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Sample records for altered iron homeostasis

  1. Iron Homeostasis and Nutritional Iron Deficiency123

    OpenAIRE

    Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins enc...

  2. Alterations in the iron homeostasis network: A driving force for macrophage-mediated hepatitis C virus persistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foka, Pelagia; Dimitriadis, Alexios; Karamichali, Eirini; Kyratzopoulou, Eleni; Giannimaras, Dionyssios; Koskinas, John; Varaklioti, Agoritsa; Mamalaki, Avgi; Georgopoulou, Urania

    2016-08-17

    Mechanisms that favor Hepatitis C virus (HCV) persistence over clearance are unclear, but involve defective innate immunity. Chronic infection is characterized by hepatic iron overload, hyperferraemia and hyperferittinaemia. Hepcidin modulates iron egress via ferroportin and its storage in ferritin. Chronic HCV patients have decreased hepcidin, while HCV replication is modified by HAMP silencing. We aimed to investigate interactions between HCV and hepcidin, during acute and chronic disease, and putative alterations in cellular iron homeostasis that enhance HCV propagation and promote viral persistence. Thus, we used HCV JFH-1-infected co-cultures of Huh7.5 hepatoma and THP-1 macrophage cells, HCV patients' sera and Huh7 hepcidin-expressing cells transfected with HCV replicons. Hepcidin levels were elevated in acutely infected patients, but correlated with viral load in chronic patients. HAMP expression was up-regulated early in HCV infection in vitro, with corresponding changes in ferritin and FPN. Hepcidin overexpression enhanced both viral translation and replication. In HCV-infected co-cultures, we observed increased hepcidin, reduced hepatoma ferritin and a concurrent rise in macrophaghic ferritin over time. Altered iron levels complemented amplified replication in hepatoma cells and one replication round in macrophages. Iron-loading of macrophages led to enhancement of hepatic HCV replication through reversed ferritin "flow." Viral transmissibility from infected macrophages to naïve hepatoma cells was induced by iron. We propose that HCV control over iron occurs both by intracellular iron sequestration, through hepcidin, and intercellular iron mobilisation via ferritin, as means toward enhanced replication. Persistence could be achieved through HCV-induced changes in macrophagic iron that enhances viral replication in these cells. PMID:27058404

  3. Protein degradation and iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joel W; Bruick, Richard K

    2012-09-01

    Regulation of both systemic and cellular iron homeostasis requires the capacity to sense iron levels and appropriately modify the expression of iron metabolism genes. These responses are coordinated through the efforts of several key regulatory factors including F-box and Leucine-rich Repeat Protein 5 (FBXL5), Iron Regulatory Proteins (IRPs), Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), and ferroportin. Notably, the stability of each of these proteins is regulated in response to iron. Recent discoveries have greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing iron-sensing and protein degradation within these pathways. It has become clear that iron's privileged roles in both enzyme catalysis and protein structure contribute to its regulation of protein stability. Moreover, these multiple pathways intersect with one another in larger regulatory networks to maintain iron homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22349011

  4. Iron homeostasis and nutritional iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theil, Elizabeth C

    2011-04-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins encoded in iron responsive element (IRE)-mRNA. The noncoding IRE-mRNA structures bind protein repressors, IRP1 or 2, during iron deficiency. Integration of the IRE-RNA in translation regulators (near the cap) or turnover elements (after the coding region) increases iron uptake (DMT1/TRF1) or decreases iron storage/efflux (FTN/FPN) when IRP binds. An antioxidant response element in FTN DNA binds Bach1, a heme-sensitive transcription factor that coordinates expression among antioxidant response proteins like FTN, thioredoxin reductase, and quinone reductase. FTN, an antioxidant because Fe(2+) and O(2) (reactive oxygen species generators) are consumed to make iron mineral, is also a nutritional iron concentrate that is an efficiently absorbed, nonheme source of iron from whole legumes. FTN protein cages contain thousands of mineralized iron atoms and enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, an absorption mechanism distinct from transport of nonheme iron salts (ferrous sulfate), iron chelators (ferric-EDTA), or heme. Recognition of 2 nutritional nonheme iron sources, small and large (FTN), will aid the solution of iron deficiency, a major public health problem, and the development of new policies on iron nutrition. PMID:21346101

  5. Iron Homeostasis and the Inflammatory Response

    OpenAIRE

    Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Iron and its homeostasis are intimately tied to the inflammatory response. The adaptation to iron deficiency, which confers resistance to infection and improves the inflammatory condition, underlies what is probably the most obvious link: the anemia of inflammation or chronic disease. A large number of stimulatory inputs must be integrated to tightly control iron homeostasis during the inflammatory response. In order to understand the pathways of iron trafficking and how they are regulated, t...

  6. The cellular mechanisms of body iron homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    MARCO T NUÑEZ; MARCO A GARATE; MIGUEL ARREDONDO; VICTORIA TAPlA; PATRICIA MUÑOZ

    2000-01-01

    Cells tightly regulate iron levels through the activity of iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that bind to RNA motifs called iron responsive elements (IREs). When cells become iron-depleted, IRPs bind to IREs present in the mRNAs of ferritin and the transferrin receptor, resulting in diminished translation of the ferritin mRNA and increased translation of the transferrin receptor mRNA. Similarly, body iron homeostasis is maintained through the control of intestinal iron absorption. Intestinal ep...

  7. Chromate alters root system architecture and activates expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis and signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Trujillo, Miguel; Méndez-Bravo, Alfonso; Ortiz-Castro, Randy; Hernández-Madrigal, Fátima; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Ruiz-Herrera, León Francisco; Long, Terri A; Cervantes, Carlos; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; López-Bucio, José

    2014-09-01

    Soil contamination by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI) or chromate] due to anthropogenic activities has become an increasingly important environmental problem. To date few studies have been performed to elucidate the signaling networks involved on adaptive responses to (CrVI) toxicity in plants. In this work, we report that depending upon its concentration, Cr(VI) alters in different ways the architecture of the root system in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Low concentrations of Cr (20-40 µM) promoted primary root growth, while concentrations higher than 60 µM Cr repressed growth and increased formation of root hairs, lateral root primordia and adventitious roots. We analyzed global gene expression changes in seedlings grown in media supplied with 20 or 140 µM Cr. The level of 731 transcripts was significantly modified in response to Cr treatment with only five genes common to both Cr concentrations. Interestingly, 23 genes related to iron (Fe) acquisition were up-regulated including IRT1, YSL2, FRO5, BHLH100, BHLH101 and BHLH039 and the master controllers of Fe deficiency responses PYE and BTS were specifically activated in pericycle cells. It was also found that increasing concentration of Cr in the plant correlated with a decrease in Fe content, but increased both acidification of the rhizosphere and activity of the ferric chelate reductase. Supply of Fe to Cr-treated Arabidopsis allowed primary root to resume growth and alleviated toxicity symptoms, indicating that Fe nutrition is a major target of Cr stress in plants. Our results show that low Cr levels are beneficial to plants and that toxic Cr concentrations activate a low-Fe rescue system. PMID:24928490

  8. Molecular control of vertebrate iron homeostasis by iron regulatory proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Wallander, Michelle L.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.; Eisenstein, Richard S.

    2006-01-01

    Both deficiencies and excesses of iron represent major public health problems throughout the world. Understanding the cellular and organismal processes controlling iron homeostasis is critical for identifying iron-related diseases and in advancing the clinical treatments for such disorders of iron metabolism. Iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) 1 and 2 are key regulators of vertebrate iron metabolism. These RNA binding proteins post-transcriptionally control the stability or translation of mRNAs ...

  9. Epigenetic regulation of iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

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    Xing, Jiewen; Wang, Tianya; Ni, Zhongfu

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is one of the most important microelement required for plant growth and development because of its unique property of catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions. Iron deficiency impairs fundamental processes which could lead to a decrease in chlorophyll production and pollen fertility, thus influencing crop productivity and quality. However, iron in excess is toxic to the cell and is harmful to the plant. To exactly control the iron content in all tissues, plants have evolved many strategies to regulate iron homeostasis, which refers to 2 successive steps: iron uptake at the root surface, and iron distribution in vivo. In the last decades, a number of transporters and regulatory factors involved in this process have been isolated and identified. To cope with the complicated flexible environmental conditions, plants apply diverse mechanisms to regulate the expression and activity of these components. One of the most important mechanisms is epigenetic regulation of iron homeostasis. This review has been presented to provide an update on the information supporting the involvement of histone modifications in iron homeostasis and possible future course of the field. PMID:26313698

  10. Epigenetic regulation of iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jiewen; Wang, Tianya; Ni, Zhongfu

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is one of the most important microelement required for plant growth and development because of its unique property of catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions. Iron deficiency impairs fundamental processes which could lead to a decrease in chlorophyll production and pollen fertility, thus influencing crop productivity and quality. However, iron in excess is toxic to the cell and is harmful to the plant. To exactly control the iron content in all tissues, plants have evolved many strategies to regulate iron homeostasis, which refers to 2 successive steps: iron uptake at the root surface, and iron distribution in vivo. In the last decades, a number of transporters and regulatory factors involved in this process have been isolated and identified. To cope with the complicated flexible environmental conditions, plants apply diverse mechanisms to regulate the expression and activity of these components. One of the most important mechanisms is epigenetic regulation of iron homeostasis. This review has been presented to provide an update on the information supporting the involvement of histone modifications in iron homeostasis and possible future course of the field. PMID:26313698

  11. Disruption of iron homeostasis in mesothelial cells after talc pleurodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghio, Andrew J; Soukup, Joleen M; Dailey, Lisa A; Richards, Judy H; Turi, Jennifer L; Pavlisko, Elizabeth N; Roggli, Victor L

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism for biological effects after exposure to particles is incompletely understood. One postulate proposed to explain biological effects after exposure to particles involves altered iron homeostasis in the host. The fibro-inflammatory properties of mineral oxide particles are exploited therapeutically with the instillation of massive quantities of talc into the pleural space, to provide sclerosis. We tested the postulates that (1) in vitro exposure to talc induces a disruption in iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and a biological effect, and (2) talc pleurodesis in humans alters iron homeostasis. In vitro exposures of both mesothelial and airway epithelial cells to 100 μg/ml talc significantly increased iron importation and concentrations of the storage protein ferritin. Using dichlorodihydrofluorescein, exposure to talc was associated with a time-dependent and concentration-dependent generation of oxidants in both cell types. The expression of proinflammatory mediators was also increased after in vitro exposures of mesothelial and airway epithelial cells to talc. Relative to control lung tissue, lung tissue from patients treated with sclerodesis demonstrated an accumulation of iron and increased expression of iron-related proteins, including ferritin, the importer divalent metal transport-1 and the exporter ferroportin-1. Talc was also observed to translocate to the parenchyma, and changes in iron homeostasis were focally distributed to sites of retention. We conclude that exposure to talc disrupts iron homeostasis, is associated with oxidative stress, and results in a biological effect (i.e., a fibro-inflammatory response). Talc pleurodesis can function as a model of the human response to mineral oxide particle exposure, albeit a massive one. PMID:22210826

  12. Nitric oxide and plant iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buet, Agustina; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2015-03-01

    Like all living organisms, plants demand iron (Fe) for important biochemical and metabolic processes. Internal imbalances, as a consequence of insufficient or excess Fe in the environment, lead to growth restriction and affect crop yield. Knowledge of signals and factors affecting each step in Fe uptake from the soil and distribution (long-distance transport, remobilization from old to young leaves, and storage in seeds) is necessary to improve our understanding of plant mineral nutrition. In this context, the role of nitric oxide (NO) is discussed as a key player in maintaining Fe homeostasis through its cross talk with hormones, ferritin, and frataxin and the ability to form nitrosyl-iron complexes. PMID:25612116

  13. Intestinal Iron Homeostasis and Colon Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatrik M. Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths in industrialized countries. Understanding the mechanisms of growth and progression of CRC is essential to improve treatment. Iron is an essential nutrient for cell growth. Iron overload caused by hereditary mutations or excess dietary iron uptake has been identified as a risk factor for CRC. Intestinal iron is tightly controlled by iron transporters that are responsible for iron uptake, distribution, and export. Dysregulation of intestinal iron transporters are observed in CRC and lead to iron accumulation in tumors. Intratumoral iron results in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and DNA damage with consequent promotion of oncogene activation. In addition, excess iron in intestinal tumors may lead to increase in tumor-elicited inflammation and tumor growth. Limiting intratumoral iron through specifically chelating excess intestinal iron or modulating activities of iron transporter may be an attractive therapeutic target for CRC.

  14. Immunity to plant pathogens and iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Thomine, Sebastien; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-11-01

    Iron is essential for metabolic processes in most living organisms. Pathogens and their hosts often compete for the acquisition of this nutrient. However, iron can catalyze the formation of deleterious reactive oxygen species. Hosts may use iron to increase local oxidative stress in defense responses against pathogens. Due to this duality, iron plays a complex role in plant-pathogen interactions. Plant defenses against pathogens and plant response to iron deficiency share several features, such as secretion of phenolic compounds, and use common hormone signaling pathways. Moreover, fine tuning of iron localization during infection involves genes coding iron transport and iron storage proteins, which have been shown to contribute to immunity. The influence of the plant iron status on the outcome of a given pathogen attack is strongly dependent on the nature of the pathogen infection strategy and on the host species. Microbial siderophores emerged as important factors as they have the ability to trigger plant defense responses. Depending on the plant species, siderophore perception can be mediated by their strong iron scavenging capacity or possibly via specific recognition as pathogen associated molecular patterns. This review highlights that iron has a key role in several plant-pathogen interactions by modulating immunity. PMID:26475190

  15. Hepcidin and Iron Homeostasis during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Dawn Koenig

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepcidin is the master regulator of systemic iron bioavailability in humans. This review examines primary research articles that assessed hepcidin during pregnancy and postpartum and report its relationship to maternal and infant iron status and birth outcomes; areas for future research are also discussed. A systematic search of the databases Medline and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health returned 16 primary research articles including 10 human and six animal studies. Collectively, the results indicate that hepcidin is lower during pregnancy than in a non-pregnant state, presumably to ensure greater iron bioavailability to the mother and fetus. Pregnant women with undetectable serum hepcidin transferred a greater quantity of maternally ingested iron to their fetus compared to women with detectable hepcidin, indicating that maternal hepcidin in part determines the iron bioavailability to the fetus. However, inflammatory states, including preeclampsia, malaria infection, and obesity were associated with higher hepcidin during pregnancy compared to healthy controls, suggesting that maternal and fetal iron bioavailability could be compromised in such conditions. Future studies should examine the relative contribution of maternal versus fetal hepcidin to the control of placental iron transfer as well as optimizing maternal and fetal iron bioavailability in pregnancies complicated by inflammation.

  16. NCOA4 Deficiency Impairs Systemic Iron Homeostasis

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    Roberto Bellelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cargo receptor NCOA4 mediates autophagic ferritin degradation. Here we show that NCOA4 deficiency in a knockout mouse model causes iron accumulation in the liver and spleen, increased levels of transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, and liver hepcidin, and decreased levels of duodenal ferroportin. Despite signs of iron overload, NCOA4-null mice had mild microcytic hypochromic anemia. Under an iron-deprived diet (2–3 mg/kg, mice failed to release iron from ferritin storage and developed severe microcytic hypochromic anemia and ineffective erythropoiesis associated with increased erythropoietin levels. When fed an iron-enriched diet (2 g/kg, mice died prematurely and showed signs of liver damage. Ferritin accumulated in primary embryonic fibroblasts from NCOA4-null mice consequent to impaired autophagic targeting. Adoptive expression of the NCOA4 COOH terminus (aa 239–614 restored this function. In conclusion, NCOA4 prevents iron accumulation and ensures efficient erythropoiesis, playing a central role in balancing iron levels in vivo.

  17. Hepcidin and Iron Homeostasis during Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Dawn Koenig; Lisa Tussing-Humphreys; Jessica Day; Brooke Cadwell; Elizabeta Nemeth

    2014-01-01

    Hepcidin is the master regulator of systemic iron bioavailability in humans. This review examines primary research articles that assessed hepcidin during pregnancy and postpartum and report its relationship to maternal and infant iron status and birth outcomes; areas for future research are also discussed. A systematic search of the databases Medline and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health returned 16 primary research articles including 10 human and six animal studies. Collectively...

  18. Iron Homeostasis in Yellowstone National Park Hot Spring Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I.; Tringe, S. G.; Franklin, H.; Bryant, D. A.; Klatt, C. G.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Guevara, M.

    2010-01-01

    It has been postulated that life may have originated on Earth, and possibly on Mars, in association with hydrothermal activity and high concentrations of ferrous iron. However, it is not clear how an iron-rich thermal hydrosphere could be hospitable to microbes, since reduced iron appears to stimulate oxidative stress in all domains of life and particularly in oxygenic phototrophs. Therefore, the study of microbial diversity in iron-depositing hot springs (IDHS) and the mechanisms of iron homeostasis and suppression of oxidative stress may help elucidate how Precambrian organisms could withstand the extremely high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by interaction between environmental Fe(2+) and O2. Proteins and clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) involved in the maintenance of Fe homeostasis found in cyanobacteria (CB) inhabiting environments with high and low [Fe] were main target of this analysis. Preliminary results of the analysis suggest that the Chocolate Pots (CP) microbial community is heavily dominated by phototrophs from the cyanobacteria (CB), Chloroflexi and Chlorobi phyla, while the Mushroom Spring (MS) effluent channel harbors a more diverse community in which Chloroflexi are the dominant phototrophs. It is speculated that CB inhabiting IDHS have an increased tolerance to both high concentrations of Fe(2+) and ROS produced in the Fenton reaction. This hypothesis was explored via a comparative analysis of the diversity of proteins and COGs involved in Fe and redox homeostasis in the CP and MS microbiomes.

  19. Deficiency of α-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghio AJ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrew J Ghio,1 Joleen M Soukup,1 Judy H Richards,1 Bernard M Fischer,2 Judith A Voynow,2 Donald E Schmechel31US Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2Division of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics,3Joseph and Kathleen Bryan Alzheimer Disease Research Center, Department of Medicine (Neurology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: There is evidence that proteases and antiproteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that α-1 antitrypsin (A1AT polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this antiprotease in humans are associated with a systemic disruption in iron homeostasis. Archived plasma samples from Alpha-1 Foundation (30 MM, 30 MZ, and 30 ZZ individuals were analyzed for A1AT, ferritin, transferrin, and C-reactive protein (CRP. Plasma samples were also assayed for metals using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES. Plasma levels of A1AT in MZ and ZZ individuals were approximately 60% and 20% of those for MM individuals respectively. Plasma ferritin concentrations in those with the ZZ genotype were greater relative to those individuals with either MM or MZ genotype. Plasma transferrin for MM, MZ, and ZZ genotypes showed no significant differences. Linear regression analysis revealed a significant (negative relationship between plasma concentrations of A1AT and ferritin while that between A1AT and transferrin levels was not significant. Plasma CRP concentrations were not significantly different between MM, MZ, and ZZ individuals. ICPAES measurement of metals confirmed elevated plasma concentrations of nonheme iron among ZZ individuals. Nonheme iron concentrations correlated (negatively with levels of A1AT. A1AT deficiency is associated with evidence of a disruption in iron homeostasis with plasma ferritin and nonheme iron concentrations being elevated among those with the ZZ genotype.Keywords: α-1

  20. Control of iron homeostasis by an iron-regulated ubiquitin ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashisht, Ajay A; Zumbrennen, Kimberly B; Huang, Xinhua; Powers, David N; Durazo, Armando; Sun, Dahui; Bhaskaran, Nimesh; Persson, Anja; Uhlen, Mathias; Sangfelt, Olle; Spruck, Charles; Leibold, Elizabeth A; Wohlschlegel, James A

    2009-10-30

    Eukaryotic cells require iron for survival and have developed regulatory mechanisms for maintaining appropriate intracellular iron concentrations. The degradation of iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) in iron-replete cells is a key event in this pathway, but the E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for its proteolysis has remained elusive. We found that a SKP1-CUL1-FBXL5 ubiquitin ligase protein complex associates with and promotes the iron-dependent ubiquitination and degradation of IRP2. The F-box substrate adaptor protein FBXL5 was degraded upon iron and oxygen depletion in a process that required an iron-binding hemerythrin-like domain in its N terminus. Thus, iron homeostasis is regulated by a proteolytic pathway that couples IRP2 degradation to intracellular iron levels through the stability and activity of FBXL5. PMID:19762596

  1. The pupylation machinery is involved in iron homeostasis by targeting the iron storage protein ferritin

    OpenAIRE

    Küberl, Andreas; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The balance of sufficient iron supply and avoidance of iron toxicity by iron homeostasis is a prerequisite for cellular metabolism and growth. Here we provide evidence that, in Actinobacteria, pupylation plays a crucial role in this process. Pupylation is a posttranslational modification in which the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup is covalently attached to a lysine residue in target proteins, thus resembling ubiquitination in eukaryotes. Pupylated proteins are recognized and unfolded ...

  2. Dysregulation of iron and copper homeostasis innonalcoholic fatty liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elmar Aigner; Günter Weiss; Christian Datz

    2015-01-01

    Elevated iron stores as indicated by hyperferritinemiawith normal or mildly elevated transferrin saturationand mostly mild hepatic iron deposition are acharacteristic finding in subjects with non-alcoholicfatty liver disease (NAFLD). Excess iron is observedin approximately one third of NAFLD patients andis commonly referred to as the "dysmetabolic ironoverload syndrome". Clinical evidence suggests thatelevated body iron stores aggravate the clinical courseof NAFLD with regard to liver-related and extrahepaticdisease complications which relates to the fact thatexcess iron catalyses the formation of toxic hydroxylradicalssubsequently resulting in cellular damage. Ironremoval improves insulin sensitivity, delays the onsetof type 2 diabetes mellitus, improves pathologic liverfunction tests and likewise ameliorates NAFLD histology.Several mechanisms contribute to pathologic ironaccumulation in NAFLD. These include impaired ironexport from hepatocytes and mesenchymal Kupffer cellsas a consequence of imbalances in the concentrationsof iron regulatory factors, such as hepcidin, cytokines,copper or other dietary factors. This review summarizesthe knowledge about iron homeostasis in NAFLD andthe rationale for its therapeutic implications.

  3. Misregulation of iron homeostasis in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajowiak, Anna; Styś, Agnieszka; Starzyński, Rafał R; Staroń, Robert; Lipiński, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for all mammalian cells, but it is toxic in excess. Our understanding of molecular mechanisms ensuring iron homeostasis at both cellular and systemic levels has dramatically increased over the past 15 years. However, despite major advances in this field, homeostatic regulation of iron in the central nervous system (CNS) requires elucidation. It is unclear how iron moves in the CNS and how its transfer to the CNS across the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers, which separate the CNS from the systemic circulation, is regulated. Increasing evidence indicates the role of iron dysregulation in neuronal cell death observed in neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective cortical czynand spinal motor neuron dysfunction that results from a complex interplay among various pathogenic factors including oxidative stress. The latter is known to strongly affect cellular iron balance, creating a vicious circle to exacerbate oxidative injury. The role of iron in the pathogenesis of ALS is confirmed by therapeutic effects of iron chelation in ALS mouse models. These models are of great importance for deciphering molecular mechanisms of iron accumulation in neurons. Most of them consist of transgenic rodents overexpressing the mutated human superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene. Mutations in the SOD1 gene constitute one of the most common genetic causes of the inherited form of ALS. However, it should be considered that overexpression of the SOD1 gene usually leads to increased SOD1 enzymatic activity, a condition which does not occur in human pathology and which may itself change the expression of iron metabolism genes. PMID:27356602

  4. Out of Balance—Systemic Iron Homeostasis in Iron-Related Disorders

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    Andrea U. Steinbicker

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential element in our daily diet. Most iron is required for the de novo synthesis of red blood cells, where it plays a critical role in oxygen binding to hemoglobin. Thus, iron deficiency causes anemia, a major public health burden worldwide. On the other extreme, iron accumulation in critical organs such as liver, heart, and pancreas causes organ dysfunction due to the generation of oxidative stress. Therefore, systemic iron levels must be tightly balanced. Here we focus on the regulatory role of the hepcidin/ferroportin circuitry as the major regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. We discuss how regulatory cues (e.g., iron, inflammation, or hypoxia affect the hepcidin response and how impairment of the hepcidin/ferroportin regulatory system causes disorders of iron metabolism.

  5. Iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a case-control study

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    Roggli Victor L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung injury caused by both inhaled dusts and infectious agents depends on increased availability of iron and metal-catalyzed oxidative stress. Because inhaled particles, such as silica, and certain infections can cause secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP, we tested the hypothesis that idiopathic PAP is associated with an altered iron homeostasis in the human lung. Methods Healthy volunteers (n = 20 and patients with idiopathic PAP (n = 20 underwent bronchoalveolar lavage and measurements were made of total protein, iron, tranferrin, transferrin receptor, lactoferrin, and ferritin. Histochemical staining for iron and ferritin was done in the cell pellets from control subjects and PAP patients, and in lung specimens of patients without cardiopulmonary disease and with PAP. Lavage concentrations of urate, glutathione, and ascorbate were also measured as indices of oxidative stress. Results Lavage concentrations of iron, transferrin, transferrin receptor, lactoferrin, and ferritin were significantly elevated in PAP patients relative to healthy volunteers. The cells of PAP patients had accumulated significant iron and ferritin, as well as considerable amounts of extracellular ferritin. Immunohistochemistry for ferritin in lung tissue revealed comparable amounts of this metal-storage protein in the lower respiratory tract of PAP patients both intracellularly and extracellularly. Lavage concentrations of ascorbate, glutathione, and urate were significantly lower in the lavage fluid of the PAP patients. Conclusion Iron homeostasis is altered in the lungs of patients with idiopathic PAP, as large amounts of catalytically-active iron and low molecular weight anti-oxidant depletion are present. These findings suggest a metal-catalyzed oxidative stress in the maintenance of this disease.

  6. Iron homeostasis and responses to iron limitation in extreme acidophiles from the Ferroplasma genus.

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    Potrykus, Joanna; Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Dopson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Extremely acidophilic archaea from the genus Ferroplasma inhabit iron-rich biomining environments and are important constituents of naturally occurring microbial consortia that catalyze the production of acid mine drainage. A combined bioinformatic, transcript profiling, and proteomic approach was used to elucidate iron homeostasis mechanisms in "F. acidarmanus" Fer1 and F. acidiphilum Y(T) . Bioinformatic analysis of the "F. acidarmanus" Fer1 genome sequence revealed genes encoding proteins hypothesized to be involved in iron-dependent gene regulation and siderophore biosynthesis; the Fhu and NRAMP cation acquisition systems; iron storage proteins; and the SUF machinery for the biogenesis of Fe-S clusters. A subset of homologous genes was identified on the F. acidiphilum Y(T) chromosome by direct PCR probing. In both strains, some of the genes appeared to be regulated in a ferrous/ferric iron-dependent manner, as indicated by RT-PCR. A detailed gel-based proteomics analysis of responses to iron depletion showed that a putative isochorismatase, presumably involved in siderophore biosynthesis, and the SufBCD system were upregulated under iron-limiting conditions. No evidence was obtained for iron sparing response during iron limitation. This study constitutes the first detailed investigation of iron homeostasis in extremely acidophilic archaea. PMID:21182194

  7. Dissecting plant iron homeostasis under short and long-term iron fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz Darbani; Briat, Jean-Francois; Holm, Preben Bach;

    2013-01-01

    discuss the lack of low affinity iron uptake mechanisms in plants, the utilization of a different uptake mechanism by graminaceous plants compared to the others, as well as the roles of riboflavin, ferritin isoforms, nitric oxide, nitrosylation, heme, aconitase, and vacuolar pH. Cross-homeostasis between...

  8. The PICALM protein plays a key role in iron homeostasis and cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula B Scotland

    Full Text Available The ubiquitously expressed phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly (PICALM protein associates with the plasma membrane, binds clathrin, and plays a role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Alterations of the human PICALM gene are present in aggressive hematopoietic malignancies, and genome-wide association studies have recently linked the PICALM locus to late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Inactivating and hypomorphic Picalm mutations in mice cause different degrees of severity of anemia, abnormal iron metabolism, growth retardation and shortened lifespan. To understand PICALM's function, we studied the consequences of PICALM overexpression and characterized PICALM-deficient cells derived from mutant fit1 mice. Our results identify a role for PICALM in transferrin receptor (TfR internalization and demonstrate that the C-terminal PICALM residues are critical for its association with clathrin and for the inhibitory effect of PICALM overexpression on TfR internalization. Murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs that are deficient in PICALM display several characteristics of iron deficiency (increased surface TfR expression, decreased intracellular iron levels, and reduced cellular proliferation, all of which are rescued by retroviral PICALM expression. The proliferation defect of cells that lack PICALM results, at least in part, from insufficient iron uptake, since it can be corrected by iron supplementation. Moreover, PICALM-deficient cells are particularly sensitive to iron chelation. Taken together, these data reveal that PICALM plays a critical role in iron homeostasis, and offer new perspectives into the pathogenesis of PICALM-associated diseases.

  9. Iron-Responsive miR-485-3p Regulates Cellular Iron Homeostasis by Targeting Ferroportin

    OpenAIRE

    Sangokoya, Carolyn; Doss, Jennifer F; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2013-01-01

    Author Summary Cellular iron homeostasis is maintained by a sophisticated system that responds to iron levels and coordinates the expression of targets important for balancing iron export and uptake with intracellular storage and utilization. Ferroportin is the only known cellular iron exporter in mammalian cells and plays a critical role in both cellular and systemic iron balance. Thus the ability to regulate cellular iron export is of great interest in the search for therapeutic strategies ...

  10. The physiological functions of iron regulatory proteins in iron homeostasis - an update

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    De-LiangZhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron regulatory proteins (IRPs regulate the expression of genes involved in iron metabolism by binding to RNA stem-loop structures known as iron responsive elements (IREs in target mRNAs. IRP binding inhibits the translation of mRNAs that contain an IRE in the 5’untranslated region of the transcripts, and increases the stability of mRNAs that contain IREs in the 3'untranslated region of transcripts. By these mechanisms, IRPs increase cellular iron absorption and decrease storage and export of iron to maintain an optimal intracellular iron balance. There are two members of the mammalian IRP protein family, IRP1 and IRP2, and they have redundant functions as evidenced by the embryonic lethality of the mice that completely lack IRP expression (Irp1-/-/Irp2-/- mice, which contrasts with the fact that Irp1-/- and Irp2-/- mice are viable. In addition, Irp2-/- mice also display neurodegenerative symptoms and microcytic hypochromic anemia, suggesting that IRP2 function predominates in the nervous system and erythropoietic homeostasis. Though the physiological significance of IRP1 had been unclear since Irp1-/- animals were first assessed in the early 1990’s, recent studies indicate that IRP1 plays an essential function in orchestrating the balance between erythropoiesis and bodily iron homeostasis. Additionally, Irp1-/- mice develop pulmonary hypertension, and they experience sudden death when maintained on an iron-deficient diet, indicating that IRP1 has a critical role in the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems. This review summarizes recent progress that has been made in understanding the physiological roles of IRP1 and IRP2, and further discusses the implications for clinical research on patients with idiopathic polycythemia, pulmonary hypertension and neurodegeneration.

  11. Metagenomic Study of Iron Homeostasis in Iron Depositing Hot Spring Cyanobacterial Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I.; Franklin H.; Tringe, S. G.; Klatt, C. G.; Bryant, D. A.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Guevara, M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: It is not clear how an iron-rich thermal hydrosphere could be hospitable to cyanobacteria, since reduced iron appears to stimulate oxidative stress in all domains of life and particularly in oxygenic phototrophs. Therefore, metagenomic study of cyanobacterial community in iron-depositing hot springs may help elucidate how oxygenic prokaryotes can withstand the extremely high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by interaction between environmental Fe2+ and O2. Method: Anchor proteins from various species of cyanobacteria and some anoxygenic phototrophs were selected on the basis of their hypothetical role in Fe homeostasis and the suppression of oxidative stress and were BLASTed against the metagenomes of iron-depositing Chocolate Pots and freshwater Mushroom hot springs. Results: BLASTing proteins hypothesized to be involved in Fe homeostasis against the microbiomes from the two springs revealed that iron-depositing hot spring has a greater abundance of defensive proteins such as bacterioferritin comigratory protein (Bcp) and DNA-binding Ferritin like protein (Dps) than a fresh-water hot spring. One may speculate that the abundance of Bcp and Dps in an iron-depositing hot spring is connected to the need to suppress oxidative stress in bacteria inhabiting environments with high Fe2+ concnetration. In both springs, Bcp and Dps are concentrated within the cyanobacterial fractions of the microbial community (regardless of abundance). Fe3+ siderophore transport (from the transport system permease protein query) may be less essential to the microbial community of CP because of the high [Fe]. Conclusion: Further research is needed to confirm that these proteins are unique to photoautotrophs such as those living in iron-depositing hot spring.

  12. An E3 ligase possessing an iron-responsive hemerythrin domain is a regulator of iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahudeen, Ameen A; Thompson, Joel W; Ruiz, Julio C; Ma, He-Wen; Kinch, Lisa N; Li, Qiming; Grishin, Nick V; Bruick, Richard K

    2009-10-30

    Cellular iron homeostasis is maintained by the coordinate posttranscriptional regulation of genes responsible for iron uptake, release, use, and storage through the actions of the iron regulatory proteins IRP1 and IRP2. However, the manner in which iron levels are sensed to affect IRP2 activity is poorly understood. We found that an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex containing the FBXL5 protein targets IRP2 for proteasomal degradation. The stability of FBXL5 itself was regulated, accumulating under iron- and oxygen-replete conditions and degraded upon iron depletion. FBXL5 contains an iron- and oxygen-binding hemerythrin domain that acted as a ligand-dependent regulatory switch mediating FBXL5's differential stability. These observations suggest a mechanistic link between iron sensing via the FBXL5 hemerythrin domain, IRP2 regulation, and cellular responses to maintain mammalian iron homeostasis. PMID:19762597

  13. Obesity Promotes Alterations in Iron Recycling

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    Marta Citelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepcidin is a key hormone that induces the degradation of ferroportin (FPN, a protein that exports iron from reticuloendothelial macrophages and enterocytes. The aim of the present study was to experimentally evaluate if the obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD modifies the expression of FPN in macrophages and enterocytes, thus altering the iron bioavailability. In order to directly examine changes associated with iron metabolism in vivo, C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control or a HFD. Serum leptin levels were evaluated. The hepcidin, divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1, FPN and ferritin genes were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of iron present in both the liver and spleen was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Ferroportin localization within reticuloendothelial macrophages was observed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Obese animals were found to exhibit increased hepcidin gene expression, while iron accumulated in the spleen and liver. They also exhibited changes in the sublocation of splenic cellular FPN and a reduction in the FPN expression in the liver and the spleen, while no changes were observed in enterocytes. Possible explanations for the increased hepcidin expression observed in HFD animals may include: increased leptin levels, the liver iron accumulation or endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Together, the results indicated that obesity promotes changes in iron bioavailability, since it altered the iron recycling function.

  14. The pupylation machinery is involved in iron homeostasis by targeting the iron storage protein ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küberl, Andreas; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael

    2016-04-26

    The balance of sufficient iron supply and avoidance of iron toxicity by iron homeostasis is a prerequisite for cellular metabolism and growth. Here we provide evidence that, in Actinobacteria, pupylation plays a crucial role in this process. Pupylation is a posttranslational modification in which the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup is covalently attached to a lysine residue in target proteins, thus resembling ubiquitination in eukaryotes. Pupylated proteins are recognized and unfolded by a dedicated AAA+ ATPase (Mycobacterium proteasomal AAA+ ATPase; ATPase forming ring-shaped complexes). In Mycobacteria, degradation of pupylated proteins by the proteasome serves as a protection mechanism against several stress conditions. Other bacterial genera capable of pupylation such as Corynebacterium lack a proteasome, and the fate of pupylated proteins is unknown. We discovered that Corynebacterium glutamicum mutants lacking components of the pupylation machinery show a strong growth defect under iron limitation, which was caused by the absence of pupylation and unfolding of the iron storage protein ferritin. Genetic and biochemical data support a model in which the pupylation machinery is responsible for iron release from ferritin independent of degradation. PMID:27078093

  15. Calcineurin signaling and membrane lipid homeostasis regulates iron mediated multidrug resistance mechanisms in Candida albicans.

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    Saif Hameed

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that iron deprivation enhances drug susceptibility of Candida albicans by increasing membrane fluidity which correlated with the lower expression of ERG11 transcript and ergosterol levels. The iron restriction dependent membrane perturbations led to an increase in passive diffusion and drug susceptibility. The mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis and multidrug resistance (MDR, however, are not yet resolved. To evaluate the potential mechanisms, we used whole genome transcriptome and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS based lipidome analyses of iron deprived Candida cells to examine the new cellular circuitry of the MDR of this pathogen. Our transcriptome data revealed a link between calcineurin signaling and iron homeostasis. Among the several categories of iron deprivation responsive genes, the down regulation of calcineurin signaling genes including HSP90, CMP1 and CRZ1 was noteworthy. Interestingly, iron deprived Candida cells as well as iron acquisition defective mutants phenocopied molecular chaperone HSP90 and calcineurin mutants and thus were sensitive to alkaline pH, salinity and membrane perturbations. In contrast, sensitivity to above stresses did not change in iron deprived DSY2146 strain with a hyperactive allele of calcineurin. Although, iron deprivation phenocopied compromised HSP90 and calcineurin, it was independent of protein kinase C signaling cascade. Notably, the phenotypes associated with iron deprivation in genetically impaired calcineurin and HSP90 could be reversed with iron supplementation. The observed down regulation of ergosterol (ERG1, ERG2, ERG11 and ERG25 and sphingolipid biosynthesis (AUR1 and SCS7 genes followed by lipidome analysis confirmed that iron deprivation not only disrupted ergosterol biosynthesis, but it also affected sphingolipid homeostasis in Candida cells. These lipid compositional changes suggested extensive remodeling of the membranes in iron

  16. Calcineurin signaling and membrane lipid homeostasis regulates iron mediated multidrug resistance mechanisms in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Saif; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Singh, Ashutosh; Goswami, Shyamal K; Prasad, Rajendra

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that iron deprivation enhances drug susceptibility of Candida albicans by increasing membrane fluidity which correlated with the lower expression of ERG11 transcript and ergosterol levels. The iron restriction dependent membrane perturbations led to an increase in passive diffusion and drug susceptibility. The mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis and multidrug resistance (MDR), however, are not yet resolved. To evaluate the potential mechanisms, we used whole genome transcriptome and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) based lipidome analyses of iron deprived Candida cells to examine the new cellular circuitry of the MDR of this pathogen. Our transcriptome data revealed a link between calcineurin signaling and iron homeostasis. Among the several categories of iron deprivation responsive genes, the down regulation of calcineurin signaling genes including HSP90, CMP1 and CRZ1 was noteworthy. Interestingly, iron deprived Candida cells as well as iron acquisition defective mutants phenocopied molecular chaperone HSP90 and calcineurin mutants and thus were sensitive to alkaline pH, salinity and membrane perturbations. In contrast, sensitivity to above stresses did not change in iron deprived DSY2146 strain with a hyperactive allele of calcineurin. Although, iron deprivation phenocopied compromised HSP90 and calcineurin, it was independent of protein kinase C signaling cascade. Notably, the phenotypes associated with iron deprivation in genetically impaired calcineurin and HSP90 could be reversed with iron supplementation. The observed down regulation of ergosterol (ERG1, ERG2, ERG11 and ERG25) and sphingolipid biosynthesis (AUR1 and SCS7) genes followed by lipidome analysis confirmed that iron deprivation not only disrupted ergosterol biosynthesis, but it also affected sphingolipid homeostasis in Candida cells. These lipid compositional changes suggested extensive remodeling of the membranes in iron deprived Candida

  17. Candida albicans specializations for iron homeostasis: from commensalism to virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is a fungal commensal-pathogen that persistently associates with its mammalian hosts. Between the commensal and pathogenic lifestyles, this microorganism inhabits host niches that differ markedly in the levels of bioavailable iron. A number of recent studies have exposed C. albicans specializations for acquiring iron from specific host molecules in regions where iron is scarce, while also defending against iron-related toxicity in regions where iron occurs in surfeit. Togethe...

  18. PfsR is a key regulator of iron homeostasis in Synechocystis PCC 6803.

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    Dan Cheng

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential cofactor in numerous cellular processes. The iron deficiency in the oceans affects the primary productivity of phytoplankton including cyanobacteria. In this study, we examined the function of PfsR, a TetR family transcriptional regulator, in iron homeostasis of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. Compared with the wild type, the pfsR deletion mutant displayed stronger tolerance to iron limitation and accumulated significantly more chlorophyll a, carotenoid, and phycocyanin under iron-limiting conditions. The mutant also maintained more photosystem I and photosystem II complexes than the wild type after iron deprivation. In addition, the activities of photosystem I and photosystem II were much higher in pfsR deletion mutant than in wild-type cells under iron-limiting conditions. The transcripts of pfsR were enhanced by iron limitation and inactivation of the gene affected pronouncedly expression of fut genes (encoding a ferric iron transporter, feoB (encoding a ferrous iron transporter, bfr genes (encoding bacterioferritins, ho genes (encoding heme oxygenases, isiA (encoding a chlorophyll-binding protein, and furA (encoding a ferric uptake regulator. The iron quota in pfsR deletion mutant cells was higher than in wild-type cells both before and after exposure to iron limitation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that PfsR bound to its own promoter and thereby auto-regulated its own expression. These data suggest that PfsR is a critical regulator of iron homeostasis.

  19. A multi-scale model of hepcidin promoter regulation reveals factors controlling systemic iron homeostasis.

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    Guillem Casanovas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic iron homeostasis involves a negative feedback circuit in which the expression level of the peptide hormone hepcidin depends on and controls the iron blood levels. Hepcidin expression is regulated by the BMP6/SMAD and IL6/STAT signaling cascades. Deregulation of either pathway causes iron-related diseases such as hemochromatosis or anemia of inflammation. We quantitatively analyzed how BMP6 and IL6 control hepcidin expression. Transcription factor (TF phosphorylation and reporter gene expression were measured under co-stimulation conditions, and the promoter was perturbed by mutagenesis. Using mathematical modeling, we systematically analyzed potential mechanisms of cooperative and competitive promoter regulation by the transcription factors, and experimentally validated the model predictions. Our results reveal that hepcidin cross-regulation primarily occurs by combinatorial transcription factor binding to the promoter, whereas signaling crosstalk is insignificant. We find that the presence of two BMP-responsive elements enhances the steepness of the promoter response towards the iron-sensing BMP signaling axis, which promotes iron homeostasis in vivo. IL6 co-stimulation reduces the promoter sensitivity towards the BMP signal, because the SMAD and STAT transcription factors compete for recruiting RNA polymerase to the transcription start site. This may explain why inflammatory signals disturb iron homeostasis in anemia of inflammation. Taken together, our results reveal why the iron homeostasis circuit is sensitive to perturbations implicated in disease.

  20. Liver-gut axis in the regulation of iron homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deepak Darshan; Gregory J Anderson

    2007-01-01

    The human body requires about 1-2 mg of iron per day for its normal functioning, and dietary iron is the only source for this essential metal. Since humans do not possess a mechanism for the active excretion of iron,the amount of iron in the body is determined by the amount absorbed across the proximal small intestine and, consequently, intestinal iron absorption is a highly regulated process. In recent years, the liver has emerged as a central regulator of both iron absorption and iron release from other tissues. It achieves this by secreting a peptide hormone called hepcidin that acts on the small intestinal epithelium and other cells to limit iron delivery to the plasma. Hepcidin itself is regulated in response to various systemic stimuli including variations in body iron stores, the rate of erythropoiesis, inflammation and hypoxia, the same stimuli that have been known for many years to modulate iron absorption. This review will summarize recent findings on the role played by the liver and hepcidin in the regulation of body iron absorption.

  1. Vacuolar-Iron-Transporter1-Like proteins mediate iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollhofer, Julia; Timofeev, Roman; Lan, Ping; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Buckhout, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a nutritional problem in plants and reduces crop productivity, quality and yield. With the goal of improving the iron (Fe) storage properties of plants, we have investigated the function of three Arabidopsis proteins with homology to Vacuolar Iron Transporter1 (AtVIT1). Heterologous expression of Vacuolar Iron Transporter-Like1 (AtVTL1; At1g21140), AtVTL2 (At1g76800) or AtVTL5 (At3g25190) in the yeast vacuolar Fe transport mutant, Δccc1, restored growth in the presence of 4 mM Fe. Isolated vacuoles from yeast expressing either of the VTL genes in the Δccc1 background had a three- to four-fold increase in Fe concentration compared to vacuoles isolated from the untransformed mutant. Transiently expressed GFP-tagged AtVTL1 was localized exclusively and AtVTL2 was localized primarily to the vacuolar membrane of onion epidermis cells. Seedling root growth of the Arabidopsis nramp3/nramp4 and vit1-1 mutants was decreased compared to the wild type when seedlings were grown under Fe deficiency. When expressed under the 35S promoter in the nramp3/nramp4 or vit1-1 backgrounds, AtVTL1, AtVTL2 or AtVTL5 restored root growth in both mutants. The seed Fe concentration in the nramp3/nramp4 mutant overexpressing AtVTL1, AtVTL2 or AtVTL5 was between 50 and 60% higher than in non-transformed double mutants or wild-type plants. We conclude that the VTL proteins catalyze Fe transport into vacuoles and thus contribute to the regulation of Fe homeostasis in planta. PMID:25360591

  2. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  3. Involvement of the Iron Regulatory Protein from Eisenia andrei Earthworms in the Regulation of Cellular Iron Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Petra Procházková; František Škanta; Radka Roubalová; Marcela Šilerová; Jiří Dvořák; Martin Bilej

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely f...

  4. Chronic hepcidin induction causes hyposideremia and alters the pattern of cellular iron accumulation in hemochromatotic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viatte, Lydie; Nicolas, Gaël; Lou, Dan-Qing; Bennoun, Myriam; Lesbordes-Brion, Jeanne-Claire; Canonne-Hergaux, François; Schönig, Kai; Bujard, Hermann; Kahn, Axel; Andrews, Nancy C; Vaulont, Sophie

    2006-04-01

    We report the generation of a tetracycline-regulated (Tet ON) transgenic mouse model for acute and chronic expression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin in the liver. We demonstrate that short-term and long-term tetracycline-dependent activation of hepcidin in adult mice leads to hypoferremia and iron-limited erythropoiesis, respectively. This clearly establishes the key role of hepcidin in regulating the extracellular iron concentration. We previously demonstrated that, when expressed early in fetal development, constitutive transgenic hepcidin expression prevented iron accumulation in an Hfe-/- mouse model of hemochromatosis. We now explore the effect of chronic hepcidin expression in adult Hfe-/- mice that have already developed liver iron overload. We demonstrate that induction of chronic hepcidin expression in 2-month-old Hfe-/- mice alters their pattern of cellular iron accumulation, leading to increased iron in tissue macrophages and duodenal cells but less iron in hepatocytes. These hepcidin-induced changes in the pattern of cellular iron accumulation are associated with decreased expression of the iron exporter ferroportin in macrophages but no detectable alteration of ferroportin expression in the hepatocytes. We speculate that this change in iron homeostasis could offer a therapeutic advantage by protecting against damage to parenchymal cells. PMID:16339398

  5. Functional genomics of pH homeostasis in Corynebacterium glutamicum revealed novel links between pH response, oxidative stress, iron homeostasis and methionine synthesis

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    Persicke Marcus

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maintenance of internal pH in bacterial cells is challenged by natural stress conditions, during host infection or in biotechnological production processes. Comprehensive transcriptomic and proteomic analyses has been conducted in several bacterial model systems, yet questions remain as to the mechanisms of pH homeostasis. Results Here we present the comprehensive analysis of pH homeostasis in C. glutamicum, a bacterium of industrial importance. At pH values between 6 and 9 effective maintenance of the internal pH at 7.5 ± 0.5 pH units was found. By DNA microarray analyses differential mRNA patterns were identified. The expression profiles were validated and extended by 1D-LC-ESI-MS/MS based quantification of soluble and membrane proteins. Regulators involved were identified and thereby participation of numerous signaling modules in pH response was found. The functional analysis revealed for the first time the occurrence of oxidative stress in C. glutamicum cells at neutral and low pH conditions accompanied by activation of the iron starvation response. Intracellular metabolite pool analysis unraveled inhibition of the TCA and other pathways at low pH. Methionine and cysteine synthesis were found to be activated via the McbR regulator, cysteine accumulation was observed and addition of cysteine was shown to be toxic under acidic conditions. Conclusions Novel limitations for C. glutamicum at non-optimal pH values were identified by a comprehensive analysis on the level of the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome indicating a functional link between pH acclimatization, oxidative stress, iron homeostasis, and metabolic alterations. The results offer new insights into bacterial stress physiology and new starting points for bacterial strain design or pathogen defense.

  6. Fenvalerate-induced Alterations in Calcium Homeostasis in Rat Ovary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of fenvalerate on calcium homeostasis in rat ovary. Methods Female SpragueDawley rats were orally given fenvalerate at daily doses of 0.00, 1.91, 9.55, and 31.80 mg/kg for four weeks. The ovary ultrastucture was observed by electron microscopy. Serum free calcium concentration was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The activities of phosphorylase a in rat ovary were evaluated by the chromatometry. The total content of calmodulin in ovary was estimated by ELISA at each stage of estrous cycle. Radioimmunoassay (RIA) was used to evaluate the level of serum progesterone. Results Histopathologically, damages of ovarian corpus luteum cells were observed. An increase in serum free calcium concentration was observed in rats treated with 31.80mg/kg fenvalerate. The activities of phosphorylase a enhanced in all treated groups, and fenvalerate increased the total content of calmodulin significantly in estrus period. Serum progesterone levels declined in fenvalerate exposed rats in diestrus. Conclusion Fenvalerate interferes with calcium homeostasis in rat ovary. Also, the inhibitory effects of fenvalerate on serum progesterone levels may be mediated partly through calcium signals.

  7. Simon Labbé’s work on iron and copper homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Simon; Labbé

    2010-01-01

    Iron and copper have a wealth of functions in biological systems,which makes them essential micronutrients for all living organisms.Defects in iron and copper homeostasis are directly responsible for diseases,and have been linked to impaired development,metabolic syndromes and fungal virulence.Consequently,it is crucial to gain a comprehensive understanding of the molecular bases of iron-and copper-dependent proteins in living systems.Simon Labbémaintains parallel programs on iron and copper homeostasis using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe(Schiz.pombe) as a model system.The study of fission yeast transition-metal metabolism has been successful,not only in discerning the genes and pathways functioning in Schiz.pombe,but also the genes and pathways that are active in mammalian systems and for other fungi.

  8. The extrahepatic role of TFR2 in iron homeostasis

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    Laura eSilvestri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2, a protein homologous to the cell iron importer transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1, is expressed in the liver and erythroid cells and is reported to bind diferric transferrin, although at lower affinity than TFR1. TFR2 gene is mutated in type 3 hemochromatosis, a disorder characterized by iron overload and inability to upregulate hepcidin in response to iron. Liver TFR2 is considered a sensor of diferric transferrin, possibly in a complex with HFE. In erythroid cells TFR2 is a partner of erythropoietin receptor (EPOR and stabilizes the receptor on the cell surface. However, Tfr2 null mice as well as TFR2 hemochromatosis patients do not show defective erythropoiesis and tolerate repeated phlebotomy. The iron deficient Tfr2-Tmprss6 double knock out mice have higher red cells count and more severe microcytosis than the liver specific Tfr2 and Tmprss6 double knock out mice. TFR2 in the bone marrow might be a sensor of iron deficiency that protects against excessive microcytosis in a way that involves EPOR, although the mechanisms remain to be worked out.

  9. Hepcidin and regulation of iron homeostasis in maintenance hemodialysis patients

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    Dawlat Sany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepcidin may play a critical role in the response of patients with anemia to iron and erythropoiesis-stimulating agent therapy. To evaluate the factors affecting serum hepcidin levels and their relation to other indexes of anemia, iron metabolism and inflammation, as well as the dose of erythropoietin, we studied 80 maintenance hemodialysis (MHD patients treated with recombinant human erythropoietin and their serum hepcidin levels were specifically measured by using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In linear regression analysis, ferritin was found to be a significant predictor of hepcidin levels in all the study patients. In the absence of apparent inflammation, serum hepcidin levels correlated exclusively with ferritin levels in MHD patients, and it was also an independent marker of inflammation as highly sensitive C-reactive protein.

  10. Alterations in auxin homeostasis suppress defects in cell wall function.

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    Blaire J Steinwand

    Full Text Available The plant cell wall is a highly dynamic structure that changes in response to both environmental and developmental cues. It plays important roles throughout plant growth and development in determining the orientation and extent of cell expansion, providing structural support and acting as a barrier to pathogens. Despite the importance of the cell wall, the signaling pathways regulating its function are not well understood. Two partially redundant leucine-rich-repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs, FEI1 and FEI2, regulate cell wall function in Arabidopsis thaliana roots; disruption of the FEIs results in short, swollen roots as a result of decreased cellulose synthesis. We screened for suppressors of this swollen root phenotype and identified two mutations in the putative mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α homolog, IAA-Alanine Resistant 4 (IAR4. Mutations in IAR4 were shown previously to disrupt auxin homeostasis and lead to reduced auxin function. We show that mutations in IAR4 suppress a subset of the fei1 fei2 phenotypes. Consistent with the hypothesis that the suppression of fei1 fei2 by iar4 is the result of reduced auxin function, disruption of the WEI8 and TAR2 genes, which decreases auxin biosynthesis, also suppresses fei1 fei2. In addition, iar4 suppresses the root swelling and accumulation of ectopic lignin phenotypes of other cell wall mutants, including procuste and cobra. Further, iar4 mutants display decreased sensitivity to the cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor isoxaben. These results establish a role for IAR4 in the regulation of cell wall function and provide evidence of crosstalk between the cell wall and auxin during cell expansion in the root.

  11. Mitochondrial ferritin in the regulation of brain iron homeostasis and neurodegenerative diseases

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    Guofen eGao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt is a novel iron-storage protein in mitochondria. Evidences have shown that FtMt is structurally and functionally similar to the cytosolic H-chain ferritin. It protects mitochondria from iron-induced oxidative damage presumably through sequestration of potentially harmful excess free iron. It also participates in the regulation of iron distribution between cytosol and mitochondrial contents. Unlike the ubiquitously expressed H-ferritin, FtMt is mainly expressed in testis and brain, which suggests its tissue-related roles. FtMt is involved in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, as its increased expression has been observed in Alzheimer’s disease, restless legs syndrome and Friedreich’s ataxia. Studies from our laboratory showed that in Alzheimer’s disease, FtMt overexpression attenuated the β-amyloid induced neurotoxicity, which on the other hand increased significantly when FtMt expression was knocked down. It is also found that, by maintaining mitochondrial iron homeostasis, FtMt could prevent 6-hydroxydopamine induced dopaminergic cell damage in Parkinson’s disease. These recent findings on FtMt regarding its functions in regulation of brain iron homeostasis and its protective role in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases are summarized and reviewed.

  12. Matriptase-2 is essential for hepcidin repression during fetal life and postnatal development in mice to maintain iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemetz, Alexandra; Lenoir, Anne; Deschemin, Jean-Christophe; Lopez-Otin, Carlos; Ramsay, Andrew J; Vaulont, Sophie; Nicolas, Gaël

    2014-07-17

    Iron is an essential element required for development and survival of all living organisms. In fetuses, maternofetal iron transfer across the placenta is essential for growth and development. In neonates, efficient intestinal iron absorption is required to scavenge as much iron as possible from the low-iron-content milk. During these periods, efficient iron mobilization is ensured by the downregulation of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin by as-yet uncharacterized molecular mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that the recently described hepcidin repressor-the serine protease matriptase-2 (encoded by Tmprss6)-is responsible for this repression throughout development, with its deficiency leading to increased hepcidin levels triggering iron deficiency and anemia starting in utero. This result might have implications for a better understanding of iron homeostasis during early development in iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia patients, who present with microcytic anemia caused by hyperhepcidinemia, and of questions about the role of matriptase-2 in human neonates. PMID:24904115

  13. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Procházková

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP. The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant.

  14. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant. PMID:25279857

  15. Vacuolar-Iron-Transporter1-Like Proteins Mediate Iron Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Gollhofer, Julia; Timofeev, Roman; LAN, PING; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Buckhout, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a nutritional problem in plants and reduces crop productivity, quality and yield. With the goal of improving the iron (Fe) storage properties of plants, we have investigated the function of three Arabidopsis proteins with homology to Vacuolar Iron Transporter1 (AtVIT1). Heterologous expression of Vacuolar Iron Transporter-Like1 (AtVTL1; At1g21140), AtVTL2 (At1g76800) or AtVTL5 (At3g25190) in the yeast vacuolar Fe transport mutant, Δccc1, restored growth in the presence of 4...

  16. Pharmacodynamic Model of Hepcidin Regulation of Iron Homeostasis in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanski, Wojciech; Xiao, Jim J; Sasu, Barbra; Hinkle, Beth; Perez-Ruixo, Juan Jose

    2016-05-01

    Hepcidin (H25) is a hormone peptide synthesized by the liver that binds to ferroportin and blocks iron export. In this study, H25 was inhibited by administration of single and multiple doses of an anti-H25 monoclonal antibody Ab 12B9m in cynomolgus monkeys. The objective of this analysis was to develop a pharmacodynamic model describing the role of H25 in regulating iron homeostasis and the impact of hepcidin inhibition by Ab 12B9m. Total serum H25 and Ab 12B9m were determined in each animal. Corresponding measurements of serum iron and hemoglobin (Hb) were obtained. The PD model consisted of iron pools in serum (FeS), reticuloendothelial macrophages (FeM), hemoglobin (FeHb), and liver (FeL). The iron was assumed to be transported between the FeS, FeHb, and FeM unidirectionally at rates k S, k Hb, and k M. H25 serum concentrations were described by the previously developed PK model with the parameters fixed at their estimates. The serum iron and Hb data were fitted simultaneously. The corresponding estimates of the rate constants were k S/Fe0 = 0.113 h(-1), k M = 0.00191 h(-1), and k Hb = 0.00817 h(-1). The model-based IC50 value for the H25 inhibitory effect on ferroportin activity was 0.398 nM. The PD model predicted a negligible effect of Ab 12B9m on Hb levels for the tested doses. The presented PD model adequately described the serum iron time courses following single and multiple doses of Ab 12B9m. Ab 12B9m-induced inhibition of H25 resulted in a temporal increase in serum and liver iron and a decrease in the iron stored in reticuloendothelial macrophages. PMID:26917226

  17. FIT interacts with AtbHLH38 and AtbHLH39 in regulating iron uptake gene expression for iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youxi Yuan; Huilan Wu; Ning Wang; Jie Li; Weina Zhao; Juan Du; Daowen Wang; Hong-Qing Ling

    2008-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for plant growth and development. Iron homeostasis in plants is tightly regulated at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional level. Several bHLH transcription factors involved in iron homeostasis have been identified recently. However, their regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. In this work, we demonstrate that the transcription factor FIT interacted with AtbHLH38 and AtbHLH39 and directly conferred the expression regulation of iron uptake genes for iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis. Yeast two-hybrid analysis and transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts showed that AtbH LH38 or AtbHLH39 interacted with FIT, a central transcription factor involved in iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis. Expression of FIT/AtbHLH38 or FIT/AtbHLH39 in yeast cells activated GUS expression driven by ferric chelate reductase (FRO2) and ferrous transporter (IRT1) promoters. Overexpression of FIT with either AtbHLH38 or AtbHLH39 in plants converted the expression of the iron uptake genes FRO2 and IRT1 from induced to constitutive. Further analysis revealed that FR02 and IRT1 were not regulated at the posttranscriptional level in these plants because IRT1 protein accumulation and high ferric chelate reductase activity were detected in the overexpression plants under both iron deficiency and iron sufficiency. The double overexpression plants accumulated more iron in their shoots than wild type or the plants overexpressing either AtbHLH38,AtbHLH39 or FIT. Our data support that ferric-chelate reductase FRO2 and ferrous-transporter IRT1 are the targets of the three transcription factors and the transcription of FRO2 and IRT1 is directly regulated by a complex of FIT/AtbHLH38 or FIT/AtbHLH39.

  18. Sleep alterations and iron deficiency anemia in infancy

    OpenAIRE

    PEIRANO, PATRICIO D.; ALGARÍN, CECILIA R.; Chamorro, Rodrigo A.; Reyes, Sussanne C.; Durán, Samuel A.; Garrido, Marcelo I.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2010-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be the most common single nutrient deficiency in the world. An estimated 20-25% of the world’s infants have IDA, with at least as many having iron deficiency without anemia. Infants are at particular risk due to rapid growth and limited dietary sources of iron. We found that infants with IDA showed different motor activity patterning in all sleep-waking states and several differences in sleep states organization. Sleep alterations were still apparent ...

  19. Comparative analysis of iron homeostasis in sub-Saharan African children with sickle cell disease and their unaffected siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma eGomez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential trace element subject to tight regulation to ensure adequate running of biological processes. In sub-Saharan Africa where hemoglobinopathies are common, iron homeostasis is likely to be impaired by these conditions. Here we assessed and compared key serum proteins associated with iron metabolism between sub-Saharan African children with sickle cell disease (SCD and their unaffected siblings. Complete blood counts and serum concentrations of four key proteins involved in iron regulation (ferritin, transferrin, sTfR and hepcidin were measured for 73 children with SCD and 68 healthy siblings in Benin, West Africa. We found significant differences in concentration of transferrin, sTfR and ferritin between the two groups. Hepcidin concentrations were found at unusually high concentrations but did not differ among the two groups. We found a significant negative correlation between hepcidin levels and both MCH and MCV in the SCD group and report that sTfR concentrations show a correlation with MCV and MHC in opposite directions in the two groups. These results highlight the unusually high levels of hepcidin in the Beninese population and the patterns of differential iron homeostasis taking place under sickle cell disease status. These results lay the foundation for a systematic evaluation of the underlying mechanisms deregulating iron homeostasis in populations with SCD or high prevalence of iron deficiency.

  20. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Indicates a Disturbed Brain Iron Homeostasis in Neuromyelitis Optica – A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado, Vanessa; Rueda, Fernanda; Deistung, Andreas; Reichenbach, Juergen R.; Tukamoto, Gustavo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Schweser, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of brain iron homeostasis is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and can be associated with oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to investigate brain iron in patients with Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) using quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), a quantitative iron-sensitive MRI technique. 12 clinically confirmed NMO patients (6 female and 6 male; age 35.4y±14.2y) and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (7 female and 5 male; age 33.9±11.3y) underwent MRI of the brain at 3 Tesla. Quantitative maps of the effective transverse relaxation rate (R2*) and magnetic susceptibility were calculated and a blinded ROI-based group comparison analysis was performed. Normality of the data and differences between patients and controls were tested by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and t-test, respectively. Correlation with age was studied using Spearman’s rank correlation and an ANCOVA-like analysis. Magnetic susceptibility values were decreased in the red nucleus (p0.95; between -15 and -22 ppb depending on reference region) with a trend toward increasing differences with age. R2* revealed significantly decreased relaxation in the optic radiations of five of the 12 patients (p<0.0001; -3.136±0.567 s-1). Decreased relaxation in the optic radiation is indicative for demyelination, which is in line with previous findings. Decreased magnetic susceptibility in the red nucleus is indicative for a lower brain iron concentration, a chemical redistribution of iron into less magnetic forms, or both. Further investigations are necessary to elucidate the pathological cause or consequence of this finding. PMID:27171423

  1. Prominent pancreatic endocrinopathy and altered control of food intake disrupt energy homeostasis in prion diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J.D.; Berardinelli, J.G.; Rocke, T.E.; Bessen, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that can induce endocrinopathies. The basis of altered endocrine function in prion diseases is not well understood, and the purpose of this study was to investigate the spatiotemporal relationship between energy homeostasis and prion infection in hamsters inoculated with either the 139H strain of scrapie agent, which induces preclinical weight gain, or the HY strain of transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), which induces clinical weight loss. Temporal changes in body weight, feed, and water intake were measured as well as both non-fasted and fasted concentrations of serum glucose, insulin, glucagon, ??-ketones, and leptin. In 139H scrapie-infected hamsters, polydipsia, hyperphagia, non-fasted hyperinsulinemia with hyperglycemia, and fasted hyperleptinemia were found at preclinical stages and are consistent with an anabolic syndrome that has similarities to type II diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome X. In HY TME-infected hamsters, hypodipsia, hypersecretion of glucagon (in both non-fasted and fasted states), increased fasted ??-ketones, fasted hypoglycemia, and suppressed non-fasted leptin concentrations were found while feed intake was normal. These findings suggest a severe catabolic syndrome in HY TME infection mediated by chronic increases in glucagon secretion. In both models, alterations of pancreatic endocrine function were not associated with PrPSc deposition in the pancreas. The results indicate that prominent endocrinopathy underlies alterations in body weight, pancreatic endocrine function, and intake of food. The prion-induced alterations of energy homeostasis in 139H scrapie- or HY TME-infected hamsters could occur within areas of the hypothalamus that control food satiety and/or within autonomic centers that provide neural outflow to the pancreas. ?? 2008 Society for Endocrinology.

  2. Partial restoration of mutant enzyme homeostasis in three distinct lysosomal storage disease cell lines by altering calcium homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Wei Mu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A lysosomal storage disease (LSD results from deficient lysosomal enzyme activity, thus the substrate of the mutant enzyme accumulates in the lysosome, leading to pathology. In many but not all LSDs, the clinically most important mutations compromise the cellular folding of the enzyme, subjecting it to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation instead of proper folding and lysosomal trafficking. A small molecule that restores partial mutant enzyme folding, trafficking, and activity would be highly desirable, particularly if one molecule could ameliorate multiple distinct LSDs by virtue of its mechanism of action. Inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels, using either diltiazem or verapamil-both US Food and Drug Administration-approved hypertension drugs-partially restores N370S and L444P glucocerebrosidase homeostasis in Gaucher patient-derived fibroblasts; the latter mutation is associated with refractory neuropathic disease. Diltiazem structure-activity studies suggest that it is its Ca2+ channel blocker activity that enhances the capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum to fold misfolding-prone proteins, likely by modest up-regulation of a subset of molecular chaperones, including BiP and Hsp40. Importantly, diltiazem and verapamil also partially restore mutant enzyme homeostasis in two other distinct LSDs involving enzymes essential for glycoprotein and heparan sulfate degradation, namely alpha-mannosidosis and type IIIA mucopolysaccharidosis, respectively. Manipulation of calcium homeostasis may represent a general strategy to restore protein homeostasis in multiple LSDs. However, further efforts are required to demonstrate clinical utility and safety.

  3. Alteration mineral mapping for iron prospecting using ETM+ data, Tonkolili iron field, northern Sierra Leone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansaray, Lamin R.; Liu, Lei; Zhou, Jun; Ma, Zhimin

    2013-10-01

    The Tonkolili iron field in northern Sierra Leone has the largest known iron ore deposit in Africa. It occurs in a greenstone belt in an Achaean granitic basement. This study focused mainly on mapping areas with iron-oxide and hydroxyl bearing minerals, and identifying potential areas for haematite mineralization and banded iron formations (BIFs) in Tonkolili. The predominant mineral assemblage at the surface (laterite duricrust) of this iron field is haematitegoethite- limonite ±magnetite. The mineralization occurs in quartzitic banded ironstones, layered amphibolites, granites, schists and hornblendites. In this study, Crosta techniques were applied on Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data to enhance areas with alteration minerals and target potential areas of haematite and BIF units in the Tonkolili iron field. Synthetic analysis shows that alteration zones mapped herein are consistent with the already discovered magnetite BIFs in Tonkolili. Based on the overlaps of the simplified geological map and the remote sensing-based alteration mineral maps obtained in this study, three new haematite prospects were inferred within, and one new haematite prospect was inferred outside the tenement boundary of the Tonkolili exploration license. As the primary iron mineral in Tonkolili is magnetite, the study concludes that, these haematite prospects could also be underlain by magnetite BIFs. This study also concludes that, the application of Crosta techniques on ETM+ data is effective not only in mapping iron-oxide and hydroxyl alterations but can also provide a basis for inferring areas of potential iron resources in Algoma-type banded iron formations (BIFs), such as those in the Tonkolili field.

  4. Silkworm ferritin 1 heavy chain homolog is involved in defense against bacterial infection through regulation of haemolymph iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otho, Sohail Ahmed; Chen, Kangkang; Zhang, Yongdong; Wang, Peng; Lu, Zhiqiang

    2016-02-01

    Iron functions as a nutrient and a potential toxin in all organisms. It plays a key role in the interaction between microbes and their hosts as well. Microbial infection disrupts iron homeostasis in the host; meanwhile the host endeavors to keep the homeostasis through iron transport and storage. Transferrins and ferritins are the major iron-binding proteins that affect iron distribution in insects. In this study, we investigated a possible involvement of Bombyx mori ferritin 1 (BmFer1) heavy chain homolog in the defense against bacterial infection in the silkworm larvae. The BmFer1 mRNA abundance was up-regulated in hemocytes, but not in fat body, after Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus infection. The infection resulted in elevated iron levels in the hemolymph. Injection of recombinant BmFer1 protein into hemocoel reduced the plasma iron level after infection, limited the bacterial growth in the hemolymph, and resulted in a lower mortality caused by infection. Our study indicated that B. mori ferritin-1 may restrict iron access of the invading bacteria to block their growth as a defense strategy. PMID:26522340

  5. Alterations in the homeostasis of phospholipids and cholesterol by antitumor alkylphospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segovia Josefa L

    2010-03-01

    biosynthesis as well as the receptor-mediated uptake of cholesterol. Thus, membrane-targeted alkylphospholipids exhibit a common mechanism of action through disruption of cholesterol homeostasis. The accumulation of cholesterol within the cell and the reduction in phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin biosyntheses certainly alter the ratio of choline-bearing phospholipids to cholesterol, which is critical for the integrity and functionality of specific membrane microdomains such as lipid rafts. Alkylphospholipid-induced alterations in lipid homeostasis with probable disturbance of the native membrane structure could well affect signaling processes vital to cell survival and growth.

  6. Iron homeostasis and H63D mutations in alcoholics with and without liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Verdelho Machado, Paula Ravasco, Alexandra Martins, Maria Rosário Almeida, Maria Ermelinda Camilo, Helena Cortez-Pinto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of HFE gene mutation and indices of disturbed iron homeostasis in alcoholics with and without liver disease.METHODS: One hundred and fifty-three heavy drinkers (defined as alcohol consumption > 80 g/d for at least 5 years were included in the study. These comprised 78 patients with liver disease [liver disease alcoholics (LDA] in whom the presence of liver disease was confirmed by liver biopsy or clinical evidence of hepatic decompensation, and 75 subjects with no evidence of liver disease, determined by normal liver tests on two occasions [non-liver disease alcoholics (NLDA], were consecutively enrolled. Serum markers of iron status and HFE C282Y and H63D mutations were determined. HFE genotyping was compared with data obtained in healthy blood donors from the same geographical area.RESULTS: Gender ratio was similar in both study groups. LDA patients were older than NLDA patients (52 ± 10 years vs 48 ± 11 years, P = 0.03. One third and one fifth of the study population had serum transferrin saturation (TS greater than 45% and 60% respectively. Serum iron levels were similar in both groups. However, LDA patients had higher TS (51 ± 27 vs 36 ± 13, P < 0.001 and ferritin levels (559 ± 607 ng/mL vs 159 ± 122 ng/mL, P < 0.001, and lower total iron binding capacity (TIBC (241 ± 88 μg/dL vs 279 ± 40 μg/dL, P = 0.001. The odds ratio for having liver disease with TS greater than 45% was 2.20 (95% confidence interval (CI: 1.37-3.54. There was no difference in C282Y allelic frequency between the two groups. However, H63D was more frequent in LDA patients (0.25 vs 0.16, P = 0.03. LDA patients had a greater probability of carrying at least one HFE mutation than NLDA patients (49.5% vs 31.6%, P = 0.02. The odds ratio for LDA in patients with H63D mutation was 1.57 (95% CI: 1.02-2.40.CONCLUSION: The present study confirms the presence of iron overload in alcoholics, which was more severe in the subset of subjects with

  7. Hiperpigmentación cutánea y homeostasis del hierro: rol de la hepcidina Cutaneous hyperpigmentation and homeostasis of iron: role of the hepcidin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wolf

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available La hiperpigmentación cutánea por melanina en zonas expuestas al sol puede estar asociada a un desequilibrio en la homeostasis del hierro. La hepcidina es un péptido responsable de la regulación negativa de la absorción del hierro en el intestino delgado y de su liberación por los macrófagos. Posee capacidad antimicrobiana. Es sintetizada en el hígado, secretada al torrente circulatorio y excretada por la orina. La sobreexpresión causa anemia y su déficit, sobrecarga de hierro (acumulación en diferentes órganos y hemocromatosis hereditaria. Los antagonistas de la hepcidina podrían utilizarse en el tratamiento de la anemia resistente a eritropoyetina, asociada a procesos crónicos. Por su parte, los agonistas o sustancias que estimulen la producción de hepcidina, podrían constituir un tratamiento en enfermedades con sobrecarga de hierro (siderosis y por consiguiente, corregir la hiperpigmentación asociada.The cutaneous hyperpigmentation by melanin in zones of the skin exposed to the sun can be associated to an imbalance in the homeostasis of the iron. The hepcidin is a peptide responsible for the negative regulation of the absorption of the iron in the small intestine and of its liberation by the macrophages. It has, in addition, antimicrobial capacity. It is synthesized in the liver, secreted to the circulatory torrent and excreted by the urine. Its overexpression causes anemia and its deficit iron overload (accumulation in different organs and hereditary hemochromatosis, The antagonists of the hepcidin, could be used in the treatment of anemia resistant to erythropoyetin associated to chronic processes. On the other hand, the agonists or substances that stimulate the hepcidin production, could constitute a treatment in diseases with overload of iron (siderosis and therefore, to correct the associate.hyperpigmentation.

  8. Insulin/IGF-1 and hypoxia signaling act in concert to regulate iron homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ackerman

    Full Text Available Iron plays an essential role in many biological processes, but also catalyzes the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which can cause molecular damage. Iron homeostasis is therefore a critical determinant of fitness. In Caenorhabditis elegans, insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS promotes growth and reproduction but limits stress resistance and lifespan through inactivation of the DAF-16/FoxO transcription factor (TF. We report that long-lived daf-2 insulin/IGF-1 receptor mutants show a daf-16-dependent increase in expression of ftn-1, which encodes the iron storage protein H-ferritin. To better understand the regulation of iron homeostasis, we performed a TF-limited genetic screen for factors influencing ftn-1 gene expression. The screen identified the heat-shock TF hsf-1, the MAD bHLH TF mdl-1, and the putative histone acetyl transferase ada-2 as activators of ftn-1 expression. It also revealed that the HIFα homolog hif-1 and its binding partner aha-1 (HIFβ are potent repressors of ftn-1 expression. ftn-1 expression is induced by exposure to iron, and we found that hif-1 was required for this induction. In addition, we found that the prolyl hydroxylase EGL-9, which represses HIF-1 via the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor VHL-1, can also act antagonistically to VHL-1 in regulating ftn-1. This suggests a novel mechanism for HIF target gene regulation by these evolutionarily conserved and clinically important hydroxylases. Our findings imply that the IIS and HIF pathways act together to regulate iron homeostasis in C. elegans. We suggest that IIS/DAF-16 regulation of ftn-1 modulates a trade-off between growth and stress resistance, as elevated iron availability supports growth but also increases ROS production.

  9. The Loss of Myocardial Benefit following Ischemic Preconditioning Is Associated with Dysregulation of Iron Homeostasis in Diet-Induced Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokur, Vladimir; Weksler-Zangen, Sarah; Berenshtein, Eduard; Eliashar, Ron; Chevion, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    Whether the diabetic heart benefits from ischemic preconditioning (IPC), similar to the non-diabetic heart, is a subject of controversy. We recently proposed new roles for iron and ferritin in IPC-protection in Type 1-like streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat heart. Here, we investigated iron homeostasis in Cohen diabetic sensitive rat (CDs) that develop hyperglycemia when fed on a high-sucrose/low-copper diet (HSD), but maintain normoglycemia on regular-diet (RD). Control Cohen-resistant rats (CDr) maintain normoglycemia on either diet. The IPC procedure improved the post-ischemic recovery of normoglycemic hearts (CDr-RD, CDr-HSD and CDs-RD). CDs-HSD hearts failed to show IPC-associated protection. The recovery of these CDs-HSD hearts following I/R (without prior IPC) was better than their RD controls. During IPC ferritin levels increased in normoglycemic hearts, and its level was maintained nearly constant during the subsequent prolonged ischemia, but decayed to its baseline level during the reperfusion phase. In CDs-HSD hearts the baseline levels of ferritin and ferritin-saturation with iron were notably higher than in the controls, and remained unchanged during the entire experiment. This unique and abnormal pattern of post-ischemic recovery of CDs-HSD hearts is associated with marked changes in myocardial iron homeostasis, and suggests that iron and iron-proteins play a causative role/s in the etiology of diabetes-associated cardiovascular disorders. PMID:27458721

  10. c-Myc over-expression in Ramos Burkitt's lymphoma cell line predisposes to iron homeostasis disruption in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkitt's lymphoma is an aggressive B-cell neoplasm resulting from deregulated c-myc expression. We have previously shown that proliferation of Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines such as Ramos is markedly reduced by iron treatment. It has been shown that iron induces expression of c-myc which, owing to its transcriptional regulatory functions, regulates genes involved in iron metabolism. Transient enhancement of c-myc expression by iron could increase the expression of genes involved in iron incorporation, which could lead to an accumulation of intracellular free iron. Here, we have investigated whether cells with a high basal level of c-Myc were more likely to accumulate free iron. Our results suggest that the basal level of c-Myc in Ramos cells is twofold higher than what is seen in HL-60 cells. Moreover, in Ramos cells, where c-Myc is expressed at a high level, H-ferritin expression is down-regulated, transferrin receptor (CD71) expression is increased, and ferritin translation is inhibited. These modifications in iron metabolism, resulting from the strong basal expression of c-Myc, and amplified by iron addition, could lead to a disruption in homeostasis and consequently to growth arrest

  11. Arabidopsis HY1 Confers Cadmium Toleranceby Decreasing Nitric Oxide Production andImproving Iron Homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Up-regulation of the gene that encodes intracellular heme oxygenase 1 (HO1) benefits plants under cad-mium (Cd2+) stress; however, the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we elucidate the role of Arabidopsis HY1(AtHO1) in Cd2+ tolerance by using genetic and molecular approaches. Analysis of two HY1 null mutants, three HY1 over-expression lines, HO double or triple mutants, as well as phyA and phyB mutants revealed the specific hypersensitivityof by1 to Cd2+ stress. Supplementation with two enzymatic by-products of HY1, carbon monoxide (CO) and iron (Fe,especially), rescued the Cd2+-induced inhibition of primary root (PR) elongation in hy1-100. The mutation of HY1, whichexhibited lower glutathione content than Col-0 in root tissues, was able to induce nitric oxide (NO) overproduction,Cd2+ accumulation, and severe Fe deficiency in root tissues. However, the contrasting responses appeared in 35S:HY1-4.Additionally, reduced levels of Ferric Reduction Oxidase 2 (FRO2) and Iron-Regulated Transporter 1 (IRT1) transcripts,and increased levels of Heavy Metal ATPase 2/4 (HMA2/4) transcripts bolster the notion that HY1 up-regulation amelio-rates Fe deficiency, and might increase Cd2+ exclusion. Taken together, these results showed that HY1 plays a commonlink in Cd2+ tolerance by decreasing NO production and improving Fe homeostasis in Arabidopsis root tissues.

  12. Zinc transporter ZIP14 functions in hepatic zinc, iron and glucose homeostasis during the innate immune response (endotoxemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolunay Beker Aydemir

    altered in the Zip14(-/- mice and their phenotype shows defects in glucose homeostasis.

  13. Zinc Transporter ZIP14 Functions in Hepatic Zinc, Iron and Glucose Homeostasis during the Innate Immune Response (Endotoxemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beker Aydemir, Tolunay; Chang, Shou-Mei; Guthrie, Gregory J.; Maki, Alyssa B.; Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Karabiyik, Afife; Cousins, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    altered in the Zip14−/− mice and their phenotype shows defects in glucose homeostasis. PMID:23110240

  14. Isolation and characterization of Lotus japonicus genes involved in iron and zinc homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Jensen, Winnie; Sandal, Niels Nørgaard; Jensen, Dorthe Bødker; Busk, Hanne; Husted, Søren; Stougaard, Jens; Jensen, Erik Østergaard

    The goal of this project is to find ways to improve the nutritional value of legumes by identifying genes and proteins important for iron and zinc regulation in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Legumes are important staples in the developing world and are a major source of nutrients in many areas....... Legumes are frequently grown in soil with limited nutrient availability. Plants use finely tuned mechanisms to keep appropriated levels of iron and zinc in each of their organs. Several genes involved in iron and zinc homeostasis have been described in yeast, and a few orthologs have been studied in...... plants. We have used these sequences to search for L. japonicus ESTs and genomic loci that are likely to be involved in iron and zinc metabolism. We have identified sequences corresponding to ferritins, ferric reductases, metal transport proteins of the ZIP family, and cation transporters of the NRAMP...

  15. Abdominal Fat and Sarcopenia in Women Significantly Alter Osteoblasts Homeostasis In Vitro by a WNT/β-Catenin Dependent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Wannenes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and sarcopenia have been associated with mineral metabolism derangement and low bone mineral density (BMD. We investigated whether imbalance of serum factors in obese or obese sarcopenic patients could affect bone cell activity in vitro. To evaluate and characterize potential cellular and molecular changes of human osteoblasts, cells were exposed to sera of four groups of patients: (1 affected by obesity with normal BMD (O, (2 affected by obesity with low BMD (OO, (3 affected by obesity and sarcopenia (OS, and (4 affected by obesity, sarcopenia, and low BMD (OOS as compared to subjects with normal body weight and normal BMD (CTL. Patients were previously investigated and characterized for body composition, biochemical and bone turnover markers. Then, sera of different groups of patients were used to incubate human osteoblasts and evaluate potential alterations in cell homeostasis. Exposure to OO, OS, and OOS sera significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and BMP4 expression compared to cells exposed to O and CTL, indicating a detrimental effect on osteoblast differentiation. Interestingly, sera of all groups of patients induced intracellular alteration in Wnt/β-catenin molecular pathway, as demonstrated by the significant alteration of specific target genes expression and by altered β-catenin cellular compartmentalization and GSK3β phosphorylation. In conclusion our results show for the first time that sera of obese subjects with low bone mineral density and sarcopenia significantly alter osteoblasts homeostasis in vitro, indicating potential detrimental effects of trunk fat on bone formation and skeletal homeostasis.

  16. Triphenyltin alters lipid homeostasis in females of the ramshorn snail Marisa cornuarietis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyssimachou, Angeliki [Environmental Chemistry Department, IIQAB-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Navarro, Juan Carlos [Institute of Aquaculture of Torre de la Sal, CSIC, 12595 Ribera de Cabanes, Castellon (Spain); Bachmann, Jean [Department of Ecology and Evolution-Ecotoxicology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt, D-60054 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Porte, Cinta, E-mail: cinta.porte@cid.csic.e [Environmental Chemistry Department, IIQAB-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    Molluscs are sensitive species to the toxic effects of organotin compounds, particularly to masculinisation. Both tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT) have been recently shown to bind to mollusc retinoid X receptor (RXR). If RXR is involved in lipid homeostasis, exposure to TPT would have an immediate effect on endogenous lipids. To test this hypothesis, the ramshorn snail Marisa cornuarietis was exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of TPT (30, 125, 500 ng/L as Sn) in a semi-static water regime for 7 days. Percentage of lipids and total fatty acid content decreased significantly in TPT-exposed females while the activity of peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase, involved in fatty acid catabolism, increased. In addition, fatty acid profiles (carbon chain length and unsaturation degree) were significantly altered in exposed females but not in males. This work highlights the ability of TPT to disrupt lipid metabolism in M. cornuarietis at environmentally realistic concentrations and the higher susceptibility of females in comparison to males. - Short-term exposure to the fungicide TPT disrupts lipid metabolism in M. cornuarietis at environmentally realistic concentrations.

  17. Transgenic poplar expressing the pine GS1a show alterations in nitrogen homeostasis during drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Rueda, Juan Jesús; Kirby, Edward G

    2015-09-01

    Transgenic hybrid poplars engineered to express ectopically the heterologous pine cytosolic GS1a display a number of significant pleiotropic phenotypes including enhanced growth, enhanced nitrogen use efficiency, and resistance to drought stress. The present study was undertaken in order to assess mechanisms whereby ectopic expression of pine GS1a in transgenic poplars results in enhanced agronomic phenotypes. Microarray analysis using the Agilent Populus whole genome array has allowed identification of genes differentially expressed between wild type (WT) and GS transgenics in four tissues (sink leaves, source leaves, stems, and roots) under three growth conditions (well-watered, drought, and recovery). Analysis revealed that differentially expressed genes in functional categories related to nitrogen metabolism show a trend of significant down-regulation in GS poplars compared to the WT, including genes encoding nitrate and nitrite reductases. The down-regulation of these genes was verified using qPCR, and downstream effects were further tested using NR activity assays. Results suggest that higher glutamine levels in GS transgenics regulate nitrate uptake and reduction. Transcript levels of nitrogen-related genes in leaves, including GS/GOGAT cycle enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase, GABA shunt enzymes, photorespiration enzymes, asparagine synthetase, phenylalanine ammonia lyase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and PII, were also assessed using qPCR revealing significant differences between GS poplars and the WT. Moreover, metabolites related to these differentially expressed genes showed alterations in levels, including higher levels of GABA, hydroxyproline, and putrescine in the GS transgenic. These alterations in nitrogen homeostasis offer insights into mechanisms accounting for drought tolerance observed in GS poplars. PMID:26113157

  18. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichette, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed. PMID:27478532

  19. Sleep duration and sleep quality are associated differently with alterations of glucose homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Stine; Hansen, Anne-Louise Smidt; Christensen, Dirk Lund;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aims  Studies suggest that inadequate sleep duration and poor sleep quality increase the risk of impaired glucose regulation and diabetes. However, associations with specific markers of glucose homeostasis are less well explained. The objective of this study was to explore possible...... associations of sleep duration and sleep quality with markers of glucose homeostasis and glucose tolerance status in a healthy population-based study sample. Methods  The study comprised 771 participants from the Danish, population-based cross-sectional ‘Health2008’ study. Sleep duration and sleep quality were......), the homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function and glucose tolerance status. Associations of sleep duration and sleep quality with markers of glucose homeostasis and tolerance were analysed by multiple linear and logistic regression. Results  A 1-h increment in sleep duration was associated with...

  20. Anaemia and Iron Homeostasis in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Obirikorang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We determined the prevalence of anaemia and evaluated markers of iron homeostasis in a cohort of HIV patients. Methods. A comparative cross-sectional study on 319 participants was carried out at the Tamale Teaching Hospital from July 2013 to December 2013, 219 patients on HAART (designated On-HAART and 100 HAART-naive patients. Data gathered include sociodemography, clinical history, and selected laboratory assays. Results. Prevalence of anaemia was 23.8%. On-HAART participants had higher CD4/CD3 lymphocyte counts, Hb, HCT/PCV, MCV, MCH, iron, ferritin, and TSAT (P<0.05. Hb, iron, ferritin, and TSAT decreased from grade 1 to grade 3 anaemia and CD4/CD3 lymphocyte count was lowest in grade 3 anaemia (P<0.05. Iron (P=0.0072 decreased with disease severity whilst transferrin (P=0.0143 and TIBC (P=0.0143 increased with disease severity. Seventy-six (23.8% participants fulfilled the criteria for anaemia, 86 (26.9% for iron deficiency, 41 (12.8% for iron deficiency anaemia, and 17 (5.3% for iron overload. The frequency of anaemia was higher amongst participants not on HAART (OR 2.6 for grade 1 anaemia; OR 3.0 for grade 3 anaemia. Conclusion. In this study population, HIV-associated anaemia is common and is related to HAART status and disease progression. HIV itself is the most important cause of anaemia and treatment of HIV should be a priority compared to iron supplementation.

  1. High dose intravenous iron, mineral homeostasis and intact FGF23 in normal and uremic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Eva; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Mace, Maria L.;

    2013-01-01

    High iron load might have a number of toxic effects in the organism. Recently intravenous (iv) iron has been proposed to induce elevation of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia in iron deficient subjects. High levels of FGF23 are associated with increased mortal...

  2. Alteration of ROS Homeostasis and Decreased Lifespan in S. cerevisiae Elicited by Deletion of the Mitochondrial Translocator FLX1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Anna Giancaspero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the control exerted by the mitochondrial translocator FLX1, which catalyzes the movement of the redox cofactor FAD across the mitochondrial membrane, on the efficiency of ATP production, ROS homeostasis, and lifespan of S. cerevisiae. The deletion of the FLX1 gene resulted in respiration-deficient and small-colony phenotype accompanied by a significant ATP shortage and ROS unbalance in glycerol-grown cells. Moreover, the flx1Δ strain showed H2O2 hypersensitivity and decreased lifespan. The impaired biochemical phenotype found in the flx1Δ strain might be justified by an altered expression of the flavoprotein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme in bioenergetics and cell regulation. A search for possible cis-acting consensus motifs in the regulatory region upstream SDH1-ORF revealed a dozen of upstream motifs that might respond to induced metabolic changes by altering the expression of Flx1p. Among these motifs, two are present in the regulatory region of genes encoding proteins involved in flavin homeostasis. This is the first evidence that the mitochondrial flavin cofactor status is involved in controlling the lifespan of yeasts, maybe by changing the cellular succinate level. This is not the only case in which the homeostasis of redox cofactors underlies complex phenotypical behaviours, as lifespan in yeasts.

  3. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to...... present and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation...

  4. F-box and Leucine-rich Repeat Protein 5 (FBXL5) Is Required for Maintenance of Cellular and Systemic Iron Homeostasis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Julio C.; Walker, Scott D.; Anderson, Sheila A.; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Bruick, Richard K.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis requires post-transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism genes by iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2). The hemerythrin-like domain of F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5), an E3 ubiquitin ligase subunit, senses iron and oxygen availability and facilitates IRP2 degradation in iron replete cells. Disruption of the ubiquitously expressed murine Fbxl5 gene results in a failure to sense increased cellular iron availability, accompanied by constitutive IRP2 accumulation and misexpression of IRP2 target genes. FBXL5-null mice die during embryogenesis, although viability is restored by simultaneous deletion of the IRP2, but not IRP1, gene. Mice containing a single functional Fbxl5 allele behave like their wild type littermates when fed an iron-sufficient diet. However, unlike wild type mice that manifest decreased hematocrit and hemoglobin levels when fed a low-iron diet, Fbxl5 heterozygotes maintain normal hematologic values due to increased iron absorption. The responsiveness of IRP2 to low iron is specifically enhanced in the duodena of the heterozygotes and is accompanied by increased expression of the divalent metal transporter-1. These results confirm the role of FBXL5 in the in vivo maintenance of cellular and systemic iron homeostasis and reveal a privileged role for the intestine in their regulation by virtue of its unique FBXL5 iron sensitivity. PMID:23135277

  5. F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5) is required for maintenance of cellular and systemic iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Julio C; Walker, Scott D; Anderson, Sheila A; Eisenstein, Richard S; Bruick, Richard K

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis requires post-transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism genes by iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2). The hemerythrin-like domain of F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5), an E3 ubiquitin ligase subunit, senses iron and oxygen availability and facilitates IRP2 degradation in iron replete cells. Disruption of the ubiquitously expressed murine Fbxl5 gene results in a failure to sense increased cellular iron availability, accompanied by constitutive IRP2 accumulation and misexpression of IRP2 target genes. FBXL5-null mice die during embryogenesis, although viability is restored by simultaneous deletion of the IRP2, but not IRP1, gene. Mice containing a single functional Fbxl5 allele behave like their wild type littermates when fed an iron-sufficient diet. However, unlike wild type mice that manifest decreased hematocrit and hemoglobin levels when fed a low-iron diet, Fbxl5 heterozygotes maintain normal hematologic values due to increased iron absorption. The responsiveness of IRP2 to low iron is specifically enhanced in the duodena of the heterozygotes and is accompanied by increased expression of the divalent metal transporter-1. These results confirm the role of FBXL5 in the in vivo maintenance of cellular and systemic iron homeostasis and reveal a privileged role for the intestine in their regulation by virtue of its unique FBXL5 iron sensitivity. PMID:23135277

  6. Chlordecone, a mixed pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) agonist, alters cholesterol homeostasis and lipoprotein metabolism in C57BL/6 mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Junga; Scheri, Richard C.; Zhang, Yuan; Curtis, Lawrence R.

    2008-01-01

    Chlordecone (CD) is one of many banned organochlorine (OC) insecticides that are widespread persistent organic pollutants. OC insecticides alter lipid homeostasis in rodents at doses that are not neurotoxic or carcinogenic. Pretreatment of mice or rats with CD altered tissue distribution of a subsequent dose of [14C]CD or [14C]cholesterol (CH). Nuclear receptors regulate expression of genes important in the homeostasis of CH and other lipids. In this study, we report that CD suppresses in vit...

  7. An iron homeostasis regulatory circuit with reciprocal roles in Candida albicans commensalism and pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Changbin; Pande, Kalyan; French, Sarah D.; Tuch, Brian B.; Noble, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract and bloodstream are highly disparate biological niches that differ in concentrations of nutrients such as iron. However, some commensal-pathogenic microorganisms, such as the yeast Candida albicans, thrive in both environments. We report the evolution of a transcription circuit in C. albicans that controls iron uptake and determines its fitness in both niches. Our analysis of DNA-binding proteins that regulate iron uptake by this organism suggests the evol...

  8. Identification of two genes potentially associated in iron-heme homeostasis in human carotid plaque using microarray analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hanène Ayari; Giampiero Bricca

    2013-06-01

    Classic characteristics are poor predictors of the risk of thromboembolism. Thus, better markers for the carotid atheroma plaque formation and symptom causing are needed. Our objective was to study by microarray analysis gene expression of genes involved in homeostasis of iron and heme in carotid atheroma plaque from the same patient. mRNA gene expression was measured by an Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST arrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA) using RNA prepared from 68 specimens of endarteriectomy from 34 patients. Two genes involved in iron-heme homeostasis, CD163 and heme oxygenase (HO-1), were analysed in 34 plaques. CD163 (2.18, =1.45E−08) and HO-1 (fold-change 2.67, =2.07E−09) mRNAs were induced. We suggest that atheroma plaques show a more pronounced induction of CD163 and HO-1. Although further evidence is needed, our results support previous data. To our knowledge, this is the first report comparing gene expression between intact arterial tissue and carotid plaque using microarray analysis.

  9. Modulation of hepcidin to treat iron deregulation: potential clinical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Blanchette, Nicole L.; Manz, David H.; Torti, Frank M.; Torti, Suzy V.

    2015-01-01

    The secreted peptide hormone hepcidin regulates systemic and local iron homeostasis through degradation of the iron exporter ferroportin. Dysregulation of hepcidin leads to altered iron homeostasis and development of pathological disorders including hemochromatosis, and iron loading and iron restrictive anemias. Therapeutic modulation of hepcidin is a promising method to ameliorate these conditions. Several approaches have been taken to enhance or reduce the effects of hepcidin in vitro and i...

  10. Oxygen glucose deprivation in rat hippocampal slice cultures results in alterations in carnitine homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F Rau

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by depolarization of mitochondrial membranes and the initiation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis are pathological responses to hypoxia-ischemia (HI in the neonatal brain. Carnitine metabolism directly supports mitochondrial metabolism by shuttling long chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for beta-oxidation. Our previous studies have shown that HI disrupts carnitine homeostasis in neonatal rats and that L-carnitine can be neuroprotective. Thus, this study was undertaken to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which HI alters carnitine metabolism and to begin to elucidate the mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effect of L-carnitine (LCAR supplementation. Utilizing neonatal rat hippocampal slice cultures we found that oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD decreased the levels of free carnitines (FC and increased the acylcarnitine (AC: FC ratio. These changes in carnitine homeostasis correlated with decreases in the protein levels of carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT 1 and 2. LCAR supplementation prevented the decrease in CPT1 and CPT2, enhanced both FC and the AC∶FC ratio and increased slice culture metabolic viability, the mitochondrial membrane potential prior to OGD and prevented the subsequent loss of neurons during later stages of reperfusion through a reduction in apoptotic cell death. Finally, we found that LCAR supplementation preserved the structural integrity and synaptic transmission within the hippocampus after OGD. Thus, we conclude that LCAR supplementation preserves the key enzymes responsible for maintaining carnitine homeostasis and preserves both cell viability and synaptic transmission after OGD.

  11. Deposition of plutonium-238 injected intratracheally within different skeleton bones iron homeostasis being changed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of the distribution of plutonium-239 injected intratracheally within different bones of the skeleton, the iron status in the blood being changed. The iron preparation caused 2.5-3-fold decrease in the plutonium loading onto cancellous bone tissue that displayed, in ordinary conditions, a higher tropism to the radionuclide than a cortical highly mineralized bone did

  12. The Abnormal Measures of Iron Homeostasis in Pediatric Obesity Are Associated with the Inflammation of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visintainer PaulF

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To determine if the low iron state described in obese children is associated with the chronic inflammatory state seen in obesity. Study Design. Obese children age from 2 to 19 years seen at a weight management clinic were studied prospectively. Data were collected on age, gender, BMI, BMI -score, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation, free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, high sensitivity creactive protein (hs-crp, and hemoglobin concentration. Results. 107 subjects were studied. Hs-crp levels correlated positively with BMI and BMI -score and negatively with serum iron . 11.2% of subjects had low serum iron. Median serum iron was significantly lower for subjects with American Heart Association high risk hs-crp values (3 mg/L compared to those with low risk hs-crp (1 mg/L, (65 mcg/dL versus 96 mcg/dL, . After adjusting for age, gender, and BMI -score, serum iron was still negatively associated with hs-crp . Conclusions. We conclude that the chronic inflammation of obesity results in the low iron state previously reported in obese children, similar to what is seen in other inflammatory diseases.

  13. The role of hepatic transferrin receptor 2 in the regulation of iron homeostasis in the body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christal A Worthen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fine tuning of body iron is required to prevent diseases such as iron-overload and anemia. The putative iron-sensor, transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2, is expressed in the liver and mutations in this protein result in the iron-overload disease Type III hereditary hemochromatosis (HH. With the loss of functional TfR2, the liver produces about two-fold less of the peptide hormone hepcidin, which is responsible for negatively regulating iron uptake from the diet. This reduction in hepcidin expression leads to the slow accumulation of iron in the liver, heart, joints, and pancreas and subsequent cirrhosis, heart disease, arthritis, and diabetes. TfR2 can bind iron-loaded transferrin in the bloodstream, and hepatocytes treated with transferrin respond with a two-fold increase in hepcidin expression through stimulation of the BMP-signaling pathway. Loss of functional TfR2 or its binding partner, the original HH protein (HFE, results in a loss of this transferrin-sensitivity. While much is known about the trafficking and regulation of TfR2, the mechanism of its transferrin-sensitivity through the BMP-signaling pathway is still not known.

  14. Methylmercury alters glutathione homeostasis by inhibiting glutaredoxin 1 and enhancing glutathione biosynthesis in cultured human astrocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Stephan; Mailloux, Ryan J; Chan, Hing Man

    2016-08-10

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxin that binds strongly to thiol residues on protein and low molecular weight molecules like reduced glutathione (GSH). The mechanism of its effects on GSH homeostasis particularly at environmentally relevant low doses is not fully known. We hypothesized that exposure to MeHg would lead to a depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) and an accumulation of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) leading to alterations in S-glutathionylation of proteins. Our results showed exposure to low concentrations of MeHg (1μM) did not significantly alter GSH levels but increased GSSG levels by ∼12-fold. This effect was associated with a significant increase in total cellular glutathione content and a decrease in GSH/GSSG. Immunoblot analyses revealed that proteins involved in glutathione synthesis were upregulated accounting for the increase in cellular glutathione. This was associated an increase in cellular Nrf2 protein levels which is required to induce the expression of antioxidant genes in response to cellular stress. Intriguingly, we noted that a key enzyme involved in reversing protein S-glutathionylation and maintaining glutathione homeostasis, glutaredoxin-1 (Grx1), was inhibited by ∼50%. MeHg treatment also increased the S-glutathionylation of a high molecular weight protein. This observation is consistent with the inhibition of Grx1 and elevated H2O2 production however; contrary to our original hypothesis we found few S-glutathionylated proteins in the astrocytoma cells. Collectively, MeHg affects multiple arms of glutathione homeostasis ranging from pool management to protein S-glutathionylation and Grx1 activity. PMID:27180086

  15. Effect of natural and synthetic iron corrosion products on silicate glass alteration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillmann, Philippe; Gin, Stéphane; Neff, Delphine; Gentaz, Lucile; Rebiscoul, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Glass long term alteration in the context of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) storage is influenced by near-field materials and environmental context. As previous studies have shown, the extent of glass alteration is strongly related to the presence of iron in the system, mainly provided by the steel overpack around surrounding the HLW glass package. A key to understanding what will happen to the glass-borne elements in the geological disposal lies in the relationship between the iron-bearing phases and the glass alteration products formed. In this study, we focus on the influence of the formation conditions (synthetized or in-situ) and the age of different iron corrosion products on SON68 glass alteration. Corrosion products obtained from archaeological iron artifacts are considered here to be true analogues of the corrosion products in a waste disposal system due to the similarities in formation conditions and physical properties. These representative corrosion products (RCP) are used in the experiment along with synthetized iron anoxic corrosion products and pristine metallic iron. The model-cracks of SON68 glass were altered in cell reactors, with one of the different iron-sources inserted in the crack each time. The study was successful in reproducing most of the processes observed in the long term archaeological system. Between the different systems, alteration variations were noted both in nature and intensity, confirming the influence of the iron-source on glass alteration. Results seem to point to a lesser effect of long term iron corrosion products (RCP) on the glass alteration than that of the more recent products (SCP), both in terms of general glass alteration and of iron transport.

  16. Altered regulation of energy homeostasis in older rats in response to thyroid hormone administration

    OpenAIRE

    Walrand, Stephane; Short, Kevin R.; Heemstra, Lydia A.; Novak, Colleen M.; Levine, James A.; Coenen-Schimke, Jill M.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism causes increased energy intake and expenditure, although anorexia and higher weight loss have been reported in elderly individuals with hyperthyroidism. To determine the effect of age on energy homeostasis in response to experimental hyperthyroidism, we administered 200 μg tri-iodothyronine (T3) in 7- and 27-mo-old rats for 14 d. T3 increased energy expenditure (EE) in both the young and the old rats, although the old rats lost more weight (147 g) than the young rats (58 g) be...

  17. Altered regulation of energy homeostasis in older rats in response to thyroid hormone administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walrand, Stephane; Short, Kevin R; Heemstra, Lydia A; Novak, Colleen M; Levine, James A; Coenen-Schimke, Jill M; Nair, K Sreekumaran

    2014-03-01

    Hyperthyroidism causes increased energy intake and expenditure, although anorexia and higher weight loss have been reported in elderly individuals with hyperthyroidism. To determine the effect of age on energy homeostasis in response to experimental hyperthyroidism, we administered 200 μg tri-iodothyronine (T3) in 7- and 27-mo-old rats for 14 d. T3 increased energy expenditure (EE) in both the young and the old rats, although the old rats lost more weight (147 g) than the young rats (58 g) because of the discordant effect of T3 on food intake, with a 40% increase in the young rats, but a 40% decrease in the old ones. The increased food intake in the young rats corresponded with a T3-mediated increase in the appetite-regulating proteins agouti-related peptide, neuropeptide Y, and uncoupling protein 2 in the hypothalamus, but no increase occurred in the old rats. Evidence of mitochondrial biogenesis in response to T3 was similar in the soleus muscle and heart of the young and old animals, but less consistent in old plantaris muscle and liver. Despite the comparable increase in EE, T3's effect on mitochondrial function was modulated by age in a tissue-specific manner. We conclude that older rats lack compensatory mechanisms to increase caloric intake in response to a T3-induced increase in EE, demonstrating a detrimental effect of age on energy homeostasis. PMID:24344330

  18. Anemia and iron homeostasis in a cohort of HIV-infected patients in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jusuf Hadi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anemia is a common clinical finding in HIV-infected patients and iron deficiency or redistribution may contribute to the development of low hemoglobin levels. Iron overload is associated with a poor prognosis in HIV and Hepatitis C virus infections. Iron redistribution may be caused by inflammation but possibly also by hepatitis C co-infection. We examined the prevalence of anemia and its relation to mortality in a cohort of HIV patients in a setting where injecting drug use (IDU is a main mode of HIV transmission, and measured serum ferritin and sTfR, in relation to anemia, inflammation, stage of HIV disease, ART and HCV infection. Methods Patient characteristics, ART history and iron parameters were recorded from adult HIV patients presenting between September 2007 and August 2009 in the referral hospital for West Java, Indonesia. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox's regression were used to assess factors affecting survival. Logistic regression was used to identity parameters associated with high ferritin concentrations. Results Anemia was found in 49.6% of 611 ART-naïve patients, with mild (Hb 10.5 - 12.99 g/dL for men; and 10.5 - 11.99 g/dL for women anemia in 62.0%, and moderate to severe anemia (Hb Conclusion HIV-associated anemia is common among HIV-infected patients in Indonesia and strongly related to mortality. High ferritin with low sTfR levels suggest that iron redistribution and low erythropoietic activity, rather than iron deficiency, contribute to anemia. Serum ferritin and sTfR should be used cautiously to assess iron status in patients with advanced HIV infection.

  19. Interference of nickel with copper and iron homeostasis contributes to metal toxicity symptoms in the nickel hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum inflatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Rasoul; Ghaderian, S Majid; Krämer, Ute

    2009-11-01

    The divalent cations of several transition metal elements have similar chemical properties and, when present in excess, one metal can interfere with the homeostasis of another. To better understand the role of interactions between transition metals in the development of metal toxicity symptoms in plants, the effects of exposure to excess nickel (Ni) on copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) homeostasis in the Ni hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum inflatum were examined. Alyssum inflatum was hypertolerant to Ni, but not to Cu. Exposure to elevated subtoxic Ni concentrations increased Cu sensitivity, associated with enhanced Cu accumulation and enhanced root surface Cu(II)-specific reductase activity. Exposure to elevated Ni concentrations resulted in an inhibition of root-to-shoot translocation of Fe and concentration-dependent progressive Fe accumulation in root pericycle, endodermis and cortex cells of the differentiation zone. Shoot Fe concentrations, chlorophyll concentrations and Fe-dependent antioxidant enzyme activities were decreased in Ni-exposed plants when compared with unexposed controls. Foliar Fe spraying or increased Fe supply to roots ameliorated the chlorosis observed under exposure to high Ni concentrations. These results suggest that Ni interferes with Cu regulation and that the disruption of root-to-shoot Fe translocation is a major cause of nickel toxicity symptoms in A. inflatum. PMID:19691676

  20. Profile of altered brain iron acquisition in restless legs syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Connor, James R; Ponnuru, Padmavathi; Wang, Xin-sheng; Patton, Stephanie M.; Allen, Richard P; Earley, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by an urgency to move the legs during periods of rest. Data from a variety of sources provide a compelling argument that the amount of iron in the brain is lower in individuals with restless legs syndrome compared with neurologically normal individuals. Moreover, a significant percentage of patients with restless legs syndrome are responsive to intravenous iron therapy. The mechanism underlying the decreased iron concentrations i...

  1. Polychlorinated biphenyls-induced alterations of thyroid hormone homeostasis and brain development in the rat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morse, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    IntroductionThe work described in this thesis was undertaken to gain insight in the processes involved in the developmental neurotoxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls. It has been previously hypothesized that the alteration of thyroid hormone status by PCBs may be in part responsibl

  2. Lipocalin 2 deficiency dysregulates iron homeostasis and exacerbates endotoxin-induced sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srinivasan, Gayathri; Aitken, Jesse D; Zhang, Benyue;

    2012-01-01

    elevated intracellular labile iron. In this study, we report that LPS induced systemic Lcn2 by 150-fold in wild-type mice at 24 h. Relative to wild-type littermates, Lcn2KO mice were markedly more sensitive to endotoxemia, exhibiting elevated indices of organ damage (transaminasemia, lactate dehydrogenase......) and increased mortality. Such exacerbated endotoxemia was associated with substantially increased caspase-3 cleavage and concomitantly elevated immune cell apoptosis. Furthermore, cells from Lcn2KO mice were hyperresponsive to LPS ex vivo, exhibiting elevated cytokine secretion. Additionally, Lcn2KO...... mice exhibited delayed LPS-induced hypoferremia despite normal hepatic hepcidin expression and displayed decreased levels of the tissue redox state indicators cysteine and glutathione in liver and plasma. Desferroxamine, an iron chelator, significantly protects Lcn2KO mice from LPS-induced toxicity...

  3. UV-A emission from fluorescent energy-saving light bulbs alters local retinoic acid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann-Regen, Julian; Heuser, Isabella; Regen, Francesca

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide bans on incandescent light bulbs (ILBs) drive the use of compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs, which emit ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Potential health issues of these light sources have already been discussed, including speculation about the putative biological effects on light exposed tissues, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesized photoisomerization of all-trans retinoic acid (at-RA), a highly light sensitive morphogen, into biologically less active isomers, as a mechanism mediating biological effects of CFLs. Local at-RA is anti-carcinogenic, entrains molecular rhythms and is crucial for skin homeostasis. Therefore, we quantified the impact of CFL irradiation on extra- and intracellular levels of RA isomers using an epidermal cell culture model. Moreover, a biologically relevant impact of CFL irradiation was assessed using highly at-RA-sensitive human neuroblastoma cells. Dose-dependent conversion of extra- and intracellular at-RA into the biologically less active 13-cis-isomer was significantly higher in CFL vs. ILB exposure and completely preventable by employing a UV-filter. Moreover, pre-irradiation of culture media by CFL attenuated at-RA-specific effects on cell viability in human at-RA-sensitive cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings point towards a biological relevance of CFL-induced at-RA decomposition, providing a mechanism for CFL-mediated effects on environmental health. PMID:24135972

  4. Homeostasis of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 is altered in mouse models of Lafora disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Ballester, Carmen; Berthier, Arnaud; Viana, Rosa; Sanz, Pascual

    2016-06-01

    Lafora disease (LD, OMIM 254780) is a fatal rare disorder characterized by epilepsy and neurodegeneration. Although in recent years a lot of information has been gained on the molecular basis of the neurodegeneration that accompanies LD, the molecular basis of epilepsy is poorly understood. Here, we present evidence indicating that the homeostasis of glutamate transporter GLT-1 (EAAT2) is compromised in mouse models of LD. Our results indicate that primary astrocytes from LD mice have reduced capacity of glutamate transport, probably because they present a reduction in the levels of the glutamate transporter at the plasma membrane. On the other hand, the overexpression in cellular models of laforin and malin, the two proteins related to LD, results in an accumulation of GLT-1 (EAAT2) at the plasma membrane and in a severe reduction of the ubiquitination of the transporter. All these results suggest that the laforin/malin complex slows down the endocytic recycling of the GLT-1 (EAAT2) transporter. Since, defects in the function of this transporter lead to excitotoxicity and epilepsy, we suggest that the epilepsy that accompanies LD could be due, at least in part, to deficiencies in the function of the GLT-1 (EAAT2) transporter. PMID:26976331

  5. Polychlorinated biphenyls-induced alterations of thyroid hormone homeostasis and brain development in the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Morse, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    IntroductionThe work described in this thesis was undertaken to gain insight in the processes involved in the developmental neurotoxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls. It has been previously hypothesized that the alteration of thyroid hormone status by PCBs may be in part responsible for the developmental neurotoxicity of these compounds in humans (Rogan et al. 1986). This is a logical hypothesis, given the well-described effects of PCBs on plasma thyroid hormone levels in adult animals, and ...

  6. Deletion of the major peroxiredoxin Tsa1 alters telomere length homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    LU, Jian; Vallabhaneni, Haritha; Yin, Jinhu; Liu, Yie

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are proposed to play a major role in telomere length alterations during aging. The mechanisms by which ROS disrupt telomeres remain unclear. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, telomere DNA consists of TG(1-3) repeats, which are maintained primarily by telomerase. Telomere length maintenance can be modulated by the expression level of telomerase subunits and telomerase activity. Additionally, telomerase-mediated telomere repeat addition is negatively modulated by the le...

  7. Neuro-endocrine basis for altered plasma glucose homeostasis in the Fragile X mouse

    OpenAIRE

    El Idrissi Abdeslem; Yan Xin; Sidime Francoise; L’Amoreaux William

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The fragile X mouse model shows an increase in seizure susceptibility, indicating an involvement of the GABAergic system via an alteration in cellular excitability. In the brain, we have previously described a reduction in GABAA receptor expression as a likely basis for this susceptibility. In the brains of fragile X mice, this reduction in receptor expression culminates with a concomitant increase in the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme responsi...

  8. Role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ISA1 and ISA2 in Iron Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Laran T.; Culotta, Valeria Cizewski

    2000-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two homologues of bacterial IscA proteins, designated Isa1p and Isa2p. Bacterial IscA is a product of the isc (iron-sulfur cluster) operon and has been suggested to participate in Fe-S cluster formation or repair. To test the function of yeast Isa1p and Isa2p, single or combinatorial disruptions were introduced in ISA1 and ISA2. The resultant isaΔ mutants were viable but exhibited a dependency on lysine and glutamate for growth and a respira...

  9. Formula feeding alters hepatic gene expression signature, iron and cholesterol homeostasis in the neonatal pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breast feeding for at least the first 6 months of life, formula feeding remains more popular in the US. In the current study, neonatal piglets were breast-fed or were fed commercially available milk-based formula (MF) or soy-based formula (SF) ...

  10. Impact of streptozotocin on altering normal glucose homeostasis during insulin testing in diabetic rats compared to normoglycemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinna NA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nidal A Qinna,1 Adnan A Badwan2 1Department of Pharmacology and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of Petra, 2Research and Innovation Centre, The Jordanian Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Co. Plc. (JPM, Amman, Jordan Abstract: Streptozotocin (STZ is currently the most used diabetogenic agent in testing insulin and new antidiabetic drugs in animals. Due to the toxic and disruptive nature of STZ on organs, apart from pancreas, involved in preserving the body’s normal glucose homeostasis, this study aims to reassess the action of STZ in inducing different glucose response states in diabetic rats while testing insulin. Diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats induced with STZ were classified according to their initial blood glucose levels into stages. The effect of randomizing rats in such a manner was investigated for the severity of interrupting normal liver, pancreas, and kidney functions. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic actions of subcutaneously injected insulin in diabetic and nondiabetic rats were compared. Interruption of glucose homeostasis by STZ was challenged by single and repeated administrations of injected insulin and oral glucose to diabetic rats. In diabetic rats with high glucose (451–750 mg/dL, noticeable changes were seen in the liver and kidney functions compared to rats with lower basal glucose levels. Increased serum levels of recombinant human insulin were clearly indicated by a significant increase in the calculated maximum serum concentration and area under the concentration–time curve. Reversion of serum glucose levels to normal levels pre- and postinsulin and oral glucose administrations to STZ diabetic rats were found to be variable. In conclusion, diabetic animals were more responsive to insulin than nondiabetic animals. STZ was capable of inducing different levels of normal glucose homeostasis disruption in rats. Both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic actions of insulin were

  11. Altered Metabolic Homeostasis in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Mechanisms of Energy Imbalance and Contribution to Disease Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides, Zara A; Ngo, Shyuan T; Henderson, Robert D; McCombe, Pamela A; Steyn, Frederik J

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the death of motor neurones, which leads to paralysis and death in an average of 3 years following diagnosis. The cause of ALS is unknown, but there is substantial evidence that metabolic factors, including nutritional state and body weight, affect disease progression and survival. This review provides an overview of the characteristics of metabolic dysregulation in ALS focusing on mechanisms that lead to disrupted energy supply (at a whole-body and cellular level) and altered energy expenditure. We discuss how a decrease in energy supply occurs in parallel with an increase in energy demand and leads to a state of chronic energy deficit which has a negative impact on disease outcome in ALS. We conclude by presenting potential and tested strategies to compensate for, or correct this energy imbalance, and speculate on promising areas for further research. PMID:27400276

  12. The PICALM Protein Plays a Key Role in Iron Homeostasis and Cell Proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Scotland, Paula B.; Heath, Jessica L.; Conway, Amanda E; Porter, Natasha B.; Armstrong, Michael B.; Walker, Jennifer A.; Mitchell L Klebig; Catherine P Lavau; Wechsler, Daniel S

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitously expressed phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly (PICALM) protein associates with the plasma membrane, binds clathrin, and plays a role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Alterations of the human PICALM gene are present in aggressive hematopoietic malignancies, and genome-wide association studies have recently linked the PICALM locus to late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Inactivating and hypomorphic Picalm mutations in mice cause different degrees of severity of anemia, a...

  13. Restraint Stress Impairs Glucose Homeostasis Through Altered Insulin Signalling in Sprague-Dawley Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morakinyo, Ayodele O; Ajiboye, Kolawole I; Oludare, Gabriel O; Samuel, Titilola A

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the potential alteration in the level of insulin and adiponectin, as well as the expression of insulin receptors (INSR) and glucose transporter 4 GLUT-4 in chronic restraint stress rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: the control group and stress group in which the rats were exposed to one of the four different restraint stressors; 1 h, twice daily for a period of 7 days (S7D), 14 days (S14D) and 28 days (S28D). Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were evaluated following the final stress exposure. ELISA were performed to assess the level of insulin and adiponectin as well as expression of INSR and GLUT4 protein in skeletal muscle. Plasma corticosterone level was also determined as a marker of stress exposure. Restraint stress for 7 days caused transient glucose intolerance, while S14D rats demonstrated increased glucose intolerance and insulin insensitivity. However, restraint stress for 28 days had no effect on glucose tolerance, but did cause an increase in glucose response to insulin challenge. The serum level of adiponectin was significantly (pcontrol value while insulin remained unchanged except at in S28D rats that had a significant (pcontrol counterparts. Restraint stress caused glucose intolerance and insulin insensitivity in male Sprague-Dawley rats, which becomes accommodated with prolonged exposure and was likely related to the blunted insulin signalling in skeletal muscle. PMID:27574760

  14. Whole transcriptome analysis of transgenic barley with altered cytokinin homeostasis and increased tolerance to drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojta, Petr; Kokáš, Filip; Husičková, Alexandra; Grúz, Jiří; Bergougnoux, Veronique; Marchetti, Cintia F; Jiskrová, Eva; Ježilová, Eliška; Mik, Václav; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Galuszka, Petr

    2016-09-25

    Cytokinin plant hormones have been shown to play an important role in plant response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we expand upon the findings of Pospíšilová et al. [30] regarding preparation of novel transgenic barley lines overexpressing cytokinin dehydrogenase 1 gene from Arabidopsis under the control of mild root-specific promotor of maize β-glycosidase. These lines showed drought-tolerant phenotype mainly due to alteration of root architecture and stronger lignification of root tissue. A detailed transcriptomic analysis of roots of transgenic plants subjected to revitalization after drought stress revealed attenuated response through the HvHK3 cytokinin receptor and up-regulation of two transcription factors implicated in stress responses and abscisic acid sensitivity. Increased expression of several genes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway as well as of genes encoding arogenate dehydratase/lyase participating in phenylalanine synthesis was found in roots during revitalization. Although more precursors of lignin synthesis were present in roots after drought stress, final lignin accumulation did not change compared to that in plants grown under optimal conditions. Changes in transcriptome indicated a higher auxin turnover in transgenic roots. The same analysis in leaves revealed that genes encoding putative enzymes responsible for production of jasmonates and other volatile compounds were up-regulated. Although transgenic barley leaves showed lower chlorophyll content and down-regulation of genes encoding proteins involved in photosynthesis than did wild-type plants when cultivated under optimal conditions, they did show a tendency to return to initial photochemical activities faster than did wild-type leaves when re-watered after severe drought stress. In contrast to optimal conditions, comparative transcriptomic analysis of revitalized leaves displayed up-regulation of genes encoding enzymes and proteins involved in photosynthesis, and especially

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction and defects in lipid homeostasis as therapeutic targets in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinghorn, Kerri J.; Castillo-Quan, Jorge Iván

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The PLA2G6 gene encodes a group VIA calcium independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2β), which hydrolyses glycerophospholipids to release fatty acids and lysophospholipids. Mutations in PLA2G6 are associated with a number of neurodegenerative disorders including neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA), infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD), and dystonia parkinsonism, collectively known as PLA2G6-associated neurodegeneration (PLAN). Recently Kinghorn et al. demonstrated in Drosophila and PLA2G6 mutant fibroblasts that loss of normal PLA2G6 activity is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondrial lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, they were able to show the beneficial effects of deuterated polyunsaturated fatty acids (D-PUFAs), which reduce lipid peroxidation. D-PUFAs were able to rescue the locomotor deficits of flies lacking the fly ortholog of PLA2G6 (iPLA2-VIA), as well as the mitochondrial abnormalities in PLA2G6 mutant fibroblasts. This work demonstrated that the iPLA2-VIA knockout fly is a useful organism to dissect the mechanisms of pathogenesis of PLAN, and that further investigation is required to determine the therapeutic potential of D-PUFAs in patients with PLA2G6 mutations. The fruit fly has also been used to study some of the other genetic causes of NBIA, and here we also describe what is known about the mechanisms of pathogenesis of these NBIA variants. Mitochondrial dysfunction, defects in lipid metabolism, as well as defective Coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis, have all been implicated in some genetic forms of NBIA, including PANK2, CoASY, C12orf19 and FA2H.

  16. Short-chain fructooligosaccharides do not alter glucose homeostasis but improve the lipid profile in obese rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Soares da Silva-Morita

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effects of short-chain fructooligosaccharides (scFOS feeding on body weight, fat accumulation, glucose homeostasis and lipid profile in cafeteria (CAF obese rats. Male Wistar rats were divided randomly into two groups: control group (CTL, n = 10, which received a chow diet and water and CAF (n = 20, which received the cafeteria diet, standard chow and soda. After 30 weeks of diet, 10 animals of CAF group received scFOS in the diet (50 g kg-1 of diet over a period of 50 days, forming the CAF FOS group. Were evaluated the body weight, fat pad as well as, quantity of feces, glucose tolerance, insulin resistance (IR and serum lipids levels. Animals submitted to the CAF diet displayed obesity, hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia and IR. The scFOS feeding   not altered obesity, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia and IR. CAF rats also presented hypertriglyceridemia and lower levels of HDL-cholesterol. The CAF FOS animals had reduced serum triglycerides (TG and increased HDL-cholesterol. Thus, the use of scFOS in the diet can be considered as a hypolipidemic agent in the obese state.

  17. Iron metabolism and cell membranes. III. Iron-induced alterations in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui, H. O.; Bradford, W. D.; Arstila, A. U.; Kinney, T. D.; Trump, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    The morphologic characteristics of acute iron loading were studied in HeLa cells incubated in an iron-enriched Eagle's medium containing 500 mug/ml of iron. Chemical studies showed that ferritin synthesis was rapidly induced and the concentration of intracellular ferritin increased up to 72 hours. Closely coupled with an increase in HeLa cell ferritin was a marked decrease in the rate of cell multiplication. The significant ultrastructural findings of iron-induced HeLa cell injury are characterized by the appearance of both autophagic multivesicular and residual bodies over the first 72 hours of iron incubation. The prominence of multivesicular bodies was noted after only 4 hours' incubation, with iron and myelin figures first appearing after 6 hours. Thus, the partial arrest of cell multiplication was associated with an increase in cytoplasmic residual bodies containing iron and other debris. The distribution of intracellular ferritin within HeLa cells differs significantly from the distribution described previously in hepatic parenchymal cells. In HeLa cells, ferritin particles were confined to lysosomal vesicles and were not identified in cell sap, endoplasmic reticulum, or Golgi apparatus. Images Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1155583

  18. Osmotic Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Danziger, John; Zeidel, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in water homeostasis can disturb cell size and function. Although most cells can internally regulate cell volume in response to osmolar stress, neurons are particularly at risk given a combination of complex cell function and space restriction within the calvarium. Thus, regulating water balance is fundamental to survival. Through specialized neuronal “osmoreceptors” that sense changes in plasma osmolality, vasopressin release and thirst are titrated in order to achieve water bala...

  19. Hiperpigmentación cutánea y homeostasis del hierro: rol de la hepcidina Cutaneous hyperpigmentation and homeostasis of iron: role of the hepcidin

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, C

    2007-01-01

    La hiperpigmentación cutánea por melanina en zonas expuestas al sol puede estar asociada a un desequilibrio en la homeostasis del hierro. La hepcidina es un péptido responsable de la regulación negativa de la absorción del hierro en el intestino delgado y de su liberación por los macrófagos. Posee capacidad antimicrobiana. Es sintetizada en el hígado, secretada al torrente circulatorio y excretada por la orina. La sobreexpresión causa anemia y su déficit, sobrecarga de hierro (acumulación en ...

  20. The common inhaled anesthetic isoflurane increases aggregation of huntingtin and alters calcium homeostasis in a cell model of Huntington's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoflurane is known to increase β-amyloid aggregation and neuronal damage. We hypothesized that isoflurane will have similar effects on the polyglutamine huntingtin protein and will cause alterations in intracellular calcium homeostasis. We tested this hypothesis in striatal cells from the expanded glutamine huntingtin knock-in mouse (STHdhQ111/Q111) and wild type (STHdhQ7/Q7) striatal neurons. The primary cultured neurons were exposed for 24 h to equipotent concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane in the presence or absence of extracellular calcium and with or without xestospongin C, a potent endoplasmic reticulum inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptor antagonist. Aggregation of huntingtin protein, cell viability, and calcium concentrations were measured. Isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane all increased the aggregation of huntingtin in STHdhQ111/Q111 cells, with isoflurane having the largest effect. Isoflurane induced greater calcium release from the ER and relatively more cell damage in the STHdhQ111/Q111 huntingtin cells than in the wild type STHdhQ7/Q7 striatal cells. However, sevoflurane and desflurane caused less calcium release from the ER and less cell damage. Xestospongin C inhibited the isoflurane-induced calcium release from the ER, aggregation of huntingtin, and cell damage in the STHdhQ111/Q111 cells. In summary, the Q111 form of huntingtin increases the vulnerability of striatal neurons to isoflurane neurotoxicity through combined actions on the ER IP3 receptors. Calcium release from the ER contributes to the anesthetic induced huntingtin aggregation in STHdhQ111/Q111 striatal cells.

  1. Chlordecone, a mixed pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) agonist, alters cholesterol homeostasis and lipoprotein metabolism in C57BL/6 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlordecone (CD) is one of many banned organochlorine (OC) insecticides that are widespread persistent organic pollutants. OC insecticides alter lipid homeostasis in rodents at doses that are not neurotoxic or carcinogenic. Pretreatment of mice or rats with CD altered tissue distribution of a subsequent dose of [14C]CD or [14C]cholesterol (CH). Nuclear receptors regulate expression of genes important in the homeostasis of CH and other lipids. In this study, we report that CD suppresses in vitro reporter systems for human liver X receptors (LXRs) and activates those for human farnesoid X receptor (FXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor α (ERα) in a concentration-dependent manner (0-50 μM). Consistent with human PXR activation in vitro, three days after a single dose of CD (15 mg/kg) hepatic microsomal CYP3A11 protein increases in C57BL/6 mice. CD decreases hepatic CH ester content without altering total CH concentration. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) contents of hepatic lipoprotein-rich and microsomal fractions of CD-treated mice are higher than controls. There is a significant reduction in non-high density lipoprotein CH but not apolipoprotein B-48/100 (apoB-48/100) in plasma from CD-treated mice after a 4 h fast. At 14 days after 15 mg CD/kg apoA-I and apoB-100 proteins but not CYP3A11 protein in hepatic microsomes are similar to controls. This work indicates that altered CH homeostasis is a mode of OC insecticide action of relevance after a single dose. This at least partially explains altered CH tissue distribution in CD-pretreated mice

  2. Effect of simvastatin on the expression of farnesoid X receptor in diabetic animal models of altered glucose homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lulu; Huang Xianping; Hu Su; Ma Xiaoli; Wang Shaolian; Pang Shuguang

    2014-01-01

    Background Statin therapy has affected glucose homoeostasis of type 2 diabetes patients,which could be related with bile acids metabolism.Whether bile acid metabolism and the expression of farnesoid X receptor (FXR),liver X receptor-α (LXR-α) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (Srebp)-1c is regulated by hyperglycemia,or whether simvastatin therapy led to higher glucose is related with down-regulated expression of FXR in diabetic rats remained unclear.Methods Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups:normal control rats,insulin resistance rats,diabetic model rats,and the late simvastatin induced diabetic rats.Normal control rats were fed with standard diet,others were fed with high-fat diet.Diabetic model rats were induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ).The late simvastatin induced diabetic rats started simvastatin administration after STZ induced diabetic model rats.Characteristics of fasting blood glucose (FPG),lipid files and total bile acids (TBAs) were measured and the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed after overnight fasting at the eighth weekend.RNA and protein levels of FXR,LXR-α and Srebp-1c were tested by Western blotting and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results The insulin resistance rats showed higher glucose,lipid files and lower expression of FXR compared with normal control rats (P >0.05).The diabetic model rats showed significantly higher glucose,lipid files,TBA and lower expression of FXR compared with insulin resistance rats (P <0.05).The late simvastatin induced diabetic rats displayed higher glucose and TBA and lower expression of FXR compared with diabetic model rats (P <0.05).Conclusions Changes in bile acid homeostasis,including the alterations of bile acid levels and bile acid receptors,are either a cause or a consequence of the metabolic disturbances observed during diabetic models.Statin therapy induced hyperglycemia may be

  3. Silicate glass alteration enhanced by iron: origin and long-term implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicate glasses are used as containment matrices for deep geological disposal of nuclear waste arising from spent fuel reprocessing. Understanding the dissolution mechanisms of glasses in contact with iron, an element present in large amounts in the immediate environment (overpack, clay-stone, etc.) would be a major breakthrough toward predicting radionuclide release in the geosphere after disposal. Two different reacted glass-iron interfaces - a short-term nuclear system and a long-term archaeological system - were examined using a multi-scale and multi-analytical approach including, for the first time on samples of this type, STXM under synchrotron radiation. Comparisons revealed remarkable similarities between the two systems and shed light on Fe-Si interactions, including migration of iron within a porous gel layer and precipitation of Fe-silicates that locally increase short-term glass alteration and are sustainable over the long-term. (authors)

  4. D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol alters cellular cholesterol homeostasis by modulating the endosome lipid domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Asami; Ishii, Kumiko; Murate, Motohide; Hayakawa, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Yusuke; Suzuki, Minoru; Ito, Kazuki; Fujisawa, Tetsuro; Matsuo, Hirotami; Ishitsuka, Reiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2006-04-11

    D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (D-PDMP) is a frequently used inhibitor of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis. However, some interesting characteristics of D-PDMP cannot be explained by the inhibition of glycolipid synthesis alone. In the present study, we showed that d-PDMP inhibits the activation of lysosomal acid lipase by late endosome/lysosome specific lipid, bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (also called as lysobisphosphatidic acid), through alteration of membrane structure of the lipid. When added to cultured fibroblasts, D-PDMP inhibits the degradation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and thus accumulates both cholesterol ester and free cholesterol in late endosomes/lysosomes. This accumulation results in the inhibition of LDL-derived cholesterol esterification and the decrease of cell surface cholesterol. We showed that D-PDMP alters cellular cholesterol homeostasis in a glycosphingolipid-independent manner using L-PDMP, a stereoisomer of D-PDMP, which does not inhibit glycosphingolipid synthesis, and mutant melanoma cell which is defective in glycolipid synthesis. Altering cholesterol homeostasis by D-PDMP explains the unique characteristics of sensitizing multidrug resistant cells by this drug. PMID:16584188

  5. Obesity and type 2 diabetes in rats are associated with altered brain glycogen and amino-acid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle M; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne;

    2010-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes have reached epidemic proportions; however, scarce information about how these metabolic syndromes influence brain energy and neurotransmitter homeostasis exist. The objective of this study was to elucidate how brain glycogen and neurotransmitter homeostasis are affected...... by these conditions. [1-(13)C]glucose was administered to Zucker obese (ZO) and Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Sprague-Dawley (SprD), Zucker lean (ZL), and ZDF lean rats were used as controls. Several brain regions were analyzed for glycogen levels along with (13)C-labeling and content of....... The MCL ratios of glutamine and glutamate were decreased in the cerebellum of the ZO and the ZDF rats. Glycogen levels were also lower in this region. These results suggest that the obese and type 2 diabetic models were associated with lower brain glucose metabolism. Glucose metabolism through the TCA...

  6. Lipopolysaccharide Increases Immune Activation and Alters T Cell Homeostasis in SHIVB’WHU Chronically Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Gao-Hong; Wu, Run-Dong; Zheng, Hong-Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Ming-Xu; Tian, Ren-Rong; Liu, Guang-Ming; Pang, Wei; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation plays a significant role in the disease progression of HIV. Microbial products, especially bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), contribute to immune activation. Increasing evidence indicates that T lymphocyte homeostasis disruptions are associated with immune activation. However, the mechanism by which LPS affects disruption of immune response is still not fully understood. Chronically SHIVB'WHU-infected Chinese rhesus macaques received 50 μg/kg body weight LPS in this study....

  7. Lipopolysaccharide Increases Immune Activation and Alters T Cell Homeostasis in SHIVB'WHU Chronically Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Gao-Hong Zhang; Run-Dong Wu; Hong-Yi Zheng; Xiao-Liang Zhang; Ming-Xu Zhang; Ren-Rong Tian; Guang-Ming Liu; Wei Pang; Yong-Tang Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation plays a significant role in the disease progression of HIV. Microbial products, especially bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), contribute to immune activation. Increasing evidence indicates that T lymphocyte homeostasis disruptions are associated with immune activation. However, the mechanism by which LPS affects disruption of immune response is still not fully understood. Chronically SHIVB’WHU-infected Chinese rhesus macaques received 50 μg/kg body weight LPS in this study....

  8. Postnatal exposure to trichloroethylene alters glutathione redox homeostasis, methylation potential, and neurotrophin expression in the mouse hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Blossom, Sarah J.; Melnyk, Stepan; Cooney, Craig A.; Gilbert, Kathleen M.; James, S. Jill

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that continuous exposure throughout gestation until the juvenile period to environmentally-relevant doses of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the drinking water of MRL+/+ mice promoted adverse behavior associated with glutathione depletion in the cerebellum indicating increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to extend our findings and further characterize the impact of TCE exposure on redox homeostasis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in...

  9. Oxygen Glucose Deprivation in Rat Hippocampal Slice Cultures Results in Alterations in Carnitine Homeostasis and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas F. Rau; Qing Lu; Shruti Sharma; Xutong Sun; Gregory Leary; Beckman, Matthew L.; Yali Hou; Wainwright, Mark S; Michael Kavanaugh; Poulsen, David J.; Black, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by depolarization of mitochondrial membranes and the initiation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis are pathological responses to hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in the neonatal brain. Carnitine metabolism directly supports mitochondrial metabolism by shuttling long chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for beta-oxidation. Our previous studies have shown that HI disrupts carnitine homeostasis in neonatal rats and that L-carnitine can be neurop...

  10. Characterization of Three New Glutaredoxin Genes in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizophagus irregularis: Putative Role of RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 in Iron Homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Tamayo

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxins (GRXs are small ubiquitous oxidoreductases involved in the regulation of the redox state in living cells. In an attempt to identify the full complement of GRXs in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis, three additional GRX homologs, besides the formerly characterized GintGRX1 (renamed here as RiGRX1, were identified. The three new GRXs (RiGRX4, RiGRX5 and RiGRX6 contain the CXXS domain of monothiol GRXs, but whereas RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 belong to class II GRXs, RiGRX6 belongs to class I together with RiGRX1. By using a yeast expression system, we observed that the newly identified homologs partially reverted sensitivity of the GRX deletion yeast strains to external oxidants. Furthermore, our results indicated that RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 play a role in iron homeostasis in yeast. Gene expression analyses revealed that RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 were more highly expressed in the intraradical (IRM than in the extraradical mycelium (ERM. Exposure of the ERM to hydrogen peroxide induced up-regulation of RiGRX1, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 gene expression. RiGRX4 expression was also up-regulated in the ERM when the fungus was grown in media supplemented with a high iron concentration. These data indicate the two monothiol class II GRXs, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5, might be involved in oxidative stress protection and in the regulation of fungal iron homeostasis. Increased expression of RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 in the IRM suggests that these GRXs should play a key role in oxidative stress protection of R. irregularis during its in planta phase.

  11. Phenotype enhancement screen of a regulatory spx mutant unveils a role for the ytpQ gene in the control of iron homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Zuber

    Full Text Available Spx is a global regulator of genes that are induced by disulfide stress in Bacillus subtilis. The regulon that it governs is comprised of over 120 genes based on microarray analysis, although it is not known how many of these are under direct Spx control. Most of the Spx-regulated genes (SRGs are of unknown function, but many encode products that are conserved in low %GC Gram-positive bacteria. Using a gene-disruption library of B. subtilis genomic mutations, the SRGs were screened for phenotypes related to Spx-controlled activities, such as poor growth in minimal medium and sensitivity to methyglyoxal, but nearly all of the SRG mutations showed little if any phenotype. To uncover SRG function, the mutations were rescreened in an spx mutant background to determine which mutant SRG allele would enhance the spx mutant phenotype. One of the SRGs, ytpQ was the site of a mutation that, when combined with an spx null mutation, elevated the severity of the Spx mutant phenotype, as shown by reduced growth in a minimal medium and by hypersensitivity to methyglyoxal. The ytpQ mutant showed elevated oxidative protein damage when exposed to methylglyoxal, and reduced growth rate in liquid culture. Proteomic and transcriptomic data indicated that the ytpQ mutation caused the derepression of the Fur and PerR regulons of B. subtilis. Our study suggests that the ytpQ gene, encoding a conserved DUF1444 protein, functions directly or indirectly in iron homeostasis. The ytpQ mutant phenotype mimics that of a fur mutation, suggesting a condition of low cellular iron. In vitro transcription analysis indicated that Spx stimulates transcription from the ytpPQR operon within which the ytpQ gene resides. The work uncovers a link between Spx and control of iron homeostasis.

  12. Tucum-Do-Cerrado (Bactris setosa Mart.) Consumption Modulates Iron Homeostasis and Prevents Iron-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustinoni-Reis, Adriana M; Arruda, Sandra F; Dourado, Lívia P S; da Cunha, Marcela S B; Siqueira, Egle M A

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of tucum-do-cerrado consumption in the oxidative status of iron-supplemented rats. Four groups of rats were treated: Control (AIN-93G), Tuc (AIN-93G added of tucum-do-cerrado), Fe (AIN-93G iron-enriched), or TucFe (AIN-93G with tucum-do-cerrado and iron-enriched) diet, for 30 days. Iron-enriched diet increased serum, liver, spleen, and intestine iron levels; transferrin saturation; liver lipid oxidation; mRNA levels of hepatic Hamp and Bmp6, and Nrf2 in the intestine. Tucum-do-cerrado consumption reduced spleen lipid and protein oxidation; mRNA levels of hepatic Hamp and Ftl, and increased serum antioxidant capacity and hepatic mRNA levels of Bmp6, Hmox1, Nqo1, and Nrf2. TucFe diet consumption abrogated the liver Hamp iron-induced up-regulation, prevented intestinal iron accumulation; hepatic lipid peroxidation; splenic protein damage, and the increase of catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase activity in some tissues. These results suggest that tucum-do-cerrado protects tissues against oxidative damage, by reducing iron availability in liver and consequently inhibiting liver Hamp expression. PMID:26901220

  13. Pulmonary Toxicity and Modifications in Iron Homeostasis Following Libby Amphibole Asbestos Exposure in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Individuals suffering from cardiovascular disease (CVD) develop iron dysregulation which may influence pulmonary toxicity and injury upon exposure to asbestos. We hypothesized spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rats woul...

  14. Experimental and clinical studies on liver regeneration and hepatocellular carcinoma. Roles of redox proteins, iron homeostasis and multikinase inhibition.

    OpenAIRE

    Mollbrink, Annelie

    2013-01-01

    Compensatory liver regeneration is triggered by chronic liver injury or surgery and is crucial to maintain tissue homeostasis. The underlying mechanisms which include a whole battery of complex signaling events have been thoroughly studied for decades. The majority of hepatocellular carcinomas develop in a highly proliferative environment caused by underlying chronic liver disease in which lost liver tissue must be restored to meet the needs of the organism. The chronic inflammatory condition...

  15. Determination of oxidation state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czapla-Masztafiak, J.; Lis, G. J.; Gajda, M.; Jasek, E.; Czubek, U.; Bolechała, F.; Borca, C.; Kwiatek, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    In order to investigate changes in chemical state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves X-ray absorption spectroscopy was applied. Since Fe is suspected to play detrimental role in aortic valve stenosis pathogenesis the oxidation state of this element has been determined. The experimental material consisted of 10 μm sections of valves excised during routine surgery and from autopsies. The experiment was performed at the MicroXAS beamline of the SLS synchrotron facility in Villigen (Switzerland). The Fe K-edge XANES spectra obtained from tissue samples were carefully analyzed and compared with the spectra of reference compounds containing iron in various chemical structures. The analysis of absorption edge position and shape of the spectra revealed that both chemical forms of iron are presented in valve tissue but Fe3+ is the predominant form. Small shift of the absorption edge toward higher energy in the spectra from stenotic valve samples indicates higher content of the Fe3+ form in pathological tissue. Such a phenomenon suggests the role of Fenton reaction and reactive oxygen species in the etiology of aortic valve stenosis. The comparison of pre-edge regions of XANES spectra for control and stenotic valve tissue confirmed no differences in local symmetry or spin state of iron in analyzed samples.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-homeostasis is altered in small and non-small cell lung cancer cell lines

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    Tufman Amanda

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of differences in the cellular physiology of malignant and non-malignant cells is a prerequisite for the development of cancer treatments that effectively kill cancer without damaging normal cells. Calcium is a ubiquitous signal molecule that is involved in the control of proliferation and apoptosis. We aimed to investigate if the endoplasmic reticulum (ER Ca2+-homeostasis is different in lung cancer and normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE cells. Methods The intracellular Ca2+-signaling was investigated using fluorescence microscopy and the expression of Ca2+-regulating proteins was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Results In a Small Cell Lung Cancer (H1339 and an Adeno Carcinoma Lung Cancer (HCC cell line but not in a Squamous Cell Lung Cancer (EPLC and a Large Cell Lung Cancer (LCLC cell line the ER Ca2+-content was reduced compared to NHBE. The reduced Ca2+-content correlated with a reduced expression of SERCA 2 pumping calcium into the ER, an increased expression of IP3R releasing calcium from the ER, and a reduced expression of calreticulin buffering calcium within the ER. Lowering the ER Ca2+-content with CPA led to increased proliferation NHBE and lung cancer cells. Conclusion The significant differences in Ca2+-homeostasis between lung cancer and NHBE cells could represent a new target for cancer treatments.

  17. Influence of microRNA on the Maintenance of Human Iron Metabolism

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    Stephen Clarke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient critical for many cellular functions including DNA synthesis, ATP generation, and cellular proliferation. Though essential, excessive iron may contribute to the generation of free radicals capable of damaging cellular lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. As such, the maintenance and control of cellular iron homeostasis is critical to prevent either iron deficiency or iron toxicity conditions. The maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis is largely coordinated by a family of cytosolic RNA binding proteins known as Iron Regulatory Proteins (IRP that function to post-transcriptionally control the translation and/or stability of mRNA encoding proteins required for iron uptake, storage, transport, and utilization. More recently, a class of small non-coding RNA known as microRNA (miRNA has also been implicated in the control of iron metabolism. To date, miRNA have been demonstrated to post-transcriptionally regulate the expression of genes associated with iron acquisition (transferrin receptor and divalent metal transporter, iron export (ferroportin, iron storage (ferritin, iron utilization (ISCU, and coordination of systemic iron homeostasis (HFE and hemojevelin. Given the diversity of miRNA and number of potential mRNA targets, characterizing factors that contribute to alterations in miRNA expression, biogenesis, and processing will enhance our understanding of mechanisms by which cells respond to changes in iron demand and/or iron availability to control cellular iron homeostasis.

  18. Disorders of Iron Metabolism and Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulated iron homeostasis plays a central role in the development of anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a major contributor toward resistance to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology requires an in-depth understanding of normal iron physiology and regulation. Recent discoveries in the field of iron biology have greatly improved our understanding of the hormonal regulation of iron trafficking in human beings and how its alterations lead to the development of anemia of CKD. In addition, emerging evidence has suggested that iron homeostasis interacts with bone and mineral metabolism on multiple levels, opening up new avenues of investigation into the genesis of disordered iron metabolism in CKD. Building on recent advances in our understanding of normal iron physiology and abnormalities in iron homeostasis in CKD, this review characterizes how anemia related to disordered iron metabolism develops in the setting of CKD. In addition, this review explores our emerging recognition of the connections between iron homeostasis and mineral metabolism and their implications for the management of altered iron status and anemia of CKD. PMID:27475656

  19. Morbillivirus glycoprotein expression induces ER stress, alters Ca2+ homeostasis and results in the release of vasostatin.

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    Jean-Marc Brunner

    Full Text Available Although the pathology of Morbillivirus in the central nervous system (CNS is well described, the molecular basis of neurodegenerative events still remains poorly understood. As a model to explore Morbillivirus-mediated CNS dysfunctions, we used canine distemper virus (CDV that we inoculated into two different cell systems: a monkey cell line (Vero and rat primary hippocampal neurons. Importantly, the recombinant CDV used in these studies not only efficiently infects both cell types but recapitulates the uncommon, non-cytolytic cell-to-cell spread mediated by virulent CDVs in brain of dogs. Here, we demonstrated that both CDV surface glycoproteins (F and H markedly accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. This accumulation triggered an ER stress, characterized by increased expression of the ER resident chaperon calnexin and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP/GADD 153. The expression of calreticulin (CRT, another ER resident chaperon critically involved in the response to misfolded proteins and in Ca(2+ homeostasis, was also upregulated. Transient expression of recombinant CDV F and H surface glycoproteins in Vero cells and primary hippocampal neurons further confirmed a correlation between their accumulation in the ER, CRT upregulation, ER stress and disruption of ER Ca(2+ homeostasis. Furthermore, CDV infection induced CRT fragmentation with re-localisation of a CRT amino-terminal fragment, also known as vasostatin, on the surface of infected and neighbouring non-infected cells. Altogether, these results suggest that ER stress, CRT fragmentation and re-localization on the cell surface may contribute to cytotoxic effects and ensuing cell dysfunctions triggered by Morbillivirus, a mechanism that might potentially be relevant for other neurotropic viruses.

  20. Effects of acute creatine supplementation on iron homeostasis and uric acid-based antioxidant capacity of plasma after wingate test

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    Barros Marcelo P

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary creatine has been largely used as an ergogenic aid to improve strength and athletic performance, especially in short-term and high energy-demanding anaerobic exercise. Recent findings have also suggested a possible antioxidant role for creatine in muscle tissues during exercise. Here we evaluate the effects of a 1-week regimen of 20 g/day creatine supplementation on the plasma antioxidant capacity, free and heme iron content, and uric acid and lipid peroxidation levels of young subjects (23.1 ± 5.8 years old immediately before and 5 and 60 min after the exhaustive Wingate test. Results Maximum anaerobic power was improved by acute creatine supplementation (10.5 %, but it was accompanied by a 2.4-fold increase in pro-oxidant free iron ions in the plasma. However, potential iron-driven oxidative insult was adequately counterbalanced by proportional increases in antioxidant ferric-reducing activity in plasma (FRAP, leading to unaltered lipid peroxidation levels. Interestingly, the FRAP index, found to be highly dependent on uric acid levels in the placebo group, also had an additional contribution from other circulating metabolites in creatine-fed subjects. Conclusions Our data suggest that acute creatine supplementation improved the anaerobic performance of athletes and limited short-term oxidative insults, since creatine-induced iron overload was efficiently circumvented by acquired FRAP capacity attributed to: overproduction of uric acid in energy-depleted muscles (as an end-product of purine metabolism and a powerful iron chelating agent and inherent antioxidant activity of creatine.

  1. Arsenic-induced alteration in intracellular calcium homeostasis induces head kidney macrophage apoptosis involving the activation of calpain-2 and ERK in Clarias batrachus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We had earlier shown that exposure to arsenic (0.50 μM) caused caspase-3 mediated head kidney macrophage (HKM) apoptosis involving the p38-JNK pathway in Clarias batrachus. Here we examined the roles of calcium (Ca2+) and extra-cellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), the other member of MAPK-pathway on arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. Arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis involved increased expression of ERK and calpain-2. Nifedipine, verapamil and EGTA pre-treatment inhibited the activation of calpain-2, ERK and reduced arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis as evidenced from reduced caspase-3 activity, Annexin V-FITC-propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342 staining. Pre-incubation with ERK inhibitor U 0126 inhibited the activation of calpain-2 and interfered with arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. Additionally, pre-incubation with calpain-2 inhibitor also interfered with the activation of ERK and inhibited arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin and diphenyleneiodonium chloride also inhibited ERK activation indicating activation of ERK in arsenic-exposed HKM also depends on signals from NADPH oxidase pathway. Our study demonstrates the critical role of Ca2+ homeostasis on arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. We suggest that arsenic-induced alteration in intracellular Ca2+ levels initiates pro-apoptotic ERK and calpain-2; the two pathways influence each other positively and induce caspase-3 mediated HKM apoptosis. Besides, our study also indicates the role of ROS in the activation of ERK pathway in arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis in C. batrachus. - Highlights: → Altered Ca2+ homeostasis leads to arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. → Calpain-2 plays a critical role in the process. → ERK is pro-apoptotic in arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. → Arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis involves cross talk between calpain-2 and ERK.

  2. Cyclic glycine-proline regulates IGF-1 homeostasis by altering the binding of IGFBP-3 to IGF-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jian; Gluckman, Peter; Yang, Panzao; Krissansen, Geoff; Sun, Xueying; Zhou, Yongzhi; Wen, Jingyuan; Phillips, Gemma; Shorten, Paul R.; McMahon, Chris D.; Wake, Graeme C.; Chan, Wendy H. K.; Thomas, Mark F.; Ren, April; Moon, Steve; Liu, Dong-Xu

    2014-03-01

    The homeostasis of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is essential for metabolism, development and survival. Insufficient IGF-1 is associated with poor recovery from wounds whereas excessive IGF-1 contributes to growth of tumours. We have shown that cyclic glycine-proline (cGP), a metabolite of IGF-1, can normalise IGF-1 function by showing its efficacy in improving the recovery from ischemic brain injury in rats and inhibiting the growth of lymphomic tumours in mice. Further investigation in cell culture suggested that cGP promoted the activity of IGF-1 when it was insufficient, but inhibited the activity of IGF-1 when it was excessive. Mathematical modelling revealed that the efficacy of cGP was a modulated IGF-1 effect via changing the binding of IGF-1 to its binding proteins, which dynamically regulates the balance between bioavailable and non-bioavailable IGF-1. Our data reveal a novel mechanism of auto-regulation of IGF-1, which has physiological and pathophysiological consequences and potential pharmacological utility.

  3. The bHLH transcription factor bHLH104 interacts with IAA-LEUCINE RESISTANT3 and modulates iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Bing; Li, Mengshu; Feng, Dongru; Jin, Honglei; Wang, Peng; Liu, Jun; Xiong, Feng; Wang, Jinfa; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2015-03-01

    Iron (Fe) is an indispensable micronutrient for plant growth and development. The regulation of Fe homeostasis in plants is complex and involves a number of transcription factors. Here, we demonstrate that a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, bHLH104, belonging to the IVc subgroup of bHLH family, acts as a key component positively regulating Fe deficiency responses. Knockout of bHLH104 in Arabidopsis thaliana greatly reduced tolerance to Fe deficiency, whereas overexpression of bHLH104 had the opposite effect and led to accumulation of excess Fe in soil-grown conditions. The activation of Fe deficiency-inducible genes was substantially suppressed by loss of bHLH104. Further investigation showed that bHLH104 interacted with another IVc subgroup bHLH protein, IAA-LEUCINE RESISTANT3 (ILR3), which also plays an important role in Fe homeostasis. Moreover, bHLH104 and ILR3 could bind directly to the promoters of Ib subgroup bHLH genes and POPEYE (PYE) functioning in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses. Interestingly, genetic analysis showed that loss of bHLH104 could decrease the tolerance to Fe deficiency conferred by the lesion of BRUTUS, which encodes an E3 ligase and interacts with bHLH104. Collectively, our data support that bHLH104 and ILR3 play pivotal roles in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses via targeting Ib subgroup bHLH genes and PYE expression. PMID:25794933

  4. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Anthony L.; Rooney, John P.; Kubik, Laura L.; Gonzalez, Claudia P.; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes. PMID:26106885

  5. General geology, alteration, and iron deposits in the Palaeoproterozoic Misi region, northern Finland

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    Tero Niiranen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Paleoproterozoic Misi region forms the northeastern part of the Peräpohja Schist Belt in northern Finland. The area comprises mafic volcanic and sedimentary rocks, differentiated gabbros, and late-orogenic granitoids. Three geochemically different mafic volcanic units were recognised: LREE-depleted amygdaloidal lavas, slightly LREE-enriched lavas, and mafic tuffs that have a flat REE pattern. Sedimentary rocks include arkosites, mica gneisses, dolomitic marbles, quartzites, tuffites, mica schists, calc-silicate rocks and graphite-bearing schists. Two types of gabbros wereidentified: one with a LREE-enriched pattern and another with flat REE pattern. The age of the former is according to Perttunen and Vaasjoki (2001 2117±4 Ma, whereas there is no age determination for the latter. The granitoid intrusions belong to the ca. 1800 Malate-orogenic group of the Central Lapland Granitoid Complex. The geochemistry and the stable isotope data on mafic lavas and dolomitic marbles show similarities with the mafic volcanic rocks and marbles of the lower part of the Kivalo group in the western part of Peräpohja Schist Belt. Peak metamorphic conditions in the region vary from upper-greenschist to upper-amphibolite facies. Three major stages of deformation were distinguished: N-S compressional D1 with ductile deformation, NE-SW compressional D2 with ductile to brittle-ductile deformation, and E-W compressional D3 with brittle deformation. Several magnetite occurrences are known in the region and four of those have been mined for iron. The ores are mainly composed of magnetite with minor haematite, pyrite, chalcopyrite and bornite. Besides iron, the ores contain small amounts of P, S and V aswell as trace amounts of Cu, Co, Te and Au. The magnetite bodies are hosted by skarnoids within the ca. 2220–2120 Ma dolomitic marble-quartzite sequence, and highly differentiated, intensely albitised, LREE-enriched gabbro. Multistage and -type alteration is

  6. Calcium channel blockers ameliorate iron overload-associated hepatic fibrosis by altering iron transport and stellate cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Xin; Chang, Yanzhong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Chu, Xi; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Zhenyi; Guo, Hui; Wang, Na; Gao, Yonggang; Zhang, Jianping; Chu, Li

    2016-06-15

    Liver fibrosis is the principal cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with iron overload. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) can antagonize divalent cation entry into renal and myocardial cells and inhibit fibrogenic gene expression. We investigated the potential of CCBs to resolve iron overload-associated hepatic fibrosis. Kunming mice were assigned to nine groups (n=8 per group): control, iron overload, deferoxamine, high and low dose verapamil, high and low dose nimodipine, and high and low dose diltiazem. Iron deposition and hepatic fibrosis were measured in mouse livers. Expression levels of molecules associated with transmembrane iron transport were determined by molecular biology approaches. In vitro HSC-T6 cells were randomized into nine groups (the same groups as the mice). Changes in proliferation, apoptosis, and metalloproteinase expression in cells were detected to assess the anti-fibrotic effects of CCBs during iron overload conditions. We found that CCBs reduced hepatic iron content, intracellular iron deposition, the number of hepatic fibrotic areas, collagen expression levels, and hydroxyproline content. CCBs rescued abnormal expression of α1C protein in L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (LVDCC) and down-regulated divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT-1) expression in mouse livers. In iron-overloaded HSC-T6 cells, CCBs reduced iron deposition, inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, and elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1). CCBs are potential therapeutic agents that can be used to address hepatic fibrosis during iron overload. They resolve hepatic fibrosis probably correlated with regulating transmembrane iron transport and inhibiting HSC growth. PMID:27095094

  7. EFFECTS OF ADDROGRAPHIS PANICULATA (NEES. ON ARSENIC- INDUCED ALTERED GLUCOSE HOMEOSTASIS AND OXIDATIVE IMPAIRMENT IN PANCREAS OF SWISS MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MANDAVA V. RAO

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Andrographis paniculata (Nees. on arsenic-induced changes in biochemical and cellular antioxident sytem was studies in adult female mice. Daily oral administration of arsenic trioxide (0.5 and 1.0mg/kg b.w for 30days induced a significant increase in blood glucose level which was associated with impaired glucose tolrence. Arsenic treatment also resulted in elevated level panreatic tissue specific makers such as activities of amylase and lipase in serum indicating pancreatic dysfunction. Interestingly, this biochemical dysfuntion was accompanied by a marked dose related enchancement of lipid peroxidation indicating significant induction of oxidative damage. Additional evidence such as deletion in reduced gluatathione levels and alterations in enzymic antioxidant defences like superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase in pancreas suggested induction of oxidative stress. Concomitant administration of Adrographis paniculata (50 mg/kg b.w. with arsenic significant restored all these parameters. These results suggest that Adrographis paniculata is capable to reducing arsenic-induce cellular oxidative and inflammatory changes in pancreas.

  8. Defects in TRPM7 channel function deregulate thrombopoiesis through altered cellular Mg(2+) homeostasis and cytoskeletal architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stritt, Simon; Nurden, Paquita; Favier, Remi; Favier, Marie; Ferioli, Silvia; Gotru, Sanjeev K; van Eeuwijk, Judith M M; Schulze, Harald; Nurden, Alan T; Lambert, Michele P; Turro, Ernest; Burger-Stritt, Stephanie; Matsushita, Masayuki; Mittermeier, Lorenz; Ballerini, Paola; Zierler, Susanna; Laffan, Michael A; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Braun, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Mg(2+) plays a vital role in platelet function, but despite implications for life-threatening conditions such as stroke or myocardial infarction, the mechanisms controlling [Mg(2+)]i in megakaryocytes (MKs) and platelets are largely unknown. Transient receptor potential melastatin-like 7 channel (TRPM7) is a ubiquitous, constitutively active cation channel with a cytosolic α-kinase domain that is critical for embryonic development and cell survival. Here we report that impaired channel function of TRPM7 in MKs causes macrothrombocytopenia in mice (Trpm7(fl/fl-Pf4Cre)) and likely in several members of a human pedigree that, in addition, suffer from atrial fibrillation. The defect in platelet biogenesis is mainly caused by cytoskeletal alterations resulting in impaired proplatelet formation by Trpm7(fl/fl-Pf4Cre) MKs, which is rescued by Mg(2+) supplementation or chemical inhibition of non-muscle myosin IIA heavy chain activity. Collectively, our findings reveal that TRPM7 dysfunction may cause macrothrombocytopenia in humans and mice. PMID:27020697

  9. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  10. Long term alteration of glass/iron systems in anoxic conditions: contribution of archaeological analogues to the study of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of glass alteration mechanisms arouses a great interest over the last decades, particularly in the nuclear field, since vitrification is used to stabilize high-level radioactive wastes in many countries. In the French concept, these nuclear glasses would be stored in geological repositories. This multi-barrier system (glass matrix, stainless steel container, low carbon steel over-container, geological barrier) must ensure the durable confinement of radionuclides. But laboratory experiments do not permit to predict directly the behaviour of these materials over typically a million-year timescale and the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data to long time periods remains problematic. Part of the validation of the predictive models relies on natural and archaeological analogues. Here, the analogues considered are vitreous slags produced as wastes by a blast furnace working during the 16. century in the iron making site of Glinet (Normandy, France). The choice of these specific artefacts is due to the presence of particular interface between corrosion products and glass matrix inside the blocks. Thus, they can help us to understand the influence of iron corrosion products from the steel containers on the glass alteration mechanisms and kinetics. A first part of this work concerns the characterization of the archaeological artefacts especially the interfacial area between glass and corrosion products inside cracks using micro and nano-beam techniques ( Raman spectroscopy, FEG-SEM, TEM, STXM...). This study has enabled to suggest an alteration process with different geochemical steps that leads to alteration profile observed. One of these steps is the precipitation of an iron silicate phase. In a second time, leaching experiments were set up on a synthetic glass of similar composition than the archaeological one to understand the first stages of alteration with and without iron. Two phenomena can be observed: silicon sorption and precipitation of iron

  11. Geology, alteration, age, and origin of iron oxide-apatite deposits in Upper Eocene quartz monzonite, Zanjan district, NW Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabatian, Ghasem; Ghaderi, Majid; Corfu, Fernando; Neubauer, Franz; Bernroider, Manfred; Prokofiev, Vsevolod; Honarmand, Maryam

    2014-02-01

    Iron oxide-apatite deposits are present in Upper Eocene pyroxene-quartz monzonitic rocks of the Zanjan district, northwestern Iran. Mineralization occurred in five stages: (1) deposition of disseminated magnetite and apatite in the host rock; (2) mineralization of massive and banded magnetite ores in veins and stockwork associated with minor brecciation and calcic alteration of host rocks; (3) deposition of sulfide ores together with potassic alteration; (4) formation of quartz and carbonate veins and sericite, chlorite, epidote, silica, carbonate, and tourmaline alteration; and (5) supergene alteration and weathering. U-Pb dating of monazite inclusions in the apatite indicates an age of 39.99 ± 0.24 Ma, which is nearly coeval with the time of emplacement of the host quartz monzonite, supporting the genetic connection. Fluid inclusions in the apatite have homogenization temperatures of about 300 °C and oxygen isotopic compositions of the magnetite support precipitation from magmatic fluids. Late-stage quartz resulted from the introduction of a cooler, less saline, and isotopically depleted fluid. The iron oxide-apatite deposits in the Tarom area of the Zanjan district are typical of a magmatic-hydrothermal origin and are similar to the Kiruna-type deposits with respect to mineral assemblages, fabric and structure of the iron ores, occurrence of the ore bodies, and wall rock alteration.

  12. Regulative roles of glutathione reductase and four glutaredoxins in glutathione redox, antioxidant activity, and iron homeostasis of Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long-Bin; Tang, Li; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Multiple glutaredoxins (Grx) and glutathione reductase (Glr) are vital for the thiol-disulfide redox system in budding yeast but generally unexplored in filamentous fungi. Here we characterized the Beauveria bassiana redox system comprising dithiol Grx1, monothiol Grx2-4, Grx-like Grx5, and Glr orthologue. Each grx or glr deletion was compensated by increased transcripts of some other grx genes in normal cultures. Particularly, grx3 compensated the absence of grx1, grx2, grx5, or glr under oxidative stress while its absence was compensated only by undeletable grx4 under normal conditions but by most of other undeleted grx and glr genes in response to menadione. Consequently, the redox state was disturbed in Δglr more than in Δgrx3 but not in Δgrx1/2/5. Superoxide dismutases were more active in normal Δgrx1-3 cultures but less in Δgrx5 or Δglr response to menadione. Total catalase activity increased differentially in all the mutant cultures stressed with or without H2O2 while total peroxidase activity decreased more in the normal or H2O2-stressed culture of Δglr than of Δgrx3. Among the mutants, Δgrx3 showed slightly increased sensitivity to menadione or H2O2; Δglr exhibited greater sensitivity to thiol-oxidizing diamide than thiol-reducing 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as well as increased sensitivity to the two oxidants. Intriguingly, all the mutants grew slower in a Fe(3+)-inclusive medium perhaps due to elevated transcripts of two Fe(3+) transporter genes. More or fewer phenotypes linked with biocontrol potential were altered in four deletion mutants excluding Δgrx5. All the changes were restored by targeted gene complementation. Overall, Grx3 played more critical role than other Grx homologues in the Glr-dependent redox system of the fungal entomopathogen. PMID:26969041

  13. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since th...

  14. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seafood, and foods that contain vitamin C , like citrus fruits, strawberries, sweet peppers, tomatoes, and broccoli. What ... diets. What are some effects of iron on health? Scientists are studying iron to understand how it ...

  15. Alterations of iron distribution in Arabidopsis tissues infected by Dickeya dadantii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Aude; Patrit, Oriane; Berger, Adeline; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-06-01

    Dickeya dadantii is a plant-pathogenic enterobacterium responsible for plant soft rot disease in a wide range of hosts, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Iron distribution in infected A. thaliana was investigated at the cellular scale using the Perls'-diaminobenzidine-H2 O2 (PDH) method. Iron visualization during infection reveals a loss of iron from cellular compartments and plant cell walls. During symptom progression, two distinct zones are clearly visible: a macerated zone displaying weak iron content and a healthy zone displaying strong iron content. Immunolabelling of cell wall methylated pectin shows that pectin degradation is correlated with iron release from cell walls, indicating a strong relationship between cell wall integrity and iron in plant tissues. Using a D. dadantii lipopolysaccharide antibody, we show that bacteria are restricted to the infected tissue, and that they accumulate iron in planta. In conclusion, weak iron content is strictly correlated with bacterial cell localization in the infected tissues, indicating a crucial role of this element during the interaction. This is the first report of iron localization at the cellular level during a plant-microbe interaction and shows that PDH is a method of choice in this type of investigation. PMID:25266463

  16. Origin of a south Texas roll-type uranium deposit--1. Alteration of iron-titanium oxide minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report (the first of two) is to describe the time-space features of the postdepositional alteration of detrital Fe-Ti oxide minerals in a south Texas roll-type deposit and to relate these features to an initial episode of host-rock sulfidization and to the evolution of the altered tongue of the deposit. The authors present evidence here that a first generation of iron disulfide minerals formed from fault-derived H;sub 2;S. 38 refs

  17. Proteomic analysis reveals that iron availability alters the metabolic status of the pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana F A Parente

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a thermodimorphic fungus and the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM. The ability of P. brasiliensis to uptake nutrients is fundamental for growth, but a reduction in the availability of iron and other nutrients is a host defense mechanism many pathogenic fungi must overcome. Thus, fungal mechanisms that scavenge iron from host may contribute to P. brasiliensis virulence. In order to better understand how P. brasiliensis adapts to iron starvation in the host we compared the two-dimensional (2D gel protein profile of yeast cells during iron starvation to that of iron rich condition. Protein spots were selected for comparative analysis based on the protein staining intensity as determined by image analysis. A total of 1752 protein spots were selected for comparison, and a total of 274 out of the 1752 protein spots were determined to have changed significantly in abundance due to iron depletion. Ninety six of the 274 proteins were grouped into the following functional categories; energy, metabolism, cell rescue, virulence, cell cycle, protein synthesis, protein fate, transcription, cellular communication, and cell fate. A correlation between protein and transcript levels was also discovered using quantitative RT-PCR analysis from RNA obtained from P. brasiliensis under iron restricting conditions and from yeast cells isolated from infected mouse spleens. In addition, western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays validated the differential regulation of proteins identified by 2-D gel analysis. We observed an increase in glycolytic pathway protein regulation while tricarboxylic acid cycle, glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycles, and electron transport chain proteins decreased in abundance under iron limiting conditions. These data suggest a remodeling of P. brasiliensis metabolism by prioritizing iron independent pathways.

  18. Iron and exercise induced alterations in antioxidant status. Protection by dietary milk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunquin, Gautier; Rouleau, Vincent; Bouhallab, Said; Bureau, Francois; Theunynck, Denis; Rousselot, Pierre; Arhan, Pierre; Bougle, Dominique

    2006-05-01

    Lipid peroxidation stress induced by iron supplementation can contribute to the induction of gut lesions. Intensive sports lead to ischemia reperfusion, which increases free radical production. Athletes frequently use heavy iron supplementation, whose effects are unknown. On the other hand, milk proteins have in vitro antioxidant properties, which could counteract these potential side effects. The main aims of the study were: (1) to demonstrate the effects of combined exercise training (ET) and iron overload on antioxidant status; (2) to assess the protective properties of casein in vivo; (3) to study the mechanisms involved in an in vitro model. Antioxidant status was assessed by measuring the activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD); glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px)), and on the onset of aberrant crypts (AC) in colon, which can be induced by lipid peroxidation. At day 30, all ET animals showed an increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, in iron concentration in colon mucosa and liver and in the number of AC compared to untrained rats. It was found that Casein's milk protein supplementation significantly reduced these parameters. Additional information on protective effect of casein was provided by measuring the extent of TBARS formation during iron/ascorbate-induced oxidation of liposomes. Free casein and casein bound to iron were found to significantly reduce iron-induced lipid peroxidation. The results of the overall study suggest that Iron supplementation during intensive sport training would decrease anti-oxidant status. Dietary milk protein supplementation could at least partly prevent occurrence of deleterious effects to tissue induced by iron overload. PMID:17390518

  19. Iron Prochelator BSIH Protects Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells against Cell Death Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Charkoudian, Louise K.; Dentchev, Tzvete; Lukinova, Nina; Wolkow, Natalie; Dunaief, Joshua L.; Franz, Katherine J.

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulation of localized iron homeostasis is implicated in several degenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and age-related macular degeneration, wherein iron-mediated oxidative stress is hypothesized to contribute to cell death. Inhibiting toxic iron without altering normal metal-dependent processes presents significant challenges for standard small molecule chelating agents. We previously introduced BSIH (isonicotinic acid [2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl...

  20. Alteration of Iron Level in Drinking Water by Aeration in Gonbad Kavoos (North East of Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    Abdoljalal Marjani; Abdoljabbar Nazari; Mostefa Seyyed

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: In this study, removal of iron was surveyed in well water in Gonbad Kavoos City. Approach: Samples were taken before and after aeration. Concentration of iron in each sample was measured by spectrophotometer. Results: The results showed that the iron concentration was decreased after aeration (0.55, 0.44, 0.44, 0.46, 0.40 and 0.41 mg L-1) when compared with before aeration of water (0.64, 0.68, 0.65, 0.62, 0.65 and 0.67 mg L-1), respectiv...

  1. Liver iron transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ross M Graham; Anita CG Chua; Carly E Herbison; John K Olynyk; Debbie Trinder

    2007-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in iron metabolism. It is the major storage site for iron and also expresses a complex range of molecules which are involved in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis. An increasing number of genes associated with hepatic iron transport or regulation have been identified. These include transferrin receptors (TFR1 and 2), a ferrireductase (STEAP3), the transporters divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and ferroportin (FPN) as well as the haemochromatosis protein, HFE and haemojuvelin (HJV),which are signalling molecules. Many of these genes also participate in iron regulatory pathways which focus on the hepatic peptide hepcidin. However, we are still only beginning to understand the complex interactions between liver iron transport and iron homeostasis. This review outlines our current knowledge of molecules of iron metabolism and their roles in iron transport and regulation of iron homeostasis.

  2. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Infancy Is Associated with Altered Temporal Organization of Sleep States in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    PEIRANO, PATRICIO D.; ALGARÍN, CECILIA R.; Garrido, Marcelo I.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2007-01-01

    The highest prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in infancy coincides with a time of rapid changes in sleep organization. Since IDA in infancy is associated with long-lasting neurofunctional effects despite iron treatment, the normal development of sleep patterns might be affected. Night polysomnographic recordings were performed in 55 healthy 4-y-old children (former IDA = 27, nonanemic controls = 28). Both groups were followed from infancy and were similar in background characteristic...

  3. Alterations of platelet functions in children and adolescents with iron-deficiency anemia and response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Galila M; Ibrahim, Wafaa E; Kassim, Nevine A; Ragab, Iman A; Saad, Abeer A; Abdel Raheem, Heba G

    2015-01-01

    Several changes in platelets have been reported in patients with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), so a relationship between iron metabolism and thrombopoiesis should be considered. We aimed to study the alterations of platelet functions in patients with IDA by assessment of platelet aggregation with epinephrine, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and ristocetin and by measuring platelet function analyzer-100 (PFA-100) closure time together with the effect of iron therapy on the same tests. A follow-up study was conducted in Ain Shams University Children's hospital in the period from June 2011 to June 2012 including 20 patients with confirmed IDA and 20 healthy age- and sex-matched control. Bleeding manifestations were reported. Laboratory analysis included complete blood count, assessment of iron status by measuring serum iron, TIBC and ferritin, assessment of platelet functions by PFA-100 closure time and platelet aggregation with collagen, ADP and ristocetin. Patients with IDA were treated by oral iron therapy 6 mg/kg/day of ferrous sulfate and post-therapeutic re-assessment was done. Mean age of IDA patients was 5.7 ± 4.2 years. Bleeding manifestations were more common in patients group. Mean PFA-100 closure times (with epinephrine) were significantly longer in patients (179.1 ± 86.4 seconds) compared to control group (115 ± 28.5 seconds) (p treatment platelet aggregation tests induced by ADP (64.78 ± 18.25%), and epinephrine (55.47 ± 24%) were significantly increased in patients with IDA compared to before treatment (39.44 ± 21.85%, 20.33 ± 14.58%; p treatment (118.4 ± 27.242) compared to before treatment (186.2 ± 90.35; p treatment (r = 0.042, p iron deficiency and platelet functions. Subtle bleeding manifestations can occur in patients with IDA with delay in platelet aggregation and prolongation in PFA-100 closure times which can be reversed by iron therapy. PMID:25026531

  4. Thermodynamic and mass balance constraints on iron-bearing phyllosilicate formation and alteration pathways on early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2013-10-01

    Widespread occurrences of phyllosilicates, predominantly nontronite and Mg saponite, in the Noachian-aged crust of Mars place constraints on water availability and surface conditions. However, the Noachian atmosphere likely lacked oxidants capable of forming nontronite from the basaltic crust and its origins are thus uncertain. In this study, scenarios for the formation of iron-bearing phyllosilicates from the weathering and hydrothermal alteration of Martian basalt were investigated using geochemical modeling to establish plausible pathways of nontronite generation and the effect of redox conditions on associated secondary phases. Hydrothermal alteration produced FeII and Mg saponite, serpentine, and zeolites at 100°C and chlorite, prehnite, and talc at 250°C, consistent with phases observed in crater deposits on Mars. Anoxic weathering produced primarily FeII and Mg saponite. High water-rock ratios produced Al-clays and amorphous silica and high pCO2 conditions inhibited smectite formation because of carbonate precipitation. Oxic weathering produced primarily nontronite and Mg saponite. Later oxidation of anoxic weathering products also formed nontronite-Mg saponite assemblages; oxidation products of hydrothermal assemblages included nontronite, Mg saponite, and either Al smectites or residual zeolites or prehnite. These calculations demonstrate that there are multiple plausible routes to form Fe/Mg smectites on early Mars and that an oxidizing atmosphere need not have existed in the Noachian. Decoupling iron oxidation from initial clay formation raises the possibilities that Mars transitioned to conditions favoring widespread iron oxidation after phyllosilicate formation ceased and that residual, unoxidized ferrous iron phyllosilicates still exist today in the Martian subsurface.

  5. Perinatal Polyunstaurated Fatty Acids Supplementation Causes Alterations in Fuel Homeostasis in Adult Male Rats but does not Offer Resistance Against STZ-induced Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, G.; Kacsandi, A.; Kobor-Nyakas, D. E.; Hogyes, E.; Nyakas, C.; Hőgyes, E.

    2011-01-01

    Maternal factors can have major imprinting effects on homeostatic mechanisms in the developing fetus and newborn. Here we studied whether supplemented perinatal polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) influence energy balance and fuel homeostasis later in life. Between day 10 after conception and day 10

  6. Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 deg C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses, except for the storage, and the total number of pigments was affected by the irradiation and the time, reducing the values with the increase of storage. Irradiation was shown to be a good method to conserve iron. (author)

  7. Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 °C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses, except for the storage, and the total number of pigments was affected by the irradiation and the time, reducing the values with the increase of storage. Irradiation was shown to be a good method to conserve iron. (author)

  8. Dysregulation of Iron Metabolism in Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Oshiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of iron metabolism has been observed in patients with neurodegenerative diseases (NDs. Utilization of several importers and exporters for iron transport in brain cells helps maintain iron homeostasis. Dysregulation of iron homeostasis leads to the production of neurotoxic substances and reactive oxygen species, resulting in iron-induced oxidative stress. In Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD, circumstantial evidence has shown that dysregulation of brain iron homeostasis leads to abnormal iron accumulation. Several genetic studies have revealed mutations in genes associated with increased iron uptake, increased oxidative stress, and an altered inflammatory response in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Here, we review the recent findings on brain iron metabolism in common NDs, such as AD, PD, and ALS. We also summarize the conventional and novel types of iron chelators, which can successfully decrease excess iron accumulation in brain lesions. For example, iron-chelating drugs have neuroprotective effects, preventing neural apoptosis, and activate cellular protective pathways against oxidative stress. Glial cells also protect neurons by secreting antioxidants and antiapoptotic substances. These new findings of experimental and clinical studies may provide a scientific foundation for advances in drug development for NDs.

  9. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin promotes BHV-1 infection in mammalian cells by interfering with iron homeostasis regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Fiorito

    Full Text Available Mammalian cells require iron to satisfy metabolic needs or to accomplish specialized functions, and DNA viruses, like bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1, require an iron-replete host to efficiently replicate, so that iron bioavailability is an important component of viral virulence. Cellular iron metabolism is coordinately controlled by the Iron Regulatory Proteins (IRP1 and IRP2, whose activity is affected by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, a current and persistent environmental contaminant. Considering that TCDD enhances BHV-1 replication, herein we analyzed the effects of TCDD on iron metabolism during BHV-1 infection in MDBK cells, and presented evidences of a divergent modulation of IRP1 and IRP2 RNA-binding capacity. Moreover, an up-regulation of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1 and a concomitant down-regulation of ferritin were observed. This scenario led to an expansion of the labile iron pool (LIP and induces a significant enhance of viral titer, as confirmed by increased levels of BHV-1 infected cell protein 0 (bICP0, the major transcriptional regulatory protein of BHV-1. Taken together, our data suggest that TCDD increases the free intracellular iron availability thereby promoting the onset of BHV-1 infection and rendering bovine cells more vulnerable to the virus.

  10. Acute hypoxic exercise does not alter post-exercise iron metabolism in moderately trained endurance athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govus, A.D.; Abbiss, C.R.; Garvican-Lewis, L.A.; Swinkels, D.W.; Laarakkers, C.M.; Gore, C.J.; Peeling, P.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study measured the influence of acute hypoxic exercise on Interleukin-6 (IL-6), hepcidin, and iron biomarkers in athletes. METHODS: In a repeated measures design, 13 moderately trained endurance athletes performed 5 x 4 min intervals at 90 % of their peak oxygen consumption velocity (v

  11. Serum Albumin Alters the Expression of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Iron Controlled Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effect serum on global transcription within P. aeruginosa at different phases of growth and the role of iron in this regulation. Results presented in this study suggest a novel mechanism through which serum regulates the expression of different P. ae...

  12. A Thyroid Hormone Challenge in Hypothyroid Rats Identifies T3 Regulated Genes in the Hypothalamus and in Models with Altered Energy Balance and Glucose Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Herwig, Annika; Campbell, Gill; Mayer, Claus-Dieter; Boelen, Anita; Richard A. Anderson; Alexander W Ross; Mercer, Julian G.; Barrett, Perry

    2014-01-01

    Background: The thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) is known to affect energy balance. Recent evidence points to an action of T3 in the hypothalamus, a key area of the brain involved in energy homeostasis, but the components and mechanisms are far from understood. The aim of this study was to identify components in the hypothalamus that may be involved in the action of T3 on energy balance regulatory mechanisms.

  13. Microarray analysis of rat pancreas reveals altered expression of Alox15 and regenerating islet-derived genes in response to iron deficiency and overload.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Coffey

    Full Text Available It is well known that iron overload can result in pancreatic iron deposition, beta-cell destruction, and diabetes in humans. Recent studies in animals have extended the link between iron status and pancreatic function by showing that iron depletion confers protection against beta-cell dysfunction and diabetes. The aim of the present study was to identify genes in the pancreas that are differentially expressed in response to iron deficiency or overload. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6/group were fed iron-deficient, iron-adequate, or iron-overloaded diets for 3 weeks to alter their iron status. Total RNA was isolated from the pancreases and pooled within each group for microarray analyses in which gene expression levels were compared to those in iron-adequate controls. In iron-deficient pancreas, a total of 66 genes were found to be differentially regulated (10 up, 56 down, whereas in iron-overloaded pancreas, 164 genes were affected (82 up, 82 down. The most up-regulated transcript in iron-deficient pancreas was arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (Alox15, which has been implicated in the development of diabetes. In iron-overloaded pancreas, the most upregulated transcripts were Reg1a, Reg3a, and Reg3b belonging to the regenerating islet-derived gene (Reg family. Reg expression has been observed in response to pancreatic stress and is thought to facilitate pancreatic regeneration. Subsequent qRT-PCR validation indicated that Alox15 mRNA levels were 4 times higher in iron-deficient than in iron-adequate pancreas and that Reg1a, Reg3a, and Reg3b mRNA levels were 17-36 times higher in iron-overloaded pancreas. The elevated Alox15 mRNA levels in iron-deficient pancreas were associated with 8-fold higher levels of Alox15 protein as indicated by Western blotting. Overall, these data raise the possibility that Reg expression may serve as a biomarker for iron-related pancreatic stress, and that iron deficiency may adversely affect the risk of

  14. Multi-domain CGFS-type glutaredoxin Grx4 regulates iron homeostasis via direct interaction with a repressor Fep1 in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Monothiol glutaredoxin Grx4 allows Fep1-mediated de-repression of iron uptake genes at low iron. → Grx4 directly interacts with Fep1 in vivo and in vitro. → The Cys172 in the CGFS motif of Grx4 is necessary for cell proliferation and iron regulation. → The Cys172 of Grx4 is required for normal interaction with Fep1. -- Abstract: The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains two CGFS-type monothiol glutaredoxins, Grx4 and Grx5, which are localized primarily in the nucleus and mitochondria, respectively. We observed involvement of Grx4 in regulating iron-responsive gene expression, which is modulated by a repressor Fep1. Lack of Grx4 caused defects not only in growth but also in the expression of both iron-uptake and iron-utilizing genes regardless of iron availability. In order to unravel how Grx4 is involved in Fep1-mediated regulation, interaction between them was investigated. Co-immunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) revealed that Grx4 physically interacts with Fep1 in vivo. BiFC revealed localized nuclear dots produced by interaction of Grx4 with Fep1. Mutation of cysteine-172 in the CGFS motif to serine (C172S) produced effects similarly observed under Grx4 depletion, such as the loss of iron-dependent gene regulation and the absence of nuclear dots in BiFC analysis. These results suggest that the ability of Grx4 to bind iron, most likely Fe-S cofactor, could be critical in interacting with and modulating the activity of Fep1.

  15. What the Erythrocytic Nuclear Alteration Frequencies Could Tell Us about Genotoxicity and Macrophage Iron Storage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Juliana M. M.; Ribeiro, Heder J.; Procópio, Marcela S.; Alvarenga, Betânia M.; Castro, Antônio C. S.; Dutra, Walderez O.; da Silva, José B. B.; Corrêa Junior, José D.

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytic nuclear alterations have been considered as an indicative of organism’s exposure to genotoxic agents. Due to their close relationship among their frequencies and DNA damages, they are considered excellent markers of exposure in eukaryotes. However, poor data has been found in literature concerning their genesis, differential occurrence and their life span. In this study, we use markers of cell viability; genotoxicity and cellular turn over in order to shed light to these events. Tilapia and their blood were exposed to cadmium in acute exposure and in vitro assays. They were analyzed using flow cytometry for oxidative stress and membrane disruption, optical microscopy for erythrocytic nuclear alteration, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for cadmium content in aquaria water, blood and cytochemical and analytical electron microscopy techniques for the hemocateretic aspects. The results showed a close relationship among the total nuclear alterations and cadmium content in the total blood and melanomacrophage centres area, mismatching reactive oxygen species and membrane damages. Moreover, nuclear alterations frequencies (vacuolated, condensed and blebbed) showed to be associated to cadmium exposure whereas others (lobed and bud) were associated to depuration period. Decrease on nuclear alterations frequencies was also associated with hemosiderin increase inside spleen and head kidney macrophages mainly during depurative processes. These data disclosure in temporal fashion the main processes that drive the nuclear alterations frequencies and their relationship with some cellular and systemic biomarkers. PMID:26619141

  16. Association Studies of HFE C282Y and H63D Variants with Oral Cancer Risk and Iron Homeostasis Among Whites and Blacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan R. Jones

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polymorphisms in the hemochromatosis (HFE gene are associated with excessive iron absorption from the diet, and pro-oxidant effects of iron accumulation are thought to be a risk factor for several types of cancer. Methods: The C282Y (rs1800562 and H63D (rs1799945 polymorphisms were genotyped in 301 oral cancer cases and 437 controls and analyzed in relation to oral cancer risk, and serum iron biomarker levels from a subset of 130 subjects. Results: Individuals with the C282Y allele had lower total iron binding capacity (TIBC (321.2 ± 37.2 µg/dL vs. 397.7 ± 89.0 µg/dL, p = 0.007 and higher percent transferrin saturation (22.0 ± 8.7 vs. 35.6 ± 22.9, p = 0.023 than wild type individuals. Iron and ferritin levels approached significantly higher levels for the C282Y allele (p = 0.0632 and p = 0.0588, respectively. Conclusions: Iron biomarker levels were elevated by the C282Y allele, but neither (rs1800562 nor (rs1799945 was associated with oral cancer risk in blacks and whites.

  17. Association Studies of HFE C282Y and H63D Variants with Oral Cancer Risk and Iron Homeostasis Among Whites and Blacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nathan R.; Ashmore, Joseph H.; Lee, Sang Y.; Richie, John P.; Lazarus, Philip; Muscat, Joshua E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polymorphisms in the hemochromatosis (HFE) gene are associated with excessive iron absorption from the diet, and pro-oxidant effects of iron accumulation are thought to be a risk factor for several types of cancer. Methods: The C282Y (rs1800562) and H63D (rs1799945) polymorphisms were genotyped in 301 oral cancer cases and 437 controls and analyzed in relation to oral cancer risk, and serum iron biomarker levels from a subset of 130 subjects. Results: Individuals with the C282Y allele had lower total iron binding capacity (TIBC) (321.2 ± 37.2 µg/dL vs. 397.7 ± 89.0 µg/dL, p = 0.007) and higher percent transferrin saturation (22.0 ± 8.7 vs. 35.6 ± 22.9, p = 0.023) than wild type individuals. Iron and ferritin levels approached significantly higher levels for the C282Y allele (p = 0.0632 and p = 0.0588, respectively). Conclusions: Iron biomarker levels were elevated by the C282Y allele, but neither (rs1800562) nor (rs1799945) was associated with oral cancer risk in blacks and whites. PMID:26690219

  18. Long-term alteration of bentonite in the presence of metallic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the KBS-3H concept, each copper canister containing spent nuclear fuel will be surrounded by a bentonite buffer and a perforated steel cylinder. Since steel is unstable in wet bentonite, it will corrode and the corrosion products will interact with the surrounding bentonite in ways that are not fully understood. Such interaction may seriously impair the bentonite's functioning as a buffer material, e.g. by lowering its CEC or decreasing its swelling capacity. This report presents results from two iron-bentonite experiments carried out under quite different conditions at VTT (Finland) and JAEA (Japan). Both studies focused on long-term iron-bentonite interactions under anaerobic conditions. The study at VTT comprised eight years long experiments focused on diffusive based interactions between solid cast-iron and compacted MX-80 bentonite (dry density 1.5-1.6 g/cm3) in contact with an aqueous 0.5 M NaCl solution. The study at JAEA comprised ten years long batch experiments, each involving a mixture of metallic iron powder (25 g), an industrially refined Na bentonite, Kunipia F, which contains more than 99% montmorillonite (25 g), and an aqueous solution (250 mL). Samples were sent to B+Tech in airtight steel vessels filled with N2 and subsequently analyzed at various laboratories in Finland and Sweden. The JAEA samples differed with regard to the initial solution chemistry, which was either distilled water, 0.3 M NaCl, 0.6 M NaCl, 0.1 M NaHCO3, or 0.05 M Na2SO4. The analyses of the MX-80 bentonite samples were carried out on samples containing a cast iron cylinder and also on corresponding background samples with no cast iron. In addition, the external solution and gas phase in contact with the bentonite were analyzed. Briefly, the gas contained H2, most possibly caused by corrosion of the cast iron, and CO2, mainly as a result of carbonate dissolution. The eight years old external solution exhibited, inter alia, reducing conditions, a pH of around eight

  19. Long-term alteration of bentonite in the presence of metallic iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpulainen, Sirpa; Kiviranta, Leena (BandTech Oy (Finland)); Carlsson, Torbjoern; Muurinen, Arto (VTT (Finland)); Svensson, Daniel (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (Sweden)); Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Yui, Mikatzu (JAEA (Japan)); Wersin, Paul; Rosch, Dominic (Gruner Ltd (Switzerland))

    2010-05-15

    According to the KBS-3H concept, each copper canister containing spent nuclear fuel will be surrounded by a bentonite buffer and a perforated steel cylinder. Since steel is unstable in wet bentonite, it will corrode and the corrosion products will interact with the surrounding bentonite in ways that are not fully understood. Such interaction may seriously impair the bentonite's functioning as a buffer material, e.g. by lowering its CEC or decreasing its swelling capacity. This report presents results from two iron-bentonite experiments carried out under quite different conditions at VTT (Finland) and JAEA (Japan). Both studies focused on long-term iron-bentonite interactions under anaerobic conditions. The study at VTT comprised eight years long experiments focused on diffusive based interactions between solid cast-iron and compacted MX-80 bentonite (dry density 1.5-1.6 g/cm3) in contact with an aqueous 0.5 M NaCl solution. The study at JAEA comprised ten years long batch experiments, each involving a mixture of metallic iron powder (25 g), an industrially refined Na bentonite, Kunipia F, which contains more than 99% montmorillonite (25 g), and an aqueous solution (250 mL). Samples were sent to B+Tech in airtight steel vessels filled with N{sub 2} and subsequently analyzed at various laboratories in Finland and Sweden. The JAEA samples differed with regard to the initial solution chemistry, which was either distilled water, 0.3 M NaCl, 0.6 M NaCl, 0.1 M NaHCO{sub 3}, or 0.05 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The analyses of the MX-80 bentonite samples were carried out on samples containing a cast iron cylinder and also on corresponding background samples with no cast iron. In addition, the external solution and gas phase in contact with the bentonite were analyzed. Briefly, the gas contained H{sub 2}, most possibly caused by corrosion of the cast iron, and CO{sub 2}, mainly as a result of carbonate dissolution. The eight years old external solution exhibited, inter alia

  20. Exposure to Bisphenol-A during Pregnancy Partially Mimics the Effects of a High-Fat Diet Altering Glucose Homeostasis and Gene Expression in Adult Male Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Marta García-Arevalo; Paloma Alonso-Magdalena; Junia Rebelo Dos Santos; Ivan Quesada; Carneiro, Everardo M.; Angel Nadal

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the most widespread EDCs used as a base compound in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics. The aim of our research has been to study how the exposure to BPA during pregnancy affects weight, glucose homeostasis, pancreatic β-cell function and gene expression in the major peripheral organs that control energy flux: white adipose tissue (WAT), the liver and skeletal muscle, in male offspring 17 and 28 weeks old. Pregnant mice were treated with a subcutaneous injec...

  1. Pharmacology of Iron Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Shaina L.; Krishnamurthy, Divya; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular basis for the regulation of iron uptake, storage, and distribution is necessary to understand iron homeostasis. Pharmacological tools are emerging to identify and distinguish among different iron transport pathways. Stimulatory or inhibitory small molecules with effects on iron uptake can help characterize the mechanistic elements of iron transport and the roles of the transporters involved in these processes. In particular, iron chelators can serve as potential phar...

  2. Iron dextran increases hepatic oxidative stress and alters expression of genes related to lipid metabolism contributing to hyperlipidaemia in murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Maísa; da Costa Guerra, Joyce Ferreira; Sampaio, Ana Flávia Santos; de Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of iron dextran on lipid metabolism and to determine the involvement of oxidative stress. Fischer rats were divided into two groups: the standard group (S), which was fed the AIN-93M diet, and the standard plus iron group (SI), which was fed the same diet but also received iron dextran injections. Serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were higher in the SI group than in the S group. Iron dextran was associated with decreased mRNA levels of pparα, and its downstream gene cpt1a, which is involved in lipid oxidation. Iron dextran also increased mRNA levels of apoB-100, MTP, and L-FABP indicating alterations in lipid secretion. Carbonyl protein and TBARS were consistently higher in the liver of the iron-treated rats. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between oxidative stress products, lfabp expression, and iron stores. In addition, a negative correlation was found between pparα expression, TBARS, carbonyl protein, and iron stores. In conclusion, our results suggest that the increase observed in the transport of lipids in the bloodstream and the decreased fatty acid oxidation in rats, which was promoted by iron dextran, might be attributed to increased oxidative stress. PMID:25685776

  3. Iron Dextran Increases Hepatic Oxidative Stress and Alters Expression of Genes Related to Lipid Metabolism Contributing to Hyperlipidaemia in Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maísa Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of iron dextran on lipid metabolism and to determine the involvement of oxidative stress. Fischer rats were divided into two groups: the standard group (S, which was fed the AIN-93M diet, and the standard plus iron group (SI, which was fed the same diet but also received iron dextran injections. Serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were higher in the SI group than in the S group. Iron dextran was associated with decreased mRNA levels of pparα, and its downstream gene cpt1a, which is involved in lipid oxidation. Iron dextran also increased mRNA levels of apoB-100, MTP, and L-FABP indicating alterations in lipid secretion. Carbonyl protein and TBARS were consistently higher in the liver of the iron-treated rats. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between oxidative stress products, lfabp expression, and iron stores. In addition, a negative correlation was found between pparα expression, TBARS, carbonyl protein, and iron stores. In conclusion, our results suggest that the increase observed in the transport of lipids in the bloodstream and the decreased fatty acid oxidation in rats, which was promoted by iron dextran, might be attributed to increased oxidative stress.

  4. Long-term alteration of bentonite in the presence of metallic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the KBS-3H concept, each copper canister containing spent nuclear fuel will be surrounded by a bentonite buffer and a perforated steel cylinder. Since steel is unstable in wet bentonite, it will corrode and the corrosion products will interact with the surrounding bentonite in ways that are not fully understood. Such interaction may seriously impair the bentonite's functioning as a buffer material, e.g. by lowering its CEC or decreasing its swelling capacity. This report presents results from two ironbentonite experiments carried out under quite different conditions at VTT (Finland) and JAEA (Japan). Both studies focused on long-term iron-bentonite interactions under anaerobic conditions. The study at VTT comprised eight years long experiments focused on diffusive based interactions between solid cast-iron and compacted MX-80 bentonite (dry density 1.5- 1.6 g/cm3) in contact with an aqueous 0.5 M NaCl solution. The study at JAEA comprised ten years long batch experiments, each involving a mixture of metallic iron powder (25 g), an industrially refined Na bentonite, Kunipia F, which contains more than 99% montmorillonite (25 g), and an aqueous solution (250 mL). Samples were sent to B and Tech in airtight steel vessels filled with N2 and subsequently analyzed at various laboratories in Finland and Sweden. The JAEA samples differed with regard to the initial solution chemistry, which was either distilled water, 0.3 M NaCl, 0.6 M NaCl, 0.1 M NaHCO3, or 0.05 M Na2SO4. The analyses of the MX-80 bentonite samples were carried out on samples containing a cast iron cylinder and also on corresponding background samples with no cast iron. In addition, the external solution and gas phase in contact with the bentonite were analyzed. Briefly, the gas contained H2, most possibly caused by corrosion of the cast iron, and CO2, mainly as a result of carbonate dissolution. The eight years old external solution exhibited, inter alia, reducing conditions, a pH of around

  5. Long-term alteration of bentonite in the presence of metallic iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpulainen, S.; Kiviranta, L. [B and Tech Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Carlsson, T.; Muurinen, A. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Svensson, D. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (SKB), Stockholm (Sweden); Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Yui, Mikatzu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) (Japan); Wersin, P.; Rosch, D. [Gruner Ltd, Basel (Switzerland)

    2011-12-15

    According to the KBS-3H concept, each copper canister containing spent nuclear fuel will be surrounded by a bentonite buffer and a perforated steel cylinder. Since steel is unstable in wet bentonite, it will corrode and the corrosion products will interact with the surrounding bentonite in ways that are not fully understood. Such interaction may seriously impair the bentonite's functioning as a buffer material, e.g. by lowering its CEC or decreasing its swelling capacity. This report presents results from two ironbentonite experiments carried out under quite different conditions at VTT (Finland) and JAEA (Japan). Both studies focused on long-term iron-bentonite interactions under anaerobic conditions. The study at VTT comprised eight years long experiments focused on diffusive based interactions between solid cast-iron and compacted MX-80 bentonite (dry density 1.5- 1.6 g/cm{sup 3}) in contact with an aqueous 0.5 M NaCl solution. The study at JAEA comprised ten years long batch experiments, each involving a mixture of metallic iron powder (25 g), an industrially refined Na bentonite, Kunipia F, which contains more than 99% montmorillonite (25 g), and an aqueous solution (250 mL). Samples were sent to B and Tech in airtight steel vessels filled with N{sub 2} and subsequently analyzed at various laboratories in Finland and Sweden. The JAEA samples differed with regard to the initial solution chemistry, which was either distilled water, 0.3 M NaCl, 0.6 M NaCl, 0.1 M NaHCO{sub 3}, or 0.05 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The analyses of the MX-80 bentonite samples were carried out on samples containing a cast iron cylinder and also on corresponding background samples with no cast iron. In addition, the external solution and gas phase in contact with the bentonite were analyzed. Briefly, the gas contained H{sub 2}, most possibly caused by corrosion of the cast iron, and CO{sub 2}, mainly as a result of carbonate dissolution. The eight years old external solution exhibited

  6. Iron Mineralogy and Aqueous Alteration on Mars from the MER Moessbauer Spectrometers. Chapter 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard V.; Klingelhoefer, Goestar

    2007-01-01

    The twin Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit (Gusev crater) and Opportunity (Meridiani Planum) used MIMOS II Moessbauer spectrometers to analyze martian surface materials in the first application of extraterrestrial Moessbauer spectroscopy. The instruments acquired spectra that identified the speciation of Fe according to oxidation state, coordination state, and mineralogical composition and provided quantitative information about the distribution of Fe among oxidation states, coordination states, and Fe-bearing phases. A total of 12 unique Fe-bearing phases were identified: Fe(2+) in olivine, pyroxene, and ilmenite; Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) in magnetite and chromite; Fe(3+) in nanophase ferric oxide (npOx), hematite, goethite, jarosite, an unassigned Fe3+ sulfate, and an unassigned Fe(3+) phase associated with jarosite; and Fe(0) in kamacite. Weakly altered basalts at Gusev crater (SO3 = 2.5 +/- 1.4 wt.% and Fe(3+)/Fe(sub T) = 0.24 +/- 0.11) are widespread on the Gusev plains and occur in less abundance on West Spur and Husband Hill in the Columbia Hills. Altered low-S rocks (SO3 = 5.2 +/- 2.0 wt.% and Fe(3+)/Fe(sub T) = 0.63 +/- 0.18) are the most common type of rock in the Columbia Hills. Ilm-bearing, weakly altered basalts were detected only in the Columbia Hills, as was the only occurrence of chromite in an altered low-S rock named Assemblee. Altered high-S rocks (SO3 > 14.2 wt.% and Fe(3+)/Fe(sub T) = 0.83 +/- 0.05) are the outcrop rocks of the ubiquitous Burns formation at Meridiani Planum. Two Fe(0)-bearing rocks at Meridiani Planum (Barberton and Heat Shield Rock) are meteorites. Laguna Class soil is weakly altered (SO3 = 6 +/- 2 wt.% and Fe(3+)/Fe(sub T) = 0.29 +/- 0.08) and widely distributed at both Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum, implying efficient global mixing processes or a global distribution of precursor rocks with comparable Fe mineralogical compositions. Paso Robles Class soil is heavily altered (SO3 approx. 31 wt.% and Fe(3+)/Fe(sub T) = 0.83 +/- 0

  7. Evidence for mechanical and chemical alteration of iron-nickel meteorites on Mars: Process insights for Meridiani Planum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, James W.; Golombek, M.P.; Christensen, P.R.; Squyres, S. W.; McCoy, T.J.; Schroder, C.; Fleischer, I.; Johnson, J. R.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Parker, T.J.

    2011-01-01

    The weathering of meteorites found on Mars involves chemical and physical processes that can provide clues to climate conditions at the location of their discovery. Beginning on sol 1961, the Opportunity rover encountered three large iron meteorites within a few hundred meters of each other. In order of discovery, these rocks have been assigned the unofficial names Block Island, Shelter Island, and Mackinac Island. Each rock presents a unique but complimentary set of features that increase our understanding of weathering processes at Meridiani Planum. Significant morphologic characteristics interpretable as weathering features include (1) a large pit in Block Island, lined with delicate iron protrusions suggestive of inclusion removal by corrosive interaction; (2) differentially eroded kamacite and taenite lamellae in Block Island and Shelter Island, providing relative timing through crosscutting relationships with deposition of (3) an iron oxide-rich dark coating; (4) regmaglypted surfaces testifying to regions of minimal surface modification, with other regions in the same meteorites exhibiting (5) large-scale, cavernous weathering (in Shelter Island and Mackinac Island). We conclude that the current size of the rocks is approximate to their original postfall contours. Their morphology thus likely results from a combination of atmospheric interaction and postfall weathering effects. Among our specific findings is evidence supporting (1) at least one possible episode of aqueous acidic exposure for Block Island; (2) ripple migration over portions of the meteorites; (3) a minimum of two separate episodes of wind abrasion; alternating with (4) at least one episode of coating-forming chemical alteration, most likely at subzero temperatures. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. In male rats with concurrent iron and (n-3) fatty acid deficiency, provision of either iron or (n-3) fatty acids alone alters monoamine metabolism and exacerbates the cognitive deficits associated with combined deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgartner, J.; Smuts, C.M.; Malan, L.; Arnold, M.; Yee, B.K.; Bianco, L.E.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Muller, M.R.; Langhans, W.; Hurrell, R.F.; Zimmermann, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    Concurrent deficiencies of iron (Fe) (ID) and (n-3) fatty acids [(n-3)FAD)] in rats can alter brain monoamine pathways and impair learning and memory. We examined whether repletion with Fe and DHA/EPA, alone and in combination, corrects the deficits in brain monoamine activity (by measuring monoamin

  9. Chemical Alteration on Mars Indicated by the Iron-Manganese Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, A. S.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Morris, R. V.

    2010-01-01

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometers (APXS) onboard the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) have measured the chemical compositions of over 400 samples on the surface of Mars. Fe and Mn are among the elements which are well established by this instrumentation. Fe2+ and Mn2+ have nearly the same ionic radii and distribute similarly in primary igneous rocks, maintaining a consistent Fe:Mn ratio. Upon exposure to an oxidative weathering environment, Fe 3+ and Mn4+ are commonly formed, and elemental fractionation can occur. Thus, altered samples will typically exhibit a Fe:Mn ratio different from precursor materials.

  10. Impacto da inflamação na regulação do ferro e deficiência funcional de ferro Importance of inflammation on iron homeostasis and functional iron deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Stella Figueiredo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Deficiência funcional de ferro (Fe pode ser definida como o desbalanço entre a quantidade necessária de Fe para a síntese de hemoglobina e o seu suprimento. Ela ocorre na ausência de estoque de Fe, característica da anemia ferropênica (AF, e na presença de bloqueio da homeostasia do Fe, como na anemia da inflamação (AI. Na AI, citocinas e células do sistema retículo-endotelial induzem alterações que interferem em diferentes vias da eritropoese levando à anemia. O bloqueio na mobilização do Fe de estoque pela hepcidina, embora não único, é o mecanismo etiológico mais evidente da AI. A hepcidina, regulador negativo da entrada de Fe no plasma, atua ligando-se à ferroportina, induzindo sua internalização e degradação. Embora a diferenciação entre AF e AI seja relativamente tranquila, pacientes com AI podem cursar com deficiência de Fe associada. O diagnóstico diferencial entre AI e AI com deficiência de Fe tem evidente importância clínica, e novas técnicas laboratoriais têm sido sugeridas para auxiliar neste diagnóstico.Functional iron deficiency can be defined as an imbalance between the iron needs of the erythroid marrow and iron supply. Iron deficiency occurs in the absence of iron deposits, as in the case of iron deficiency anemia (IDA, or when there is an impaired iron mobilization, such as in anemia of inflammation (AI. Cytokines and cells of the reticuloendothelial system can induce changes in several pathways, interfering in erythropoiesis and causing anemia. The retention of iron within cells of the reticuloendothelial system is due to hepcidin. Although this is not the only mechanism evolved in AI, it is the most important. Hepcidin is a negative regulator of iron entry into the plasma. Hepcidin binds to ferroportin, inducing its internalization and degradation. Differentiation between IDA and AI is relatively easy, but patients with AI can have the association of true iron deficiency. The differential

  11. The role of miR-126 in embryonic angiogenesis, adult vascular homeostasis, and vascular repair and its alterations in atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-08-01

    Expression of microRNA (miR)-126 is enriched in endothelial cells (ECs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). MiR-126 is considered a master regulator of physiological angiogenesis. In embryonic vasculogenesis, this miRNA is involved in induction of angiogenic signaling, supports differentiation of embryonic stem cells to EPCs and ECs, and promotes EC maturation. However, in mature ECs and adult EPCs, miR-126 contributes to vascular homeostasis by inhibiting angiogenesis and maintaining the quiescent endothelial phenotype associated with increased vascular integrity and inhibited proliferation and motility. In a case of vessel injury and/or hypoxia, miR-126 up-regulation activates EPCs and ECs and contributes to vascular healing and neovessel formation. Indeed, miR-126 exhibits vasculoprotective and atheroprotective properties. The promising regenerative and proangiogenic potential of this miRNA will be helpful for development of cardioprotective strategies and cardiovascular repair therapies of myocardial infarction, heart failure, and other cardiovascular pathology. PMID:27180261

  12. Hepcidin and its role in iron absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, K J

    2004-01-01

    Maintaining the correct iron balance is crucial to good health. Disorders of iron homeostasis have a global distribution. As iron is not actively excreted by the body, understanding the role of proteins involved in regulating iron uptake is essential to our understanding of disease involving iron homeostasis. Over the past 10 years, major advances have been made in understanding the genetics of iron metabolism and this has led to identification of a number of new proteins, including hepcidin,...

  13. The Role of the Cytoplasmic Heme-binding Protein (PhuS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Intracellular Heme Trafficking and Iron Homeostasis*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Ajinder P.; Lansky, Ila B.; Wilks, Angela

    2009-01-01

    The cytoplasmic heme-binding protein PhuS, encoded within the Fur-regulated Pseudomonas heme utilization (phu) operon, has previously been shown to traffic heme to the iron-regulated heme oxygenase (HO). We further investigate the role of PhuS in heme trafficking to HO on disruption of the phuS and hemO genes in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore-deficient and wild-type background. Previous studies have shown that deletion of hemO prevents the cells from utilizin...

  14. Exposure to bisphenol-A during pregnancy partially mimics the effects of a high-fat diet altering glucose homeostasis and gene expression in adult male mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta García-Arevalo

    Full Text Available Bisphenol-A (BPA is one of the most widespread EDCs used as a base compound in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics. The aim of our research has been to study how the exposure to BPA during pregnancy affects weight, glucose homeostasis, pancreatic β-cell function and gene expression in the major peripheral organs that control energy flux: white adipose tissue (WAT, the liver and skeletal muscle, in male offspring 17 and 28 weeks old. Pregnant mice were treated with a subcutaneous injection of 10 µg/kg/day of BPA or a vehicle from day 9 to 16 of pregnancy. One month old offspring were divided into four different groups: vehicle treated mice that ate a normal chow diet (Control group; BPA treated mice that also ate a normal chow diet (BPA; vehicle treated animals that had a high fat diet (HFD and BPA treated animals that were fed HFD (HFD-BPA. The BPA group started to gain weight at 18 weeks old and caught up to the HFD group before week 28. The BPA group as well as the HFD and HFD-BPA ones presented fasting hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance and high levels of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA in plasma compared with the Control one. Glucose stimulated insulin release was disrupted, particularly in the HFD-BPA group. In WAT, the mRNA expression of the genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, Srebpc1, Pparα and Cpt1β was decreased by BPA to the same extent as with the HFD treatment. BPA treatment upregulated Pparγ and Prkaa1 genes in the liver; yet it diminished the expression of Cd36. Hepatic triglyceride levels were increased in all groups compared to control. In conclusion, male offspring from BPA-treated mothers presented symptoms of diabesity. This term refers to a form of diabetes which typically develops in later life and is associated with obesity.

  15. A magnetic-dependent protein corona of tailor-made superparamagnetic iron oxides alters their biological behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziyao; Zhan, Xiaohui; Yang, Minggang; Yang, Qi; Xu, Xianghui; Lan, Fang; Wu, Yao; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, it is becoming increasingly evident that once nanoparticles come into contact with biological fluids, a protein corona surely forms and critically affects the biological behaviors of nanoparticles. Herein, we investigate whether the formation of protein corona on the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs) is influenced by static magnetic field. Under static magnetic field, there is no obvious variation in the total amount of protein adsorption, but the proportion of adsorbed proteins significantly changes. Noticeably, certain proteins including apolipoproteins, complement system proteins and acute phase proteins, increase in the protein corona of SPIOs in the magnetic field. More importantly, the magnetic-dependent protein corona of SPIOs enhances the cellular uptake of SPIOs into the normal cell line (3T3 cells) and tumor cell line (HepG2 cells), due to increased adsorption of apolipoprotein. In addition, SPIOs with the magnetic-dependent protein corona cause high cytotoxicity to 3T3 cells and HepG2 cells. This work discloses that superparamagnetism as a key feature of SPIOs affects the composition of protein corona to a large extent, which further alters the biological behaviors of SPIOs.In recent years, it is becoming increasingly evident that once nanoparticles come into contact with biological fluids, a protein corona surely forms and critically affects the biological behaviors of nanoparticles. Herein, we investigate whether the formation of protein corona on the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs) is influenced by static magnetic field. Under static magnetic field, there is no obvious variation in the total amount of protein adsorption, but the proportion of adsorbed proteins significantly changes. Noticeably, certain proteins including apolipoproteins, complement system proteins and acute phase proteins, increase in the protein corona of SPIOs in the magnetic field. More importantly, the magnetic-dependent protein

  16. Iron Metabolism: Interactions with Normal and Disordered Erythropoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2012-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies and other disorders of erythroid cells are often associated with abnormal iron homeostasis. We review the molecular physiology of intracellular and systemic iron regulation, and the interactions between erythropoiesis and iron homeostasis. Finally, we discuss iron disorders that affect erythropoiesis as well as erythroid disorders that cause iron dysregulation.

  17. Iron oxide nanoparticles induced alterations in haematological, biochemical and ionoregulatory responses of an Indian major carp Labeo rohita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravanan, M.; Suganya, R.; Ramesh, M., E-mail: mathanramesh@yahoo.com; Poopal, R. K. [Bharathiar University, Unit of Toxicology, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences (India); Gopalan, N. [Bharathiar University, DRDO-BU (India); Ponpandian, N. [Bharathiar University, Department of Nanoscience and Technology (India)

    2015-06-15

    The wide use of iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs) in various applications has raised great concerns worldwide. In this work, we measured the potential harmful effects of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NP (<50 nm) at concentrations of 1 and 25 mg/L on haematological, biochemical, and ionoregulatory responses in an Indian major carp, Labeo rohita for a short-term period of 96 h. The results revealed significant (P < 0.05) decreases in haemoglobin, haematocrit, mean cellular volume, mean cellular haemoglobin, protein, sodium (Na{sup +}), potassium (K{sup +}), chloride (Cl{sup −}) and gill Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase levels in both the concentrations. White blood cell, mean cellular haemoglobin concentration and glucose levels were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in response to both concentrations during the study period. However, no significant changes in red blood cell count and gill Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase (25 mg/L) activity were noticed compared to those of the respective control groups. Based on this study, it was found that the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs do have prominent effects on freshwater fish L. rohita. Our data suggest that the alterations of these parameters can be used as nonspecific biomarkers to monitor the environmental risks arising from nanoparticles in aquatic ecosystem and also regulate the use, production and release of nanoparticles.

  18. The presence of serum alters the properties of iron oxide nanoparticles and lowers their accumulation by cultured brain astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Such particles are able to cross the blood–brain barrier and are taken up into brain cells. To test whether serum components affect the properties of IONPs and/or their uptake into brain cells, we have incubated dimercaptosuccinate-coated magnetic IONPs without and with fetal calf serum (FCS) and have exposed cultured brain astrocytes with IONPs in the absence or presence of FCS. Incubation with FCS caused a concentration-dependent increase in the average hydrodynamic diameter of the particles and of their zeta-potential. In the presence of 10 % FCS, the diameter of the IONPs increased from 57 ± 2 to 107 ± 6 nm and the zeta-potential of the particles from −22 ± 5 to −9 ± 1 mV. FCS affected also strongly the uptake of IONPs by cultured astrocytes. The efficient time- and temperature-dependent cellular accumulation of IONPs was lowered with increasing concentration of FCS by up to 90 %. In addition, in the absence of serum, endocytosis inhibitors did not alter the IONP accumulation by astrocytes, while chlorpromazine or wortmannin lowered significantly the accumulation of IONPs in the presence of FCS, suggesting that clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis are involved in astrocytic IONP uptake from serum-containing medium. These data demonstrate that the presence of FCS strongly affects the properties of IONPs as well as their accumulation by cultured brain cells.

  19. The presence of serum alters the properties of iron oxide nanoparticles and lowers their accumulation by cultured brain astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geppert, Mark; Petters, Charlotte [University of Bremen, Centre for Biomolecular Interactions Bremen (Germany); Thiel, Karsten [Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials (Germany); Dringen, Ralf, E-mail: ralf.dringen@uni-bremen.de [University of Bremen, Centre for Biomolecular Interactions Bremen (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Such particles are able to cross the blood-brain barrier and are taken up into brain cells. To test whether serum components affect the properties of IONPs and/or their uptake into brain cells, we have incubated dimercaptosuccinate-coated magnetic IONPs without and with fetal calf serum (FCS) and have exposed cultured brain astrocytes with IONPs in the absence or presence of FCS. Incubation with FCS caused a concentration-dependent increase in the average hydrodynamic diameter of the particles and of their zeta-potential. In the presence of 10 % FCS, the diameter of the IONPs increased from 57 {+-} 2 to 107 {+-} 6 nm and the zeta-potential of the particles from -22 {+-} 5 to -9 {+-} 1 mV. FCS affected also strongly the uptake of IONPs by cultured astrocytes. The efficient time- and temperature-dependent cellular accumulation of IONPs was lowered with increasing concentration of FCS by up to 90 %. In addition, in the absence of serum, endocytosis inhibitors did not alter the IONP accumulation by astrocytes, while chlorpromazine or wortmannin lowered significantly the accumulation of IONPs in the presence of FCS, suggesting that clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis are involved in astrocytic IONP uptake from serum-containing medium. These data demonstrate that the presence of FCS strongly affects the properties of IONPs as well as their accumulation by cultured brain cells.

  20. A neuronal disruption in redox homeostasis elicited by ammonia alters the glycine/glutamate (GABA) cycle and contributes to MMA-induced excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Gabbi, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Leandro Rodrigo; Della-Pace, Iuri Domingues; Rodrigues, Fernanda Silva; de Oliveira Ferreira, Ana Paula; da Silveira Junior, Mauro Eduardo Porto; da Silva, Luís Roberto Hart; Grisólia, Alan Barroso Araújo; Braga, Danielle Valente; Dobrachinski, Fernando; da Silva, Anderson Manoel Herculano Oliveira; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Marchesan, Sara; Furian, Ana Flavia; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider; Fighera, Michele Rechia

    2016-06-01

    Hyperammonemia is a common finding in children with methylmalonic acidemia. However, its contribution to methylmalonate-induced excitotoxicty is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanisms by which ammonia influences in the neurotoxicity induced by methylmalonate (MMA) in mice. The effects of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl 3, 6, and 12 mmol/kg; s.c.) on electroencephalographic (EEG) and behavioral convulsions induced by MMA (0.3, 0.66, and 1 µmol/2 µL, i.c.v.) were observed in mice. After, ammonia, TNF-α, IL1β, IL-6, nitrite/nitrate (NOx) levels, mitochondrial potential (ΔΨ), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, Methyl-Tetrazolium (MTT) reduction, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity levels were measured in the cerebral cortex. The binding of [(3)H]flunitrazepam, release of glutamate-GABA; glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and neuronal damage [opening of blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cellular death volume] were also measured. EEG recordings showed that an intermediate dose of NH4Cl (6 mmol/kg) increased the duration of convulsive episodes induced by MMA (0.66 μmol/2 μL i.c.v). NH4Cl (6 mmol/kg) administration also induced neuronal ammonia and NOx increase, as well as mitochondrial ROS generation throughout oxidation of 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) to DCF-RS, followed by GS and GAD inhibition. The NH4Cl plus MMA administration did not alter cytokine levels, plasma fluorescein extravasation, or neuronal damage. However, it potentiated DCF-RS levels, decreased the ΔΨ potential, reduced MTT, inhibited SDH activity, and increased Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. NH4Cl also altered the GABA cycle characterized by GS and GAD activity inhibition, [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding, and GABA release after MMA injection. On the basis of our findings, the changes in ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) levels elicited by ammonia alter the glycine

  1. In male rats with concurrent iron and (n-3) fatty acid deficiency, provision of either iron or (n-3) fatty acids alone alters monoamine metabolism and exacerbates the cognitive deficits associated with combined deficiency 1-3

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgartner, Jeannine; Smuts, Cornelius M.; Malan, Linda; Arnold, Myrtha; Yee, Benjamin K.

    2012-01-01

    Concurrent deficiencies of iron (Fe) (ID) and (n-3) fatty acids [(n-3)FAD)] in rats can alter brain monoamine pathways and impair learning and memory. We examined whether repletion with Fe and DHA/EPA, alone and in combination, corrects the deficits in brain monoamine activity (by measuring monoamines and related gene expression) and spatial working and reference memory [by Morris water maze (MWM) testing] associated with deficiency. Using a 2 × 2 design, male rats with concurrent ID and (n-3...

  2. Iron metabolism in the mononuclear phagocyte system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weina Kong; Xianglin Duan; Zhenhua Shi; Yanzhong Chang

    2008-01-01

    The maintenance of body iron homeostasis requires the coordination of multiple regulatory mechanisms of iron metabolism.The mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS,composed of monocytes,macrophages,and their precursor cells) is crucial in the maintenance of iron homeostasis.Recycling of iron is carried out by specialized macrophages via engulfment of aged erythrocytes.The iron stores of macrophages depend on the levels of recovered and exported iron.However,the molecular mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis in macrophages are poorly understood.Recent studies characterizing the function and regulation of natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nrampl),divalent metal transporter 1 (DMTI),HLA-linked hemechromatosis gene (HFE),ferroportin 1 (FPN1),and hepcidin are rapidly expanding our knowledge on the molecular level of MPS iron handling.These studies are deepening our understanding about the molecular mechanism of iron homeostasis and iron-related diseases.

  3. C9orf72 Hexanucleotide Expansions Are Associated with Altered Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Homeostasis and Stress Granule Formation in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell‐Derived Neurons from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafinca, Ruxandra; Scaber, Jakub; Ababneh, Nida'a; Lalic, Tatjana; Weir, Gregory; Christian, Helen; Vowles, Jane; Douglas, Andrew G.L.; Fletcher‐Jones, Alexandra; Browne, Cathy; Nakanishi, Mahito; Turner, Martin R.; Wade‐Martins, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in a noncoding region of the C9orf72 gene is a major cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), accounting for up to 40% of familial cases and 7% of sporadic ALS in European populations. We have generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of patients carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansions, differentiated these to functional motor and cortical neurons, and performed an extensive phenotypic characterization. In C9orf72 iPSC‐derived motor neurons, decreased cell survival is correlated with dysfunction in Ca2+ homeostasis, reduced levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl‐2, increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, C9orf72 motor neurons, and also cortical neurons, show evidence of abnormal protein aggregation and stress granule formation. This study is an extensive characterization of iPSC‐derived motor neurons as cellular models of ALS carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeats, which describes a novel pathogenic link between C9orf72 mutations, dysregulation of calcium signaling, and altered proteostasis and provides a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of ALS and the related neurodegenerative disease frontotemporal dementia. Stem Cells 2016;34:2063–2078 PMID:27097283

  4. Iron economy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaesener, Anne G.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.

    2013-01-01

    While research on iron nutrition in plants has largely focused on iron-uptake pathways, photosynthetic microbes such as the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provide excellent experimental systems for understanding iron metabolism at the subcellular level. Several paradigms in iron homeostasis have been established in this alga, including photosystem remodeling in the chloroplast and preferential retention of some pathways and key iron-dependent proteins in response to suboptimal iron supply. This review presents our current understanding of iron homeostasis in Chlamydomonas, with specific attention on characterized responses to changes in iron supply, like iron-deficiency. An overview of frequently used methods for the investigation of iron-responsive gene expression, physiology and metabolism is also provided, including preparation of media, the effect of cell size, cell density and strain choice on quantitative measurements and methods for the determination of metal content and assessing the effect of iron supply on photosynthetic performance. PMID:24032036

  5. BREAD BAKING DOES NOT ALTER THE BIOAVAILABILITY OF HYDROGEN-REDUCED IRON POWDER ADDED TO REFINED WHEAT FLOUR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elemental iron powders are widely used to fortify flour and cereal products. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that baking enhances the bioavailability of elemental iron powders by oxidizing Fe0 to Fe2+ or Fe3+. In the present study we used an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture model an...

  6. Alteration, oxygen isotope, and fluid inclusion study of the Meishan iron oxide-apatite deposit, SE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinjie; Che, Linrui; Wang, Tiezhu

    2015-10-01

    The Meishan deposit (338 Mt at 39 % Fe) comprises massive ores in the main orebody and stockwork and disseminated ores along the main orebody. Four stages of mineralization and related alteration have been identified. The second stage of mineralization, which was the main stage of iron mineralization, formed stringer, disseminated iron ores, as well as the main Meishan orebody. The fourth stage formed small pyrite and/or gold orebodies above or alongside the main magnetite orebody. Stage 2 apatites have homogenization temperatures of 257-485 °C and salinities of 7.3-11 wt% NaCleq. Calculated δ18Ofluid values of magnetite and apatite from the disseminated ores vary between 7.7 and 14.9 ‰, which is similar to values observed in the massive ores (8.1-12.9 ‰). The high-18O fluids at Meishan have been interpreted as being of magmatic-hydrothermal origin. These fluids are indicative of the boiling of ore-forming fluids. Quartz, occurring as cavity fillings, gives homogenization temperatures from 202 to 344 °C, with most values lying between 250 and 330 °C. Corresponding salinities are ˜5 wt% NaCleq. Calculated δ18Ofluid values are +6.4 to +6.8 ‰. These values indicate that the lower-temperature (250-330 °C) quartz was deposited from a cooling magmatic-hydrothermal fluid. Stage 3 siderites contain fluid inclusions that homogenized between 190 and 310 °C, mainly between 210 and 290 °C. Corresponding salinities are 4-8 wt% NaCleq. Stage 4 quartz-carbonate veinlets contain fluid inclusions that homogenized at moderate to low temperatures (150-230 °C) and exhibit low salinities (2-10 wt% NaCl eq). δ18Ofluid values of the mineralizing fluids for the quartz and calcite can be calculated to vary from -0.7 to +5.6 ‰ and +6.3 to +10.2 ‰, respectively. While there is some overlap, the δ18O values of the fluids are generally lower than those observed in the massive and disseminated magnetite ores. δD values for the quartz and calcite vary between -154 and -123

  7. Cadmium Toxicity Induced Alterations in the Root Proteome of Green Gram in Contrasting Response towards Iron Supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowbiya Muneer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium signifies a severe threat to crop productivity and green gram is a notably iron sensitive plant which shows considerable variation towards cadmium stress. A gel-based proteomics analysis was performed with the roots of green gram exposed to iron and cadmium combined treatments. The resulting data show that twenty three proteins were down-regulated in iron-deprived roots either in the absence (−Fe/−Cd or presence (−Fe/+Cd of cadmium. These down-regulated proteins were however well expressed in roots under iron sufficient conditions, even in the presence of cadmium (+Fe/+Cd. The functional classification of these proteins determined that 21% of the proteins are associated with nutrient metabolism. The other proteins in higher quantities are involved in either transcription or translation regulation, and the rest are involved in biosynthesis metabolism, antioxidant pathways, molecular chaperones and stress response. On the other hand, several protein spots were also absent in roots in response to iron deprivation either in absence (−Fe/−Cd or presence (−Fe/+Cd of cadmium but were well expressed in the presence of iron (+Fe/+Cd. Results suggest that green gram plants exposed to cadmium stress are able to change the nutrient metabolic balance in roots, but in the mean time regulate cadmium toxicity through iron supplements.

  8. Altered potassium homeostasis in Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total body potassium (TBK), serum potassium, and the number of red blood cell ouabain-binding sites was studied in 94 patients with Crohn's diease. TBK was measured by counting the endogenous 40K in a whole body counter. TBK was 87%+-13% in 94 patients was Crohn's disease, while in control subjects, it was 97%+-12% (n=24). This significant reduction in TBK was accompanied by normal serum potassium levels (4.4+-0.5 mM). TBK was significantly correlated with the Crohn's disease activity index (r=0.79, n=113, P3H-ouabain showed a significant increse in the number of Na-K pumps in Crohn's disease (396+-65, n=27) compared with the control group. 290+-45 (n=24). These results support the suggestion that changes in TBK may regulate the synthesis of Na-K pump molecules. The total body potassium depletion and the need for a preoperative nutritional support in Crohn's disease are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Iron regulation by hepatocytes and free radicals

    OpenAIRE

    Takami, Taro; Sakaida, Isao

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential metallic microelement for life. However, iron overload is toxic. The liver serves an important role as a storehouse for iron in the body. About 20–25 mg of iron is required each day for hemoglobin synthesis. To maintain iron homeostasis, transferrin and transferrin receptors are primarily involved in the uptake of iron into hepatocytes, ferritin in its storage, and ferroportin in its export. Moreover, hepcidin controls ferroportin and plays a central role in the iron meta...

  10. Regulating Subcellular Metal Homeostasis: The Key to Crop Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Khurram; Rasheed, Sultana; Kobayashi, Takanori; Seki, Motoaki; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), and copper (Cu) are essential micronutrient mineral elements for living organisms, as they regulate essential cellular processes, such as chlorophyll synthesis and photosynthesis (Fe, Cu, and Mn), respiration (Fe and Cu), and transcription (Zn). The storage and distribution of these minerals in various cellular organelles is strictly regulated to ensure optimal metabolic rates. Alteration of the balance in uptake, distribution, and/or storage of these minerals severely impairs cellular metabolism and significantly affects plant growth and development. Thus, any change in the metal profile of a cellular compartment significantly affects metabolism. Different subcellular compartments are suggested to be linked through complex retrograde signaling networks to regulate cellular metal homeostasis. Various genes regulating cellular and subcellular metal distribution have been identified and characterized. Understanding the role of these transporters is extremely important to elaborate the signaling between various subcellular compartments. Moreover, modulation of the proteins involved in cellular metal homeostasis may help in the regulation of metabolism, adaptability to a diverse range of environmental conditions, and biofortification. Here, we review progress in the understanding of different subcellular metal transport components in plants and discuss the prospects of regulating cellular metabolism and strategies to develop biofortified crop plants. PMID:27547212

  11. Loss of NCB5OR in the cerebellum disturbs iron pathways, potentiates behavioral abnormalities, and exacerbates harmaline-induced tremor in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, Matthew A; Winter, Michelle K; Swerdlow, Russell H; McCarson, Kenneth E; Zhu, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Iron dyshomeostasis has been implicated in many diseases, including a number of neurological conditions. Cytosolic NADH cytochrome b5 oxidoreductase (NCB5OR) is ubiquitously expressed in animal tissues and is capable of reducing ferric iron in vitro. We previously reported that global gene ablation of NCB5OR resulted in early-onset diabetes and altered iron homeostasis in mice. To further investigate the specific effects of NCB5OR deficiency on neural tissue without contributions from known phenotypes, we generated a conditional knockout (CKO) mouse that lacks NCB5OR only in the cerebellum and midbrain. Assessment of molecular markers in the cerebellum of CKO mice revealed changes in pathways associated with cellular and mitochondrial iron homeostasis. (59)Fe pulse-feeding experiments revealed cerebellum-specific increased or decreased uptake of iron by 7 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Additionally, we characterized behavioral changes associated with loss of NCB5OR in the cerebellum and midbrain in the context of dietary iron deprivation-evoked generalized iron deficiency. Locomotor activity was reduced and complex motor task execution was altered in CKO mice treated with an iron deficient diet. A sucrose preference test revealed that the reward response was intact in CKO mice, but that iron deficient diet consumption altered sucrose preference in all mice. Detailed gait analysis revealed locomotor changes in CKO mice associated with dysfunctional proprioception and locomotor activation independent of dietary iron deficiency. Finally, we demonstrate that loss of NCB5OR in the cerebellum and midbrain exacerbated harmaline-induced tremor activity. Our findings suggest an essential role for NCB5OR in maintaining both iron homeostasis and the proper functioning of various locomotor pathways in the mouse cerebellum and midbrain. PMID:27188291

  12. High-Iron Consumption Impairs Growth and Causes Copper-Deficiency Anemia in Weanling Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jung-Heun; Doguer, Caglar; Wang, Xiaoyu; Flores, Shireen R; Collins, James F

    2016-01-01

    Iron-copper interactions were described decades ago; however, molecular mechanisms linking the two essential minerals remain largely undefined. Investigations in humans and other mammals noted that copper levels increase in the intestinal mucosa, liver and blood during iron deficiency, tissues all important for iron homeostasis. The current study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that dietary copper influences iron homeostasis during iron deficiency and iron overload. We thus fed weanling, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6-11/group) AIN-93G-based diets containing high (~8800 ppm), adequate (~80) or low (~11) iron in combination with high (~183), adequate (~8) or low (~0.9) copper for 5 weeks. Subsequently, the iron- and copper-related phenotype of the rats was assessed. Rats fed the low-iron diets grew slower than controls, with changes in dietary copper not further influencing growth. Unexpectedly, however, high-iron (HFe) feeding also impaired growth. Furthermore, consumption of the HFe diet caused cardiac hypertrophy, anemia, low serum and tissue copper levels and decreased circulating ceruloplasmin activity. Intriguingly, these physiologic perturbations were prevented by adding extra copper to the HFe diet. Furthermore, higher copper levels in the HFe diet increased serum nonheme iron concentration and transferrin saturation, exacerbated hepatic nonheme iron loading and attenuated splenic nonheme iron accumulation. Moreover, serum erythropoietin levels, and splenic erythroferrone and hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels were altered by the dietary treatments in unanticipated ways, providing insight into how iron and copper influence expression of these hormones. We conclude that high-iron feeding of weanling rats causes systemic copper deficiency, and further, that copper influences the iron-overload phenotype. PMID:27537180

  13. Iron regulation by hepcidin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ningning; Zhang, An-Sheng; Enns, Caroline A

    2013-01-01

    Hepcidin is a key hormone that is involved in the control of iron homeostasis in the body. Physiologically, hepcidin is controlled by iron stores, inflammation, hypoxia, and erythropoiesis. The regulation of hepcidin expression by iron is a complex process that requires the coordination of multiple proteins, including hemojuvelin, bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), hereditary hemochromatosis protein, transferrin receptor 2, matriptase-2, neogenin, BMP receptors, and transferrin. Misregulati...

  14. Alterations of systemic and muscle iron metabolism in human subjects treated with low-dose recombinant erythropoietin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robach, Paul; Recalcati, Stefania; Girelli, Domenico;

    2009-01-01

    healthy volunteers were treated with recombinant erythropoietin (rhEpo) for 1 month. As expected, the treatment efficiently increased erythropoiesis and stimulated bone marrow iron use. It was also associated with a prompt and considerable decrease in urinary hepcidin and a slight transient increase in...

  15. Depletion of cellular iron by curcumin leads to alteration in histone acetylation and degradation of Sml1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajendra Kumar Azad

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound, is known to possess diverse pharmacological properties. There is a scarcity of literature documenting the exact mechanism by which curcumin modulates its biological effects. In the present study, we have used yeast as a model organism to dissect the mechanism underlying the action of curcumin. We found that the yeast mutants of histone proteins and chromatin modifying enzymes were sensitive to curcumin and further supplementation of iron resulted in reversal of the changes induced by curcumin. Additionally, treatment of curcumin caused the iron starvation induced expression of FET3, FRE1 genes. We also demonstrated that curcumin induces degradation of Sml1p, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor involved in regulating dNTPs production. The degradation of Sml1p was mediated through proteasome and vacuole dependent protein degradation pathways. Furthermore, curcumin exerts biological effect by altering global proteome profile without affecting chromatin architecture. These findings suggest that the medicinal properties of curcumin are largely contributed by its cumulative effect of iron starvation and epigenetic modifications.

  16. Potential toxicity of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neenu Singh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION are being widely used for various biomedical applications, for example, magnetic resonance imaging, targeted delivery of drugs or genes, and in hyperthermia. Although, the potential benefits of SPION are considerable, there is a distinct need to identify any potential cellular damage associated with these nanoparticles. Besides focussing on cytotoxicity, the most commonly used determinant of toxicity as a result of exposure to SPION, this review also mentions the importance of studying the subtle cellular alterations in the form of DNA damage and oxidative stress. We review current studies and discuss how SPION, with or without different surface coating, may cause cellular perturbations including modulation of actin cytoskeleton, alteration in gene expression profiles, disturbance in iron homeostasis and altered cellular responses such as activation of signalling pathways and impairment of cell cycle regulation. The importance of protein–SPION interaction and various safety considerations relating to SPION exposure are also addressed.

  17. Nanoscale zerovalent iron alters soil bacterial community structure and inhibits chloroaromatic biodegradation potential in Aroclor 1242-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) has potential for the remediation of organochlorine-contaminated environments. Environmental safety concerns associated with in situ deployment of nZVI include potential negative impacts on indigenous microbes whose biodegradative functions could contribute to contaminant remediation. With respect to a two-step polychlorinated biphenyl remediation scenario comprising nZVI dechlorination followed by aerobic biodegradation, we examined the effect of polyacrylic acid (PAA)-coated nZVI (mean diameter = 12.5 nm) applied at 10 g nZVI kg−1 to Aroclor-1242 contaminated and uncontaminated soil over 28 days. nZVI had a limited effect on Aroclor congener profiles, but, either directly or indirectly via changes to soil physico-chemical conditions (pH, Eh), nZVI addition caused perturbation to soil bacterial community composition, and reduced the activity of chloroaromatic mineralizing microorganisms. We conclude that nZVI addition has the potential to inhibit microbial functions that could be important for PCB remediation strategies combining nZVI treatment and biodegradation. Highlights: ► Impact of nano-sized zerovalent iron on microbes was investigated in soil microcosms. ► Zerovalent iron had short-lived effects on redox potential and Aroclor dechlorination. ► Microbial populations also showed short-lived perturbations in their size. ► The activity of chloroaromatic degrading microbes did not recover within 28 days. ► Zerovalent iron application inhibits ensuing PCB bioremediative microbial functions. - nZVI inhibits microbial functions of potential importance for remediation strategies combining nZVI treatment and biodegradation.

  18. Homeostasis in anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Södersten, Per; Bergh, Cecilia; Zandian, Modjtaba; Ioakimidis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    Brainstem and hypothalamic “orexigenic/anorexigenic” networks are thought to maintain body weight homeostasis in response to hormonal and metabolic feedback from peripheral sites. This approach has not been successful in managing over- and underweight patients. It is suggested that concept of homeostasis has been misinterpreted; rather than exerting control, the brain permits eating in proportion to the amount of physical activity necessary to obtain food. In support, animal experiments have ...

  19. Homeostasis in anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Per eSodersten; Cecilia eBergh; Modjtaba eZandian; Ioannis eIoakimidis

    2014-01-01

    Brainstem and hypothalamic orexigenic/anorexigenic networks are thought to maintain body weight homeostasis in response to hormonal and metabolic feedback from peripheral sites. This approach has not been successful in managing over- and underweight patients. It is suggested that concept of homeostasis has been misinterpreted; rather than exerting control, the brain permits eating in proportion to the amount of physical activity necessary to obtain food. In support, animal experiments have sh...

  20. The Role of Hepcidin in Iron Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    Hepcidin is the central regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Dysregulation of hepcidin production results in a variety of iron disorders. Hepcidin deficiency is the cause of iron overload in hereditary hemochromatosis, iron-loading anemias, and hepatitis C. Hepcidin excess is associated with anemia of inflammation, chronic kidney disease and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia. Diagnostic and therapeutic applications of this new knowledge are beginning to emerge. Dr. Ernest Beutler play...

  1. Geochemistry, Paragenesis, and Wall-Rock Alteration of the Qatruyeh Iron Deposits, Southwest of Iran: Implications for a Hydrothermal-Metasomatic Genetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Asadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Qatruyeh iron deposits, located on the eastern border of the NW-SE trending Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic zone, southwest of Iran, are hosted by a late Proterozoic to early Paleozoic sequence dominated by metamorphosed carbonate rocks. The magnetite ores occurred as layered to massive bodies, with lesser amounts of disseminated magnetite and hematite-bearing veins. Textural evidences, along with geochemical analyses of the high field strengths (HFSEs, large ion lithophiles (LILEs, and rare earth elements (REEs, indicate that the main mineralization stage occurred as low-grade layered magnetite ores due to high-temperature hydrothermal fluids accompanied by Na-Ca alteration. Most of the main ore-stage minerals precipitated from an aqueous-carbonic fluid (3.5–15 wt.% NaCl equiv. at temperatures ranging between 300° and 410°C during fluid mixing process, CO2 effervescence, cooling, and increasing of pH. Low-temperature hydrothermal activity subsequently produced hematite ores associated with propylitic alteration. The metacarbonate host rocks are LILE-depleted and HFSE-enriched due to metasomatic alteration.

  2. Potentiostatically Poised Electrodes Mimic Iron Oxide and Interact with Soil Microbial Communities to Alter the Biogeochemistry of Arctic Peat Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Largus T. Angenent

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria are ubiquitous in soils worldwide, possess the ability to transfer electrons outside of their cell membranes, and are capable of respiring with various metal oxides. Reduction of iron oxides is one of the more energetically favorable forms of anaerobic respiration, with a higher energy yield than both sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. As such, this process has significant implications for soil carbon balances, especially in the saturated, carbon-rich soils of the northern latitudes. However, the dynamics of these microbial processes within the context of the greater soil microbiome remain largely unstudied. Previously, we have demonstrated the capability of potentiostatically poised electrodes to mimic the redox potential of iron(III- and humic acid-compounds and obtain a measure of metal-reducing respiration. Here, we extend this work by utilizing poised electrodes to provide an inexaustable electron acceptor for iron- and humic acid-reducing microbes, and by measuring the effects on both microbial community structure and greenhouse gas emissions. The application of both nonpoised and poised graphite electrodes in peat soils stimulated methane emissions by 15%–43% compared to soils without electrodes. Poised electrodes resulted in higher (13%–24% methane emissions than the nonpoised electrodes. The stimulation of methane emissions for both nonpoised and poised electrodes correlated with the enrichment of proteobacteria, verrucomicrobia, and bacteroidetes. Here, we demonstrate a tool for precisely manipulating localized redox conditions in situ (via poised electrodes and for connecting microbial community dynamics with larger ecosystem processes. This work provides a foundation for further studies examining the role of dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria in global biogeochemical cycles.

  3. Alteration of proteins and pigments influence the function of photosystem I under iron deficiency from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswarlu Yadavalli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Iron is an essential micronutrient for all organisms because it is a component of enzyme cofactors that catalyze redox reactions in fundamental metabolic processes. Even though iron is abundant on earth, it is often present in the insoluble ferric [Fe (III] state, leaving many surface environments Fe-limited. The haploid green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is used as a model organism for studying eukaryotic photosynthesis. This study explores structural and functional changes in PSI-LHCI supercomplexes under Fe deficiency as the eukaryotic photosynthetic apparatus adapts to Fe deficiency. RESULTS: 77K emission spectra and sucrose density gradient data show that PSI and LHCI subunits are affected under iron deficiency conditions. The visible circular dichroism (CD spectra associated with strongly-coupled chlorophyll dimers increases in intensity. The change in CD signals of pigments originates from the modification of interactions between pigment molecules. Evidence from sucrose gradients and non-denaturing (green gels indicates that PSI-LHCI levels were reduced after cells were grown for 72 h in Fe-deficient medium. Ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy suggests that red-shifted pigments in the PSI-LHCI antenna were lost during Fe stress. Further, denaturing gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis reveals that levels of the PSI subunits PsaC and PsaD decreased, while PsaE was completely absent after Fe stress. The light harvesting complexes were also susceptible to iron deficiency, with Lhca1 and Lhca9 showing the most dramatic decreases. These changes in the number and composition of PSI-LHCI supercomplexes may be caused by reactive oxygen species, which increase under Fe deficiency conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Fe deficiency induces rapid reduction of the levels of photosynthetic pigments due to a decrease in chlorophyll synthesis. Chlorophyll is important not only as a light-harvesting pigment, but also has a structural role

  4. Responses to iron limitation are impacted by light quality and regulated by RcaE in the chromatically acclimating cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, Bagmi; Busch, Andrea W U; Hu, Pingsha; Chen, Jin; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2014-05-01

    Photosynthetic organisms adapt to environmental fluctuations of light and nutrient availability. Iron is critical for photosynthetic organismal growth, as many cellular processes depend upon iron cofactors. Whereas low iron levels can have deleterious effects, excess iron can lead to damage, as iron is a reactive metal that can result in the production of damaging radicals. Therefore, organisms regulate cellular iron levels to maintain optimal iron homeostasis. In particular, iron is an essential factor for the function of photosystems associated with photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes. Photosynthetic organisms, including cyanobacteria, generally respond to iron deficiency by reduced growth, degradation of non-essential proteins and in some cases alterations of cellular morphology. In response to fluctuations in ambient light quality, the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon undergoes complementary chromatic adaptation (CCA). During CCA, phycobiliprotein composition of light-harvesting antennae is altered in response to green light (GL) and red light (RL) for efficient utilization of light energy for photosynthesis. We observed light-regulated responses to iron limitation in F. diplosiphon. RL-grown cells exhibited significant reductions in growth and pigment levels, and alterations in iron-associated proteins, which impact the accumulation of reactive oxygen species under iron-limiting conditions, whereas GL-grown cells exhibited partial resistance to iron limitation. We investigated the roles of known CCA regulators RcaE, RcaF and RcaC in this light-dependent iron-acclimation response. Through comparative analyses of wild-type and CCA mutant strains, we determined that photoreceptor RcaE has a central role in light-induced oxidative stress associated with iron limitation, and impacts light-regulated iron-acclimation responses, physiologically and morphologically. PMID:24623652

  5. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked. PMID:26935626

  6. Iron and Mechanisms of Emotional Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jonghan; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Iron is required for appropriate behavioral organization. Iron deficiency results in poor brain myelination and impaired monoamine metabolism. Glutamate and GABA homeostasis is modified by changes in brain iron status. Such changes not only produce deficits in memory/learning capacity and motor skills, but also emotional and psychological problems. An accumulating body of evidence indicates that both energy metabolism and neurotransmitter homeostasis influence emotional behavior, and both fun...

  7. Structural evolution of the Mount Wall region in the Hamersley province, Western Australia and its control on hydrothermal alteration and formation of high-grade iron deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalstra, Hilke J.

    2014-10-01

    The discovery of two relatively small but high-grade iron ore deposits near Mt Wall, an intensely faulted part of the southwestern Hamersley province provides unique insights into the structural control on ore formation in this region. The deposits have many geological features typical of the high grade microplaty hematite group which also contains the much larger Mt Tom Price, Paraburdoo and Mt Whaleback deposits. The deposits are structurally controlled along early normal faults and contain abundant microplaty hematite and martite, and are largely confined to the Dales Gorge member of the Brockman Iron Formation. In addition to the microplaty hematite-martite ore, there are martite-goethite ores and rare magnetite-goethite or magnetite-hematite ores. Below the modern weathering surface, hydrothermally altered zones in wallrock BIF from the Lower Dales Gorge member contain magnetite, hematite and carbonate/talc bearing mineral assemblages. A staged ore genesis model involving early extension and fluid circulation along normal faults, hypogene silica leaching and carbonate alteration, followed by deep meteoric oxidation with microplaty hematite formation and finally weathering can explain most features of the Mt Wall deposits. The role of deformation was to provide pathways for mineralising fluids and initiate the seed points for the mineralised systems. High grade iron in the Wellthandalthaluna deposit is situated between the NW to NNW trending Boolgeeda Creek fault and a synthetic joining splay, the Northern fault. Both are high angle normal faults and formed during early extension in this part of the province. Faults are characterised by localised small scale deformation and brecciation, deep carbonate alteration and oxidation. Recent weathering has penetrated deeply into the fault zones, converting the carbonate-rich assemblages into goethite. Mineralisation in the Arochar deposit is situated in the overlap or relay zone between two segments of the Mt Wall

  8. Studies of petrography, metasomatic alteration, and genesis of Kamtal iron-copper skarn, northeast of Kharvana, East-Azarbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool Ferdowsi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Kamtal skarn is located 15 km northeast of Kharvana, East-Azarbaijan. A quartz-monzonitic stock of Oligocene age intruded the upper Cretaceous sedimentary sequence (claystone, limestone, marl, and siltstone developing noticeable metamorphic (marble, hornfels and metasomatic (skarn alteration zones along the contact. Kamtal skarn is of calcic type and consists of both endoskarn and exoskarn zones. Exoskarn includes two zones of garnet skarn and epidote skarn. Skarnification processes are divided mainly in two major stages (1 prograde and (2 retrograde. During prograde stage, the emplacement of intrusive body caused isochemical metamorphism of the wall rocks and developed marble and hornfels units in enclosing rocks. Crystallization of intrusive body led to evolvement of hydrothermal fluid phase which infiltrated into enclosing rocks. Reaction of these fluids with the early-formed metamorphosed wall rocks brought about extensive progressive metasomatic alteration characterized by the formation of anhydrous calc-silicate minerals such as garnets and pyroxenes at a temperature range of 420-550°C and ¦O2=10-22-10-25. Retrograde stage was accompanied by some physicochemical changes (decrease in temperature to <420°C and increase in ¦S2 which caused the alteration of pre-existing anhydrous calc-silicates to hydrous calc-silicates (epidote, and tremolite-actinolite, silicates (quartz, chlorites, and other clay minerals, oxides (magnetite and hematite, sulfides (pyrite, chalcopyrite, and tetrahedrite, and carbonate (calcite. Comparison of Kamtal skarn with some other ones of corresponding type from Iran and other countries shows that Kamtal skarn well resembles to Anjerd and Pahnavar skarns in East-Azarbaijan.

  9. Ferritin polarization and iron transport across monolayer epithelial barriers in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EstherG.Meyron-Holtz

    2014-08-01

    Iron is an essential element but toxic at excess. Therefore, all iron-requiring organisms tightly regulate iron concentrations on systemic and cellular levels. In contrast to most cell types that control just their own iron homeostasis, EBCs also regulate homeostasis of the compartment they enclose or the body as a whole. Iron is transported across EBCs by specialized transporters such as the transferrin receptor and ferroportin. Recently, the iron storage protein ferritin was also attributed a role in the regulation of systemic iron homeostasis and we gathered evidence from the literature and original data that ferritin is polarized in EBC, suggesting also a role for ferritin in iron trafficking across EBCs.

  10. When Less is More: Novel Mechanisms of Iron Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Bayeva, Marina; Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Wu, Rongxue; Ardehali, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of iron homeostasis are very common, yet the molecular mechanisms of iron regulation remain understudied. Over 20 years have passed since the first characterization of iron regulatory proteins (IRP) as mediators of cellular iron deficiency response in mammals through iron acquisition. However, little is known about other mechanisms necessary for adaptation to low-iron states. In this review we present recent evidence that establishes existence of a new iron regulatory pathway aimed ...

  11. Hepcidin, a new iron regulatory peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Gaël; Viatte, Lydie; Bennoun, Myriam; Beaumont, Carole; Kahn, Axel; Vaulont, Sophie

    2002-01-01

    Maintaining normal iron homeostasis is essential for the organism, as both iron deficiency and iron excess are associated with cellular dysfunction. Recently, several lines of evidence have suggested that hepcidin, a peptide mainly produced by the liver, plays a major role in the control of body iron homeostasis. The subject of this paper is to summarize the advances toward the understanding of function and regulation of hepcidin in iron metabolism and to provide new data on the regulation of hepcidin gene expression by erythropoietin, the major regulator of mammalian erythropoiesis. PMID:12547223

  12. Heme Iron Content in Lamb Meat Is Differentially Altered upon Boiling, Grilling, or Frying as Assessed by Four Distinct Analytical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azin Pourkhalili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lamb meat is regarded as an important source of highly bioavailable iron (heme iron in the Iranians diet. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of traditional cooking methods on the iron changes in lamb meat. Four published experimental methods for the determination of heme iron were assessed analytically and statistically. Samples were selected from lambs' loin. Standard methods (AOAC were used for proximate analysis. For measuring heme iron, the results of four experimental methods were compared regarding their compliance to Ferrozine method which was used for the determination of nonheme iron. Among three cooking methods, the lowest total iron and heme iron were found in boiling method. The heme iron proportions to the total iron in raw, boiled lamb meat and grilled, were counted as 65.70%, 67.75%, and 76.01%, receptively. Measuring the heme iron, the comparison of the methods in use showed that the method in which heme extraction solution was composed of 90% acetone, 18% water, and 2% hydrochloric acid was more appropriate and more correlated with the heme iron content calculated by the difference between total iron and nonheme iron.

  13. Hepcidin in iron overload disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Papanikolaou, George; Tzilianos, Michalis; Christakis, John I.; Bogdanos, Dionisios; Tsimirika, Konstantina; MacFarlane, Julie; Goldberg, Y. Paul; Sakellaropoulos, Nikos; Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2005-01-01

    Hepcidin is the principal regulator of iron absorption in humans. The peptide inhibits cellular iron efflux by binding to the iron export channel ferroportin and inducing its internalization and degradation. Either hepcidin deficiency or alterations in its target, ferroportin, would be expected to result in dysregulated iron absorption, tissue maldistribution of iron, and iron overload. Indeed, hepcidin deficiency has been reported in hereditary hemochromatosis and attributed to mutations in ...

  14. Blood withdrawal affects iron store dynamics in primates with consequences on monoaminergic system function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyacinthe, C; De Deurwaerdere, P; Thiollier, T; Li, Q; Bezard, E; Ghorayeb, I

    2015-04-01

    Iron homeostasis is essential for the integrity of brain monoaminergic functions and its deregulation might be involved in neurological movement disorders such as the restless legs syndrome (RLS). Although iron metabolism breakdown concomitantly appears with monoaminergic system dysfunction in iron-deficient rodents and in RLS patients, the direct consequences of peripheral iron deficiency in the central nervous system (CNS) of non-human primates have received little attention. Here, we evaluated the peripheral iron-depletion impact on brain monoamine levels in macaque monkeys. After documenting circadian variations of iron and iron-related proteins (hemoglobin, ferritin and transferrin) in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of normal macaques, repeated blood withdrawals (RBW) were used to reduce peripheral iron-related parameter levels. Decreased serum iron levels were paradoxically associated with increased CSF iron concentrations. Despite limited consequences on tissue monoamine contents (dopamine - DA, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid - DOPAC, homovanillic acid, L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine - L-DOPA, 5-8 hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid - 5-HIAA and noradrenaline) measured with post-mortem chromatography, we found distinct and region-dependent relationships of these tissue concentrations with CSF iron and/or serum iron and/or blood hemoglobin. Additionally, striatal extracellular DA, DOPAC and 5-HIAA levels evaluated by in vivo microdialysis showed a substantial increase, suggesting an overall increase in both DA and 5-HT tones. Finally, a trending increase in general locomotor activity, measured by actimetry, was observed in the most serum iron-depleted macaques. Taken together, our data are compatible with an increase in nigrostriatal DAergic function in the event of iron deficiency and point to a specific alteration of the 5-HT/DA interaction in the CNS that is possibly involved in the etiology of RLS. PMID:25662508

  15. Cellular Homeostasis and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, F Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Aging and longevity are controlled by a multiplicity of molecular and cellular signaling events that interface with environmental factors to maintain cellular homeostasis. Modulation of these pathways to extend life span, including insulin-like signaling and the response to dietary restriction, identified the cellular machineries and networks of protein homeostasis (proteostasis) and stress resistance pathways as critical players in the aging process. A decline of proteostasis capacity during aging leads to dysfunction of specific cell types and tissues, rendering the organism susceptible to a range of chronic diseases. This volume of the Annual Review of Biochemistry contains a set of two reviews addressing our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying aging in model organisms and humans. PMID:27050288

  16. Iron and immunity: immunological consequences of iron deficiency and overload

    OpenAIRE

    Cherayil, Bobby J.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of iron on immune function has been long appreciated. However, the molecular basis for this interaction is less well understood. Recently, there have been several important advances that have shed light on the mechanisms that regulate mammalian iron metabolism. The new insights provide a conceptual framework for understanding and manipulating the cross-talk between iron homeostasis and the immune system. This article will review what is currently known about how disturbances of ...

  17. The Hepcidin Circuits Act: Balancing Iron and Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Maliken, Bryan D.; Nelson, James E.; Kowdley, Kris V.

    2011-01-01

    Hepcidin is a peptide hormone that regulates iron homeostasis and acts as an antimicrobial peptide. It is expressed and secreted by a variety of cell types in response to iron loading and inflammation. Hepcidin mediates iron homeostasis by binding to the iron exporter ferroportin, inducing its internalization and degradation via activation of the protein kinase Jak2 and the subsequent phosphorylation of ferroportin. Here we have shown that hepcidin-activated Jak2 also phosphorylates the trans...

  18. From the proteomic point of view: Integration of adaptive changes to iron deficiency in plants

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    Hans-Jörg Mai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the proteomic adaptations to iron deficiency in plants may contribute to find possible new research targets in order to generate crop plants that are more tolerant to iron deficiency, to increase the iron content or to enhance the bioavailability of iron in food plants. We provide this update on adaptations to iron deficiency from the proteomic standpoint. We have mined the data and compared ten studies on iron deficiency-related proteomic changes in six different Strategy I plant species. We summarize these results and point out common iron deficiency-induced alterations of important biochemical pathways based on the data provided by these publications, deliver explanations on the possible benefits that arise from these adaptations in iron-deficient plants and present a concluding model of these adaptations. Furthermore, we demonstrate the close interdependence of proteins which were found regulated across multiple studies, and we pinpoint proteins with yet unknown function, which may play important roles in iron homeostasis.

  19. Water Homeostasis: Evolutionary Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidel, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    As a major component of homeostasis, all organisms regulate the water composition of various compartments. Through the selective use of barrier membranes and surface glycoproteins, as well as aquaporin water channels, organisms ranging from Archaebacteria to humans can vary water permeabilities across their cell membranes by 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. In barrier epithelia the outer, or exofacial, leaflet acts as the main resistor to water flow; this leaflet restricts water flow by minimizing...

  20. Mineralogy of iron sulfides in CM1 and CI1 lithologies of the Kaidun breccia: Records of extreme to intense hydrothermal alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Dennis; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2016-05-01

    The polymict Kaidun microbreccia contains lithologies of C-type chondrites with euhedral iron sulfide crystals of hydrothermal origin. Our FIB-TEM study reveals that acicular sulfides in a CM1 lithology are composed of Fe-rich pyrrhotite with nonintegral vacancy superstructures (NC-pyrrhotite), troilite, and pentlandite, all showing distinct exsolution textures. Based on phase relations in the Fe-Ni-S system, we constrain the temperature of formation of the originally homogeneous monosulfide solid solution to the range of 100-300 °C. In some crystals the exsolution of pentlandite and the microtextural equilibration was incomplete, probably due to rapid cooling. We use thermodynamic modeling to constrain the physicochemical conditions of the extreme hydrothermal alteration in this lithology. Unless the CM1 lithology was sourced from a large depth in the parent body (internal pressure >85 bar) or the temperatures were in the lower range of the interval determined, the water was likely present as vapor. Previously described light δ34S compositions of sulfides in Kaidun's CM1 lithology are likely due to the loss of 34S-enriched H2S during boiling. Platy sulfide crystals in an adjacent, intensely altered CI1 lithology are composed of Fe-poor, monoclinic 4C-pyrrhotite and NC-pyrrhotite and probably formed at lower temperatures and higher fS2 relative to the CM1 lithology. However, a better understanding of the stability of Fe-poor pyrrhotites at temperatures below 300 °C is required to better constrain these conditions.

  1. Iron deficiency and cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Hulthén, Lena

    2003-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional disorder in the world. One of the most worrying consequences of iron deficiency in children is the alteration of behaviour and cognitive performance. In iron-deficient children, striking behavioural changes are observed, such as reduced attention span, reduced emotional responsiveness and low scores on tests of intelligence. Animal studies on nutritional iron deficiency show effects on learning ability that parallel the human studies. Despite ...

  2. Knock-out of SO1377 gene, which encodes the member of a conserved hypothetical bacterial protein family COG2268, results in alteration of iron metabolism, increased spontaneous mutation and hydrogen peroxide sensitivity in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

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    Klingeman Dawn M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative, gram-negative bacterium capable of coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to a wide range of electron acceptors such as oxygen, nitrate and metals, and has potential for bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated sites. The complete 5-Mb genome of S. oneidensis MR-1 was sequenced and standard sequence-comparison methods revealed approximately 42% of the MR-1 genome encodes proteins of unknown function. Defining the functions of hypothetical proteins is a great challenge and may need a systems approach. In this study, by using integrated approaches including whole genomic microarray and proteomics, we examined knockout effects of the gene encoding SO1377 (gi24372955, a member of the conserved, hypothetical, bacterial protein family COG2268 (Clusters of Orthologous Group in bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, under various physiological conditions. Results Compared with the wild-type strain, growth assays showed that the deletion mutant had a decreased growth rate when cultured aerobically, but not affected under anaerobic conditions. Whole-genome expression (RNA and protein profiles revealed numerous gene and protein expression changes relative to the wild-type control, including some involved in iron metabolism, oxidative damage protection and respiratory electron transfer, e. g. complex IV of the respiration chain. Although total intracellular iron levels remained unchanged, whole-cell electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR demonstrated that the level of free iron in mutant cells was 3 times less than that of the wild-type strain. Siderophore excretion in the mutant also decreased in iron-depleted medium. The mutant was more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and gave rise to 100 times more colonies resistant to gentamicin or kanamycin. Conclusion Our results showed that the knock-out of SO1377 gene had pleiotropic effects and suggested that SO1377 may play a role in iron

  3. Iron and Iron Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Melike Sezgin Evim; Birol Baytan; Adalet Meral Güneş

    2012-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for almost all living organisms except some bacteria. A great number of new articles related to the iron metabolism have been published in recent years explaining new findings. Hepsidine, a peptide hormon, that is recently found, regulates iron methabolism by effecting iron absorbsion from gut, secreting iron from hepatic store and flows iron from macrophages. Hepsidin blockes to effluxe iron from cells by bounding to ferroportin and by inducing ferroportin destru...

  4. Lack of hepcidin gene expression and severe tissue iron overload in upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2) knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, G; Bennoun, M; Devaux, I; Beaumont, C; Grandchamp, B; Kahn, A; Vaulont, S

    2001-07-17

    We previously reported the disruption of the murine gene encoding the transcription factor USF2 and its consequences on glucose-dependent gene regulation in the liver. We report here a peculiar phenotype of Usf2(-/-) mice that progressively develop multivisceral iron overload; plasma iron overcomes transferrin binding capacity, and nontransferrin-bound iron accumulates in various tissues including pancreas and heart. In contrast, the splenic iron content is strikingly lower in knockout animals than in controls. To identify genes that may account for the abnormalities of iron homeostasis in Usf2(-/-) mice, we used suppressive subtractive hybridization between livers from Usf2(-/-) and wild-type mice. We isolated a cDNA encoding a peptide, hepcidin (also referred to as LEAP-1, for liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide), that was very recently purified from human blood ultrafiltrate and from urine as a disulfide-bonded peptide exhibiting antimicrobial activity. Accumulation of iron in the liver has been recently reported to up-regulate hepcidin expression, whereas our data clearly show that a complete defect in hepcidin expression is responsible for progressive tissue iron overload. The striking similarity of the alterations in iron metabolism between HFE knockout mice, a murine model of hereditary hemochromatosis, and the Usf2(-/-) hepcidin-deficient mice suggests that hepcidin may function in the same regulatory pathway as HFE. We propose that hepcidin acts as a signaling molecule that is required in conjunction with HFE to regulate both intestinal iron absorption and iron storage in macrophages. PMID:11447267

  5. Homeostasis Hombre-Naturaleza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephano Betancourt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available La tendencia al equilibrio en la naturaleza y el flujo energético entre los organismos y suambiente; resulta de vital importancia para la supervivencia de estos últimos. Cuando seda una mirada antropocéntrica a esta interacción, se genera un enfoque reduccionista de losfactores que influyen para mantener la tendencia al equilibrio. Por consiguiente, el sostenerlo inteligible de las interacciones de los elementos que conforman nuestra existencia es unpunto clave de la compleja relación, entre el ser humano y su entorno, para poder permitiruna homeostasis entre ellos.

  6. Hepcidin screening to guide iron supplementation in African children

    OpenAIRE

    Pasricha, S-R; Atkinson, S; Armitage, A; Khandwala, S; Veenemans, J.; Cox, S.; Eddowes, L; Hayes, T.; Doherty, C; Demir, A; Tijhaar, E.; Verhoef, H.; Prentice, A; Drakesmith, H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Hematologic and non-hematologic benefits from iron supplementation are chiefly seen in iron deficient individuals; concerns that iron might promote infection especially in non-iron deficient individuals have complicated global anemia control policies, particularly in malaria-endemic settings. Iron homeostasis, including intestinal absorption, is controlled by hepcidin. Hepcidin is regulated by iron, erythropoietic drive, and inflammation, suggesting its potential utility to apprai...

  7. Homeostasis in anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per eSodersten

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Brainstem and hypothalamic orexigenic/anorexigenic networks are thought to maintain body weight homeostasis in response to hormonal and metabolic feedback from peripheral sites. This approach has not been successful in managing over- and underweight patients. It is suggested that concept of homeostasis has been misinterpreted; rather than exerting control, the brain permits eating in proportion to the amount of physical activity necessary to obtain food. In support, animal experiments have shown that while a hypothalamic orexigen excites eating when food is abundant, it inhibits eating and stimulates foraging when food is in short supply. As the physical price of food approaches zero, eating and body weight increase without constraints. Conversely, in anorexia nervosa body weight is homeostatically regulated, the high level of physical activity in anorexia is displaced hoarding for food that keeps body weight constantly low. A treatment based on this point of view, providing patients with computerized mealtime support to re-establish normal eating behavior, has brought 75% of patients with eating disorders into remission, reduced the rate of relapse to 10%, and eliminated mortality.

  8. Ageing and water homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, David; Jordan, Jens; Jacob, Giris; Ketch, Terry; Shannon, John R.; Biaggioni, Italo

    2002-01-01

    This review outlines current knowledge concerning fluid intake and volume homeostasis in ageing. The physiology of vasopressin is summarized. Studies have been carried out to determine orthostatic changes in plasma volume and to assess the effect of water ingestion in normal subjects, elderly subjects, and patients with dysautonomias. About 14% of plasma volume shifts out of the vasculature within 30 minutes of upright posture. Oral ingestion of water raises blood pressure in individuals with impaired autonomic reflexes and is an important source of noise in blood pressure trials in the elderly. On the average, oral ingestion of 16 ounces (473ml) of water raises blood pressure 11 mmHg in elderly normal subjects. In patients with autonomic impairment, such as multiple system atrophy, strikingly exaggerated pressor effects of water have been seen with blood pressure elevations greater than 75 mmHg not at all uncommon. Ingestion of water is a major determinant of blood pressure in the elderly population. Volume homeostasis is importantly affected by posture and large changes in plasma volume may occur within 30 minutes when upright posture is assumed.

  9. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  10. Frataxin and the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial iron-loading in Friedreich's ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Shannon; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Sahni, Sumit; Lane, Darius J R; Merlot, Angelica M; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Huang, Michael L-H; Richardson, Des R

    2016-06-01

    The mitochondrion is a major site for the metabolism of the transition metal, iron, which is necessary for metabolic processes critical for cell vitality. The enigmatic mitochondrial protein, frataxin, is known to play a significant role in both cellular and mitochondrial iron metabolism due to its iron-binding properties and its involvement in iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) and heme synthesis. The inherited neuro- and cardio-degenerative disease, Friedreich's ataxia (FA), is caused by the deficient expression of frataxin that leads to deleterious alterations in iron metabolism. These changes lead to the accumulation of inorganic iron aggregates in the mitochondrial matrix that are presumed to play a key role in the oxidative damage and subsequent degenerative features of this disease. Furthermore, the concurrent dys-regulation of cellular antioxidant defense, which coincides with frataxin deficiency, exacerbates oxidative stress. Hence, the pathogenesis of FA underscores the importance of the integrated homeostasis of cellular iron metabolism and the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox environments. This review focuses on describing the pathogenesis of the disease, the molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial iron-loading and the dys-regulation of cellular antioxidant defense due to frataxin deficiency. In turn, current and emerging therapeutic strategies are also discussed. PMID:27129098

  11. Global transcriptional response to Hfe deficiency and dietary iron overload in mouse liver and duodenum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Rodriguez

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential trace element whose absorption is usually tightly regulated in the duodenum. HFE-related hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is characterized by abnormally low expression of the iron-regulatory hormone, hepcidin, which results in increased iron absorption. The liver is crucial for iron homeostasis as it is the main production site of hepcidin. The aim of this study was to explore and compare the genome-wide transcriptome response to Hfe deficiency and dietary iron overload in murine liver and duodenum. Illumina arrays containing over 47,000 probes were used to study global transcriptional changes. Quantitative RT-PCR (Q-RT-PCR was used to validate the microarray results. In the liver, the expression of 151 genes was altered in Hfe(-/- mice while dietary iron overload changed the expression of 218 genes. There were 173 and 108 differentially expressed genes in the duodenum of Hfe(-/- mice and mice with dietary iron overload, respectively. There was 93.5% concordance between the results obtained by microarray analysis and Q-RT-PCR. Overexpression of genes for acute phase reactants in the liver and a strong induction of digestive enzyme genes in the duodenum were characteristic of the Hfe-deficient genotype. In contrast, dietary iron overload caused a more pronounced change of gene expression responsive to oxidative stress. In conclusion, Hfe deficiency caused a previously unrecognized increase in gene expression of hepatic acute phase proteins and duodenal digestive enzymes.

  12. The role of iron in pulmonary pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Khiroya, Heena; Turner, Alice M

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory disease accounts for a large proportion of emergency admissions to hospital and diseaseassociated mortality. Genetic association studies demonstrate a link between iron metabolism and pulmonary disease phenotypes. IREB2 is a gene that produces iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2), which has a key role in iron homeostasis. This review addresses pathways involved in iron metabolism, particularly focusing on the role of IREB2. In addition to this, environmental factors also influence phe...

  13. Autophagy and intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Khushbu K; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient absorption is the basic function that drives mammalian intestinal biology. To facilitate nutrient uptake, the host's epithelial barrier is composed of a single layer of cells. This constraint is problematic, as a design of this type can be easily disrupted. The solution during the course of evolution was to add numerous host defense mechanisms that can help prevent local and systemic infection. These mechanisms include specialized epithelial cells that produce a physiochemical barrier overlying the cellular barrier, robust and organized adaptive and innate immune cells, and the ability to mount an inflammatory response that is commensurate with a specific threat level. The autophagy pathway is a critical cellular process that strongly influences all these functions. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the components of this pathway and their influence on inflammation, immunity, and barrier function will facilitate our understanding of homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23216414

  14. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanis Missirlis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import, the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage. We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  15. Iron overload and immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gra(c)a Porto; Maria De Sousa

    2007-01-01

    Progress in the characterization of genes involved in the control of iron homeostasis in humans and in mice has improved the definition of iron overload and of the cells affected by it. The cell involved in iron overload with the greatest effect on immunity is the macrophage.Intriguing evidence has emerged, however, in the last 12 years indicating that parenchymal iron overload is linked to genes classically associated with the immune system. This review offers an update of the genes and proteins relevant to iron metabolism expressed in cells of the innate immune system, and addresses the question of how this system is affected in clinical situations of iron overload. The relationship between iron and the major cells of adaptive immunity, the T lymphocytes,will also be reviewed. Most studies addressing this last question in humans were performed in the clinical model of Hereditary Hemochromatosis. Data will also be reviewed demonstrating how the disruption of molecules essentially involved in adaptive immune responses result in the spontaneous development of iron overload and how they act as modifiers of iron overload.

  16. Ndfip2 is a potential regulator of the iron transporter DMT1 in the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, Natalie J.; Gembus, Kelly M.; Mackenzie, Kimberly; Kumar, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of divalent metal ion transporter DMT1, the primary non-heme iron importer in mammals, is critical for maintaining iron homeostasis. Previously we identified ubiquitin-dependent regulation of DMT1 involving the Nedd4 family of ubiquitin ligases and the Ndfip1 and Ndfip2 adaptors. We also established the in vivo function of Ndfip1 in the regulation of DMT1 in the duodenum of mice. Here we have studied the function of Ndfip2 using Ndfip2-deficient mice. The DMT1 protein levels in the duodenum were comparable in wild type and Ndfip2−/− mice, as was the transport activity of isolated enterocytes. A complete blood examination showed no significant differences between wild type and Ndfip2−/− mice in any of the hematological parameters measured. However, when fed a low iron diet, female Ndfip2−/− mice showed a decrease in liver iron content, although they maintained normal serum iron levels and transferrin saturation, compared to wild type female mice that showed a reduction in serum iron and transferrin saturation. Ndfip2−/− female mice also showed an increase in DMT1 expression in the liver, with no change in male mice. We suggest that Ndfip2 controls DMT1 in the liver with female mice showing a greater response to altered dietary iron than the male mice. PMID:27048792

  17. Plant transporters involved in heavy metal homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorina Podar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ions (predominately manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper and zinc havean array of catalytic and regulatory roles in the growth and development of all living organisms.However, an excess of these metal ions can also be toxic to any life form and therefore every cell andwhole organism needs to maintain the concentration of these essential nutrient metals within a narrowrange: a process known as metal homeostasis. Heavy metal ions are taken up into cells by selectivetransporters and as they cannot be degraded, the “desired” levels of metal ions are achieved by anumber of strategies that involve: chelation, sequestration and export out of the cell. Cation DiffusionFacilitators (CDF is a large family of transporters involved in maintaining the cytosolic metalconcentration. They transport different heavy metal divalent ions, but exhibit main affinity for zinc, ironand manganese. Metal Tolerance Proteins (MTPs are a subfamily of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator (CDFfamily found in plants. There has been much interest in these heavy metal transporters in order toprovide an insight into plant metal homeostasis, which has significant implications in human health andphytoremediation. Although data regarding the CDFs/MTPs mechanism is gathering there is still littleinformation with respect to metal selectivity determinants.

  18. Iron-Responsive Bacterial Small RNAs: Variations on a Theme

    OpenAIRE

    Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G.; Murphy, Erin R.

    2013-01-01

    For most living organisms, iron is both essential and potentially toxic, making the precise maintenance of iron homeostasis necessary for survival. To manage this paradox, bacteria regulate the acquisition, utilization, and storage of iron in response to its availability. The iron-dependent ferric uptake repressor (Fur) often mediates this iron-responsive regulation, by both direct and indirect mechanisms. In 2002, Masse and Gottesman identified a novel target of Fur-mediated regulation in Es...

  19. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Ursini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the misperception that reactions in redox signaling involve “reactive oxygen species” rather than reaction of specific electrophiles with specific protein thiolates. The third is that hormesis provides protection against oxidants by increasing cellular defense or repair mechanisms rather than by specifically addressing the offset of redox homeostasis. Instead, we propose that both oxidant and antioxidant signaling are main features of redox homeostasis. As the redox shift is rapidly reversed by feedback reactions, homeostasis is maintained by continuous signaling for production and elimination of electrophiles and nucleophiles. Redox homeostasis, which is the maintenance of nucleophilic tone, accounts for a healthy physiological steady state. Electrophiles and nucleophiles are not intrinsically harmful or protective, and redox homeostasis is an essential feature of both the response to challenges and subsequent feedback. While the balance between oxidants and nucleophiles is preserved in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress provokes the establishment of a new radically altered redox steady state. The popular belief that scavenging free radicals by antioxidants has a beneficial effect is wishful thinking. We propose, instead, that continuous feedback preserves nucleophilic tone and that this is supported by redox active nutritional phytochemicals. These nonessential compounds, by activating Nrf2, mimic the effect of endogenously produced electrophiles

  20. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursini, Fulvio; Maiorino, Matilde; Forman, Henry Jay

    2016-08-01

    The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the misperception that reactions in redox signaling involve "reactive oxygen species" rather than reaction of specific electrophiles with specific protein thiolates. The third is that hormesis provides protection against oxidants by increasing cellular defense or repair mechanisms rather than by specifically addressing the offset of redox homeostasis. Instead, we propose that both oxidant and antioxidant signaling are main features of redox homeostasis. As the redox shift is rapidly reversed by feedback reactions, homeostasis is maintained by continuous signaling for production and elimination of electrophiles and nucleophiles. Redox homeostasis, which is the maintenance of nucleophilic tone, accounts for a healthy physiological steady state. Electrophiles and nucleophiles are not intrinsically harmful or protective, and redox homeostasis is an essential feature of both the response to challenges and subsequent feedback. While the balance between oxidants and nucleophiles is preserved in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress provokes the establishment of a new radically altered redox steady state. The popular belief that scavenging free radicals by antioxidants has a beneficial effect is wishful thinking. We propose, instead, that continuous feedback preserves nucleophilic tone and that this is supported by redox active nutritional phytochemicals. These nonessential compounds, by activating Nrf2, mimic the effect of endogenously produced electrophiles (parahormesis). In summary

  1. Iron accumulates in the lavage and explanted lungs of cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Oxidative stress participates in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF). An underlying disruption in iron homeostasis can frequently be demonstrated in injuries and diseases associated with an oxidative stress. We tested the hypothesis that iron accumulation and ...

  2. Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat; Alteracoes provocadas pela irradiacao e armazenamento nos teores de ferro heme em carne de frango

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Adriana Regia Marques de; Arthur, Valter Arthur [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao]. E-mail: sgcbraza@esalq.usp.br

    2007-04-15

    Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 deg C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses, except for the storage, and the total number of pigments was affected by the irradiation and the time, reducing the values with the increase of storage. Irradiation was shown to be a good method to conserve iron. (author)

  3. Astrocytic Dysfunction and Addiction: Consequences of Impaired Glutamate Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, Michael D.; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Addiction is characterized as a chronic relapsing disorder whereby addicted individuals persistently engage in drug seeking and use despite profound negative consequences. The results of studies using animal models of addiction and relapse indicate that drug seeking is mediated by alterations in cortico-accumbal plasticity induced by chronic drug exposure. Among the maladaptive responses to drug exposure are long-lasting alterations in the expression of proteins localized to accumbal astrocytes, which are responsible for maintaining glutamate homeostasis. These alterations engender an aberrant potentiation of glutamate transmission in the cortico-accumbens circuit that is linked to the reinstatement of drug seeking. Accordingly, pharmacological restoration of glutamate homeostasis functions as an efficient method of reversing drug-induced plasticity and inhibiting drug seeking in both rodents and humans. PMID:24496610

  4. Blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter prevents iron accumulation in a model of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Huiying [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Hao, Shuangying; Sun, Xiaoyan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular Medicine, Medical School of Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Dingding; Gao, Xin; Yu, Zhuang [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Li, Kuanyu, E-mail: likuanyu@nju.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular Medicine, Medical School of Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093, Jiangsu Province (China); Hang, Chun-Hua, E-mail: hang_neurosurgery@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • Iron accumulation was involved in the acute phase following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could attenuate cellular iron accumulation following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could decrease ROS generation and improve cell energy supply following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could alleviate apoptosis and brain injury following SAH. - Abstract: Previous studies have shown that iron accumulation is involved in the pathogenesis of brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and chelation of iron reduced mortality and oxidative DNA damage. We previously reported that blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) provided benefit in the early brain injury after experimental SAH. This study was undertaken to identify whether blockage of MCU could ameliorate iron accumulation-associated brain injury following SAH. Therefore, we used two reagents ruthenium red (RR) and spermine (Sper) to inhibit MCU. Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups including sham, SAH, SAH + RR, and SAH + Sper. Biochemical analysis and histological assays were performed. The results confirmed the iron accumulation in temporal lobe after SAH. Interestingly, blockage of MCU dramatically reduced the iron accumulation in this area. The mechanism was revealed that inhibition of MCU reversed the down-regulation of iron regulatory protein (IRP) 1/2 and increase of ferritin. Iron–sulfur cluster dependent-aconitase activity was partially conserved when MCU was blocked. In consistence with this and previous report, ROS levels were notably reduced and ATP supply was rescued; levels of cleaved caspase-3 dropped; and integrity of neurons in temporal lobe was protected. Taken together, our results indicated that blockage of MCU could alleviate iron accumulation and the associated injury following SAH. These findings suggest that the alteration of calcium and iron homeostasis be coupled and MCU be considered to be a therapeutic target for patients suffering from SAH.

  5. Blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter prevents iron accumulation in a model of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Iron accumulation was involved in the acute phase following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could attenuate cellular iron accumulation following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could decrease ROS generation and improve cell energy supply following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could alleviate apoptosis and brain injury following SAH. - Abstract: Previous studies have shown that iron accumulation is involved in the pathogenesis of brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and chelation of iron reduced mortality and oxidative DNA damage. We previously reported that blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) provided benefit in the early brain injury after experimental SAH. This study was undertaken to identify whether blockage of MCU could ameliorate iron accumulation-associated brain injury following SAH. Therefore, we used two reagents ruthenium red (RR) and spermine (Sper) to inhibit MCU. Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups including sham, SAH, SAH + RR, and SAH + Sper. Biochemical analysis and histological assays were performed. The results confirmed the iron accumulation in temporal lobe after SAH. Interestingly, blockage of MCU dramatically reduced the iron accumulation in this area. The mechanism was revealed that inhibition of MCU reversed the down-regulation of iron regulatory protein (IRP) 1/2 and increase of ferritin. Iron–sulfur cluster dependent-aconitase activity was partially conserved when MCU was blocked. In consistence with this and previous report, ROS levels were notably reduced and ATP supply was rescued; levels of cleaved caspase-3 dropped; and integrity of neurons in temporal lobe was protected. Taken together, our results indicated that blockage of MCU could alleviate iron accumulation and the associated injury following SAH. These findings suggest that the alteration of calcium and iron homeostasis be coupled and MCU be considered to be a therapeutic target for patients suffering from SAH

  6. Iron and iron derived radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Deciphering Mineral Homeostasis in Barley Seed Transfer Cells at Transcriptional Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Darbani

    Full Text Available In addition to the micronutrient inadequacy of staple crops for optimal human nutrition, a global downtrend in crop-quality has emerged from intensive breeding for yield. This trend will be aggravated by elevated levels of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. Therefore, crop biofortification is inevitable to ensure a sustainable supply of minerals to the large part of human population who is dietary dependent on staple crops. This requires a thorough understanding of plant-mineral interactions due to the complexity of mineral homeostasis. Employing RNA sequencing, we here communicate transfer cell specific effects of excess iron and zinc during grain filling in our model crop plant barley. Responding to alterations in mineral contents, we found a long range of different genes and transcripts. Among them, it is worth to highlight the auxin and ethylene signaling factors Arfs, Abcbs, Cand1, Hps4, Hac1, Ecr1, and Ctr1, diurnal fluctuation components Sdg2, Imb1, Lip1, and PhyC, retroelements, sulfur homeostasis components Amp1, Hmt3, Eil3, and Vip1, mineral trafficking components Med16, Cnnm4, Aha2, Clpc1, and Pcbps, and vacuole organization factors Ymr155W, RabG3F, Vps4, and Cbl3. Our analysis introduces new interactors and signifies a broad spectrum of regulatory levels from chromatin remodeling to intracellular protein sorting mechanisms active in the plant mineral homeostasis. The results highlight the importance of storage proteins in metal ion toxicity-resistance and chelation. Interestingly, the protein sorting and recycling factors Exoc7, Cdc1, Sec23A, and Rab11A contributed to the response as well as the polar distributors of metal-transporters ensuring the directional flow of minerals. Alternative isoform switching was found important for plant adaptation and occurred among transcripts coding for identical proteins as well as transcripts coding for protein isoforms. We also identified differences in the alternative-isoform preference between

  8. Perturbed cholesterol homeostasis in aging spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2016-09-01

    The spinal cord is vital for the processing of sensorimotor information and for its propagation to and from both the brain and the periphery. Spinal cord function is affected by aging, however, the mechanisms involved are not well-understood. To characterize molecular mechanisms of spinal cord aging, microarray analyses of gene expression were performed on cervical spinal cords of aging rats. Of the metabolic and signaling pathways affected, cholesterol-associated pathways were the most comprehensively altered, including significant downregulation of cholesterol synthesis-related genes and upregulation of cholesterol transport and metabolism genes. Paradoxically, a significant increase in total cholesterol content was observed-likely associated with cholesterol ester accumulation. To investigate potential mechanisms for the perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, we quantified the expression of myelin and neuroinflammation-associated genes and proteins. Although there was minimal change in myelin-related expression, there was an increase in phagocytic microglial and astrogliosis markers, particularly in the white matter. Together, these results suggest that perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, possibly as a result of increased inflammatory activation in spinal cord white matter, may contribute to impaired spinal cord function with aging. PMID:27459933

  9. Wood smoke particle sequesters cell iron to impact a biological effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biological effect of an inorganic particle (i.e., silica) can be associated with a disruption in cell iron homeostasis. Organic compounds included in particles originating from combustion processes can also complex sources of host cell iron to disrupt metal homeostasis. We te...

  10. Homeostasis of T Cell Diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vinay S. Mahajan; Ilya B. Leskov; Jianzhu Chen

    2005-01-01

    T cell homeostasis commonly refers to the maintenance of relatively stable T cell numbers in the peripheral lymphoid organs. Among the large numbers of T cells in the periphery, T cells exhibit structural diversity, I.e., the expression of a diverse repertoire of T cell receptors (TCRs), and functional diversity, I.e., the presence of T cells at na(I)ve, effector, and memory developmental stages. Although the homeostasis of T cell numbers has been extensively studied, investigation of the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of structural and functional diversity of T cells is still at an early stage. The fundamental feature throughout T cell development is the interaction between the TCR and either self or foreign peptides in association with MHC molecules. In this review, we present evidence showing that homeostasis of T cell number and diversity is mediated through competition for limiting resources.The number of T cells is maintained through competition for limiting cytokines, whereas the diversity of T cells is maintained by competition for self-peptide-MHC complexes. In other words, diversity of the self-peptide repertoire limits the structural (TCR) diversity of a T cell population. We speculate that cognate low affinity self-peptides,acting as weak agonists and antagonists, regulate the homeostasis of T cell diversity whereas non-cognate or null peptides which are extremely abundant for any given TCR, may contribute to the homeostasis of T cell number by providing survival signals. Moreover, self-peptides and cytokines may form specialized niches for the regulation of T cell homeostasis.

  11. Homeostasis of T Cell Diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VinayS.Mahajan; IlyaB.Leskov; JianzhuChen

    2005-01-01

    T cell homeostasis commonly refers to the maintenance of relatively stable T cell numbers in the peripheral lymphoid organs. Among the large numbers of T cells in the periphery, T cells exhibit structural diversity, i.e., the expression of a diverse repertoire of T cell receptors (TCRs), and functional diversity, i.e., the presence of T cells at naive, effector, and memory developmental stages. Although the homeostasis of T cell numbers has been extensively studied, investigation of the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of structural and functional diversity of T cells is still at an early stage. The fundamental feature throughout T cell development is the interaction between the TCR and either self or foreign peptides in association with MHC molecules. In this review, we present evidence showing that homeostasis of T cell number and diversity is mediated through competition for limiting resources. The number of T cells is maintained through competition for limiting cytokines, whereas the diversity of T cells is maintained by competition for self-peptide-MHC complexes. In other words, diversity of the self-peptide repertoire limits the structural (TCR) diversity of a T cell population. We speculate that cognate low affinity self-peptides, acting as weak agonists and antagonists, regulate the homeostasis of T cell diversity whereas non-cognate or null peptides which are extremely abundant for any given TCR, may contribute to the homeostasis of T cell number by providing survival signals. Moreover, self-peptides and cytokines may form specialized niches for the regulation of T cell homeostasis. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1): 1-10.

  12. Lipocalin 2 alleviates iron toxicity by facilitating hypoferremia of inflammation and limiting catalytic iron generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xia; Yeoh, Beng San; Saha, Piu; Olvera, Rodrigo Aguilera; Singh, Vishal; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2016-06-01

    Iron is an essential transition metal ion for virtually all aerobic organisms, yet its dysregulation (iron overload or anemia) is a harbinger of many pathologic conditions. Hence, iron homeostasis is tightly regulated to prevent the generation of catalytic iron (CI) which can damage cellular biomolecules. In this study, we investigated the role of iron-binding/trafficking innate immune protein, lipocalin 2 (Lcn2, aka siderocalin) on iron and CI homeostasis using Lcn2 knockout (KO) mice and their WT littermates. Administration of iron either systemically or via dietary intake strikingly upregulated Lcn2 in the serum, urine, feces, and liver of WT mice. However, similarly-treated Lcn2KO mice displayed elevated CI, augmented lipid peroxidation and other indices of organ damage markers, implicating that Lcn2 responses may be protective against iron-induced toxicity. Herein, we also show a negative association between serum Lcn2 and CI in the murine model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. The inability of DSS-treated Lcn2KO mice to elicit hypoferremic response to acute colitis, implicates the involvement of Lcn2 in iron homeostasis during inflammation. Using bone marrow chimeras, we further show that Lcn2 derived from both immune and non-immune cells participates in CI regulation. Remarkably, exogenous rec-Lcn2 supplementation suppressed CI levels in Lcn2KO serum and urine. Collectively, our results suggest that Lcn2 may facilitate hypoferremia, suppress CI generation and prevent iron-mediated adverse effects. PMID:27007712

  13. Leptin and Hormones: Energy Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Georgios A; Paschou, Stavroula A; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2016-09-01

    Leptin, a 167 amino acid adipokine, plays a major role in human energy homeostasis. Its actions are mediated through binding to leptin receptor and activating JAK-STAT3 signal transduction pathway. It is expressed mainly in adipocytes, and its circulating levels reflect the body's energy stores in adipose tissue. Recombinant methionyl human leptin has been FDA approved for patients with generalized non-HIV lipodystrophy and for compassionate use in subjects with congenital leptin deficiency. The purpose of this review is to outline the role of leptin in energy homeostasis, as well as its interaction with other hormones. PMID:27519135

  14. Extracellular Norepinephrine, Norepinephrine Receptor and Transporter Protein and mRNA Levels Are Differentially Altered in the Developing Rat Brain Due to Dietary Iron Deficiency and Manganese Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Joel G.; Fordahl, Steven C.; Cooney, Paula T.; Weaver, Tara L.; Colyer, Christa L.; Erikson, Keith M.

    2009-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element, but overexposure is characterized by Parkinson’s like symptoms in extreme cases. Previous studies have shown Mn accumulation is exacerbated by dietary iron deficiency (ID) and disturbances in norepinephrine (NE) have been reported. Because behaviors associated with Mn neurotoxicity are complex, the goal of this study was to examine the effects of Mn exposure and ID-associated Mn accumulation on NE uptake in synaptosomes, extracellular NE concentra...

  15. Icariin regulates systemic iron metabolism by increasing hepatic hepcidin expression through Stat3 and Smad1/5/8 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Liu, Jing; Guo, Wenli; Liu, Xin; Liu, Sijin; Yin, Huijun

    2016-05-01

    Systemic iron homeostasis is strictly controlled under normal conditions to ensure a balance between the absorption, utilization, storage and recycling of iron. The hepcidin-ferroportin (FPN) axis is of critical importance in the maintenance of iron homeostasis. Hepcidin deficiency gives rise to enhanced dietary iron absorption, as well as to increased iron release from macrophages, and this in turn results in iron accumulation in the plasma and organs, and is associated with a range of tissue pathologies. Low hepcidin levels have been demonstrated in most forms of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH), as well as in β-thalassemia. Therapies that increase hepcidin concentrations may potentially play a role in the treatment of these iron overload-related diseases. To date, natural compounds have not been extensively investigated for this purpose, to the best of our knowledge. Thus, in the present study, we screened natural compounds that have the potential to regulate hepcidin expression. By performing hepcidin promoter-luciferase assay, RT-qPCR and animal experiments, we demonstrated that icariin and berberine were potent stimulators of hepcidin transcription. Mechanistic experiments indicated that icariin and berberine increased hepcidin expression by activating the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) and Smad1/5/8 signaling pathways. The induction of hepcidin was confirmed in mice following icariin administration, coupled with associated changes in serum and tissue iron concentrations. In support of these findings, the icariin analogues, epimedin A, B and C, also increased hepatic hepcidin expression. However, these changes were not observed in hepcidin-deficient [Hamp1-/- or Hamp1‑knockout (KO)] mice following icariin administration, thereby verifying hepatic hepcidin as the target of icariin. Although berberine exhibited a robust capacity to promote hepcidin expression in vitro, it failed to alter hepcidin expression in mice. Taken together

  16. The Role of Iron and Iron Overload in Chronic Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Orlic, Lidija; Devcic, Edita; Starcevic-Cizmarevic, Nada; Stimac, Davor; Kapovic, Miljenko; Ristic, Smiljana

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a major role in iron homeostasis; thus, in patients with chronic liver disease, iron regulation may be disturbed. Higher iron levels are present not only in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, but also in those with alcoholic liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and hepatitis C viral infection. Chronic liver disease decreases the synthetic functions of the liver, including the production of hepcidin, a key protein in iron metabolism. Lower levels of hepcidin result in iron overload, which leads to iron deposits in the liver and higher levels of non-transferrin-bound iron in the bloodstream. Iron combined with reactive oxygen species leads to an increase in hydroxyl radicals, which are responsible for phospholipid peroxidation, oxidation of amino acid side chains, DNA strain breaks, and protein fragmentation. Iron-induced cellular damage may be prevented by regulating the production of hepcidin or by administering hepcidin agonists. Both of these methods have yielded successful results in mouse models. PMID:27332079

  17. The Role of Iron and Iron Overload in Chronic Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Orlic, Lidija; Devcic, Edita; Starcevic-Cizmarevic, Nada; Stimac, Davor; Kapovic, Miljenko; Ristic, Smiljana

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a major role in iron homeostasis; thus, in patients with chronic liver disease, iron regulation may be disturbed. Higher iron levels are present not only in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, but also in those with alcoholic liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and hepatitis C viral infection. Chronic liver disease decreases the synthetic functions of the liver, including the production of hepcidin, a key protein in iron metabolism. Lower levels of hepcidin result in iron overload, which leads to iron deposits in the liver and higher levels of non-transferrin-bound iron in the bloodstream. Iron combined with reactive oxygen species leads to an increase in hydroxyl radicals, which are responsible for phospholipid peroxidation, oxidation of amino acid side chains, DNA strain breaks, and protein fragmentation. Iron-induced cellular damage may be prevented by regulating the production of hepcidin or by administering hepcidin agonists. Both of these methods have yielded successful results in mouse models. PMID:27332079

  18. Hepcidin Regulation of Iron Transport1–3

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, James F.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne; Knutson, Mitchell D.

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of hepcidin as a key regulator of iron homeostasis has advanced our current knowledge of this field. Liver-derived hepcidin peptide is secreted in response to iron and inflammation and interacts with the iron export protein ferroportin. This review summarizes recent advances discussed at the Symposium. A particular focus is on molecular interactions between hepcidin and ferroportin, the regulation of hepcidin expression by iron and inflammation, and emerging methods to measure s...

  19. The role of gut microbiota in immune homeostasis and autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Hsin-Jung; Wu, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Keeping a delicate balance in the immune system by eliminating invading pathogens, while still maintaining self-tolerance to avoid autoimmunity, is critical for the body’s health. The gut microbiota that resides in the gastrointestinal tract provides essential health benefits to its host, particularly by regulating immune homeostasis. Moreover, it has recently become obvious that alterations of these gut microbial communities can cause immune dysregulation, leading to autoimmune disorders. He...

  20. Altered sleep homeostasis in rev-erbα knockout mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mang, Géraldine M.; La Spada, Francesco; Emmenegger, Yann; Chappuis, Sylvie; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Albrecht, Urs; Franken, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The nuclear receptor REV-ERBα is a potent, constitutive transcriptional repressor critical for the regulation of key circadian and metabolic genes. Recently, REV-ERBα's involvement in learning, neurogenesis, mood, and dopamine turnover was demonstrated suggesting a specific role in central nervous system functioning. We have previously shown that the brain expression of several core clock genes, including Rev-erbα, is modulated by sleep loss. We here test the consequen...

  1. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B;

    1996-01-01

    transfected. Parvalbumin-transfected and mock-transfected cells were loaded with the calcium indicator fura-2 and were exposed, in the same dish, to different concentrations of the calcium ionophore A23187 or to KCI. The results show that parvalbumin-transfected PCC7 cells had much better calcium buffering...

  2. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B;

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...

  3. Iron-Responsive Regulation of the Helicobacter pylori Iron-Cofactored Superoxide Dismutase SodB Is Mediated by Fur

    OpenAIRE

    Ernst, Florian D.; Homuth, Georg; Stoof, Jeroen; Mäder, Ulrike; Waidner, Barbara; Kuipers, Ernst J; Kist, Manfred; Kusters, Johannes G.; Bereswill, Stefan; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.

    2005-01-01

    Maintaining iron homeostasis is a necessity for all living organisms, as free iron augments the generation of reactive oxygen species like superoxide anions, at the risk of subsequent lethal cellular damage. The iron-responsive regulator Fur controls iron metabolism in many bacteria, including the important human pathogen Helicobacter pylori, and thus is directly or indirectly involved in regulation of oxidative stress defense. Here we demonstrate that Fur is a direct regulator of the H. pylo...

  4. The iron/heme regulated genes of Haemophilus influenzae: comparative transcriptional profiling as a tool to define the species core modulon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morton Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haemophilus influenzae requires heme for aerobic growth and possesses multiple mechanisms to obtain this essential nutrient. Although an understanding of the heme acquisition mechanisms of H. influenzae is emerging, significant gaps in our knowledge remain. Unresolved issues include the identities of all genes exhibiting altered transcription in response to iron and heme availability, the fraction of such genes functioning in iron/heme acquisition, and the heterogeneity of this gene set among clinical isolates. Previously we utilized H. influenzae strain Rd KW20 to demonstrate the utility of transcriptional profiling in defining the genes exhibiting altered transcription in response to environmental iron and heme levels. The current study expands upon those observations by determining the iron/heme modulons of two clinical isolates, the type b isolate 10810 and the nontypeable isolate R2866. These data are used to begin to define the core iron/heme modulon of the species. Results Microarray studies were performed to compare gene expression on transition from iron/heme-restricted to iron/heme-replete conditions for each isolate. Of 1820 ORFs on the array corresponding to R2866 genes, 363 were significantly differentially expressed: 233 were maximally transcribed under iron/heme-replete conditions and 130 under iron/heme-restricted conditions. Of the 1883 ORFs representing genes of strain 10810, 353 were significantly differentially transcribed: 150 were preferentially transcribed under iron/heme-replete conditions and 203 under iron/heme-restricted conditions. Comparison of the data sets indicated that 163 genes exhibited similar regulation in both isolates and that 74 of these exhibited similar patterns of regulation in Rd KW20. These comprise the putative core iron/heme modulon. Conclusion This study provides evidence for a conserved core of H. influenzae genes the transcription of which is altered by the availability of

  5. Quantitative analysis of dietary iron utilization for erythropoiesis in response to body iron status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo-Tezuka, Yukari; Noguchi-Sasaki, Mariko; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yorozu, Keigo; Shimonaka, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    Erythropoiesis requires large amounts of iron for hemoglobin synthesis. There are two sources of iron for erythropoiesis, dietary and stored iron; however, their relative contributions to erythropoiesis remain unknown. In this study, we used the stable iron isotope (57)Fe to quantify synthesis of hemoglobin derived from dietary iron. Using this method, we investigated the activities of dietary iron absorption and the utilization of dietary iron for erythropoiesis in responses to stimulated erythropoiesis and to interventions to alter body iron status. Under iron-loaded conditions, the activity of dietary iron absorption was clearly lowered in response to up-regulation of hepcidin, although the estimated activity of iron release from stored iron was not compared with that under control conditions. This result was supported by the observation that two duodenal iron transporters, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and ferroportin, were downregulated by iron loading, although the levels of expression of ferroportin in iron storage tissues were not changed by iron loading under erythropoietic stimulation by epoetin-β pegol (C.E.R.A., a long-acting erythropoiesis-stimulating agent). These results indicate that the dietary iron absorption system is more sensitive to body iron status than are reticuloendothelial iron- release mechanisms. Our data indicated that there could be a regulatory mechanism favoring use of stored iron over dietary iron under iron-loaded conditions. PMID:26911670

  6. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: magnetic nanoplatforms as drug carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahajuddin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Wahajuddin,1,2 Sumit Arora21Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism Division, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Rae Bareli, IndiaAbstract: A targeted drug delivery system is the need of the hour. Guiding magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the help of an external magnetic field to its target is the principle behind the development of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs as novel drug delivery vehicles. SPIONs are small synthetic γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite or Fe3O4 (magnetite particles with a core ranging between 10 nm and 100 nm in diameter. These magnetic particles are coated with certain biocompatible polymers, such as dextran or polyethylene glycol, which provide chemical handles for the conjugation of therapeutic agents and also improve their blood distribution profile. The current research on SPIONs is opening up wide horizons for their use as diagnostic agents in magnetic resonance imaging as well as for drug delivery vehicles. Delivery of anticancer drugs by coupling with functionalized SPIONs to their targeted site is one of the most pursued areas of research in the development of cancer treatment strategies. SPIONs have also demonstrated their efficiency as nonviral gene vectors that facilitate the introduction of plasmids into the nucleus at rates multifold those of routinely available standard technologies. SPION-induced hyperthermia has also been utilized for localized killing of cancerous cells. Despite their potential biomedical application, alteration in gene expression profiles, disturbance in iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and altered cellular responses are some SPION-related toxicological aspects which require due consideration. This review provides a comprehensive understanding of SPIONs with regard to their method of preparation, their utility as drug delivery vehicles, and some concerns which need to

  7. Sleeping, Waking, ... and Glucose Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Rudic R. Daniel; McNamara Peter; Curtis Anne-Maria; Boston Raymond C; Panda Satchidananda; Hogenesch John B; FitzGerald Garret A

    2004-01-01

    Circadian timing is generated through a unique series of autoregulatory interactions termed the molecular clock. Behavioral rhythms subject to the molecular clock are well characterized. We demonstrate a role for Bmal1 and Clock in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Inactivation of the known clock components Bmal1 (Mop3) and Clock suppress the diurnal variation in glucose and triglycerides. Gluconeogenesis is abolished by deletion of Bmal1 and is depressed in Clock mutants, but the counte...

  8. Zinc bioavailability and homeostasis1234

    OpenAIRE

    Hambidge, K Michael; Miller, Leland V; Westcott, Jamie E; Sheng, Xiaoyang; Krebs, Nancy F.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc has earned recognition recently as a micronutrient of outstanding and diverse biological, clinical, and global public health importance. Regulation of absorption by zinc transporters in the enterocyte, together with saturation kinetics of the absorption process into and across the enterocyte, are the principal means by which whole-body zinc homeostasis is maintained. Several physiologic factors, most notably the quantity of zinc ingested, determine the quantity of zinc absorbed and the e...

  9. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  10. Iron overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral found in many over-the-counter supplements. Iron overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ... This can be by accident or on purpose. Iron overdose is especially dangerous for children. A severe ...

  11. Haemolysis and perturbations in the systemic iron metabolism of suckling, copper-deficient mosaic mutant mice - an animal model of Menkes disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Lenartowicz

    Full Text Available The biological interaction between copper and iron is best exemplified by the decreased activity of multicopper ferroxidases under conditions of copper deficiency that limits the availability of iron for erythropoiesis. However, little is known about how copper deficiency affects iron homeostasis through alteration of the activity of other copper-containing proteins, not directly connected with iron metabolism, such as superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1. This antioxidant enzyme scavenges the superoxide anion, a reactive oxygen species contributing to the toxicity of iron via the Fenton reaction. Here, we analyzed changes in the systemic iron metabolism using an animal model of Menkes disease: copper-deficient mosaic mutant mice with dysfunction of the ATP7A copper transporter. We found that the erythrocytes of these mutants are copper-deficient, display decreased SOD1 activity/expression and have cell membrane abnormalities. In consequence, the mosaic mice show evidence of haemolysis accompanied by haptoglobin-dependent elimination of haemoglobin (Hb from the circulation, as well as the induction of haem oxygenase 1 (HO1 in the liver and kidney. Moreover, the hepcidin-ferroportin regulatory axis is strongly affected in mosaic mice. These findings indicate that haemolysis is an additional pathogenic factor in a mouse model of Menkes diseases and provides evidence of a new indirect connection between copper deficiency and iron metabolism.

  12. The role of sedimentology, oceanography, and alteration on the δ56Fe value of the Sokoman Iron Formation, Labrador Trough, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raye, Urmidola; Pufahl, Peir K.; Kyser, T. Kurtis; Ricard, Estelle; Hiatt, Eric E.

    2015-09-01

    The Sokoman Formation is a ca. 100-m-thick succession of interbedded iron formation and fine-grained siliciclastics deposited at 1.88 Ga. Accumulation occurred on a dynamic paleoshelf where oxygen stratification, coastal upwelling of hydrothermally derived Fe and Si, microbial processes, tide and storm currents, diagenesis, and low-grade prehnite-pumpellyite metamorphism controlled lithofacies character and produced complex associations of multigenerational chert, hematite, magnetite, greenalite, stilpnomelane and Fe carbonate. Hematite-rich facies were deposited along suboxic segments of the coastline where photosynthetic oxygen oases impinged on the seafloor. Hematitic, cross-stratified grainstones were formed by winnowing and reworking of freshly precipitated Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide and opal-A by waves and currents into subaqueous dunes. Magnetite-rich facies contain varying proportions of greenalite and stilpnomelane and record deposition in anoxic middle shelf environments beneath an oxygen chemocline. Minor negative Ce anomalies in hematitic facies, but prominent positive Ce and Eu anomalies and high LREE/HREE ratios in magnetite-rich facies imply the existence of a weakly oxygenated surface ocean above anoxic bottom waters. The Fe isotopic composition of 31 whole rock (-0.46 ⩽ δ56Fe ⩽ 0.47‰) and 21 magnetite samples (-0.29 ⩽ δ56Fe ⩽ 0.22‰) from suboxic and anoxic lithofacies was controlled primarily by the physical oceanography of the paleoshelf. Despite low-grade metamorphism recorded by the δ18O values of paragenetically related quartz and magnetite, the Sokoman Formation preserves a robust primary Fe isotopic signal. Coastal upwelling is interpreted to have affected the isotopic equilibria between Fe2+aq and Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide in open marine versus coastal environments, which controlled the Fe isotopic composition of lithofacies. Unlike previous work that focuses on microbial and abiotic fractionation processes with little regard for

  13. Global Transcriptional Response to Hfe Deficiency and Dietary Iron Overload in Mouse Liver and Duodenum

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandra Rodriguez; Tiina Luukkaala; Fleming, Robert E.; Britton, Robert S.; Bacon, Bruce R.; Seppo Parkkila

    2009-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace element whose absorption is usually tightly regulated in the duodenum. HFE-related hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is characterized by abnormally low expression of the iron-regulatory hormone, hepcidin, which results in increased iron absorption. The liver is crucial for iron homeostasis as it is the main production site of hepcidin. The aim of this study was to explore and compare the genome-wide transcriptome response to Hfe deficiency and dietary iron overload in...

  14. Alpha Klotho and phosphate homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, Ao; Xing, Changying; Hu, Ming Chang

    2014-01-01

    The Klotho family consists of three single-pass transmembrane proteins—αKlotho, βKlotho and γKlotho. Each of them combines with fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors (FGFRs) to form receptor complexes for various FGF’s. αKlotho is a co-receptor for physiological FGF23 signaling and appears essential for FGF23-mediated regulation of mineral metabolism. αKlotho protein also plays a FGF23-independent role in phosphate homeostasis. Animal experimental studies and clinical observations have dem...

  15. Monomeric Yeast Frataxin is an Iron Binding Protein†

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Jeremy D.; Bencze, Krisztina Z.; Jankovic, Ana D.; Crater, Anna K.; Busch, Courtney N.; Bradley, Patrick B.; Stemmler, Ann J.; Spaller, Mark R.; Stemmler, Timothy L.

    2006-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia, an autosomal cardio- and neurodegenerative disorder that affects 1 in 50,000 humans, is caused by decreased levels of the protein frataxin. Although nuclear encoded, frataxin is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and necessary for proper regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. Frataxin is required for the cellular production of both heme and iron-sulfur clusters. Monomeric frataxin binds with high affinity to ferrochelatase, the enzyme involved in iron insertion into p...

  16. ER Stress Controls Iron Metabolism Through Induction of Hepcidin

    OpenAIRE

    Vecchi, Chiara; Montosi, Giuliana; Zhang, Kezhong; Lamberti, Igor; Duncan, Stephen A.; Kaufman, Randal J.; Pietrangelo, Antonello

    2009-01-01

    Hepcidin is a peptide hormone that is secreted by the liver and controls body iron homeostasis. Hepcidin overproduction causes anemia of inflammation, whereas its deficiency leads to hemochromatosis. Inflammation and iron are known extracellular stimuli for hepcidin expression. We found that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress also induces hepcidin expression and causes hypoferremia and spleen iron sequestration in mice. CREBH (cyclic AMP response element–binding protein H), an ER stress–activa...

  17. Iron and learning potential in childhood.

    OpenAIRE

    B. Lozoff

    1989-01-01

    Cognitive function. There is reasonably good evidence that mental and motor developmental test scores are lower among infants with iron deficiency anemia. Although the research on cognitive function in iron deficient older children and adults is sparse and diverse, it suggests that there may be alterations in attentional processes associated with iron deficiency. Iron therapy has not yet been shown effective in completely correcting many of the observed disturbances. Although some aspects of ...

  18. Molecular Determinants of Magnesium Homeostasis: Insights from Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, R. Todd; Hoenderop, Joost G.; Bindels, René J.

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed multiple advances in our understanding of magnesium (Mg2+) homeostasis. The discovery that mutations in claudin-16/paracellin-1 or claudin-19 are responsible for familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis provided insight into the molecular mechanisms governing paracellular transport of Mg2+. Our understanding of the transcellular movement of Mg2+ was similarly enhanced by the realization that defects in transient receptor potential melastatin 6 (TRPM6) cause hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia. This channel regulates the apical entry of Mg2+ into epithelia. In so doing, TRPM6 alters whole-body Mg2+ homeostasis by controlling urinary excretion. Consequently, investigation into the regulation of TRPM6 has increased. Acid-base status, 17β estradiol, and the immunosuppressive agents FK506 and cyclosporine affect plasma Mg2+ levels by altering TRPM6 expression. A mutation in epithelial growth factor is responsible for isolated autosomal recessive hypomagnesemia, and epithelial growth factor activates TRPM6. A defect in the γ-subunit of the Na,K-ATPase causes isolated dominant hypomagnesemia by altering TRPM6 activity through a decrease in the driving force for apical Mg2+ influx. We anticipate that the next decade will provide further detail into the control of the gatekeeper TRPM6 and, therefore, overall whole-body Mg2+ balance. PMID:18562569

  19. Epigenetic Regulation of Cholesterol Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve eMeaney

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although best known as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, cholesterol is a vital component of all mammalian cells. In addition to key structural roles, cholesterol is a vital biochemical precursor for numerous biologically important compounds including oxysterols and bile acids, as well as acting as an activator of critical morphogenic systems (e.g. the Hedgehog system. A variety of sophisticated regulatory mechanisms interact to coordinate the overall level of cholesterol in cells, tissues and the entire organism. Accumulating evidence indicates that in additional to the more ‘traditional’ regulatory schemes, cholesterol homeostasis is also under the control of epigenetic mechanisms such as histone acetylation and DNA methylation. The available evidence supporting a role for these mechanisms in the control of cholesterol synthesis, elimination, transport and storage are the focus of this review.

  20. Obesity as an Emerging Risk Factor for Iron Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmar Aigner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis is affected by obesity and obesity-related insulin resistance in a many-facetted fashion. On one hand, iron deficiency and anemia are frequent findings in subjects with progressed stages of obesity. This phenomenon has been well studied in obese adolescents, women and subjects undergoing bariatric surgery. On the other hand, hyperferritinemia with normal or mildly elevated transferrin saturation is observed in approximately one-third of patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. This constellation has been named the “dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome (DIOS”. Both elevated body iron stores and iron deficiency are detrimental to health and to the course of obesity-related conditions. Iron deficiency and anemia may impair mitochondrial and cellular energy homeostasis and further increase inactivity and fatigue of obese subjects. Obesity-associated inflammation is tightly linked to iron deficiency and involves impaired duodenal iron absorption associated with low expression of duodenal ferroportin (FPN along with elevated hepcidin concentrations. This review summarizes the current understanding of the dysregulation of iron homeostasis in obesity.

  1. Rapidly Escalating Hepcidin and Associated Serum Iron Starvation Are Features of the Acute Response to Typhoid Infection in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Darton

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron is a key pathogenic determinant of many infectious diseases. Hepcidin, the hormone responsible for governing systemic iron homeostasis, is widely hypothesized to represent a key component of nutritional immunity through regulating the accessibility of iron to invading microorganisms during infection. However, the deployment of hepcidin in human bacterial infections remains poorly characterized. Typhoid fever is a globally significant, human-restricted bacterial infection, but understanding of its pathogenesis, especially during the critical early phases, likewise is poorly understood. Here, we investigate alterations in hepcidin and iron/inflammatory indices following experimental human typhoid challenge.Fifty study participants were challenged with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and monitored for evidence of typhoid fever. Serum hepcidin, ferritin, serum iron parameters, C-reactive protein (CRP, and plasma IL-6 and TNF-alpha concentrations were measured during the 14 days following challenge. We found that hepcidin concentrations were markedly higher during acute typhoid infection than at baseline. Hepcidin elevations mirrored the kinetics of fever, and were accompanied by profound hypoferremia, increased CRP and ferritin, despite only modest elevations in IL-6 and TNF-alpha in some individuals. During inflammation, the extent of hepcidin upregulation associated with the degree of hypoferremia.We demonstrate that strong hepcidin upregulation and hypoferremia, coincident with fever and systemic inflammation, are hallmarks of the early innate response to acute typhoid infection. We hypothesize that hepcidin-mediated iron redistribution into macrophages may contribute to S. Typhi pathogenesis by increasing iron availability for macrophage-tropic bacteria, and that targeting macrophage iron retention may represent a strategy for limiting infections with macrophage-tropic pathogens such as S. Typhi.

  2. Cholesterol homeostasis: How do cells sense sterol excess?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Vicky; Sharpe, Laura J; Alexopoulos, Stephanie J; Kunze, Sarah V; Chua, Ngee Kiat; Li, Dianfan; Brown, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol is vital in mammals, but toxic in excess. Consequently, elaborate molecular mechanisms have evolved to maintain this sterol within narrow limits. How cells sense excess cholesterol is an intriguing area of research. Cells sense cholesterol, and other related sterols such as oxysterols or cholesterol synthesis intermediates, and respond to changing levels through several elegant mechanisms of feedback regulation. Cholesterol sensing involves both direct binding of sterols to the homeostatic machinery located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and indirect effects elicited by sterol-dependent alteration of the physical properties of membranes. Here, we examine the mechanisms employed by cells to maintain cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:26993747

  3. Iron Overload

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drug called an iron chelator to remove excess iron from your body because of transfusion-dependent anemias. Be sure to talk with your doctor about the potential benefits and risks of using these drugs. Previous Article ...

  4. Iron and genome stability: An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pra, Daniel, E-mail: daniel_pra@yahoo.com [PPG em Promocao da Saude, Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); PPG em Saude e Comportamento, Universidade Catolica de Pelotas, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Franke, Silvia Isabel Rech [PPG em Promocao da Saude, Universidade de Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Santa Cruz do Sul, RS (Brazil); Henriques, Joao Antonio Pegas [Instituto de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil); Fenech, Michael [CSIRO Food and Nutritional Sciences, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2012-05-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient which is required in a relatively narrow range for maintaining metabolic homeostasis and genome stability. Iron participates in oxygen transport and mitochondrial respiration as well as in antioxidant and nucleic acid metabolism. Iron deficiency impairs these biological pathways, leading to oxidative stress and possibly carcinogenesis. Iron overload has been linked to genome instability as well as to cancer risk increase, as seen in hereditary hemochromatosis. Iron is an extremely reactive transition metal that can interact with hydrogen peroxide to generate hydroxyl radicals that form the 8-hydroxy-guanine adduct, cause point mutations as well as DNA single and double strand breaks. Iron overload also induces DNA hypermethylation and can reduce telomere length. The current Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for iron, according with Institute of Medicine Dietary Reference Intake (DRI), is based in the concept of preventing anemia, and ranges from 7 mg/day to 18 mg/day depending on life stage and gender. Pregnant women need 27 mg/day. The maximum safety level for iron intake, the Upper Level (UL), is 40-45 mg/day, based on the prevention of gastrointestinal distress associated to high iron intakes. Preliminary evidence indicates that 20 mg/day iron, an intake slightly higher than the RDA, may reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancer in the elderly as well as increasing genome stability in lymphocytes of children and adolescents. Current dietary recommendations do not consider the concept of genome stability which is of concern because damage to the genome has been linked to the origin and progression of many diseases and is the most fundamental pathology. Given the importance of iron for homeostasis and its potential influence over genome stability and cancer it is recommended to conduct further studies that conclusively define these relationships.

  5. Iron and genome stability: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron is an essential micronutrient which is required in a relatively narrow range for maintaining metabolic homeostasis and genome stability. Iron participates in oxygen transport and mitochondrial respiration as well as in antioxidant and nucleic acid metabolism. Iron deficiency impairs these biological pathways, leading to oxidative stress and possibly carcinogenesis. Iron overload has been linked to genome instability as well as to cancer risk increase, as seen in hereditary hemochromatosis. Iron is an extremely reactive transition metal that can interact with hydrogen peroxide to generate hydroxyl radicals that form the 8-hydroxy-guanine adduct, cause point mutations as well as DNA single and double strand breaks. Iron overload also induces DNA hypermethylation and can reduce telomere length. The current Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for iron, according with Institute of Medicine Dietary Reference Intake (DRI), is based in the concept of preventing anemia, and ranges from 7 mg/day to 18 mg/day depending on life stage and gender. Pregnant women need 27 mg/day. The maximum safety level for iron intake, the Upper Level (UL), is 40–45 mg/day, based on the prevention of gastrointestinal distress associated to high iron intakes. Preliminary evidence indicates that 20 mg/day iron, an intake slightly higher than the RDA, may reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancer in the elderly as well as increasing genome stability in lymphocytes of children and adolescents. Current dietary recommendations do not consider the concept of genome stability which is of concern because damage to the genome has been linked to the origin and progression of many diseases and is the most fundamental pathology. Given the importance of iron for homeostasis and its potential influence over genome stability and cancer it is recommended to conduct further studies that conclusively define these relationships.

  6. Metal Homeostasis Regulators Suppress FRDA Phenotypes in a Drosophila Model of the Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Sirena; Calap-Quintana, Pablo; Llorens, José Vicente; Al-Ramahi, Ismael; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Martínez-Sebastián, María José; Botas, Juan; Moltó, María Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA), the most commonly inherited ataxia in populations of European origin, is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a decrease in frataxin levels. One of the hallmarks of the disease is the accumulation of iron in several tissues including the brain, and frataxin has been proposed to play a key role in iron homeostasis. We found that the levels of zinc, copper, manganese and aluminum were also increased in a Drosophila model of FRDA, and that copper and zinc chelation improve their impaired motor performance. By means of a candidate genetic screen, we identified that genes implicated in iron, zinc and copper transport and metal detoxification can restore frataxin deficiency-induced phenotypes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the metal dysregulation in FRDA includes other metals besides iron, therefore providing a new set of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27433942

  7. Duodenal Cytochrome b (DCYTB in Iron Metabolism: An Update on Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius J. R. Lane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron and ascorbate are vital cellular constituents in mammalian systems. The bulk-requirement for iron is during erythropoiesis leading to the generation of hemoglobin-containing erythrocytes. Additionally; both iron and ascorbate are required as co-factors in numerous metabolic reactions. Iron homeostasis is controlled at the level of uptake; rather than excretion. Accumulating evidence strongly suggests that in addition to the known ability of dietary ascorbate to enhance non-heme iron absorption in the gut; ascorbate regulates iron homeostasis. The involvement of ascorbate in dietary iron absorption extends beyond the direct chemical reduction of non-heme iron by dietary ascorbate. Among other activities; intra-enterocyte ascorbate appears to be involved in the provision of electrons to a family of trans-membrane redox enzymes; namely those of the cytochrome b561 class. These hemoproteins oxidize a pool of ascorbate on one side of the membrane in order to reduce an electron acceptor (e.g., non-heme iron on the opposite side of the membrane. One member of this family; duodenal cytochrome b (DCYTB; may play an important role in ascorbate-dependent reduction of non-heme iron in the gut prior to uptake by ferrous-iron transporters. This review discusses the emerging relationship between cellular iron homeostasis; the emergent “IRP1-HIF2α axis”; DCYTB and ascorbate in relation to iron metabolism.

  8. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by cellular labile iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kyohei; Kawakami, Toru; Yamamoto, Naoki; Tomizawa, Miyu; Fujiwara, Tohru; Ishii, Tomonori; Harigae, Hideo; Ogasawara, Kouetsu

    2016-02-01

    Cellular labile iron, which contains chelatable redox-active Fe(2+), has been implicated in iron-mediated cellular toxicity leading to multiple organ dysfunction. Iron homeostasis is controlled by monocytes/macrophages through their iron recycling and storage capacities. Furthermore, iron sequestration by monocytes/macrophages is regulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1, highlighting the importance of these cells in the crosstalk between inflammation and iron homeostasis. However, a role for cellular labile iron in monocyte/macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses has not been defined. Here we describe how cellular labile iron activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes. Stimulation of lipopolysaccharide-primed peripheral blood mononuclear cells with ferric ammonium citrate increases the level of cellular Fe(2+) levels in monocytes and induces production of interleukin-1β in a dose-dependent manner. This ferric ammonium citrate-induced interleukin-1β production is dependent on caspase-1 and is significantly inhibited by an Fe(2+)-specific chelator. Ferric ammonium citrate consistently induced interleukin-1β secretion in THP1 cells, but not in NLRP3-deficient THP1 cells, indicating a requirement for the NLRP3 inflammasome. Additionally, activation of the inflammasome is mediated by potassium efflux, reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction, and lysosomal membrane permeabilization. Thus, these results suggest that monocytes/macrophages not only sequestrate iron during inflammation, but also mediate inflammation in response to cellular labile iron, which provides novel insights into the role of iron in chronic inflammation. PMID:26577567

  9. Gallium and its competing roles with iron in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2016-08-01

    Gallium, a group IIIa metal, shares chemical properties with iron. Studies have shown that gallium-based compounds have potential therapeutic activity against certain cancers and infectious microorganisms. By functioning as an iron mimetic, gallium perturbs iron-dependent proliferation processes in tumor cells. Gallium's action on iron homeostasis leads to disruption of ribonucleotide reductase, mitochondrial function, and the regulation of transferrin receptor and ferritin. In addition, gallium nitrate stimulates an increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in cells which triggers downstream upregulation of metallothionein and hemoxygenase-1. Gallium's anti-infective activity against bacteria and fungi results from disruption of microbial iron utilization through mechanisms which include gallium binding to siderophores and downregulation of bacterial iron uptake. Gallium compounds lack cross-resistance to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs and antibiotics thus making them attractive agents for drug development. This review will focus on the mechanisms of action of gallium with emphasis on its interaction with iron and iron proteins. PMID:27150508

  10. Redox control of iron regulatory protein 2 stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Anja; Lee, Julie; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2011-02-18

    Iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) is a critical switch for cellular and systemic iron homeostasis. In iron-deficient or hypoxic cells, IRP2 binds to mRNAs containing iron responsive elements (IREs) and regulates their expression. Iron promotes proteasomal degradation of IRP2 via the F-box protein FBXL5. Here, we explored the effects of oxygen and cellular redox status on IRP2 stability. We show that iron-dependent decay of tetracycline-inducible IRP2 proceeds efficiently under mild hypoxic conditions (3% oxygen) but is compromised in severe hypoxia (0.1% oxygen). A treatment of cells with exogenous H(2)O(2) protects IRP2 against iron and increases its IRE-binding activity. IRP2 is also stabilized during menadione-induced oxidative stress. These data demonstrate that the degradation of IRP2 in iron-replete cells is not only oxygen-dependent but also sensitive to redox perturbations. PMID:21281640

  11. Supplementation of iron in pulmonary hypertension: Rationale and design of a phase II clinical trial in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Luke S.G.E.; Watson, Geoffrey M.J.; Wharton, John; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Chan, Kakit; Khengar, Rajeshree; Robbins, Peter A.; Kiely, David G.; Condliffe, Robin; Elliott, Charlie A.; Pepke-Zaba*, Joanna; Sheares, Karen; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Davies, Rachel; Ashby, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Our aim is to assess the safety and potential clinical benefit of intravenous iron (Ferinject) infusion in iron deficient patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). Iron deficiency in the absence of anemia (1) is common in patients with IPAH; (2) is associated with inappropriately raised levels of hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis; and (3) correlates with disease severity and worse clinical outcomes. Oral iron absorption may be impeded by reduced absorption...

  12. Role of alcohol in the regulation of iron metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease frequently exhibit increased body iron stores, as reflected by elevated serum iron indices (transferrin saturation, ferritin) and hepatic iron concentration. Even mild to moderate alcohol consumption has been shown to increase the prevalence of iron overload. Moreover, increased hepatic iron content is associated with greater mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis, suggesting a pathogenic role for iron in alcoholic liver disease. Alcohol increases the severity of disease in patients with genetic hemochromatosis,an iron overload disorder common in the Caucasian population. Both iron and alcohol individually cause oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, which culminates in liver injury. Despite these observations, the underlying mechanisms of iron accumulation and the source of the excess iron observed in alcoholic liver disease remain unclear. Over the last decade, several novel iron-regulatory proteins have been identified and these have greatly enhanced our understanding of iron metabolism. For example, hepcidin, a circulatory antimicrobial peptide synthesized by the hepatocytes of the liver is now known to play a central role in the regulation of iron homeostasis. This review attempts to describe the interaction of alcohol and iron-regulatory molecules. Understanding these molecular mechanisms is of considerable clinical importance because both alcoholic liver disease and genetic hemochromatosis are common diseases, in which alcohol and iron appear to act synergistically to cause liver injury.

  13. Effects of Pregnancy and Lactation on Iron Metabolism in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guofen Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In female, inadequate iron supply is a highly prevalent problem that often leads to iron-deficiency anemia. This study aimed to understand the effects of pregnancy and lactation on iron metabolism. Rats with different days of gestation and lactation were used to determine the variations in iron stores and serum iron level and the changes in expression of iron metabolism-related proteins, including ferritin, ferroportin 1 (FPN1, ceruloplasmin (Cp, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, and the major iron-regulatory molecule—hepcidin. We found that iron stores decline dramatically at late-pregnancy period, and the low iron store status persists throughout the lactation period. The significantly increased FPN1 level in small intestine facilitates digestive iron absorption, which maintains the serum iron concentration at a near-normal level to meet the increase of iron requirements. Moreover, a significant decrease of hepcidin expression is observed during late-pregnancy and early-lactation stages, suggesting the important regulatory role that hepcidin plays in iron metabolism during pregnancy and lactation. These results are fundamental to the understanding of iron homeostasis during pregnancy and lactation and may provide experimental bases for future studies to identify key molecules expressed during these special periods that regulate the expression of hepcidin, to eventually improve the iron-deficiency status.

  14. Pancreatic regulation of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Pia V; Wu, Bingbing; Liu, Yixian; Han, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    In order to ensure normal body function, the human body is dependent on a tight control of its blood glucose levels. This is accomplished by a highly sophisticated network of various hormones and neuropeptides released mainly from the brain, pancreas, liver, intestine as well as adipose and muscle tissue. Within this network, the pancreas represents a key player by secreting the blood sugar-lowering hormone insulin and its opponent glucagon. However, disturbances in the interplay of the hormones and peptides involved may lead to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) whose prevalence, comorbidities and medical costs take on a dramatic scale. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to uncover and understand the mechanisms underlying the various interactions to improve existing anti-diabetic therapies and drugs on the one hand and to develop new therapeutic approaches on the other. This review summarizes the interplay of the pancreas with various other organs and tissues that maintain glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, anti-diabetic drugs and their impact on signaling pathways underlying the network will be discussed. PMID:26964835

  15. Cp/Heph mutant mice have iron-induced neurodegeneration diminished by deferiprone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liangliang; Hadziahmetovic, Majda; Wang, Chenguang; Xu, Xueying; Song, Ying; Jinnah, H A; Wodzinska, Jolanta; Iacovelli, Jared; Wolkow, Natalie; Krajacic, Predrag; Weissberger, Alyssa Cwanger; Connelly, John; Spino, Michael; Lee, Michael K; Connor, James; Giasson, Benoit; Harris, Z Leah; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2015-12-01

    Brain iron accumulates in several neurodegenerative diseases and can cause oxidative damage, but mechanisms of brain iron homeostasis are incompletely understood. Patients with mutations in the cellular iron-exporting ferroxidase ceruloplasmin (Cp) have brain iron accumulation causing neurodegeneration. Here, we assessed the brains of mice with combined mutation of Cp and its homolog hephaestin. Compared to single mutants, brain iron accumulation was accelerated in double mutants in the cerebellum, substantia nigra, and hippocampus. Iron accumulated within glia, while neurons were iron deficient. There was loss of both neurons and glia. Mice developed ataxia and tremor, and most died by 9 months. Treatment with the oral iron chelator deferiprone diminished brain iron levels, protected against neuron loss, and extended lifespan. Ferroxidases play important, partially overlapping roles in brain iron homeostasis by facilitating iron export from glia, making iron available to neurons. Above: Iron (Fe) normally moves from capillaries to glia to neurons. It is exported from the glia by ferroportin (Fpn) with ferroxidases ceruloplasmin (Cp) and/or Hephaestin (Heph). Below: In mice with mutation of Cp and Heph, iron accumulates in glia, while neurons have low iron levels. Both neurons and glia degenerate and mice become ataxic unless given an iron chelator. PMID:26303407

  16. Impact of Anaerobiosis on Expression of the Iron-Responsive Fur and RyhB Regulons

    OpenAIRE

    Beauchene, Nicole A.; Kevin S Myers; Chung, Dongjun; Park, Dan M.; Weisnicht, Allison M.; Keleş, Sündüz; Kiley, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iron, a major protein cofactor, is essential for most organisms. Despite the well-known effects of O2 on the oxidation state and solubility of iron, the impact of O2 on cellular iron homeostasis is not well understood. Here we report that in Escherichia coli K-12, the lack of O2 dramatically changes expression of genes controlled by the global regulators of iron homeostasis, the transcription factor Fur and the small RNA RyhB. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq)...

  17. Sustained sleep fragmentation induces sleep homeostasis in mice

    KAUST Repository

    Baud, Maxime O.

    2015-04-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep fragmentation (SF) is an integral feature of sleep apnea and other prevalent sleep disorders. Although the effect of repetitive arousals on cognitive performance is well documented, the effects of long-term SF on electroencephalography (EEG) and molecular markers of sleep homeostasis remain poorly investigated. To address this question, we developed a mouse model of chronic SF and characterized its effect on EEG spectral frequencies and the expression of genes previously linked to sleep homeostasis including clock genes, heat shock proteins, and plasticity-related genes. Design: N/A. Setting: Animal sleep research laboratory. Participants : Sixty-six C57BL6/J adult mice. Interventions: Instrumental sleep disruption at a rate of 60/h during 14 days Measurements and Results: Locomotor activity and EEG were recorded during 14 days of SF followed by recovery for 2 days. Despite a dramatic number of arousals and decreased sleep bout duration, SF minimally reduced total quantity of sleep and did not significantly alter its circadian distribution. Spectral analysis during SF revealed a homeostatic drive for slow wave activity (SWA; 1-4 Hz) and other frequencies as well (4-40 Hz). Recordings during recovery revealed slow wave sleep consolidation and a transient rebound in SWA, and paradoxical sleep duration. The expression of selected genes was not induced following chronic SF. Conclusions: Chronic sleep fragmentation (SF) increased sleep pressure confirming that altered quality with preserved quantity triggers core sleep homeostasis mechanisms. However, it did not induce the expression of genes induced by sleep loss, suggesting that these molecular pathways are not sustainably activated in chronic diseases involving SF.

  18. Aberrant water homeostasis detected by stable isotope analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon P O'Grady

    Full Text Available While isotopes are frequently used as tracers in investigations of disease physiology (i.e., 14C labeled glucose, few studies have examined the impact that disease, and disease-related alterations in metabolism, may have on stable isotope ratios at natural abundance levels. The isotopic composition of body water is heavily influenced by water metabolism and dietary patterns and may provide a platform for disease detection. By utilizing a model of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes as an index case of aberrant water homeostasis, we demonstrate that untreated diabetes mellitus results in distinct combinations, or signatures, of the hydrogen (delta2H and oxygen (delta18O isotope ratios in body water. Additionally, we show that the delta2H and delta18O values of body water are correlated with increased water flux, suggesting altered blood osmolality, due to hyperglycemia, as the mechanism behind this correlation. Further, we present a mathematical model describing the impact of water flux on the isotopic composition of body water and compare model predicted values with actual values. These data highlight the importance of factors such as water flux and energy expenditure on predictive models of body water and additionally provide a framework for using naturally occurring stable isotope ratios to monitor diseases that impact water homeostasis.

  19. Pathophysiology in Medicine: Hepcidin and iron regulation in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Means, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    A decade ago hepcidin, an antimicrobial peptide with iron-regulatory properties, was discovered and proposed as playing a significant role in the pathogenesis of the anemia of chronic disease. Subsequent studies have demonstrated that hepcidin is the keystone of the linked systems of iron balance and iron transport in health and in disease. The definition of the role of hepcidin and of its regulation has permitted the mechanisms of disorders of iron homeostasis to be understood at a molecular...

  20. The Effect of Iron Limitation on the Transcriptome and Proteome of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Chee Kent; Hassan, Karl A.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Loper, Joyce E.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important micronutrients for bacterial growth is iron, whose bioavailability in soil is limited. Consequently, rhizospheric bacteria such as Pseudomonas fluorescens employ a range of mechanisms to acquire or compete for iron. We investigated the transcriptomic and proteomic effects of iron limitation on P. fluorescens Pf-5 by employing microarray and iTRAQ techniques, respectively. Analysis of this data revealed that genes encoding functions related to iron homeostasis, includ...

  1. Intravenous iron therapy in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and iron deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiter, Gerrina; Manders, Emmy; Happé, Chris M.; Schalij, Ingrid; Groepenhoff, Herman; Howard, Luke S.; Wilkins, Martin R.; Bogaard, Harm J.; Westerhof, Nico; van der Laarse, Willem J.; de Man, Frances S.; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton

    2015-01-01

    In patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (iPAH), iron deficiency is common and has been associated with reduced exercise capacity and worse survival. Previous studies have shown beneficial effects of intravenous iron administration. In this study, we investigated the use of intravenous iron therapy in iron-deficient iPAH patients in terms of safety and effects on exercise capacity, and we studied whether altered exercise capacity resulted from changes in right ventricular (...

  2. microRNA Regulation of Peritoneal Cavity Homeostasis in Peritoneal Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Lopez-Anton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of peritoneal cavity homeostasis and peritoneal membrane function is critical for long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD treatment. Several microRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated in the regulation of key molecular pathways driving peritoneal membrane alterations leading to PD failure. miRNAs regulate the expression of the majority of protein coding genes in the human genome, thereby affecting most biochemical pathways implicated in cellular homeostasis. In this review, we report published findings on miRNAs and PD therapy, with emphasis on evidence for changes in peritoneal miRNA expression during long-term PD treatment. Recent work indicates that PD effluent- (PDE- derived cells change their miRNA expression throughout the course of PD therapy, contributing to the loss of peritoneal cavity homeostasis and peritoneal membrane function. Changes in miRNA expression profiles will alter regulation of key molecular pathways, with the potential to cause profound effects on peritoneal cavity homeostasis during PD treatment. However, research to date has mainly adopted a literature-based miRNA-candidate methodology drawing conclusions from modest numbers of patient-derived samples. Therefore, the study of miRNA expression during PD therapy remains a promising field of research to understand the mechanisms involved in basic peritoneal cell homeostasis and PD failure.

  3. microRNA Regulation of Peritoneal Cavity Homeostasis in Peritoneal Dialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Anton, Melisa; Bowen, Timothy; Jenkins, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of peritoneal cavity homeostasis and peritoneal membrane function is critical for long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) treatment. Several microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in the regulation of key molecular pathways driving peritoneal membrane alterations leading to PD failure. miRNAs regulate the expression of the majority of protein coding genes in the human genome, thereby affecting most biochemical pathways implicated in cellular homeostasis. In this review, we report published findings on miRNAs and PD therapy, with emphasis on evidence for changes in peritoneal miRNA expression during long-term PD treatment. Recent work indicates that PD effluent- (PDE-) derived cells change their miRNA expression throughout the course of PD therapy, contributing to the loss of peritoneal cavity homeostasis and peritoneal membrane function. Changes in miRNA expression profiles will alter regulation of key molecular pathways, with the potential to cause profound effects on peritoneal cavity homeostasis during PD treatment. However, research to date has mainly adopted a literature-based miRNA-candidate methodology drawing conclusions from modest numbers of patient-derived samples. Therefore, the study of miRNA expression during PD therapy remains a promising field of research to understand the mechanisms involved in basic peritoneal cell homeostasis and PD failure. PMID:26495316

  4. Decreased serum hepcidin, inflammation, and improved functional iron status six-months post-restrictive bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excess adiposity is associated with low-grade inflammation and decreased iron status. Iron depletion (ID) in obesity is thought to be mediated by an inflammation-induced increase in the body’s main regulator of iron homeostasis, hepcidin. Elevated hepcidin can result in ID as it prevents the release...

  5. Serum hepcidin is significantly associated with iron absorption from food and supplemental sources in healthy young woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepcidin is a key regulator of iron homeostasis, but to date no studies have examined the effect of hepcidin on iron absorption in humans. Our objective was to assess relations between both serum hepcidin and serum prohepcidin with nonheme-iron absorption in the presence and absence of food with the...

  6. Serum Iron Parameters, HFE C282Y Genotype, and Cognitive Performance in Older Adults: Results From the FACIT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiepers, O.J.G.; Boxtel, van M.P.J.; Groot, R.H.M.; Jolles, J.; Kort, de W.L.A.M.; Swinkels, D.W.; Kok, F.J.; Verhoef, P.; Durga, J.

    2010-01-01

    Although iron homeostasis is essential for brain functioning, the effects of iron levels on cognitive performance in older individuals have scarcely been investigated. In the present study, serum iron parameters and hemochromatosis (HFE) C282Y genotype were determined in 818 older individuals who pa

  7. The role of malate in plant homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Finkemeier, Iris; Sweetlove, Lee J.

    2009-01-01

    Malate is a central metabolite of the plant cell with important roles in plant physiology and metabolism. Here, we summarize the most recent advances in our understanding of malate homeostasis in central metabolism, guard cell functioning, and root exudation.

  8. The role of sirtuins in cellular homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupis, Wioleta; Pałyga, Jan; Tomal, Ewa; Niewiadomska, Ewa

    2016-09-01

    Sirtuins are evolutionarily conserved nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent lysine deacylases or ADP-ribosyltransferases. These cellular enzymes are metabolic sensors sensitive to NAD(+) levels that maintain physiological homeostasis in the animal and plant cells. PMID:27154583

  9. Orm family proteins mediate sphingolipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breslow, David K; Collins, Sean R; Bodenmiller, Bernd;

    2010-01-01

    expression or mutations to their phosphorylation sites cause dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolism. Our work identifies the Orm proteins as critical mediators of sphingolipid homeostasis and raises the possibility that sphingolipid misregulation contributes to the development of childhood asthma....

  10. Leptin therapy, insulin sensitivity, and glucose homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Gilberto Paz-Filho; Claudio Mastronardi; Ma-Li Wong; Julio Licinio

    2012-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis is closely regulated not only by insulin, but also by leptin. Both hormones act centrally, regulating food intake and adiposity in humans. Leptin has several effects on the glucose-insulin homeostasis, some of which are independent of body weight and adiposity. Those effects of leptin are determined centrally in the hypothalamus and peripherally in the pancreas, muscles and liver. Leptin has beneficial effects on the glucose-insulin metabolism, by decreasing glycemia, insu...

  11. Iron Regulatory Proteins Control a Mucosal Block to Intestinal Iron Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Galy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated “mucosal block.” We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin “mucosal block” and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  12. Influence of whole-body irradiation on calcium and phosphate homeostasis in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous irradiation studies have revealed marked alterations in calcium metabolism. Moreover, the maintenance of calcium homeostasis with parathyroid hormone or calcium salts has been reported to reduce radiation lethality. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the influence of irradiation on calcium homeostasis in the rat. Nine hundred rad of whole-body irradiation produced a significant depression of both plasma calcium and phosphate at 4 days postirradiation. This effect of irradiation was observed to be dose-dependent over a range of 600 to 1200 rad, and possibly related to irradiation-induced anorexia. The physiological significance of these observations is discussed

  13. Impact of metal ion homeostasis of genetically modified Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and K12 (W3110) strains on colonization properties in the murine intestinal tract

    OpenAIRE

    Kupz, Andreas; Fischer, André; Nies, Dietrich H.; Grass, Gregor; Göbel, Ulf B.; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2013-01-01

    Metal ions are integral parts of pro- as well as eukaryotic cell homeostasis. Escherichia coli proved a valuable in vitro model organism to elucidate essential mechanisms involved in uptake, storage, and export of metal ions. Given that E. coli Nissle 1917 is able to overcome murine colonization resistance, we generated several E. coli Nissle 1917 mutants with defects in zinc, iron, copper, nickel, manganese homeostasis and performed a comprehensive survey of the impact of m...

  14. Prenatal inflammation-induced hypoferremia alters dopamine function in the adult offspring in rat: relevance for schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argel Aguilar-Valles

    Full Text Available Maternal infection during pregnancy has been associated with increased incidence of schizophrenia in the adult offspring. Mechanistically, this has been partially attributed to neurodevelopmental disruption of the dopamine neurons, as a consequence of exacerbated maternal immunity. In the present study we sought to target hypoferremia, a cytokine-induced reduction of serum non-heme iron, which is common to all types of infections. Adequate iron supply to the fetus is fundamental for the development of the mesencephalic dopamine neurons and disruption of this following maternal infection can affect the offspring's dopamine function. Using a rat model of localized injury induced by turpentine, which triggers the innate immune response and inflammation, we investigated the effects of maternal iron supplementation on the offspring's dopamine function by assessing behavioral responses to acute and repeated administration of the dopamine indirect agonist, amphetamine. In addition we measured protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase, and tissue levels of dopamine and its metabolites, in ventral tegmental area, susbtantia nigra, nucleus accumbens, dorsal striatum and medial prefrontal cortex. Offspring of turpentine-treated mothers exhibited greater responses to a single amphetamine injection and enhanced behavioral sensitization following repeated exposure to this drug, when compared to control offspring. These behavioral changes were accompanied by increased baseline levels of tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine and its metabolites, selectively in the nucleus accumbens. Both, the behavioral and neurochemical changes were prevented by maternal iron supplementation. Localized prenatal inflammation induced a deregulation in iron homeostasis, which resulted in fundamental alterations in dopamine function and behavioral alterations in the adult offspring. These changes are characteristic of schizophrenia symptoms in humans.

  15. The reproductive ecology of iron in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive ecology focuses on the sensitivity of human reproduction to environmental variation. While reproductive ecology has historically focused on the relationship between energy status and reproductive outcomes, iron status is equally critical to women's reproductive health, given the wide-ranging detrimental effects of iron-deficiency anemia on maternal and infant well-being. This review interprets the vast literature on iron status and women's reproduction through an evolutionary framework. First, it will critique the evidence for iron deficiency caused by blood loss during menstruation, reinterpreting the available data as ecological variation in menses within and between populations of women. Second, it will highlight the scant but growing evidence that iron status is implicated in fertility, a relationship that has deep evolutionary roots. Third, this review proposes a new hypothesis for the transfer of iron from mother to infant via pregnancy and breastfeeding: reproductive iron withholding. In this hypothesis, mothers transfer iron to infants in a manner that helps infants avoid iron-mediated infection and oxidative stress, but trades off with potential risk of maternal and infant iron deficiency. Finally, this review explores two main factors that can modify the relationship between iron status and the gestation-lactation cycle: (1) the relationship between long-term reproductive effort (parity) and iron status and (2) supplementation schemes before and during pregnancy. The review concludes by suggesting continued research into iron homeostasis in women using evolutionary, ecological, and biocultural frameworks. Am J Phys Anthropol 159:S172-S195, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26808104

  16. Iron load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Cassarà

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research addressed the main role of hepcidin in the regulation of iron metabolism. However, while this mechanism could be relevant in causing iron load in Thalassemia Intermedia and Sickle-Cell Anemia, its role in Thalassemia Major (TM is marginal. This is mainly due to the high impact of transfusional requirement into the severe increase of body iron. Moreover, the damage of iron load may be worsened by infections, as HCV hepatitis, or liver and endocrinological damage. One of the most relevant associations was found between splenectomy and increase of risk for mortality due,probably, to more severe iron load. These issues suggest as morbidity and mortality of this group of patients they do not depend only by our ability in controlling heart damage but even in preventing or treating particular infections and complications. This finding is supported by the impairment of survival curves in patients with complications different from heart damage. However, because, during recent years different direct and indirect methods to detect iron overload in patients affected by secondary hemochromatosis have been implemented, our ability to maintain under control iron load is significantly improved. Anyway, the future in iron load management remains to be able to have an iron load map of our body for targeting chelation and other medical treatment according to the single organ damage.

  17. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES...... understand iron metabolism in elderly HF patients....

  18. Hepcidin in human iron disorders: diagnostic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Kroot, J.J.C.; Tjalsma, H.; Fleming, R E; Swinkels, D. W.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The peptide hormone hepcidin plays a central role in regulating dietary iron absorption and body iron distribution. Many human diseases are associated with alterations in hepcidin concentrations. The measurement of hepcidin in biological fluids is therefore a promising tool in the diagnosis and management of medical conditions in which iron metabolism is affected. CONTENT: We describe hepcidin structure, kinetics, function, and regulation. We moreover explore the therapeutic poten...

  19. Iron-dependent regulation of hepcidin in Hjv-/- mice: evidence that hemojuvelin is dispensable for sensing body iron levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Gkouvatsos

    Full Text Available Hemojuvelin (Hjv is a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP co-receptor involved in the control of systemic iron homeostasis. Functional inactivation of Hjv leads to severe iron overload in humans and mice due to marked suppression of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. To investigate the role of Hjv in body iron sensing, Hjv-/- mice and isogenic wild type controls were placed on a moderately low, a standard or a high iron diet for four weeks. Hjv-/- mice developed systemic iron overload under all regimens. Transferrin (Tf was highly saturated regardless of the dietary iron content, while liver iron deposition was proportional to it. Hepcidin mRNA expression responded to fluctuations in dietary iron intake, despite the absence of Hjv. Nevertheless, iron-dependent upregulation of hepcidin was more than an order of magnitude lower compared to that seen in wild type controls. Likewise, iron signaling via the BMP/Smad pathway was preserved but substantially attenuated. These findings suggest that Hjv is not required for sensing of body iron levels and merely functions as an enhancer for iron signaling to hepcidin.

  20. [Iron deficiency in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Tuur; Joosten, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common diagnosis in the geriatric population, especially in institutionalized and hospitalized elderly. Most common etiologies for anemia in elderly people admitted to a geriatric ward are iron-deficiency anemia and anemia associated with chronic disease.Determination of serum ferritin is the most used assay in the differential diagnosis, despite low sensitivity and moderate specificity. New insights into iron homeostasis lead to new diagnostic assays such as serum hepcidin, serum transferrin receptor and reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent.Importance of proper diagnosis and treatment for this population is large since there is a correlation between anemia and morbidity - mortality. Anemia is usually defined as hemoglobin less than 12 g/dl for women and less than 13 g/dl for men. There is no consensus for which hemoglobinvalue an investigation into underlying pathology is obligatory. This needs to be evaluated depending on functional condition of the patient. PMID:27106490

  1. Telomere homeostasis in mammalian germ cells: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig-Viader, Rita; Garcia-Caldés, Montserrat; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2016-06-01

    Telomeres protect against genome instability and participate in chromosomal movements during gametogenesis, especially in meiosis. Thus, maintaining telomere structure and telomeric length is essential to both cell integrity and the production of germ cells. As a result, alteration of telomere homeostasis in the germ line may result in the generation of aneuploid gametes or gametogenesis disruption, triggering fertility problems. In this work, we provide an overview on fundamental aspects of the literature regarding the organization of telomeres in mammalian germ cells, paying special attention to telomere structure and function, as well as the maintenance of telomeric length during gametogenesis. Moreover, we discuss the different roles recently described for telomerase and TERRA in maintaining telomere functionality. Finally, we review how new findings in the field of reproductive biology underscore the role of telomere homeostasis as a potential biomarker for infertility. Overall, we anticipate that the study of telomere stability and equilibrium will contribute to improve diagnoses of patients; assess the risk of infertility in the offspring; and in turn, find new treatments. PMID:26525972

  2. Leptin therapy, insulin sensitivity, and glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Paz-Filho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose homeostasis is closely regulated not only by insulin, but also by leptin. Both hormones act centrally, regulating food intake and adiposity in humans. Leptin has several effects on the glucose-insulin homeostasis, some of which are independent of body weight and adiposity. Those effects of leptin are determined centrally in the hypothalamus and peripherally in the pancreas, muscles and liver. Leptin has beneficial effects on the glucose-insulin metabolism, by decreasing glycemia, insulinemia and insulin resistance. The understanding of the effects of leptin on the glucose-insulin homeostasis will lead to the development of leptin-based therapies against diabetes and other insulin resistance syndromes. In these review, we summarize the interactions between leptin and insulin, and their effects on the glucose metabolism.

  3. Melanocortin-4 receptor-regulated energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krashes, Michael J; Lowell, Bradford B; Garfield, Alastair S

    2016-02-01

    The melanocortin system provides a conceptual blueprint for the central control of energetic state. Defined by four principal molecular components--two antagonistically acting ligands and two cognate receptors--this phylogenetically conserved system serves as a prototype for hierarchical energy balance regulation. Over the last decade the application of conditional genetic techniques has facilitated the neuroanatomical dissection of the melanocortinergic network and identified the specific neural substrates and circuits that underscore the regulation of feeding behavior, energy expenditure, glucose homeostasis and autonomic outflow. In this regard, the melanocortin-4 receptor is a critical coordinator of mammalian energy homeostasis and body weight. Drawing on recent advances in neuroscience and genetic technologies, we consider the structure and function of the melanocortin-4 receptor circuitry and its role in energy homeostasis. PMID:26814590

  4. Iron biology, immunology, aging and obesity: four fields connected by the small peptide hormone, hepcidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is well-known that obesity and aging have a negative impact on iron status and immune response, but little is known about the additional impact that obesity may have on iron homeostasis and immunity in the elderly. This question is relevant given the rising numbers of elderly obese individuals a...

  5. Elevated systemic hepcidin and iron depletion in obese pre-menopausal females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepcidin, the body’s main regulator of systemic iron homeostasis, is unregulated in response to inflammation, and is thought to play a role in the manifestation of iron deficiency (ID) observed in obese populations. We determined systemic hepcidin levels and its association with body mass, inflammat...

  6. The effect of iron limitation on the transcriptome and proteome of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the transcriptomic and proteomic effects of iron limitation on Pf-5 by employing microarray and iTRAQ techniques, respectively. Analysis of this data revealed that molecular elements involved in iron homeostasis, including the pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin biosynthesis clusters a...

  7. Methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS)-based silica-iron oxide superhydrophobic nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadargi, Digambar; Gurav, Jyoti; Marioni, Miguel A; Romer, Sara; Matam, Santhosh; Koebel, Matthias M

    2015-12-01

    We report a facile synthesis of superhydrophobic silica-iron oxide nanocomposites via a co-precursor sol-gel process. The choice of the silica precursor (Methyltrimethoxysilane, MTMS) in combination with iron nitrate altered the pore structure dramatically. The influence of iron oxide doping on the structural properties of pristine MTMS aerogel is discussed. PMID:26277744

  8. ROS homeostasis and metabolism: a dangerous liason in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panieri, E; Santoro, M M

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells harbor genetic alterations that promote a continuous and elevated production of reactive oxygen species. Whereas such oxidative stress conditions would be harmful to normal cells, they facilitate tumor growth in multiple ways by causing DNA damage and genomic instability, and ultimately, by reprogramming cancer cell metabolism. This review outlines the metabolic-dependent mechanisms that tumors engage in when faced with oxidative stress conditions that are critical for cancer progression by producing redox cofactors. In particular, we describe how the mitochondria has a key role in regulating the interplay between redox homeostasis and metabolism within tumor cells. Last, we will discuss the potential therapeutic use of agents that directly or indirectly block metabolism. PMID:27277675

  9. [Epithelial cell in intestinal homeostasis and inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouiten-Mekki, Lilia; Serghini, Meriem; Fekih, Monia; Kallel, Lamia; Matri, Samira; Ben Mustapha, Nadia; Boubaker, Jalel; Filali, Azza

    2013-12-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the principal inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) which physiopathology is currently poorly elucidated. During these diseases, the participation of the epithelial cell in the installation and the perpetuation of the intestinal inflammation is now clearly implicated. In fact, the intestinal epithelium located at the interface between the internal environment and the intestinal luminal, is key to the homeostatic regulation of the intestinal barrier. This barrier can schematically be regarded as being three barriers in one: a physical, chemical and immune barrier. The barrier function of epithelial cell can be altered by various mechanisms as occurs in IBD. The goal of this article is to review the literature on the role of the epithelial cell in intestinal homeostasis and its implication in the IBD. PMID:24356146

  10. Red Meat, Dietary Heme Iron, and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: The Involvement of Advanced Lipoxidation Endproducts12

    OpenAIRE

    White, Desley L.; Collinson, Avril

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence of disordered iron homeostasis in the diabetic condition, with links proposed between dietary iron intakes and both the risk of disease and the risk of complications of advanced disease. In the United States, Britain, and Canada, the largest dietary contributors of iron are cereals and cereal products and meat and meat products. This review discusses the findings of cohort studies and meta-analyses of heme iron and red meat intakes and the risk of type 2 diabetes. Th...

  11. Heterozygous Mutations in BMP6 Pro-peptide Lead to Inappropriate Hepcidin Synthesis and Moderate Iron Overload in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Daher, Raed; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Houamel, Dounia; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Bardou-Jacquet, Edouard; Ducrot, Nicolas; Kerguenec, Caroline,; Jouanolle, Anne-Marie; Robreau, Anne-Marie; Oudin, Claire; Le Gac, Gerald; Moulouel, Boualem; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Bedossa, Pierre; Valla, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Hereditary hemochromatosis is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders characterized by parenchymal iron overload. It is caused by defective expression of liver hepcidin, the main regulator of iron homeostasis. Iron stimulates the gene encoding (HAMP) hepcidin via the BMP6 signaling to SMAD. Although several genetic factors have been found to cause late-onset hemochromatosis, many patients have unexplained signs of iron overload. We investigated BMP6 function in these indi...

  12. Dysregulation of bile acid homeostasis in parenteral nutrition mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Le; Yang, Ill; Kong, Bo; Shen, Jianliang; Gorczyca, Ludwik; Memon, Naureen; Buckley, Brian T; Guo, Grace L

    2016-01-15

    Long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) administration can lead to PN-associated liver diseases (PNALD). Although multiple risk factors have been identified for PNALD, to date, the roles of bile acids (BAs) and the pathways involved in BA homeostasis in the development and progression of PNALD are still unclear. We have established a mouse PN model with IV infusion of PN solution containing soybean oil-based lipid emulsion (SOLE). Our results showed that PN altered the expression of genes involved in a variety of liver functions at the mRNA levels. PN increased liver gene expression of Cyp7a1 and markedly decreased that of Cyp8b1, Cyp7b1, Bsep, and Shp. CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 are important for synthesizing the total amount of BAs and regulating the hydrophobicity of BAs, respectively. Consistently, both the levels and the percentages of primary BAs as well as total non-12α-OH BAs increased significantly in the serum of PN mice compared with saline controls, whereas liver BA profiles were largely similar. The expression of several key liver-X receptor-α (LXRα) target genes involved in lipid synthesis was also increased in PN mouse livers. Retinoid acid-related orphan receptor-α (RORα) has been shown to induce the expression of Cyp8b1 and Cyp7b1, as well as to suppress LXRα function. Western blot showed significantly reduced nuclear migration of RORα protein in PN mouse livers. This study shows that continuous PN infusion with SOLE in mice leads to dysregulation of BA homeostasis. Alterations of liver RORα signaling in PN mice may be one of the mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of PNALD. PMID:26564717

  13. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    We live in an oxidized world: oxygen makes up 22 percent of the atmosphere and by reacting with organic matter produces most of our energy, including the energy our bodies use to function: breathe, think, move, etc. It has not always been thus. Originally the Earth, in common with most of the Solar...... System, was reduced. The oxidized outer layers of the Earth have formed by two processes. Firstly, water is decomposed to oxygen and hydrogen by solar radiation in the upper parts of the atmosphere, the light hydrogen diffusing to space, leaving oxygen behind. Secondly, plants, over the course of...... situation unique in the Solar System. In such a world, iron metal is unstable and, as we all know, oxidizes to the ferric iron compounds we call 'rust'. If we require iron metal it must be produced at high temperatures by reacting iron ore, usually a mixture of ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) oxides (Fe2O3...

  14. Metabolic Alterations Associated to Brain Dysfunction in Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    João M N Duarte

    2015-01-01

    From epidemiological studies it is known that diabetes patients display increased risk of developing dementia. Moreover, cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are also accompanied by impaired glucose homeostasis and insulin signalling. Although there is plenty of evidence for a connection between insulin-resistant diabetes and AD, definitive linking mechanisms remain elusive. Cerebrovascular complications of diabetes, alterations in glucose homeostasis and insulin signalling, as w...

  15. Redox Homeostasis in Pancreatic beta Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Petr; Dlasková, Andrea; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 2012 (2012), s. 932838. ISSN 1942-0900 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/10/P204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : beta cells * reactive oxygen species homeostasis * mitochondria Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.393, year: 2012

  16. [The role of iron as a deficient element].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schümann, K

    1989-12-01

    Iron is an essential trace element. In its heme-form as well as in its non heme-form it is a part of enzymes and hemoproteins. For a safe and adequate dietary intake 10-18 mg of iron are recommended daily. Frequently, this quantity is not available: approximately 20% of the world population is iron-deficient. In this state the enteral transfer capacity for toxic metals, e.g., Cd and Pb, is increased and the adaptation to physical strain as well as the immunological responses are depressed. Alterations of body iron-stores are almost exclusively balanced by adequate adaptation of the enteral iron-transfer capacity. The mechanism of this adaptation process can neither be satisfactorily explained by the "mucosal block hypothesis", nor by the "mucosal transferrin hypothesis". When the time-course of iron storage and its relation to intestinal iron transfer was investigated after i.v. iron administration to iron-deficient rats, the results indicated that the process of adaptation is located in the intestinal mucosa. Intestinal iron loading is decreased in iron deficiency, whereas the iron transfer into the organism is increased. Further investigation is necessary to find out by which mechanism the iron manages to bypass existing mucosal storage capacity in this situation. The geographical distribution of iron deficiency is influenced by a variety of local factors. Still, the paramount causes of iron-deficiency are unbalanced iron losses and the lack of bioavailable iron in the diet. The bioavailability of non heme iron is influenced by the composition of the diet. The effect of promotors of iron absorption, such as meat, amino acids, polycarbonic acids and ascorbate is opposed by the influence of inhibitors, such as bran, soya products, vegetables and egg-dishes. Iron losses are mainly due to blood losses. Thus, the wide distribution of hookworm diseases in tropical areas contributes significantly to the endemic iron-deficiency in these regions. A more physiological loss

  17. Targeting one carbon metabolism with an antimetabolite disrupts pyrimidine homeostasis and induces nucleotide overflow

    OpenAIRE

    Ser, Zheng; GAO, XIA; Johnson, Christelle; Mehrmohamadi, Mahya; Liu, Xiaojing; Li, SiQi; Locasale, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-metabolite agents that affect nucleotide metabolism are frontline chemotherapy agents in several cancers and often successfully target one carbon metabolism. However, the precise mechanisms and resulting determinants of their therapeutic value are unknown. We show that 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a commonly used anti-metabolite therapeutic with varying efficacy, induces specific alterations to nucleotide metabolism by disrupting pyrimidine homeostasis. An integrative metabolomics analysis of ...

  18. Brown Adipose Tissue Improves Whole-Body Glucose Homeostasis and Insulin Sensitivity in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Chondronikola, Maria; Volpi, Elena; Børsheim, Elisabet; Porter, Craig; Annamalai, Palam; Enerbäck, Sven; Lidell, Martin E.; Saraf, Manish K.; Sebastien M Labbe; Hurren, Nicholas M; Yfanti, Christina; Chao, Tony; Andersen, Clark R.; Cesani, Fernando; Hawkins, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has attracted scientific interest as an antidiabetic tissue owing to its ability to dissipate energy as heat. Despite a plethora of data concerning the role of BAT in glucose metabolism in rodents, the role of BAT (if any) in glucose metabolism in humans remains unclear. To investigate whether BAT activation alters whole-body glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in humans, we studied seven BAT-positive (BAT+) men and five BAT-negative (BAT−) men under thermon...

  19. Rare variants in calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1 found in early onset Alzheimer's disease patients alter calcium homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Rubio-Moscardo

    Full Text Available Calcium signaling in the brain is fundamental to the learning and memory process and there is evidence to suggest that its dysfunction is involved in the pathological pathways underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD. Recently, the calcium hypothesis of AD has received support with the identification of the non-selective Ca(2+-permeable channel CALHM1. A genetic polymorphism (p. P86L in CALHM1 reduces plasma membrane Ca(2+ permeability and is associated with an earlier age-at-onset of AD. To investigate the role of CALHM1 variants in early-onset AD (EOAD, we sequenced all CALHM1 coding regions in three independent series comprising 284 EOAD patients and 326 controls. Two missense mutations in patients (p.G330D and p.R154H and one (p.A213T in a control individual were identified. Calcium imaging analyses revealed that while the mutation found in a control (p.A213T behaved as wild-type CALHM1 (CALHM1-WT, a complete abolishment of the Ca(2+ influx was associated with the mutations found in EOAD patients (p.G330D and p.R154H. Notably, the previously reported p. P86L mutation was associated with an intermediate Ca(2+ influx between the CALHM1-WT and the p.G330D and p.R154H mutations. Since neither expression of wild-type nor mutant CALHM1 affected amyloid ß-peptide (Aß production or Aß-mediated cellular toxicity, we conclude that rare genetic variants in CALHM1 lead to Ca(2+ dysregulation and may contribute to the risk of EOAD through a mechanism independent from the classical Aß cascade.

  20. Biting the Iron Bullet: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Adds the Pain of Hepcidin to Chronic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Messner, Donald J.; Kowdley, Kris V.

    2010-01-01

    Hepcidin is a peptide hormone that is secreted by the liver and controls body iron homeostasis. Hepcidin overproduction causes anemia of inflammation, whereas its deficiency leads to hemochromatosis. Inflammation and iron are known extracellular stimuli for hepcidin expression. We found that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress also induces hepcidin expression and causes hypoferremia and spleen iron sequestration in mice. CREBH (cyclic AMP response element-binding protein H), an ER stress-activa...

  1. Iron transferrin regulates hepcidin synthesis in primary hepatocyte culture through hemojuvelin and BMP2/4

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Lan; Valore, Erika V.; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Goodnough, Julia B; Gabayan, Victoria; Ganz, Tomas

    2007-01-01

    The peptide hormone hepcidin is the principal regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. We examined the pathway by which iron stimulates the production of hepcidin. In humans who ingested 65 mg of iron, the increase in transferrin saturation preceded by hours the increase in urinary hepcidin excretion. Increases in urinary hepcidin concentrations were proportional to the increment in transferrin saturation. Paradoxically, in previous studies in primary hepatocytes and cell lines, hepcidin respo...

  2. Iron disorders of genetic origin: a changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissot, Pierre; Bardou-Jacquet, Edouard; Jouanolle, Anne-Marie; Loréal, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    Iron disorders of genetic origin are mainly composed of iron overload diseases, the most frequent being HFE-related hemochromatosis. Hepcidin deficiency underlies iron overload in HFE-hemochromatosis as well as in several other genetic iron excess disorders, such as hemojuvelin or hepcidin-related hemochromatosis and transferrin receptor 2-related hemochromatosis. Deficiency of ferroportin, the only known cellular protein iron exporter, produces iron overload in the typical form of ferroportin disease. By contrast, genetically enhanced hepcidin production, as observed in matriptase-2 deficiency, generates iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia. Diagnosis of these iron storage disorders is usually established noninvasively through combined biochemical, imaging and genetic approaches. Moreover, improved knowledge of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the variations of iron stores opens the way of novel therapeutic approaches aiming to restore normal iron homeostasis. In this review, we will summarize recent findings about these various genetic entities that have been identified owing to an exemplary interplay between clinicians and basic scientists. PMID:21862411

  3. Adaptation of iron requirement to hypoxic conditions at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassmann, Max; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2015-12-15

    Adequate acclimatization time to enable adjustment to hypoxic conditions is one of the most important aspects for mountaineers ascending to high altitude. Accordingly, most reviews emphasize mechanisms that cope with reduced oxygen supply. However, during sojourns to high altitude adjustment to elevated iron demand is equally critical. Thus in this review we focus on the interaction between oxygen and iron homeostasis. We review the role of iron 1) in the oxygen sensing process and erythropoietin (Epo) synthesis, 2) in gene expression control mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor-2 (HIF-2), and 3) as an oxygen carrier in hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochromes. The blood hormone Epo that is abundantly expressed by the kidney under hypoxic conditions stimulates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow, a process requiring high iron levels. To ensure that sufficient iron is provided, Epo-controlled erythroferrone that is expressed in erythroid precursor cells acts in the liver to reduce expression of the iron hormone hepcidin. Consequently, suppression of hepcidin allows for elevated iron release from storage organs and enhanced absorption of dietary iron by enterocytes. As recently observed in sojourners at high altitude, however, iron uptake may be hampered by reduced appetite and gastrointestinal bleeding. Reduced iron availability, as observed in a hypoxic mountaineer, enhances hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and may contribute to other hypoxia-related diseases. Overall, adequate systemic iron availability is an important prerequisite to adjust to high-altitude hypoxia and may have additional implications for disease-related hypoxic conditions. PMID:26183475

  4. ROS Homeostasis Regulates Somatic Embryogenesis via the Regulation of Auxin Signaling in Cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting; Yang, Xiyan; Guo, Kai; Deng, Jinwu; Xu, Jiao; Gao, Wenhui; Lindsey, Keith; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-06-01

    Somatic embryogenesis (S.E.) is a versatile model for understanding the mechanisms of plant embryogenesis and a useful tool for plant propagation. To decipher the intricate molecular program and potentially to control the parameters affecting the frequency of S.E., a proteomics approach based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with MALDI-TOF/TOF was used. A total of 149 unique differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were identified at different stages of cotton S.E. compared with the initial control (0 h explants). The expression profile and functional annotation of these DEPs revealed that S.E. activated stress-related proteins, including several reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging enzymes. Proteins implicated in metabolic, developmental, and reproductive processes were also identified. Further experiments were performed to confirm the role of ROS-scavenging enzymes, suggesting the involvement of ROS homeostasis during S.E. in cotton. Suppressing the expression of specifically identified GhAPX proteins resulted in the inhibition of dedifferentiation. Accelerated redifferentiation was observed in the suppression lines of GhAPXs or GhGSTL3 in parallel with the alteration of endogenous ascorbate metabolism and accumulation of endogenous H2O2 content. Moreover, disrupting endogenous redox homeostasis through the application of high concentrations of DPI, H2O2, BSO, or GSH inhibited the dedifferentiation of cotton explants. Mild oxidation induced through BSO treatment facilitated the transition from embryogenic calluses (ECs) to somatic embryos. Meanwhile, auxin homeostasis was altered through the perturbation of ROS homeostasis by chemical treatments or suppression of ROS-scavenging proteins, along with the activating/suppressing the transcription of genes related to auxin transportation and signaling. These results show that stress responses are activated during S.E. and may regulate the ROS homeostasis by interacting with auxin signaling

  5. HERC2 targets the iron regulator FBXL5 for degradation and modulates iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroishi, Toshiro; Yamauchi, Takayoshi; Nishiyama, Masaaki; Nakayama, Keiichi I

    2014-06-01

    FBXL5 (F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5) is the F-box protein subunit of, and therefore responsible for substrate recognition by, the SCF(FBXL5) ubiquitin-ligase complex, which targets iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) for proteasomal degradation. IRP2 plays a central role in the maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis in mammals through posttranscriptional regulation of proteins that contribute to control of the intracellular iron concentration. The FBXL5-IRP2 axis is integral to control of iron metabolism in vivo, given that mice lacking FBXL5 die during early embryogenesis as a result of unrestrained IRP2 activity and oxidative stress attributable to excessive iron accumulation. Despite its pivotal role in the control of iron homeostasis, however, little is known of the upstream regulation of FBXL5 activity. We now show that FBXL5 undergoes constitutive ubiquitin-dependent degradation at the steady state. With the use of a proteomics approach to the discovery of proteins that regulate the stability of FBXL5, we identified the large HECT-type ubiquitin ligase HERC2 (HECT and RLD domain containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 2) as an FBXL5-associated protein. Inhibition of the HERC2-FBXL5 interaction or depletion of endogenous HERC2 by RNA interference resulted in the stabilization of FBXL5 and a consequent increase in its abundance. Such accumulation of FBXL5 in turn led to a decrease in the intracellular content of ferrous iron. Our results thus suggest that HERC2 regulates the basal turnover of FBXL5, and that this ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway contributes to the control of mammalian iron metabolism. PMID:24778179

  6. Structural and functional characterization of the bacterial ferrous homeostasis protein FeoA

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Vanessa Cristina de Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    O objectivo deste trabalho intitulado ““Structural and functional characterization of the bacterial ferrous homeostasis protein FeoA” consistiu na determinação da estrutura e função da proteína FeoA da bacteria E.coli. A principal via bacteriana de entrada do ferro ferroso é através do sistema Feo que deriva das palavras inglesas ferrous iron transport. O ferro é um elemento essencial para a maioria dos organismos participando em vias metabólicas essenciais. Os sistemas de importação ...

  7. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron and Your Child KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron and ... enough iron in their daily diets. How Much Iron Do Kids Need? Kids require different amounts of ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, ... iron supplements and multivitamins to improve her iron levels. Susan also made changes to her diet, such ...

  9. Role of Inflammation in Muscle Homeostasis and Myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costamagna, Domiziana; Costelli, Paola; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Penna, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mass is subject to rapid changes according to growth stimuli inducing both hypertrophy, through increased protein synthesis, and hyperplasia, activating the myogenic program. Muscle wasting, characteristic of several pathological states associated with local or systemic inflammation, has been for long considered to rely on the alteration of myofiber intracellular pathways regulated by both hormones and cytokines, eventually leading to impaired anabolism and increased protein breakdown. However, there are increasing evidences that even alterations of the myogenic/regenerative program play a role in the onset of muscle wasting, even though the precise mechanisms involved are far from being fully elucidated. The comprehension of the links potentially occurring between impaired myogenesis and increased catabolism would allow the definition of effective strategies aimed at counteracting muscle wasting. The first part of this review gives an overview of skeletal muscle intracellular pathways determining fiber size, while the second part considers the cells and the regulatory pathways involved in the myogenic program. In both parts are discussed the evidences supporting the role of inflammation in impairing muscle homeostasis and myogenesis, potentially determining muscle atrophy. PMID:26508819

  10. Transcranial electrical stimulation accelerates human sleep homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Reato

    Full Text Available The sleeping brain exhibits characteristic slow-wave activity which decays over the course of the night. This decay is thought to result from homeostatic synaptic downscaling. Transcranial electrical stimulation can entrain slow-wave oscillations (SWO in the human electro-encephalogram (EEG. A computational model of the underlying mechanism predicts that firing rates are predominantly increased during stimulation. Assuming that synaptic homeostasis is driven by average firing rates, we expected an acceleration of synaptic downscaling during stimulation, which is compensated by a reduced drive after stimulation. We show that 25 minutes of transcranial electrical stimulation, as predicted, reduced the decay of SWO in the remainder of the night. Anatomically accurate simulations of the field intensities on human cortex precisely matched the effect size in different EEG electrodes. Together these results suggest a mechanistic link between electrical stimulation and accelerated synaptic homeostasis in human sleep.

  11. Homeostasis as the Mechanism of Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Torday

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Homeostasis is conventionally thought of merely as a synchronic (same time servo-mechanism that maintains the status quo for organismal physiology. However, when seen from the perspective of developmental physiology, homeostasis is a robust, dynamic, intergenerational, diachronic (across-time mechanism for the maintenance, perpetuation and modification of physiologic structure and function. The integral relationships generated by cell-cell signaling for the mechanisms of embryogenesis, physiology and repair provide the needed insight to the scale-free universality of the homeostatic principle, offering a novel opportunity for a Systems approach to Biology. Starting with the inception of life itself, with the advent of reproduction during meiosis and mitosis, moving forward both ontogenetically and phylogenetically through the evolutionary steps involved in adaptation to an ever-changing environment, Biology and Evolution Theory need no longer default to teleology.

  12. Homeostasis as the Mechanism of Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torday, John S

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis is conventionally thought of merely as a synchronic (same time) servo-mechanism that maintains the status quo for organismal physiology. However, when seen from the perspective of developmental physiology, homeostasis is a robust, dynamic, intergenerational, diachronic (across-time) mechanism for the maintenance, perpetuation and modification of physiologic structure and function. The integral relationships generated by cell-cell signaling for the mechanisms of embryogenesis, physiology and repair provide the needed insight to the scale-free universality of the homeostatic principle, offering a novel opportunity for a Systems approach to Biology. Starting with the inception of life itself, with the advent of reproduction during meiosis and mitosis, moving forward both ontogenetically and phylogenetically through the evolutionary steps involved in adaptation to an ever-changing environment, Biology and Evolution Theory need no longer default to teleology. PMID:26389962

  13. The Commensal Microbiota Drives Immune Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Arrieta, Marie-Claire; Finlay, Barton Brett

    2012-01-01

    For millions of years, microbes have coexisted with eukaryotic cells at the mucosal surfaces of vertebrates in a complex, yet usually harmonious symbiosis. An ever-expanding number of reports describe how eliminating or shifting the intestinal microbiota has profound effects on the development and functionality of the mucosal and systemic immune systems. Here, we examine some of the mechanisms by which bacterial signals affect immune homeostasis. Focusing on the strategies that microbes use t...

  14. Thiol redox homeostasis in neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gethin J. McBean

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This review provides an overview of the biochemistry of thiol redox couples and the significance of thiol redox homeostasis in neurodegenerative disease. The discussion is centred on cysteine/cystine redox balance, the significance of the xc− cystine–glutamate exchanger and the association between protein thiol redox balance and neurodegeneration, with particular reference to Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and glaucoma. The role of thiol disulphide oxidoreductases in providing neuroprotection is also discussed.

  15. Oxidative Stress and Autophagy in Cardiovascular Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Cyndi R.; Pedrozo, Zully; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient process of intracellular protein and organelle recycling required to maintain cellular homeostasis in the face of a wide variety of stresses. Dysregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) leads to oxidative damage. Both autophagy and ROS/RNS serve pathological or adaptive roles within cardiomyocytes, depending on the context. Recent Advances: ROS/RNS and autophagy communicate with each other via both tra...

  16. Recent Advances in Iron Metabolism: Relevance for Health, Exercise, and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Paolo; Gammella, Elena; Rybinska, Ilona; Cairo, Gaetano; Recalcati, Stefania

    2015-08-01

    Iron is necessary for physiological processes essential for athletic performance, such as oxygen transport, energy production, and cell division. However, an excess of "free" iron is toxic because it produces reactive hydroxyl radicals that damage biological molecules, thus leading to cell and tissue injury. Therefore, iron homeostasis is strictly regulated; and in recent years, there have been important advancements in our knowledge of the underlying processes. Hepcidin is the central regulator of systemic iron homeostasis and exerts its function by controlling the presence of the iron exporter ferroportin on the cell membrane. Hepcidin binding induces ferroportin degradation, thus leading to cellular iron retention and decreased levels of circulating iron. As iron is required for hemoglobin synthesis, the tight link between erythropoiesis and iron metabolism is particularly relevant to sports physiology. The iron needed for hemoglobin synthesis is ensured by inhibiting hepcidin to increase ferroportin activity and iron availability and hence to make certain that efficient blood oxygen transport occurs for aerobic exercise. However, hepcidin expression is also affected by exercise-associated conditions, such as iron deficiency, anemia or hypoxia, and, particularly, inflammation, which can play a role in the pathogenesis of sports anemia. Here, we review recent advances showing the relevance of iron for physical exercise and athletic performance. Low body iron levels can cause anemia and thus limit the delivery of oxygen to exercising muscle, but tissue iron deficiency may also affect performance by, for example, hampering muscle oxidative metabolism. Accordingly, a hemoglobin-independent effect of iron on exercise capacity has been demonstrated in animal models and humans. Here, we review recent advances showing the relevance of iron for physical exercise and athletic performance. PMID:25494391

  17. Regulation of energy homeostasis via GPR120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuhiko eIchimura

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Free fatty acids (FFAs are fundamental units of key nutrients. FFAs exert various biological functions, depending on the chain length and degree of desaturation. Recent studies have shown that several FFAs act as ligands of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, activate intracellular signaling and exert physiological functions via these GPCRs. GPR120 (also known as free fatty acid receptor 4, FFAR4 is activated by unsaturated medium- to long-chain FFAs and has a critical role in various physiological homeostasis mechanisms such as incretin hormone secretion, food preference, anti-inflammation and adipogenesis. Recent studies showed that a lipid sensor GPR120 has a key role in sensing dietary fat in white adipose tissue and regulates the whole body energy homeostasis in both humans and rodents. Genetic study in human identified the loss-of-functional mutation of GPR120 associated with obesity and insulin resistance. In addition, dysfunction of GPR120 has been linked as a novel risk factor for diet-induced obesity. This review aims to provide evidence from the recent development in physiological function of GPR120 and discusses its functional roles in regulation of energy homeostasis and its potential as drug targets.

  18. Effect of chromium (VI) exposure on antioxidant defense status and trace element homeostasis in acute experiment in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotyzová, Dana; Hodková, Anna; Bludovská, Monika; Eybl, Vladislav

    2015-11-01

    Occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) compounds is of concern in many Cr-related industries and their surrounding environment. Cr(VI) is a proven toxin and carcinogen. The Cr(VI) compounds are easily absorbed, can diffuse across cell membranes, and have strong oxidative potential. Despite intensive studies of Cr(VI) pro-oxidative effects, limited data exist on the influence of Cr(VI) on selenoenzymes thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-important components of antioxidant defense system. This study investigates the effect of Cr(VI) exposure on antioxidant defense status, with focus on these selenoenzymes, and on trace element homeostasis in an acute experiment in rat. Male Wistar rats (130-140g) were assigned to two groups of 8 animals: I. control; and II. Cr(VI) treated. The animals in Cr(VI) group were administered a single dose of K2Cr2O7 (20 mg /kg, intraperitoneally (ip)). The control group received saline solution. After 24 h, the animals were sacrificed and the liver and kidneys were examined for lipid peroxidation (LP; thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentration), the level of reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activities of GPx-1, TrxR-1, and glutathione reductase (GR). Samples of tissues were also used to estimate Cr accumulation and alterations in zinc, copper, and iron levels. The acute Cr(VI) exposure caused an increase in both hepatic and renal LP (by 70%, p effect of Cr(VI) was found on TrxR-1 activity in both the liver and the kidneys. The ability of Cr(VI) to cause TrxR inhibition could contribute to its cytotoxic effects. Further investigation of oxidative responses in different in vivo models may enable the development of strategies to protect against Cr(VI) oxidative damage. PMID:23625905

  19. Interaction of curcumin with manganese may compromise metal and neurotransmitter homeostasis in the hippocampus of young mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Ariana Ern; de Oliveira, Paulo Alexandre; de Souza, Luiz F; da Silva, Danilo Grünig Humberto; Danielski, Samara; Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Fisher, Andrew; Farina, Marcelo; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2014-06-01

    Manganese (Mn) exposure is related to industrial activities, where absorption by inhalation has high relevance. Manganism, a syndrome caused as a result of excessive accumulation of Mn in the central nervous system, has numerous symptoms similar to those seen in idiopathic Parkinson disease (IPD). Some of these symptoms, such as learning, memory, sensorial, and neurochemical changes, appear before the onset of motor deficits in both manganism and IPD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible neuroprotective effects of curcumin against behavioral deficits induced by Mn toxicity in young (2 months old) Swiss mice. We evaluated the effect of chronic inhalation of a Mn mixture [Mn(OAc)3 and MnCl2 (20:40 mM)], 1 h/session, three times a week, over a 14-week period on behavioral and neurochemical parameters. Curcumin was supplemented in the diet (500 or 1,500 ppm in food pellets). The Mn disrupted the motor performance evaluated in the single-pellet reach task, as well as the short- and long-term spatial memory evaluated in the step-down inhibitory avoidance task. Surprisingly, curcumin also produced similar deleterious effects in such behavioral tests. Moreover, the association of Mn plus curcumin significantly increased the levels of Mn and iron, and decreased the levels of dopamine and serotonin in the hippocampus. These alterations were not observed in the striatum. In conclusion, the current Mn treatment protocol resulted in mild deficits in motor and memory functions, resembling the early phases of IPD. Additionally, curcumin showed no beneficial effects against Mn-induced disruption of hippocampal metal and neurotransmitter homeostasis. PMID:24723215

  20. Glucose homeostasis in Egyptian children and adolescents with β-Thalassemia major: Relationship to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotb Abbass Metwalley

    2014-01-01

    alteration in oxidant-antioxidant status and increase in insulin resistance. Recommendation: 1- Glucose tolerance tests, HOMA-IR, and MDA should be an integral part of the long-term follow-up of children and adolescents with β-thalassemia major. 2- Regular iron chelation and antioxidant therapy should be advised for thalassemic patients to improve glucose hemostasis.

  1. Metformin regulates glycemic homeostasis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus as an NO donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Sergeevich Kuznetsov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the influence of metformin on nitric oxide bioavailability in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM regarding glycemic homeostasis, and to investigate a correlation between metformin dosage and NO levels in vivo.Materials and Methods. Two groups – primary and control – were assembled for the clinical section of this study. Patients with newly diagnosed T2DM on metformin therapy were included to the primary group, while drug-naïve T2DM patients were enrolled as control subjects. Glycemic parameters and NO bioavailability was tested in both groups prior to and after the follow-up period. Experimental section was dedicated to the elucidation of potential dose-dependent effects of metformin on NO bioavailability. Mice were intraperitoneally infused with metformin at 0.5; 1.1; 5.6 mg per subject. Tissue detection of NO was performed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DETC iron complexes to form mononitrosyl iron compounds (MIC with paramagnetic properties. Control rodents were intraperitoneally infused with metformin without spin trapping.Results. We found nitrite and methaemoglobin (a marker for NO bioavailability to increase in parallel along with glycemic compensation in the primary but not control group. In vivo rodent models showed linear correlation between accumulation of DETC/MIC and dose of metformin, as well as formation of dinitrosyl iron complexes, known as endogenous NO transporters.Conclusion. Our data suggests that metformin benefits glycemic homeostasis in T2DM as an NO donor via formation of dinitrosyl iron complexes.

  2. The Application of Spectral Characteristic Space Method to the Alteration Information Extraction of Lake Superior-Type Iron Deposit%基于光谱特征空间的苏必利尔湖型铁矿高光谱遥感蚀变信息提取方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄爽; 陈圣波; 周超; 査逢丽; 路鹏; 黄唯实

    2015-01-01

    The field study of overseas iron ore deposits is difficult because of its remote location.The spectral characteristic was used to extract alteration information in view of the limitation of the traditional methods in this paper,aiming to explore altera-tion information extraction from hyperspectral images for the Lake Superior type iron ore to facilitate overseas prospecting.A two-dimensional spectral characteristic space takes on an anisotropic feature in associated distribution of two principal bands af-ter principal component analysis.The distribution is usually combined by oval clusters.The scatter points were enclosed in oval clusters of alteration information,and the mean spectra of abnormal scatter points were matched with mineral spectra from United States Geological Survey(USGS)spectral library by means of spectral feature fitting to ensure the type of alteration minerals.Spectral characteristic space method was described with the instance of Lake Superior-type iron deposit—Aguas Clar-as iron area in Brazil.Hematite,chlorite and other minerals were extracted in this study.It is found that the type and distribu-tion of extracted altered minerals were consistent well with geological condition.%由于境外铁矿床位置偏远,现场研究困难,旨在探讨苏必利尔湖型铁矿的高光谱遥感蚀变信息提取方法,为境外找矿提供依据。鉴于传统蚀变信息提取方法的局限性,研究了在二维光谱特征空间中提取蚀变信息的方法。高光谱影像经主成分变换后,包含较多地物信息的两个主成分的二维光谱特征空间体现了各向异性的特点,不同地物的聚类常呈类似椭圆分布。在蚀变信息的聚类椭圆中圈定散点,并应用波谱特征拟合,将异常散点的平均光谱与美国地质调查局(United States Geological Sur-vey,USGS)光谱库中的矿物光谱匹配,确定蚀变矿物类型。以苏必利尔湖型铁矿———巴西 Aguas Claras 铁矿区为例,提取了

  3. Abnormal chloride homeostasis in the substancia nigra pars reticulata contributes to locomotor deficiency in a model of acute liver injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Ling Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Altered chloride homeostasis has been thought to be a risk factor for several brain disorders, while less attention has been paid to its role in liver disease. We aimed to analyze the involvement and possible mechanisms of altered chloride homeostasis of GABAergic neurons within the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr in the motor deficit observed in a model of encephalopathy caused by acute liver failure, by using glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 - green fluorescent protein knock-in transgenic mice. METHODS: Alterations in intracellular chloride concentration in GABAergic neurons within the SNr and changes in the expression of two dominant chloride homeostasis-regulating genes, KCC2 and NKCC1, were evaluated in mice with hypolocomotion due to hepatic encephalopathy (HE. The effects of pharmacological blockade and/or activation of KCC2 and NKCC1 functions with their specific inhibitors and/or activators on the motor activity were assessed. RESULTS: In our mouse model of acute liver injury, chloride imaging indicated an increase in local intracellular chloride concentration in SNr GABAergic neurons. In addition, the mRNA and protein levels of KCC2 were reduced, particularly on neuronal cell membranes; in contrast, NKCC1 expression remained unaffected. Furthermore, blockage of KCC2 reduced motor activity in the normal mice and led to a further deteriorated hypolocomotion in HE mice. Blockade of NKCC1 was not able to normalize motor activity in mice with liver failure. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that altered chloride homeostasis is likely involved in the pathophysiology of hypolocomotion following HE. Drugs aimed at restoring normal chloride homeostasis would be a potential treatment for hepatic failure.

  4. Human iron transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Garrick, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Human iron transporters manage iron carefully because tissues need iron for critical functions, but too much iron increases the risk of reactive oxygen species. Iron acquisition occurs in the duodenum via divalent metal transporter (DMT1) and ferroportin. Iron trafficking depends largely on the transferrin cycle. Nevertheless, non-digestive tissues have a variety of other iron transporters that may render DMT1 modestly redundant, and DMT1 levels exceed those needed for the just-mentioned task...

  5. INFLUENCE OF IRON CHELATION ON R1 AND R2 CALIBRATION CURVES IN GERBIL LIVER AND HEART

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, John C.; AGUILAR, MICHELLE; Otto-Duessel, Maya; Nick, Hanspeter; Nelson, Marvin D.; Moats, Rex

    2008-01-01

    MRI is gaining increasing importance for the noninvasive quantification of organ iron burden. Since transverse relaxation rates depend on iron distribution as well as iron concentration, physiologic and pharmacologic processes that alter iron distribution could change MRI calibration curves. This paper compares the effect of three iron chelators, deferoxamine, deferiprone, and deferasirox on R1 and R2 calibration curves according to two iron loading and chelation strategies. 33 Mongolian gerb...

  6. Iron bioavailability from commercially available iron supplements

    OpenAIRE

    Christides, Tatiana; Wray, David; McBride, Richard; Fairweather, Rose; Sharp, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a global public health problem. Treatment with the standard of care ferrous iron salts may be poorly tolerated, leading to non-compliance and ineffective correction of IDA. Employing supplements with higher bioavailability might permit lower doses of iron to be used with fewer side effects, thus improving treatment efficacy. Here, we compared the iron bioavailability of ferrous sulphate tablets with alternative commercial iron products, including th...

  7. Effect of iron deficiency anemia and its treatment on cell mediated immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Attia, Mohamed Attia; Salwa A. Essa; Nosair, Nahla A; Amin, Ahmed M; El-Agamy, Osama A.

    2009-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is one of the most prevalent micronutrient deficiencies particularly in the developing countries. While there is evidence of an altered immune profile in iron deficiency, the exact immunoregulatory role of iron is not known. Knowledge particularly in children, who are vulnerable to iron deficiency and infection, is lacking. We aimed to study the effects of IDA and its treatment with oral iron supplementation on cell-mediated immunity. The levels of T-lymphocytes, ...

  8. The molecular physiology of uric acid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Asim K; Mount, David B

    2015-01-01

    Uric acid, generated from the metabolism of purines, has proven and emerging roles in human disease. Serum uric acid is determined by production and the net balance of reabsorption or secretion by the kidney and intestine. A detailed understanding of epithelial absorption and secretion of uric acid has recently emerged, aided in particular by the results of genome-wide association studies of hyperuricemia. Novel genetic and regulatory networks with effects on uric acid homeostasis have also emerged. These developments promise to lead to a new understanding of the various diseases associated with hyperuricemia and to novel, targeted therapies for hyperuricemia. PMID:25422986

  9. Epididymis cholesterol homeostasis and sperm fertilizing ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabrice Saez; Aurélia Ouvrier; Jo(e)l R Drevet

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol, being the starting point of steroid hormone synthesis, is a long known modulator of both female and male reproductive physiology especially at the level of the gonads and the impact cholesterol has on gametogenesis. Less is known about the effects cholesterol homeostasis may have on postgonadic reproductive functions. Lately, several data have been reported showing how imbalanced cholesterol levels may particularly affect the post-testicular events of sperm maturation that lead to fully fertile male gametes. This review will focus on that aspect and essentially centers on how cholesterol is important for the physiology of the mammalian epididymis and spermatozoa.

  10. Disruption of brain zinc homeostasis promotes the pathophysiological progress of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin-Bo; Wang, Zhan-You

    2016-06-01

    Zinc is abundant in the brain, where it plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and in learning; however, excessive zinc is toxic to neuronal cells, and dyshomeostasis of zinc in the brain is a contributing factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Deposition of zinc has been detected in senile plaques in the form of zinc-Aβ (β-amyloid) complexes. Recent studies have demonstrated that zinc exposure to the brain enhances β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression, amyloidogenic APP cleavage and plaque burden. Furthermore, alterations in zinc transporters, which are responsible for zinc homeostasis, occur in AD human brain and transgenic mouse models. These suggest that abnormal brain zinc homeostasis is involved in the pathophysiological progress of AD. PMID:26883958

  11. Impact of metal ion homeostasis of genetically modified Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and K12 (W3110) strains on colonization properties in the murine intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupz, Andreas; Fischer, André; Nies, Dietrich H; Grass, Gregor; Göbel, Ulf B; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M

    2013-09-01

    Metal ions are integral parts of pro- as well as eukaryotic cell homeostasis. Escherichia coli proved a valuable in vitro model organism to elucidate essential mechanisms involved in uptake, storage, and export of metal ions. Given that E. coli Nissle 1917 is able to overcome murine colonization resistance, we generated several E. coli Nissle 1917 mutants with defects in zinc, iron, copper, nickel, manganese homeostasis and performed a comprehensive survey of the impact of metal ion transport and homeostasis for E. coli colonization capacities within the murine intestinal tract. Seven days following peroral infection of conventional mice with E. coli Nissle 1917 strains exhibiting defined defects in zinc or iron uptake, the respective mutant and parental strains could be cultured at comparable, but low levels from the colonic lumen. We next reassociated gnotobiotic mice in which the microbiota responsible for colonization resistance was abrogated by broad-spectrum antibiotics with six different E. coli K12 (W3110) mutants. Seven days following peroral challenge, each mutant and parental strain stably colonized duodenum, ileum, and colon at comparable levels. Taken together, defects in zinc, iron, copper, nickel, and manganese homeostasis do not compromise colonization capacities of E. coli in the murine intestinal tract. PMID:24265943

  12. Brain glycogen and its role in supporting glutamate and GABA homeostasis in a type 2 diabetes rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle Mark; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Schousboe, Arne;

    2012-01-01

    diabetic state. Also, our objective was to elucidate the contribution of glycogen to support neurotransmitter glutamate and GABA homeostasis. A glycogen phosphorylase (GP) inhibitor was administered to Sprague-Dawley (SprD) and Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats in vivo and after one day of treatment [1......-(13)C]glucose was used to monitor metabolism. Brain levels of (13)C labeling in glucose, lactate, alanine, glutamate, GABA, glutamine and aspartate were determined. Our results show that inhibition of brain glycogen metabolism reduced the amounts of glutamate in both the control and type 2 diabetes......The number of people suffering from diabetes is hastily increasing and the condition is associated with altered brain glucose homeostasis. Brain glycogen is located in astrocytes and being a carbohydrate reservoir it contributes to glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, glycogen has been indicated to be...

  13. Iron deposition in modern and archaeological teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.-M.M., E-mail: AnneMarie.Williams@utas.edu.au [School of Medicine, Private Bag 34, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7001 (Australia); Siegele, R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    Iron surface concentrations and profile maps were measured on the enamel of archaeological and modern teeth to determine how iron is deposited in tooth enamel and if it was affected by the post-mortem environment. Teeth from Australian children who died in the second half of the 19th century were compared with contemporary teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes. Surface analysis of the teeth was performed using the 3 MV Van Der Graff Accelerator at The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Sydney, Australia. A small sample of teeth were then cut in the mid sagittal plane and analysed using ANSTO High Energy Heavy Ion Microprobe. Maps and linear profiles were produced showing the distribution of iron across the enamel. Results show that both the levels and distribution of iron in archaeological teeth is quite different to contemporary teeth, raising the suggestion that iron has been significantly altered by the post-mortem environment.

  14. Iron deposition in modern and archaeological teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron surface concentrations and profile maps were measured on the enamel of archaeological and modern teeth to determine how iron is deposited in tooth enamel and if it was affected by the post-mortem environment. Teeth from Australian children who died in the second half of the 19th century were compared with contemporary teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes. Surface analysis of the teeth was performed using the 3 MV Van Der Graff Accelerator at The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Sydney, Australia. A small sample of teeth were then cut in the mid sagittal plane and analysed using ANSTO High Energy Heavy Ion Microprobe. Maps and linear profiles were produced showing the distribution of iron across the enamel. Results show that both the levels and distribution of iron in archaeological teeth is quite different to contemporary teeth, raising the suggestion that iron has been significantly altered by the post-mortem environment

  15. MAVS maintains mitochondrial homeostasis via autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Sun, Liwei; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Li, Ying; Lin, Wei; Chen, Dahua; Sun, Qinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) acts as a critical adaptor protein to transduce antiviral signalling by physically interacting with activated RIG-I and MDA5 receptors. MAVS executes its functions at the outer membrane of mitochondria to regulate downstream antiviral signalling, indicating that the mitochondria provides a functional platform for innate antiviral signalling transduction. However, little is known about whether and how MAVS-mediated antiviral signalling contributes to mitochondrial homeostasis. Here we show that the activation of MAVS is sufficient to induce autophagic signalling, which may mediate the turnover of the damaged mitochondria. Importantly, we find MAVS directly interacts with LC3 through its LC3-binding motif 'YxxI', suggesting that MAVS might act as an autophagy receptor to mediate mitochondrial turnover upon excessive activation of RLR signalling. Furthermore, we provide evidence that both MAVS self-aggregation and its interaction with TRAF2/6 proteins are important for MAVS-mediated mitochondrial turnover. Collectively, our findings suggest that MAVS acts as a potential receptor for mitochondria-associated autophagic signalling to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:27551434

  16. Apoptosis signaling pathways and lymphocyte homeostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangwu Xu; Yufang Shi

    2007-01-01

    It has been almost three decades since the term "apoptosis" was first coined to describe a unique form of cell death that involves orderly, gene-dependent cell disintegration. It is now well accepted that apoptosis is an essential life process for metazoan animals and is critical for the formation and function of tissues and organs. In the adult mammalian body, apoptosis is especially important for proper functioning of the immune system. In recent years, along with the rapid advancement of molecular and cellular biology, great progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms leading to apoptosis. It is generally accepted that there are two major pathways of apoptotic cell death induction: extrinsic signaling through death receptors that leads to the formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), and intrinsic signaling mainly through mitochondria which leads to the formation of the apoptosome. Formation of the DISC or apoptosome, respectively, activates initiator and common effector caspases that execute the apoptosis process. In the immune system, both pathways operate; however, it is not known whether they are sufficient to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis. Recently, new apoptotic mechanisms including caspase-independent pathways and granzyme-initiated pathways have been shown to exist in lymphocytes. This review will summarize our understanding of the mechanisms that control the homeostasis of various lymphocyte populations.

  17. Regulation of neuronal chloride homeostasis by neuromodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Vivek; Woodin, Melanie A

    2016-05-15

    KCC2 is the central regulator of neuronal Cl(-) homeostasis, and is critical for enabling strong hyperpolarizing synaptic inhibition in the mature brain. KCC2 hypofunction results in decreased inhibition and increased network hyperexcitability that underlies numerous disease states including epilepsy, neuropathic pain and neuropsychiatric disorders. The current holy grail of KCC2 biology is to identify how we can rescue KCC2 hypofunction in order to restore physiological levels of synaptic inhibition and neuronal network activity. It is becoming increasingly clear that diverse cellular signals regulate KCC2 surface expression and function including neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. In the present review we explore the existing evidence that G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signalling can regulate KCC2 activity in numerous regions of the nervous system including the hypothalamus, hippocampus and spinal cord. We present key evidence from the literature suggesting that GPCR signalling is a conserved mechanism for regulating chloride homeostasis. This evidence includes: (1) the activation of group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors and metabotropic Zn(2+) receptors strengthens GABAergic inhibition in CA3 pyramidal neurons through a regulation of KCC2; (2) activation of the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 2A serotonin receptors upregulates KCC2 cell surface expression and function, restores endogenous inhibition in motoneurons, and reduces spasticity in rats; and (3) activation of A3A-type adenosine receptors rescues KCC2 dysfunction and reverses allodynia in a model of neuropathic pain. We propose that GPCR-signals are novel endogenous Cl(-) extrusion enhancers that may regulate KCC2 function. PMID:26876607

  18. Consciousness, endogenous generation of goals and homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitolovsky, Lev E.

    2015-08-01

    Behaviour can be both unpredictable and goal directed, as animals act in correspondence with their motivation. Motivation arises when neurons in specific brain areas leave the state of homeostatic equilibrium and are injured. The basic goal of organisms and living cells is to maintain their life and their functional state is optimal if it does not lead to physiological damage. This can somehow be sensed by neurons and the occurrence of damage elicits homeostatic protection to recover excitability and the ability to produces spikes. It can be argued that the neuron's activity is guided on the scale of "damage-protection" and it behaves as an object possessing minimum awareness. The approach of death increases cellular efforts to operate. Thus, homeostasis may evidently produce both maintenance of life and will. The question is - how does homeostasis reach the optimum? We have no possibility of determining how the cell evaluates its own states, e.g. as "too little free energy" or in terms of "threat" to life. In any case, the approach of death increases cellular efforts to operate. For the outside observer, this is reminiscent of intentional action and a manifestation of will.

  19. Lipoproteins, cholesterol homeostasis and cardiac health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler F. Daniels, Karen M. Killinger, Jennifer J. Michal, Raymond W. Wright Jr., Zhihua Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is an essential substance involved in many functions, such as maintaining cell membranes, manufacturing vitamin D on surface of the skin, producing hormones, and possibly helping cell connections in the brain. When cholesterol levels rise in the blood, they can, however, have dangerous consequences. In particular, cholesterol has generated considerable notoriety for its causative role in atherosclerosis, the leading cause of death in developed countries around the world. Homeostasis of cholesterol is centered on the metabolism of lipoproteins, which mediate transport of the lipid to and from tissues. As a synopsis of the major events and proteins that manage lipoprotein homeostasis, this review contributes to the substantial attention that has recently been directed to this area. Despite intense scrutiny, the majority of phenotypic variation in total cholesterol and related traits eludes explanation by current genetic knowledge. This is somewhat disappointing considering heritability estimates have established these traits as highly genetic. Thus, the continued search for candidate genes, mutations, and mechanisms is vital to our understanding of heart disease at the molecular level. Furthermore, as marker development continues to predict risk of vascular illness, this knowledge has the potential to revolutionize treatment of this leading human disease.

  20. Histopathological data of iron and calcium in the mouse lung after asbestos exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Trevisan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This data article contains data related to the research article entitled, “Synchrotron X-ray microscopy reveals early calcium and iron interaction with crocidolite fibers in the lung of exposed mice” [1]. Asbestos fibers disrupt iron homeostasis in the human and mouse lung, leading to the deposition of iron (Fe onto longer asbestos fibers which forms asbestos bodies (AB [2]. Similar to Fe, calcium (Ca is also deposited in the coats of the AB. This article presents data on iron and calcium in the mouse lung after asbestos exposure detected by histochemical evaluation.

  1. Hepatic iron overload following liver transplantation of a C282y homozygous allograft: a case report and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dwyer, Jeremy P

    2011-11-01

    Hereditary haemochromatosis is a common genetic disease associated with progressive iron overload and parenchymal organ damage including liver, pancreas and heart. We report a case of inadvertent transplantation of a liver from a haemochromatosis donor to a 56-year-old Asian female. Progressive iron overload occurred over a 2 year follow up as assessed by liver biopsy and iron studies in the absence of a secondary cause of iron overload, supporting a primary role of liver rather than small intestine in the regulation of iron homeostasis in hereditary haemochromatosis.

  2. Homeostasis of plasma membrane viscosity in fluctuating temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinière, Alexandre; Shvedunova, Maria; Thomson, Adrian J W; Evans, Nicola H; Penfield, Steven; Runions, John; McWatters, Harriet G

    2011-10-01

    Temperature has a direct effect at the cellular level on an organism. For instance, in the case of biomembranes, cooling causes lipids to lose entropy and pack closely together. Reducing temperature should, in the absence of other factors, increase the viscosity of a lipid membrane. We have investigated the effect of temperature variation on plasma membrane (PM) viscosity. We used dispersion tracking of photoactivated green fluorescent protein (GFP) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in wild-type and desaturase mutant Arabidopsis thaliana plants along with membrane lipid saturation analysis to monitor the effect of temperature and membrane lipid composition on PM viscosity. Plasma membrane viscosity in A. thaliana is negatively correlated with ambient temperature only under constant-temperature conditions. In the more natural environment of temperature cycles, plants actively manage PM viscosity to counteract the direct effects of temperature. Plasma membrane viscosity is regulated by altering the proportion of desaturated fatty acids. In cold conditions, cell membranes accumulate desaturated fatty acids, which decreases membrane viscosity and vice versa. Moreover, we show that control of fatty acid desaturase 2 (FAD2)-dependent lipid desaturation is essential for this homeostasis of membrane viscosity. Finally, a lack of FAD2 function results in aberrant temperature responses. PMID:21762166

  3. Elevated Shear Stress in Arteriovenous Fistulae: Is There Mechanical Homeostasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGah, Patrick; Leotta, Daniel; Beach, Kirk; Aliseda, Alberto

    2011-11-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae are created surgically to provide access for dialysis in patients with renal failure. The current hypothesis is that the rapid remodeling occurring after the fistula creation is in part a process to restore the mechanical stresses to some preferred level (i.e. mechanical homeostasis). Given that nearly 50% of fistulae require an intervention after one year, understanding the altered hemodynamic stress is important in improving clinical outcomes. We perform numerical simulations of four patient-specific models of functioning fistulae reconstructed from 3D Doppler ultrasound scans. Our results show that the vessels are subjected to `normal' shear stresses away from the anastomosis; about 1 Pa in the veins and about 2.5 Pa in the arteries. However, simulations show that part of the anastomoses are consistently subjected to very high shear stress (>10Pa) over the cardiac cycle. These elevated values shear stresses are caused by the transitional flows at the anastomoses including flow separation and quasiperiodic vortex shedding. This suggests that the remodeling process lowers shear stress in the fistula but that it is limited as evidenced by the elevated shear at the anastomoses. This constant insult on the arterialized venous wall may explain the process of late fistula failure in which the dialysis access become occluded after years of use. Supported by an R21 Grant from NIDDK (DK081823).

  4. Zeolite A effect on calcium homeostasis in growing goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaller, D; Wilkens, M R; Liesegang, A

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of 2 different concentrations of zeolite A on calcium homeostasis. Seventeen growing goats were divided into 3 groups. Whereas the control group (5 animals) received no supplementation, 2 treatment groups were supplemented with zeolite A at either 1.2 (6 animals) or 1.6 g/kg BW (6 animals), respectively. Blood and urine samples were continually drawn and bone mineral density was measured weekly by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. After 3 wks, the animals were slaughtered and samples were taken from the rumen, duodenum, and kidneys. Plasma concentrations of phosphate ( Ussing chamber technique and quantification of RNA and protein expression of genes known to be involved in active calcium absorption did not reveal any stimulating effect of zeolite. Plasma calcium concentrations were not altered, probably because of the sufficient dietary calcium supply. However due to the effects of zeolite on 1,25 dihydroxycholecalciferol, bone metabolism and serum concentrations of phosphate and magenesium shown in the present study, potential negative long-termin effects on the animals should be considered whenever rations with zeolite are designed. PMID:27136016

  5. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  6. Iron Sucrose Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is in a class of medications called iron replacement products. It works by replenishing iron stores so ... ferumoxytol (Feraheme), iron dextran (Dexferrum, Infed, Proferdex), or sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit); any other medications; or any ...

  7. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is in a class of medications called iron replacement products. It works by replenishing iron stores so ... carboxymaltose (Injectafer), ferumoxytol (Feraheme), iron sucrose (Venofer), or sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit);any other medications; or any ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... refers to a condition in which your blood has a lower than normal number of red blood ... iron, your body starts using the iron it has stored. Soon, the stored iron gets used up. ...

  9. Taking iron supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007478.htm Taking iron supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... levels. You may also need to take iron supplements as well to rebuild iron stores in your ...

  10. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Iron-rich foods include: Chicken and turkey Dried lentils, peas, and beans Fish Meats (liver is the ... and egg yolks are high sources of iron. Flour, bread, and some cereals are fortified with iron. ...

  11. Serum PBDE levels in exposed rats in relation to effects on thyroxine homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darnerud, P.O.; Aune, M.; Larsson, L.; Hallgren, S. [National Food Administration, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) is a group of environmental chemicals for which lately both interest and knowledge have increased considerably. Among the BFRs, the polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have attained special interest. Much data on environmental and human levels have been presented and several toxicological reviews are now published. Among interesting results is the difference in human PBDE levels that seem to exist between U.S.A. and Europe, results that suggest differences in exposure but without being able to pin-point the exact sources. In experimental studies PBDEs alter serum thyroxin levels, an effect seen both in rats and in mice. The mechanism(s) are still not completely clarified, but are thought to include alterations in serum transport, induced enzymatic degradation and possibly also direct effects on the thyroid gland. As perinatal alterations in thyroid homeostasis could affect brain development, early effects on thyroid hormones may be of special concern. Indeed, PBDEs have been shown to affect behaviour and learning in mice, when given neonatally. The aim of the present study was to relate the serum levels of PBDEs in rats to effects of these compounds on thyroxine homeostasis in these animals. Specifically, the relation between serum PBDE levels and effects on serum thyroxine levels was investigated, after two weeks of daily oral exposure. The result may have consequences for the future risk assessment activities on PBDE and specifically in finding the critical serum PBDE concentration at which the effect on thyroid hormone levels begin to occur.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  13. PACAP in the Defense of Energy Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudecki, Alexander P; Gray, Sarah L

    2016-09-01

    The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) mediates diverse physiology from neuroprotection to thermoregulation. PACAP is well established as a master regulator of the stress response, regulating psychological and physiological equilibrium via the autonomic nervous system. Neuroanatomical and functional evidence support a role for PACAP in energy metabolism, including thermogenesis, activity, mobilization of energy stores, and appetite. Through integration of this evidence we suggest PACAP be included in the growing list of neuropeptides that mediate energy homeostasis. Future work to uncover the intricacies of PACAP expression and the molecular pathways responsible for PACAP signaling may show potential for this neuropeptide as a therapeutic target as well as further elucidate the complex neuroanatomical networks involved in defending energy balance. PMID:27166671

  14. Environmental stresses disrupt telomere length homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Hagit Romano

    Full Text Available Telomeres protect the chromosome ends from degradation and play crucial roles in cellular aging and disease. Recent studies have additionally found a correlation between psychological stress, telomere length, and health outcome in humans. However, studies have not yet explored the causal relationship between stress and telomere length, or the molecular mechanisms underlying that relationship. Using yeast as a model organism, we show that stresses may have very different outcomes: alcohol and acetic acid elongate telomeres, whereas caffeine and high temperatures shorten telomeres. Additional treatments, such as oxidative stress, show no effect. By combining genome-wide expression measurements with a systematic genetic screen, we identify the Rap1/Rif1 pathway as the central mediator of the telomeric response to environmental signals. These results demonstrate that telomere length can be manipulated, and that a carefully regulated homeostasis may become markedly deregulated in opposing directions in response to different environmental cues.

  15. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep...

  16. Impaired Bile Acid Homeostasis in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Voskuijl, Wieger; Mouzaki, Marialena; Groen, Albert K.; Alexander, Jennifer; Bourdon, Celine; Wang, Alice; Versloot, Christian J.; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Bandsma, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objective Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is a major cause of mortality in children under 5 years and is associated with hepatic steatosis. Bile acids are synthesized in the liver and participate in dietary fat digestion, regulation of energy expenditure, and immune responses. The aim of this work was to investigate whether SAM is associated with clinically relevant changes in bile acid homeostasis. Design An initial discovery cohort with 5 healthy controls and 22 SAM-patients was used to identify altered bile acid homeostasis. A follow up cohort of 40 SAM-patients were then studied on admission and 3 days after clinical stabilization to assess recovery in bile acid metabolism. Recruited children were 6–60 months old and admitted for SAM in Malawi. Clinical characteristics, feces and blood were collected on admission and prior to discharge. Bile acids, 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and FGF-19 were quantified. Results On admission, total serum bile acids were higher in children with SAM than in healthy controls and glycine-conjugates accounted for most of this accumulation with median and interquartile range (IQR) of 24.6 μmol/L [8.6–47.7] compared to 1.9 μmol/L [1.7–3.3] (p = 0.01) in controls. Total serum bile acid concentrations did not decrease prior to discharge. On admission, fecal conjugated bile acids were lower and secondary bile acids higher at admission compared to pre- discharge, suggesting increased bacterial conversion. FGF19 (Fibroblast growth factor 19), a marker of intestinal bile acid signaling, was higher on admission and was associated with decreased C4 concentrations as a marker of bile acid synthesis. Upon recovery, fecal calprotectin, a marker of intestinal inflammation, was lower. Conclusion SAM is associated with increased serum bile acid levels despite reduced synthesis rates. In SAM, there tends to be increased deconjugation of bile acids and conversion from primary to secondary bile acids, which may contribute to the

  17. Iceland as a Model for Chemical Alteration on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Schiffman, P.; Murad, E.; Southard, R.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Subglacial volcanic activity on Iceland has led to the formation of a variety of silicate and iron oxide-rich alteration products that may serve as a model for chemical alteration on Mars. Multiple palagonitic tuffs, altered pillow lavas, hydrothermal springs and alteration at glacial run-off streams were observed during a recent field trip in Iceland. Formation of alteration products and ferrihydrite in similar environments on Mars may have contributed to the ferric oxide-rich surface material there. The spectral and chemical properties of Icelandic alteration products and ferrihydrites are presented here.

  18. IL-4 and TGF-β1 Counterbalance One Another while Regulating Mast Cell Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Macey, Matthew R.; Sturgill, Jamie L.; Morales, Johanna K.; Falanga, Yves T.; Morales, Joshua; Norton, Sarah K.; Yerram, Nitin; Shim, Hoon; Fernando, Josephine; Gifillan, Alasdair M.; Gomez, Gregorio; Schwartz, Lawrence; Oskeritzian, Carole; Spiegel, Sarah; Conrad, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Mast cell responses can be altered by cytokines, including those secreted by Th2 and regulatory T cells (Treg). Given the important role of mast cells in Th2-mediated inflammation and recent demonstrations of Treg-mast cell interactions, we examined the ability of IL-4 and TGF-β1 to regulate mast cell homeostasis. Using in vitro and in vivo studies of mouse and human mast cells, we demonstrate that IL-4 suppresses TGF-β1 receptor expression and signaling, and vice versa. In vitro studies demo...

  19. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... contours are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  20. F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5): sensing intracellular iron and oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Julio C; Bruick, Richard K

    2014-04-01

    Though essential for many vital biological processes, excess iron results in the formation of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, iron metabolism must be tightly regulated. F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5), an E3 ubiquitin ligase subunit, regulates cellular and systemic iron homeostasis by facilitating iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) degradation. FBXL5 possesses an N-terminal hemerythrin (Hr)-like domain that mediates its own differential stability by switching between two different conformations to communicate cellular iron availability. In addition, the FBXL5-Hr domain also senses O2 availability, albeit by a distinct mechanism. Mice lacking FBXL5 fail to sense intracellular iron levels and die in utero due to iron overload and exposure to damaging levels of oxidative stress. By closely monitoring intracellular levels of iron and oxygen, FBLX5 prevents the formation of conditions that favor ROS formation. These findings suggest that FBXL5 is essential for the maintenance of iron homeostasis and is a key sensor of bioavailable iron. Here, we describe the iron and oxygen sensing mechanisms of the FBXL5 Hr-like domain and its role in mediating ROS biology. PMID:24508277

  1. Cadmium-induced aggregation of iron regulatory protein-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron regulatory protein-1 (IRP-1) is central to regulation of iron homeostasis, and has been shown to be sensitive to Cd2+ in vitro. Although Cd2+ induces disulfide-bond formation in many proteins, the critical cysteine residues for iron binding in IRP-1 were shown not to be involved in Cd-induced IRP-1 aggregation in vitro. Here we show that Cd2+ causes polymerization and aggregation of IRP-1 in vitro and in vivo, and decreases in a dose-dependent manner both its RNA-binding and aconitase enzymatic activities, as well as its cytosolic expression. We have used two-dimensional electrophoresis to demonstrate thiol-dependent self-association of purified recombinant IRP-1 treated with Cd2+, as well as self-association in Cd2+-exposed mesangial cells. Circular dichroism spectra confirm significant conformational changes in the purified protein upon Cd2+ exposure. Following Cd2+ treatment, there is increased translocation of inactive IRP-1 to the actin cytoskeletal fraction, and this translocation is diminished by both antioxidant (BHA) treatment and inhibition of CaMK-II. These changes differ from those elicited by manipulation of iron levels. Cadmium-induced translocation of proteins to cellular compartments, and particularly to the cytoskeleton, is becoming a recognized event in Cd2+ toxicity. Polymer-dependent translocation of IRP-1 in Cd2+-exposed cells may underlie effects of Cd2+ on iron homeostasis

  2. The immune system, natural autoantibodies and general homeostasis in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletaev, A; Boura, P

    2011-10-01

    It is generally accepted that the destination of the immune system is not only to discriminate between self and non-self but also to mount responses against non-self. During the last decades, it became evident that weak self-reactivity is a necessary condition for immune homeostasis. Natural self reactivity and the internal image created by autoantibodies, participate greatly to the maintenance of homeostasis. Under conditions of increased or altered antigenic pressure, the homeostatic status is disrupted and the organism becomes vulnerable to the emergence of diseases. "Immunculus" is the self-reactive and interconnected entity of the immune system, provided by a complicated network of natural autoantibobies of different specificity, as a mosaic picture. Quantitative changes in each part of the image are related to variations of expression of relative antigens. The immune system takes in account image information from the continuous screening of the antigenic status and compares between presented state and the desired (optimal) one. Substantial and prolonged deviations from the optimal state, triggers the induction of compensatory and reparative processes, aiming to restore molecular and functional homeostasis. So, natural autoimmunity through the ability of natural a-Abs to induce mechanisms of natural and acquired immunity, aims to prevent pathogenic processes and maintain or restore health status. PMID:24391407

  3. Impairment of interrelated iron- and copper homeostatic mechanisms in brain contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Moos, Torben

    2012-01-01

    (DMT1) is involved in the uptake of both iron and copper. Furthermore, copper is an essential co-factor in numerous proteins that are vital for iron homeostasis and affects the binding of iron-response proteins to iron-response elements in the mRNA of the transferrin receptor, DMT1, and ferroportin......Iron and copper are important co-factors for a number of enzymes in the brain, including enzymes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and myelin formation. Both shortage and an excess of iron or copper will affect the brain. The transport of iron and copper into the brain from the circulation is...... strictly regulated, and concordantly protective barriers, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCB) have evolved to separate the brain environment from the circulation. The uptake mechanisms of the two metals interact. Both iron deficiency and overload lead...

  4. Development and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (Part 1): Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Contrast agents, such as iron oxide, enhance MR images by altering the relaxation times of tissues in which the agent is present. They can also be used to label targeted molecular imaging probes. Unfortunately, no molecular imaging probe is currently available on the clinical MRI market. A promising platform for MRI contrast agent development is nanotechnology, where superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS) are tailored for MR contrast enhancement, and/or for molecular imaging. SPI...

  5. A conceptual framework for homeostasis: development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Jenny; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Michael, Joel; Cliff, William; Wright, Ann; Modell, Harold

    2016-06-01

    We have developed and validated a conceptual framework for understanding and teaching organismal homeostasis at the undergraduate level. The resulting homeostasis conceptual framework details critical components and constituent ideas underlying the concept of homeostasis. It has been validated by a broad range of physiology faculty members from community colleges, primarily undergraduate institutions, research universities, and medical schools. In online surveys, faculty members confirmed the relevance of each item in the framework for undergraduate physiology and rated the importance and difficulty of each. The homeostasis conceptual framework was constructed as a guide for teaching and learning of this critical core concept in physiology, and it also paves the way for the development of a concept inventory for homeostasis. PMID:27105740

  6. Staphylococcus aureus redirects central metabolism to increase iron availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Friedman

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is significantly influenced by the iron status of the host. However, the regulatory impact of host iron sources on S. aureus gene expression remains unknown. In this study, we combine multivariable difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry with multivariate statistical analyses to systematically cluster cellular protein response across distinct iron-exposure conditions. Quadruplicate samples were simultaneously analyzed for alterations in protein abundance and/or post-translational modification state in response to environmental (iron chelation, hemin treatment or genetic (Deltafur alterations in bacterial iron exposure. We identified 120 proteins representing several coordinated biochemical pathways that are affected by changes in iron-exposure status. Highlighted in these experiments is the identification of the heme-regulated transport system (HrtAB, a novel transport system which plays a critical role in staphylococcal heme metabolism. Further, we show that regulated overproduction of acidic end-products brought on by iron starvation decreases local pH resulting in the release of iron from the host iron-sequestering protein transferrin. These findings reveal novel strategies used by S. aureus to acquire scarce nutrients in the hostile host environment and begin to define the iron and heme-dependent regulons of S. aureus.

  7. Special thermite cast irons

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. Zhiguts; I. Kurytnik

    2008-01-01

    The given paper deals with the problems of the synthesis of cast iron by metallothermy synthesis. On the basis of investigated method of calculations structures of charges have been arranged and cast iron has been synthesized further. Peculiarities metallothermic smelting were found, mechanical properties and structure of received cast iron were investigated and different technologies for cast iron receiving were worked out.

  8. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  9. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  10. O-GlcNAcase expression is sensitive to changes in O-GlcNAc homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHEN eZHANG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc is a post-translational modification involving an attachment of a single β-N-acetylglucosamine moiety to serine or threonine residues in nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. Cellular O-GlcNAc levels are regulated by two enzymes: O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT and O-GlcNAcase (OGA, which add and remove the modification respectively. The levels of O-GlcNAc can rapidly change in response to fluctuations in the extracellular environment; however, O-GlcNAcylation returns to a baseline level quickly after stimulus removal. This process termed O-GlcNAc homeostasis appears to be critical to the regulation of many cellular functions including cell cycle progress, stress response, and gene transcription. Disruptions in O-GlcNAc homeostasis are proposed to lead to the development of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease. O-GlcNAc homeostasis is correlated with the expression of OGT and OGA. We reason that alterations in O-GlcNAc levels affect OGA and OGT transcription. We treated several human cell lines with Thiamet-G (TMG, an OGA inhibitor to increase overall O-GlcNAc levels resulting in decreased OGT protein expression and increased OGA protein expression. OGT transcript levels slightly declined with TMG treatment, but OGA transcript levels were significantly increased. Pretreating cells with protein translation inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX did not stabilize OGT or OGA protein expression in the presence of TMG; nor did TMG stabilize OGT and OGA mRNA levels when cells were treated with RNA transcription inhibitor actinomycin D (AMD. Finally, we performed RNA Polymerase II chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP at the OGA promoter and found RNA Pol II occupancy at the transcription start site (TSS was lower after prolonged TMG treatment. Together, these data suggest that OGA transcription was sensitive to changes in O-GlcNAc homeostasis and was potentially regulated by O-GlcNAc.

  11. Urinary iron excretion test in iron deficiency anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura,Ikuro; Yamana,Masatoshi; NNishishita,Akira; Sugiyama,Motoharu; Miyata, Akira

    1980-01-01

    A urinary iron excretion test was carried out in 22 patients with iron deficiency anemia. The iron excretion index was significantly higher in patients with intractable iron deficiency anemia compared with normal subjects and anemic patients who were responsive to iron therapy. The findings suggest that iron excretion may be a factor that modulates the response of patients to iron therapy.

  12. Mammalian iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gregory Jon; Vulpe, Christopher D

    2009-10-01

    Iron is essential for basic cellular processes but is toxic when present in excess. Consequently, iron transport into and out of cells is tightly regulated. Most iron is delivered to cells bound to plasma transferrin via a process that involves transferrin receptor 1, divalent metal-ion transporter 1 and several other proteins. Non-transferrin-bound iron can also be taken up efficiently by cells, although the mechanism is poorly understood. Cells can divest themselves of iron via the iron export protein ferroportin in conjunction with an iron oxidase. The linking of an oxidoreductase to a membrane permease is a common theme in membrane iron transport. At the systemic level, iron transport is regulated by the liver-derived peptide hepcidin which acts on ferroportin to control iron release to the plasma. PMID:19484405

  13. Monomeric Yeast Frataxin is an Iron Binding Protein†

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.; Bencze, K; Jankovic, A; Crater, A; Busch, C; Bradley, P; Stemmler, A; Spaller, M; Stemmler, T

    2009-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia, an autosomal cardio- and neurodegenerative disorder that affects 1 in 50000 humans, is caused by decreased levels of the protein frataxin. Although frataxin is nuclear-encoded, it is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and necessary for proper regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. Frataxin is required for the cellular production of both heme and iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters. Monomeric frataxin binds with high affinity to ferrochelatase, the enzyme involved in iron insertion into porphyrin during heme production. Monomeric frataxin also binds to Isu, the scaffold protein required for assembly of Fe-S cluster intermediates. These processes (heme and Fe-S cluster assembly) share requirements for iron, suggesting that monomeric frataxin might function as the common iron donor. To provide a molecular basis to better understand frataxin's function, we have characterized the binding properties and metal-site structure of ferrous iron bound to monomeric yeast frataxin. Yeast frataxin is stable as an iron-loaded monomer, and the protein can bind two ferrous iron atoms with micromolar binding affinity. Frataxin amino acids affected by the presence of iron are localized within conserved acidic patches located on the surfaces of both helix-1 and strand-1. Under anaerobic conditions, bound metal is stable in the high-spin ferrous state. The metal-ligand coordination geometry of both metal-binding sites is consistent with a six-coordinate iron-(oxygen/nitrogen) based ligand geometry, surely constructed in part from carboxylate and possibly imidazole side chains coming from residues within these conserved acidic patches on the protein. On the basis of our results, we have developed a model for how we believe yeast frataxin interacts with iron.

  14. Monomeric Yeast Frataxin is an Iron-Binding Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook,J.; Bencze, K.; Jankovic, A.; Crater, A.; Busch, C.; Bradley, P.; Stemmler, A.; Spaller, M.; Stemmler, T.

    2006-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia, an autosomal cardio- and neurodegenerative disorder that affects 1 in 50 000 humans, is caused by decreased levels of the protein frataxin. Although frataxin is nuclear-encoded, it is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and necessary for proper regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. Frataxin is required for the cellular production of both heme and iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters. Monomeric frataxin binds with high affinity to ferrochelatase, the enzyme involved in iron insertion into porphyrin during heme production. Monomeric frataxin also binds to Isu, the scaffold protein required for assembly of Fe-S cluster intermediates. These processes (heme and Fe-S cluster assembly) share requirements for iron, suggesting that monomeric frataxin might function as the common iron donor. To provide a molecular basis to better understand frataxin's function, we have characterized the binding properties and metal-site structure of ferrous iron bound to monomeric yeast frataxin. Yeast frataxin is stable as an iron-loaded monomer, and the protein can bind two ferrous iron atoms with micromolar binding affinity. Frataxin amino acids affected by the presence of iron are localized within conserved acidic patches located on the surfaces of both helix-1 and strand-1. Under anaerobic conditions, bound metal is stable in the high-spin ferrous state. The metal-ligand coordination geometry of both metal-binding sites is consistent with a six-coordinate iron-(oxygen/nitrogen) based ligand geometry, surely constructed in part from carboxylate and possibly imidazole side chains coming from residues within these conserved acidic patches on the protein. On the basis of our results, we have developed a model for how we believe yeast frataxin interacts with iron.

  15. Monomeric Yeast Frataxin is an Iron-Binding Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedreich's ataxia, an autosomal cardio- and neurodegenerative disorder that affects 1 in 50 000 humans, is caused by decreased levels of the protein frataxin. Although frataxin is nuclear-encoded, it is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and necessary for proper regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. Frataxin is required for the cellular production of both heme and iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters. Monomeric frataxin binds with high affinity to ferrochelatase, the enzyme involved in iron insertion into porphyrin during heme production. Monomeric frataxin also binds to Isu, the scaffold protein required for assembly of Fe-S cluster intermediates. These processes (heme and Fe-S cluster assembly) share requirements for iron, suggesting that monomeric frataxin might function as the common iron donor. To provide a molecular basis to better understand frataxin's function, we have characterized the binding properties and metal-site structure of ferrous iron bound to monomeric yeast frataxin. Yeast frataxin is stable as an iron-loaded monomer, and the protein can bind two ferrous iron atoms with micromolar binding affinity. Frataxin amino acids affected by the presence of iron are localized within conserved acidic patches located on the surfaces of both helix-1 and strand-1. Under anaerobic conditions, bound metal is stable in the high-spin ferrous state. The metal-ligand coordination geometry of both metal-binding sites is consistent with a six-coordinate iron-(oxygen/nitrogen) based ligand geometry, surely constructed in part from carboxylate and possibly imidazole side chains coming from residues within these conserved acidic patches on the protein. On the basis of our results, we have developed a model for how we believe yeast frataxin interacts with iron

  16. Iron metabolism and iron supplementation in cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Heinz; Evstatiev, Rayko; Kornek, Gabriela; Aapro, Matti; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Fridrik, Michael; Geissler, Dietmar; Geissler, Klaus; Gisslinger, Heinz; Koller, Elisabeth; Kopetzky, Gerhard; Lang, Alois; Rumpold, Holger; Steurer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Iron deficiency and iron deficiency-associated anemia are common complications in cancer patients. Most iron deficient cancer patients present with functional iron deficiency (FID), a status with adequate storage iron, but insufficient iron supply for erythroblasts and other iron dependent tissues. FID is the consequence of the cancer-associated cytokine release, while in absolute iron deficiency iron stores are depleted resulting in similar but often more severe symptoms of insuffici...

  17. Novel MntR-Independent Mechanism of Manganese Homeostasis in Escherichia coli by the Ribosome-Associated Protein HflX

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Gursharan; Sengupta, Sandeepan; Kumar, Vineet; Kumari, Aruna; Ghosh, Aditi; Parrack, Pradeep; Dutta, Dipak

    2014-01-01

    Manganese is a micronutrient required for activities of several important enzymes under conditions of oxidative stress and iron starvation. In Escherichia coli, the manganese homeostasis network primarily constitutes a manganese importer (MntH) and an exporter (MntP), which are regulated by the MntR dual regulator. In this study, we find that deletion of E. coli hflX, which encodes a ribosome-associated GTPase with unknown function, renders extreme manganese sensitivity characterized by ar...

  18. Mechanisms involved in cellular ceramide homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sphingolipids are ubiquitous and critical components of biological membranes. Their biosynthesis starts with soluble precursors in the endoplasmic reticulum and culminates in the Golgi complex and plasma membrane. Ceramides are important intermediates in the biosynthesis of sphingolipids, such as sphingomyelin, and their overload in the membranes is injurious to cells. The major product of ceramide metabolism is sphingomyelin. We observed that sphingomyelin synthase (SMS 1 or SMS2 deficiencies significantly decreased plasma and liver sphingomyelin levels. However, SMS2 but not SMS1 deficiency increased plasma ceramides. Surprisingly, SMS1 deficiency significantly increased glucosylceramide and ganglioside GM3, but SMS2 deficiency did not. To explain these unexpected findings about modest to no significant changes in ceramides and increases in other sphingolipids after the ablation of SMS1, we hypothesize that cells have evolved several organelle specific mechanisms to maintain ceramide homeostasis. First, ceramides in the endoplasmic reticulum membranes are controlled by its export to Golgi by protein mediated transfer. Second, in the Golgi, ceramide levels are modulated by their enzymatic conversion to different sphingolipids such as sphingomyelin, and glucosylceramides. Additionally, these sphingolipids can become part of triglyceride-rich apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and be secreted. Third, in the plasma membrane ceramide levels are maintained by ceramide/sphingomyelin cycle, delivery to lysosomes, and efflux to extracellular plasma acceptors. All these pathways might have evolved to ensure steady cellular ceramide levels.

  19. Breast milk, microbiota, and intestinal immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, W Allan; Iyengar, Rajashri Shuba

    2015-01-01

    Newborns adjust to the extrauterine environment by developing intestinal immune homeostasis. Appropriate initial bacterial colonization is necessary for adequate intestinal immune development. An environmental determinant of adequate colonization is breast milk. Although the full-term infant is developmentally capable of mounting an immune response, the effector immune component requires bacterial stimulation. Breast milk stimulates the proliferation of a well-balanced and diverse microbiota, which initially influences a switch from an intrauterine TH2 predominant to a TH1/TH2 balanced response and with activation of T-regulatory cells by breast milk-stimulated specific organisms (Bifidobacteria, Lactobacillus, and Bacteroides). As an example of its effect, oligosaccharides in breast milk are fermented by colonic bacteria producing an acid milieu for bacterial proliferation. In addition, short-chain fatty acids in breast milk activate receptors on T-reg cells and bacterial genes, which preferentially mediate intestinal tight junction expression and anti-inflammation. Other components of breast milk (defensins, lactoferrin, etc.) inhibit pathogens and further contribute to microbiota composition. The breast milk influence on initial intestinal microbiota also prevents expression of immune-mediated diseases (asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes) later in life through a balanced initial immune response, underscoring the necessity of breastfeeding as the first source of nutrition. PMID:25310762

  20. Gravity and positional homeostasis of the cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nace, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of gravity upon cytoplasmic aggregates of the size present in eggs and upon cells is investigated. An expression is developed to describe the tendency of torque to rotate the egg and reorganize its constituents. This expression provides the net torque resulting from buoyancy and gravity acting upon a dumbbell-shaped cell, with heavy and light masses at either end and floating in a medium. Torques of approximately 2.5 x 10 to the -13th to 0.85 dyne-cm are found to act upon cells ranging from 6.4 microns to 31 mm (chicken egg). It is noted that cells must expend energy to maintain positional homeostasis against gravity, as demonstrated by results from Skylab 3, where tissue cultures used 58 percent more glucose on earth than in space. The implications for developmental biology, physiology, genetics, and evolution are discussed. It is argued that at the cellular and tissue levels the concept of gravity receptors may be unnecessary.

  1. DYSREGULATION OF ION HOMEOSTASIS BY ANTIFUNGAL AGENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RajiniRao

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ion signaling and transduction networks are central to fungal development and virulence because they regulate gene expression, filamentation, host association and invasion, pathogen stress response and survival. Dysregulation of ion homeostasis rapidly mediates cell death, forming the mechanistic basis by which a growing number of amphipathic but structurally unrelated compounds elicit antifungal activity. Included in this group is carvacrol, a terpenoid phenol that is a prominent component of oregano and other plant essential oils. Carvacrol triggers an early dose dependent Ca2+ burst and long lasting pH changes in the model yeast S. cerevisiae. The distinct phases of ionic transients and a robust transcriptional response that overlaps with Ca2+ stress and nutrient starvation point to specific signaling events elicited by plant terpenoid phenols, rather than a non-specific lesion of the membrane as was previously considered. We discuss the potential use of plant essential oils and other agents that disrupt ion signaling pathways as chemosensitizers to augment conventional antifungal therapy, and to convert fungistatic drugs with strong safety profiles into fungicides.

  2. Cellular Auxin Homeostasis:Gatekeeping Is Housekeeping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michel Ruiz Rosquete; Elke Barbez; Jürgen Kleine-Vehn

    2012-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is essential for plant development and contributes to nearly every aspect of the plant life cycle.The spatio-temporal distribution of auxin depends on a complex interplay between auxin metabolism and cell-to-cell auxin transport.Auxin metabolism and transport are both crucial for plant development;however,it largely remains to be seen how these processes are integrated to ensure defined cellular auxin levels or even gradients within tissues or organs.In this review,we provide a glance at very diverse topics of auxin biology,such as biosynthesis,conjugation,oxidation,and transport of auxin.This broad,but certainly superficial,overview highlights the mutual importance of auxin metabolism and transport.Moreover,it allows pinpointing how auxin metabolism and transport get integrated to jointly regulate cellular auxin homeostasis.Even though these processes have been so far only separately studied,we assume that the phytohormonal crosstalk integrates and coordinates auxin metabolism and transport.Besides the integrative power of the global hormone signaling,we additionally introduce the hypothetical concept considering auxin transport components as gatekeepers for auxin responses.

  3. The effect of iron supplement on children with euthyroid goiter: a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Ordooei, M; Akbarzadeh, M; Soleimanizad, R; Shamsi, F.; Masoumi Dehshiri, R

    2014-01-01

    Background Endemic goiter is present in most parts of Iran. Iron deficiency adversely affects the physiology of thyroid. The initial steps of thyroid hormone synthesis are catalyzed by thyroperoxidases and are dependent on iron. In many developing countries, children are at high risk of both goiter and iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency may alter central nervous system control of thyroid metabolism; andalso Iron-deficiency anemia decreases plasma concentrations of thyroxine ...

  4. Deregulation of proteins involved in iron metabolism in hepcidin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viatte, Lydie; Lesbordes-Brion, Jeanne-Claire; Lou, Dan-Qing; Bennoun, Myriam; Nicolas, Gaël; Kahn, Axel; Canonne-Hergaux, François; Vaulont, Sophie

    2005-06-15

    Evidence is accumulating that hepcidin, a liver regulatory peptide, could be the common pathogenetic denominator of all forms of iron overload syndromes including HFE-related hemochromatosis, the most prevalent genetic disorder characterized by inappropriate iron absorption. To understand the mechanisms whereby hepcidin controls iron homeostasis in vivo, we have analyzed the level of iron-related proteins by Western blot and immunohistochemistry in hepcidin-deficient mice, a mouse model of severe hemochromatosis. These mice showed important increased levels of duodenal cytochrome b (Dcytb), divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin compared with control mice. Interestingly, the level of ferroportin was coordinately up-regulated in the duodenum, the spleen, and the liver (predominantly in the Kupffer cells). Finally, we also evidenced a decrease of ceruloplasmin in the liver of hepcidin-deficient mice. We hypothesized that the deregulation of these proteins might be central in the pathogenesis of iron overload, providing key therapeutic targets for iron disorders. PMID:15713792

  5. Genetically engineered mouse models to evaluate the role of Wnt secretion in bone development and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bart O

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in components of the Wnt signaling pathway are associated with altered bone development and homeostasis in several human diseases. We created genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) that mimic the cellular defect associated with the Porcupine mutations in patients with Goltz Syndrome/Focal Dermal Hypoplasia. These GEMMs were established by utilizing mice containing a conditionally inactivatable allele of Wntless/GPR177 (a gene encoding a protein required for the transport of Porcupine-modified ligand to the plasma membrane for secretion). We crossed this strain to another which drives cre-mediated gene deletion in mature osteoblasts (Osteocalcin-cre) resulted in mice lacking the ability to secrete Wnt ligands in this cell type. These mice displayed severely reduced bone mass and provide a model to understand the effects of disrupting the ability to secrete Wnt ligands on the skeletal system. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26818176

  6. The gene encoding the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin is regulated by anemia, hypoxia, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Gaël; Chauvet, Caroline; Viatte, Lydie; Danan, Jean Louis; Bigard, Xavier; Devaux, Isabelle; Beaumont, Carole; Kahn, Axel; Vaulont, Sophie

    2002-10-01

    The present study was aimed at determining whether hepcidin, a recently identified peptide involved in iron metabolism, plays a role in conditions associated with both iron overload and iron deficiency. Hepcidin mRNA levels were assessed in two models of anemia, acute hemolysis provoked by phenylhydrazine and bleeding provoked by repeated phlebotomies. Hepcidin response to hypoxia was also studied, both ex vivo, in human hepatoma cells, and in vivo. Anemia and hypoxia were associated with a dramatic decrease in liver hepcidin gene expression, which may account for the increase in iron release from reticuloendothelial cells and increase in iron absorption frequently observed in these situations. A single injection of turpentine for 16 hours induced a sixfold increase in liver hepcidin mRNA levels and a twofold decrease in serum iron. The hyposideremic effect of turpentine was completely blunted in hepcidin-deficient mice, revealing hepcidin participation in anemia of inflammatory states. These modifications of hepcidin gene expression further suggest a key role for hepcidin in iron homeostasis under various pathophysiological conditions, which may support the pharmaceutical use of hepcidin agonists and antagonists in various iron homeostasis disorders. PMID:12370282

  7. Scavenging iron: a novel mechanism of plant immunity activation by microbial siderophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Rigault, Martine; Riache, Nassima; Joseph, Delphine; Desmaële, Didier; Mouille, Grégory; Boutet, Stéphanie; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Thomine, Sébastien; Expert, Dominique; Dellagi, Alia

    2014-04-01

    Siderophores are specific ferric iron chelators synthesized by virtually all microorganisms in response to iron deficiency. We have previously shown that they promote infection by the phytopathogenic enterobacteria Dickeya dadantii and Erwinia amylovora. Siderophores also have the ability to activate plant immunity. We have used complete Arabidopsis transcriptome microarrays to investigate the global transcriptional modifications in roots and leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants after leaf treatment with the siderophore deferrioxamine (DFO). Physiological relevance of these transcriptional modifications was validated experimentally. Immunity and heavy-metal homeostasis were the major processes affected by DFO. These two physiological responses could be activated by a synthetic iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid, indicating that siderophores eliciting activities rely on their strong iron-chelating capacity. DFO was able to protect Arabidopsis against the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Siderophore treatment caused local modifications of iron distribution in leaf cells visible by ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine-H₂O₂ staining. Metal quantifications showed that DFO causes a transient iron and zinc uptake at the root level, which is presumably mediated by the metal transporter iron regulated transporter1 (IRT1). Defense gene expression and callose deposition in response to DFO were compromised in an irt1 mutant. Consistently, plant susceptibility to D. dadantii was increased in the irt1 mutant. Our work shows that iron scavenging is a unique mechanism of immunity activation in plants. It highlights the strong relationship between heavy-metal homeostasis and immunity. PMID:24501001

  8. The FBXL5-IRP2 axis is integral to control of iron metabolism in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroishi, Toshiro; Nishiyama, Masaaki; Takeda, Yukiko; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Nakayama, Keiichi I

    2011-09-01

    Iron-dependent degradation of iron-regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) is a key event for maintenance of an appropriate intracellular concentration of iron. Although FBXL5 (F box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5) is thought to mediate this degradation, the role of FBXL5 in the control of iron homeostasis in vivo has been poorly understood. We have now found that mice deficient in FBXL5 died in utero, associated with excessive iron accumulation. This embryonic mortality was prevented by additional ablation of IRP2, suggesting that impaired IRP2 degradation is primarily responsible for the death of Fbxl5(-)(/-) mice. We also found that liver-specific deletion of Fbxl5 resulted in deregulation of both hepatic and systemic iron homeostasis, leading to the development of steatohepatitis. The liver-specific mutant mice died with acute liver failure when fed a high-iron diet. Thus, our results uncover a major role for FBXL5 in ensuring an appropriate supply of iron to cells. PMID:21907140

  9. Anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody Fc variants differentially impact regulatory T cells and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, David J; Pellerin, Alex F; Collette, Brian P; Kannan, Arun K; Peng, Liaomin; Datta, Abhishek; Wipke, Brian T; Fontenot, Jason D

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a critical regulator of immune homeostasis through its non-redundant role in regulatory T (Treg) cell biology. There is major interest in therapeutic modulation of the IL-2 pathway to promote immune activation in the context of tumour immunotherapy or to enhance immune suppression in the context of transplantation, autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases. Antibody-mediated targeting of the high-affinity IL-2 receptor α chain (IL-2Rα or CD25) offers a direct mechanism to target IL-2 biology and is being actively explored in the clinic. In mouse models, the rat anti-mouse CD25 clone PC61 has been used extensively to investigate the biology of IL-2 and Treg cells; however, there has been controversy and conflicting data on the exact in vivo mechanistic function of PC61. Engineering antibodies to alter Fc/Fc receptor interactions can significantly alter their in vivo function. In this study, we re-engineered the heavy chain constant region of an anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody to generate variants with highly divergent Fc effector function. Using these anti-CD25 Fc variants in multiple mouse models, we investigated the in vivo impact of CD25 blockade versus depletion of CD25(+) Treg cells on immune homeostasis. We report that immune homeostasis can be maintained during CD25 blockade but aberrant T-cell activation prevails when CD25(+) Treg cells are actively depleted. These results clarify the impact of PC61 on Treg cell biology and reveal an important distinction between CD25 blockade and depletion of CD25(+) Treg cells. These findings should inform therapeutic manipulation of the IL-2 pathway by targeting the high-affinity IL-2R. PMID:27012310

  10. Investigating the role of two iron-regulated small RNAs of Pseudomonas syringae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) have emerged as important components of many regulatory pathways and have been shown to have key roles in the regulation of iron homeostasis in a number of bacteria. To date, only a few sRNAs have been described for the bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomat...

  11. Molecular responses of ceruloplasmin to Edwardsiella ictaluri infection and iron overload in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruloplasmin is a serum ferroxidase that carries more than 90% of the copper in plasma and has documented roles in iron homeostasis as well as antioxidative functions. In our previous studies, it has been shown that the ceruloplasmin gene is strongly up-regulated in catfish during challenge with Ed...

  12. Caffeine and glucose homeostasis during rest and exercise in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharieva, Dessi P; Riddell, Michael C

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine is a substance that has been used in our society for generations, primarily for its effects on the central nervous system that causes wakefulness. Caffeine supplementation has become increasingly more popular as an ergogenic aid for athletes and considerable scientific evidence supports its effectiveness. Because of their potential to alter energy metabolism, the effects of coffee and caffeine on glucose metabolism in diabetes have also been studied both epidemiologically and experimentally. Predominantly targeting the adenosine receptors, caffeine causes alterations in glucose homeostasis by decreasing glucose uptake into skeletal muscle, thereby causing elevations in blood glucose concentration. Caffeine intake has also been proposed to increase symptomatic warning signs of hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes and elevate blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Other effects include potential increases in glucose counterregulatory hormones such as epinephrine, which can also decrease peripheral glucose disposal. Despite these established physiological effects, increased coffee intake has been associated with reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes in large-scale epidemiological studies. This review paper highlights the known effects of caffeine on glucose homeostasis and diabetes metabolism during rest and exercise. PMID:23855268

  13. Alkaline ceramidase 1 is essential for mammalian skin homeostasis and regulating whole-body energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Vancollie, Valerie E; Lelliott, Christopher J; Speak, Anneliese O; Lafont, David; Protheroe, Hayley J; Ingvorsen, Camilla; Galli, Antonella; Green, Angela; Gleeson, Diane; Ryder, Ed; Glover, Leanne; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Karp, Natasha A; Arends, Mark J; Brenn, Thomas; Spiegel, Sarah; Adams, David J; Watt, Fiona M; van der Weyden, Louise

    2016-07-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of skin that acts as a barrier to protect the body from the external environment and to control water and heat loss. This barrier function is established through the multistage differentiation of keratinocytes and the presence of bioactive sphingolipids such as ceramides, the levels of which are tightly regulated by a balance of ceramide synthase and ceramidase activities. Here we reveal the essential role of alkaline ceramidase 1 (Acer1) in the skin. Acer1-deficient (Acer1(-/-) ) mice showed elevated levels of ceramide in the skin, aberrant hair shaft cuticle formation and cyclic alopecia. We demonstrate that Acer1 is specifically expressed in differentiated interfollicular epidermis, infundibulum and sebaceous glands and consequently Acer1(-/-) mice have significant alterations in infundibulum and sebaceous gland architecture. Acer1(-/-) skin also shows perturbed hair follicle stem cell compartments. These alterations result in Acer1(-/-) mice showing increased transepidermal water loss and a hypermetabolism phenotype with associated reduction of fat content with age. We conclude that Acer1 is indispensable for mammalian skin homeostasis and whole-body energy homeostasis. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:27126290

  14. Iron Metabolism Regulates p53 Signaling through Direct Heme-p53 Interaction and Modulation of p53 Localization, Stability, and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Shen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron excess is closely associated with tumorigenesis in multiple types of human cancers, with underlying mechanisms yet unclear. Recently, iron deprivation has emerged as a major strategy for chemotherapy, but it exerts tumor suppression only on select human malignancies. Here, we report that the tumor suppressor protein p53 is downregulated during iron excess. Strikingly, the iron polyporphyrin heme binds to p53 protein, interferes with p53-DNA interactions, and triggers both nuclear export and cytosolic degradation of p53. Moreover, in a tumorigenicity assay, iron deprivation suppressed wild-type p53-dependent tumor growth, suggesting that upregulation of wild-type p53 signaling underlies the selective efficacy of iron deprivation. Our findings thus identify a direct link between iron/heme homeostasis and the regulation of p53 signaling, which not only provides mechanistic insights into iron-excess-associated tumorigenesis but may also help predict and improve outcomes in iron-deprivation-based chemotherapy.

  15. Involvement of the Iron Regulatory Protein from Eisenia andrei Earthworms in the Regulation of Cellular Iron Homeostasis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 10 (2014). E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0055 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : MULTIPLE SEQUENCE ALIGNMENT * ELEMENT- BINDING PROTEIN * FERRITIN MESSENGER-RNA Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  16. Involvement of the Iron Regulatory Protein from Eisenia andrei Earthworms in the Regulation of Cellular Iron Homeostasis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 10 (2014). E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0055 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : MULTIPLE SEQUENCE ALIGNMENT * ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN * FERRITIN MESSENGER-RNA Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  17. Early Iron Deficiency Has Brain and Behavior Effects Consistent with Dopaminergic Dysfunction123

    OpenAIRE

    Lozoff, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    To honor the late John Beard’s many contributions regarding iron and dopamine biology, this review focuses on recent human studies that test specific hypotheses about effects of early iron deficiency on dopamine system functioning. Short- and long-term alterations associated with iron deficiency in infancy can be related to major dopamine pathways (mesocortical, mesolimbic, nigrostriatal, tuberohypophyseal). Children and young adults who had iron deficiency anemia in infancy show poorer inhib...

  18. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    interiors of Earth and other terrestrial planets. This chapter deals with our current knowledge of these meteorites. How did they form? What can they tell us about the early evolution of the solar system and its solid bodies? How closely do they resemble the materials from planetary interiors? What do and...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar......Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...

  19. Altered telomere homeostasis and resistance to skin carcinogenesis in Suv39h1 transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Petti, Eleonora; Jordi, Fabian; Buemi, Valentina; Dinami, Roberto; Benetti, Roberta; Blasco, Maria A.; Schoeftner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The Suv39h1 and Suv39h2 H3K9 histone methyltransferases (HMTs) have a conserved role in the formation of constitutive heterochromatin and gene silencing. Using a transgenic mouse model system we demonstrate that elevated expression of Suv39h1 increases global H3K9me3 levels in vivo. More specifically, Suv39h1 overexpression enhances the imposition of H3K9me3 levels at constitutive heterochromatin at telomeric and major satellite repeats in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Chromatin compac...

  20. Astrocytic dysfunction in epileptogenesis: consequence of altered potassium and glutamate homeostasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Yaron; Cacheaux, Luisa P; Ivens, Sebastian; Lapilover, Ezequiel; Heinemann, Uwe; Kaufer, Daniela; Friedman, Alon

    2009-08-26

    Focal epilepsy often develops following traumatic, ischemic, or infectious brain injury. While the electrical activity of the epileptic brain is well characterized, the mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis are poorly understood. We have recently shown that in the rat neocortex, long-lasting breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) or direct exposure of the neocortex to serum-derived albumin leads to rapid upregulation of the astrocytic marker GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein), followed by delayed (within 4-7 d) development of an epileptic focus. We investigated the role of astrocytes in epileptogenesis in the BBB-breakdown and albumin models of epileptogenesis. We found similar, robust changes in astrocytic gene expression in the neocortex within hours following treatment with deoxycholic acid (BBB breakdown) or albumin. These changes predict reduced clearance capacity for both extracellular glutamate and potassium. Electrophysiological recordings in vitro confirmed the reduced clearance of activity-dependent accumulation of both potassium and glutamate 24 h following exposure to albumin. We used a NEURON model to simulate the consequences of reduced astrocytic uptake of potassium and glutamate on EPSPs. The model predicted that the accumulation of glutamate is associated with frequency-dependent (>100 Hz) decreased facilitation of EPSPs, while potassium accumulation leads to frequency-dependent (10-50 Hz) and NMDA-dependent synaptic facilitation. In vitro electrophysiological recordings during epileptogenesis confirmed frequency-dependent synaptic facilitation leading to seizure-like activity. Our data indicate a transcription-mediated astrocytic transformation early during epileptogenesis. We suggest that the resulting reduction in the clearance of extracellular potassium underlies frequency-dependent neuronal hyperexcitability and network synchronization. PMID:19710312

  1. Tissue-specific alterations in thyroid hormone homeostasis in combined Mct10 and Mct8 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Müller (Julia); S. Mayerl (Steffen); T.J. Visser (Ton); V.M. Darras (Veerle); A. Boelen (Anita); L. Frappart (Lucien); L. Mariotta (Luca); F. Verrey; H. Heuer (Heike)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe monocarboxylate transporter Mct10 (Slc16a10; T-type amino acid transporter) facilitates the cellular transport of thyroid hormone (TH) and shows an overlapping expression with the wellestablished TH transporter Mct8. Because Mct8 deficiency is associated with distinct tissue-specific

  2. Alterations in regulation of energy homeostasis in cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 3B–null mice

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Young Hun; Park, Sunhee; Hockman, Steven; Zmuda-Trzebiatowska, Emilia; Svennelid, Fredrik; Haluzik, Martin; Gavrilova, Oksana; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Pepin, Laurent; Napolitano, Maria; Taira, Masato; Sundler, Frank; Stenson Holst, Lena; Degerman, Eva; Manganiello, Vincent C.

    2006-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 3B (PDE3B) has been suggested to be critical for mediating insulin/IGF-1 inhibition of cAMP signaling in adipocytes, liver, and pancreatic β cells. In Pde3b-KO adipocytes we found decreased adipocyte size, unchanged insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of protein kinase B and activation of glucose uptake, enhanced catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis and insulin-stimulated lipogenesis, and blocked insulin inhibition of catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis. Glucos...

  3. Altered Energy Homeostasis and Resistance to Diet-Induced Obesity in KRAP-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Miyasaka, Kyoko; Koyanagi, Midori; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Baba, Iwai; Doi, Keiko; Ohta, Minoru; Kato, Norihiro; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2009-01-01

    Obesity and related metabolic disorders have become leading causes of adult morbidity and mortality. KRAP (Ki-ras-induced actin-interacting protein) is a cytoskeleton-associated protein and a ubiquitous protein among tissues, originally identified as a cancer-related molecule, however, its physiological roles remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that KRAP-deficient (KRAP−/− ) mice show enhanced metabolic rate, decreased adiposity, improved glucose tolerance, hypoinsulinemia and hypoleptinemia....

  4. Familial Alzheimer's disease-associated presenilin-1 alters cerebellar activity and calcium homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Hagel, Christian; Korwitz, Anne; Vinueza-Veloz, Maria Fernanda; Zhou, Kuikui; Schonewille, Martijn; Zhou, Haibo; Velazquez-Perez, Luis; Rodriguez-Labrada, Roberto; Villegas, Andres; Ferrer, Isidro; Lopera, Francisco; Langer, Thomas; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Glatzel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) is characterized by autosomal dominant heritability and early disease onset. Mutations in the gene encoding presenilin-1 (PS1) are found in approximately 80% of cases of FAD, with some of these patients presenting cerebellar damage with amyloid plaques and ataxia w

  5. Nf1 Haploinsufficiency Alters Myeloid Lineage Commitment and Function, Leading to Deranged Skeletal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Steven D; Yang, Hao; Dong, Ruizhi; Menon, Keshav; He, Yongzheng; Li, Zhaomin; Chen, Shi; Staser, Karl W; Jiang, Li; Wu, Xiaohua; Yang, Xianlin; Peng, Xianghong; Mohammad, Khalid S; Guise, Theresa A; Xu, Mingjiang; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2015-10-01

    Although nullizygous loss of NF1 leads to myeloid malignancies, haploinsufficient loss of NF1 (Nf1) has been shown to contribute to osteopenia and osteoporosis which occurs in approximately 50% of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients. Bone marrow mononuclear cells of haploinsufficient NF1 patients and Nf1(+/-) mice exhibit increased osteoclastogenesis and accelerated bone turnover; however, the culprit hematopoietic lineages responsible for perpetuating these osteolytic manifestations have yet to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that conditional inactivation of a single Nf1 allele within the myeloid progenitor cell population (Nf1-LysM) is necessary and sufficient to promote multiple osteoclast gains-in-function, resulting in enhanced osteoclastogenesis and accelerated osteoclast bone lytic activity in response to proresorptive challenge in vivo. Surprisingly, mice conditionally Nf1 heterozygous in mature, terminally differentiated osteoclasts (Nf1-Ctsk) do not exhibit any of these skeletal phenotypes, indicating a critical requirement for Nf1 haploinsufficiency at a more primitive/progenitor stage of myeloid development in perpetuating osteolytic activity. We further identified p21Ras-dependent hyperphosphorylation of Pu.1 within the nucleus of Nf1 haploinsufficient myelomonocytic osteoclast precursors, providing a novel therapeutic target for the potential treatment of NF1 associated osteolytic manifestations. PMID:25917016

  6. Prions, protein homeostasis, and phenotypic diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Halfmann, Randal; Alberti, Simon; Lindquist, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Prions are fascinating but often misunderstood protein aggregation phenomena. The traditional association of the mammalian prion protein with disease has overshadowed a potentially more interesting attribute of prions: their ability to create protein-based molecular memories. In fungi, prions alter the relationship between genotype and phenotype in a heritable way that diversifies clonal populations. Recent findings in yeast indicate that prions might be much more common than previously real...

  7. Calcium homeostasis modulator (CALHM) ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhongming; Tanis, Jessica E; Taruno, Akiyuki; Foskett, J Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1), formerly known as FAM26C, was recently identified as a physiologically important plasma membrane ion channel. CALHM1 and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog, CLHM-1, are regulated by membrane voltage and extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]o). In the presence of physiological [Ca(2+)]o (∼1.5 mM), CALHM1 and CLHM-1 are closed at resting membrane potentials but can be opened by strong depolarizations. Reducing [Ca(2+)]o increases channel open probability, enabling channel activation at negative membrane potentials. Together, voltage and Ca(2+) o allosterically regulate CALHM channel gating. Through convergent evolution, CALHM has structural features that are reminiscent of connexins and pannexins/innexins/LRRC8 (volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC)) gene families, including four transmembrane helices with cytoplasmic amino and carboxyl termini. A CALHM1 channel is a hexamer of CALHM1 monomers with a functional pore diameter of ∼14 Å. CALHM channels discriminate poorly among cations and anions, with signaling molecules including Ca(2+) and ATP able to permeate through its pore. CALHM1 is expressed in the brain where it plays an important role in cortical neuron excitability induced by low [Ca(2+)]o and in type II taste bud cells in the tongue that sense sweet, bitter, and umami tastes where it functions as an essential ATP release channel to mediate nonsynaptic neurotransmitter release. CLHM-1 is expressed in C. elegans sensory neurons and body wall muscles, and its genetic deletion causes locomotion defects. Thus, CALHM is a voltage- and Ca(2+) o-gated ion channel, permeable to large cations and anions, that plays important roles in physiology. PMID:26603282

  8. Mechanical homeostasis regulating adipose tissue volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svedman Paul

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The total body adipose tissue volume is regulated by hormonal, nutritional, paracrine, neuronal and genetic control signals, as well as components of cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions. There are no known locally acting homeostatic mechanisms by which growing adipose tissue might adapt its volume. Presentation of the hypothesis Mechanosensitivity has been demonstrated by mesenchymal cells in tissue culture. Adipocyte differentiation has been shown to be inhibited by stretching in vitro, and a pathway for the response has been elucidated. In humans, intermittent stretching of skin for reconstructional purposes leads to thinning of adipose tissue and thickening of epidermis – findings matching those observed in vitro in response to mechanical stimuli. Furthermore, protracted suspension of one leg increases the intermuscular adipose tissue volume of the limb. These findings may indicate a local homeostatic adipose tissue volume-regulating mechanism based on movement-induced reduction of adipocyte differentiation. This function might, during evolution, have been of importance in confined spaces, where overgrowth of adipose tissue could lead to functional disturbance, as for instance in the turtle. In humans, adipose tissue near muscle might in particular be affected, for instance intermuscularly, extraperitoneally and epicardially. Mechanical homeostasis might also contribute to protracted maintainment of soft tissue shape in the face and neck region. Testing of the hypothesis Assessment of messenger RNA-expression of human adipocytes following activity in adjacent muscle is planned, and study of biochemical and volumetric adipose tissue changes in man are proposed. Implications of the hypothesis The interpretation of metabolic disturbances by means of adipose tissue might be influenced. Possible applications in the head and neck were discussed.

  9. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  10. Hepcidin and Iron Metabolism in Pregnancy: Correlation with Smoking and Birth Weight and Length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chełchowska, Magdalena; Ambroszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Gajewska, Joanna; Jabłońska-Głąb, Ewa; Maciejewski, Tomasz M; Ołtarzewski, Mariusz

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the effect of tobacco smoking on iron homeostasis and the possible association between hepcidin and the neonatal birth weight and length, concentrations of serum hepcidin and selected iron markers were measured in 81 healthy pregnant women (41 smokers and 40 nonsmokers). The smoking mothers had significantly lower concentrations of serum hepcidin (p erythropoietin (p erythropoietin suggest that smoking could lead to subclinical iron deficiency and chronic hypoxia not only in mothers but also in fetus. Low serum hepcidin concentration in smoking pregnant women might be associated with lower fetal birth weight and length. PMID:26785641

  11. Using glutamate homeostasis as a target for treating addictive disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Reissner, Kathryn J.; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    Well-developed cellular mechanisms exist to preserve glutamate homeostasis and regulate extrasynaptic glutamate levels. Accumulating evidence indicates that disruptions in glutamate homeostasis are associated with addictive disorders. The disruptions in glutamate concentrations observed following prolonged exposure to drugs of abuse are associated with changes in the function and activity of several key components within the homeostatic control mechanism, including the cystine/glutamate excha...

  12. Neutrophil Homeostasis and Periodontal Health in Children and Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Hajishengallis, E.; Hajishengallis, G

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on neutrophil basic biology and discusses how the breakdown of neutrophil homeostasis affects periodontal health. The homeostasis of neutrophils is tightly regulated through coordinated bone marrow production, release into the circulation, transmigration to and activation in peripheral tissues, and clearance of senescent neutrophils. Dysregulation of any of these homeostatic mechanisms at any age can cause severe periodontitis in humans an...

  13. Autophagy in Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis and in Muscular Dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Bonaldo; Paolo Grumati

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscles are the agent of motion and one of the most important tissues responsible for the control of metabolism. The maintenance of muscle homeostasis is finely regulated by the balance between catabolic and anabolic process. Macroautophagy (or autophagy) is a catabolic process that provides the degradation of protein aggregation and damaged organelles through the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes. Proper regulation of the autophagy flux is fundamental for the homeostasis o...

  14. Plasticity and Dedifferentiation within the Pancreas: Development, Homeostasis, and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Puri, Sapna; Folias, Alexandra E.; Hebrok, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Cellular identity is established by genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors that regulate organogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Although some flexibility in fate potential is beneficial to overall organ health, dramatic changes in cellular identity can have disastrous consequences. Emerging data within the field of pancreas biology are revising current beliefs about how cellular identity is shaped by developmental and environmental cues under homeostasis and stress conditions. Here, we...

  15. The GARP complex is required for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, Florian; Petit, Constance; Kory, Nora;

    2015-01-01

    (GARP) complex, which functions in endosome-to-Golgi retrograde vesicular transport, as a critical player in sphingolipid homeostasis. GARP deficiency leads to accumulation of sphingolipid synthesis intermediates, changes in sterol distribution, and lysosomal dysfunction. A GARP complex mutation...... the phenotypes of GARP-deficient yeast or mammalian cells. Together, these data show that GARP is essential for cellular sphingolipid homeostasis and suggest a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PCCA2....

  16. Lung Stem and Progenitor Cells in Tissue Homeostasis and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Leeman, Kristen T.; Fillmore, Christine M.; Kim, Carla F.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian lung is a complex organ containing numerous putative stem/progenitor cell populations that contribute to region-specific tissue homeostasis and repair. In this review, we discuss recent advances in identifying and studying these cell populations in the context of lung homeostasis and disease. Genetically engineered mice now allow for lineage tracing of several lung stem and progenitor cell populations in vivo during different types of lung injury repair. Using specific sets of c...

  17. Sex differences in metabolic homeostasis, diabetes, and obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2015-01-01

    There are fundamental aspects of the control of metabolic homeostasis that are regulated differently in males and females. This sex asymmetry represents an evolutionary paradigm for females to resist the loss of energy stores. This perspective discusses the most fundamental sex differences in metabolic homeostasis, diabetes, and obesity. Together, the role of genetic sex, the programming effect of testosterone in the prenatal period in males, and the activational role of sex hormones at puber...

  18. Oxidative stress response in neural stem cells exposed to different superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongrac, Igor M; Pavičić, Ivan; Milić, Mirta; Brkić Ahmed, Lada; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Vinković Vrček, Ivana; Gajović, Srećko

    2016-01-01

    Biocompatibility, safety, and risk assessments of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are of the highest priority in researching their application in biomedicine. One improvement in the biological properties of SPIONs may be achieved by different functionalization and surface modifications. This study aims to investigate how a different surface functionalization of SPIONs – uncoated, coated with d-mannose, or coated with poly-l-lysine – affects biocompatibility. We sought to investigate murine neural stem cells (NSCs) as important model system for regenerative medicine. To reveal the possible mechanism of toxicity of SPIONs on NSCs, levels of reactive oxygen species, intracellular glutathione, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell-membrane potential, DNA damage, and activities of SOD and GPx were examined. Even in cases where reactive oxygen species levels were significantly lowered in NSCs exposed to SPIONs, we found depleted intracellular glutathione levels, altered activities of SOD and GPx, hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, dissipated cell-membrane potential, and increased DNA damage, irrespective of the surface coating applied for SPION stabilization. Although surface coating should prevent the toxic effects of SPIONs, our results showed that all of the tested SPION types affected the NSCs similarly, indicating that mitochondrial homeostasis is their major cellular target. Despite the claimed biomedical benefits of SPIONs, the refined determination of their effects on various cellular functions presented in this work highlights the need for further safety evaluations. This investigation helps to fill the knowledge gaps on the criteria that should be considered in evaluating the biocompatibility and safety of novel nanoparticles.

  19. Oxidative stress response in neural stem cells exposed to different superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongrac, Igor M; Pavičić, Ivan; Milić, Mirta; Brkić Ahmed, Lada; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Vinković Vrček, Ivana; Gajović, Srećko

    2016-01-01

    Biocompatibility, safety, and risk assessments of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are of the highest priority in researching their application in biomedicine. One improvement in the biological properties of SPIONs may be achieved by different functionalization and surface modifications. This study aims to investigate how a different surface functionalization of SPIONs - uncoated, coated with d-mannose, or coated with poly-l-lysine - affects biocompatibility. We sought to investigate murine neural stem cells (NSCs) as important model system for regenerative medicine. To reveal the possible mechanism of toxicity of SPIONs on NSCs, levels of reactive oxygen species, intracellular glutathione, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell-membrane potential, DNA damage, and activities of SOD and GPx were examined. Even in cases where reactive oxygen species levels were significantly lowered in NSCs exposed to SPIONs, we found depleted intracellular glutathione levels, altered activities of SOD and GPx, hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, dissipated cell-membrane potential, and increased DNA damage, irrespective of the surface coating applied for SPION stabilization. Although surface coating should prevent the toxic effects of SPIONs, our results showed that all of the tested SPION types affected the NSCs similarly, indicating that mitochondrial homeostasis is their major cellular target. Despite the claimed biomedical benefits of SPIONs, the refined determination of their effects on various cellular functions presented in this work highlights the need for further safety evaluations. This investigation helps to fill the knowledge gaps on the criteria that should be considered in evaluating the biocompatibility and safety of novel nanoparticles. PMID:27217748

  20. Research on the Relationship between Exercise and Iron Homeostasis%运动与铁稳态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    漆正堂; 贺杰; 罗艳蕊

    2006-01-01

    机体对运动的不适应不仅可能导致铁的丢失,还可能导致铁转运障碍,铁在储铁组织(肝脏、肌肉)蓄积过多,而在耗铁组织(骨髓)又相对缺乏.这种贫富悬殊的铁分布可能是运动性贫血的发病机理之一.长期运动训练后,如果机体产生运动适应,上调转铁蛋白及其受体的表达或增强非Tf结合铁的转运,那么就会克服铁的紊乱分布,将富铁组织的铁转运到贫铁的骨髓,有利于运动性贫血发生后血红蛋白与红细胞比容的恢复,这可能是运动性贫血呈现一过性、长期运动训练后机体出现低铁而不贫血状态的原因所在.

  1. Effects of environmental pollutants on cellular iron homeostasis and ultimate links to human disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic disease has increased in the last several decades, and environmental pollutants have been implicated. The magnitude and variety of diseases indicate the malfunctioning of some basic mechanism underlying human health. Environmental pollutants demonstrate a capability to co...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Deficiency Anemia Explore Iron-Deficiency Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ...

  3. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  4. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - iron; Ferric acid; Ferrous acid; Ferritin ... The human body needs iron to make the oxygen-carrying proteins hemoglobin and myoglobin. Hemoglobin is found in red blood cells and myoglobin is found ...

  5. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully ... With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from ... iron levels. Susan also made changes to her diet, such as focusing more on green leafy vegetables, ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video— ... treatment. For more information about living with and managing iron-deficiency anemia, go to the Health Topics ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Iron-deficiency ... 2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intravenous iron therapy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood ...

  11. Effects of iron overload on the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, E M; Walker, S M

    2000-10-01

    Iron and its binding proteins have immunoregulatory properties, and shifting of immunoregulatory balances by iron excess or deficiency may produce severe, deleterious physiological effects. Effects of iron overload include decreased antibody-mediated and mitogen-stimulated phagocytosis by monocytes and macrophages, alterations in T-lymphocyte subsets, and modification of lymphocyte distribution in different compartments of the immune system. The importance of iron in regulating the expression of T-lymphocyte cell surface markers, influencing the expansion of different T-cell subsets, and affecting immune cell functions can be demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. The poor ability of lymphocytes to sequester excess iron in ferritin may help to explain the immune system abnormalities in iron-overloaded patients. Iron overload as seen in hereditary hemochromatosis patients enhances suppressor T-cell (CD8) numbers and activity, decreases the proliferative capacity, numbers, and activity of helper T cells (CD4) with increases in CD8/CD4 ratios, impairs the generation of cytotoxic T cells, and alters immunoglobulin secretion when compared to treated hereditary hemochromatosis patients or controls. A correlation has recently been found between low CD8+ lymphocyte numbers, liver damage associated with HCV positivity, and severity of iron overload in beta-thalassemia major patients. Iron overload, with its associated increases of serum iron levels and transferrin saturation, may cause a poor response to interferon therapy. Iron overload with hyperferremia is associated with suppressed functions of the complement system (classic or alternative types). High plasma ferritin content in patients with chronic, diffuse diseases of the liver (cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis), beta-thalassemia major, dyserythropoiesis, and hereditary hemochromatosis may induce the development of anti-ferritin antibodies with the production of circulating immune complexes. Increased body stores of iron in

  12. The interplay between iron accumulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation during the execution step of neurodegenerative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MarcoTulioNunez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A growing set of observations points to mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, oxidative damage and chronic inflammation as common pathognomonic signs of a number of neurodegenerative diseases that includes Alzheimer's disease, Huntington disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedrich’s ataxia and Parkinson’s disease. Particularly relevant for neurodegenerative processes is the relationship between mitochondria and iron. The mitochondrion upholds the synthesis of iron-sulfur clusters and heme, the most abundant iron-containing prosthetic groups in a large variety of proteins, so a fraction of incoming iron must go through this organelle before reaching its final destination. In turn, the mitochondrial respiratory chain is the source of reactive oxygen species (ROS derived from leaks in the electron transport chain. The co-existence of both iron and ROS in the secluded space of the mitochondrion makes this organelle particularly prone to hydroxyl radical-mediated damage. In addition, a connection between the loss of iron homeostasis and inflammation is starting to emerge; thus, inflammatory cytokines like TNF-alpha and IL-6 induce the synthesis of the divalent metal transporter 1 and promote iron accumulation in neurons and microglia. Here, we review the recent literature on mitochondrial iron homeostasis and the role of inflammation on mitochondria dysfunction and iron accumulation on the neurodegenerative process that lead to cell death in Parkinson’s disease. We also put forward the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation and inflammation are part of a synergistic self-feeding cycle that ends in apoptotic cell death, once the antioxidant cellular defense systems are finally overwhelmed.

  13. Is the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin a risk factor for alcoholic liver disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duygu Dee Harrison-Findik

    2009-01-01

    Despite heavy consumption over a long period of time,only a small number of alcoholics develop alcoholic liver disease. This alludes to the possibility that other factors,besides alcohol, may be involved in the progression of the disease. Over the years, many such factors have indeed been identified, including iron. Despite being crucial for various important biological processes, iron can also be harmful due to its ability to catalyze Fenton chemistry. Alcohol and iron have been shown to interact synergistically to cause liver injury. Iron-mediated cell signaling has been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of experimental alcoholic liver disease. Hepcidin is an iron-regulatory hormone synthesized by the liver,which plays a pivotal role in iron homeostasis. Both acute and chronic alcohol exposure suppress hepcidin expression in the liver. The sera of patients with alcoholic liver disease, particularly those exhibiting higher serum iron indices, have also been reported to display reduced prohepcidin levels. Alcohol-mediated oxidative stress is involved in the inhibition of hepcidin promoter activity and transcription in the liver. This in turn leads to an increase in intestinal iron transport and liver iron storage. Hepcidin is expressed primarily in hepatocytes.It is noteworthy that both hepatocytes and Kupffer cells are involved in the progression of alcoholic liver disease. However, the activation of Kupffer cells and TNF-α signaling has been reported not to be involved in the down-regulation of hepcidin expression by alcohol in the liver. Alcohol acts within the parenchymal cells of the liver to suppress the synthesis of hepcidin. Due to its crucial role in the regulation of body iron stores, hepcidin may act as a secondary risk factor in the progression of alcoholic liver disease. The clarification of the mechanisms by which alcohol disrupts iron homeostasis will allow for further understanding of the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease.

  14. Iron Therapy for Preterm Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Raghavendra; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2009-01-01

    Preterm infants are at risk for both iron deficiency and iron overload. The role of iron in multiple organ functions suggests that iron supplementation is essential for the preterm infant. Conversely, the potential for iron overload and the poorly developed anti-oxidant measures in the preterm infant argues against indiscriminate iron supplementation in this population. The purpose of this article is to review the predisposing factors and consequences of iron deficiency and iron overload in t...

  15. Special thermite cast irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Zhiguts

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The given paper deals with the problems of the synthesis of cast iron by metallothermy synthesis. On the basis of investigated method of calculations structures of charges have been arranged and cast iron has been synthesized further. Peculiarities metallothermic smelting were found, mechanical properties and structure of received cast iron were investigated and different technologies for cast iron receiving were worked out.

  16. Alternative iron making routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, P.; Sharma, T. [Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India)

    2002-07-01

    The versatile route of iron production 'blast furnace' technique is being replaced by widely accepted Corex technology, Midrex process using Fastmelt ironmaking, eco-friendly Romelt process, more innovative Ausmelt & Hismelt technology, TATA KORF Mini blast furnace improvement, 'quickest iron through Orbiting Plasma', Direct iron ore smelting process, Conred, AISI-Hyl, Inred processes, Direct iron ore reduction methods, their comparison and proposed modifications. 18 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

  17. New Insights on Iron Study in Myelodysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha M. El Husseiny

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hepcidin plays a pivotal role in iron homeostasis. It is predominantly produced by hepatocytes and inhibits iron release from macrophages and iron uptake by intestinal epithelial cells. Competitive ELISA is the current method of choice for the quantification of serum hepcidin because of its lower detection limit, low costs, and high throughput. This study aims to discuss the role of hepcidin in the pathogenesis of iron overload in recently diagnosed myelodysplasia (MDS cases. METHODS: The study included 21 recently diagnosed MDS patients and 13 healthy controls. Ferritin, hepcidin, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTFR were measured in all subjects. RESULTS: There were 7 cases of hypocellular MDS, 8 cases of refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, and 6 cases of refractory anemia with excess blasts. No difference was observed among the 3 MDS subtypes in terms of hepcidin, sTFR, and ferritin levels (p>0.05. Mean hepcidin levels in the MDS and control groups were 55.8±21.5 ng/mL and 19.9±2.6 ng/ mL, respectively. Mean sTFR was 45.7±8.8 nmol/L in MDS patients and 31.1±5.6 nmol/L in the controls. Mean ferritin levels were significantly higher in MDS patients than in controls (539.14±83.5 ng/mL vs. 104.6±42.9 ng/mL, p0.05. CONCLUSION: Hepcidin may not be the main cause of iron overload in MDS. Further studies are required to test failure of production or peripheral unresponsiveness to hepcidin in MDS cases.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... Institutes of Health—shows how Susan, a full-time worker and student, has coped with having iron- ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...