with C. roseus with respect to their vigour index. There was significant difference in the population of total diazotrophs. Azospirillum and Azotobacter between rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils of C. roseus had the same trend and were observed at various locations of the study. The activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX) and catalase (CAT) were increased to a significant extent due to the treatment with diazotrophs. PMID:17610323

  5. Alterations in seedling vigour and antioxidant enzyme activities in Catharanthus roseus under seed priming with native diazotrophs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KARTHIKEYAN B.; JALEEL C.A.; GOPI R.; DEIVEEKASUNDARAM M.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment was conducted on Catharanthus roseus to study the effect of seed treatments with native diazotrophs on its seedling growth and antioxidant enzyme activities. The treatments had significant influence on various seedling parameters.There is no significant influence on dry matter production with the diazotrophs, Azospirillum and Azotobacter. However, the vital seedling parameters such as germination percentage and vigour index were improved. Azotobacter treatment influenced maximum of 50% germination, whereas Azospirillum and Azotobacter were on par with C. roseus with respect to their vigour index. There was significant difference in the population of total diazotrophs. Azospirillum and Azotobacter between rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils of C. roseus had the same trend and were observed at various locations of the study. The activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX) and catalase (CAT) were increased to a significant extent due to the treatment with diazotrophs.

  6. Early Adolescence as a Critical Window During Which Social Stress Distinctly Alters Behavior and Brain Norepinephrine Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Bingham, Brian; McFadden, Kile; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Bhatnagar, Seema; Beck, Sheryl; Valentino, Rita

    2010-01-01

    Many neural programs that shape behavior become established during adolescence. Adverse events at this age can have enduring consequences for both adolescent and adult mental health. Here we show that repeated social stress at different stages of adolescent development differentially affects rat behavior and neuronal activity. Early-adolescent (PND 28, EA), mid-adolescent (PND 42, MA), and adult (PND 63) rats were subjected to resident-intruder social stress (7 days) and behavior was examined...

  7. Altered autonomic nervous system activity as a potential etiological factor of premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi Tatsuya; Kimura Tetsuya; Ushiroyama Takahisa; Matsumoto Tamaki; Moritani Toshio

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) encompasses a wide variety of cyclic and recurrent physical, emotional, and behavioral symptoms occurring during the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and abating shortly following the beginning of menses. Although PMS is widely recognized, its etiopathogenesis is not yet understood. The present study investigates whether the activity of the autonomic nervous system, which plays a vital role in orchestrating physiological homeostasis with...

  8. Alterations in seedling vigour and antioxidant enzyme activities in Catharanthus roseus under seed priming with native diazotrophs

    OpenAIRE

    B.Karthikeyan; Jaleel, C.A.; Gopi, R.; Deiveekasundaram, M.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment was conducted on Catharanthus roseus to study the effect of seed treatments with native diazotrophs on its seedling growth and antioxidant enzyme activities. The treatments had significant influence on various seedling parameters. There is no significant influence on dry matter production with the diazotrophs, Azospirillum and Azotobacter. However, the vital seedling parameters such as germination percentage and vigour index were improved. Azotobacter treatment influenced maximu...

  9. Food insecurity in children but not in their mothers is associated with altered activities, school absenteeism, and stunting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Jennifer; Frongillo, Edward A; Herrera, Héctor A; Rivera, Juan A

    2014-10-01

    Household food insecurity has substantial detrimental effects on children, but little is known about the mechanisms through which these effects occur. This study investigated some possible mechanisms by examining associations of food insecurity reported by children and mothers with daily activities, school absenteeism, and stunting. We conducted a cross-sectional study in a nonprobabilistic sample of 131 mother-child pairs from a poor peri-urban area in Miranda State, Venezuela. We assessed food insecurity in children by using an instrument developed through a naturalistic approach that had 10 items for food insecurity and 9 items for management strategies. To obtain mothers' reports of food insecurity, a previously validated 12-item instrument was used. Children's daily activities, school absenteeism, and stunting were measured. Chi-square tests for contingency tables and logistic and multiple regression analyses were used to test associations of food insecurity with outcomes. There was no association between mothers' reports of food-insecurity and any child outcome. Children's reports of food insecurity were associated with higher odds of doing passive home chores (OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.32), cooking at home (OR: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.05, 1,38), taking care of siblings (OR: 1.15; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.31), and doing labor (OR: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.42) and lower odds of playing video games (OR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.76, 0.98) (all P Children's reports of management strategies were associated with 5 of 7 work activities measured. Labor in food-insecure children was the main activity that explained school absenteeism. Food insecurity reported by children can be assessed by pediatricians, school personnel, and other practitioners by using a simple instrument to identify food-insecure children and to respond to mitigate their food insecurity and its consequences. PMID:25143373

  10. Modulation of expression and activity of cytochrome P450s and alteration of praziquantel kinetics during murine schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara A Gotardo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the expression and activity of liver cytochrome P450s (CYPs and praziquantel (PZQ kinetics in mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Swiss Webster (SW mice of both genders were infected (100 cercariae on postnatal day 10 and killed on post-infection days (PIDs 30 or 55. Non-infected mice of the same age and sex served as controls. Regardless of mouse sex, infection depressed the activities of CYP1A [ethoxy/methoxy-resorufin-O-dealkylases (EROD/MROD], 2B9/10 [pentoxy/benzyloxy-resorufin-O-dealkylases (PROD, BROD], 2E1 [p-nitrophenol-hydroxylase (PNPH] and 3A11 [erythromycin N-demethylase (END] on PID 55 but not on PID 30. On PID 55, infection decreased liver CYP mRNA levels (real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. On PID 30, whereas mRNA levels remained unaltered in males, they were depressed in females. Plasma PZQ (200 and 400 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally levels were measured (high-performance liquid chromatography at different post-treatment intervals. In males and females, infection delayed the PZQ clearance on PID 55, but not on PID 30. Therefore, it can be concluded that schistosomiasis down-modulated CYP expression and activity and delayed PZQ clearance on PID 55, when a great number of parasite eggs were lodged in the liver. On PID 30, when egg-laying was initiated by the worms, no change of CYP expression and activity was found, except for a depression of CYP1A2 and 3A11 mRNAs in female mice.

  11. Altered baseline brain activity with 72 h of simulated microgravity--initial evidence from resting-state fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liao

    Full Text Available To provide the basis and reference to further insights into the neural activity of the human brain in a microgravity environment, we discuss the amplitude changes of low-frequency brain activity fluctuations using a simulated microgravity model. Twelve male participants between 24 and 31 years old received resting-state fMRI scans in both a normal condition and after 72 hours in a -6° head down tilt (HDT. A paired sample t-test was used to test the amplitude differences of low-frequency brain activity fluctuations between these two conditions. With 72 hours in a -6° HDT, the participants showed a decreased amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in the left thalamus compared with the normal condition (a combined threshold of P<0.005 and a minimum cluster size of 351 mm(3 (13 voxels, which corresponded with the corrected threshold of P<0.05 determined by AlphaSim. Our findings indicate that a gravity change-induced redistribution of body fluid may disrupt the function of the left thalamus in the resting state, which may contribute to reduced motor control abilities and multiple executive functions in astronauts in a microgravity environment.

  12. Alterations in antioxidant enzyme activities and proline content in pea leaves under long-term drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataş, Ilhami; Öztürk, Lokman; Demir, Yavuz; Unlükara, Ali; Kurunç, Ahmet; Düzdemir, Oral

    2014-09-01

    The effects of long-term drought stress on chlorophyll, proline, protein and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) contents, malondialdehyde (MDA) in terms of lipid peroxidation and on the changes in the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11), catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) and peroxidase (POX; EC 1.11.1.7) in the leaves of pea (Pisum sativum L.) were studied in field conditions. Chlorophyll and protein contents in leaves decreased significantly with increased drought stress. The proline content increased markedly under water deficit. MDA amounts were elevated as a result of water shortage, whereas H(2)O(2) content changed slightly in pea leaves exposed to drought stress. Drought stress markedly enhanced the activities of SOD, CAT and POX but slightly changed the activity of APX. We conclude that in field conditions, long-term water shortage increased the susceptibility to drought in peas.

  13. Pre-symptomatic activation of antioxidant responses and alterations in glucose and pyruvate metabolism in Niemann-Pick Type C1-deficient murine brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry E Kennedy

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC disease is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused in most cases by mutations in the NPC1 gene. NPC1-deficiency is characterized by late endosomal accumulation of cholesterol, impaired cholesterol homeostasis, and a broad range of other cellular abnormalities. Although neuronal abnormalities and glial activation are observed in nearly all areas of the brain, the most severe consequence of NPC1-deficiency is a near complete loss of Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum. The link between cholesterol trafficking and NPC pathogenesis is not yet clear; however, increased oxidative stress in symptomatic NPC disease, increases in mitochondrial cholesterol, and alterations in autophagy/mitophagy suggest that mitochondria play a role in NPC disease pathology. Alterations in mitochondrial function affect energy and neurotransmitter metabolism, and are particularly harmful to the central nervous system. To investigate early metabolic alterations that could affect NPC disease progression, we performed metabolomics analyses of different brain regions from age-matched wildtype and Npc1 (-/- mice at pre-symptomatic, early symptomatic and late stage disease by (1H-NMR spectroscopy. Metabolic profiling revealed markedly increased lactate and decreased acetate/acetyl-CoA levels in Npc1 (-/- cerebellum and cerebral cortex at all ages. Protein and gene expression analyses indicated a pre-symptomatic deficiency in the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, and an upregulation of glycolytic gene expression at the early symptomatic stage. We also observed a pre-symptomatic increase in several indicators of oxidative stress and antioxidant response systems in Npc1 (-/- cerebellum. Our findings suggest that energy metabolism and oxidative stress may present additional therapeutic targets in NPC disease, especially if intervention can be started at an early stage of the disease.

  14. CSF markers of Alzheimer’s pathology and microglial activation are associated with altered white matter microstructure in asymptomatic adults at risk for Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melah, Kelsey E; Lu, Sharon Yuan-Fu; Hoscheidt, Siobhan M; Alexander, Andrew L; Adluru, Nagesh; Destiche, Daniel J; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Gleason, Carey E; Dowling, N Maritza; Bratzke, Lisa C; Rowley, Howard A; Sager, Mark A; Asthana, Sanjay; Johnson, Sterling C; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2015-01-01

    Background The immune response in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) involves activation of microglia which may remove β-amyloid. However, overproduction of inflammatory compounds may exacerbate neural damage in Alzheimer’s disease. AD pathology accumulates years before diagnosis, yet the extent to which neuroinflammation is involved in the earliest disease stages is unknown. Objective To determine whether neuroinflammation exacerbates neural damage in preclinical AD. Methods We utilized cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and magnetic resonance imaging collected in 192 asymptomatic late-middle-aged adults (mean age=60.98 years). Neuroinflammatory markers chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in CSF were utilized as markers of neuroinflammation. Neural cell damage was assessed using CSF neurofilament light chain protein (NFL), CSF total tau (T-Tau), and neural microstructure assessed with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). With regard to AD pathology, CSF Aβ42 and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-Tau181) were used as markers of amyloid and tau pathology, respectively. We hypothesized that higher YKL-40 and MCP-1 in the presence of AD pathology would be associated with higher NFL, T-Tau, and altered microstructure on DTI. Results Neuroinflammation was associated with markers of neural damage. Higher CSF YKL-40 was associated with both higher CSF NFL and T-Tau. Inflammation interacted with AD pathology, such that greater MCP-1 and lower Aβ42 was associated with altered microstructure in bilateral frontal and right temporal lobe and that greater MCP-1 and greater P-Tau181 was associated with altered microstructure in precuneus. Conclusion Inflammation may play a role in neural damage in preclinical AD. PMID:26836182

  15. Intravenous pretreatment with empty pH gradient liposomes alters the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of doxorubicin through in vivo active drug encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, L D; Reamer, J; Bally, M B

    1999-01-01

    Liposomes have been used widely to improve the therapeutic activity of pharmaceutical agents. The traditional approach for such applications has been to formulate the pharmaceutical agent in liposomes prior to administration in vivo. In this report we demonstrate that liposomes exhibiting a transmembrane pH gradient injected intravenously (iv) can actively encapsulate doxorubicin in the circulation after iv administration of free drug. Small (110 nm) liposomes composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC)/cholesterol (Chol, 55:45 mol:mol) exhibiting a pH gradient (inside acidic) were administered iv 1 h prior to free doxorubicin, and plasma drug levels as well as toxicity and efficacy were evaluated. Predosing with egg PC/Chol pH gradient liposomes increased the plasma concentration of doxorubicin as much as 200-fold compared to free drug alone as well as to predosing with dipalmitoyl PC/Chol pH gradient liposomes or EPC/Chol liposomes without a pH gradient. The ability of the liposomes to alter the pharmacokinetics of doxorubicin was dependent on the presence of a transmembrane pH gradient and correlated with the extent of doxorubicin uptake into the liposomes at 37 degreesC in pH 7.5 buffer, indicating that doxorubicin was being actively accumulated in the circulating liposomes. This in vivo drug loading was achieved over a range of doxorubicin doses (5 mg/kg-40 mg/kg) and was dependent on the dose of EPC/Chol liposomes administered prior to free doxorubicin injection. The altered pharmacokinetic properties of doxorubicin associated with in vivo doxorubicin encapsulation were accompanied by a decrease in drug toxicity and maintained antitumor potency. These results suggest that pretreatment with empty liposomes exhibiting a pH gradient may provide a versatile and straightforward method for enhancing the pharmacological properties of many drugs that can accumulate into such vesicle systems at physiological temperatures.

  16. Antidepressant-like activity of magnesium in the chronic mild stress model in rats: alterations in the NMDA receptor subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochwat, Bartłomiej; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Sowa-Kucma, Magdalena; Siwek, Agata; Doboszewska, Urszula; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Gruca, Piotr; Papp, Mariusz; Nowak, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    Recent data suggests that the glutamatergic system is involved in the pathophysiology and treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) and that the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a potential target for antidepressant drugs. The magnesium ion blocks the ion channel of the NMDA receptor and prevents its excessive activation. Some preclinical and clinical evidence suggests also that magnesium may be useful in the treatment of depression. The present study investigated the effect of magnesium treatment (10, 15 and 20 mg/kg, given as magnesium hydroaspartate) in the chronic mild stress (CMS) model of depression in rats. Moreover, the effect of CMS and magnesium (with an effective dose) on the level of the proteins related to the glutamatergic system (GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B and PSD-95) in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex (PFC) and amygdala were examined. A significant reduction in the sucrose intake induced by CMS was increased by magnesium treatment at a dose of 15 mg/kg, beginning from the third week of administration. Magnesium did not affect this behavioural parameter in the control animals. CMS significantly increased the level of the GluN1 subunit in the amygdala (by 174%) and GluN2A in the hippocampus (by 191%), both of which were significantly attenuated by magnesium treatment. Moreover, magnesium treatment in CMS animals increased the level of GluN2B (by 116%) and PSD-95 (by 150%) in the PFC. The present results for the first time demonstrate the antidepressant-like activity of magnesium in the animal model of anhedonia (CMS), thus indicating the possible involvement of the NMDA/glutamatergic receptors in this activity.

  17. Activation changes in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata brain areas evoked by alterations of the earth magnetic field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Keary

    Full Text Available Many animals are able to perceive the earth magnetic field and to use it for orientation and navigation within the environment. The mechanisms underlying the perception and processing of magnetic field information within the brain have been thoroughly studied, especially in birds, but are still obscure. Three hypotheses are currently discussed, dealing with ferromagnetic particles in the beak of birds, with the same sort of particles within the lagena organs, or describing magnetically influenced radical-pair processes within retinal photopigments. Each hypothesis is related to a well-known sensory organ and claims parallel processing of magnetic field information with somatosensory, vestibular and visual input, respectively. Changes in activation within nuclei of the respective sensory systems have been shown previously. Most of these previous experiments employed intensity enhanced magnetic stimuli or lesions. We here exposed unrestrained zebra finches to either a stationary or a rotating magnetic field of the local intensity and inclination. C-Fos was used as an activity marker to examine whether the two treatments led to differences in fourteen brain areas including nuclei of the somatosensory, vestibular and visual system. An ANOVA revealed an overall effect of treatment, indicating that the magnetic field change was perceived by the birds. While the differences were too small to be significant in most areas, a significant enhancement of activation by the rotating stimulus was found in a hippocampal subdivision. Part of the hyperpallium showed a strong, nearly significant, increase. Our results are compatible with previous studies demonstrating an involvement of at least three different sensory systems in earth magnetic field perception and suggest that these systems, probably less elaborated, may also be found in nonmigrating birds.

  18. Social marketing self-esteem: a socio-medical approach to high-risk and skin tone alteration activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karelas, Gregory D

    2011-05-01

    This paper proposes social marketing as a tool to build individual self-esteem and thus prevent the uptake of activities that pose risk to health. Evidence supporting this approach can be drawn from pioneer social marketing campaigns of the last 30 years that successfully addressed the prevention, treatment and stigmatization of skin cancer and leprosy with a fraction of the communication and media tools available today. Focusing primarily on the practices of skin tanning and lightening, this paper builds on studies that validate the ties between self-esteem and behavior, and addresses popular conceptions of skin color as drivers for individual behavior. PMID:21506977

  19. Protease-Activated Receptor 4 Variant p.Tyr157Cys Reduces Platelet Functional Responses and Alters Receptor Trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, Jane E; Cunningham, Margaret R; Jones, Matthew L.; Walker, Mary E; Westbury, Sarah K; Sessions, Richard B.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Mumford, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Protease-activated receptor 4 (PAR4) is a key regulator of platelet reactivity and is encoded by F2RL3, which has abundant rare missense variants. We aimed to provide proof of principle that rare F2LR3 variants potentially affect platelet reactivity and responsiveness to PAR1 antagonist drugs and to explore underlying molecular mechanisms.APPROACH AND RESULTS: We identified 6 rare F2RL3 missense variants in 236 cardiac patients, of which the variant causing a tyrosine 157 to cystei...

  20. Root endophyte Piriformospora indica DSM 11827 alters plant morphology, enhances biomass and antioxidant activity of medicinal plant Bacopa monniera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ram; Kamal, Shwet; Sharma, Pradeep K; Oelmüller, Ralf; Varma, Ajit

    2013-12-01

    Unorganized collections and over exploitation of naturally occurring medicinal plant Bacopa monniera is leading to rapid depletion of germplasm and is posing a great threat to its survival in natural habitats. The species has already been listed in the list of highly threatened plants of India. This calls for micropropagation based multiplication of potential accessions and understanding of their mycorrhizal associations for obtaining plants with enhanced secondary metabolite contents. The co-cultivation of B. monniera with axenically cultivated root endophyte Piriformospora indica resulted in growth promotion, increase in bacoside content, antioxidant activity and nuclear hypertrophy of this medicinal plant.

  1. Altered baseline brain activity in children with bipolar disorder during mania state: a resting-state study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu D

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dali Lu,1 Qing Jiao,2 Yuan Zhong,3,4 Weijia Gao,1 Qian Xiao,1 Xiaoqun Liu,1 Xiaoling Lin,5 Wentao Cheng,6 Lanzhu Luo,6 Chuanjian Xu,3 Guangming Lu,2 Linyan Su1 1Mental Health Institute of the Second Xiangya Hospital, Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, Central South University, Changsha, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Radiology, Taishan Medical University, Taian, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Nanjing, People's Republic of China; 4School of Psychology, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China; 5School of Nursing of Central South University, Changsha, People's Republic of China; 6Department of Pediatric and Geriatric Psychiatry, Fuzhou Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Fuzhou, People's Republic of China Background: Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies have shown abnormal functional connectivity in regions involved in emotion processing and regulation in pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD. Recent studies indicate, however, that task-dependent neural changes only represent a small fraction of the brain's total activity. How the brain allocates the majority of its resources at resting state is still unknown. We used the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF method of fMRI to explore the spontaneous neuronal activity in resting state in PBD patients. Methods: Eighteen PBD patients during the mania phase and 18 sex-, age- and education-matched healthy subjects were enrolled in this study and all patients underwent fMRI scanning. The ALFF method was used to compare the resting-state spontaneous neuronal activity between groups. Correlation analysis was performed between the ALFF values and Young Mania Rating Scale scores. Results: Compared with healthy controls, PBD patients presented increased ALFF in bilateral caudate and left pallidum as well as decreased ALFF in left precuneus

  2. ATP alters current fluctuations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: evidence for a three-state activation mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis gene product cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a low conductance, cAMP-regulated Cl- channel. Removal of cytosolic ATP causes a cessation of cAMP-dependent kinase-phosphorylated CFTR channel activity that resumes upon ATP addition. (Anderson, M. P., H. A. Berger, D. R. Rich, R. J. Gregory, A. E. Smith, and M. J. Welsh. 1991. Cell. 67:775-784). The aim of this study was to quantify possible effects of ATP on CFTR gating. We analyzed multichannel ...

  3. Peripheral activation of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 inhibits food intake and alters meal structures in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lixin; Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Martinez, Vicente; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Rivier, Jean; Taché, Yvette

    2010-01-01

    The orexigenic effect of urocortins (Ucn 1, Ucn 2 and Ucn 3) through activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors, has been well characterized after injection into the brain but not in the periphery. We examined the role of CRF receptor subtype 2 (CRF2) in the regulation of food intake using intraperitoneal (ip) injection of Ucns, the selective CRF2 antagonist, astressin2-B, and CRF2 knockout (−/−) mice. Meal structures were monitored using an automated episodic solid food int...

  4. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure alters polyunsaturated fatty acid composition, induces oxidative stress and activates the AKT/AMPK pathway in mouse epididymis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yin; Pan, Yitao; Sheng, Nan; Zhao, Allan Z; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-09-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a degradation-resistant compound with a carbon-fluorine bond. Although PFOA emissions have been reduced since 2000, it remains persistent in the environment. Several studies on laboratory animals indicate that PFOA exposure can impact male fertility. Here, adult male mice received either PFOA (1.25, 5 or 20 mg/kg/d) or an equal volume of water for 28 d consecutively. PFOA accumulated in the epididymis in a dose-dependent manner and resulted in reduced epididymis weight, lower levels of triglycerides (TG), cholesterol (CHO), and free fatty acids (FFA), and activated AKT/AMPK signaling in the epididymis. Altered polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) compositions, such as a higher arachidonic acid:linoleic acid (AA:LA) ratio, concomitant with excessive oxidative stress, as demonstrated by increased malonaldehyde (MDA) and decreased glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in the epididymis, were observed in epididymis tissue following treatment with PFOA. These results indicate that the epididymis is a potential target of PFOA. Oxidative stress and PUFA alteration might help explain the sperm injury and male reproductive dysfunction induced by PFOA exposure. PMID:27262104

  5. Intracerebroventricular D-galactose administration impairs memory and alters activity and expression of acetylcholinesterase in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, André Felipe; Biasibetti, Helena; Zanotto, Bruna Stela; Sanches, Eduardo Farias; Pierozan, Paula; Schmitz, Felipe; Parisi, Mariana Migliorini; Barbé-Tuana, Florencia; Netto, Carlos Alexandre; Wyse, Angela T S

    2016-05-01

    Tissue accumulation of galactose is a hallmark in classical galactosemia. Cognitive deficit is a symptom of this disease which is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intracerebroventricular administration of galactose on memory (inhibitory avoidance and novel object recognition tasks) of adult rats. We also investigated the effects of galactose on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, immunocontent and gene expression in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Wistar rats received a single injection of galactose (4mM) or saline (control). For behavioral parameters, galactose was injected 1h or 24h previously to the testing. For biochemical assessment, animals were decapitated 1h, 3h or 24h after galactose or saline injection; hippocampus and cerebral cortex were dissected. Results showed that galactose impairs the memory formation process in aversive memory (inhibitory avoidance task) and recognition memory (novel object recognition task) in rats. The activity of AChE was increased, whereas the gene expression of this enzyme was decreased in hippocampus, but not in cerebral cortex. These findings suggest that these changes in AChE may, at least in part, to lead to memory impairment caused by galactose. Taken together, our results can help understand the etiopathology of classical galactosemia. PMID:26948151

  6. Immobilized tannase treatment alters polyphenolic composition in teas and their potential anti-obesity and hypoglycemic activities in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Bruna Sampaio; Macedo, Gabriela Alves; Macedo, Juliana Alves; Martins, Isabela Mateus; Nakajima, Vânia Mayumi; Allwood, J William; Stewart, Derek; McDougall, Gordon J

    2016-09-14

    The aim of this work was to assess the effect of immobilized-tannase treatment on black, green, white and mate tea components and on their bioactivities relevant to obesity. Tannase treatment caused predictable changes in polyphenol composition with substantial reduction in galloylated catechins in green, white and black tea. Mate tea, which is rich in chlorogenic acids, was much less affected by tannase treatment although some degradation of caffeoyl quinic acid derivatives was noted. The original tea samples were effective in inhibiting digestive enzymes in vitro. They inhibited amylase activity, some with IC50 values ∼70 μg mL(-1), but were much less effective against α-glucosidase. They also inhibited lipase activity in vitro and caused dose-dependent reductions in lipid accumulation in cultured adipocytes. The bio-transformed tea samples generally matched the effectiveness of the original samples but in some cases they were markedly improved. In particular, tannase treatment reduced the IC50 value for amylase inhibition for green tea and white tea by 15- and 6-fold respectively. In addition, the bio-transformed samples were more effective than the original samples in preventing lipid accumulation in adipocytes. These in vitro studies indicate that bio-transformed tea polyphenols could assist in the management of obesity through improvement in energy uptake and lipid metabolism and also indicate that biotechnological modification of natural food molecules can improve the benefits of a common beverage such as tea. PMID:27528497

  7. Nociceptin receptor activation does not alter acquisition, expression, extinction and reinstatement of conditioned cocaine preference in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, G C; Powell, S K; Wiedner, H J; Wahlestedt, C; Brothers, S P

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence indicates that targeting nociceptin receptor (NOP) signaling may have therapeutic efficacy in treating alcohol and opioid addiction. However, little is known about the therapeutic value of selective NOP agonists for the treatment of cocaine dependence. Recently, we identified a highly selective, brain-penetrant NOP small molecule agonist (SR-8993), and using this compound, we previously showed that nociceptin receptor activation attenuated consolidation of fear-related memories. Here, we sought to determine whether SR-8993 also affects the rewarding properties of cocaine. Using a conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure, we show that SR-8993 (3 or 10 mg/kg) failed to disrupt acquisition or expression of cocaine CPP (7.5 or 15 mg/kg) in C57BL/6 mice. Additionally, SR-8993 did not affect rate of extinction or reinstatement (yohimbine- and cocaine-induced) of cocaine CPP. These studies indicate that selective activation of NOP may not be sufficient in reducing behavioral responses to cocaine. PMID:26657743

  8. TCR signal strength alters T-DC activation and interaction times and directs the outcome of differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas eVan Panhuys

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of CD4+ T cells to differentiate into effector subsets underpins their ability to shape the immune response and mediate host protection. During T cell receptor induced activation of CD4+ T cells both the quality and quantity of specific activatory peptide/MHC ligands have been shown to control the polarization of naïve CD4+ T cells in addition to co-stimulatory and cytokine based signals. Recently, advances in two photon microscopy and tetramer based cell tracking methods have allowed investigators to greatly extend the study of the role of TCR signaling in effector differentiation under in vivo conditions. In this review we consider data from recent in vivo studies analyzing the role of TCR signal strength in controlling the outcome of CD4+ T cell differentiation and discuss the role of the TCR in controlling the critical nature of CD4+ T cell interactions with dendritic cells during activation. We further propose a model whereby TCR signal strength controls the temporal aspects of T:DC interactions and the implications for this in mediating the downstream signaling events which influence the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of effector differentiation.

  9. Altered behavior and neural activity in conspecific cagemates co-housed with mouse models of brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyunwoo; Jung, Seungmoon; Seo, Jinsoo; Khalid, Arshi; Yoo, Jung-Seok; Park, Jihyun; Kim, Soyun; Moon, Jangsup; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun; Jeon, Daejong

    2016-09-01

    The psychosocial environment is one of the major contributors of social stress. Family members or caregivers who consistently communicate with individuals with brain disorders are considered at risk for physical and mental health deterioration, possibly leading to mental disorders. However, the underlying neural mechanisms of this phenomenon remain poorly understood. To address this, we developed a social stress paradigm in which a mouse model of epilepsy or depression was housed long-term (>4weeks) with normal conspecifics. We characterized the behavioral phenotypes and electrophysiologically investigated the neural activity of conspecific cagemate mice. The cagemates exhibited deficits in behavioral tasks assessing anxiety, locomotion, learning/memory, and depression-like behavior. Furthermore, they showed severe social impairment in social behavioral tasks involving social interaction or aggression. Strikingly, behavioral dysfunction remained in the cagemates 4weeks following co-housing cessation with the mouse models. In an electrophysiological study, the cagemates showed an increased number of spikes in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neurons. Our results demonstrate that conspecifics co-housed with mouse models of brain disorders develop chronic behavioral dysfunctions, and suggest a possible association between abnormal mPFC neural activity and their behavioral pathogenesis. These findings contribute to the understanding of the psychosocial and psychiatric symptoms frequently present in families or caregivers of patients with brain disorders. PMID:27211331

  10. Mice lacking brain/kidney phosphate-activated glutaminase have impaired glutamatergic synaptic transmission, altered breathing, disorganized goal-directed behavior and die shortly after birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Justine; Darmon, Michèle; Conjard, Agnès; Chuhma, Nao; Ropert, Nicole; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel; Foutz, Arthur S; Parrot, Sandrine; Miller, Gretchen M; Jorisch, Renée; Polan, Jonathan; Hamon, Michel; Hen, René; Rayport, Stephen

    2006-04-26

    Neurotransmitter glutamate has been thought to derive mainly from glutamine via the action of glutaminase type 1 (GLS1). To address the importance of this pathway in glutamatergic transmission, we knocked out GLS1 in mice. The insertion of a STOP cassette by homologous recombination produced a null allele that blocked transcription, encoded no immunoreactive protein, and abolished GLS1 enzymatic activity. Null mutants were slightly smaller, were deficient in goal-directed behavior, hypoventilated, and died in the first postnatal day. No gross or microscopic defects were detected in peripheral organs or in the CNS. In cultured neurons from the null mutants, miniature EPSC amplitude and duration were normal; however, the amplitude of evoked EPSCs decayed more rapidly with sustained 10 Hz stimulation, consistent with an observed reduction in depolarization-evoked glutamate release. Because of this activity-dependent impairment in glutamatergic transmission, we surmised that respiratory networks, which require temporal summation of synaptic input, would be particularly affected. We found that the amplitude of inspirations was decreased in vivo, chemosensitivity to CO2 was severely altered, and the frequency of pacemaker activity recorded in the respiratory generator in the pre-Bötzinger complex, a glutamatergic brainstem network that can be isolated in vitro, was increased. Our results show that although alternate pathways to GLS1 glutamate synthesis support baseline glutamatergic transmission, the GLS1 pathway is essential for maintaining the function of active synapses, and thus the mutation is associated with impaired respiratory function, abnormal goal-directed behavior, and neonatal demise.

  11. Altered brain activation and functional connectivity in working memory related networks in patients with type 2 diabetes: An ICA-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Lu, Shan; Liu, Chunlei; Zhang, Huimei; Zhou, Xuanhe; Ni, Changlin; Qin, Wen; Zhang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) can cause multidimensional cognitive deficits, among which working memory (WM) is usually involved at an early stage. However, the neural substrates underlying impaired WM in T2DM patients are still unclear. To clarify this issue, we utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and independent component analysis to evaluate T2DM patients for alterations in brain activation and functional connectivity (FC) in WM networks and to determine their associations with cognitive and clinical variables. Twenty complication-free T2DM patients and 19 matched healthy controls (HCs) were enrolled, and fMRI data were acquired during a block-designed 1-back WM task. The WM metrics of the T2DM patients showed no differences compared with those of the HCs, except for a slightly lower accuracy rate in the T2DM patients. Compared with the HCs, the T2DM patients demonstrated increased activation within their WM fronto-parietal networks, and activation strength was significantly correlated with WM performance. The T2DM patients also showed decreased FC within and between their WM networks. Our results indicate that the functional integration of WM sub-networks was disrupted in the complication-free T2DM patients and that strengthened regional activity in fronto-parietal networks may compensate for the WM impairment caused by T2DM. PMID:27021340

  12. Lithium alters brain activation in bipolar disorder in a task- and state-dependent manner: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Sanjay

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is unknown if medications used to treat bipolar disorder have effects on brain activation, and whether or not any such changes are mood-independent. Methods Patients with bipolar disorder who were depressed (n = 5 or euthymic (n = 5 were examined using fMRI before, and 14 days after, being started on lithium (as monotherapy in 6 of these patients. Patients were examined using a word generation task and verbal memory task, both of which have been shown to be sensitive to change in previous fMRI studies. Differences in blood oxygenated level dependent (BOLD magnitude between the pre- and post-lithium results were determined in previously defined regions of interest. Severity of mood was determined by the Hamilton Depression Scale for Depression (HAM-D and the Young mania rating scale (YMRS. Results The mean HAM-D score at baseline in the depressed group was 15.4 ± 0.7, and after 2 weeks of lithium it was 11.0 ± 2.6. In the euthymic group it was 7.6 ± 1.4 and 3.2 ± 1.3 respectively. At baseline mean BOLD signal magnitude in the regions of interest for the euthymic and depressed patients were similar in both the word generation task (1.56 ± 0.10 and 1.49 ± 0.10 respectively and working memory task (1.02 ± 0.04 and 1.12 ± 0.06 respectively. However, after lithium the mean BOLD signal decreased significantly in the euthymic group in the word generation task only (1.56 ± 0.10 to 1.00 ± 0.07, p Conclusion This is the first study to examine the effects of lithium on brain activation in bipolar patients. The results suggest that lithium has an effect on euthymic patients very similar to that seen in healthy volunteers. The same effects are not seen in depressed bipolar patients, although it is uncertain if this lack of change is linked to the lack of major improvements in mood in this group of patients. In conclusion, this study suggests that lithium may have effects on brain activation that are task- and state

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Alters Growth Activity, Autolysis, and Antibiotic Tolerance in a Human Host-Adapted Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lineage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Christensen, Anne-Mette; Bojer, Martin Saxtorph;

    2014-01-01

    Interactions among members of polymicrobial infections or between pathogens and the commensal flora may determine disease outcomes. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are important opportunistic human pathogens and are both part of the polymicrobial infection communities in human....... aeruginosa DK2 strains outcompeted S. aureus during coculture on agar plates, we found that later P. aeruginosa DK2 strains showed a commensal-like interaction, where S. aureus was not inhibited by P. aeruginosa and the growth activity of P. aeruginosa was enhanced in the presence of S. aureus. This effect...... is mediated by one or more extracellular S. aureus proteins greater than 10 kDa, which also suppressed P. aeruginosa autolysis and prevented killing by clinically relevant antibiotics through promoting small-colony variant (SCV) formation. The commensal interaction was abolished with S. aureus strains mutated...

  14. Toxicological effects of particulate matter (PM2.5) on rats: Bioaccumulation, antioxidant alterations, lipid damage, and ABC transporter activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Joaquim de Paula; Kalb, Ana Cristina; Campos, Paula Peixoto; Cruz, Alex Rubén Huaman De La; Martinez, Pablo Elias; Gioda, Adriana; Souza, Marta Marques de; Gioda, Carolina Rosa

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the harmful effects of atmospheric pollutants on cardiac systems because of the presence of particulate matter (PM), a complex mixture of numerous substances including trace metals. In this study, the toxicity of PM2.5 from two regions, rural (PM2.5 level of 8.5 ± 4.0 μg m(-3)) and industrial (PM2.5 level of 14.4 ± 4.1 μg m(-3)) in Brazil, was investigated through in vivo experiments in rats. Metal accumulation and biochemical responses were evaluated after rats were exposed to three different concentrations of PM2.5 in saline extract (10× dilution, 5× dilution, and concentrated). The experimental data showed the bioaccumulation of diverse trace metals in the hearts of groups exposed to PM2.5 from both regions. Furthermore, mobilization of the antioxidant defenses and an increase in lipid peroxidation of the cardiac tissue was observed in response to the industrial and rural area PM2.5. Glutathione-S-transferase activity was increased in groups exposed to the 5× and concentrated rural PM2.5. Additionally, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter activity in the cardiac tissue exposed to PM2.5 was reduced in response to the 5× dilution of the rural and industrial region PM2.5. Histological analysis showed a decrease in the percentage of cardiac cells in the heart at all tested concentrations. The results indicate that exposure to different concentrations of PM2.5 from both sources causes biochemical and histological changes in the heart with consequent damage to biological structures; these factors can favor the development of cardiac diseases. PMID:27567156

  15. Altered active zones, vesicle pools, nerve terminal conductivity, and morphology during experimental MuSK myasthenia gravis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwendra Patel

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrate reduced motor-nerve function during autoimmune muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK myasthenia gravis (MG. To further understand the basis of motor-nerve dysfunction during MuSK-MG, we immunized female C57/B6 mice with purified rat MuSK ectodomain. Nerve-muscle preparations were dissected and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs studied electrophysiologically, morphologically, and biochemically. While all mice produced antibodies to MuSK, only 40% developed respiratory muscle weakness. In vitro study of respiratory nerve-muscle preparations isolated from these affected mice revealed that 78% of NMJs produced endplate currents (EPCs with significantly reduced quantal content, although potentiation and depression at 50 Hz remained qualitatively normal. EPC and mEPC amplitude variability indicated significantly reduced number of vesicle-release sites (active zones and reduced probability of vesicle release. The readily releasable vesicle pool size and the frequency of large amplitude mEPCs also declined. The remaining NMJs had intermittent (4% or complete (18% failure of neurotransmitter release in response to 50 Hz nerve stimulation, presumably due to blocked action potential entry into the nerve terminal, which may arise from nerve terminal swelling and thinning. Since MuSK-MG-affected muscles do not express the AChR γ subunit, the observed prolongation of EPC decay time was not due to inactivity-induced expression of embryonic acetylcholine receptor, but rather to reduced catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase. Muscle protein levels of MuSK did not change. These findings provide novel insight into the pathophysiology of autoimmune MuSK-MG.

  16. Citrate and malonate increase microbial activity and alter microbial community composition in uncontaminated and diesel-contaminated soil microcosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Belinda C.; George, Suman J.; Price, Charles A.; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Ball, Andrew S.; Tibbett, Mark; Ryan, Megan H.

    2016-09-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) are among the most prevalent sources of environmental contamination. It has been hypothesized that plant root exudation of low molecular weight organic acid anions (carboxylates) may aid degradation of PHCs by stimulating heterotrophic microbial activity. To test their potential implication for bioremediation, we applied two commonly exuded carboxylates (citrate and malonate) to uncontaminated and diesel-contaminated microcosms (10 000 mg kg-1; aged 40 days) and determined their impact on the microbial community and PHC degradation. Every 48 h for 18 days, soil received 5 µmol g-1 of (i) citrate, (ii) malonate, (iii) citrate + malonate or (iv) water. Microbial activity was measured daily as the flux of CO2. After 18 days, changes in the microbial community were assessed by a community-level physiological profile (CLPP) and 16S rRNA bacterial community profiles determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Saturated PHCs remaining in the soil were assessed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Cumulative soil respiration increased 4- to 6-fold with the addition of carboxylates, while diesel contamination resulted in a small, but similar, increase across all carboxylate treatments. The addition of carboxylates resulted in distinct changes to the microbial community in both contaminated and uncontaminated soils but only a small increase in the biodegradation of saturated PHCs as measured by the n-C17 : pristane biomarker. We conclude that while the addition of citrate and malonate had little direct effect on the biodegradation of saturated hydrocarbons present in diesel, their effect on the microbial community leads us to suggest further studies using a variety of soils and organic acids, and linked to in situ studies of plants, to investigate the role of carboxylates in microbial community dynamics.

  17. Brain reward-system activation in response to anticipation and consumption of palatable food is altered by glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloemendaal, L.; Veltman, D. J.; ten Kulve, J. S.; Groot, P. F. C.; Ruhe, H. G.; Barkhof, F.; Sloan, J. H.; Diamant, M.; Ijzerman, R. G.

    2015-01-01

    AimTo test the hypothesis that food intake reduction after glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation is mediated through brain areas regulating anticipatory and consummatory food reward. MethodsAs part of a larger study, we determined the effects of GLP-1 receptor activation on brain respo

  18. Is the carbohydrate sialosyl-Tn a marker for altered, non-malignant activity in squamous epithelium in the head and neck region?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryne, M; Gravdahl, C; Koppang, H S;

    1995-01-01

    on basal cells in some lesions with epithelial hyperplasia and dysplasia. The aim of this study was to carry out a systematic investigation of STn expression on epithelial basal cells in hyperplastic, 'borderline' malignant, and malignant head and neck lesions, to see if the expression of STn is associated...... specifically with hyperplastic conditions. Using the primary monoclonal antibody TKH2, normal controls did not reveal STn. STn was detected on probably post-mitotic basal cells in hyperplastic head and neck lesions and on basal cells adjacent to cancers, but not within the carcinomas. A Ki67 antibody reacted...... STn, in contrast to the highly differentiated VCs and KAs. These findings indicate that STn-negative cases may have a greater malignant potential that the STn-positive cases. In conclusion, STn expressed on basal cells is possibly a marker for non-malignant conditions with altered basal cell activity...

  19. Alterations of 5-HT1A receptor-induced G-protein functional activation and relationship to memory deficits in patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar-Herrera, Manola; Velasco, Ana Luisa; Velasco, Francisco; Trejo, David; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Nuche-Bricaire, Avril; Vázquez-Barrón, Daruni; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda; Rocha, Luisa

    2014-12-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine-1A (5-HT1A) receptors are known to be involved in the inhibition of seizures in epilepsy. Moreover, studies propose a role for the 5-HT1A receptor in memory function; it is believed that the higher density of this receptor in the hippocampus plays an important role in its regulation. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) have demonstrated that a decrease in 5-HT1A receptor binding in temporal regions may play a role in memory impairment. The evidences lead us to speculate whether this decrease in receptor binding is associated with a reduced receptor number or if the functionality of the 5-HT1A receptor-induced G-protein activation and/or the second messenger cascade is modified. The purpose of the present study is to determine 5-HT1A receptor-induced G-protein functional activation by 8-OH-DPAT-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding assay in hippocampal tissue of surgical patients with mTLE. We correlate functional activity with epilepsy history and neuropsychological assessment of memory. We found that maximum functional activation stimulation values (Emax) of [(35)S]GTPγS binding were significantly increased in mTLE group when compared to autopsy samples. Furthermore, significant correlations were found: (1) positive coefficients between the Emax with the age of patient and frequency of seizures; (2) negative coefficients between the Emax and working memory, immediate recall and delayed recall memory tasks. Our data suggest that the epileptic hippocampus of patients with mTLE presents an increase in 5-HT1A receptor-induced G-protein functional activation, and that this altered activity is related to age and seizure frequency, as well as to memory consolidation deficit.

  20. Estrogen-dependent activation of the avian very low density apolipoprotein II and vitellogenin genes. Transient alterations in mRNA polyadenylation and stability early during induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, A W; Deeley, R G

    1988-10-01

    Administration of estrogen to egg-laying vertebrates activates unscheduled, hepatic expression of major, egg-yolk protein genes in immature animals and mature males. Two avian yolk protein genes, encoding very low density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDLII) and vitellogenin II, are dormant prior to stimulation with estrogen, but within three days their cognate mRNAs accumulate to become two of the most abundant species in the liver. Accumulation of these mRNAs has been attributed to both induction of transcription and selective, estrogen-dependent mRNA stabilization. We have detected alterations in the size of apoVLDLII mRNA that occur during the first 24 hours that are attributable to a shift in the extent of polyadenylation as steady-state is approached. In vitro transcription assays indicate that primary activation of both genes takes place relatively slowly and that maximal rates of mRNA accumulation occur when the apoVLDLII and vitellogenin II genes are expressed at only 30% and 10% of their fully induced levels, respectively. Transcription data combined with the structural alteration of apoVLDLII mRNA suggest that stability of the two mRNAs may change as steady-state is approached. We have assessed the compatibility of this suggestion with earlier estimates of the kinetics of accumulation of both mRNAs by developing a generally useful algorithm that predicts approach to steady-state kinetics under conditions where both the rate of synthesis and mRNA stability change throughout the accumulation phase of the response. The results predict that the stability of both mRNAs decreases by at least two- to threefold during the approach to steady-state and that, although an additional destabilization of apoVLDLII mRNA may occur following withdrawal of estrogen, the steady-state stability of vitellogenin mRNA is not significantly decreased upon removal of hormone. PMID:3210227

  1. Early GABAergic transmission defects in the external globus pallidus and rest/activity rhythm alteration in a mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhuowei; Chazalon, Marine; Bestaven, Emma; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Baufreton, Jérôme; Cazalets, Jean-René; Cho, Yoon H; Garret, Maurice

    2016-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is characterized by progressive motor symptoms preceded by cognitive deficits and is regarded as a disorder that primarily affects the basal ganglia. The external globus pallidus (GPe) has a central role in the basal ganglia, projects directly to the cortex, and is majorly modulated by GABA. To gain a better understanding of the time course of HD progression and gain insight into the underlying mechanisms, we analyzed GABAergic neurotransmission in the GPe of the R6/1 mouse model at purportedly asymptomatic and symptomatic stages (i.e., 2 and 6months). Western blot and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses revealed alterations in the GPe of male R6/1 mice compared with wild-type littermates. Expression of proteins involved in pre- and post-synaptic GABAergic compartments as well as synapse number were severely decreased at 2 and 6months. At both ages, patch-clamp electrophysiological recordings showed a decrease of spontaneous and miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) suggesting that HD mutation has an early effect on the GABA signaling in the brain. Therefore, we performed continuous locomotor activity recordings from 2 to 4months of age. Actigraphy analyses revealed rest/activity fragmentation alterations that parallel GABAergic system impairment at 2months, while the locomotor deficit is evident only at 3months in R6/1 mice. Our results reveal early deficits in HD and support growing evidence for a critical role played by the GPe in physiological and pathophysiological states. We suggest that actimetry may be used as a non-invasive tool to monitor early disease progression. PMID:27217211

  2. Alterations of β-catenin and Tcf-4 instead of GSK-3β contribute to activation of Wnt pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Jian 崔健; ZHOU Xinda 周信达; LIU Yinkun 刘银坤; TANG Zhaoyou 汤钊猷; Mahmoud Romeih

    2003-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study is to investigate the inappropriate activation of Wnt pathway in the hepatocarcinogenesis.Methods We analyzed the alterations of three key components of Wnt pathway, β-catenin, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) and T cell factor 4 (Tcf-4), in 34 samples of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and paracancerous normal liver by immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP), direct sequencing, semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization.Results We found 61.8% (21/34) of all the HCCs examined showed an abnormal β-catenin protein accumulation in the cytoplasm or nuclei. RT-PCR-SSCP and direct sequencing showed that β-catenin exon 3 mutations existed in 44.1% (15/34) of the HCCs. No mutations of GSK-3β or Tcf-4 were detected in HCCs. Moreover, mRNA of β-catenin and Tcf-4 but not GSK-3β was found to be over expressed in HCCs. On analyzing the relationship between alterations of β-catenin or Tcf-4 and C-myc or Cyclin D1 expression, we found that the mutations of β-catenin as well as over expression of β-catenin or Tcf-4 gene were independently correlated with C-myc gene over expression in HCCs.Conclusions Our present findings strongly suggest mutations of β-catenin as well as over expression of β-catenin and Tcf-4 gene activate the Wnt pathway in HCC independently with the target gene most likely to be C-myc.

  3. Using acetone as solvent to study removal of anthracene in soil inhibits microbial activity and alters nitrogen dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Edgar Vázquez; Rodríguez, Viviana; Gaytán, Alejandro García; Luna-Guido, Marco; Betancur-Galvis, Liliana A; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2009-08-01

    Acetone is often used as a carrier to contaminate soil with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and then to study the factors that control their removal. Acetone is an organic solvent that might affect soil processes. An alkaline saline (Texcoco soil) and an agricultural soil (Acolman soil) were amended with or without acetone, nitrogen + phosphorus (NP), and contaminated with anthracene at 520 mg/kg soil while emissions of CO2 and N2O and concentrations of NH4+, NO2(-) and NO3(-) were monitored. The CO2 emission rate decreased greater than 10 times in the soils amended with acetone. Emission of N2O decreased 70 times in the Acolman soil amended with acetone and NP and 5 times in the Texcoco soil. The concentration of NH4+ decreased in the unamended Acolman and Texcoco soil but increased when acetone was added in the first and remained constant in the latter. Acetone inhibited the increase in the amount of NO3(-) in the Acolman soil but not in the Texcoco soil. It was found that microbial activity as evidenced by the emission of CO2, nitrification, and production of N2O were inhibited by acetone. The amount of acetone used as solvent should thus be kept to a minimum, but it can be assumed that its effect on soil processes will be temporary, as microorganisms are known to repopulate soil quickly.

  4. Hind Limb Unloading Model Alters Nuclear Factor kappa B and Activator Protein-1 Signaling in Mouse Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Vani, Vani; Renard, Renard; Vera, Vera; Wilosn, Wilosn; Ramesh, Govindarajan

    Microgravity induces inflammatory response and also modulates immune functions, which may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to the microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects. However, there is little research exploring the etiology of neurological effects of exposure to this environment. To explore this area we evaluated changes in Nuclear Factor kappa B, Activator Protein 1, MAPP kinase and N terminal c-Jun kinase in mouse brain exposed to a simulated microgravity environment using the hindlimb unloading model. BALB/c male mice were randomly assigned to hindlimb unloading group (n=12) and control group (n=12) to simulate a microgravity environment, for 7 days. Changes observed in NF-κB, AP- 1 DNA binding, MAPKK and N terminal c-Jun kinase were measured using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and western blot analysis and compared to unexposed brain regions. Hindlimb unloading exposed mice showed significant increases in generated NF-κB, AP-1, MAPKK and Kinase in all regions of the brain exposed to hindlimb unloading as compared to the control brain regions. Results suggest that exposure to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors and protein kinases. This work was supported by funding from NASA NCC 9-165. 504b030414000600080000002100828abc13fa0000001c020000130000005b436f6e74656e745f54797065735d2e78

  5. Altering the redox state of skeletal muscle by glutathione depletion increases the exercise-activation of PGC-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Natalie A; Matsumoto, Aya; Peake, Jonathan M; Marsh, Susan A; Peternelj, Tina-Tinkara; Briskey, David; Fassett, Robert G; Coombes, Jeff S; Wadley, Glenn D

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the relationship between markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, cell signaling, and antioxidant enzymes by depleting skeletal muscle glutathione with diethyl maleate (DEM) which resulted in a demonstrable increase in oxidative stress during exercise. Animals were divided into six groups: (1) sedentary control rats; (2) sedentary rats + DEM; (3) exercise control rats euthanized immediately after exercise; (4) exercise rats + DEM; (5) exercise control rats euthanized 4 h after exercise; and (6) exercise rats + DEM euthanized 4 h after exercise. Exercising animals ran on the treadmill at a 10% gradient at 20 m/min for the first 30 min. The speed was then increased every 10 min by 1.6 m/min until exhaustion. There was a reduction in total glutathione in the skeletal muscle of DEM treated animals compared to the control animals (P exercise (P Exercising animals given DEM showed a significantly greater increase in peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) mRNA compared to the control animals that were exercised (P exercise, PGC-1α gene expression was augmented. These findings further highlight the important role of exercise induced oxidative stress in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25538148

  6. Aspirin decreases systemic exposure to clopidogrel through modulation of P-glycoprotein but does not alter its antithrombotic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, J; Shin, D; Lim, K S; Lee, S; Jung, K-H; Chu, K; Hong, K S; Shin, K-H; Cho, J-Y; Yoon, S H; Ji, S C; Yu, K-S; Lee, H; Jang, I-J

    2014-06-01

    Decreased oral clopidogrel absorption caused by induction of intestinal permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) expression after aspirin administration was observed in rats. This study evaluated the effect of aspirin coadministration on the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel in humans. A single 75-mg dose of clopidogrel was orally administered before and after 2 and 4 weeks of once-daily 100-mg aspirin administration in 18 healthy volunteers who were recruited based on CYP2C19 and PON1 genotypes. Plasma concentrations of clopidogrel and its active metabolite, H4, and relative platelet inhibition (RPI) were determined. The P-gp microRNA miR-27a increased by up to 7.67-fold (P = 0.004) and the clopidogrel area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) decreased by 14% (P > 0.05), but the AUC of H4 remained unchanged and RPI increased by up to 15% (P = 0.002) after aspirin administration. These findings indicate low-dose aspirin coadministration may decrease clopidogrel bioavailability but does not decrease its efficacy. PMID:24566733

  7. Altered resting-state neural activity and changes following a craving behavioral intervention for Internet gaming disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Tao; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Potenza, Marc N; Xia, Cui-Cui; Lan, Jing; Liu, Lu; Wang, Ling-Jiao; Liu, Ben; Ma, Shan-Shan; Fang, Xiao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Internet gaming disorder (IGD) has become a serious mental health issue worldwide. Evaluating the benefits of interventions for IGD is of great significance. Thirty-six young adults with IGD and 19 healthy comparison (HC) subjects were recruited and underwent resting-state fMRI scanning. Twenty IGD subjects participated in a group craving behavioral intervention (CBI) and were scanned before and after the intervention. The remaining 16 IGD subjects did not receive an intervention. The results showed that IGD subjects showed decreased amplitude of low fluctuation in the orbital frontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex, and exhibited increased resting-state functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, compared with HC subjects. Compared with IGD subjects who did not receive the intervention, those receiving CBI demonstrated significantly reduced resting-state functional connectivity between the: (1) orbital frontal cortex with hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus; and, (2) posterior cingulate cortex with supplementary motor area, precentral gyrus, and postcentral gyrus. These findings suggest that IGD is associated with abnormal resting-state neural activity in reward-related, default mode and executive control networks. Thus, the CBI may exert effects by reducing interactions between regions within a reward-related network, and across the default mode and executive control networks. PMID:27381822

  8. Repeated exposure to corticosterone increases depression-like behavior in two different versions of the forced swim test without altering nonspecific locomotor activity or muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Wendie; Fournier, Neil M; Kalynchuk, Lisa E

    2009-08-01

    We have recently shown that repeated high dose injections of corticosterone (CORT) reliably increase depression-like behavior on a modified one-day version of the forced swim test. The main purpose of this experiment was to compare the effect of these CORT injections on our one-day version of the forced swim test and the more traditional two-day version of the test. A second purpose was to determine whether altered behavior in the forced swim test could be due to nonspecific changes in locomotor activity or muscle strength. Separate groups of rats received a high dose CORT injection (40 mg/kg) or a vehicle injection once per day for 21 consecutive days. Then, half the rats from each group were exposed to the traditional two-day forced swim test and the other half were exposed to our one-day forced swim test. After the forced swim testing, all the rats were tested in an open field and in a wire suspension grip strength test. The CORT injections significantly increased the time spent immobile and decreased the time spent swimming in both versions of the forced swim test. However, they had no significant effect on activity in the open field or grip strength in the wire suspension test. These results show that repeated CORT injections increase depression-like behavior regardless of the specific parameters of forced swim testing, and that these effects are independent of changes in locomotor activity or muscle strength.

  9. Gut dendritic cell activation links an altered colonic microbiome to mucosal and systemic T-cell activation in untreated HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, S M; Lee, E J; Kotter, C V; Austin, G L; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, D M; Landay, A L; McManus, M C; Robertson, C E; Frank, D N; McCarter, M D; Wilson, C C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c(+) and CD1c(neg)) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c(+) mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percentage of CD83(+)CD1c(+) mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of interferon-γ-producing colon CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c(+) mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and Prevotella stercorea but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species, including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c(+) mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that, during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  10. Gut Dendritic Cell Activation Links an Altered Colonic Microbiome to Mucosal and Systemic T Cell Activation in Untreated HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, SM; Lee, EJ; Kotter, CV; Austin, GL; Gianella, S; Siewe, B; Smith, DM; Landay, AL; McManus, MC; Robertson, CE; Frank, DN; McCarter, MD; Wilson, CC

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1-associated disruption of intestinal homeostasis is a major factor contributing to chronic immune activation and inflammation. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, but the impact of HIV-1 infection on intestinal DC number and function has not been extensively studied. We compared the frequency and activation/maturation status of colonic myeloid DC (mDC) subsets (CD1c+ and CD1cneg) and plasmacytoid DCs in untreated HIV-1-infected subjects with uninfected controls. Colonic mDCs in HIV-1-infected subjects had increased CD40 but decreased CD83 expression, and CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively correlated with mucosal HIV-1 viral load, with mucosal and systemic cytokine production, and with frequencies of activated colon and blood T cells. Percent of CD83+CD1c+ mDCs negatively correlated with frequencies of IFN-γ-producing colon CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. CD40 expression on CD1c+ mDCs positively associated with abundance of high prevalence mucosal Prevotella copri and P. stercorea, but negatively associated with a number of low prevalence mucosal species including Rumminococcus bromii. CD1c+ mDC cytokine production was greater in response to in vitro stimulation with Prevotella species relative to R. bromii. These findings suggest that during HIV infection, colonic mDCs become activated upon exposure to mucosal pathobiont bacteria leading to mucosal and systemic immune activation. PMID:25921339

  11. TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial alterations in human T cells requires FADD and caspase-8 activation but not RIP and caspase-3 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Sung, Bokyung; Sethi, Gautam; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2010-09-15

    Although much is known about how TNF-alpha induces apoptosis in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis, little is known about how it induces apoptosis without these inhibitors. In this report we investigated temporal sequence of events induced by TNF-alpha in the absence of protein synthesis. Regardless of whether we measured the effects by plasma membrane phosphotidylserine accumulation, by DNA strand breaks, or activation of caspases, significant changes were observed only between 12-24 h of TNF-alpha treatment. One of the earliest changes observed after TNF-alpha treatment was mitochondrial swelling at 10 min; followed by cytochrome c and Smac release at 10-30 min, and then heterochromatin clumping occurred at 60 min. While genetic deletion of receptor-interaction protein (RIP) had no effect on TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial damage, deletion of Fas-associated death domain (FADD) abolished the TNF-induced mitochondrial swelling. Since pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk abolished the TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial changes, z-DEVD-fmk, an inhibitor of caspase-3 had no effect, suggesting that TNF-alpha-induced mitochondrial changes or cytochrome c and Smac release requires caspase-8 but not caspase-3 activation. Overall, our results indicated that mitochondrial changes are early events in TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis and that these mitochondrial changes require recruitment of FADD and caspase-8 activation, but not caspase-3 activation or RIP recruitment. PMID:20136500

  12. Altered promoter recycling rates contribute to dominant-negative activity of human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma mutations associated with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Leff, Todd

    2007-04-01

    The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) plays an important role in regulating lipid and glucose metabolism and improves insulin sensitivity in diabetic patients when activated by thiazolidinedione drugs. Several loss-of-function mutations in PPARgamma have been identified that cause lipodystrophy and diabetes in humans. Because affected individuals are heterozygotes and have one normal PPARgamma allele, it is of interest to know whether these mutations act in a dominant-negative fashion to inhibit the activity of the wild-type (WT) receptor. Here we compare the molecular phenotypes of two previously identified PPARgamma mutations: P467L, reported to be dominant negative; and F388L, reported to be devoid of dominant-negative activity. We developed a competitive chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to measure the relative ability of mutant PPARgamma to compete with WT receptor for binding to a PPAR regulatory element (PPRE)-containing promoter. By determining the ratio of mutant and WT receptors bound to a PPRE over time, we estimated the relative promoter turnover rate of each receptor. This assay demonstrated that PPARgamma bearing the P467L had a reduced promoter turnover rate compared with the F388L receptor, and over time out-competed the WT receptor for promoter binding sites. We propose that the P467L receptor is dominant negative because in a cell containing both WT and mutant receptors, the majority of the PPAR-regulated promoters will be occupied by the transcriptionally defective mutant receptor. In contrast, the F388L mutation lacks dominant-negative activity because its more rapid promoter turnover rate prevented it from out-competing the WT receptor for promoter binding sites.

  13. Cigarette smoking leads to persistent and dose-dependent alterations of brain activity and connectivity in anterior insula and anterior cingulate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchi, Davide; Brody, Arthur L; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Kopel, Rotem; Emmert, Kirsten; Preti, Maria Giulia; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Haller, Sven

    2015-11-01

    Although many smokers try to quit smoking, only about 20-25 percent will achieve abstinence despite 6 months or more of gold-standard treatment. This low success rate suggests long-term changes in the brain related to smoking, which remain poorly understood. We compared ex-smokers to both active smokers and non-smokers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore persistent modifications in brain activity and network organization. This prospective and consecutive study includes 18 non-smokers (29.5 ± 6.7 years of age, 11 women), 14 smokers (≥10 cigarettes a day >2 years of smoking, 29.3 ± 6.0 years of age, 10 women) and 14 ex-smokers (>1 year of quitting 30.5 ± 5.7 years of age, 10 women). Participants underwent a block-design fMRI study contrasting smoking cue with control (neutral cue) videos. Data analyses included task-related general linear model, seed-based functional connectivity, voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of gray matter and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) of white matter. Smoking cue videos versus control videos activated the right anterior insula in ex-smokers compared with smokers, an effect correlating with cumulative nicotine intake (pack-years). Moreover, ex-smokers had a persistent decrease in functional connectivity between right anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) compared with control participants, but similar to active smokers. Potentially confounding alterations in gray or white matter were excluded in VBM and TBSS analyses. In summary, ex-smokers with long-term nicotine abstinence have persistent and dose-dependent brain network changes notably in the right anterior insula and its connection to the ACC.

  14. Activation of D2 autoreceptors alters cocaine-induced locomotion and slows down local field oscillations in the rat ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulchitsky, Stanislav; Delairesse, Charlotte; Beeken, Thom; Monteforte, Alexandre; Dethier, Julie; Quertemont, Etienne; Findeisen, Rolf; Bullinger, Eric; Seutin, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Psychoactive substances affecting the dopaminergic system induce locomotor activation and, in high doses, stereotypies. Network mechanisms underlying the shift from an active goal-directed behavior to a "seemingly purposeless" stereotypic locomotion remain unclear. In the present study we sought to determine the relationships between the behavioral effects of dopaminergic drugs and their effects on local field potentials (LFPs), which were telemetrically recorded within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of freely moving rats. We used the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole in a low, autoreceptor-selective (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) and in a high (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) dose, and a moderate dose of cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.). In the control group, power spectrum analysis revealed a prominent peak of LFP power in the theta frequency range during active exploration. Cocaine alone stimulated locomotion, but had no significant effect on the peak of the LFP power. In contrast, co-administration of low dose quinpirole with cocaine markedly altered the pattern of locomotion, from goal-directed exploratory behavior to recurrent motion resembling locomotor stereotypy. This behavioral effect was accompanied by a shift of the dominant theta power toward a significantly lower (by ∼15%) frequency. High dose quinpirole also provoked an increased locomotor activity with signs of behavioral stereotypies, and also induced a shift of the dominant oscillation frequency toward the lower range. These results demonstrate a correlation between the LFP oscillation frequency within the VTA and a qualitative aspect of locomotor behavior, perhaps due to a variable level of coherence of this region with its input or output areas.

  15. Activation of D2 autoreceptors alters cocaine-induced locomotion and slows down local field oscillations in the rat ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulchitsky, Stanislav; Delairesse, Charlotte; Beeken, Thom; Monteforte, Alexandre; Dethier, Julie; Quertemont, Etienne; Findeisen, Rolf; Bullinger, Eric; Seutin, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Psychoactive substances affecting the dopaminergic system induce locomotor activation and, in high doses, stereotypies. Network mechanisms underlying the shift from an active goal-directed behavior to a "seemingly purposeless" stereotypic locomotion remain unclear. In the present study we sought to determine the relationships between the behavioral effects of dopaminergic drugs and their effects on local field potentials (LFPs), which were telemetrically recorded within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of freely moving rats. We used the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole in a low, autoreceptor-selective (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) and in a high (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) dose, and a moderate dose of cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.). In the control group, power spectrum analysis revealed a prominent peak of LFP power in the theta frequency range during active exploration. Cocaine alone stimulated locomotion, but had no significant effect on the peak of the LFP power. In contrast, co-administration of low dose quinpirole with cocaine markedly altered the pattern of locomotion, from goal-directed exploratory behavior to recurrent motion resembling locomotor stereotypy. This behavioral effect was accompanied by a shift of the dominant theta power toward a significantly lower (by ∼15%) frequency. High dose quinpirole also provoked an increased locomotor activity with signs of behavioral stereotypies, and also induced a shift of the dominant oscillation frequency toward the lower range. These results demonstrate a correlation between the LFP oscillation frequency within the VTA and a qualitative aspect of locomotor behavior, perhaps due to a variable level of coherence of this region with its input or output areas. PMID:27130904

  16. Radiosensitivity profiles from a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines exhibiting genetic alterations in p53 and disparate DNA-dependent protein kinase activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langland, Gregory T.; Yannone, Steven M.; Langland, Rachel A.; Nakao, Aki; Guan, Yinghui; Long, Sydney B.T.; Vonguyen, Lien; Chen, David J.; Gray, Joe W; Chen, Fanqing

    2009-09-07

    The variability of radiation responses in ovarian tumors and tumor-derived cell lines is poorly understood. Since both DNA repair capacity and p53 status can significantly alter radiation sensitivity, we evaluated these factors along with radiation sensitivity in a panel of sporadic human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. We observed a gradation of radiation sensitivity among these sixteen lines, with a five-fold difference in the LD50 between the most radiosensitive and the most radioresistant cells. The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is essential for the repair of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks in human somatic cells. Therefore, we measured gene copy number, expression levels, protein abundance, genomic copy and kinase activity for DNA-PK in all of our cell lines. While there were detectable differences in DNA-PK between the cell lines, there was no clear correlation with any of these differences and radiation sensitivity. In contrast, p53 function as determined by two independent methods, correlated well with radiation sensitivity, indicating p53 mutant ovarian cancer cells are typically radioresistant relative to p53 wild-type lines. These data suggest that the activity of regulatory molecules such as p53 may be better indicators of radiation sensitivity than DNA repair enzymes such as DNAPK in ovarian cancer.

  17. Hierridin B Isolated from a Marine Cyanobacterium Alters VDAC1, Mitochondrial Activity, and Cell Cycle Genes on HT-29 Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Freitas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hierridin B was isolated from a marine cyanobacterium Cyanobium sp. strain and induced cytotoxicity selectively in HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells. The underlying molecular mechanism was not yet elucidated. Methods: HT-29 cells were exposed to the IC50 concentration of hierridin B (100.2 μM for 48 h. Non-targeted proteomics was performed using 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. The mRNA expression of apoptotic and cell cycle genes were analyzed by real-time PCR. Automated quantification of 160 cytoplasm and mitochondrial parameter was done by fluorescence microscopy using CellProfiler software. Results: Proteomics identified 21 significant different proteins, which belonged to protein folding/synthesis and cell structure amongst others. Increase of VDAC1 protein responsible for formation of mitochondrial channels was confirmed by mRNA expression. A 10-fold decrease of cytoskeleton proteins (STMN1, TBCA provided a link to alterations of the cell cycle. CCNB1 and CCNE mRNA were decreased two-fold, and P21CIP increased 10-fold, indicative of cell cycle arrest. Morphological analysis of mitochondrial parameter confirmed a reduced mitochondrial activity. Conclusion: Hierridin B is a potential anticancer compound that targets mitochondrial activity and function.

  18. Hierridin B Isolated from a Marine Cyanobacterium Alters VDAC1, Mitochondrial Activity, and Cell Cycle Genes on HT-29 Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Sara; Martins, Rosário; Costa, Margarida; Leão, Pedro N.; Vitorino, Rui; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Urbatzka, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hierridin B was isolated from a marine cyanobacterium Cyanobium sp. strain and induced cytotoxicity selectively in HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells. The underlying molecular mechanism was not yet elucidated. Methods: HT-29 cells were exposed to the IC50 concentration of hierridin B (100.2 μM) for 48 h. Non-targeted proteomics was performed using 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. The mRNA expression of apoptotic and cell cycle genes were analyzed by real-time PCR. Automated quantification of 160 cytoplasm and mitochondrial parameter was done by fluorescence microscopy using CellProfiler software. Results: Proteomics identified 21 significant different proteins, which belonged to protein folding/synthesis and cell structure amongst others. Increase of VDAC1 protein responsible for formation of mitochondrial channels was confirmed by mRNA expression. A 10-fold decrease of cytoskeleton proteins (STMN1, TBCA) provided a link to alterations of the cell cycle. CCNB1 and CCNE mRNA were decreased two-fold, and P21CIP increased 10-fold, indicative of cell cycle arrest. Morphological analysis of mitochondrial parameter confirmed a reduced mitochondrial activity. Conclusion: Hierridin B is a potential anticancer compound that targets mitochondrial activity and function. PMID:27589771

  19. Alterations in grooming activity and syntax in heterozygous SERT and BDNF knockout mice: the utility of behavior-recognition tools to characterize mutant mouse phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Evan J; Pham, Mimi; Roth, Andrew; Cachat, Jonathan; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Kalueff, Allan V

    2012-12-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are key modulators of molecular signaling, cognition and behavior. Although SERT and BDNF mutant mouse phenotypes have been extensively characterized, little is known about their self-grooming behavior. Grooming represents an important behavioral domain sensitive to environmental stimuli and is increasingly used as a model for repetitive behavioral syndromes, such as autism and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The present study used heterozygous ((+/-)) SERT and BDNF male mutant mice on a C57BL/6J background and assessed their spontaneous self-grooming behavior applying both manual and automated techniques. Overall, SERT(+/-) mice displayed a general increase in grooming behavior, as indicated by more grooming bouts and more transitions between specific grooming stages. SERT(+/-) mice also aborted more grooming bouts, but showed generally unaltered activity levels in the observation chamber. In contrast, BDNF(+/-) mice displayed a global reduction in grooming activity, with fewer bouts and transitions between specific grooming stages, altered grooming syntax, as well as hypolocomotion and increased turning behavior. Finally, grooming data collected by manual and automated methods (HomeCageScan) significantly correlated in our experiments, confirming the utility of automated high-throughput quantification of grooming behaviors in various genetic mouse models with increased or decreased grooming phenotypes. Taken together, these findings indicate that mouse self-grooming behavior is a reliable behavioral biomarker of genetic deficits in SERT and BDNF pathways, and can be reliably measured using automated behavior-recognition technology.

  20. Inventory of Long-Term Braiding Activity at a Regional Scale as a Tool for Detecting Alterations to a Rivers' Hydromorphological State: A Case Study for Romania's South-Eastern Subcarpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioana-Toroimac, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    The inventory of long-term braiding activity is a useful tool for detecting alterations in a rivers' hydromorphological state and for a river's management in the context of the Water Framework Directive on integrated river basin management for Europe. Our study focuses on braided sectors of rivers in South-Eastern Subcarpathians (Romania). The inventory evaluates types of alterations based on the spatial analysis of fluvial morphology indicators (i.e., length of the river sector forming a braided pattern; width of the braided active channel), and vegetation cover (i.e., length of banks covered by forest and shrubs; area of in-stream patches of shrubs) accumulated over the last century. Furthermore, we performed a regional scale hierarchical cluster analysis to estimate the degree of alteration when compared to an historical baseline. In South-Eastern Subcarpathians, the studied rivers experienced a decrease of braiding activity revealed by the shortening and narrowing of their braided sectors, expansion of riparian forests, and the diminishment of vegetated islands' areas. We separated three types of river clusters, corresponding to low (cluster 1), moderate (cluster 2), and high (cluster 3) degree of alteration. Moreover, the clusters demonstrate the evolutionary path of the braided pattern alterations until the functioning of another channel pattern. The inventory is relevant for differing types and levels of alterations. Additionally, this tool may serve as a first step toward the restoration of altered sectors by identifying rivers in cluster 1 as potential candidates of present-day reference sites for altered rivers with similar natural conditions as in cluster 3.

  1. TNF-α-Induced Mitochondrial Alterations in Human T Cells Requires FADD and Caspase-8 Activation but Not RIP and Caspase-3 Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Sung, Bokyung; Sethi, Gautam; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2010-01-01

    Although much is known about how TNF-α induces apoptosis in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis, little is known about how it induces apoptosis without these inhibitors. In this report we investigated temporal sequence of events induced by TNF-α in the absence of protein synthesis. Regardless of whether we measured the effects by plasma membrane phosphotidylserine accumulation, by DNA strand breaks, or activation of caspases, significant changes were observed only between 12–24 h ...

  2. An altered gp100 peptide ligand with decreased binding by TCR and CD8alpha dissects T cell cytotoxicity from production of cytokines and activation of NFAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels eSchaft

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Altered peptide ligands (APLs provide useful tools to study T cell activation and potentially direct immune responses to improve treatment of cancer patients. To better understand and exploit APLs, we studied the relationship between APLs and T cell function in more detail. Here, we tested a broad panel of gp100(280-288 APLs with respect to T cell cytotoxicity, production of cytokines and activation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT by human T cells gene-engineered with a gp100-HLA-A2-specific TCRalpha/beta. We demonstrated that gp100-specific cytotoxicity, production of cytokines, and activation of NFAT were not affected by APLs with single amino acid substitutions, except for an APL with an amino acid substitution at position 3 (APL A3, which did not elicit any T cell response. A gp100 peptide with a double amino acid mutation (APL S4S6 elicited T cell cytotoxicity and production of IFNgamma, and to a lesser extent TNFalpha, IL-4, and IL-5, but not production of IL-2 and IL-10, or activation of NFAT. Notably, TCR-mediated functions showed decreases in sensitivities for S4S6 versus gp100 wt peptide, which were minor for cytotoxicity but at least a 1000-fold more prominent for the production of cytokines. TCR-engineered T cells did not bind A3-HLA-A2, but did bind S4S6-HLA-A2 although to a lowered extent compared to wt peptide-HLA-A2. Moreover, S4S6-induced T cell function demonstrated an enhanced dependency on CD8alpha. Taken together, most gp100 APLs functioned as agonists, but A3 and S4S6 peptides acted as a null ligand and partial agonist, respectively. Our results further suggest that TCR-mediated cytotoxicity can be dissected from production of cytokines and activation of NFAT, and that the agonist potential of peptide mutants relates to the extent of binding by TCR and CD8alpha. These findings may facilitate the design of APLs to advance the study of T cell activation and their use for therapeutic applications.

  3. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Affects Acetic Acid Production during Anaerobic Fermentation of Waste Activated Sludge by Altering Activity and Viability of Acetogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingyang; Chen, Yinguang; Feng, Leiyu

    2016-07-01

    Till now, almost all the studies on anaerobic fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) for bioproducts generation focused on the influences of operating conditions, pretreatment methods and sludge characteristics, and few considered those of widespread persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in sludge, for example, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Herein, phenanthrene, which was a typical PAH and widespread in WAS, was selected as a model compound to investigate its effect on WAS anaerobic fermentation for short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) accumulation. Experimental results showed that the concentration of SCFAs derived from WAS was increased in the presence of phenanthrene during anaerobic fermentation. The yield of acetic acid which was the predominant SCFA in the fermentation reactor with the concentration of 100 mg/kg dry sludge was 1.8 fold of that in the control. Mechanism exploration revealed that the present phenanthrene mainly affected the acidification process of anaerobic fermentation and caused the shift of the microbial community to benefit the accumulation of acetic acid. Further investigation showed that both the activities of key enzymes (phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase) involved in acetic acid production and the quantities of their corresponding encoding genes were enhanced in the presence of phenanthrene. Viability tests by determining the adenosine 5'-triphosphate content and membrane potential confirmed that the acetogens were more viable in anaerobic fermentation systems with phenanthrene, which resulted in the increased production of acetic acid. PMID:27267805

  4. The activation and blockage of CRF type 2 receptors of the medial amygdala alter elevated T-maze inhibitory avoidance, an anxiety-related response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Stephanie W E; Portela, Natasha C; Silva, Mariana S; Céspedes, Isabel C; Bittencourt, Jackson C; Viana, Milena B

    2016-05-15

    Previous results show that the activation of CRF type 1 (CRFR1) receptors of the medial amygdala (MeA) induces anxiogenic-like effects. The present study investigates the role played by medial amygdala CRF type 2 receptors (CRFR2) in the modulation of anxiety and panic-related responses. Male Wistar rats were administered into the MeA with the CRFR2 agonist urocortin 2 (0.5 e 1.0μg/0.2μl, experiment 1) or with the CRFR2 antagonist astressin 2-B (60ng/0.2μl, experiment 2) and 10min later tested in the elevated T-maze (ETM) for inhibitory avoidance and escape measurements. In clinical terms, these responses have been respectively related to generalized anxiety and panic disorder. In a third experiment, the effects of the combined treatment with urocortin 2 (1.0μg/0.2μl) and a sub-effective dose of astressin 2-B (30ng/0.2μl) were also investigated. All animals were tested in an open field, immediately after the ETM, for locomotor activity assessment. Results showed that urocortin 2, in the highest dose administered (1.0μg/0.2μl), facilitated ETM avoidance, an anxiogenic-like effect. Astressin 2-B, also in the highest dose (60ng/0.2μl), significantly decreased avoidance latencies, an anxiolytic-like effect. The lower dose of astressin 2-B (30ng/0.2μl) did not induce anxiolytic-like effects but was able to counteract the anxiogenic-like effects of urocortin 2. None of the compounds administered altered escape responses or locomotor activity measurements. These results suggest that CRFR2 in the medial amygdala, as CRFR1, selectively modulate an anxiety-related response. PMID:26965566

  5. Circadian Disruption Alters the Effects of Lipopolysaccharide Treatment on Circadian and Ultradian Locomotor Activity and Body Temperature Rhythms of Female Siberian Hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Brian J; Cable, Erin J; Stevenson, Tyler J; Onishi, Kenneth G; Zucker, Irving; Kay, Leslie M

    2015-12-01

    The effect of circadian rhythm (CR) disruption on immune function depends on the method by which CRs are disrupted. Behavioral and thermoregulatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment were assessed in female Siberian hamsters in which circadian locomotor activity (LMA) rhythms were eliminated by exposure to a disruptive phase-shifting protocol (DPS) that sustains arrhythmicity even when hamsters are housed in a light-dark cycle. This noninvasive treatment avoids genome manipulations and neurological damage associated with other models of CR disruption. Circadian rhythmic (RHYTH) and arrhythmic (ARR) hamsters housed in a 16L:8D photocycle were injected with bacterial LPS near the onset of the light (zeitgeber time 1; ZT1) or dark (ZT16) phase. LPS injections at ZT16 and ZT1 elicited febrile responses in both RHYTH and ARR hamsters, but the effect was attenuated in the arrhythmic females. In ZT16, LPS inhibited LMA in the dark phase immediately after injection but not on subsequent nights in both chronotypes; in contrast, LPS at ZT1 elicited more enduring (~4 day) locomotor hypoactivity in ARR than in RHYTH hamsters. Power and period of dark-phase ultradian rhythms (URs) in LMA and Tb were markedly altered by LPS treatment, as was the power in the circadian waveform. Disrupted circadian rhythms in this model system attenuated responses to LPS in a trait- and ZT-specific manner; changes in UR period and power are novel components of the acute-phase response to infection that may affect energy conservation.

  6. [Autotelic activities aimed at the alteration of the human body from socially accepted to pathological forms: about non-suicidal self-injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmar, Sandor

    2016-03-01

    The author lays down that non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) constitutes an increasingly more common and serious public health problem, especially during the age of adolescence. In spite of the fact that the phenomenon has been known since the beginning of human mankind even in animals, we have not been able to either give a clear explanation or prevent its spreading yet. The author reviews the conceptual disturbances, behavioural phenotypes, cultural-historical and mythological antecedents related to self-injury, just as the controversial concepts, reasons of unclearness of the concepts, and clinical classification of self-injuries, and he outlines a new categorisation/ classification of the explanation of autotelic activities aimed at the alteration of the human body. He reviews the relationship between self-injuries and other psychological signs and symptoms and psychiatric illnesses, the explanations of developing self-injurious behaviour and further research directions. Besides the different models of self-injury he presents a holistic model. Besides the therapeutic guidelines of self-injurious behaviour, he calls the attention to the importance of genetic and nervous system researches, psychological and spiritual research, the importance of mental education and prevention, and he also lists some more essential questions future researchers have to find the answers for if we would like all children to be allowed to enter the adults' world in a healthy and sound state.

  7. Alterations in protein synthesis in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 6301 in response to Calendula Micrantha extract with the Molluscicidal activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response to the extract of the egyptian wild herb Calendula Micrantha, with the Molluscicidal activity, was examined in the unicellular no bacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 6301. growth and chlorophyll of the cells were only slightly affected by low plant extract concentrations but were drastically reduced by high concentration. the rate of protein synthesis progressively decreased by increasing extract concentration. the cells preferentially induced the synthesis of a limited number of polypeptides in response to the treatment. Among the induced polypeptides were those with apparent molecular weights of 161 K (161.000), 96.7 K, 93.4 K, 69.9 K, 59 K, 49 K, 45 K, 35 K, 32.4 K, 28 K, 24 K, 21.7 K, 18 K and 16 K based on their mobilities in gel electrophoresis. these initial studies suggest that the plant extract exerted certain stress which stimulated alteration in the pattern of protein synthesis in Synechococcus sp. some of induced polypeptides are similar to that known to occur in other stresses specially heat shock stress. 3 figs

  8. Central HIV-1 Tat exposure elevates anxiety and fear conditioned responses of male mice concurrent with altered mu-opioid receptor-mediated G-protein activation and β-arrestin 2 activity in the forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Yun K; Paris, Jason J; Lichtman, Aron H; Hauser, Kurt F; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Selley, Dana E; Knapp, Pamela E

    2016-08-01

    Co-exposure to opiates and HIV/HIV proteins results in enhanced CNS morphological and behavioral deficits in HIV(+) individuals and in animal models. Opiates with abuse liability, such as heroin and morphine, bind preferentially to and have pharmacological actions through μ-opioid-receptors (MORs). The mechanisms underlying opiate-HIV interactions are not understood. Exposure to the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein causes neurodegenerative outcomes that parallel many aspects of the human disease. We have also observed that in vivo exposure to Tat results in apparent changes in morphine efficacy, and thus have hypothesized that HIV proteins might alter MOR activation. To test our hypothesis, MOR-mediated G-protein activation was determined in neuroAIDS-relevant forebrain regions of transgenic mice with inducible CNS expression of HIV-1 Tat. G-protein activation was assessed by MOR agonist-stimulated [(35)S]guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTPγS) autoradiography in brain sections, and in concentration-effect curves of MOR agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding in membranes isolated from specific brain regions. Comparative studies were done using the MOR-selective agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala(2), N-MePhe(4), Gly-ol]-enkephalin) and a more clinically relevant agonist, morphine. Tat exposure reduced MOR-mediated G-protein activation in an agonist, time, and regionally dependent manner. Levels of the GPCR regulatory protein β-arrestin-2, which is involved in MOR desensitization, were found to be elevated in only one affected brain region, the amygdala; amygdalar β-arrestin-2 also showed a significantly increased association with MOR by co-immunoprecipitation, suggesting decreased availability of MOR. Interestingly, this correlated with changes in anxiety and fear-conditioned extinction, behaviors that have substantial amygdalar input. We propose that HIV-1 Tat alters the intrinsic capacity of MOR to signal in response to agonist binding

  9. Curcumin prevents maleate-induced nephrotoxicity: relation to hemodynamic alterations, oxidative stress, mitochondrial oxygen consumption and activity of respiratory complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, E; Sánchez-Lozada, L G; García-Niño, W R; García, E; Cerecedo, A; García-Arroyo, F E; Osorio, H; Arellano, A; Cristóbal-García, M; Loredo, M L; Molina-Jijón, E; Hernández-Damián, J; Negrette-Guzmán, M; Zazueta, C; Huerta-Yepez, S; Reyes, J L; Madero, M; Pedraza-Chaverrí, J

    2014-11-01

    The potential protective effect of the dietary antioxidant curcumin (120 mg/Kg/day for 6 days) against the renal injury induced by maleate was evaluated. Tubular proteinuria and oxidative stress were induced by a single injection of maleate (400 mg/kg) in rats. Maleate-induced renal injury included increase in renal vascular resistance and in the urinary excretion of total protein, glucose, sodium, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and N-acetyl β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), upregulation of kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1, decrease in renal blood flow and claudin-2 expression besides of necrosis and apoptosis of tubular cells on 24 h. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring the oxidation of lipids and proteins and diminution in renal Nrf2 levels. Studies were also conducted in renal epithelial LLC-PK1 cells and in mitochondria isolated from kidneys of all the experimental groups. Maleate induced cell damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in LLC-PK1 cells in culture. In addition, maleate treatment reduced oxygen consumption in ADP-stimulated mitochondria and diminished respiratory control index when using malate/glutamate as substrate. The activities of both complex I and aconitase were also diminished. All the above-described alterations were prevented by curcumin. It is concluded that curcumin is able to attenuate in vivo maleate-induced nephropathy and in vitro cell damage. The in vivo protection was associated to the prevention of oxidative stress and preservation of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and activity of respiratory complex I, and the in vitro protection was associated to the prevention of ROS production.

  10. Biliary excretion of acetaminophen-glutathione as an index of toxic activation of acetaminophen: effect of chemicals that alter acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhu, C.; Gregus, Z.; Klaassen, C.D.

    1989-03-01

    Acetaminophen (AA) is converted, presumably by cytochrome P-450, to an electrophile which is conjugated with glutathione (GS). AA-GS is excreted into bile, therefore the biliary excretion rate of AA-GS may reflect the rate of activation of AA in vivo. In order to test this hypothesis, the effect of agents capable of altering the activation of AA including cytochrome P-450 inducers and inhibitors, cobaltous chloride which decreases the amount of P-450, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors (indomethacin and naproxen), antioxidants (butylated hydroxyanisole, alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid and ascorbic acid palmitate) and other chemicals known to decrease AA hepatotoxicity (dimethylsulfoxide and cysteamine), on the biliary excretion of AA-GS was studied in hamsters, the species most sensitive to AA-induced hepatotoxicity. The biliary excretion of AA-GS increased linearly up to 1 mmol/kg of AA i.v., but at higher dosages exhibited saturation kinetics. Dosages above 0.5 mmol/kg lowered hepatic GS concentration. Of the cytochrome P-450 inducers, 3-methylcholanthrene and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, increased the biliary excretion of AA-GS (2.9- and 3.2-fold, respectively) whereas ethanol and isoniazid did not affect it, and pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile tended to decrease it (43%). Phenobarbital tended to increase the biliary excretion of AA-GS, but not in a statistically significant manner. Several cytochrome P-450 inhibitors (metyrapone, 8-methoxypsoralen, 2-(4,6-dichloro-biphenyloxy) ethylamine, alpha-naphthoflavone and cimetidine) decreased the biliary excretion of AA-GS, although SKF 525-A and piperonyl butoxide did not. Cobaltous chloride decreased dramatically the biliary excretion of AA-GS.

  11. Altered intrinsic regional brain spontaneous activity and subjective sleep quality in patients with chronic primary insomnia: a resting-state fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai XJ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Xi-Jian Dai,1,2 De-Chang Peng,1 Hong-Han Gong,1 Ai-Lan Wan,3 Xiao Nie,1 Hai-Jun Li,1 Yi-Xiang J Wang2 1Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nangchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong; 3Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nangchang University, Nangchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China Study objective: To prospectively explore the underlying regional homogeneity (ReHo brain-activity deficit in patients with chronic primary insomnia (PCPIs and its relationship with clinical features.Design: The ReHo method and Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 software were used to evaluate whether resting-state localized brain activity was modulated between PCPIs and good sleepers (GSs, and correlation analysis between altered regional brain areas and clinical features was calculated. Patients and participants: Twenty-four PCPIs (17 females, seven males and 24 (12 females, 12 males age-, sex-, and education-matched GSs.Measurements and results: PCPIs disturbed subjective sleep quality, split positive mood, and exacerbated negative moods. Compared with GSs, PCPIs showed higher ReHo in left fusiform gyrus, and lower ReHo in bilateral cingulate gyrus and right cerebellum anterior lobe. Compared with female GSs, female PCPIs showed higher ReHo in the left fusiform gyrus and right posterior cingulate, and lower ReHo in the left cerebellum anterior lobe and left superior frontal gyrus. Compared with male GSs, male PCPIs showed higher ReHo in the right temporal lobe and lower ReHo in the bilateral frontal lobe. The fusiform gyrus showed strong positive correlations and the frontal lobe showed negative correlations with the clinical measurements.Conclusion: The ReHo analysis is a useful noninvasive imaging tool for the detection of cerebral changes and

  12. Chronic exposure to low levels of inorganic arsenic causes alterations in locomotor activity and in the expression of dopaminergic and antioxidant systems in the albino rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Verónica Mireya; Limón-Pacheco, Jorge Humberto; Carrizales, Leticia; Mendoza-Trejo, María Soledad; Giordano, Magda

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have associated chronic arsenicism with decreases in IQ and sensory and motor alterations in humans. Likewise, studies of rodents exposed to inorganic arsenic ((i)As) have found changes in locomotor activity, brain neurochemistry, behavioral tasks, oxidative stress, and in sensory and motor nerves. In the current study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to environmentally relevant doses of (i)As (0.05, 0.5 mg (i)As/L) and to a high dose (50 mg (i)As/L) in drinking water for one year. Hypoactivity and increases in the striatal dopamine content were found in the group treated with 50 mg (i)As/L. Exposure to 0.5 and 50 mg (i)As/L increased the total brain content of As. Furthermore, (i)As exposure produced a dose-dependent up-regulation of mRNA for Mn-SOD and Trx-1 and a down-regulation of DAR-D₂ mRNA levels in the nucleus accumbens. DAR-D₁ and Nrf2 mRNA expression were down-regulated in nucleus accumbens in the group exposed to 50 mg (i)As/L. Trx-1 mRNA levels were up-regulated in the cortex in an (i)As dose-dependent manner, while DAR-D₁ mRNA expression was increased in striatum in the 0.5 mg (i)As/L group. These results show that chronic exposure to low levels of arsenic causes subtle but region-specific changes in the nervous system, especially in antioxidant systems and dopaminergic elements. These changes became behaviorally evident only in the group exposed to 50 mg (i)As/L.

  13. The order of exercise during concurrent training for rehabilitation does not alter acute genetic expression, mitochondrial enzyme activity or improvements in muscle function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren G MacNeil

    Full Text Available Concurrent exercise combines different modes of exercise (e.g., aerobic and resistance into one training protocol, providing stimuli meant to increase muscle strength, aerobic capacity and mass. As disuse is associated with decrements in strength, aerobic capacity and muscle size concurrent training is an attractive modality for rehabilitation. However, interference between the signaling pathways may result in preferential improvements for one of the exercise modes. We recruited 18 young adults (10 ♂, 8 ♀ to determine if order of exercise mode during concurrent training would differentially affect gene expression, protein content and measures of strength and aerobic capacity after 2 weeks of knee-brace induced disuse. Concurrent exercise sessions were performed 3x/week for 6 weeks at gradually increasing intensities either with endurance exercise preceding (END>RES or following (RES>END resistance exercise. Biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis before, 3 h after the first exercise bout and 48 h after the end of training. Concurrent exercise altered the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α, PRC, PPARγ, hypertrophy (PGC-1α4, REDD2, Rheb and atrophy (MuRF-1, Runx1, increased electron transport chain complex protein content, citrate synthase and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase enzyme activity, muscle mass, maximum isometric strength and VO 2peak. However, the order in which exercise was completed (END>RES or RES>END only affected the protein content of mitochondrial complex II subunit. In conclusion, concurrent exercise training is an effective modality for the rehabilitation of the loss of skeletal muscle mass, maximum strength, and peak aerobic capacity resulting from disuse, regardless of the order in which the modes of exercise are performed.

  14. NK cells infiltrating a MHC class I-deficient lung adenocarcinoma display impaired cytotoxic activity toward autologous tumor cells associated with altered NK cell-triggering receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maux Chansac, Béatrice; Moretta, Alessandro; Vergnon, Isabelle; Opolon, Paule; Lécluse, Yann; Grunenwald, Dominique; Kubin, Marek; Soria, Jean-Charles; Chouaib, Salem; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia

    2005-11-01

    NK cells are able to discriminate between normal cells and cells that have lost MHC class I (MHC-I) molecule expression as a result of tumor transformation. This function is the outcome of the capacity of inhibitory NK receptors to block cytotoxicity upon interaction with their MHC-I ligands expressed on target cells. To investigate the role of human NK cells and their various receptors in the control of MHC-I-deficient tumors, we have isolated several NK cell clones from lymphocytes infiltrating an adenocarcinoma lacking beta2-microglobulin expression. Unexpectedly, although these clones expressed NKG2D and mediated a strong cytolytic activity toward K562, Daudi and allogeneic MHC-class I+ carcinoma cells, they were unable to lyse the autologous MHC-I- tumor cell line. This defect was associated with alterations in the expression of natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) by NK cells and the NKG2D ligands, MHC-I-related chain A, MHC-I-related chain B, and UL16 binding protein 1, and the ICAM-1 by tumor cells. In contrast, the carcinoma cell line was partially sensitive to allogeneic healthy donor NK cells expressing high levels of NCR. Indeed, this lysis was inhibited by anti-NCR and anti-NKG2D mAbs, suggesting that both receptors are required for the induced killing. The present study indicates that the MHC-I-deficient lung adenocarcinoma had developed mechanisms of escape from the innate immune response based on down-regulation of NCR and ligands required for target cell recognition.

  15. Altered colonic mucosal Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (PUFA derived lipid mediators in ulcerative colitis: new insight into relationship with disease activity and pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Masoodi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Ulcerative colitis (UC is a relapsing inflammatory disorder of unconfirmed aetiology, variable severity and clinical course, characterised by progressive histological inflammation and with elevation of eicosanoids which have a known pathophysiological role in inflammation. Therapeutic interventions targetting eicosanoids (5-aminosalicylates (ASA are effective first line and adjunctive treatments in mild-moderate UC for achieving and sustaining clinical remission. However, the variable clinical response to 5-ASA and frequent deterioration in response to cyclo-oxygenase (COX inhibitors, has prompted an in depth simultaneous evaluation of multiple lipid mediators (including eicosanoids within the inflammatory milieu in UC. We hypothesised that severity of inflammation is associated with alteration of lipid mediators, in relapsing UC. DESIGN: Study was case-control design. Mucosal lipid mediators were determined by LC-MS/MS lipidomics analysis on mucosal biopsies taken from patients attending outpatients with relapsing UC. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were used to investigate the association of mucosal lipid mediators, with the disease state and severity graded histologically. RESULTS: Levels of PGE2, PGD2, TXB2, 5-HETE, 11-HETE, 12-HETE and 15-HETE are significantly elevated in inflamed mucosa and correlate with severity of inflammation, determined using validated histological scoring systems. CONCLUSIONS: Our approach of capturing inflammatory mediator signature at different stages of UC by combining comprehensive lipidomics analysis and computational modelling could be used to classify and predict mild-moderate inflammation; however, predictive index is diminished in severe inflammation. This new technical approach could be developed to tailor drug treatments to patients with active UC, based on the mucosal lipid mediator profile.

  16. Age related changes in NAD+ metabolism oxidative stress and Sirt1 activity in wistar rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nady Braidy

    Full Text Available The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ has emerged as a key regulator of metabolism, stress resistance and longevity. Apart from its role as an important redox carrier, NAD+ also serves as the sole substrate for NAD-dependent enzymes, including poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, an important DNA nick sensor, and NAD-dependent histone deacetylases, Sirtuins which play an important role in a wide variety of processes, including senescence, apoptosis, differentiation, and aging. We examined the effect of aging on intracellular NAD+ metabolism in the whole heart, lung, liver and kidney of female wistar rats. Our results are the first to show a significant decline in intracellular NAD+ levels and NAD:NADH ratio in all organs by middle age (i.e.12 months compared to young (i.e. 3 month old rats. These changes in [NAD(H] occurred in parallel with an increase in lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls (o- and m- tyrosine formation and decline in total antioxidant capacity in these organs. An age dependent increase in DNA damage (phosphorylated H2AX was also observed in these same organs. Decreased Sirt1 activity and increased acetylated p53 were observed in organ tissues in parallel with the drop in NAD+ and moderate over-expression of Sirt1 protein. Reduced mitochondrial activity of complex I-IV was also observed in aging animals, impacting both redox status and ATP production. The strong positive correlation observed between DNA damage associated NAD+ depletion and Sirt1 activity suggests that adequate NAD+ concentrations may be an important longevity assurance factor.

  17. Occupational exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields does not alter responses of inflammatory genes and activation of splenic lymphocytes in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Luo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of the present study was to observe the effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields (MFs on the immune function of splenic lymphocytes in mice. Material and Methods: Twenty male Kunming mice (6 weeks old, weighing 18– 25 g, were randomly divided into sham exposure (N = 10 and 500 μT MFs (N = 10 groups. The mice in the MFs group were exposed to 500 μT MFs for 8 h daily (5 days/week for up to 60 days. In vitro study was carried out to examine the effects of 50 Hz MFs on the expression of inflammatory factor genes and a cluster of differentiation 69 (CD69 in mouse prime splenic lymphocytes activated by para-Methoxyamphetamine (PMA and ionomycin. In the in vitro experiments, lymphocytes were isolated from the spleen of 10 healthy Kunming mice, the cells were cultured in the Roswell Park Memorial Institute 1640 medium (RPMI-1640 and exposed to 0 μT, 250 μT, 500 μT, or 1 mT MFs in an incubator under 5% carbon dioxide (CO2 at 37°C for 6 h. The levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2, IL-4, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, GATA binding protein 3 (GATA-3 and T cell-specific T-box transcription factor (T-bet were assessed by the real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR, respectively. The expression of CD69 was checked using the flow cytometry. Results: Under our experimental conditions, body weight of the mice exposed to occupational, extremely low frequency- electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs significantly decreased on day 20 and day 30. There were no significant changes observed in vivo in spleen weight, splenic coefficient, splenic histology profile and cytokine production in spleen tissues. Our in vitro experiments showed that 50 Hz MFs had no effect on the expression of these genes and CD69 to primary splenic cells. Conclusions: In conclusion, under the applied experimental conditions, occupational exposure to 50 Hz magnetic field did not alter responses of inflammatory genes and activation of splenic

  18. Food restriction alters pramipexole-induced yawning, hypothermia, and locomotor activity in rats: Evidence for sensitization of dopamine D2 receptor-mediated effects

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Gregory T; Calinski, Diane M.; Newman, Amy Hauck; Grundt, Peter; Woods, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Food restriction enhances sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of a variety of drugs of abuse including opiates, nicotine, and psychostimulants. Food restriction has also been shown to alter a variety of behavioral and pharmacological responses to dopaminergic agonists including an increased sensitivity to the locomotor stimulatory effects of direct- and indirect-dopamine agonists, elevated extracellular dopamine levels in responses to psychostimulants, as well as suppression of agonist-ind...

  19. EARLY MATERNAL SEPARATION AFFECTS ETHANOL-INDUCED CONDITIONING IN A nor-BNI INSENSITIVE MANNER, BUT DOES NOT ALTER ETHANOL-INDUCED LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Fabio, Ma. Carolina; Spear, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    Early environmental stress significantly affects the development of offspring. This stress has been modeled in rats through the maternal separation (MS) paradigm, which alters the functioning of the HPA axis and can enhance ethanol intake at adulthood. Infant rats are sensitive to ethanol’s reinforcing effects, which modulate ethanol seeking and intake. Little is known about the impact of MS on sensitivity to ethanol’s appetitive and aversive effects during infancy. The present study assessed...

  20. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in Drinking Water Causes Alterations in Locomotor Activity and Decreases Striatal mRNA for the D2 Dopamine Receptor in CD1 Male Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Leticia Moreno Ávila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic exposure has been associated with sensory, motor, memory, and learning alterations in humans and alterations in locomotor activity, behavioral tasks, and neurotransmitters systems in rodents. In this study, CD1 mice were exposed to 0.5 or 5.0 mg As/L of drinking water for 6 months. Locomotor activity, aggression, interspecific behavior and physical appearance, monoamines levels, and expression of the messenger for dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were assessed. Arsenic exposure produced hypoactivity at six months and other behaviors such as rearing and on-wall rearing and barbering showed both increases and decreases. No alterations on aggressive behavior or monoamines levels in striatum or frontal cortex were observed. A significant decrease in the expression of mRNA for D2 receptors was found in striatum of mice exposed to 5.0 mg As/L. This study provides evidence for the use of dopamine receptor D2 as potential target of arsenic toxicity in the dopaminergic system.

  1. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in Drinking Water Causes Alterations in Locomotor Activity and Decreases Striatal mRNA for the D2 Dopamine Receptor in CD1 Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Ávila, Claudia Leticia; Limón-Pacheco, Jorge H; Giordano, Magda; Rodríguez, Verónica M

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with sensory, motor, memory, and learning alterations in humans and alterations in locomotor activity, behavioral tasks, and neurotransmitters systems in rodents. In this study, CD1 mice were exposed to 0.5 or 5.0 mg As/L of drinking water for 6 months. Locomotor activity, aggression, interspecific behavior and physical appearance, monoamines levels, and expression of the messenger for dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were assessed. Arsenic exposure produced hypoactivity at six months and other behaviors such as rearing and on-wall rearing and barbering showed both increases and decreases. No alterations on aggressive behavior or monoamines levels in striatum or frontal cortex were observed. A significant decrease in the expression of mRNA for D2 receptors was found in striatum of mice exposed to 5.0 mg As/L. This study provides evidence for the use of dopamine receptor D2 as potential target of arsenic toxicity in the dopaminergic system. PMID:27375740

  2. Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in Drinking Water Causes Alterations in Locomotor Activity and Decreases Striatal mRNA for the D2 Dopamine Receptor in CD1 Male Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Ávila, Claudia Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic exposure has been associated with sensory, motor, memory, and learning alterations in humans and alterations in locomotor activity, behavioral tasks, and neurotransmitters systems in rodents. In this study, CD1 mice were exposed to 0.5 or 5.0 mg As/L of drinking water for 6 months. Locomotor activity, aggression, interspecific behavior and physical appearance, monoamines levels, and expression of the messenger for dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were assessed. Arsenic exposure produced hypoactivity at six months and other behaviors such as rearing and on-wall rearing and barbering showed both increases and decreases. No alterations on aggressive behavior or monoamines levels in striatum or frontal cortex were observed. A significant decrease in the expression of mRNA for D2 receptors was found in striatum of mice exposed to 5.0 mg As/L. This study provides evidence for the use of dopamine receptor D2 as potential target of arsenic toxicity in the dopaminergic system. PMID:27375740

  3. THE MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN MUSCLE SPINDLES AND ALTERATIONS IN CELL ACTIVITY OF THE RATS RED NUCLEUS AFTER 2 WEEKS SIMULATED WEIGHTLESSNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The extensive negative effects induced by zerogravity or microgravity where offer special environ-ment are har mful for cos monauts[1-3].The real spaceenvironment has many characteristics,including mi-crogravity,electromagnetic fields,and radiation,which may have an effect on the function and mor-phology of the CNS[4],but the changes in CNSin-duced by si mulated weightlessness on the groundcaused the corresponding adaptive changes of cere-bral circulation,which made alterations in sensoryperception,and the ...

  4. Electromagnetic fields at 2.45 GHz trigger changes in heat shock proteins 90 and 70 without altering apoptotic activity in rat thyroid gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Misa Agustiño

    2012-07-01

    Non-ionizing radiation at 2.45 GHz may modify the expression of genes that codify heat shock proteins (HSP in the thyroid gland. Using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA technique, we studied levels of HSP-90 and HSP-70. We also used hematoxilin eosin to look for evidence of lesions in the gland and applied the DAPI technique of fluorescence to search for evidence of chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation in the thyroid cells of adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. Fifty-four rats were individually exposed for 30 min to 2.45 GHz radiation in a Gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM cell at different levels of non-thermal specific absorption rate (SAR, which was calculated using the finite difference time domain (FDTD technique. Ninety minutes after radiation, HSP-90 and HSP-70 had decreased significantly (P<0.01 after applying a SAR of 0.046±1.10 W/Kg or 0.104±5.10−3 W/Kg. Twenty-four hours after radiation, HSP-90 had partially recovered and HSP-70 had recovered completely. There were few indications of lesions in the glandular structure and signs of apoptosis were negative in all radiated animals. The results suggest that acute sub-thermal radiation at 2.45 GHz may alter levels of cellular stress in rat thyroid gland without initially altering their anti-apoptotic capacity.

  5. Experimental study of gold activation-transportation in the process of potash metasomatism-alteration ——North China platform gold deposit taken as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Yurong; HU; Shouxi

    2001-01-01

    Chemical reactions of plagioclase, biotite and their single minerals, as well as a mineral mixture of (plagioclase +biotite+quartz), with KCl and (KCl+KHCO3) solutions were carried out at 150400℃ and 5080 MPa. Experiments show that alkaline fluid promotes plagioclase’s changing into potash feldspar, while acid fluid helps plagioclase, potash feldspar and biotite alteration form chlorite and sericite. After chemical reaction the acidity-alkalinity of solutions often changes reversely. It was observed that gold dissolved from the tube wall and recrystallized on the surfaces of biotite and pyrite. Therefore the transportation and enrichment of gold are related to the elementary effect of the fluid-mineral interfaces. Fe3+-Fe2+, as an oxidition-reduction agent, and volatile components Cl? and CO2 play important roles in the reaction process.

  6. Music alters visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Jolij

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual perception is not a passive process: in order to efficiently process visual input, the brain actively uses previous knowledge (e.g., memory and expectations about what the world should look like. However, perception is not only influenced by previous knowledge. Especially the perception of emotional stimuli is influenced by the emotional state of the observer. In other words, how we perceive the world does not only depend on what we know of the world, but also by how we feel. In this study, we further investigated the relation between mood and perception. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We let observers do a difficult stimulus detection task, in which they had to detect schematic happy and sad faces embedded in noise. Mood was manipulated by means of music. We found that observers were more accurate in detecting faces congruent with their mood, corroborating earlier research. However, in trials in which no actual face was presented, observers made a significant number of false alarms. The content of these false alarms, or illusory percepts, was strongly influenced by the observers' mood. CONCLUSIONS: As illusory percepts are believed to reflect the content of internal representations that are employed by the brain during top-down processing of visual input, we conclude that top-down modulation of visual processing is not purely predictive in nature: mood, in this case manipulated by music, may also directly alter the way we perceive the world.

  7. Construction and characterization of mutations at codon 751 of the Escherichia coli gyrB gene that confer resistance to the antimicrobial peptide microcin B17 and alter the activity of DNA gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo, F J; del Castillo, I; Moreno, F

    2001-03-01

    Microcin B17 is a peptide antibiotic that inhibits DNA replication in Escherichia coli by targeting DNA gyrase. Previously, two independently isolated microcin B17-resistant mutants were shown to harbor the same gyrB point mutation that results in the replacement of tryptophan 751 by arginine in the GyrB polypeptide. We used site-directed mutagenesis to construct mutants in which tryptophan 751 was deleted or replaced by other amino acids. These mutants exhibit altered DNA gyrase activity and different levels of resistance to microcin B17.

  8. Chronic exposure to cigarette smoke during gestation results in altered cholinesterase enzyme activity and behavioral deficits in adult rat offspring: potential relevance to schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugno, Alexandra I; Fraga, Daiane B; De Luca, Renata D; Ghedim, Fernando V; Deroza, Pedro F; Cipriano, Andreza L; Oliveira, Mariana B; Heylmann, Alexandra S A; Budni, Josiane; Souza, Renan P; Quevedo, João

    2013-06-01

    Prenatal cigarette smoke exposure (PCSE) has been associated with physiological and developmental changes that may be related to an increased risk for childhood and adult neuropsychiatric diseases. The present study investigated locomotor activity and cholinesterase enzyme activity in rats, following PCSE and/or ketamine treatment in adulthood. Pregnant female Wistar rats were exposed to 12 commercially filtered cigarettes per day for a period of 28 days. We evaluated motor activity and cholinesterase activity in the brain and serum of adult male offspring that were administered acute subanesthetic doses of ketamine (5, 15 and 25 mg/kg), which serves as an animal model of schizophrenia. To determine locomotor activity, we used the open field test. Cholinesterase activity was assessed by hydrolysis monitored spectrophotometrically. Our results show that both PCSE and ketamine treatment in the adult offspring induced increase of locomotor activity. Additionally, it was observed increase of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activity in the brain and serum, respectively. We demonstrated that animals exposed to cigarettes in the prenatal period had increased the risk for psychotic symptoms in adulthood. This also occurs in a dose-dependent manner. These changes provoke molecular events that are not completely understood and may result in abnormal behavioral responses found in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia.

  9. Structural changes of the ligand and of the receptor alters the receptor preference for neutrophil activating peptides starting with a 3 formylmethionyl group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsman, Huamei; Winther, Malene; Gabl, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus strains produce N-formylmethionyl containing peptides, of which the tetrapeptide fMIFL is a potent activator of the neutrophil formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) and the PSMα2 peptide is a potent activator of the closely related FPR2. Variants derived from these two...

  10. Alteration of Interictal Brain Activity in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in the Left Dominant Hemisphere: A Resting-State MEG Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Resting MEG activities were compared between patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE and normal controls. Using SAMg2, the activities of MEG data were reconstructed and normalized. Significantly elevated SAMg2 signals were found in LTLE patients in the left temporal lobe and medial structures. Marked decreases of SAMg2 signals were found in the wide extratemporal lobe regions, such as the bilateral visual cortex. The study also demonstrated a positive correlation between the seizure frequency and brain activities of the abnormal regions after the multiple linear regression analysis. These results suggested that the aberrant brain activities not only were related to the epileptogenic zones, but also existed in other extratemporal regions in patients with LTLE. The activities of the aberrant regions could be further damaged with the increase of the seizure frequency. Our findings indicated that LTLE could be a multifocal disease, including complex epileptic networks and brain dysfunction networks.

  11. Altered Activation in Cerebellum Contralateral to Unilateral Thalamotomy May Mediate Tremor Suppression in Parkinson's Disease: A Short-Term Regional Homogeneity fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Wen

    Full Text Available Ventral intermediate nucleus thalamotomy is an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease tremor. However, its mechanism is still unclear.We used resting-state fMRI to investigate short-term ReHo changes after unilateral thalamotomy in tremor-dominant PD, and to speculate about its possible mechanism on tremor suppression.26 patients and 31 healthy subjects (HS were recruited. Patients were divided into two groups according to right- (rPD and left-side (lPD thalamotomy. Tremor was assessed using the 7-item scale from the Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale motor score (mUPDRS. Patients were scanned using resting state fMRI after 12h withdrawal of medication, both preoperatively (PDpre and 7- day postoperatively (PDpost, whereas healthy subjects were scanned once. The regions associated with tremor and altered ReHo due to thalamic ablation were examined.The impact of unilateral VIM thalamotomy was characterized in the frontal, parietal, temporal regions, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Compared with PDpre, significantly reduced ReHo was found in the left cerebellum in patients with rPDpost, and slightly decreased ReHo in the cerebellum vermis in patients with lPDpost, which was significantly higher than HS. We demonstrated a positive correlation between the ReHo values in the cerebellum (in rPD, peak coordinate [-12, -54, -21], R = 0.64, P = 0.0025, and peak coordinate [-9, -54, -18], R = 0.71, P = 0.0025; in lPD, peak coordinate [3, -45, -15], R = 0.71, P = 0.004 in the pre-surgical condition, changes of ReHo induced by thalamotomy (in rPD, R = 0.63, P = 0.021, R = 0.6, P = 0.009; in lPD, R = 0.58, P = 0.028 and tremor scores contralateral to the surgical side, respectively.The specific area that may be associated with PD tremor and altered ReHo due to thalamic ablation is the cerebellum. The neural basis underlying thalamotomy is complex; cerebellum involvement is far beyond cerebello-thalamic tract breakage.

  12. Prior cold water swim stress alters immobility in the forced swim test and associated activation of serotonergic neurons in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drugan, R C; Hibl, P T; Kelly, K J; Dady, K F; Hale, M W; Lowry, C A

    2013-12-01

    Prior adverse experience alters behavioral responses to subsequent stressors. For example, exposure to a brief swim increases immobility in a subsequent swim test 24h later. In order to determine if qualitative differences (e.g. 19°C versus 25°C) in an initial stressor (15-min swim) impact behavioral, physiological, and associated neural responses in a 5-min, 25°C swim test 24h later, rats were surgically implanted with biotelemetry devices 1 week prior to experimentation then randomly assigned to one of six conditions (Day 1 (15 min)/Day 2 (5 min)): (1) home cage (HC)/HC, (2) HC/25°C swim, (3) 19°C swim/HC, (4) 19°C swim/25°C swim, (5) 25°C swim/HC, (6) 25°C swim/25°C swim. Core body temperature (Tb) was measured on Days 1 and 2 using biotelemetry; behavior was measured on Day 2. Rats were transcardially perfused with fixative 2h following the onset of the swim on Day 2 for analysis of c-Fos expression in midbrain serotonergic neurons. Cold water (19°C) swim on Day 1 reduced Tb, compared to both 25°C swim and HC groups on Day 1, and, relative to rats exposed to HC conditions on Day 1, reduced the hypothermic response to the 25°C swim on Day 2. The 19°C swim on Day 1, relative to HC exposure on Day 1, increased immobility during the 5-min swim on Day 2. Also, 19°C swim, relative to HC conditions, on Day 1 reduced swim (25°C)-induced increases in c-Fos expression in serotonergic neurons within the dorsal and interfascicular parts of the dorsal raphe nucleus. These results suggest that exposure to a 5-min 19°C cold water swim, but not exposure to a 5-min 25°C swim alters physiological, behavioral and serotonergic responses to a subsequent stressor.

  13. Altered Activation in Cerebellum Contralateral to Unilateral Thalamotomy May Mediate Tremor Suppression in Parkinson’s Disease: A Short-Term Regional Homogeneity fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhi; Zhang, Jie; Li, Jielan; Dai, Jiankun; Lin, Fuchun; Wu, Guangyao

    2016-01-01

    Background Ventral intermediate nucleus thalamotomy is an effective treatment for Parkinson’s disease tremor. However, its mechanism is still unclear. Purpose We used resting-state fMRI to investigate short-term ReHo changes after unilateral thalamotomy in tremor-dominant PD, and to speculate about its possible mechanism on tremor suppression. Methods 26 patients and 31 healthy subjects (HS) were recruited. Patients were divided into two groups according to right- (rPD) and left-side (lPD) thalamotomy. Tremor was assessed using the 7-item scale from the Unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale motor score (mUPDRS). Patients were scanned using resting state fMRI after 12h withdrawal of medication, both preoperatively (PDpre) and 7- day postoperatively (PDpost), whereas healthy subjects were scanned once. The regions associated with tremor and altered ReHo due to thalamic ablation were examined. Results The impact of unilateral VIM thalamotomy was characterized in the frontal, parietal, temporal regions, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Compared with PDpre, significantly reduced ReHo was found in the left cerebellum in patients with rPDpost, and slightly decreased ReHo in the cerebellum vermis in patients with lPDpost, which was significantly higher than HS. We demonstrated a positive correlation between the ReHo values in the cerebellum (in rPD, peak coordinate [-12, -54, -21], R = 0.64, P = 0.0025, and peak coordinate [-9, -54, -18], R = 0.71, P = 0.0025; in lPD, peak coordinate [3, -45, -15], R = 0.71, P = 0.004) in the pre-surgical condition, changes of ReHo induced by thalamotomy (in rPD, R = 0.63, P = 0.021, R = 0.6, P = 0.009; in lPD, R = 0.58, P = 0.028) and tremor scores contralateral to the surgical side, respectively. Conclusion The specific area that may be associated with PD tremor and altered ReHo due to thalamic ablation is the cerebellum. The neural basis underlying thalamotomy is complex; cerebellum involvement is far beyond cerebello

  14. Carbofuran induced oxidative stress mediated alterations in Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase activity in rat brain: amelioration by vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sunil Kumar; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2014-07-01

    Pesticides cause oxidative stress and adversely influence Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in animals. Since impact of carbofuran has not been properly studied in the mammalian brain, the ability of carbofuran to induce oxidative stress and modulation in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and its amelioration by vitamin E was performed. The rats divided into six groups received two different doses of carbofuran (15% and 30% LD50) for 15 days. The results suggested that the carbofuran treatment caused a significant elevation in levels of malonaldehyde and reduced glutathione and sharp inhibition in the activities of super oxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione-S-transferase; the effect being dose dependent. Carbofuran at different doses also caused sharp reduction in the activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. The pretreatment of vitamin E, however, showed a significant recovery in these indices. The pretreatment of rats with vitamin E offered protection from carbofuran-induced oxidative stress.

  15. Type 2 diabetes is associated with altered NF-¿B DNA binding activity, JNK phosphorylation, and AMPK phosphorylation in skeletal muscle after LPS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Anne Sofie; Kelly, Meghan; Berg, Ronan Martin Griffin;

    2011-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is often associated with impaired glucose metabolism. We therefore studied the activation of inflammatory pathway intermediates that interfere with glucose uptake during systemic inflammation by applying a standardised inflammatory stimulus in vivo. After ethical approval, i...

  16. Do altered activities of superoxide dismutases and the level of NF-kB modulate the effects of gamma radiation in HeLaS3 cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA NICIFOROVIC

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Most experimental models, including cell culture studies, have demon­strated that over-expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD in cells bearing a carcinoma phenotype has anti-proliferative and tumour suppression chara­cteristics. In contrast, when cervical carcinoma biopsies express MnSOD, there is a poor prognosis and resistance to radiation therapy. The results herein indicate that human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLaS3 cells have increased MnSOD activity (up to 50 % of the total SOD activity due to low expression of its repressor p53 and a high level of oxidative stress arising from the cell culture conditions. High MnSOD activity may be related to HeLaS3 cell radioresistance, illustrated by a high IC50 of 3.4 Gy and by a relatively high level of cell viability after gamma irradiation. In contrast to MnSOD activity, cytosolic CuZnSOD activity decreased after ionising radiation. The catalase (Cat activity was unchanged. IR also increa­sed the nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity. Such conditions lead to increased con­centrations of the superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and NO., which together may be responsible for the decreased expression of NF-kB and unaltered Cat ac­tivity. Therefore, the disturbed redox balance within HeLaS3 cells may be respon­sible for the cytotoxicity observed at higher irradiation doses. It could be concluded that inhibition of the CuZnSOD activity may be an important target for the selective killing of radioresistant cancer cells.

  17. Antagonism of antiviral and allogeneic activity of a human public CTL clonotype by a single altered peptide ligand: implications for allograft rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ely, Lauren K.; Green, Katherine J.; Beddoe, Travis; Clements, Craig S.; Miles, John J.; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Zernich, Danielle; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; Burrows, Scott R. (Monash)

    2010-06-30

    Alloreactive T lymphocytes are central mediators of graft-versus-host disease and allograft rejection. A public CTL clonotype with specificity for the alloantigens HLA-B*4402 and B*4405 is often expanded to large numbers in healthy HLA-B*0801{sup +} individuals, driven by cross-reactive stimulation with the common, persistent herpesvirus EBV. Since such alloreactive memory CTL expansions have the potential to influence transplantation outcome, altered peptide ligands (APLs) of the target HLA-B*0801-binding EBV peptide, FLRGRAYGL, were screened as specific antagonists for this immunodominant clonotype. One APL, FLRGRFYGL, exerted powerful antagonism of a prototypic T cell clone expressing this immunodominant TCR when costimulated with target cells presenting HLA-B*0801{sup FLRGRAYGL}. Significantly, this APL also reduced the lysis of allogeneic target cells expressing HLA-B*4402 by up to 99%. The affinities of the agonist and antagonist complexes for the public TCR, measured using solution and solid-phase assays, were 8 and 138 {micro}M, respectively. Surprisingly, the half-life of the agonist and antagonist complexes was similar, yet the association rate for the antagonist complex was significantly slower. These observations were further supported by structural studies that suggested a large conformational hurdle was required to ligate the immunodominant TCR to the HLA-B*0801 antagonist complex. By defining an antagonist APL against an immunodominant alloreactive TCR, these findings raise the prospect of exploiting such peptides to inhibit clinical alloreactivity, particularly against clonal T cell expansions that react with alloantigens.

  18. Genome-wide DNA methylation identifies trophoblast invasion-related genes: Claudin-4 and Fucosyltransferase IV control mobility via altering matrix metalloproteinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuxiang; Blair, John D; Yuen, Ryan K C; Robinson, Wendy P; von Dadelszen, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Previously we showed that extravillous cytotrophoblast (EVT) outgrowth and migration on a collagen gel explant model were affected by exposure to decidual natural killer cells (dNK). This study investigates the molecular causes behind this phenomenon. Genome wide DNA methylation of exposed and unexposed EVT was assessed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array (450 K array). We identified 444 differentially methylated CpG loci in dNK-treated EVT compared with medium control (P EVT. Among these genes, CLDN4 (encoding claudin-4) and FUT4 (encoding fucosyltransferase IV) were chosen for follow-up studies because of their biological relevance from research on tumor cells. The results showed that the mRNA and protein expressions of both CLDN4 and FUT4 in dNK-treated EVT were significantly reduced compared with control (P EVT mobility at least partially in association with an alteration of DNA methylation profile. Hypermethylation of CLDN4 and FUT4 reduces protein expression. CLDN4 and FUT4 are representative genes that participate in modulating trophoblast mobility. PMID:25697377

  19. Neonatal Phosphate Nutrition Alters in Vivo and in Vitro Satellite Cell Activity in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad H. Stahl

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Satellite cell activity is necessary for postnatal skeletal muscle growth. Severe phosphate (PO4 deficiency can alter satellite cell activity, however the role of neonatal PO4 nutrition on satellite cell biology remains obscure. Twenty-one piglets (1 day of age, 1.8 ± 0.2 kg BW were pair-fed liquid diets that were either PO4 adequate (0.9% total P, supra-adequate (1.2% total P in PO4 requirement or deficient (0.7% total P in PO4 content for 12 days. Body weight was recorded daily and blood samples collected every 6 days. At day 12, pigs were orally dosed with BrdU and 12 h later, satellite cells were isolated. Satellite cells were also cultured in vitro for 7 days to determine if PO4 nutrition alters their ability to proceed through their myogenic lineage. Dietary PO4 deficiency resulted in reduced (P < 0.05 sera PO4 and parathyroid hormone (PTH concentrations, while supra-adequate dietary PO4 improved (P < 0.05 feed conversion efficiency as compared to the PO4 adequate group. In vivo satellite cell proliferation was reduced (P < 0.05 among the PO4 deficient pigs, and these cells had altered in vitro expression of markers of myogenic progression. Further work to better understand early nutritional programming of satellite cells and the potential benefits of emphasizing early PO4 nutrition for future lean growth potential is warranted.

  20. Chitobiase activity as an indicator of altered survival, growth and reproduction in Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna (Crustacea: Cladocera) exposed to spinosad and diflubenzuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchet, Claire; Mitie Inafuku, Marília; Caquet, Thierry; Larroque, Michel; Franquet, Evelyne; Lagneau, Christophe; Lagadic, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Chitobiase is involved in exoskeleton degradation and recycling during the moulting process in arthropods. In aquatic species, the moulting fluid is released into the aqueous environment, and chitobiase activity present therein can be used to follow the dynamics of arthropod populations. Here, chitobiase activity was used for monitoring the impact of mosquito candidate larvicides on Daphnia pulex and Daphnia magna under laboratory conditions. Both species were exposed to spinosad (2, 4, 8 μg L(-1)) and diflubenzuron (0.2, 0.4, 0.8 μg L(-1)) for 14 days. Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti; 0.25, 0.5, 1 μL L(-1)) was used as the reference larvicide. Chitobiase activity, adult survival, individual growth and fecundity, expressed as the number of neonates produced, were measured every 2 days. Average Exposure Concentrations of spinosad were ten-fold lower than the nominal concentrations, whereas only a slight deviation was observed for diflubenzuron. In contrast to Bti, spinosad and diflubenzuron significantly affected both species in terms of adult survival, and production of neonates. As compared to D. pulex, D. magna was more severely affected by diflubenzuron, at low and medium concentrations, with reduced adult growth and much lower chitobiase activity. Chitobiase activity was positively correlated with the individual body length, number of neonates produced between two consecutive observation dates, and number of females and neonates. In addition, the significant positive correlations between chitobiase activity measured on the last sampling date before the first emission of neonates and the cumulative number of neonates produced during the whole observation period strongly support the potential of the activity of this chitinolytic enzyme as a proxy for assessing the dynamics of arthropod populations exposed to larvicides used for mosquito control.

  1. Increased L-CPT-1 activity and altered gene expression in pancreatic islets of malnourished adult rats: a possible relationship between elevated free fatty acid levels and impaired insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros Reis, Marise Auxiliadora; Arantes, Vanessa Cristina; Cunha, Daniel Andrade; Latorraca, Márcia Queiroz; Toyama, Marcos Hikari; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães; Boschero, Antonio Carlos

    2008-02-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction is associated with chronically elevated levels of serum fatty acids and reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Lipid metabolism in pancreatic beta cells is critical for the regulation of insulin secretion, and the chronic exposure to fatty acids results in higher palmitate oxidation rates and an altered insulin response to glucose. Using a rat model of isocaloric protein restriction, we examined whether pre- and postnatal protein malnutrition influences the properties of pancreatic islet carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (liver isoform, L-CPT-1), a rate-limiting enzyme that regulates fatty acid oxidation in mitochondria. The activity of L-CPT-1 in pancreatic islets increased in the low protein (LP), although the L-CPT-1 mRNA levels were unaffected by malnutrition. The susceptibility of enzyme to inhibition by malonyl-CoA was unaltered and the content of malonyl-CoA was reduced in LP cells. Because the mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids is related to the altered expression of a number of genes encoding proteins involved in insulin secretion, the levels of expression of insulin and GLUT-2 mRNA were assessed. A reduced expression of both genes was observed in malnourished rats. These results provide further evidence that increased L-CPT-1 activity and changes in gene expression in pancreatic islets may be involved in the reduced insulin secretion seen in malnourished rats. PMID:17531461

  2. CYP2C19*17 increases clopidogrel-mediated platelet inhibition but does not alter the pharmacokinetics of the active metabolite of clopidogrel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Steen; Nielsen, Flemming; Stage, Tore Bjerregaard;

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of CYP2C19*17 on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the active metabolite of clopidogrel and the pharmacokinetics of proguanil. Thus, we conducted an open-label two-phase cross-over study in 31 healthy male volunteers (11 CYP2C19......*1/*1, 11 CYP2C19*1/*17 and nine CYP2C19*17/*17). In Phase A, the pharmacokinetics of the derivatized active metabolite of clopidogrel (CAMD) and platelet function were determined after administration of a single oral dose of 600 mg clopidogrel (Plavix; Sanofi-Avensis, Horsholm, Denmark). In Phase B...... or higher exposure to the active metabolite after a single oral administration of 600 mg clopidogrel....

  3. Replacement of the C-terminal tetrapeptide (314PAPV317 to 314SSSM317) in interferon regulatory factor-2 alters its N-terminal DNA-binding activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishna Prakash; Pramod C Rath

    2010-12-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-2 (IRF-2) is an important transcription factor involved in cell growth regulation, immune response and cancer. IRF-2 can function as a transcriptional repressor and activator depending on its DNA-binding activity and protein–protein interactions. We compared the amino acid sequences of IRF-2 and found a C-terminal tetrapeptide (314PAPV317) of mouse IRF-2 to be different (314SSSM317) from human IRF-2. Recombinant GST-IRF-2 with 314PAPV317 (wild type) and 314SSSM317 (mutant) expressed in Escherichia coli were assessed for DNA-binding activity with 32P-(GAAAGT)4 by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Wild type- and mutant GST-IRF-2 showed similar expression patterns and immunoreactivities but different DNA-binding activities. Mutant (mt) IRF-2 formed higher-molecular-mass, more and stronger DNA–protein complexes in comparison to wild type (wt) IRF-2. Anti-IRF-2 antibody stabilized the DNA–protein complexes formed by both wt IRF-2 and mt IRF-2, resolving the differences. This suggests that PAPV and SSSM sequences at 314-317 in the C-terminal region of mouse and human IRF-2 contribute to conformation of IRF-2 and influence DNA-binding activity of the N-terminal region, indicating intramolecular interactions. Thus, evolution of IRF-2 from murine to human genome has resulted in subtle differences in C-terminal amino acid motifs, which may contribute to qualitative changes in IRF-2-dependent DNA-binding activity and gene expression.

  4. Reduction of liver function delays resumption of postpartum ovarian activity and alters the synthesis of acute phase proteins in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagner, Paula; Krause, Ana Rita Tavares; Schwegler, Elizabeth; Weschenfelder, Marina Menoncin; Rabassa, Viviane Rohrig; Schneider, Augusto; Pereira, Rubens Alves; Brauner, Cássio Cassal; Del Pino, Francisco Augusto Burkert; Gonçalves, Fernanda Medeiros; Corrêa, Marcio Nunes

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentration of acute phase proteins, milk production, and resumption of postpartum ovarian activity of clinically healthy dairy cows in a semi-extensive system with different Liver Functionality Index (LFI) values. The animals were divided into two groups: Low LFI (LLFI: -7 to -12; n: 10) and High LFI (HLFI: -7 to -4; n: 10). Animals with LLFI had lower paraoxonase activity and lower albumin concentration in the pre- and postpartum periods (Pacute phase proteins and the first ovulation interval, and it can be used to improve the production and reproductive performance. PMID:27234541

  5. Age-related learning and memory deficits in rats: role of altered brain neurotransmitters, acetylcholinesterase activity and changes in antioxidant defense system

    OpenAIRE

    Haider, Saida; Saleem, Sadia; Perveen, Tahira; Tabassum, Saiqa; Batool, Zehra; Sadir, Sadia; Liaquat, Laraib; Madiha, Syeda

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress from generation of increased reactive oxygen species or free radicals of oxygen has been reported to play an important role in the aging. To investigate the relationship between the oxidative stress and memory decline during aging, we have determined the level of lipid peroxidation, activities of antioxidant enzymes, and activity of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) in brain and plasma as well as biogenic amine levels in brain from Albino–Wistar rats at age of 4 and 24 months. Th...

  6. Inactivation of thioredoxin f1 leads to decreased light activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and altered diurnal starch turnover in leaves of Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormählen, Ina; Ruber, Joachim; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Ehrlich, Sven-Matthias; Massot, Vincent; Hümmer, Christine; Tezycka, Justyna; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Geigenberger, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplast thioredoxin f (Trx f) is an important regulator of primary metabolic enzymes. However, genetic evidence for its physiological importance is largely lacking. To test the functional significance of Trx f in vivo, Arabidopsis mutants with insertions in the trx f1 gene were studied, showing a drastic decrease in Trx f leaf content. Knockout of Trx f1 led to strong attenuation in reductive light activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), the key enzyme of starch synthesis, in leaves during the day and in isolated chloroplasts, while sucrose-dependent redox activation of AGPase in darkened leaves was not affected. The decrease in light-activation of AGPase in leaves was accompanied by a decrease in starch accumulation, an increase in sucrose levels and a decrease in starch-to-sucrose ratio. Analysis of metabolite levels at the end of day shows that inhibition of starch synthesis was unlikely due to shortage of substrates or changes in allosteric effectors. Metabolite profiling by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry pinpoints only a small number of metabolites affected, including sugars, organic acids and ethanolamine. Interestingly, metabolite data indicate carbon shortage in trx f1 mutant leaves at the end of night. Overall, results provide in planta evidence for the role played by Trx f in the light activation of AGPase and photosynthetic carbon partitioning in plants.

  7. Altered modulation of prefrontal and subcortical brain activity in newly diagnosed schizophrenia and schizophreniform disorder. A regional cerebral blood flow study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, P; Holm, S; Friberg, L;

    1991-01-01

    To measure prefrontal and subcortical activity during a cognitive task, we examined 19 newly diagnosed schizophrenics and patients with schizophreniform psychosis. Seven healthy volunteers served as controls. The patients were drug naive or had received neuroleptics for a few days only. Cerebral...

  8. The cellular distribution of extracellular superoxide dismutase in macrophages is altered by cellular activation but unaffected by the natural occurring R213G substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfredsen, Randi Heidemann; Goldstrohm, David; Hartney, John;

    2014-01-01

    and associated with the cell surface via the extracellular matrix (ECM)-binding region. Upon cellular activation induced by lipopolysaccharide, EC-SOD is relocated and detected both in the cell culture medium and in lipid raft structures. Although the secreted material presented a significantly reduced ligand...

  9. Defective jejunal and colonic salt absorption and alteredNa +/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3) activity in NHE regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) adaptor protein-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Broere (Nellie); M. Chen (Min); A. Cinar (Ayhan); A.K. Singh (Arbind); J. Hillesheim (Jutta); B. Riederer (Beat Michel); M. Lunnemann; I. Rottinghaus (Ingrid); A. Krabbenhöft (Anja); R. Engelhardt (Regina); B. Rausch; E.J. Weinman (Edward); M. Donowitz (Mark); A. Hubbard; O. Kocher (Olivier); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo); B.M. Hogema (Boris); U. Seidler (Ursula)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe investigated the role of the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) on intestinal salt and water absorption, brush border membrane (BBM) morphology, and on the NHE3 mRNA expression, protein abundance, and transport activity in the murine intestine. NHERF1-deficient mice display

  10. Kinetics of wheat straw solid-state fermentation with Trametes versicolor and Pleurotus ostreatus - lignin and polysaccharide alteration and production of related enzymatic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valmaseda, M.; Martinez, M.J.; Martinez, A.T. (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain). Centro des Investigaciones Biologicas)

    1991-09-01

    The kinetics of straw solid-state fermentation (SSF) with Trametes versicolor and Pleurotus ostreatus was investigated to characterize the delignification processes by these white-rot fungi. Two sucessive phases could be defined during straw transformation, characterized by changes in respiratory activity, changes in lignin and polysaccharide content and composition, increase in in-vitro digestibility, and enzymatic activities produced by the fungi. Lignin composition was analysed after CuO alkaline degradation, and decreases in syringyl/guaiacyl and syringyl/p-hydroxyphenyl ratios and cinnamic acid content were observed during the fungal treatment. An increase in the phenolic acid yield, revealing fungal degradation of sidechains in lignin, was produced by P. ostreatus. The highest xylanase level was produced by P. ostreatus, and exocellulase activity was nearly absent from straw treated with this fungus. Laccase activity was found in straw treated with both fungi, but lignin peroxidase was only detected during the initial phase of straw transformation with T. versicolor. High levels of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-producing acryl-alcohol oxidase occurred throughout the straw SSF with P. ostreatus. (orig.).

  11. Activation-induced spatiotemporal cerebral blood flow changes and behavioral deficit after developmental mTBI in rats can be favorably altered by facilitating mitochondrial calcium uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuvika eMurugan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI leads to secondary neuronal loss via excitotoxic mechanisms, including mitochondrial Ca2+ overload. However in the surviving cellular population, mitochondrial Ca2+ influx and oxidative metabolism are diminished leading to suboptimal neuronal circuit activity and poor prognosis. Hence we tested the impact of boosting neuronal electrical activity and oxidative metabolism by facilitating mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in a rat model of mTBI. In developing rats (P25-P26 sustaining an mTBI, we demonstrate post-traumatic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF in the sensorimotor cortex in response to whisker stimulation compared to sham using functional Laser Doppler Imaging (fLDI at adulthood (P67-P73. Compared to sham, whisker stimulation-evoked positive CBF responses decreased while negative CBF responses increased in the mTBI animals. The spatiotemporal CBF changes representing underlying neuronal activity suggested profound changes to neurovascular activity after mTBI. Behavioral assessment of the same cohort of animals prior to fLDI showed that mTBI resulted in persistent contralateral sensorimotor behavioral deficit along with ipsilateral neuronal loss compared to sham. Treating mTBI rats with Kaempferol, a dietary flavonol compound that enhanced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, eliminated the inter-hemispheric asymmetry in the whisker stimulation-induced positive CBF responses and the ipsilateral negative CBF responses otherwise observed in the untreated and vehicle-treated mTBI animals in adulthood. Kaempferol also improved somatosensory behavioral measures compared to untreated and vehicle treated mTBI animals without augmenting post-injury neuronal loss. The results indicate that reduced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in the surviving populations affect post-traumatic neural activation leading to persistent behavioral deficits. Improvement in sensorimotor behavior and spatiotemporal neurovascular activity

  12. Hippocampal network activity is transiently altered by induction of long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus of freely behaving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Bikbaev

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A role for oscillatory activity in hippocampal neuronal networks has been proposed in sensory encoding, cognitive functions and synaptic plasticity. In the hippocampus, theta (5–10 Hz and gamma (30–100 Hz oscillations may provide a mechanism for temporal encoding of information, and the basis for formation and retrieval of memory traces. Long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic transmission, a candidate cellular model of synaptic information storage, is typically induced by high-frequency tetanisation (HFT of afferent pathways. Taking into account the role of oscillatory activity in the processing of information, dynamic changes may occur in hippocampal network activity in the period during HFT and/or soon after it. These changes in rhythmic activity may determine or, at least, contribute to successful potentiation and, in general, to formation of memory. We have found that short-term potentiation (STP and LTP as well LTPfailure are characterised with different profiles of changes in theta and gamma frequencies. Potentiation of synaptic transmission was associated with a significant increase in the relative theta power and mean amplitude of theta cycles in the period encompassing 300 seconds after HFT. Where LTP or STP, but not failure of potentiation, occurred, this facilitation of theta was accompanied by transient increases in gamma power and in the mean amplitude of gamma oscillations within a single theta cycle. Our data support that specific, correlated changes in these parameters are associated with successful synaptic potentiation. These findings suggest that changes in theta-gamma activity associated with induction of LTP may enable synaptic information storage in the hippocampus.

  13. Furanodiene presents synergistic anti-proliferative activity with paclitaxel via altering cell cycle and integrin signaling in 95-D lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen-Shan; Dang, Yuan-Ye; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Lu, Jin-Jian; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2014-02-01

    Furanodiene (FUR) is a natural terpenoid isolated from Rhizoma Curcumae, a well-known Chinese medicinal herb that presents anti-proliferative activities in several cancer cell lines. Recently, we found that the combined treatment of FUR with paclitaxel (TAX) showed synergetic anti-proliferative activities in 95-D lung cancer cells. Herein, we showed that FUR reduced the cell numbers distributed in mitosis phase induced by TAX while increased those in G1 phase. The protein levels of cyclin D1, cyclin B1, CDK6 and c-Myc were all down-regulated in the group of combined treatment. The dramatically down-regulated expression of integrin β4, focal adhesion kinase and paxillin might partially contribute to the synergic effect. Though FUR alone obviously induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, this signaling pathway may not contribute to the synergetic anti-proliferative effect as the protein expression of CHOP and BIP was similar in FUR alone and combined treatment group.

  14. Variants in the DYX2 locus are associated with altered brain activation in reading-related brain regions in subjects with reading disability

    OpenAIRE

    Cope, Natalie; Eicher, John D.; Meng, Haiying; Gibson, Christopher J.; Hager, Karl; Lacadie, Cheryl; Fulbright, Robert K.; Constable, R. Todd; Page, Grier P.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Reading disability (RD) is a complex genetic disorder with unknown etiology. Genes on chromosome 6p22, including DCDC2, KIAA0319, and TTRAP, have been identified as RD associated genes. Imaging studies have shown both functional and structural differences between brains of individuals with and without RD. There are limited association studies performed between RD genes, specifically genes on 6p22, and regional brain activation during reading tasks. Using fourteen variants in DCDC2, KIAA0319, ...

  15. Altered Gene Expression in the Schistosome-Transmitting Snail Biomphalaria glabrata following Exposure to Niclosamide, the Active Ingredient in the Widely Used Molluscicide Bayluscide

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Si-Ming; Buddenborg, Sarah K; Adema, Coen M.; Sullivan, John T.; Loker, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    In view of the call by the World Health Organization (WHO) for elimination of schistosomiasis as a public health problem by 2025, use of molluscicides in snail control to supplement chemotherapy–based control efforts is likely to increase in the coming years. The mechanisms of action of niclosamide, the active ingredient in the most widely used molluscicides, remain largely unknown. A better understanding of its toxicology at the molecular level will both improve our knowledge of snail biolog...

  16. Genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease alters the five-year trajectory of semantic memory activation in cognitively intact elders

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Stephen M.; Bonner-Jackson, Aaron; Nielson, Kristy A.; Seidenberg, Michael; Smith, J. Carson; Woodard, John L.; Durgerian, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Healthy aging is associated with cognitive declines typically accompanied by increased task-related brain activity in comparison to younger counterparts. The Scaffolding Theory of Aging and Cognition (STAC) (Park and Reuter-Lorenz, 2009; Reuter-Lorenz and Park, 2014) posits that compensatory brain processes are responsible for maintaining normal cognitive performance in older adults, despite accumulation of aging-related neural damage. Cross-sectional studies indicate that cognitively intact ...

  17. Source-based neurofeedback methods using EEG recordings: training altered brain activity in a functional brain source derived from blind source separation

    OpenAIRE

    David James White; Marco eCongedo; Joseph eCiorciari

    2014-01-01

    International audience A developing literature explores the use of neurofeedback in the treatment of a range of clinical conditions, particularly ADHD and epilepsy, whilst neurofeedback also provides an experimental tool for studying the functional significance of endogenous brain activity. A critical component of any neurofeedback method is the underlying physiological signal which forms the basis for the feedback. While the past decade has seen the emergence of fMRI-based protocols train...

  18. Histamine activates p38 MAP kinase and alters local lamellipodia dynamics, reducing endothelial barrier integrity and eliciting central movement of actin fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adderley, Shaquria P; Lawrence, Curtis; Madonia, Eyong; Olubadewo, Joseph O; Breslin, Jerome W

    2015-07-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in endothelial barrier function has been debated for nearly four decades. Our previous investigation revealed spontaneous local lamellipodia in confluent endothelial monolayers that appear to increase overlap at intercellular junctions. We tested the hypothesis that the barrier-disrupting agent histamine would reduce local lamellipodia protrusions and investigated the potential involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation and actin stress fiber formation. Confluent monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) expressing green fluorescent protein-actin were studied using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The protrusion and withdrawal characteristics of local lamellipodia were assessed before and after addition of histamine. Changes in barrier function were determined using electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing. Histamine initially decreased barrier function, lamellipodia protrusion frequency, and lamellipodia protrusion distance. A longer time for lamellipodia withdrawal and reduced withdrawal distance and velocity accompanied barrier recovery. After barrier recovery, a significant number of cortical fibers migrated centrally, eventually resembling actin stress fibers. The p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 attenuated the histamine-induced decreases in barrier function and lamellipodia protrusion frequency. SB203580 also inhibited the histamine-induced decreases in withdrawal distance and velocity, and the subsequent actin fiber migration. These data suggest that histamine can reduce local lamellipodia protrusion activity through activation of p38 MAP kinase. The findings also suggest that local lamellipodia have a role in maintaining endothelial barrier integrity. Furthermore, we provide evidence that actin stress fiber formation may be a reaction to, rather than a cause of, reduced endothelial barrier integrity. PMID:25948734

  19. The effect of altered temperature on Ca2(+)-sensitive force in permeabilized myocardium and skeletal muscle. Evidence for force dependence of thin filament activation

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The effect of changes in temperature on the calcium sensitivity of tension development was examined in permeabilized cellular preparations of rat ventricle and rabbit psoas muscle. Maximum force and Ca2+ sensitivity of force development increased with temperature in both muscle types. Cardiac muscle was more sensitive to changes in temperature than skeletal muscle in the range 10-15 degrees C. It was postulated that the level of thin filament activation may be decreased by cooling. To investi...

  20. LXR activation by GW3965 alters fat tissue distribution and adipose tissue inflammation in ob/ob female mice[S

    OpenAIRE

    Archer, Amena; Stolarczyk, Émilie; Doria, Maria Luisa; Helguero, Luisa; Domingues, Rosário; Howard, Jane K; Mode, Agneta; Korach-André, Marion; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the role of liver X receptor (LXR) in adipose tissue metabolism during obesity, ob/ob mice were treated for 5 weeks with the synthetic LXR agonist GW3965. MRI analysis revealed that pharmacological activation of LXR modified fat distribution by decreasing visceral (VS) fat and inversely increasing subcutaneous (SC) fat storage without affecting whole body fat content. This was concordant with opposite regulation by GW3965 of the lipolytic markers hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) ...

  1. A novel familial mutation in the PCSK1 gene that alters the oxyanion hole residue of proprotein convertase 1/3 and impairs its enzymatic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wilschanski

    Full Text Available Four siblings presented with congenital diarrhea and various endocrinopathies. Exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping identified five regions, comprising 337 protein-coding genes that were shared by three affected siblings. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous N309K mutation in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 (PCSK1 gene, encoding the neuroendocrine convertase 1 precursor (PC1/3 which was recently reported as a cause of Congenital Diarrhea Disorder (CDD. The PCSK1 mutation affected the oxyanion hole transition state-stabilizing amino acid within the active site, which is critical for appropriate proprotein maturation and enzyme activity. Unexpectedly, the N309K mutant protein exhibited normal, though slowed, prodomain removal and was secreted from both HEK293 and Neuro2A cells. However, the secreted enzyme showed no catalytic activity, and was not processed into the 66 kDa form. We conclude that the N309K enzyme is able to cleave its own propeptide but is catalytically inert against in trans substrates, and that this variant accounts for the enteric and systemic endocrinopathies seen in this large consanguineous kindred.

  2. Loss of the Coffin-Lowry syndrome-associated gene RSK2 alters ERK activity, synaptic function and axonal transport in Drosophila motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Katherina; Ehmann, Nadine; Andlauer, Till F M; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Strecker, Katrin; Fischer, Matthias; Kittel, Robert J; Raabe, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Plastic changes in synaptic properties are considered as fundamental for adaptive behaviors. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated signaling has been implicated in regulation of synaptic plasticity. Ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (RSK2) acts as a regulator and downstream effector of ERK. In the brain, RSK2 is predominantly expressed in regions required for learning and memory. Loss-of-function mutations in human RSK2 cause Coffin-Lowry syndrome, which is characterized by severe mental retardation and low IQ scores in affected males. Knockout of RSK2 in mice or the RSK ortholog in Drosophila results in a variety of learning and memory defects. However, overall brain structure in these animals is not affected, leaving open the question of the pathophysiological consequences. Using the fly neuromuscular system as a model for excitatory glutamatergic synapses, we show that removal of RSK function causes distinct defects in motoneurons and at the neuromuscular junction. Based on histochemical and electrophysiological analyses, we conclude that RSK is required for normal synaptic morphology and function. Furthermore, loss of RSK function interferes with ERK signaling at different levels. Elevated ERK activity was evident in the somata of motoneurons, whereas decreased ERK activity was observed in axons and the presynapse. In addition, we uncovered a novel function of RSK in anterograde axonal transport. Our results emphasize the importance of fine-tuning ERK activity in neuronal processes underlying higher brain functions. In this context, RSK acts as a modulator of ERK signaling.

  3. Loss of the Coffin-Lowry syndrome-associated gene RSK2 alters ERK activity, synaptic function and axonal transport in Drosophila motoneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherina Beck

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plastic changes in synaptic properties are considered as fundamental for adaptive behaviors. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK-mediated signaling has been implicated in regulation of synaptic plasticity. Ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (RSK2 acts as a regulator and downstream effector of ERK. In the brain, RSK2 is predominantly expressed in regions required for learning and memory. Loss-of-function mutations in human RSK2 cause Coffin-Lowry syndrome, which is characterized by severe mental retardation and low IQ scores in affected males. Knockout of RSK2 in mice or the RSK ortholog in Drosophila results in a variety of learning and memory defects. However, overall brain structure in these animals is not affected, leaving open the question of the pathophysiological consequences. Using the fly neuromuscular system as a model for excitatory glutamatergic synapses, we show that removal of RSK function causes distinct defects in motoneurons and at the neuromuscular junction. Based on histochemical and electrophysiological analyses, we conclude that RSK is required for normal synaptic morphology and function. Furthermore, loss of RSK function interferes with ERK signaling at different levels. Elevated ERK activity was evident in the somata of motoneurons, whereas decreased ERK activity was observed in axons and the presynapse. In addition, we uncovered a novel function of RSK in anterograde axonal transport. Our results emphasize the importance of fine-tuning ERK activity in neuronal processes underlying higher brain functions. In this context, RSK acts as a modulator of ERK signaling.

  4. Hyperthermia-induced seizures alter adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity in rat cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Navarro, David Agustín; Albasanz, José L; Martín, Mairena

    2015-08-01

    Febrile seizure is one of the most common convulsive disorders in children. The neuromodulator adenosine exerts anticonvulsant actions through binding adenosine receptors. Here, the impact of hyperthermia-induced seizures on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity has been studied at different periods in the cerebral cortical area by using radioligand binding, real-time PCR, and 5'-nucleotidase activity assays. Hyperthermic seizures were induced in 13-day-old rats using a warmed air stream from a hair dryer. Neonates exhibited rearing and falling over associated with hindlimb clonus seizures (stage 5 on Racine scale criteria) after hyperthermic induction. A significant increase in A1 receptor density was observed using [(3) H]DPCPX as radioligand, and mRNA coding A1 was observed 48 h after hyperthermia-induced seizures. In contrast, a significant decrease in A2A receptor density was detected, using [(3) H]ZM241385 as radioligand, 48 h after hyperthermia-evoked convulsions. These short-term changes in A1 and A2A receptors were also accompanied by a loss of 5'-nucleotidase activity. No significant variations either in A1 or A2A receptor density or 5'-nucleotidase were observed 5 and 20 days after hyperthermic seizures. Taken together, both regulation of A1 and A2A receptors and loss of 5'-nucleotidase in the cerebral cortex suggest the existence of a neuroprotective mechanism against seizures. Febrile seizure is one of the most common convulsive disorders in children. The consequences of hyperthermia-induced seizures (animal model of febrile seizures) on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity have been studied at different periods in cerebral cortical area. A significant increase in A1 receptor density and mRNA coding A1 was observed 48 h after hyperthermia-induced seizures. In contrast, a significant decrease in A2A receptor density and 5'-nucleotidase activity was detected 48 h after convulsions evoked by hyperthermia

  5. Iceland as a Model for Chemical Alteration on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Schiffman, P.; Murad, E.; Southard, R.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Subglacial volcanic activity on Iceland has led to the formation of a variety of silicate and iron oxide-rich alteration products that may serve as a model for chemical alteration on Mars. Multiple palagonitic tuffs, altered pillow lavas, hydrothermal springs and alteration at glacial run-off streams were observed during a recent field trip in Iceland. Formation of alteration products and ferrihydrite in similar environments on Mars may have contributed to the ferric oxide-rich surface material there. The spectral and chemical properties of Icelandic alteration products and ferrihydrites are presented here.

  6. Doxorubicin in vivo rapidly alters expression and translation of myocardial electron transport chain genes, leads to ATP loss and caspase 3 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy V Pointon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Doxorubicin is one of the most effective anti-cancer drugs but its use is limited by cumulative cardiotoxicity that restricts lifetime dose. Redox damage is one of the most accepted mechanisms of toxicity, but not fully substantiated. Moreover doxorubicin is not an efficient redox cycling compound due to its low redox potential. Here we used genomic and chemical systems approaches in vivo to investigate the mechanisms of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity, and specifically test the hypothesis of redox cycling mediated cardiotoxicity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were treated with an acute dose of either doxorubicin (DOX (15 mg/kg or 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ (25 mg/kg. DMNQ is a more efficient redox cycling agent than DOX but unlike DOX has limited ability to inhibit gene transcription and DNA replication. This allowed specific testing of the redox hypothesis for cardiotoxicity. An acute dose was used to avoid pathophysiological effects in the genomic analysis. However similar data were obtained with a chronic model, but are not specifically presented. All data are deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO. Pathway and biochemical analysis of cardiac global gene transcription and mRNA translation data derived at time points from 5 min after an acute exposure in vivo showed a pronounced effect on electron transport chain activity. This led to loss of ATP, increased AMPK expression, mitochondrial genome amplification and activation of caspase 3. No data gathered with either compound indicated general redox damage, though site specific redox damage in mitochondria cannot be entirely discounted. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate the major mechanism of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity is via damage or inhibition of the electron transport chain and not general redox stress. There is a rapid response at transcriptional and translational level of many of the genes coding for proteins of the electron transport chain

  7. Chemical inhibition of potato ABA-8'-hydroxylase activity alters in vitro and in vivo ABA metabolism and endogenous ABA levels but does not affect potato microtuber dormancy duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttle, Jeffrey C; Abrams, Suzanne R; De Stefano-Beltrán, Luis; Huckle, Linda L

    2012-09-01

    The effects of azole-type P450 inhibitors and two metabolism-resistant abscisic acid (ABA) analogues on in vitro ABA-8'-hydroxylase activity, in planta ABA metabolism, endogenous ABA content, and tuber meristem dormancy duration were examined in potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Russet Burbank). When functionally expressed in yeast, three potato CYP707A genes were demonstrated to encode enzymatically active ABA-8'-hydroxylases with micromolar affinities for (+)-ABA. The in vitro activity of the three enzymes was inhibited by the P450 azole-type inhibitors ancymidol, paclobutrazol, diniconazole, and tetcyclasis, and by the 8'-acetylene- and 8'-methylene-ABA analogues, with diniconazole and tetcyclasis being the most potent inhibitors. The in planta metabolism of [(3)H](±)-ABA to phaseic acid and dihydrophaseic acid in tuber meristems was inhibited by diniconazole, tetcyclasis, and to a lesser extent by 8'-acetylene- and 8'-methylene-ABA. Continuous exposure of in vitro generated microtubers to diniconazole resulted in a 2-fold increase in endogenous ABA content and a decline in dihydrophaseic acid content after 9 weeks of development. Similar treatment with 8'-acetylene-ABA had no effects on the endogenous contents of ABA or phaseic acid but reduced the content of dihydrophaseic acid. Tuber meristem dormancy progression was determined ex vitro in control, diniconazole-, and 8'-acetylene-ABA-treated microtubers following harvest. Continuous exposure to diniconazole during microtuber development had no effects on subsequent sprouting at any time point. Continuous exposure to 8'-acetylene-ABA significantly increased the rate of microtuber sprouting. The results indicate that, although a decrease in ABA content is a hallmark of tuber dormancy progression, the decline in ABA levels is not a prerequisite for dormancy exit and the onset of tuber sprouting. PMID:22664582

  8. Altered mRNA cap recognition activity of initiation factor 4E in the yeast cell cycle division mutant cdc33.

    OpenAIRE

    Altmann, M; Trachsel, H

    1989-01-01

    The mutation in the S. cerevisiae cell cycle division mutant cdc33 consists of a single G to A transition in the open reading frame encoding translation initiation factor 4E (eIF-4E). This leads to the substitution of glycine 113 by aspartic acid close to tryptophane 115 in the protein. This mutation reduces cap binding activity of eIF-4E as measured by binding of eIF-4E to m7GDP agarose columns and slows down overall protein synthesis at the non-permissive temperature. Comparison of the cdc3...

  9. Alteration of insulin content in thermal and combined radiation-thermal burns and the insulin modulating activity of blood medium-weight molecular peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of thermal and combined radiation thermal burns on insulin content in blood plasma was studied in mice irradiated with 137Cs in 3.4 Gy. Insulin content in blood plasma of experimental animals and patients with thermal burns was determined with the help of radioimmune method. The insulin modulating activity of bolld medium-weight molecular peptides wqas considered. The investigations conducted showed that with the severity of burn in the period of toxemia the level of immunoreactive insulin and medium-weight molecular peptides increased

  10. Studies on the alterations in haematological indices, micronuclei induction and pathological marker enzyme activities in Channa punctatus (spotted snakehead) perciformes, channidae exposed to thermal power plant effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Javed, Mehjbeen; Ahmad, Irshad; Ahmad, Ajaz; Usmani, Nazura; Ahmad, Masood

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the toxicity of thermal power plant effluent containing heavy metals (Fe > Cu > Zn > Mn > Ni > Co > Cr) on haematological indices, micronuclei, lobed nuclei and activity of pathological marker enzymes [alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate transferase (AST), alanine transferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK)] in Channa punctatus. Total erythrocyte count (−54.52 %), hemoglobin (−36.98 %), packed cell volume (−36.25 %), mean corpuscular hemoglobin conce...

  11. Inhibition of GSK-3β activity can result in drug and hormonal resistance and alter sensitivity to targeted therapy in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolosky, Melissa; Chappell, William H.; Stadelman, Kristin; Abrams, Stephen L.; Davis, Nicole M.; Steelman, Linda S.; McCubrey, James A.

    2014-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 pathway plays prominent roles in malignant transformation, prevention of apoptosis, drug resistance, and metastasis. One molecule regulated by this pathway is GSK-3β. GSK-3β is phosphorylated by Akt on S9, which leads to its inactivation; however, GSK-3β also can regulate the activity of the PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 pathway by phosphorylating molecules such as PTEN, TSC2, p70S6K, and 4E-BP1. To further elucidate the roles of GSK-3β in chemotherapeutic drug and hormonal resistance o...

  12. Salt stress induced lipid accumulation in heterotrophic culture cells of Chlorella protothecoides: Mechanisms based on the multi-level analysis of oxidative response, key enzyme activity and biochemical alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Ge, Haiyan; Liu, Tingting; Tian, Xiwei; Wang, Zejian; Guo, Meijin; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping

    2016-06-20

    Salt stress as an effective stress factor that could improve the lipid content and lipid yield of glucose in the heterotrophic culture cells of Chlorella protothecoides was demonstrated in this study. The highest lipid content of 41.2% and lipid yield of 185.8mg/g were obtained when C. protothecoides was stressed under 30g/L NaCl condition at its late logarithmic growth phase. Moreover, the effects of salt and osmotic stress on lipid accumulation were comparatively analyzed, and it was found that the effects of NaCl and KCl stress had no significant differences at the same osmolarity level of 1150mOsm/kg with lipid contents of 41.7 and 40.8% as well as lipid yields of 192.9 and 186.8mg/g, respectively, whereas these results were obviously higher than those obtained under the iso-osmotic glycerol and sorbitol stresses. Furthermore, basing on the multi-level analysis of oxidative response, key enzyme activity and biochemical alteration, the superior performance of salt stress driving lipid over-synthesis was probably ascribed to the more ROS production as a result of additional ion effect besides the osmotic effect, subsequently mediating the alteration from carbohydrate storage to lipid accumulation in signal transduction process of C. protothecoides. PMID:27085889

  13. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Sakurai, Takeshi, E-mail: tsakurai@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  14. Studies on the alterations in haematological indices, micronuclei induction and pathological marker enzyme activities in Channa punctatus (spotted snakehead) perciformes, channidae exposed to thermal power plant effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Mehjbeen; Ahmad, Irshad; Ahmad, Ajaz; Usmani, Nazura; Ahmad, Masood

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the toxicity of thermal power plant effluent containing heavy metals (Fe > Cu > Zn > Mn > Ni > Co > Cr) on haematological indices, micronuclei, lobed nuclei and activity of pathological marker enzymes [alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate transferase (AST), alanine transferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK)] in Channa punctatus. Total erythrocyte count (-54.52 %), hemoglobin (-36.98 %), packed cell volume (-36.25 %), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (-1.41 %) and oxygen (O2) carrying capacity (-37.04 %) declined significantly over reference fish, however total leukocyte count (+25.43 %), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (+33.52 %) and mean corpuscular volume (+35.49 %) showed elevation. High frequency of micronuclei (1133.3 %) and lobed nuclei (150 %) were observed in exposed fish which may indicate mutagenesis. Activities of pathological marker enzymes ALP, AST, ALT and CK increased significantly in serum of exposed fish. The ratio of ALT: AST in exposed fish was beyond 1 which indicates manifestation of pathological processes. These biomarkers show that fish have macrocytic hypochromic anemia. Leukocytosis showed general defence response against heavy metal toxicity and marker enzymes showed tissue degeneration. In conclusion, thermal power plant effluent has strong potential to induce micronuclei, tissue pathology, making the fish anemic, weak, stressed and vulnerable to diseases.

  15. Studies on the alterations in haematological indices, micronuclei induction and pathological marker enzyme activities in Channa punctatus (spotted snakehead) perciformes, channidae exposed to thermal power plant effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Mehjbeen; Ahmad, Irshad; Ahmad, Ajaz; Usmani, Nazura; Ahmad, Masood

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the toxicity of thermal power plant effluent containing heavy metals (Fe > Cu > Zn > Mn > Ni > Co > Cr) on haematological indices, micronuclei, lobed nuclei and activity of pathological marker enzymes [alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate transferase (AST), alanine transferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK)] in Channa punctatus. Total erythrocyte count (-54.52 %), hemoglobin (-36.98 %), packed cell volume (-36.25 %), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (-1.41 %) and oxygen (O2) carrying capacity (-37.04 %) declined significantly over reference fish, however total leukocyte count (+25.43 %), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (+33.52 %) and mean corpuscular volume (+35.49 %) showed elevation. High frequency of micronuclei (1133.3 %) and lobed nuclei (150 %) were observed in exposed fish which may indicate mutagenesis. Activities of pathological marker enzymes ALP, AST, ALT and CK increased significantly in serum of exposed fish. The ratio of ALT: AST in exposed fish was beyond 1 which indicates manifestation of pathological processes. These biomarkers show that fish have macrocytic hypochromic anemia. Leukocytosis showed general defence response against heavy metal toxicity and marker enzymes showed tissue degeneration. In conclusion, thermal power plant effluent has strong potential to induce micronuclei, tissue pathology, making the fish anemic, weak, stressed and vulnerable to diseases. PMID:27386247

  16. Alterations in Co2 fixation enzymes, Phosphatase Activity and Endogenous Phytohormones in P-deficient Callus induced from phloem of carrot (Daccus Carota) Roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A carrot callus liquid medium culture experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of P-deficiency on cellular responses separate from the whole plant response. Carrot (Daccus carota L.) callus was induced from the secondary phloem of the tap root. When explants were supplied with one-tenth the amount of Pi supplied to control explants (40 ppm), the concentration of P in callus was reduced by about 68% in a period of three weeks. This reduction in callus P was correlated with 48% reduction in callus fresh and dry weights. This effect was mediated through a reduction in cell number/callus by 48%. Meanwhile, the cell number/mg f.wt. of callus tissue was not affected in P-deficient treatment comparing to P-sufficient one, which might refer to a direct role of P-deficiency on the reduction of cell division. Although total N and soluble protein concentrations were not affected in P-deficient callus, chlorophyll concentration was reduced. In addition higher activity of acid phosphatase was obtained in P-deficient tissue reaching about 41% over its activity in P-sufficient callus which in turn could increase recycling process of P to spare available P for the newly formed cells. This was supported by the higher value of P utilization efficiency (d.wt. produced per unit P taken up) obtained from P-deficient callus

  17. Altered alkaline phosphatase activity in obese Zucker rats liver respect to lean Zucker and Wistar rats discussed in terms of all putative roles ascribed to the enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bertone

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Biliary complications often lead to acute and chronic liver injury after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. Bile composition and secretion depend on the integrated action of all the components of the biliary tree, starting from hepatocytes. Fatty livers are often discarded as grafts for OLT, since they are extremely vulnerable to conventional cold storage (CS. However, the insufficiency of donors has stimulated research to improve the usage of such marginal organs as well as grafts. Our group has recently developed a machine perfusion system at subnormothermic temperature (20°C; MP20 that allows a marked improvement in preservation of fatty and even of normal rat livers as compared with CS. We sought to evaluate the response of the biliary tree of fatty liver to MP20, and a suitable marker was essential to this purpose. Alkaline phosphatase (AlkP, EC 3.1.3.1, frequently used as marker of membrane transport in hepatocytes and bile ducts, was our first choice. Since no histochemical data were available on AlkP distribution and activity in fatty liver, we have first settled to investigate AlkP activity in the steatotic liver of fatty Zucker rats (fa/fa, using as controls lean Zucker (fa/+ and normal Wistar rats. The AlkP reaction in Wistar rats was in accordance with the existing data and, in particular, was present in bile canaliculi of hepatocytes in the periportal region and midzone, in the canals of Hering and in small bile ducts but not in large bile ducts. In lean ZR liver the AlkP reaction in Hering canals and small bile ducts was similar to Wistar rat liver but hepatocytes had lower canalicular activity and besides presented moderate basolateral reaction. The difference between lean Zucker and Wistar rats, both phenotypically normal animals, could be related to the fact that lean Zucker rats are genotypically heterozygous for a recessive mutated allele. In fatty liver, the activity in ductules and small bile ducts was unchanged, but

  18. Alterations in mitochondrial electron transport system activity in response to warm acclimation, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sappal, Ravinder [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); MacDougald, Michelle [Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Health Sciences Centre, Prince Philip Drive, St. John’s, NL, A1B 3V6 (Canada); Fast, Mark [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Siah, Ahmed [British Columbia Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences, 871A Island Highway, Campbell River, BC, V9W 2C2 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Sequential inhibition and activation allows assessment of multiple segments of the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation have global effects on the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation sensitize the electron transport system to copper. • Thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper act additively to impair mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Fish expend significant amounts of energy to handle the numerous potentially stressful biotic and abiotic factors that they commonly encounter in aquatic environments. This universal requirement for energy singularizes mitochondria, the primary cellular energy transformers, as fundamental drivers of responses to environmental change. Our study probed the interacting effects of thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation (HRO) and copper (Cu) exposure in rainbow trout to test the prediction that they act jointly to impair mitochondrial function. Rainbow trout were acclimated to 11 (controls) or 20 °C for 2 months. Liver mitochondria were then isolated and their responses in vitro to Cu (0–20 μM) without and with HRO were assessed. Sequential inhibition and activation of mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) enzyme complexes permitted the measurement of respiratory activities supported by complex I–IV (CI–IV) in one run. The results showed that warm acclimation reduced fish and liver weights but increased mitochondrial protein indicating impairment of energy metabolism, increased synthesis of defense proteins and/or reduced liver water content. Whereas acute rise (11 → 20 °C) in temperature increased mitochondrial oxidation rates supported by CI–IV, warm acclimation reduced the maximal (state 3) and increased the basal (state 4) respiration leading to global uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). HRO profoundly inhibited both maximal and basal respiration rates supported by CI–IV, reduced RCR for all except

  19. Prenylation of a Rab1B mutant with altered GTPase activity is impaired in cell-free systems but not in intact mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A L; Sheridan, K M; Erdman, R A; Maltese, W A

    1996-09-15

    Previous studies have reached differing conclusions as to whether or not guanine-nucleotide-dependent conformational changes affect the ability of Rab proteins to undergo post-translational modification by Rab:geranylgeranyltransferase (Rab-GGTase). We now show that the ability of a Rab1B mutant [Q67L (Gln-67-->Leu)] with reduced intrinsic GTPase activity to undergo geranylgeranylation in cell-free assays depends on the guanine nucleotide composition of the system. When GTP is the predominant nucleotide in the assay, Rab1BQ67L is a poor substrate. However, when GDP is present and GTP is omitted, prenylation of the Q67L mutant is comparable with that of the wild-type (WT) protein. These studies, coupled with the poor prenylation of Rab1BWT in the presence of the non-hydrolysable GTP analogue guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate, support the notion that Rab-GGTase prefers substrates in the GDP conformation. When the abilities of Rab1BQ67L and Rab1BWT to undergo prenylation were compared by metabolic labelling of transiently expressed proteins in cultured human 293 cells, we did not observe a decline in prenylation of the mutant protein as predicted on the basis of the cell-free assays. Moreover, the Q67L mutant was comparable with the wild-type Rab1B in its ability to associate with co-expressed Rab GDP dissociation inhibitors in 293 cells. These findings raise the possibility that unidentified proteins present in intact cells may compensate for the reduced intrinsic GTPase activity of the Q67L mutant, allowing a significant proportion of the nascent Rab1BQ67L to assume a GDP conformation. The differential prenylation of Rab1BQ67L in cell-free systems versus intact cells underscores the importance of evaluating the post-translational modification of specific Rab mutants in vivo, where poorly characterized regulatory proteins may have a significant effect on GTPase activity or nucleotide exchange rates.

  20. Attention Alters Perceived Attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Störmer, Viola S; Alvarez, George A

    2016-04-01

    Can attention alter the impression of a face? Previous studies showed that attention modulates the appearance of lower-level visual features. For instance, attention can make a simple stimulus appear to have higher contrast than it actually does. We tested whether attention can also alter the perception of a higher-order property-namely, facial attractiveness. We asked participants to judge the relative attractiveness of two faces after summoning their attention to one of the faces using a briefly presented visual cue. Across trials, participants judged the attended face to be more attractive than the same face when it was unattended. This effect was not due to decision or response biases, but rather was due to changes in perceptual processing of the faces. These results show that attention alters perceived facial attractiveness, and broadly demonstrate that attention can influence higher-level perception and may affect people's initial impressions of one another. PMID:26966228

  1. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine Alters Left Ventricular Function and Activates Nuclear Factor-Kappa B (NF-kB in a Time and Dose Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Y. Hargrave

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA is an illicit psychoactive drug with cardiovascular effects that have not been fully described. In the current study, we observed the effects of acute MDMA on rabbit left ventricular function. We also observed the effects of MDMA on nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB activity in cultured rat ventricular myocytes (H9c2. In the rabbit, MDMA (2 mg/kg alone caused a significant increase in heart rate and a significant decrease in the duration of the cardiac cycle. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS by pretreatment with L-NAME (10 mg/kg alone caused significant dysfunction in heart rate, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, duration of relaxation, duration of cardiac cycle, and mean left ventricular pressure. Pretreatment with L-NAME followed by treatment with MDMA caused significant dysfunction in additional parameters that were not abnormal upon exposure to either compound in isolation: duration of contraction, inotropy, and pulse pressure. Exposure to 1.0 mM MDMA for 6 h or 2.0 mM MDMA for 12 h caused increased nuclear localization of NF-kB in cultured H9c2 cells. The current results suggest that MDMA is acutely detrimental to heart function and that an intact cardiovascular NOS system is important to help mitigate early sequelae in some functional parameters. The delayed timing of NF-kB activation suggests that this factor may be relevant to MDMA induced cardiomyopathy of later onset.

  2. Altered Gene Expression in the Schistosome-Transmitting Snail Biomphalaria glabrata following Exposure to Niclosamide, the Active Ingredient in the Widely Used Molluscicide Bayluscide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si-Ming; Buddenborg, Sarah K; Adema, Coen M; Sullivan, John T; Loker, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    In view of the call by the World Health Organization (WHO) for elimination of schistosomiasis as a public health problem by 2025, use of molluscicides in snail control to supplement chemotherapy-based control efforts is likely to increase in the coming years. The mechanisms of action of niclosamide, the active ingredient in the most widely used molluscicides, remain largely unknown. A better understanding of its toxicology at the molecular level will both improve our knowledge of snail biology and may offer valuable insights into the development of better chemical control methods for snails. We used a recently developed Biomphalaria glabrata oligonucleotide microarray (31K features) to investigate the effect of sublethal exposure to niclosamide on the transcriptional responses of the snail B. glabrata relative to untreated snails. Most of the genes highly upregulated following exposure of snails to niclosamide are involved in biotransformation of xenobiotics, including genes encoding cytochrome P450s (CYP), glutathione S-transferases (GST), and drug transporters, notably multi-drug resistance protein (efflux transporter) and solute linked carrier (influx transporter). Niclosamide also induced stress responses. Specifically, six heat shock protein (HSP) genes from three super-families (HSP20, HSP40 and HSP70) were upregulated. Genes encoding ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and coatomer, all of which are involved in vesicle trafficking in the Golgi of mammalian cells, were also upregulated. Lastly, a hemoglobin gene was downregulated, suggesting niclosamide may affect oxygen transport. Our results show that snails mount substantial responses to sublethal concentrations of niclosamide, at least some of which appear to be protective. The topic of how niclosamide's lethality at higher concentrations is determined requires further study. Given that niclosamide has also been used as an anthelmintic drug for decades and has been

  3. PTEN loss and chromosome 8 alterations in Gleason grade 3 prostate cancer cores predicts the presence of un-sampled grade 4 tumor: implications for active surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trock, Bruce J; Fedor, Helen; Gurel, Bora; Jenkins, Robert B; Knudsen, B S; Fine, Samson W; Said, Jonathan W; Carter, H Ballentine; Lotan, Tamara L; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2016-07-01

    Men who enter active surveillance because their biopsy exhibits only Gleason grade 3 (G3) frequently have higher grade tumor missed by biopsy. Thus, biomarkers are needed that, when measured on G3 tissue, can predict the presence of higher grade tumor in the whole prostate. We evaluated whether PTEN loss, chromosome 8q gain (MYC) and/or 8p loss (LPL) measured only on G3 cores is associated with un-sampled G4 tumor. A tissue microarray was constructed of prostatectomy tissue from patients whose prostates exhibited only Gleason score 3+3, only 3+4 or only 4+3 tumor (n=50 per group). Cores sampled only from areas of G3 were evaluated for PTEN loss by immunohistochemistry, and PTEN deletion, LPL/8p loss and MYC/8q gain by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Biomarker results were compared between Gleason score 6 vs 7 tumors using conditional logistic regression. PTEN protein loss, odds ratio=4.99, P=0.033; MYC/8q gain, odds ratio=5.36, P=0.010; and LPL/8p loss, odds ratio=3.96, P=0.003 were significantly more common in G3 cores derived from Gleason 7 vs Gleason 6 tumors. PTEN gene deletion was not statistically significant. Associations were stronger comparing Gleason 4+3 vs 6 than for Gleason 3+4 vs 6. MYC/8q gain, LPL/8p loss and PTEN protein loss measured in G3 tissue microarray cores strongly differentiate whether the core comes from a Gleason 6 or Gleason 7 tumor. If validated to predict upgrading from G3 biopsy to prostatectomy these biomarkers could reduce the likelihood of enrolling high-risk men and facilitate safe patient selection for active surveillance.

  4. Specific deletion of AMP-activated protein kinase (α1AMPK in murine oocytes alters junctional protein expression and mitochondrial physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Bertoldo

    Full Text Available Oogenesis and folliculogenesis are dynamic processes that are regulated by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine signals. These signals are exchanged between the oocyte and the somatic cells of the follicle. Here we analyzed the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, an important regulator of cellular energy homeostasis, by using transgenic mice deficient in α1AMPK specifically in the oocyte. We found a decrease of 27% in litter size was observed in ZP3-α1AMPK-/- (ZP3-KO female mice. Following in vitro fertilization, where conditions are stressful for the oocyte and embryo, ZP3-KO oocytes were 68% less likely to pass the 2-cell stage. In vivo and in cumulus-oocyte complexes, several proteins involved in junctional communication, such as connexin37 and N-cadherin were down-regulated in the absence of α1AMPK. While the two signalling pathways (PKA and MAPK involved in the junctional communication between the cumulus/granulosa cells and the oocyte were stimulated in control oocytes, ZP3-KO oocytes exhibited only low phosphorylation of MAPK or CREB proteins. In addition, MII oocytes deficient in α1AMPK had a 3-fold lower ATP concentration, an increase in abnormal mitochondria, and a decrease in cytochrome C and PGC1α levels, suggesting perturbed energy production by mitochondria. The absence of α1AMPK also induced a reduction in histone deacetylase activity, which was associated with an increase in histone H3 acetylation (K9/K14 residues. Together, the results of the present study suggest that absence of AMPK, modifies oocyte quality through energy processes and oocyte/somatic cell communication. The limited effect observed in vivo could be partly due to a favourable follicle microenvironment where nutrients, growth factors, and adequate cell interaction were present. Whereas in a challenging environment such as that of in vitro culture following IVF, the phenotype is revealed.

  5. PPARγ activation alters fatty acid composition in adipose triglyceride, in addition to proliferation of small adipocytes, in insulin resistant high-fat fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Daisuke; Oda, Kanako; Kusunoki, Masataka; Nishina, Atsuyoshi; Takahashi, Kazuaki; Feng, Zhonggang; Tsutsumi, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Takao

    2016-02-15

    It was reported that adipocyte size is potentially correlated in part to amount of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and insulin resistance because several long chain PUFAs can be ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). In our previous study, marked reduction of PUFAs was observed in insulin-resistant high-fat fed rats, which may indicate that PUFAs are consumed to improve insulin resistance. Although PPARγ agonist, well known as an insulin sensitizer, proliferates small adipocytes, the effects of PPARγ agonist on FA composition in adipose tissue have not been clarified yet. In the present study, we administered pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, to high-fat fed rats, and measured their FA composition of triglyceride fraction in adipose tissue and adipocyte diameters in pioglitazone-treated (PIO) and non-treated (control) rats. Insulin sensitivity was obtained with hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Average adipocyte diameter in the PIO group were smaller than that in the control one without change in tissue weight. In monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs), 14:1n-5, 16:1n-7, and 18:1n-9 contents in the PIO group were lower than those, respectively, in the control group. In contrast, 22:6n-3, 20:3n-6, 20:4n-6, and 22:4n-6 contents in the PIO group were higher than those, respectively, in the control group. Insulin sensitivity was higher in the PIO group than in the control one. These findings suggest that PPARγ activation lowered MUFAs whereas suppressed most of C20 or C22 PUFAs reduction, and that the change of fatty acid composition may be relevant with increase in small adipocytes. PMID:26825545

  6. Enhancement of anti-inflammatory activity of Aloe vera adventitious root extracts through the alteration of primary and secondary metabolites via salicylic acid elicitation.

    Science.gov (Unite