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Sample records for altered cell viability

  1. Imatinib alters cell viability but not growth factors levels in TM4 Sertoli cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemnia, Seyyed Mohammad Reza; Atari-Hajipirloo, Somayeh; Roshan-Milani, Shiva; Valizadeh, Nasim; Mahabadi, Sonya; Kheradmand, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The anticancer agent imatinib (IM) is a small molecular analog of ATP that inhibits tyrosine kinase activity of platelet derived growth factors (PDGFs) and stem cell factor (SCF) receptor in cancer cells. However these factors have a key role in regulating growth and development of normal Sertoli, Leydig and germ cells. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine cell viability, PDGF and SCF levels in mouse normal Sertoli cells exposed to IM. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the mouse TM4 Sertoli cells were treated with 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 μM IM for 2, 4 or 6 days. The cell viability and growth factors levels were assessed by MTT and ELISA methods, respectively. For statistical analysis, One-Way ANOVA was performed. Results: IM showed significant decrease in Sertoli cell viability compared to control group (p=0.001). However, IM increased PDGF and SCF level insignificantly (p>0.05). Conclusion: Results suggested that IM treatment induced a dose dependent reduction of cell viability in Sertoli cells. It seems that treatment with this anticancer drug is involved in the fertility process. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of PDGF and SCF in this cell. PMID:27738659

  2. Circulatory shear flow alters the viability and proliferation of circulating colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rong Fan; Travis Emery; Yongguo Zhang; Yuxuan Xia; Jun Sun; Jiandi Wan

    2016-01-01

    During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells constantly experience hemodynamic shear stress in the circulation. Cellular responses to shear stress including cell viability and proliferation thus play critical roles in cancer metastasis. Here, we developed a microfluidic approach to establish a circulatory microenvironment and studied circulating human colon cancer HCT116 cells in response to a variety of magnitude of shear stress and circulating time. Our results showed that cell viabili...

  3. Exposure to Music Alters Cell Viability and Cell Motility of Human Nonauditory Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestard, Nathalia R.

    2016-01-01

    Although music is part of virtually all cultures in the world, little is known about how it affects us. Since the beginning of this century several studies suggested that the response to music, and to sound in general, is complex and might not be exclusively due to emotion, given that cell types other than auditory hair cells can also directly react to audible sound. The present study was designed to better understand the direct effects of acoustic vibrations, in the form of music, in human cells in culture. Our results suggest that the mechanisms of cell growth arrest and/or cell death induced by acoustic vibrations are similar for auditory and nonauditory cells. PMID:27478480

  4. Exposure to Music Alters Cell Viability and Cell Motility of Human Nonauditory Cells in Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestard, Nathalia R; Capella, Marcia A M

    2016-01-01

    Although music is part of virtually all cultures in the world, little is known about how it affects us. Since the beginning of this century several studies suggested that the response to music, and to sound in general, is complex and might not be exclusively due to emotion, given that cell types other than auditory hair cells can also directly react to audible sound. The present study was designed to better understand the direct effects of acoustic vibrations, in the form of music, in human cells in culture. Our results suggest that the mechanisms of cell growth arrest and/or cell death induced by acoustic vibrations are similar for auditory and nonauditory cells. PMID:27478480

  5. Circulatory shear flow alters the viability and proliferation of circulating colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rong; Emery, Travis; Zhang, Yongguo; Xia, Yuxuan; Sun, Jun; Wan, Jiandi

    2016-06-01

    During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells constantly experience hemodynamic shear stress in the circulation. Cellular responses to shear stress including cell viability and proliferation thus play critical roles in cancer metastasis. Here, we developed a microfluidic approach to establish a circulatory microenvironment and studied circulating human colon cancer HCT116 cells in response to a variety of magnitude of shear stress and circulating time. Our results showed that cell viability decreased with the increase of circulating time, but increased with the magnitude of wall shear stress. Proliferation of cells survived from circulation could be maintained when physiologically relevant wall shear stresses were applied. High wall shear stress (60.5 dyne/cm2), however, led to decreased cell proliferation at long circulating time (1 h). We further showed that the expression levels of β-catenin and c-myc, proliferation regulators, were significantly enhanced by increasing wall shear stress. The presented study provides a new insight to the roles of circulatory shear stress in cellular responses of circulating tumor cells in a physiologically relevant model, and thus will be of interest for the study of cancer cell mechanosensing and cancer metastasis.

  6. Hibiscus sabdariffa extractivities on cadmium-mediated alterations of human U937 cell viability and activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tebekeme Okoko; Diepreye Ere

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of the anthocyanin-rich extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa (H. sabdariffa) calyx on the viability of cadmium-treated U937 cells and cadmium-mediated activation of U937-derived macrophages. Methods:The macrophage cell line U937 was treated with cadmium (0.1μmol/L) and later incubated with the anthocyanin-rich extract and cell viability was assessed via trypan blue staining. In the other experiment, the U937 cells were transformed to the macrophage form by treatment with phorbol 12, myristate 13, and acetate and incubated with cadmium (10μmol/L). The anthocyanin-rich extract was added to the cells later and subsequently, the supernatant of each cell culture was analysed for the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), nitric oxide, and catalase activity as indices for the activation of macrophages. Results:It revealed that the anthocynanin-rich extract significantly (P <0.05) increased the viability of the cells which was suppressed by cadmium when compared to quercetin dihydrate. The extract also reduced the cadmium-mediated production of the markers of macrophage-activation when compared to quercetin dihydrate. In both experiments, the activity of the extract was concentration-dependent (P <0.05). Conclusion:The findings show that H. sabdariffa possesses significant immunoprotective effect. These corroborate the immense reported antioxidant and medicinal potential of the calyces of the plant which could be exploited for pharmacological and neutraceutical advantages.

  7. In vitro organotin administration alters guinea pig cochlear outer hair cell shape and viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, W J; Chertoff, M E; Brownell, W E; Fechter, L D

    1993-06-01

    Trimethyltin (TMT) and triethyltin (TET) disrupt auditory function at doses far below those shown to be neurotoxic. In vivo studies suggest that the initial effect of TMT on hearing occurs at the inner hair cell/spiral ganglion cell synapse, while later, the outer hair cell (OHC) undergoes structural and functional damage. TET produces acute effects upon afferent neurotransmission similar to those observed following TMT, but TET's effects on OHC structure and function have not been examined. OHCs are motile elements within the cochlea, believed to modulate the sensitivity and tuning within the inner ear. Changes in OHC length may alter hearing function, and length changes have been reported following exposure to various ototoxic agents in vitro. In the present study, 77 OHCs from 45 pigmented male guinea pigs were isolated in primary culture and exposed for 90 min to concentrations between 30 microM and 1.0 mM of TMT or TET and then to bathing medium for 30 min to remove the toxicant. Significant shortening of the OHC cell body occurred at all doses to both organotins, with a mean reduction in length of 15.1 and 20.2% for 1.0 mM TMT and TET, respectively, at the end of testing; control cells were only 3.4% shorter at the end of 90 min of perfusion with bathing medium. The effect of organotin exposure on OHC volume was not consistently related to either TMT or TET concentration or altered cell length. In addition, disruption of the plasma membrane characterized by bleb formation, the forceful ejection of cytoplasm, or bursting was seen in 80% of cells exposed to 1.0 mM TET, although not TMT; lower concentrations of both organotins disrupted the cell membrane in 10-30% of cells. Membrane rupture was not reliably associated with either increased cell volume or decreased length, implicating a weakening of the plasma membrane or cortical lattice as the basis for this effect. Consistent with the irreversible structural weakening of the lateral wall, resorption of

  8. Alterations in cell migration and cell viability of wounded human skin fibroblasts following visible red light exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva S.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2014-02-01

    The present study intended to examine the effect of visible red light on structural and cellular parameters on wounded skin fibroblast cells. To achieve the stated objective, uniform scratch was created on confluent monolayered human skin fibroblast cells, and were exposed to single dose of He-Ne laser (15 mm spot, 6.6808 mWcm-2) at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 Jcm-2 in the presence and absence of 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Beam profile measurements of the expanded laser beam were conducted to ensure the beam uniformity. The influence of laser dose on the change in temperature was recorded using sensitive temperature probe. Additionally, following laser exposure cell migration and cell survival were documented at different time intervals on wounded human skin fibroblast cells grown in vitro. Beam profile measurements indicated more or less uniform power distribution over the whole beam area. Temperature monitoring of sham irradiated control and laser treatment groups displayed negligible temperature change indicating the absence of thermal effect at the tested laser doses. In the absence of 10% FBS, single exposure of different laser doses failed to produce any significant effects on cell migration or cell survival. However, in the presence of serum single exposure of 5 J/cm2 on wounded skin fibroblasts significantly enhanced the cell migration (PLLLT acts by improving cell migration and cell proliferation to produce measurable changes in wounded fibroblast cells.

  9. Cryopreservation of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Alters Their Viability and Subpopulation Composition but Not Their Treatment Effects in a Rodent Stroke Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The systemic administration of autologous bone marrow (BM derived mononuclear cells (MNCs is under investigation as a novel therapeutic modality for the treatment of ischemic stroke. Autologous applications raise the possibility that MNCs could potentially be stored as a banked source. There have been no studies that investigate the effects of cryopreservation of BM-MNCs on their functional abilities in stroke models. In the present study, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo for 60 minutes and then divided into two treatment groups: fresh MNCs versus cryopreserved MNCs. BM-MNCs were collected at 22 hours after MCAo and were stored in liquid nitrogen for 12 months in cryopreserved MNCs group. BM-MNCs cellular viability, composition, and phenotype of the various subpopulations of mice BM-MNCs were evaluated by flow cytometry, and the behavioral recovery of stroke animals was tested with freshly harvested MNCs versus cryopreserved MNCs by corner test and ladder rung test. We found that long-term cryopreservation negatively impacts the cellular viability of bone marrow MNCs. Cryopreservation also alters the cellular composition of various subpopulations within the MNCs. However, despite the changes observed in cryopreserved cells, both fresh and frozen MNCs have similar beneficial effect on behavioral and histological outcomes.

  10. Exposure of human JEG-3 cell line to TCDD alters progesterone secretion but does not act on their viability and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustowska, K.; Gregoraszczuk, E.L. [Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow (Poland)

    2004-09-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related compounds are lipophilic and difficult to metabolize. Any environmental exposure of living organisms to these congeners results in their accumulation in fat tissue and bioconcentration in humans via the food chain. TCDD acts as an endocrine disrupter to alter differentiation and function of the reproductive system. Therefore, these compounds represent a serious health risk, especially to the fetus and infants, whose enzymatic and metabolic systems are not yet mature. Our previous data showed high accumulation of TCDD in cultured human placental tissue which caused a decrease in hormone secretion. However, the mechanism of this action is still unclear. JEG-3 cell line from malignant placental tissue has been used as an in vitro model for investigation of the effects of xenobiotics on placenta toxicity. These cells are morphologically similar to their origin, the trophoblast of the normal first trimester placenta, and produce many peptides and steroid hormones found in normal trophoblast cells, such as hCG, GhRH, progesterone. The aim of the present study was firstly, to show dose- and time-dependent effects of TCDD on progesterone production by JEG-3 cells and secondly, to examine mechanism of its action on cell viability and apoptosis.

  11. Failure of 5-thio-d-glucose to alter the viability or radiation response of EMT6 tumor cells in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glucose analogue 5-thio-d-glucose (5TG) was toxic to hypoxic EMT6 Rw mouse mammary tumor cells in exponential growth in cell culture, at a concentration of 5mM and with incubation times of 2-6 hrs. These same treatments were not toxic to aerated EMT6 cells. When hypoxic or aerobic cultures were preincubated with 5mM 5TG for 2 hors before irradiation, only insignificant changes in the radiation dose-response curves were observed. Mice bearing solid intradermal EMT6 tumors were treated with single or multiple injections of 5TG predicted to produce 5TG levels similar to those used during in vitro experiments. These 5TG treatments produced no significant changes in tumor cell viability, either in unirradiated tumors or in tumors irradiated with 15Gy of x-rays to deplete the aerobic tumor cell population. Fasting the mice before treatment to lower blood glucose levels increased the toxicity of 5TG, but did not allow more efficacious treatment of the tumors. These data provide no evidence that 5TG can be used effectively in the treatment of solid tumors, either as a cytotoxic agent which selectively kills hypoxic cells or as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer

  12. Viability of mesenchymal stem cells during electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zanatta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is a technique by which a live tissue can be re-constructed and one of its main goals is to associate cells with biomaterials. Electrospinning is a technique that facilitates the production of nanofibers and is commonly used to develop fibrous scaffolds to be used in tissue engineering. In the present study, a different approach for cell incorporation into fibrous scaffolds was tested. Mesenchymal stem cells were extracted from the wall of the umbilical cord and mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood. Cells were re-suspended in a 10% polyvinyl alcohol solution and subjected to electrospinning for 30 min under a voltage of 21 kV. Cell viability was assessed before and after the procedure by exclusion of dead cells using trypan blue staining. Fiber diameter was observed by scanning electron microscopy and the presence of cells within the scaffolds was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. After electrospinning, the viability of mesenchymal stem cells was reduced from 88 to 19.6% and the viability of mononuclear cells from 99 to 8.38%. The loss of viability was possibly due to the high viscosity of the polymer solution, which reduced the access to nutrients associated with electric and mechanical stress during electrospinning. These results suggest that the incorporation of cells during fiber formation by electrospinning is a viable process that needs more investigation in order to find ways to protect cells from damage.

  13. Exercise regulates breast cancer cell viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Christine; Lillelund, Christian; Midtgaard, Julie;

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Exercise decreases breast cancer risk and disease recurrence, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Training adaptations in systemic factors have been suggested as mediating causes. We aimed to examine if systemic adaptations to training over time, or acute exercise responses......, in breast cancer survivors could regulate breast cancer cell viability in vitro. Methods: Blood samples were collected from breast cancer survivors, partaking in either a 6-month training intervention or across a 2 h acute exercise session. Changes in training parameters and systemic factors were evaluated...... and pre/post exercise-conditioned sera from both studies were used to stimulate breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) in vitro. Results: Six months of training increased VO2peak (16.4 %, p

  14. Non-disruptive measurement system of cell viability in bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudek, F.; Nelsen, B. L.; Baselt, T.; Berger, T.; Wiele, M.; Prade, I.; Hartmann, P.

    2016-04-01

    Nutrient and oxygen transport, as well as the removal of metabolic waste are essential processes to support and maintain viable tissue. Current bioreactor technology used to grow tissue cultures in vitro has a fundamental limit to the thickness of tissues. Based on the low diffusion limit of oxygen a maximum tissue thickness of 200 μm is possible. The efficiency of those systems is currently under investigation. During the cultivation process of the artificial tissue in bioreactors, which lasts 28 days or longer, there are no possibilities to investigate the viability of cells. This work is designed to determine the influence of a non-disruptive cell viability measuring system on cellular activity. The measuring system uses a natural cellular marker produced during normal metabolic activity. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is a coenzyme naturally consumed and produced during cellular metabolic processes and has thoroughly been studied to determine the metabolic state of a cell. Measuring the fluorescence of NADH within the cell represents a non-disruptive marker for cell viability. Since the measurement process is optical in nature, NADH fluorescence also provides a pathway for sampling at different measurement depths within a given tissue sample. The measurement system we are using utilizes a special UV light source, to excite the NADH fluorescence state. However, the high energy potentially alters or harms the cells. To investigate the influence of the excitation signal, the cells were irradiated with a laser operating at a wavelength of 355 nm and examined for cytotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to develop a non-cytotoxic system that is applicable for large-scale operations during drug-tissue interaction testing.

  15. Viability of dielectrophoretically trapped neural cortical cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, T.; Vulto, P.; Rutten, W.L.C.; Marani, E.

    2001-01-01

    Negative dielectrophoretic trapping of neural cells is an efficient way to position neural cells on the electrode sites of planar micro-electrode arrays. The preservation of viability of the neural cells is essential for this approach. This study investigates the viability of postnatal cortical rat

  16. Mammalian cell viability in electrospun composite nanofiber structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbolat, Mehmet Fatih; Tang, Christina; Bernacki, Susan H; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Khan, Saad

    2011-10-10

    Incorporation of mammalian cells into nanofibers (cell electrospinning) and multilayered cell-nanofiber structures (cell layering) via electrospinning are promising techniques for tissue engineering applications. We investigate the viability of 3T3-L1 mouse fibroblasts after incorporation into poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibers and multilayering with poly(caprolactone) nanofibers and analyze the possible factors that affect cell viability. We observe that cells do not survive cell electrospinning but survive cell layering. Assessing the factors involved in cell electrospinning, we find that dehydration and fiber stretching are the main causes of cell death. In cell layering, the choice of solvent is critical, as residual solvent in the electrospun fibers could be detrimental to the cells. PMID:21984502

  17. Comparison of methods used for assessing the viability and vitality of yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Zadrag-Tecza, Renata

    2014-11-01

    Determination of cell viability is the most commonly used method for assessing the impact of various types of stressors in toxicity research and in industrial microbiology studies. Viability is defined as a percentage of live cells in a whole population. Although cell death is one of the consequences of toxicity, chemical or physical factors may exert their toxic effects through a number of cellular alterations that may compromise cell ability to divide without necessarily leading to cell death. This aspect represents the term 'cell vitality' defined as physiological capabilities of cells. It is important to note that cell viability and cell vitality represent two different aspects of cell functions, and both are required for the estimation of the physiological state of a cell after exposure to various types of stressors and chemical or physical factors. In this paper, we introduced a classification of available methods for estimating both viability and vitality in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells (wild-type and Δsod1 mutant) in which the effects of selected oxidants causing oxidative stress is evaluated. We present the advantages as well as disadvantages of the selected methods and assess their usefulness in different types of research.

  18. In Vitro Periodontal Ligament Cell Viability in Different Storage Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Meenakshi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the viability of periodontal ligament cells of avulsed teeth in three different storage media. Forty-five mature premolars extracted for orthodontic therapeutic purposes were randomly and equally divided into three groups according to the storage medium: milk (control), rice water and egg white. After placing extracted teeth for 30 min in storage media, the scrapings of the periodontal ligament (PDL) were collected in Falcon tubes containing collagenase in 2.5 mL of phosphate buffer saline and were incubated for 30 min and centrifuged for 5 min at 800 rpm. Cell viability was analyzed by Trypan blue exclusion. Rice water had a significantly higher number of viable cells compared to egg white and milk. There was no statistically significant difference between egg white and milk. Rice water may be able to maintain PDL cell viability of avulsed teeth better than egg white or milk. PMID:27652702

  19. Effect of salt hyperosmotic stress on yeast cell viability

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    Logothetis Stelios

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During fermentation for ethanol production, yeasts are subjected to different kinds of physico-chemical stresses such as: initially high sugar concentration and low temperature; and later, increased ethanol concentrations. Such conditions trigger a series of biological responses in an effort to maintain cell cycle progress and yeast cell viability. Regarding osmostress, many studies have been focused on transcriptional activation and gene expression in laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The overall aim of this present work was to further our understanding of wine yeast performance during fermentations under osmotic stress conditions. Specifically, the research work focused on the evaluation of NaCl-induced stress responses of an industrial wine yeast strain S. cerevisiae (VIN 13, particularly with regard to yeast cell growth and viability. The hypothesis was that osmostress conditions energized specific genes to enable yeast cells to survive under stressful conditions. Experiments were designed by pretreating cells with different sodium chloride concentrations (NaCl: 4%, 6% and 10% w/v growing in defined media containing D-glucose and evaluating the impact of this on yeast growth and viability. Subsequent fermentation cycles took place with increasing concentrations of D-glucose (20%, 30%, 40% w/v using salt-adapted cells as inocula. We present evidence that osmostress induced by mild salt pre-treatments resulted in beneficial influences on both cell viability and fermentation performance of an industrial wine yeast strain.

  20. Effects of Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunday, Brittney; Triantafillu, Ursula; Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun

    2014-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are believed to be the source of tumor formation, are exposed to fluid shear stress as a result of blood flow within the blood vessels. It was theorized that CSCs would be less susceptible to cell death than non-CSCs after both types of cell were exposed to a fluid shear stress, and that higher levels of fluid shear stress would result in lower levels of cell viability for both cell types. To test this hypothesis, U87 glioblastoma cells were cultured adherently (containing smaller populations of CSCs) and spherically (containing larger populations of CSCs). They were exposed to fluid shear stress in a simulated blood flow through a 125-micrometer diameter polyetheretherketone (PEEK) tubing using a syringe pump. After exposure, cell viability data was collected using a BioRad TC20 Automated Cell Counter. Each cell type was tested at three physiological shear stress values: 5, 20, and 60 dynes per centimeter squared. In general, it was found that the CSC-enriched U87 sphere cells had higher cell viability than the CSC-depleted U87 adherent cancer cells. Interestingly, it was also observed that the cell viability was not negatively affected by the higher fluid shear stress values in the tested range. In future follow-up studies, higher shear stresses will be tested. Furthermore, CSCs from different tumor origins (e.g. breast tumor, prostate tumor) will be tested to determine cell-specific shear sensitivity. National Science Foundation Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  1. Inhibiting ice recrystallization and optimization of cell viability after cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaytor, Jennifer L; Tokarew, Jacqueline M; Wu, Luke K; Leclère, Mathieu; Tam, Roger Y; Capicciotti, Chantelle J; Guolla, Louise; von Moos, Elisabeth; Findlay, C Scott; Allan, David S; Ben, Robert N

    2012-01-01

    The ice recrystallization inhibition activity of various mono- and disaccharides has been correlated with their ability to cryopreserve human cell lines at various concentrations. Cell viabilities after cryopreservation were compared with control experiments where cells were cryopreserved with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The most potent inhibitors of ice recrystallization were 220 mM solutions of disaccharides; however, the best cell viability was obtained when a 200 mM d-galactose solution was utilized. This solution was minimally cytotoxic at physiological temperature and effectively preserved cells during freeze-thaw. In fact, this carbohydrate was just as effective as a 5% DMSO solution. Further studies indicated that the cryoprotective benefit of d-galactose was a result of its internalization and its ability to mitigate osmotic stress, prevent intracellular ice formation and/or inhibit ice recrystallization. This study supports the hypothesis that the ability of a cryoprotectant to inhibit ice recrystallization is an important property to enhance cell viability post-freeze-thaw. This cryoprotective benefit is observed in three different human cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the ability of a potential cryoprotectant to inhibit ice recrystallation may be used as a predictor of its ability to preserve cells at subzero temperatures.

  2. Thermal Pretreatment Improves Viability of Cryopreserved Human Endothelial Cells.

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    Hofmann, Nicola; Sun, Huan; Chatterjee, Anamika; Saha, Debapriya; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2015-10-01

    A high survival rate of cryopreserved cells requires optimal cooling and thawing rates in the presence of a cryoprotective agent (CPA) or a combination of CPAs in adequate concentrations. One of the most widely used CPAs, dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO), however is toxic at high concentrations and has detrimental effects on cellular functions. Additional processing steps are necessary to remove the CPA after thawing, which make the process expensive and time consuming. Therefore it is of great interest to develop new cryoprotective strategies to replace the currently used CPAs or to reduce their concentration. The aim of this study was to investigate if thermal activation of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC ST-1.6R), prior to cryopreservation, could improve their post-thaw viability since the resulting heat shock protein expression acts as an intrinsic cellular protection mechanism. The results of this study suggest that both heat and cold shock pretreatments improve cryopreservation outcome of the HPMEC ST-1.6R cells. By re-cultivating cells after heat shock treatment before cryopreservation, a significant increase in cellular membrane integrity and adherence capacity could be achieved. However a combination of thermal activation and cryopreservation with alternative CPAs such as ectoine and L-proline could not further enhance the cell viability. The results of this study showed that pretreatment of endothelial cells with thermal activation could be used to reduce the Me2SO concentration required in order to preserve cell viability after cryopreservation. PMID:26419006

  3. Host-based Th2 cell therapy for prolongation of cardiac allograft viability.

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    Shoba Amarnath

    Full Text Available Donor T cell transfusion, which is a long-standing approach to prevent allograft rejection, operates indirectly by alteration of host T cell immunity. We therefore hypothesized that adoptive transfer of immune regulatory host Th2 cells would represent a novel intervention to enhance cardiac allograft survival. Using a well-described rat cardiac transplant model, we first developed a method for ex vivo manufacture of rat host-type Th2 cells in rapamycin, with subsequent injection of such Th2.R cells prior to class I and class II disparate cardiac allografting. Second, we determined whether Th2.R cell transfer polarized host immunity towards a Th2 phenotype. And third, we evaluated whether Th2.R cell therapy prolonged allograft viability when used alone or in combination with a short-course of cyclosporine (CSA therapy. We found that host-type Th2.R cell therapy prior to cardiac allografting: (1 reduced the frequency of activated T cells in secondary lymphoid organs; (2 shifted post-transplant cytokines towards a Th2 phenotype; and (3 prolonged allograft viability when used in combination with short-course CSA therapy. These results provide further support for the rationale to use "direct" host T cell therapy for prolongation of allograft viability as an alternative to "indirect" therapy mediated by donor T cell infusion.

  4. Viability Tests for Fresh and Stored Haemopoietic Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews current methods of measurement of the viability of fresh and stored haemopoietic cells. The life expectancy of granulocytes and monocytes after transfusion can be studied by in-vitro labelling with 3H-DFP and subsequent autoradiography. The evaluation of data in about 30 patients with various haemopoietic conditions indicates a wide variation of the disappearance half-time of granulocytes. 3H-cytidine labels essentially all lymphocytes in vitro, predominantly in their RNA. Transfusion of 3H-cytidine-labelled lymphocytes enables one to measure the lower limit of their life-expectancy as well as their rate of RNA metabolism. If bone-marrow cells are labelled in vitro with 3H-thymidine and subsequently transfused, their capability to circulate, to reach the haemopoietic tissue of the host, to proliferate and to mature can be demonstrated. However, the repopulating capacity of frozen and thawed marrow is independent of the ability of 3H-TDR-labelled marrow cells to circulate, proliferate and mature. It is assumed that bone-marrow cells capable of repopulating depleted haemopoietic tissue are resting under steady-state conditions and can be labelled by means of 3H-TDR only using special conditions. Thus the only viability tests for fresh and stored bone-marrow cells at present appear to be bioassay methods at the animal experimental level. The results indicate the need for the development of reliable viability tests for stem cells applicable in both experimental and clinical conditions. (author)

  5. Influence of location-dependent protuberance damage on cell viability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG HaiFeng; ZHOU Ming; DI JianKe; ZHAO EnLan; YANG PeiFang; GONG AiHua; SUN XiangLan

    2009-01-01

    The influence of femtosecond laser-induced damages on viability of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) is investigated. Several cytokinetic processes including cellular damage, recovery and death are dis-cussed. Using femtosecond laser with the power of 100 μW and cutting speed of 2 μm/s, we cut the cellular protuberance with smaller diameter twice in different locations, and then observe the viability of the damaged cells. Under the same conditions, the root of protuberance with larger diameter is cut six times to observe changes of cellular shape. Whether the damage is located in the end, middle or root of protuberance with smaller diameter, the cell viability can recover within 3 h. When the damage is located in the root of protuberance with larger diameter, the damaged cell will die in the way of oncoais. Cytokinetic phenomena including intracellular high Ca2+ concentration, cellular morphologic change, recovery and oncosis are discussed. Meanwhile, high Ca2+ concentration is observed after femtosec-ond laser surgery. Therefore, femtosecond laser surgery is an important tool for establishing cell damage model and studying cytokinetics.

  6. Cell Viability Assessment: Toward Content-Rich Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Christina Nicole; Antczak, Christophe; Djaballah, Hakim

    2013-01-01

    Importance of the field Monitoring cell viability in vitro is critical in many areas of biomedical research, and the ultimate goal in drug discovery is the ability to predict the in vivo toxicology of drug candidates based on their toxicity profile in vitro. Over the last decade, the contribution of high-throughput screening (HTS) toward this goal has been tremendous, providing the ability to screen compounds in parallel against multiple cell types. However, the toxic effects of drug candidates uncovered during clinical trials are by far the main reason for their failure. Over the same period, our understanding of programmed cell death has evolved dramatically with the identification of critical control points in the cell death pathways. As a result, cell viability should no longer be characterized solely on the basis of discrete endpoint measurements such as membrane permeability. Areas covered in this review/What the reader will gain This review summarizes the traditional viability assays currently commercially available, focusing on methods amenable to high density format. Assays categorized into the following classes are discussed: dye exclusion assays, DNA condensation-based assays and assays monitoring a metabolic function. We describe each approach, and using case studies, we emphasize their limitations. Take home message Current low-content methods based on single parameter readouts are prone to error due to the heterogeneity of cell populations and the multi-faceted nature of cell death. High-content approaches based on continuous, multiplexed readouts are becoming increasingly important for monitoring multiple markers of cell death induction simultaneously, on a cell by cell basis. The use of such content-rich platforms is a necessity to predict the toxicology of drug candidates accurately. PMID:22823019

  7. Femtosecond Optical Trapping of Cells: Efficiency and Viability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Jixian; LI Fang; XING Qirong

    2009-01-01

    The femtosecond optical trapping capability and the effect of femtosecond laser pulses on cell viability were studied. The maximum lateral velocity at which the particles just failed to be trapped, together with the measured average trapping power, were used to calculate the lateral trapping force(Q-value). The viability of the cells after femtosecond laser trapping was ascertained by vital staining. Measurement of the Q-values shows that femtosecond optical tweezers are just as effective as continuous wave optical tweezers. The experiments demonstrate that there is a critical limit for expo-sure time at each corresponding laser power of femtosecond optical tweezers, and femtosecond laser tweezers are safe for optical trapping at low power with short exposure time.

  8. Effects of Triclosan on Neural Stem Cell Viability and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bo Kyung; Gonzales, Edson Luck T; Yang, Sung Min; Bang, Minji; Choi, Chang Soon; Shin, Chan Young

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan is an antimicrobial or sanitizing agent used in personal care and household products such as toothpaste, soaps, mouthwashes and kitchen utensils. There are increasing evidence of the potentially harmful effects of triclosan in many systemic and cellular processes of the body. In this study, we investigated the effects of triclosan in the survivability of cultured rat neural stem cells (NSCs). Cortical cells from embryonic day 14 rat embryos were isolated and cultured in vitro. After stabilizing the culture, triclosan was introduced to the cells with concentrations ranging from 1 μM to 50 μM and in varied time periods. Thereafter, cell viability parameters were measured using MTT assay and PI staining. TCS decreased the cell viability of treated NSC in a concentration-dependent manner along with increased expressions of apoptotic markers, cleaved caspase-3 and Bax, while reduced expression of Bcl2. To explore the mechanisms underlying the effects of TCS in NSC, we measured the activation of MAPKs and intracellular ROS. TCS at 50 μM induced the activations of both p38 and JNK, which may adversely affect cell survival. In contrast, the activities of ERK, Akt and PI3K, which are positively correlated with cell survival, were inhibited. Moreover, TCS at this concentration augmented the ROS generation in treated NSC and depleted the glutathione activity. Taken together, these results suggest that TCS can induce neurodegenerative effects in developing rat brains through mechanisms involving ROS activation and apoptosis initiation. PMID:26759708

  9. New small molecules targeting apoptosis and cell viability in osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Maugg

    Full Text Available Despite the option of multimodal therapy in the treatment strategies of osteosarcoma (OS, the most common primary malignant bone tumor, the standard therapy has not changed over the last decades and still involves multidrug chemotherapy and radical surgery. Although successfully applied in many patients a large number of patients eventually develop recurrent or metastatic disease in which current therapeutic regimens often lack efficacy. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In this study, we performed a phenotypic high-throughput screening campaign using a 25,000 small-molecule diversity library to identify new small molecules selectively targeting osteosarcoma cells. We could identify two new small molecules that specifically reduced cell viability in OS cell lines U2OS and HOS, but affected neither hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2 nor primary human osteoblasts (hOB. In addition, the two compounds induced caspase 3 and 7 activity in the U2OS cell line. Compared to conventional drugs generally used in OS treatment such as doxorubicin, we indeed observed a greater sensitivity of OS cell viability to the newly identified compounds compared to doxorubicin and staurosporine. The p53-negative OS cell line Saos-2 almost completely lacked sensitivity to compound treatment that could indicate a role of p53 in the drug response. Taken together, our data show potential implications for designing more efficient therapies in OS.

  10. Progesterone promotes propagation and viability of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shan-Wei; Song, Hou-Yan

    2009-10-25

    It has been known that estrogen-17beta stimulates proliferation of mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells. To explore the function of another steroid hormone progesterone, we used MTT method and BrdU incorporation assay to obtain growth curves, clone forming assay to detect the propagation and viability of individual mES cells, Western blot to test the expression of ES cell marker gene Oct-4, fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) to test cell cycle, and real-time PCR to detect the expressions of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases and proto-oncogenes. The results showed that progesterone promoted proliferation of mES cells. The number of clones was more in progesterone-treated group than that in the control group. The expression of pluripotency-associated transcriptional factor Oct-4 changed little after progesterone treatment as shown by Western blot, indicating that most of mES cells were in undifferentiated state. The results of FACS proved that progesterone promoted DNA synthesis in mES cells. The proportion of mES cells in S+G(2)/M phase was higher in progesterone-treated group than that in the control group. Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases, as well as proto-oncogenes (c-myc, c-fos) were up-regulated when cells were treated with progesterone. The results obtained indicate that progesterone promotes propagation and viability of mES cells. The up-regulation of cell cycle-related factors might contribute to the function of progesterone.

  11. Cell viability and functionality of probiotic bacteria in dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel eVinderola

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic bacteria, according to the definition adopted by the World Health Organization in 2002, are live microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit to the host. Recent studies show that the same probiotic strain produced and/or preserved under different storage conditions, may present different responses regarding their susceptibility to the adverse conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, its capacity to adhere to the intestinal epithelium, or its immunomodulating capacity, being the functionality affected without changes in cell viability. This could imply that the control of cell viability is not always enough to guarantee the functionality (probiotic capacity of a strain. Therefore, a new challenge arises for food technologists and microbiologists when it comes to designing and monitoring probiotic food: to be able to monitor the cell functionality a probiotic microorganism along all the stages the strain goes through from the moment it is produced and included into the food vehicle until to the moment of consumption. Conventional methodological tools or others still to be developed must be used. The application of cell membrane functionality markers, the use of tests of resistence to intestinal barriers, the study of surface properties and the application of in vivo models comes together as complementary tools to assess the actual capacity of a probiotic into a specific food to exert functional effects regardless the number of viable cells present at the moment of consumption.

  12. Cytotoxicity and Effects on Cell Viability of Nickel Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Rodriguez, Jose E.

    2013-05-01

    Recently, magnetic nanoparticles are finding an increased use in biomedical applications and research. Nanobeads are widely used for cell separation, biosensing and cancer therapy, among others. Due to their properties, nanowires (NWs) are gaining ground for similar applications and, as with all biomaterials, their cytotoxicity is an important factor to be considered before conducting biological studies with them. In this work, the cytotoxic effects of nickel NWs (Ni NWs) were investigated in terms of cell viability and damage to the cellular membrane. Ni NWs with an average diameter of 30-34 nm were prepared by electrodeposition in nanoporous alumina templates. The templates were obtained by a two-step anodization process with oxalic acid on an aluminum substrate. Characterization of NWs was done using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-Ray analysis (EDAX), whereas their morphology was observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cell viability studies were carried out on human colorectal carcinoma cells HCT 116 by the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) cell proliferation colorimetric assay, whereas the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) homogenous membrane fluorimetric assay was used to measure the degree of cell membrane rupture. The density of cell seeding was calculated to obtain a specific cell number and confluency before treatment with NWs. Optical readings of the cell-reduced MTT products were measured at 570 nm, whereas fluorescent LDH membrane leakage was recorded with an excitation wavelength of 525 nm and an emission wavelength of 580 - 640 nm. The effects of NW length, cell exposure time, as well as NW:cell ratio, were evaluated through both cytotoxic assays. The results show that cell viability due to Ni NWs is affected depending on both exposure time and NW number. On the other hand, membrane rupture and leakage was only significant at later exposure times. Both

  13. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexsandra da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa; da Silva, Camila Luna; de Carvalho, Simone Nunes; Cortez, Erika; Mencalha, André Luiz; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Stumbo, Ana Carolina

    2016-07-01

    Low-level infrared laser is considered safe and effective for treatment of muscle injuries. However, the mechanism involved on beneficial effects of laser therapy are not understood. The aim was to evaluate cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser at therapeutic fluences. C2C12 myoblast cultures at different (2 and 10 %) fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (808 nm, 100 mW) at different fluences (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) and evaluated after 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated by WST-1 assay; reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and necrosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Cell viability was decreased atthe lowest FBS concentration. Laser exposure increased the cell viability in myoblast cultures at 2 % FBS after 48 and 72 h, but no significant increase in ROS was observed. Apoptosis was decreased at the higher fluence and necrosis was increased at lower fluence in myoblast cultures after 24 h of laser exposure at 2 % FBS. No laser-induced alterations were obtained at 10 % FBS. Results show that level of reactive oxygen species is not altered, at least to those evaluated in this study, but low-level infrared laser exposure affects cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures depending on laser fluence and physiologic conditions of cells. PMID:26886589

  14. Effect of microemulsions on cell viability of human dermal fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juyi; Mironava, Tatsiana; Simon, Marcia; Rafailovich, Miriam; Garti, Nissim

    Microemulsions are optically clear, thermostable and isotropic mixture consisting of water, oil and surfactants. Their advantages of ease preparation, spontaneous formation, long-term stability and enhanced solubility of bioactive materials make them great potentials as vehicles in food and pharmaceutical applications. In this study, comparative in vitro cytotoxicity tests were performed to select a best formulation of microemulsion with the least toxicity for human dermal fibroblasts. Three different kinds of oils and six different kinds of surfactants were used to form microemulsions by different ratios. The effect of oil type and surfactant type as well as their proportions on cell proliferation and viability were tested.

  15. Effects of lead on viability and intracellular metal content of C6 rat glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiffany-Castiglioni, E.; Garcia, D.M.; Wu, J.N.; Zmudzki, J.; Bratton, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    Cultured C6 rat glioma cells were exposed to lead (Pb) acetate (0, 1, 10, or 100 ..mu..M) for 3-4 d. Cells were analyzed for changes in viability and intracellular lead, iron, and copper concentrations after Pb treatment was discontinued. The results were compared with previous findings on astroglia and oligodendroglia in culture in order to evaluate C6 cultures as a model for Pb toxicity in glia. Viability was measured by three methods on the day Pb was removed from the cells (designated d 0), and 2 and 9 d after Pb treatment was discontinued (designated d 2 and 9). The methods used were trypan blue dye exclusion, total cell counts, and incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-L-leucine into proteins. With respect to Pb and Fe uptake, C6 cells closely resembled immature astroglia in culture. Unlike C6 cells, however, astroglia showed elevations of intracellular Fe and Cu after treatment. Thus, Pb effects on C6 cells resembled those on cultured oligodendroglia and astroglia in some respects but not in others. C6 cells appear to be an adequate model for selected events in glial toxicosis, such as PB-stimulated protein synthesis in oligodendroglia and Pb uptake in astroglia, but not Pb-induced alterations of intracellular Cu and Fe in astroglia. Their use as a model for glial progenitor cells in Pb toxicity studies remains to be determined.

  16. Cell proliferation alterations in Chlorella cells under stress conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very little is known about growth and proliferation in relation to the cell cycle regulation of algae. The lack of knowledge is even greater when referring to the potential toxic effects of pollutants on microalgal cell division. To assess the effect of terbutryn, a triazine herbicide, on the proliferation of the freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris three flow cytometric approaches were used: (1) in vivo cell division using 5-,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) staining was measured, (2) the growth kinetics were determined by cytometric cell counting and (3) cell viability was evaluated with the membrane-impermeable double-stranded nucleic acid stain propidium iodide (PI). The results obtained in the growth kinetics study using CFSE to identify the microalgal cell progeny were consistent with those determined by cytometric cell counting. In all C. vulgaris cultures, each mother cell had undergone only one round of division through the 96 h of assay and the cell division occurred during the dark period. Cell division of the cultures exposed to the herbicide was asynchronous. Terbutryn altered the normal number of daughter cells (4 autospores) obtained from each mother cell. The number was only two in the cultures treated with 250 nM. The duration of the lag phase after the exposure to terbutryn could be dependent on the existence of a critical cell size to activate cytoplasmic division. Cell size, complexity and fluorescence of chlorophyll a of the microalgal cells presented a marked light/dark (day/night) cycle, except in the non-dividing 500 nM cultures, where terbutryn arrested cell division at the beginning of the cycle. Viability results showed that terbutryn has an algastatic effect in C. vulgaris cells at this concentration. The rapid and precise determination of cell proliferation by CFSE staining has allowed us to develop a model for assessing both the cell cycle of C. vulgaris and the in vivo effects of pollutants on growth and

  17. Cell proliferation alterations in Chlorella cells under stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioboo, Carmen [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15008 A Coruna (Spain); O' Connor, Jose Enrique [Laboratorio de Citomica, Unidad Mixta de Investigacion CIPF-UVEG, Centro de Investigacion Principe Felipe, Avda. Autopista del Saler, 16, 46013 Valencia (Spain); Prado, Raquel; Herrero, Concepcion [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15008 A Coruna (Spain); Cid, Angeles, E-mail: cid@udc.es [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15008 A Coruna (Spain)

    2009-09-14

    Very little is known about growth and proliferation in relation to the cell cycle regulation of algae. The lack of knowledge is even greater when referring to the potential toxic effects of pollutants on microalgal cell division. To assess the effect of terbutryn, a triazine herbicide, on the proliferation of the freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris three flow cytometric approaches were used: (1) in vivo cell division using 5-,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) staining was measured, (2) the growth kinetics were determined by cytometric cell counting and (3) cell viability was evaluated with the membrane-impermeable double-stranded nucleic acid stain propidium iodide (PI). The results obtained in the growth kinetics study using CFSE to identify the microalgal cell progeny were consistent with those determined by cytometric cell counting. In all C. vulgaris cultures, each mother cell had undergone only one round of division through the 96 h of assay and the cell division occurred during the dark period. Cell division of the cultures exposed to the herbicide was asynchronous. Terbutryn altered the normal number of daughter cells (4 autospores) obtained from each mother cell. The number was only two in the cultures treated with 250 nM. The duration of the lag phase after the exposure to terbutryn could be dependent on the existence of a critical cell size to activate cytoplasmic division. Cell size, complexity and fluorescence of chlorophyll a of the microalgal cells presented a marked light/dark (day/night) cycle, except in the non-dividing 500 nM cultures, where terbutryn arrested cell division at the beginning of the cycle. Viability results showed that terbutryn has an algastatic effect in C. vulgaris cells at this concentration. The rapid and precise determination of cell proliferation by CFSE staining has allowed us to develop a model for assessing both the cell cycle of C. vulgaris and the in vivo effects of pollutants on growth and

  18. A bacteriophage detection tool for viability assessment of Salmonella cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, E; Martins, V C; Nóbrega, C; Carvalho, C M; Cardoso, F A; Cardoso, S; Dias, J; Deng, D; Kluskens, L D; Freitas, P P; Azeredo, J

    2014-02-15

    Salmonellosis, one of the most common food and water-borne diseases, has a major global health and economic impact. Salmonella cells present high infection rates, persistence over inauspicious conditions and the potential to preserve virulence in dormant states when cells are viable but non-culturable (VBNC). These facts are challenging for current detection methods. Culture methods lack the capacity to detect VBNC cells, while biomolecular methods (e.g. DNA- or protein-based) hardly distinguish between dead innocuous cells and their viable lethal counterparts. This work presents and validates a novel bacteriophage (phage)-based microbial detection tool to detect and assess Salmonella viability. Salmonella Enteritidis cells in a VBNC physiological state were evaluated by cell culture, flow-cytometry and epifluorescence microscopy, and further assayed with a biosensor platform. Free PVP-SE1 phages in solution showed the ability to recognize VBNC cells, with no lysis induction, in contrast to the minor recognition of heat-killed cells. This ability was confirmed for immobilized phages on gold surfaces, where the phage detection signal follows the same trend of the concentration of viable plus VBNC cells in the sample. The phage probe was then tested in a magnetoresistive biosensor platform allowing the quantitative detection and discrimination of viable and VBNC cells from dead cells, with high sensitivity. Signals arising from 3 to 4 cells per sensor were recorded. In comparison to a polyclonal antibody that does not distinguish viable from dead cells, the phage selectivity in cell recognition minimizes false-negative and false-positive results often associated with most detection methods.

  19. >Effect of progesterone hormon on cell viability and stem cell activation in dental pulp cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segah Altuntaş

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The dental pulp is the part in the center of a tooth made up of living connective tissue and cells called odontoblasts. The vitality of the dentin structure, both during health and after injury, depends on pulp cell activity and the signaling processes that regulate the cell’s behavior. Dental pulp tissue has condensed stem cell activity. Dental pulp stem cells are multipotent stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into a variety of cell types. Several publications have stressed the importance of the expression of pluripotentiality associated markers: the transcription factors Nanog, Sox2, Oct3/4, SSEA4, CD13, Stro1 are indispensable for the stem cells to divide indefinitely without affecting their differentiation potential (self renewal capacity. Progesterone is a steroid hormone leading to menstrual cycle and gestation. There is a widespread rumor among people that pregnancy causes toothy loss. Method: So, progesterone was applied in different concentrations on human dental pulp cells in cell culture. Cell viability assay was applied 24th hour later with trypan blue. RNA isolation, cDNA synthesis and Real Time PCR analysis were applied on selected transcription factors (Nanog and Oct4 (POU5F1 genes which have role on steamness of stem cells. Gene expression analyses results were correlated with the cell viability assay results. Results: Cell viability assay results were 80% viable in control, 82% viable in 7 ml progesterone application, 81% viable in 14 ml progesterone application, 83% viable in 21 ml progesterone application. Due to our findings, progesterone in different concentrations did not chance the cell viability in dental pulpa cells. On gene expression analyses, preliminary results supported that high concentrations of progesterone enhance the gene expressions of steamness genes (Nanog, and Oct4 in dental pulp cells. Conclusions: So, progesterone did not change cell viability in high concentrations. We

  20. Cell viability and repair systems in mammal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchronized cell cultures of mice are irradiated with 4,0J/m2 ultraviolet light at different times. The possible mechanisms involved in the recuperation of the cellular survival observed, are discussed. (M.A.)

  1. Effect of Cold Plasma on Cell Viability and Collagen Synthesis in Cultured Murine Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xingmin; Cai, Jingfen; Xu, Guimin; Ren, Hongbin; Chen, Sile; Chang, Zhengshi; Liu, Jinren; Huang, Chongya; Zhang, Guanjun; Wu, Xili

    2016-04-01

    An argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet was employed to treat L929 murine fibroblasts cultured in vitro. Experimental results showed that, compared with the control cells, the treatment of fibroblasts with 15 s of plasma led to a significant increase of cell viability and collagen synthesis, while the treatment of 25 s plasma resulted in a remarkable decrease. Exploration of related mechanisms suggested that cold plasma could up-regulate CyclinD1 gene expression and down-regulate p27 gene expression at a low dose, while it could down-regulate CyclinD1 expression and up-regulate p27 expression at a higher dose, thus altering the cell cycle progression, and then affecting cell viability and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts. supported partly by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 81372076, 51307133 and 51221005), China National Funds for Distinguished Young Scientists (No. 51125029), the Sci-Tech Project of Shaanxi Province of China (No. 2010K16-04), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. xkjc2013004)

  2. Bisphenol A Disrupts Transcription and Decreases Viability in Aging Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Varandas, Edna; Pereira, H. Sofia; Monteiro, Sara; Neves, Elsa; Brito, Luísa; Boavida Ferreira, Ricardo; Viegas, Wanda; Delgado, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely utilized endocrine disruptor capable of mimicking endogenous hormones, employed in the manufacture of numerous consumer products, thereby interfering with physiological cellular functions. Recent research has shown that BPA alters epigenetic cellular mechanisms in mammals and may be correlated to enhanced cellular senescence. Here, the effects of BPA at 10 ng/mL and 1 µg/mL, concentrations found in human samples, were analyzed on HT29 human colon adenocarcinona cell line and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC). Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) transcriptional analysis of the Long Interspersed Element-1 (LINE-1) retroelement showed that BPA induces global transcription deregulation in both cell lines, although with more pronounced effects in HUVEC cells. Whereas there was an increase in global transcription in HT29 exclusively after 24 h of exposure, this chemical had prolonged effects on HUVEC. Immunoblotting revealed that this was not accompanied by alterations in the overall content of H3K9me2 and H3K4me3 epigenetic marks. Importantly, cell viability assays and transcriptional analysis indicated that prolonged BPA exposure affects aging processes in senescent HUVEC. To our knowledge this is the first report that BPA interferes with senescence in primary vascular endothelial cells, therefore, suggesting its association to the etiology of age-related human pathologies, such as atherosclerosis. PMID:25207595

  3. Effect of intervertebral disc degeneration on disc cell viability: a numerical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbusera, Fabio; Mietsch, Antje; Schmidt, Hendrik; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Neidlinger-Wilke, Cornelia

    2013-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc may be initiated and supported by impairment of the nutrition processes of the disc cells. The effects of degenerative changes on cell nutrition are, however, only partially understood. In this work, a finite volume model was used to investigate the effect of endplate calcification, water loss, reduction of disc height and cyclic mechanical loading on the sustainability of the disc cell population. Oxygen, lactate and glucose diffusion, production and consumption were modelled with non-linear coupled partial differential equations. Oxygen and glucose consumption and lactate production were expressed as a function of local oxygen concentration, pH and cell density. The cell viability criteria were based on local glucose concentration and pH. Considering a disc with normal water content, cell death was initiated in the centre of the nucleus for oxygen, glucose, and lactate diffusivities in the cartilaginous endplate below 20% of the physiological values. The initial cell population could not be sustained even in the non-calcified endplates when a reduction of diffusion inside the disc due to water loss was modelled. Alterations in the disc shape such as height loss, which shortens the transport route between the nutrient sources and the cells, and cyclic mechanical loads, could enhance cell nutrition processes. PMID:21970697

  4. Spatial and Temporal Measurements of Temperature and Cell Viability in Response to Nanoparticle Mediated Photothermal Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, Jon R [ORNL; Rodgers, Amanda [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Harvie, Erica [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Carswell, William [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Torti, Suzy [Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Rylander, Christopher [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Rylander, Nichole M [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Nanoparticle enhanced photothermal therapy is a promising alternative to tumor resection. However, quantitative measurements of cellular response to these treatments are limited. This paper introduces a Bimodal Enhanced Analysis of Spatiotemporal Temperature (BEAST) algorithm to rapidly determine the viability of cancer cells in vitro following photothermal therapy alone or in combination with nanoparticles. Materials & Methods: To illustrate the capability of the BEAST viability algorithm, single wall carbon nanohorns were added to renal cancer (RENCA) cells in vitro and time-dependent spatial temperature maps measured with an infrared camera during laser therapy were correlated with post-treatment cell viability distribution maps obtained by cell-staining fluorescent microscopy. Conclusion: The BEAST viability algorithm accurately and rapidly determined the cell viability as function of time, space, and temperature.

  5. Cell motility, morphology, viability and proliferation in response to nanotopography on silicon black

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopacinska, Joanna M.; Gradinaru, Cristian; Wierzbicki, Rafal;

    2012-01-01

    viability and proliferation show little dependence on substrate type. We conclude that motility analysis can show a wide range of cell responses e. g. over a factor of two in cell speed to different nano-topographies, where standard assays, such as viability or proliferation, in the tested cases show much...... standard measurements of cell viability, proliferation, and morphology on various surfaces. We also analyzed the motility of cells on the same surfaces, as recorded in time lapse movies of sparsely populated cell cultures. We find that motility and morphology vary strongly with nano-patterns, while...

  6. Altered arterial stiffness and subendocardial viability ratio in young healthy light smokers after acute exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Doonan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies showed that long-standing smokers have stiffer arteries at rest. However, the effect of smoking on the ability of the vascular system to respond to increased demands (physical stress has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effect of smoking on arterial stiffness and subendocardial viability ratio, at rest and after acute exercise in young healthy individuals. METHODS/RESULTS: Healthy light smokers (n = 24, pack-years = 2.9 and non-smokers (n = 53 underwent pulse wave analysis and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measurements at rest, and 2, 5, 10, and 15 minutes following an exercise test to exhaustion. Smokers were tested, 1 after 12h abstinence from smoking (chronic condition and 2 immediately after smoking one cigarette (acute condition. At rest, chronic smokers had higher augmentation index and lower aortic pulse pressure than non-smokers, while subendocardial viability ratio was not significantly different. Acute smoking increased resting augmentation index and decreased subendocardial viability ratio compared with non-smokers, and decreased subendocardial viability ratio compared with the chronic condition. After exercise, subendocardial viability ratio was lower, and augmentation index and aortic pulse pressure were higher in non-smokers than smokers in the chronic and acute conditions. cfPWV rate of recovery of was greater in non-smokers than chronic smokers after exercise. Non-smokers were also able to achieve higher workloads than smokers in both conditions. CONCLUSION: Chronic and acute smoking appears to diminish the vascular response to physical stress. This can be seen as an impaired 'vascular reserve' or a blunted ability of the blood vessels to accommodate the changes required to achieve higher workloads. These changes were noted before changes in arterial stiffness or subendocardial viability ratio occurred at rest. Even light smoking in young healthy individuals

  7. Effect of Sodium Arsenite on Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Cells Viability and Morphological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Abnosi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Sodium arsenite as an environmental pollutant being found in the air, water, and earth crust threats the human beings' health. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium arsenite on viability and morphology of mesenchymal stem cells in rat bone marrow.Materials & Methods: In this exprimental study the cells were extracted in DMEM containing 15% FBS and Pen/Strep until the 3rd passage then treated with 0, 0.1, 0.5, 2.5, 12.5 and 20 µM of sodium arsenite for 12, 24, 36 and 48 hrs. Viability of the cells was carried out with trypan blue and MTT staining, then 0.1 µM and 36 hrs treatment was selected for further investigations. Morphology of the cells was studied using fluorescent dye (Hochest, propidium iodide and acridine orange as well as protein profile of the cells were studied using SDS-PAGE. Data was analyzed using one and two way ANOVA.Results: Based on the two way ANOVA, cumulative effect of treatment time and used dosage caused highly significant reduction (p<0.001 in viability of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. One way ANOVA indicated that the viability of the cells reduced significantly (p<0.05 from 0.1 µM of sodium arsenite on wards in all the treatment time. Morphological changes including condensation and deformation of the nuclei, membrane disruption, and shrinkage of cytoplasm were also observed. Conclusion: Sodium arsenite toxicity caused morphological and protein profile changes as well as dose and time dependent reduction in viability of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

  8. Cell size dynamics and viability of cells exposed to hypotonic treatment and electroporation for electrofusion optimization:

    OpenAIRE

    Hudej, Rosana; Kandušer, Maša; Miklavčič, Damijan; Trontelj, Katja; Ušaj, Marko

    2009-01-01

    Background. Various electrofusion parameters have to be adjusted to obtain theoptimal electrofusion efficiency. Based on published data, good electrofusion conditions can be achieved with the hypotonic treatment. However, the duration of the hypotonic treatment before electroporation and buffer hypoosmolarity have to be adjusted in order to cause cell swelling, to avoid regulatory volume decrease and to preserve cell viability. The aims of our study were to determine cell size dynamics and vi...

  9. Cell size dynamics and viability of cells exposed to hypotonic treatment and electroporation for electrofusion optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Trontelj, Katja; Kandušer, Maša; Miklavčič, Damijan; Hudej, Rosana; Ušaj, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Background. Various electrofusion parameters have to be adjusted to obtain theoptimal electrofusion efficiency. Based on published data, good electrofusion conditions can be achieved with the hypotonic treatment. However, the duration of the hypotonic treatment before electroporation and buffer hypoosmolarity have to be adjusted in order to cause cell swelling, to avoid regulatory volume decrease and to preserve cell viability. The aims of our study were to determine cell size dynamics and vi...

  10. Cytotoxic Effects of Alcoholic Extract of Dorema Glabrum Seed on Cancerous Cells Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Bannazadeh Amirkhiz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the present study cytotoxic effects of the alcoholic extract of Dorema Glabrum seed on viability of WEHI-164 cells, mouse Fibrosarcoma cell line and L929 normal cells were compared with the cytotoxic effects of Taxol (anticancer and apoptosis inducer drug. Methods: To find out the plant extract cytotoxic effects, MTT test and DNA fragmentation assay, the biochemical hallmark of apoptosis were performed on cultured and treated cells. Results: According to the findings the alcoholic extract of Dorema Glabrum seed can alter cells morphology and because of chromatin condensation and other changes they shrink and take a spherical shape, and lose their attachment too. So the plant extract inhibits cell growth albeit in a time and dose dependent manner and results in degradation of chromosomal DNA. Conclusion: Our data well established the anti-proliferative effect of methanolic extract of Dorema Glabrum seed and clearly showed that the plant extract can induce apoptosis and not necrosis in vitro, but the mechanism of its activities remained unknown. These results demonstrated that Dorema Glabrum seed might be a novel and attractive therapeutic candidate for tumor treatment in clinical practices.

  11. Pseudorabies Virus Induces Viability Changes and Oxidative Stress in Swine Testis Cell-Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Zhan Zhang§1, Ye Chen§1, Hong-Liang Huang§2, Dong-Lei Xu1, Chang-Bao Ren2, Bi-Tao Liu1, Shuo Su1 and Zhao-Xin Tang1, 2*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the association between pseudorabies (PRV virus-induced viability changes and oxidative stress in vitro cultivated swine testis (ST cells. The kinetic of 2, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h during the cell culture with PRV by using a multiplicity of infection (MOI of 1 TCID50 per cell were adopted. The results suggested a complex relation between cell viability and oxidative stress during PRV infection. In the early stages of PRV infection, the cell viability was higher than the control group, and the state of cellular oxidative stress remained relatively stable. After 24 h, the cell viability began to decrease, and the amount of the cellular malondialdehyde in ST cells increased significantly, and the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase decreased significantly (P<0.05. Meanwhile, the rising concentrations of cellular hydrogen peroxide were detected prior to the changes in cell viability and oxidative stress. In conclusion, the PRV infection of ST cells leads to oxidative stress, and this stress could play a crucial role on the cell viability as the PRV infection time progresses.

  12. The Cytotoxic Role of Intermittent High Glucose on Apoptosis and Cell Viability in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Glucose fluctuations are both strong predictor of diabetic complications and crucial factor for beta cell damages. Here we investigated the effect of intermittent high glucose (IHG on both cell apoptosis and proliferation activity in INS-1 cells and the potential mechanisms. Methods. Cells were treated with normal glucose (5.5 mmol/L, constant high glucose (CHG (25 mmol/L, and IHG (rotation per 24 h in 11.1 or 25 mmol/L for 7 days. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, xanthine oxidase (XOD level, apoptosis, cell viability, cell cycle, and expression of cyclinD1, p21, p27, and Skp2 were determined. Results. We found that IHG induced more significant apoptosis than CHG and normal glucose; intracellular ROS and XOD levels were more markedly increased in cells exposed to IHG. Cells treated with IHG showed significant decreased cell viability and increased cell proportion in G0/G1 phase. Cell cycle related proteins such as cyclinD1 and Skp2 were decreased significantly, but expressions of p27 and p21 were increased markedly. Conclusions. This study suggested that IHG plays a more toxic effect including both apoptosis-inducing and antiproliferative effects on INS-1 cells. Excessive activation of cellular stress and regulation of cyclins might be potential mechanism of impairment in INS-1 cells induced by IHG.

  13. Mps1 kinase regulates tumor cell viability via its novel role in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Ling, Y; Guo, Y; Bai, Y; Shi, X; Gong, F; Tan, P; Zhang, Y; Wei, C; He, X; Ramirez, A; Liu, X; Cao, C; Zhong, H; Xu, Q; Ma, R Z

    2016-01-01

    Targeting mitotic kinase monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) for tumor therapy has been investigated for many years. Although it was suggested that Mps1 regulates cell viability through its role in spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), the underlying mechanism remains less defined. In an endeavor to reveal the role of high levels of mitotic kinase Mps1 in the development of colon cancer, we unexpectedly found the amount of Mps1 required for cell survival far exceeds that of maintaining SAC in aneuploid cell lines. This suggests that other functions of Mps1 besides SAC are also employed to maintain cell viability. Mps1 regulates cell viability independent of its role in cytokinesis as the genetic depletion of Mps1 spanning from metaphase to cytokinesis affects neither cytokinesis nor cell viability. Furthermore, we developed a single-cycle inhibition strategy that allows disruption of Mps1 function only in mitosis. Using this strategy, we found the functions of Mps1 in mitosis are vital for cell viability as short-term treatment of mitotic colon cancer cell lines with Mps1 inhibitors is sufficient to cause cell death. Interestingly, Mps1 inhibitors synergize with microtubule depolymerizing drug in promoting polyploidization but not in tumor cell growth inhibition. Finally, we found that Mps1 can be recruited to mitochondria by binding to voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) via its C-terminal fragment. This interaction is essential for cell viability as Mps1 mutant defective for interaction fails to main cell viability, causing the release of cytochrome c. Meanwhile, deprivation of VDAC1 can make tumor cells refractory to loss of Mps1-induced cell death. Collectively, we conclude that inhibition of the novel mitochondrial function Mps1 is sufficient to kill tumor cells. PMID:27383047

  14. Inhibition of Geranylgeranyl Transferase-I Decreases Cell Viability of HTLV-1-Transformed Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia A. Pise-Masison

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL, an aggressive and highly chemoresistant malignancy. Rho family GTPases regulate multiple signaling pathways in tumorigenesis: cytoskeletal organization, transcription, cell cycle progression, and cell proliferation. Geranylgeranylation of Rho family GTPases is essential for cell membrane localization and activation of these proteins. It is currently unknown whether HTLV-1-transformed cells are preferentially sensitive to geranylgeranylation inhibitors, such as GGTI-298. In this report, we demonstrate that GGTI-298 decreased cell viability and induced G2/M phase accumulation of HTLV-1-transformed cells, independent of p53 reactivation. HTLV-1-LTR transcriptional activity was inhibited and Tax protein levels decreased following treatment with GGTI-298. Furthermore, GGTI-298 decreased activation of NF-κB, a downstream target of Rho family GTPases. These studies suggest that protein geranylgeranylation contributes to dysregulation of cell survival pathways in HTLV-1-transformed cells.

  15. Quercetin Stimulates Insulin Secretion and Reduces the Viability of Rat INS-1 Beta-Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kittl

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previously we described insulinotropic effects of Leonurus sibiricus L. plant extracts used for diabetes mellitus treatment in Traditional Mongolian Medicine. The flavonoid quercetin and its glycoside rutin, which exert anti-diabetic properties in vivo by interfering with insulin signaling in peripheral target tissues, are constituents of these extracts. This study was performed to better understand short- and long-term effects of quercetin and rutin on beta-cells. Methods: Cell viability, apoptosis, phospho-protein abundance and insulin release were determined using resazurin, annexin-V binding assays, Western blot and ELISA, respectively. Membrane potentials (Vmem, whole-cell Ca2+ (ICa- and ATP-sensitive K+ (IKATP currents were measured by patch clamp. Intracellular Ca2+ (Cai levels were measured by time-lapse imaging using the ratiometric Ca2+ indicator Fura-2. Results: Rutin, quercetin and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K inhibitor LY294002 caused a dose-dependent reduction in cell viability with IC50 values of ∼75 µM, ∼25 µM and ∼3.5 µM, respectively. Quercetin (50 µM significantly increased the percentage of Annexin-V+ cells within 48 hrs. The mean cell volume (MCV of quercetin-treated cells was significantly lower. Within 2 hrs, quercetin significantly decreased basal- and insulin-stimulated Akt(T308 phosphorylation and increased Erk1/2 phosphorylation, without affecting P-Akt(S473 abundance. Basal- and glucose-stimulated insulin release were significantly stimulated by quercetin. Quercetin significantly depolarized Vmem by ∼25 mV which was prevented by the KATP-channel opener diazoxide, but not by the L-type ICa inhibitor nifedipine. Quercetin significantly stimulated ICa and caused a 50% inhibition of IKATP. The effects on Vmem, ICa and IKATP rapidly reached peak values and then gradually diminished to control values within ∼1 minute. With a similar time-response quercetin induced an elevation in Cai

  16. MAML1 regulates cell viability via the NF-{kappa}B pathway in cervical cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuncharin, Yanin [Medical Microbiology Interdisciplinary Program, Graduate School, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Sangphech, Naunpun [Biotechnology Program, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Kueanjinda, Patipark [Medical Microbiology Interdisciplinary Program, Graduate School, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Bhattarakosol, Parvapan [Medical Microbiology Interdisciplinary Program, Graduate School, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Palaga, Tanapat, E-mail: tanapat.p@chula.ac.th [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2011-08-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays important roles in tumorigenesis in a context-dependent manner. In human cervical cancer, alterations in Notch signaling have been reported, and both tumor-suppressing and tumor-promoting roles of Notch signaling have been proposed; however, the precise molecular mechanisms governing these roles in cervical cancer remain controversial. MAML is a transcriptional co-activator originally identified by its role in Notch signaling. Recent evidence suggests that it also plays a role in other signaling pathways, such as the p53 and {beta}-catenin pathways. MAML is required for stable formation of Notch transcriptional complexes at the promoters of Notch target genes. Chromosomal translocations affecting MAML have been shown to promote tumorigenesis. In this study, we used a truncated dominant-negative MAML1 (DN-MAML) to investigate the role of MAML in HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines. Three human cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa, SiHa and CaSki) expressed all Notch receptors and the Notch target genes Hes1 and MAML1. Among these 3 cell lines, constitutive appearance of cleaved Notch1 was found only in CaSki cells, which suggests that Notch1 is constitutively activated in this cell line. Gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI) treatment, which suppresses Notch receptor activation, completely abrogated this form of Notch1 but had no effect on cell viability. Overexpression of DN-MAML by retroviral transduction in CaSki cells resulted in significant decreases in the mRNA levels of Hes1 and Notch1 but had no effects on the levels of MAML1, p53 or HPV E6/E7. DN-MAML expression induced increased viability of CaSki cells without any effect on cell cycle progression or cell proliferation. In addition, clonogenic assay experiments revealed that overexpression of DN-MAML resulted in increased colony formation compared to the overexpression of the control vector. When the status of the NF-{kappa}B pathway was investigated, CaSki cells overexpressing

  17. Ice-Binding Protein Derived from Glaciozyma Can Improve the Viability of Cryopreserved Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak Jun; Shim, Hye Eun; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Kang, Yong-Cheol; Hur, Young Baek

    2015-12-28

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) can inhibit ice recrystallization (IR), a major cause of cell death during cryopreservation. IBPs are hypothesized to improve cell viability after cryopreservation by alleviating the cryoinjury caused by IR. In our previous studies, we showed that supplementation of the freezing medium with the recombinant IBP of the Arctic yeast Glaciozyma sp. (designated as LeIBP) could reduce post-thaw hemolysis of human red blood cells and increase the survival of cryopreserved diatoms. Here, we showed that LeIBP could improve the viability of cryopreserved mammalian cells. Human cervical cancer cells (HeLa), mouse fibroblasts (NIH/3T3), human preosteoblasts (MC3T3-E1), Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1), and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were evaluated. These mammalian cells were frozen in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/fetal bovine serum (FBS) solution with or without 0.1 mg/ml LeIBP at a cooling rate of -1°C/min in a -80°C freezer overnight. The minimum effective concentration (0.1 mg/ml) of LeIBP was determined, based on the viability of HeLa cells after treatment with LeIBP during cryopreservation and the IR inhibition assay results. The post-thaw viability of mammalian cells was examined. In all cases, cell viability was significantly enhanced by more than 10% by LeIBP supplementation in 5% DMSO/5% FBS: viability increased by 20% for HeLa cells, 28% for NIH/3T3 cells, 21% for MC3T3-E1, 10% for CHO-K1, and 20% for HaCaT. Furthermore, addition of LeIBP reduced the concentrations of toxic DMSO and FBS down to 5%. Therefore, we demonstrated that LeIBP can increase the viability of cryopreserved mammalian cells by inhibiting IR.

  18. Cell viability - Open TG-GATEs | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us Open... Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Cell viability - Open TG-GATEs | LSDB Archive ...

  19. Microfluidic high viability neural cell separation using viscoelastically tuned hydrodynamic spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Zhigang; Hjort, Klas; Wicher, Grzegorz;

    2008-01-01

    A high viability microfluidic cell separation technique of high throughput was demonstrated based on size difference continuous mode hydrodynamic spreading with viscoelastic tuning. Using water with fluorescent dye as sample fluid and in parallel introducing as elution a viscoelastic biocompatibl...

  20. Preparation of Nanoporous Polymer Films for Real-Time Viability Monitoring of Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Man Chou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated an alternative way to monitor the viability of cells adhered on a nanoporous polymer film in real time. The nanoporous polymer films were prepared by laser interference pattering. During exposure of holographic patterning, the dissolved solvents were phase separated with photocured polymer and the nanopores were created as the solvents evaporated. The diffracted spectra from the nanoporous polymer film responded to each activity of the cell cycle, from initial cell seeding, through growth, and eventual cell death. This cell-based biosensor uses a nanoporous polymer film to noninvasively monitor cell viability and may prove useful for biotechnological applications.

  1. Survivin Modulates Squamous Cell Carcinoma-Derived Stem-Like Cell Proliferation, Viability and Tumor Formation in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Lotti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous Cell Carcinoma-derived Stem-like Cells (SCC-SC originate from alterations in keratinocyte stem cells (KSC gene expression and sustain tumor development, invasion and recurrence. Since survivin, a KSC marker, is highly expressed in SCC-SC, we evaluate its role in SCC-SC cell growth and SCC models. Survivin silencing by siRNA decreases clonal growth of SCC keratinocytes and viability of total, rapidly adhering (RAD and non-RAD (NRAD cells from primary SCC. Similarly, survivin silencing reduces the expression of stem cell markers (OCT4, NOTCH1, CD133, β1-integrin, while it increases the level of differentiation markers (K10, involucrin. Moreover, survivin silencing improves the malignant phenotype of SCC 3D-reconstruct, as demonstrated by reduced epidermal thickness, lower Ki-67 positive cell number, and decreased expression of MMP9 and psoriasin. Furthermore, survivin depletion by siRNA in RasG12V-IκBα-derived tumors leads to smaller tumor formation characterized by lower mitotic index and reduced expression of the tumor-associated marker HIF1α, VEGF and CD51. Therefore, our results indicate survivin as a key gene in regulating SCC cancer stem cell formation and cSCC development.

  2. Survivin Modulates Squamous Cell Carcinoma-Derived Stem-Like Cell Proliferation, Viability and Tumor Formation in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, Roberta; Palazzo, Elisabetta; Petrachi, Tiziana; Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Saltari, Annalisa; Truzzi, Francesca; Quadri, Marika; Puviani, Mario; Maiorana, Antonino; Marconi, Alessandra; Pincelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma-derived Stem-like Cells (SCC-SC) originate from alterations in keratinocyte stem cells (KSC) gene expression and sustain tumor development, invasion and recurrence. Since survivin, a KSC marker, is highly expressed in SCC-SC, we evaluate its role in SCC-SC cell growth and SCC models. Survivin silencing by siRNA decreases clonal growth of SCC keratinocytes and viability of total, rapidly adhering (RAD) and non-RAD (NRAD) cells from primary SCC. Similarly, survivin silencing reduces the expression of stem cell markers (OCT4, NOTCH1, CD133, β₁-integrin), while it increases the level of differentiation markers (K10, involucrin). Moreover, survivin silencing improves the malignant phenotype of SCC 3D-reconstruct, as demonstrated by reduced epidermal thickness, lower Ki-67 positive cell number, and decreased expression of MMP9 and psoriasin. Furthermore, survivin depletion by siRNA in Ras(G12V)-IκBα-derived tumors leads to smaller tumor formation characterized by lower mitotic index and reduced expression of the tumor-associated marker HIF1α, VEGF and CD51. Therefore, our results indicate survivin as a key gene in regulating SCC cancer stem cell formation and cSCC development.

  3. The role of adrenergic activation on murine luteal cell viability and progesterone production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Tang, Min; Jiang, Huaide; Wu, Bing; Cai, Wei; Hu, Chuan; Bao, Riqiang; Dong, Qiming; Xiao, Li; Li, Gang; Zhang, Chunping

    2016-09-15

    Sympathetic innervations exist in mammalian CL. The action of catecholaminergic system on luteal cells has been the focus of a variety of studies. Norepinephrine (NE) increased progesterone secretion of cattle luteal cells by activating β-adrenoceptors. In this study, murine luteal cells were treated with NE and isoprenaline (ISO). We found that NE increased the viability of murine luteal cells and ISO decreased the viability of luteal cells. Both NE and ISO promoted the progesterone production. Nonselective β-adrenergic antagonist, propranolol reversed the effect of ISO on cell viability but did not reverse the effect of NE on cell viability. Propranolol blocked the influence of NE and ISO on progesterone production. These results reveal that the increase of luteal cell viability induced by NE is not dependent on β-adrenergic activation. α-Adrenergic activation possibly contributes to it. Both NE and ISO increased progesterone production through activating β-adrenergic receptor. Further study showed that CyclinD2 is involved in the increase of luteal cell induced by NE. 3β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, LHR, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), and PGF2α contribute to the progesterone production induced by NE and ISO. PMID:27173955

  4. Evaluation of skin viability effect on ethosome and liposome-mediated psoralen delivery via cell uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Tai; Shen, Li-Na; Wu, Zhong-Hua; Zhao, Ji-Hui; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of skin viability on its permeability to psoralen delivered by ethosomes, as compared with liposomes. With decreasing skin viability, the amount of liposome-delivered psoralen that penetrated through the skin increased, whereas skin deposition of psoralen from both ethosomes and liposomes reduced. Psoralen delivery to human-immortalized epidermal cells was more effective using liposomes, whereas delivery to human embryonic skin fibroblast cells was more effective when ethosomes were used. These findings agreed with those of in vivo studies showing that skin psoralen deposition from ethosomes and liposomes first increased and then plateaued overtime, which may indicate gradual saturation of intracellular drug delivery. It also suggested that the reduced deposition of ethosome- or liposome-delivered psoralen in skin with reduced viability may relate to reduced cellular uptake. This work indicated that the effects of skin viability should be taken into account when evaluating nanocarrier-mediated drug skin permeation. PMID:25070929

  5. Evaluation of skin viability effect on ethosome and liposome-mediated psoralen delivery via cell uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Tai; Shen, Li-Na; Wu, Zhong-Hua; Zhao, Ji-Hui; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of skin viability on its permeability to psoralen delivered by ethosomes, as compared with liposomes. With decreasing skin viability, the amount of liposome-delivered psoralen that penetrated through the skin increased, whereas skin deposition of psoralen from both ethosomes and liposomes reduced. Psoralen delivery to human-immortalized epidermal cells was more effective using liposomes, whereas delivery to human embryonic skin fibroblast cells was more effective when ethosomes were used. These findings agreed with those of in vivo studies showing that skin psoralen deposition from ethosomes and liposomes first increased and then plateaued overtime, which may indicate gradual saturation of intracellular drug delivery. It also suggested that the reduced deposition of ethosome- or liposome-delivered psoralen in skin with reduced viability may relate to reduced cellular uptake. This work indicated that the effects of skin viability should be taken into account when evaluating nanocarrier-mediated drug skin permeation.

  6. Is cell viability always directly related to corrosion resistance of stainless steels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahinejad, E; Ghaffari, M; Vashaee, D; Tayebi, L

    2016-05-01

    It has been frequently reported that cell viability on stainless steels is improved by increasing their corrosion resistance. The question that arises is whether human cell viability is always directly related to corrosion resistance in these biostable alloys. In this work, the microstructure and in vitro corrosion behavior of a new class of medical-grade stainless steels were correlated with adult human mesenchymal stem cell viability. The samples were produced by a powder metallurgy route, consisting of mechanical alloying and liquid-phase sintering with a sintering aid of a eutectic Mn-Si alloy at 1050 °C for 30 and 60 min, leading to nanostructures. In accordance with transmission electron microscopic studies, the additive particles for the sintering time of 30 min were not completely melted. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic experiments suggested the higher corrosion resistance for the sample sintered for 60 min; however, a better cell viability on the surface of the less corrosion-resistant sample was unexpectedly found. This behavior is explained by considering the higher ion release rate of the Mn-Si additive material, as preferred sites to corrosion attack based on scanning electron microscopic observations, which is advantageous to the cells in vitro. In conclusion, cell viability is not always directly related to corrosion resistance in stainless steels. Typically, the introduction of biodegradable and biocompatible phases to biostable alloys, which are conventionally anticipated to be corrosion-resistant, can be advantageous to human cell responses similar to biodegradable metals. PMID:26952444

  7. Use of fluorescent redox indicators to evaluate cell proliferation and viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, E.S.

    1999-01-01

    The performance of two cell viability test kits based on the use of redox indicators yielding fluorescent products, the AlamarBlue assay and a resazurin-based in vitro toxicology assay kit from Sigma, was compared in the present study. Cultures of human neonatal foreskin fibroblasts were exposed...... components were tentatively identified as resazurin and resorufin. The AlamarBlue assay has gained wide application as a cell viability indicator that allows continuous monitoring of cell proliferation or cytotoxicity in human and animal cells, bacteria, and fungi, but no studies with the deliberate use...

  8. Aspiration, but not injection, decreases cultured equine mesenchymal stromal cell viability

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Lynn B.; Russell, Keith A.; Koenig, Judith B.; Thomas G. Koch

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, equine multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have received significant attention as therapy for various conditions due to their proposed regenerative and immune-modulating capacity. MSC are commonly administered to the patient through a hypodermic needle. Currently, little information is available on the effect of such injection has on equine MSC immediate and delayed viability. We hypothesize that viability of equine MSC is not correlated with needle diameter durin...

  9. Effect of amyloid peptides on serum withdrawal-induced cell differentiation and cell viability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Peng WANG; Ze Fen WANG; Ying Chun ZHANG; Qing TIAN; Jian Zhi WANG

    2004-01-01

    Abnormal deposition of amyloid-β(Aβ) peptides and formation of neuritic plaques are recognized as pathological processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. By using amyloid precursor protein (APP) transfected cells, this study aims to investigate the effect of overproduction of Aβ on cell differentiation and cell viability. It was shown that after serum withdrawal, untransfected cell (N2a/Wt) and vector transfected cells (N2a/vector) extended long and branched cell processes, whereas no neurites was induced in wild type APP (N2a/APP695) and Swedish mutant APP (N2a/APPswe) transfected N2a cells. After differentiation by serum withdrawal, the localization of APP/Aβ and neurofilament was extended to neurites, whereas those of APP-transfected cells were still restricted within the cell body. Levels of both APP and Aβ were significantly higher in N2a/APP695 and N2a/APPswe than in N2a/Wt, as determined by Western blot and Sandwich ELISA, respectively. To further investigate the effect of Aβ on the inhibition of cell differentiation,we added exogenously the similar level or about 10-times of the Aβ level produced by N2a/APP695 and N2a/APPswe to the culture medium and co-cultured with N2a/Wt for 12 h, and we found that the inhibition of serum withdrawalinduced differentiation observed in N2a/APP695 and N2a/APPswe could not be reproduced by exogenous administration of Aβ into N2a/Wt. We also observed that neither endogenous production nor exogenous addition of Aβ1-40 or Aβ1-42, even to hundreds fold of the physiological concentration, affected obviously the cell viability. These results suggest that the overproduction of Aβ could not arrest cell differentiation induced by serum deprivation and that, at least to a certain degree and in a limited time period, is not toxic to cell viability.

  10. Influence of electrospun scaffolds prepared from distinct polymers on proliferation and viability of endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matveeva, V. G., E-mail: matveeva-vg@mail.ru; Antonova, L. V., E-mail: antonova.la@mail.ru; Velikanova, E. A.; Sergeeva, E. A.; Krivkina, E. O.; Glushkova, T. V.; Kudryavtseva, Yu. A.; Barbarash, O. L.; Barbarash, L. S. [Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases, Kemerovo, 650002 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    We compared electrospun nonwoven scaffolds from polylactic acid (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), and polyhydroxybutyrate/valerate (PHBV)/polycaprolactone (PHBV/PCL). The surface of PHBV/PCL and PCL scaffolds was highly porous and consisted of randomly distributed fibers, whilst the surface of PLA scaffolds consisted of thin straight fibers, which located more sparsely, forming large pores. Culture of EA.hy 926 endothelial cells on these scaffolds during 7 days and further fluorescent microscopy demonstrated that the surface of PHBV/PCL scaffolds was most favorable for efficient adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. The lowest proliferation rate and cell viability were detected on PLA scaffolds. Therefore, PHBV/PCL electrospun nonwoven scaffolds demonstrated the best results regarding endothelial cell proliferation and viability as compared to PCL and PLA scaffolds.

  11. Influence of electrospun scaffolds prepared from distinct polymers on proliferation and viability of endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveeva, V. G.; Antonova, L. V.; Velikanova, E. A.; Sergeeva, E. A.; Krivkina, E. O.; Glushkova, T. V.; Kudryavtseva, Yu. A.; Barbarash, O. L.; Barbarash, L. S.

    2015-10-01

    We compared electrospun nonwoven scaffolds from polylactic acid (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), and polyhydroxybutyrate/valerate (PHBV)/polycaprolactone (PHBV/PCL). The surface of PHBV/PCL and PCL scaffolds was highly porous and consisted of randomly distributed fibers, whilst the surface of PLA scaffolds consisted of thin straight fibers, which located more sparsely, forming large pores. Culture of EA.hy 926 endothelial cells on these scaffolds during 7 days and further fluorescent microscopy demonstrated that the surface of PHBV/PCL scaffolds was most favorable for efficient adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. The lowest proliferation rate and cell viability were detected on PLA scaffolds. Therefore, PHBV/PCL electrospun nonwoven scaffolds demonstrated the best results regarding endothelial cell proliferation and viability as compared to PCL and PLA scaffolds.

  12. [Water activity and food stability. I. Effects on viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerzoni, M E; Suzzi, G; Lerici, C R; Bartolini, R; Testa, G

    1976-01-01

    Biological activity of microorganism is related to water activity (aw). In this paper the effect of glicerol as humectant on Saccharomyces cerevisiae viability was considered. The irreversible loss of viability was observed only for values inferior than 0,75. The K+ presence promoted an increasing of cell viability and growth. We have evaluated the changes of the most important components of cell poll; the increasing of glicerol amount of the system induced a drastic fall of aminoacids, purines and K ions content, but it increased the Na ions content. The exposure of cells to increasing glicerol concentrations, caused an aminoacids and purines excretion related to contact time; after a few hours this material was readsorbed by cells. PMID:799835

  13. Rat visceral yolk sac cells: viability and expression of cell markers during maternal diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The function of the visceral yolk sac (VYS) is critical for embryo organogenesis until final fetal development in rats, and can be affected by conditions such as diabetes. In view of the importance of diabetes during pregnancy for maternal and neonatal health, the objective of this study was to assess fetal weight, VYS cell markers, and viability in female Wistar rats (200-250 g) with induced diabetes (alloxan, 37 mg/kg) on the 8th gestational day (gd 8). At gd 15, rats from control (n=5) and diabetic (n=5) groups were anesthetized and laparotomized to remove the uterine horns for weighing of fetuses and collecting the VYS. Flow cytometry was used for characterizing VYS cells, and for determining mitochondrial activity, cell proliferation, DNA ploidy, cell cycle phases, and caspase-3 activity. Fetal weight was reduced in the diabetic group. Expression of the cell markers CD34, VEGFR1, CD115, CD117, CD14, CCR2, CD90, CD44, STRO-1, OCT3/4, and Nanog was detected in VYS cells in both groups. In the diabetic group, significantly decreased expression of CD34 (P<0.05), CCR2 (P<0.001), and OCT3/4 (P<0.01), and significantly increased expression of CD90 (P<0.05), CD117 (P<0.01), and CD14 (P<0.05) were observed. VYS cells with inactive mitochondria, activated caspase-3, and low proliferation were present in the rats with diabetes. Severe hyperglycemia caused by maternal diabetes had negative effects on pregnancy, VYS cell viability, and the expression of cell markers

  14. Rat visceral yolk sac cells: viability and expression of cell markers during maternal diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B. Aires

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The function of the visceral yolk sac (VYS is critical for embryo organogenesis until final fetal development in rats, and can be affected by conditions such as diabetes. In view of the importance of diabetes during pregnancy for maternal and neonatal health, the objective of this study was to assess fetal weight, VYS cell markers, and viability in female Wistar rats (200-250 g with induced diabetes (alloxan, 37 mg/kg on the 8th gestational day (gd 8. At gd 15, rats from control (n=5 and diabetic (n=5 groups were anesthetized and laparotomized to remove the uterine horns for weighing of fetuses and collecting the VYS. Flow cytometry was used for characterizing VYS cells, and for determining mitochondrial activity, cell proliferation, DNA ploidy, cell cycle phases, and caspase-3 activity. Fetal weight was reduced in the diabetic group. Expression of the cell markers CD34, VEGFR1, CD115, CD117, CD14, CCR2, CD90, CD44, STRO-1, OCT3/4, and Nanog was detected in VYS cells in both groups. In the diabetic group, significantly decreased expression of CD34 (P<0.05, CCR2 (P<0.001, and OCT3/4 (P<0.01, and significantly increased expression of CD90 (P<0.05, CD117 (P<0.01, and CD14 (P<0.05 were observed. VYS cells with inactive mitochondria, activated caspase-3, and low proliferation were present in the rats with diabetes. Severe hyperglycemia caused by maternal diabetes had negative effects on pregnancy, VYS cell viability, and the expression of cell markers.

  15. Rat visceral yolk sac cells: viability and expression of cell markers during maternal diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aires, M.B. [Departamento de Morfologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Santos, J.R.A. [Departamento de Enfermagem, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Souza, K.S.; Farias, P.S. [Departamento de Morfologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Santos, A.C.V. [Departamento de Enfermagem, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Fioretto, E.T. [Departamento de Morfologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Maria, D.A. [Laboratório de Bioquímica e Biofísica, Instituto Butantan, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-10

    The function of the visceral yolk sac (VYS) is critical for embryo organogenesis until final fetal development in rats, and can be affected by conditions such as diabetes. In view of the importance of diabetes during pregnancy for maternal and neonatal health, the objective of this study was to assess fetal weight, VYS cell markers, and viability in female Wistar rats (200-250 g) with induced diabetes (alloxan, 37 mg/kg) on the 8th gestational day (gd 8). At gd 15, rats from control (n=5) and diabetic (n=5) groups were anesthetized and laparotomized to remove the uterine horns for weighing of fetuses and collecting the VYS. Flow cytometry was used for characterizing VYS cells, and for determining mitochondrial activity, cell proliferation, DNA ploidy, cell cycle phases, and caspase-3 activity. Fetal weight was reduced in the diabetic group. Expression of the cell markers CD34, VEGFR1, CD115, CD117, CD14, CCR2, CD90, CD44, STRO-1, OCT3/4, and Nanog was detected in VYS cells in both groups. In the diabetic group, significantly decreased expression of CD34 (P<0.05), CCR2 (P<0.001), and OCT3/4 (P<0.01), and significantly increased expression of CD90 (P<0.05), CD117 (P<0.01), and CD14 (P<0.05) were observed. VYS cells with inactive mitochondria, activated caspase-3, and low proliferation were present in the rats with diabetes. Severe hyperglycemia caused by maternal diabetes had negative effects on pregnancy, VYS cell viability, and the expression of cell markers.

  16. Selection of mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells altered glycoproteins by means of tritiated fucose suicide.

    OpenAIRE

    Hirschberg, C B; Baker, R.M.; Perez, M.; Spencer, L A; Watson, D

    1981-01-01

    Mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells altered in glycoproteins have been isolated by selecting for ability to survive exposure to [6-3H]fucose. Mutagenized wild-type cells were permitted to incorporate [3H]fucose to approximately 1 cpm of trichloroacetic acid-insoluble radioactivity per cell and then frozen for several days to accumulate radiation damage. The overall viability of the population was reduced by 5- to 50-fold. Four consecutive selection cycles were carried out. The surviving cells ...

  17. Mathematical analysis of mis-estimation of cell subsets in flow cytometry: viability staining revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrunkina, A M; Harrison, R A P

    2011-05-31

    Many research projects in cell biology now use flow cytometry for analysis or for isolation of specific cell types. In such studies, cell viability is obviously a crucial issue. However, many studies appear to rely upon light-scattering characteristics to identify and gate out non-viable cells, despite the fact that reliable identification of such cells can only be achieved through staining with impermeable fluorescent nuclear dyes such as propidium iodide or 7-amino actinomycin. In this paper we apply mathematical analysis to the theoretical problem of quantifying cell sub-populations labeled with two or more fluorescent markers, comparing situations in which dead cells have been identified with those in which cell viability has not been assessed. We demonstrate that in all cases in which dead cells are present within the population, percentages of live sub-populations in different subsets are mis-estimated. In cases where the pattern of marker expression differs greatly between live and dead cells, or where the proportion of dead cells is high, this mis-estimation will be aggravated; the subsets pattern will therefore be biased in a population selected only on the basis of light-scatter behavior. The importance of accurately detecting and gating out dead cells is illustrated by an experimental example accompanying the mathematical analysis. To conclude, identification of dead cells by means of viability stains should be an absolute routine in practical flow cytometry, so as to avoid mis-estimation in sorting or analysis.

  18. Cell biological analyses of anther morphogenesis and pollen viability in Arabidopsis and rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fang; Zhang, Zaibao; Jin, Yue; Ma, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Major advances have been made in recent years in our understanding of anther development through a combination of genetic studies, cell biological technologies, biochemical analysis, microarray and high-throughput sequencing-based approaches. In this chapter, we summarize the widely used protocols for pollen viability staining; the investigation of anther morphogenesis by light microscopy of semi-thin sections; TUNEL assay for programmed tapetum cell death; and laser microdissection procedures to obtain specialized cells or cell layers for carrying out transcriptomics.

  19. Effect of methotrexate conjugated PAMAM dendrimers on the viability of MES-SA uterine cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samreen Khatri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to synthesize methotrexate (MTX-polyamidoamine (PAMAM dendritic nanoconjugates and to study their effect on cell viability in uterine sarcoma cells. The amide-bonded PAMAM dendrimer-MTX conjugates were prepared by conjugation between the amine-terminated G5 dendrimer and the carboxylic groups of the MTX using a dicyclohexylcarbodiimide coupling reaction. The formation of conjugates was evaluated by ultraviolet (UV and 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR spectroscopy studies. The cell survival of MES-SA cells, a uterine sarcoma cell line, was evaluated in the presence of the dendrimer-MTX nanoconjugate, using appropriate controls. The UV and 1 H NMR study confirmed the formation of covalent bonds between the drug and the dendrimer. The cell viability study indicated that the nanoconjugates had significantly improved cell killing compared to the free MTX.

  20. The JAMM motif of human deubiquitinase Poh1 is essential for cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallery, Melissa; Blank, Jonathan L; Lin, Yinghui; Gutierrez, Juan A; Pulido, Jacqueline C; Rappoli, David; Badola, Sunita; Rolfe, Mark; Macbeth, Kyle J

    2007-01-01

    Poh1 deubiquitinase activity is required for proteolytic processing of polyubiquitinated substrates by the 26S proteasome, linking deubiquitination to complete substrate degradation. Poh1 RNA interference (RNAi) in HeLa cells resulted in a reduction in cell viability and an increase in polyubiquitinated protein levels, supporting the link between Poh1 and the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. To more specifically test for any requirement of the zinc metalloproteinase motif of Poh1 to support cell viability and proteasome function, we developed a RNAi complementation strategy. Effects on cell viability and proteasome activity were assessed in cells with RNAi of endogenous Poh1 and induced expression of wild-type Poh1 or a mutant form of Poh1, in which two conserved histidines of the proposed catalytic site were replaced with alanines. We show that an intact zinc metalloproteinase motif is essential for cell viability and 26S proteasome function. As a required enzymatic component of the proteasome, Poh1 is an intriguing therapeutic drug target for cancer.

  1. Effect of Varying Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability & Protein Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun; Dozier, David; Triantafillu, Ursula

    2013-11-01

    Cancer stem cells cultured in vitro in stirred bioreactors are exposed to shear stress. By observing the effect of shear stress on cancer stem cell viability, laboratory cell growth could be optimized. In addition, metastasized cancer stem cells in vivo are naturally exposed to shear stress, a factor influencing stem cell differentiation, while circulating in the bloodstream. Changes in protein expression after exposure to shear stress could allow for identification and targeting of circulating cancer cells. In this study, blood flow through capillaries was simulated by using a syringe pump to inject suspensions of Kasumi-1 leukemia stem cells into model blood vessels composed of PEEK tubing 125 microns in diameter. The Hagen-Poisseuille equation was used to solve for operating flow rates based on specified amounts of shear stress. After exposure, cell counts and viabilities were observed using an optical microscope and proteins were analyzed using Western blotting. It was observed that at a one minute exposure to stress, cell viability increased as the amount of shear was increased from 10 to 60 dynes per square centimeter. Results from this research are applicable to optimization of large-scale stem cell growth in bioreactors as well as to the design of targeted cancer therapies. Funding from NSF REU grant #1062611 is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Human hepatocyte isolation and relationship of cell viability to early graft function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitry, Ragai R; Hughes, Robin D; Aw, Marion M; Terry, Claire; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Girlanda, Raffaele; Muiesan, Paolo; Rela, Mohamed; Heaton, Nigel D; Dhawan, Anil

    2003-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation is emerging as an additional modality of treatment for patients with acute liver failure or liver-based metabolic disorders. The procedure requires isolation of high-quality hepatocytes from unused donor livers. Hepatocytes were isolated from 20 donor livers (11 right lobes, 3 left lateral segments, 6 whole livers) using a collagenase perfusion technique. Cell viability (median 56%, range 13-95%) and yield (median 1.4 x 10(9) cells, range 2.0 x 10(6)-1.8 x 10(10) cells) varied according to the tissue available. Fatty livers rejected for transplantation gave lower cell viability (median 45%, range 25-59%). There was a significant correlation between age of donor (median 21 years, range 7-66 years) and viability of isolated hepatocytes in vitro (r = -0.683, p = 0.001). The 13 segments of livers were from reduced/split grafts used for clinical transplantation in 9 children and 4 adults. There was no significant correlation between in vitro cell viability and clinical parameters including intensive care stay, serum aspartate aminotransferase,and international normalized ratio (in the first 7 days), and allograft rejection or other early posttransplant complications, in patients transplanted with the corresponding tissue. PMID:12693666

  3. Oxygen-Purged Microfluidic Device to Enhance Cell Viability in Photopolymerized PEG Hydrogel Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bingzhao; Krutkramelis, Kaspars; Oakey, John

    2016-07-11

    Encapsulating cells within biocompatible materials is a widely used strategy for cell delivery and tissue engineering. While cells are commonly suspended within bulk hydrogel-forming solutions during gelation, substantial interest in the microfluidic fabrication of miniaturized cell encapsulation vehicles has more recently emerged. Here, we utilize multiphase microfluidics to encapsulate cells within photopolymerized picoliter-volume water-in-oil droplets at high production rates. The photoinitiated polymerization of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) is used to continuously produce solid particles from aqueous liquid drops containing cells and hydrogel forming solution. It is well understood that this photoinitiated addition reaction is inhibited by oxygen. In contrast to bulk polymerization in which ambient oxygen is rapidly and harmlessly consumed, allowing the polymerization reaction to proceed, photopolymerization within air permeable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices allows oxygen to be replenished by diffusion as it is depleted. This sustained presence of oxygen and the consequential accumulation of peroxy radicals produce a dramatic effect upon both droplet polymerization and post-encapsulation cell viability. In this work we employ a nitrogen microjacketed microfluidic device to purge oxygen from flowing fluids during photopolymerization. By increasing the purging nitrogen pressure, oxygen concentration was attenuated, and increased post-encapsulation cell viability was achieved. A reaction-diffusion model was used to predict the cumulative intradroplet concentration of peroxy radicals, which corresponded directly to post-encapsulation cell viability. The nitrogen-jacketed microfluidic device presented here allows the droplet oxygen concentration to be finely tuned during cell encapsulation, leading to high post-encapsulation cell viability. PMID:27285343

  4. Influence of different buffers (HEPES/MOPS) on keratinocyte cell viability and microbial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Kássia de Carvalho; Barbugli, Paula Aboud; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed the effect of the buffers 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) and 3-(N-morpholino) propanesulfonic acid (MOPS) on keratinocyte cell viability and microbial growth. It was observed that RPMI buffered with HEPES, supplemented with l-glutamine and sodium bicarbonate, can be used as a more suitable medium to promote co-culture. PMID:27060444

  5. Comparison of viability of adipose-derived Mesenchymal stem cells on agarose and fibrin glue scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Tafvizi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Utilizing tissue engineering techniques and designing similar structures of the damaged tissues require the use of tools such as scaffolds, cells, and bioactive molecules in vitro. Meanwhile, appropriate cell cultures with the ability to divide and differentiate on the natural scaffolds lacking features like immunogenicity and tumorgenesis is particularly important. Adipose tissue has attracted researchers’ attention due to its abundance of mesenchymal stem cells and its availability through a liposuction. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the reproducibility and viability of the adipose-derived stem cells on natural scaffolds of fibrin glue and agarose. Methods: In the present experimental study, the isolation and identification of the mesenchymal stem cells was performed on tissue obtained from liposuction. The tissues were extensively washed with PBS and were digested with collagenase I, then the mesenchymal stem cells were isolated. The cells were cultured in RPMI medium supplemented with antibiotic. Subsequently, the expression of cell surface markers including CD34, CD44, CD90, and CD105 were analyzed by flow cytometry to confirm the mesenchymal cells. After preparing fibrin glue and agarose scaffolds, the viability and proliferation of the adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells were examined at the period of 24, 48, and 72 hours by MTT and ELISA assays. The obtained results were analyzed by SPSS ver.19. Results: The results of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells culture on the fibrin glue and agarose scaffolds indicated that cell viability on fibrin glue and agarose scaffold were 68.22% and 89.75% in 24 hrs, 64.04% and 66.97% in 48 hours, 222.87% and 1089.68% in 72 hours respectively. Significant proliferation and viability cells on a synthesized agarose scaffold were seen compared to the fibrin glue scaffold after 72 hrs. The viability of the cells significantly increased on the

  6. Short Peptides Enhance Single Cell Adhesion and Viability onMicroarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Asphahani,Fareid; Zhang, Miqin

    2007-01-19

    Single cell patterning holds important implications forbiology, biochemistry, biotechnology, medicine, and bioinformatics. Thechallenge for single cell patterning is to produce small islands hostingonly single cells and retaining their viability for a prolonged period oftime. This study demonstrated a surface engineering approach that uses acovalently bound short peptide as a mediator to pattern cells withimproved single cell adhesion and prolonged cellular viabilityon goldpatterned SiO2 substrates. The underlying hypothesis is that celladhesion is regulated bythe type, availability, and stability ofeffective cell adhesion peptides, and thus covalently bound shortpeptides would promote cell spreading and, thus, single cell adhesion andviability. The effectiveness of this approach and the underlyingmechanism for the increased probability of single cell adhesion andprolonged cell viability by short peptides were studied by comparingcellular behavior of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells on threemodelsurfaces whose gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin,physically adsorbed Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, and covalently boundLys-Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, respectively. The surface chemistry and bindingproperties were characterized by reflectance Fourier transform infraredspectroscopy. Both short peptides were superior to fibronectin inproducing adhesion of only single cells, whereas the covalently boundpeptide also reduced apoptosis and necrosisof adhered cells. Controllingcell spreading by peptide binding domains to regulate apoptosis andviability represents a fundamental mechanism in cell-materialsinteraction and provides an effective strategy in engineering arrays ofsingle cells.

  7. A combined approach for the assessment of cell viability and cell functionality of human fibrochondrocytes for use in tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Garzón

    Full Text Available Temporo-mandibular joint disc disorders are highly prevalent in adult populations. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a well-established method for the treatment of several chondral defects. However, very few studies have been carried out using human fibrous chondrocytes from the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ. One of the main drawbacks associated to chondrocyte cell culture is the possibility that chondrocyte cells kept in culture tend to de-differentiate and to lose cell viability under in in-vitro conditions. In this work, we have isolated human temporo-mandibular joint fibrochondrocytes (TMJF from human disc and we have used a highly-sensitive technique to determine cell viability, cell proliferation and gene expression of nine consecutive cell passages to determine the most appropriate cell passage for use in tissue engineering and future clinical use. Our results revealed that the most potentially viable and functional cell passages were P5-P6, in which an adequate equilibrium between cell viability and the capability to synthesize all major extracellular matrix components exists. The combined action of pro-apoptotic (TRAF5, PHLDA1 and anti-apoptotic genes (SON, HTT, FAIM2 may explain the differential cell viability levels that we found in this study. These results suggest that TMJF should be used at P5-P6 for cell therapy protocols.

  8. Enhanced reduction in cell viability by hyperthermia induced by magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor L Rodríguez-Luccioni

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Héctor L Rodríguez-Luccioni, Magda Latorre-Esteves, Janet Méndez-Vega, Orlando Soto, Ana R Rodríguez, Carlos Rinaldi, Madeline Torres-LugoDepartment of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez 00681, Puerto RicoAbstract: Colloidal suspensions of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles are known to dissipate energy when exposed to an oscillating magnetic field. Such energy dissipation can be employed to locally raise temperature inside a tumor between 41°C and 45°C (hyperthermia to promote cell death, a treatment known as magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH. This work seeks to quantify differences between MFH and hot-water hyperthermia (HWH in terms of reduction in cell viability using two cancer cell culture models, Caco-2 (human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma and MCF-7 (human breast cancer. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method and functionalized with adsorbed carboxymethyl dextran. Cytotoxicity studies indicated that in the absence of an oscillating magnetic field, cell viability was not affected at concentrations of up to 0.6 mg iron oxide/mL. MFH resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability when exposed to a magnetic field for 120 minutes and allowed to rest for 48 hours, compared with similar field applications, but with shorter resting time. The results presented here suggest that MFH most likely induces apoptosis in both cell types. When compared with HWH, MFH produced a significant reduction in cell viability, and these effects appear to be cell-type related.Keywords: magnetic fluid hyperthermia, carboxymethyl dextran magnetite, cell death, apoptosis

  9. Oleuropein-Enriched Olive Leaf Extract Affects Calcium Dynamics and Impairs Viability of Malignant Mesothelioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Marchetti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant mesothelioma is a poor prognosis cancer in urgent need of alternative therapies. Oleuropein, the major phenolic of olive tree (Olea europaea L., is believed to have therapeutic potentials for various diseases, including tumors. We obtained an oleuropein-enriched fraction, consisting of 60% w/w oleuropein, from olive leaves, and assessed its effects on intracellular Ca2+ and cell viability in mesothelioma cells. Effects of the oleuropein-enriched fraction on Ca2+ dynamics and cell viability were studied in the REN mesothelioma cell line, using fura-2 microspectrofluorimetry and MTT assay, respectively. Fura-2-loaded cells, transiently exposed to the oleuropein-enriched fraction, showed dose-dependent transient elevations of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+i. Application of standard oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol, and of the inhibitor of low-voltage T-type Ca2+ channels NNC-55-0396, suggested that the effect is mainly due to oleuropein acting through its hydroxytyrosol moiety on T-type Ca2+ channels. The oleuropein-enriched fraction and standard oleuropein displayed a significant antiproliferative effect, as measured on REN cells by MTT cell viability assay, with IC50 of 22 μg/mL oleuropein. Data suggest that our oleuropein-enriched fraction from olive leaf extract could have pharmacological application in malignant mesothelioma anticancer therapy, possibly by targeting T-type Ca2+ channels and thereby dysregulating intracellular Ca2+ dynamics.

  10. Polyphenolic Extracts of Edible Flowers Incorporated onto Atelocollagen Matrices and Their Effect on Cell Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge López-García

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The phenolic extract of chives flowers (Allium schoenoprasum, Liliaceae, introduced Sage (Salvia pratensis, Lamiaceae, European elderberry (Sambucus nigra, Caprifoliaceae and common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale, Asteraceae were characterised by High Performance Liquid Chromatography and incorporated in different concentrations onto atelocollagen thin films. In order to assess the biological impact of these phenolic compounds on cell viability, human immortalised non-tumorigenic keratinocyte cell line was seeded on the thin films and cell proliferation was determined by using an MTT assay. In addition, their antimicrobial activity was estimated by using an agar diffusion test. Data indicated the concomitance between cell viability and concentration of polyphenols. These findings suggest that these phenolic-endowed atelocollagen films might be suitable for tissue engineering applications, on account of the combined activity of polyphenols and collagen.

  11. Photothermal effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the viability of BT-474 cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Hung-Tao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Wang, Tsung-Pao [Department of Medical Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chi-Young [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Tai, Nyan-Hwa, E-mail: nhtai@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hwan-You, E-mail: hychang@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2 Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsin-chu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2013-03-01

    Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) were conjugated to an antibody of BT-474 cancer cells (f-MWCNTs-ab), and the photothermal effect of the f-MWCNTs-ab for BT-474 cancer cell destruction was demonstrated. After near-infrared irradiation, the f-MWCNTs-ab were more capable of killing cancer cells and possessed higher cell specificity than f-MWCNTs. Quantitative results showed that the viability of the cancer cells was affected by the concentration of the f-MWCNTs-ab solution, irradiation time, and settling time after irradiation. The membrane impermeable fluorescence dye ethidium bromide was used to detect cell viability after near-infrared irradiation, and the results agreed with those obtained from the Alamar Blue cell viability assay. The EtBr fluorescence results suggest that the cell membrane, attached to f-MWCNTs-ab, was damaged after irradiation, which led to cell death and necrosis. Using confocal microscopy, a few f-MWCNTs-ab were detected in the cell, indicating the endocytosis effect. The results not only explain the improved efficiency of thermotherapy but also indicate that necrosis may result from protein denaturation attributing to the heated f-MWCNTs-ab in the cell. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer f-MWCNTs conjugated with anti-HER2 antibody by chemical method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kill breast cancer cells by using low dose f-MWCNTs-ab due to photothermal effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use EtBr fluorescent to prove that the cell membrane was broken by heated f-MWCNTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Few f-MWCNTs-ab were detected in the cell indicating the endocytosis effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Necrosis may result from protein denaturation due to contact with the heated CNTs.

  12. The glial cell modulator ibudilast attenuates neuroinflammation and enhances retinal ganglion cell viability in glaucoma through protein kinase A signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva Vargas, Jorge L; Belforte, Nicolas; Di Polo, Adriana

    2016-09-01

    Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease and the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Vision deficits in glaucoma result from the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC). Glial cell-mediated neuroinflammation has been proposed to contribute to disease pathophysiology, but whether this response is harmful or beneficial for RGC survival is not well understood. To test this, we characterized the role of ibudilast, a clinically approved cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor with preferential affinity for PDE type 4 (PDE4). Here, we demonstrate that intraocular administration of ibudilast dampened macroglia and microglia reactivity in the retina and optic nerve hence decreasing production of proinflammatory cytokines in a rat model of ocular hypertension. Importantly, ibudilast promoted robust RGC soma survival, prevented axonal degeneration, and improved anterograde axonal transport in glaucomatous eyes without altering intraocular pressure. Intriguingly, ocular hypertension triggered upregulation of PDE4 subtype A in Müller glia, and ibudilast stimulated cAMP accumulation in these cells. Co-administration of ibudilast with Rp-cAMPS, a cell-permeable and non-hydrolysable cAMP analog that inhibits protein kinase A (PKA), completely blocked ibudilast-induced neuroprotection. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ibudilast, a safe and well-tolerated glial cell modulator, attenuates gliosis, decreases levels of proinflammatory mediators, and enhances neuronal viability in glaucoma through activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway. This study provides insight into PDE4 signaling as a potential target to counter the harmful effects associated with chronic gliosis and neuroinflammation in glaucoma. PMID:27163643

  13. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits cell proliferation and improves viability by regulating S phase and mitochondrial permeability in primary rat Leydig cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, LIN; WANG, DIAN; LI, LONGLONG; DING, XIAO; MA, HAITIAN

    2016-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is widely used as a nutritional supplement and exhibits putative anti-aging properties. However, the molecular basis of the actions of DHEA, particularly on the biological characteristics of target cells, remain unclear. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of DHEA on cell viability, cell proliferation, cell cycle and mitochondrial function in primary rat Leydig cells. Adult Leydig cells were purified by Percoll gradient centrifugation, and cell proliferation was detected using a Click-iT® EdU Assay kit and cell cycle assessment performed using flow cytometry. Mitochondrial membrane potential was detected using JC-1 staining assay. The results of the current study demonstrate that DHEA decreased cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, whereas it improved cell viability in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that DHEA treatment increased the S phase cell population and decreased the G2/M cell population. Cyclin A and CDK2 mRNA levels were decreased in primary rat Leydig cells following DHEA treatment. DHEA treatment decreased the transmembrane electrical gradient in primary Leydig cells, whereas treatment significantly increased succinate dehydrogenase activity. These results indicated that DHEA inhibits primary rat Leydig cell proliferation by decreasing cyclin mRNA level, whereas it improves cells viability by modulating the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane and succinate dehydrogenase activity. These findings may demonstrate an important molecular mechanism by which DHEA activity is mediated. PMID:27220727

  14. A loss-of-function genetic screening identifies novel mediators of thyroid cancer cell viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantisani, Maria Carmela; Parascandolo, Alessia; Perälä, Merja; Allocca, Chiara; Fey, Vidal; Sahlberg, Niko; Merolla, Francesco; Basolo, Fulvio; Laukkanen, Mikko O.; Kallioniemi, Olli Pekka; Santoro, Massimo; Castellone, Maria Domenica

    2016-01-01

    RET, BRAF and other protein kinases have been identified as major molecular players in thyroid cancer. To identify novel kinases required for the viability of thyroid carcinoma cells, we performed a RNA interference screening in the RET/PTC1(CCDC6-RET)-positive papillary thyroid cancer cell line TPC1 using a library of synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the human kinome and related proteins. We identified 14 hits whose silencing was able to significantly reduce the viability and the proliferation of TPC1 cells; most of them were active also in BRAF-mutant BCPAP (papillary thyroid cancer) and 8505C (anaplastic thyroid cancer) and in RAS-mutant CAL62 (anaplastic thyroid cancer) cells. These included members of EPH receptor tyrosine kinase family as well as SRC and MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinases) families. Importantly, silencing of the identified hits did not affect significantly the viability of Nthy-ori 3-1 (hereafter referred to as NTHY) cells derived from normal thyroid tissue, suggesting cancer cell specificity. The identified proteins are worth exploring as potential novel druggable thyroid cancer targets. PMID:27058903

  15. An Optimized Injectable Hydrogel Scaffold Supports Human Dental Pulp Stem Cell Viability and Spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T. D.; Kefi, A.; Sun, S.; Cho, M.; Alapati, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. HyStem-C™ is a commercially available injectable hydrogel composed of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA), hyaluronan (HA), and gelatin (Gn). These components can be mechanically tuned to enhance cell viability and spreading. Methods. The concentration of PEGDA with an added disulfide bond (PEGSSDA) was varied from 0.5 to 8.0% (w/v) to determine the optimal concentration for injectable clinical application. We evaluated the cell viability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) embedded in 2% (w/v) PEGSSDA-HA-Gn hydrogels. Volume ratios of HA : Gn from 100 : 0 to 25 : 75 were varied to encourage hDPSC spreading. Fibronectin (Fn) was added to our model to determine the effect of extracellular matrix protein concentration on hDPSC behavior. Results. Our preliminary data suggests that the hydrogel gelation time decreased as the PEGSSDA cross-linker concentration increased. The PEGSSDA-HA-Gn was biocompatible with hDPSCs, and increased ratios of HA : Gn enhanced cell viability for 14 days. Additionally, cell proliferation with added fibronectin increased significantly over time at concentrations of 1.0 and 10.0 μg/mL in PEGDA-HA-Gn hydrogels, while cell spreading significantly increased at Fn concentrations of 0.1 μg/mL. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that PEG-based injectable hydrogels maintain hDPSC viability and facilitate cell spreading, mainly in the presence of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. PMID:27294191

  16. An Optimized Injectable Hydrogel Scaffold Supports Human Dental Pulp Stem Cell Viability and Spreading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Jones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. HyStem-C™ is a commercially available injectable hydrogel composed of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA, hyaluronan (HA, and gelatin (Gn. These components can be mechanically tuned to enhance cell viability and spreading. Methods. The concentration of PEGDA with an added disulfide bond (PEGSSDA was varied from 0.5 to 8.0% (w/v to determine the optimal concentration for injectable clinical application. We evaluated the cell viability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs embedded in 2% (w/v PEGSSDA-HA-Gn hydrogels. Volume ratios of HA : Gn from 100 : 0 to 25 : 75 were varied to encourage hDPSC spreading. Fibronectin (Fn was added to our model to determine the effect of extracellular matrix protein concentration on hDPSC behavior. Results. Our preliminary data suggests that the hydrogel gelation time decreased as the PEGSSDA cross-linker concentration increased. The PEGSSDA-HA-Gn was biocompatible with hDPSCs, and increased ratios of HA : Gn enhanced cell viability for 14 days. Additionally, cell proliferation with added fibronectin increased significantly over time at concentrations of 1.0 and 10.0 μg/mL in PEGDA-HA-Gn hydrogels, while cell spreading significantly increased at Fn concentrations of 0.1 μg/mL. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that PEG-based injectable hydrogels maintain hDPSC viability and facilitate cell spreading, mainly in the presence of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins.

  17. Lipid emulsions differentially affect LPS-induced acute monocytes inflammation: in vitro effects on membrane remodeling and cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisramé-Helms, Julie; Delabranche, Xavier; Klymchenko, Andrey; Drai, Jocelyne; Blond, Emilie; Zobairi, Fatiha; Mely, Yves; Hasselmann, Michel; Toti, Florence; Meziani, Ferhat

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess how lipid emulsions for parenteral nutrition affect lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute monocyte inflammation in vitro. An 18 h long LPS induced human monocyte leukemia cell stimulation was performed and the cell-growth medium was supplemented with three different industrial lipid emulsions: Intralipid(®), containing long-chain triglycerides (LCT--soybean oil); Medialipid(®), containing LCT (soybean oil) and medium-chain triglycerides (MCT--coconut oil); and SMOFlipid(®), containing LCT, MCT, omega-9 and -3 (soybean, coconut, olive and fish oils). Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed by Trypan blue exclusion and flow cytometry respectively. Monocyte composition and membrane remodeling were studied using gas chromatography and NR12S staining. Microparticles released in supernatant were measured by prothrombinase assay. After LPS challenge, both cellular necrosis and apoptosis were increased (threefold and twofold respectively) and microparticle release was enhanced (sevenfold) after supplementation with Medialipid(®) compared to Intralipid(®), SMOFlipid(®) and monocytes in the standard medium. The monocytes differentially incorporated fatty acids after lipid emulsion challenge. Finally, lipid-treated cells displayed microparticles characterized by disrupted membrane lipid order, reflecting lipid remodeling of the parental cell plasma membrane. Our data suggest that lipid emulsions differentially alter cell viability, monocyte composition and thereby microparticle release. While MCT have deleterious effects, we have shown that parenteral nutrition emulsion containing LCT or LCT and MCT associated to n-3 and n-9 fatty acids have no effect on endotoxin-induced cell death and inflammation. PMID:25038627

  18. Effect of bioink properties on printability and cell viability for 3D bioplotting of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liliang; Yao, Rui; Zhao, Yu; Sun, Wei

    2016-01-01

    3D cell printing is an emerging technology for fabricating complex cell-laden constructs with precise and pre-designed geometry, structure and composition to overcome the limitations of 2D cell culture and conventional tissue engineering scaffold technology. This technology enables spatial manipulation of cells and biomaterials, also referred to as 'bioink', and thus allows study of cellular interactions in a 3D microenvironment and/or in the formation of functional tissues and organs. Recently, many efforts have been made to develop new bioinks and to apply more cell sources for better biocompatibility and biofunctionality. However, the influences of printing parameters on the shape fidelity of 3D constructs as well as on cell viability after the cell printing process have been poorly characterized. Furthermore, parameter optimization based on a specific cell type might not be suitable for other types of cells, especially cells with high sensibility. In this study, we systematically studied the influence of bioink properties and printing parameters on bioink printability and embryonic stem cell (ESC) viability in the process of extrusion-based cell printing, also known as bioplotting. A novel method was established to determine suitable conditions for bioplotting ESCs to achieve both good printability and high cell viability. The rheological properties of gelatin/alginate bioinks were evaluated to determine the gelation properties under different bioink compositions, printing temperatures and holding times. The bioink printability was characterized by a newly developed semi-quantitative method. The results demonstrated that bioinks with longer gelation times would result in poorer printability. The live/dead assay showed that ESC viability increased with higher printing temperatures and lower gelatin concentrations. Furthermore, an exponential relationship was obtained between ESC viability and induced shear stress. By defining the proper printability and

  19. A key inactivation factor of HeLa cell viability by a plasma flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Mayo [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Johkura, Kohei, E-mail: sato@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Histology and Embryology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    Recently, a plasma flow has been applied to medical treatment using effects of various kinds of stimuli such as chemical species, charged particles, heat, light, shock wave and electric fields. Among them, the chemical species are known to cause an inactivation of cell viability. However, the mechanisms and key factors of this event are not yet clear. In this study, we focused on the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in plasma-treated culture medium because it is generated in the culture medium and it is also chemically stable compared with free radicals generated by the plasma flow. To elucidate the significance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, we assessed the differences in the effects of plasma-treated medium and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-added medium against inactivation of HeLa cell viability. These two media showed comparable effects on HeLa cells in terms of the survival ratios, morphological features of damage processes, permeations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into the cells, response to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition by catalase and comprehensive gene expression. The results supported that among chemical species generated in a plasma-treated culture medium, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is one of the main factors responsible for inactivation of HeLa cell viability. (fast track communication)

  20. DMPD: Nitric oxide and cell viability in inflammatory cells: a role for NO inmacrophage function and fate. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15691589 Nitric oxide and cell viability in inflammatory cells: a role for NO inmac...(.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Nitric oxide and cell viability in inflammatory cells: a role for NO inma...ty in inflammatory cells: a role for NO inmacrophage function and fate. Authors Bosca L, Zeini M, Traves PG,

  1. The effect of tuning cold plasma composition on glioblastoma cell viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqian Cheng

    Full Text Available Previous research in cold atmospheric plasma (CAP and cancer cell interaction has repeatedly proven that the cold plasma induced cell death. It is postulated that the reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS play a major role in the CAP cancer therapy. In this paper, we seek to determine a mechanism of CAP therapy on glioblastoma cells (U87 through an understanding of the composition of the plasma, including treatment time, voltage, flow-rate and plasma-gas composition. In order to determine the threshold of plasma treatment on U87, normal human astrocytes (E6/E7 were used as the comparison cell line. Our data showed that the 30 sec plasma treatment caused 3-fold cell death in the U87 cells compared to the E6/E7 cells. All the other compositions of cold plasma were performed based on this result: plasma treatment time was maintained at 30 s per well while other plasma characteristics such as voltage, flow rate of source gas, and composition of source gas were changed one at a time to vary the intensity of the reactive species composition in the plasma jet, which may finally have various effect on cells reflected by cell viability. We defined a term "plasma dosage" to summarize the relationship of all the characteristics and cell viability.

  2. Role of Cell-Cell bond for the viability and the function of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC viability and homeostasis is regulated by cell-matrix and cell-cell contact: disruption of these interactions are responsible of a switch from a mature to a high proliferative phenotype. VSMCs migration, rate of growth and apoptosis, and the extent of their extracellular matrix (ECM deposition can be also modulated by proatherogenic peptides. Among them, ATII induces the transactivation of IGF I R, which, together with the binding protein IGFBP3, represents a determinant of cell survival, growth and proliferation. Aim of our in vitro study was to verify the role of elective cell-cell bond in moulating the response to ATII. Thus, we evaluated viability, proliferation, IGFIR, IGFBP3 expression and the long term survival and production of ECM in a provisional tissue. A7r5 cell-line was used in adherent cultures or incubated in agarose-coated culture plates to inhibit cell-matrix interactions. Cells, treated or not with ATII 100 nM, were evaluated for apoptosis rate, cell cycle, IGFIR and IGFBP3 protei expression. Fibrin provisional tissue was developed polymerizing a fibrin solution. cantaining A7r5 cells with thrombin. Histological stainings for ECM components were performed on sections of prvisional tissue. An exclusive cell-cell contact resulted to monolayer cell cultures. ATII did not affect the cell survival in both culture conditions, but promoted a 10% decrease in "S" phase and an increases IGFIR expression only in adherent cells. while suspended cell aggregates were resistant to ATII administration; IGFBP3 was reduced both in ATII treated adherent cells and in floating clustered cells, irrespective of the treatmentn. VSMC conditioning in agarose-coated plates before seeding in fibrin provisional matrix reduced, but not abolished, the cell ability to colonize the clot and to produce ECM. This study demonstrates that the elective cell-cell contact induces a quiescent status in cells lacking of cell

  3. Analysis of the Interactions of Botanical Extract Combinations Against the Viability of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Lynn S.; Seeram, Navindra P.; Hardy, Mary L.; Catherine Carpenter; David Heber

    2006-01-01

    Herbal medicines are often combinations of botanical extracts that are assumed to have additive or synergistic effects. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effect of individual botanical extracts with combinations of extracts on prostate cell viability. We then modeled the interactions between botanical extracts in combination isobolographically. Scutellaria baicalensis, Rabdosia rubescens, Panax-pseudo ginseng, Dendranthema morifolium, Glycyrrhiza uralensis and Serenoa re...

  4. The Influence of Micronutrients in Cell Culture: A Reflection on Viability and Genomic Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Vargas Arigony

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Micronutrients, including minerals and vitamins, are indispensable to DNA metabolic pathways and thus are as important for life as macronutrients. Without the proper nutrients, genomic instability compromises homeostasis, leading to chronic diseases and certain types of cancer. Cell-culture media try to mimic the in vivo environment, providing in vitro models used to infer cells' responses to different stimuli. This review summarizes and discusses studies of cell-culture supplementation with micronutrients that can increase cell viability and genomic stability, with a particular focus on previous in vitro experiments. In these studies, the cell-culture media include certain vitamins and minerals at concentrations not equal to the physiological levels. In many common culture media, the sole source of micronutrients is fetal bovine serum (FBS, which contributes to only 5–10% of the media composition. Minimal attention has been dedicated to FBS composition, micronutrients in cell cultures as a whole, or the influence of micronutrients on the viability and genetics of cultured cells. Further studies better evaluating micronutrients' roles at a molecular level and influence on the genomic stability of cells are still needed.

  5. Biochanin A Modulates Cell Viability, Invasion, and Growth Promoting Signaling Pathways in HER-2-Positive Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Sehdev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of HER-2 receptor is associated with poor prognosis and aggressive forms of breast cancer. Scientific literature indicates a preventive role of isoflavones in cancer. Since activation of HER-2 receptor initiates growth-promoting events in cancer cells, we studied the effect of biochanin A (an isoflavone on associated signaling events like receptor activation, downstream signaling, and invasive pathways. HER-2-positive SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells, MCF-10A normal breast epithelial cells, and NIH-3T3 normal fibroblast cells were treated with biochanin A (2–100 μM for 72 hours. Subsequently cell viability assay, western blotting and zymography were carried out. The data indicate that biochanin A inhibits cell viability, signaling pathways, and invasive enzyme expression and activity in SK-BR-3 cancer cells. Biochanin A did not inhibit MCF-10A and NIH-3T3 cell viability. Therefore, biochanin A could be a unique natural anticancer agent which can selectively target cancer cells and inhibit multiple signaling pathways in HER-2-positive breast cancer cells.

  6. Analysis of the Interactions of Botanical Extract Combinations Against the Viability of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn S. Adams

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines are often combinations of botanical extracts that are assumed to have additive or synergistic effects. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effect of individual botanical extracts with combinations of extracts on prostate cell viability. We then modeled the interactions between botanical extracts in combination isobolographically. Scutellaria baicalensis, Rabdosia rubescens, Panax-pseudo ginseng, Dendranthema morifolium, Glycyrrhiza uralensis and Serenoa repens were collected, taxonomically identified and extracts prepared. Effects of the extracts on cell viability were quantitated in prostate cell lines using a luminescent ATP cell viability assay. Combinations of two botanical extracts of the four most active extracts were tested in the 22Rv1 cell line and their interactions assessed using isobolographic analysis. Each extract significantly inhibited the proliferation of prostate cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner except repens. The most active extracts, baicalensis, D. morifolium, G. uralensis and R. rubescens were tested as two-extract combinations. baicalensis and D. morifolium when combined were additive with a trend toward synergy, whereas D. morifolium and R. rubescens together were additive. The remaining two-extract combinations showed antagonism. The four extracts together were significantly more effective than the two-by-two combinations and the individual extracts alone. Combining the four herbal extracts significantly enhanced their activity in the cell lines tested compared with extracts alone. The less predictable nature of the two-way combinations suggests a need for careful characterization of the effects of each individual herb based on their intended use.

  7. >Effect of progesterone hormon on cell viability and stem cell activation in dental pulp cells

    OpenAIRE

    Segah Altuntaş; Muhammed Ali Kara; Deniz Selin Aksoy; Zehra Dilşad Çoban; Şefik Güran

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The dental pulp is the part in the center of a tooth made up of living connective tissue and cells called odontoblasts. The vitality of the dentin structure, both during health and after injury, depends on pulp cell activity and the signaling processes that regulate the cell’s behavior. Dental pulp tissue has condensed stem cell activity. Dental pulp stem cells are multipotent stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into a variety of cell types. Several publications hav...

  8. Effect of methoxychlor on Ca(2+) movement and viability in MDCK renal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, He-Hsiung; Lu, Yi-Chau; Lu, Ti; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Mar, Guang-Yuan; Fang, Yi-Chien; Chai, Kuo-Liang; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2012-10-01

    The effect of the insecticide methoxychlor on the physiology of renal tubular cells is unknown. This study aimed to explore the effect of methoxychlor on cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+) ](i) ) in MDCK renal tubular cells using the Ca(2+) -sensitive fluorescent dye fura-2. Methoxychlor at 5-20 μM increased [Ca(2+) ](i) in a concentration-dependent manner. The signal was reduced by 80% by removing extracellular Ca(2+) . Methoxychlor-induced Ca(2+) entry was not affected by nifedipine and SK&F96365 but was inhibited by econazole and protein kinase C modulators. In Ca(2+) -free medium, treatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin or 2,5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone (BHQ) partly inhibited methoxychlor-induced [Ca(2+) ](i) rise. Incubation with methoxychlor also inhibited thapsigargin- or BHQ-induced [Ca(2+) ](i) rise. Inhibition of phospholipase C with U73122 nearly abolished methoxychlor-induced [Ca(2+) ](i) rise. At 5-15 μM, methoxychlor slightly increased cell viability, whereas at 20 μM, it decreased viability. The cytotoxic effect of methoxychlor was not reversed by chelating cytosolic Ca(2+) with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N,N-tetraacetic acid/AM (BAPTA/AM). Annexin V-FITC data suggest that 10 μM methoxychlor inhibited apoptosis, while 20 μM methoxychlor enhanced apoptosis. Methoxychlor (10 and 20 μM) increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Together, in renal tubular cells, methoxychlor induced [Ca(2+) ](i) rise by inducing phospholipase C-dependent Ca(2+) release from multiple stores and Ca(2+) entry via protein kinase C- and econazole-sensitive channels. Methoxychlor slightly enhanced or inhibited cell viability in a concentration-dependent, Ca(2+) -independent manner. Methoxychlor induced cell death that may involve apoptosis via mitochondrial pathways.

  9. The viability and intestinal epithelial cell adhesion of probiotic strain combination--in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piątek, Jacek; Gibas-Dorna, Magdalena; Olejnik, Anna; Krauss, Hanna; Wierzbicki, Krzysztof; Żukiewicz-Sobczak, Wioletta; Głowacki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    To be effective, probiotic bacteria must exhibit a number of functional characteristics, including the resistance to gastric acidity and the ability to adhere to the intestinal epithelium. In this study, we examined in vitro the viability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) combination after exposure to low pH, and the adhesion of LAB to Caco-2 cells during coincubation of 9 bacterial strains. To test bacterial viability, 6 commercially available products were incubated in 0.1 N HCl at pH 1.2 for 60 min. The greatest growth inhibition was noted for the non-capsulated product containing the Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain (log reduction of CFU = 6.4), and the best survival observed for the product containing 9 bacterial strains, equipped with a modern capsule made according to the Multi-Resistant Encapsulation technology (log reduction of CFU = 0.1). In the adhesion experiment, the combination of 9 bacterial strains was added to 17-day-old Caco-2 cell culture for 90 min. The greatest efficiency of adhesion was observed for the inoculum containing 5.5x10(8) CFU/mL/9.6 cm(2) of Caco-2 and the dose of probiotic bacteria of 190 cells per one Caco-2 cell. As a result, approximately 157 bacterial cells adhered to one Caco-2 cell. The results indicate that the combination of 9 bacterial strains in the examined product is characterized as highly adhesive. PMID:22462453

  10. Effect of vertebroplasty filler materials on viability and gene expression of human nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazáry, Aron; Speer, Gábor; Varga, Péter Pál; Balla, Bernadett; Bácsi, Krisztián; Kósa, János P; Nagy, Zsolt; Takács, István; Lakatos, Péter

    2008-05-01

    Consequences of intradiscal cement leakage--often occurring after vertebral cement augmentation for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures--are still unknown. In this study, we have investigated the influences of vertebroplasty filler materials (polymethylmethacrylate-, calcium phosphate- and calcium sulfate-based bone cement) on isolated nucleus pulposus cells. Cell viability of cultured human nucleus pulposus cells were measured after treatment with vertebroplasty filler materials. Gene expression profile of selected genes was determined with quantitative real-time PCR. The widely used polymethylmethacrylate and calcium phosphate cement significantly decreased cell number in a dose- and time-dependent manner while calcium sulfate cement affected cell viability less. Expression of genes involved in matrix metabolism of nucleus pulposus--aggrecan, collagens, small proteoglycans--as well as important transcription factors have also significantly changed due to treatment (e.g., 2.5-fold decrease in aggrecan expression was determined in cultures due to polymethylmethacrylate treatment). Our results suggest that vertebroplasty filler materials--depending on the type of applied material--can accelerate the degeneration of nucleus pulposus cells resulting in a less flexible disc in case of intradiscal cement leakage. This process may increase the risk of a subsequent new vertebral fracture, the main complication of vertebral augmentation. PMID:18176942

  11. Ca2+-induced changes in energy metabolism and viability of melanoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Glass-Marmor, L; Penso, J; Beitner, R

    1999-01-01

    Cancer cells are characterized by a high rate of glycolysis, which is their primary energy source. We show here that a rise in intracellular-free calcium ion (Ca2+), induced by Ca2+-ionophore A23187, exerted a deleterious effect on glycolysis and viability of B16 melanoma cells. Ca2+-ionophore caused a dose-dependent detachment of phosphofructokinase (EC 2.7.1.11), one of the key enzymes of glycolysis, from cytoskeleton. It also induced a decrease in the levels of glucose 1,6-bisphosphate and...

  12. The Impact of Glyphosate, Its Metabolites and Impurities on Viability, ATP Level and Morphological changes in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Jarosiewicz, Paweł; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Huras, Bogumiła; Bukowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of herbicides to animals and human is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study has been undertaken to assess toxic effect of widely used pesticide-glyphosate, its metabolites: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and methylphosphonic acid and its impurities: N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), N-methylglyphosate, hydroxymethylphosphonic acid and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We have evaluated the effect of those compounds on viability, ATP level, size (FSC-A parameter) and granulation (SSC-A parameter) of the cells studied. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities (0.01-10 mM) for 4 and 24 h. It was found that investigated compounds caused statistically significant decrease in viability and ATP level of PBMCs. The strongest changes in cell viability and ATP level were observed after 24 h incubation of PBMCs with bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and particularly PMIDA. Moreover, all studied compounds changed cell granularity, while PMIDA and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine altered PBMCs size. It may be concluded that bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and PMIDA caused a slightly stronger damage to PBMCs than did glyphosate. Changes in the parameters studied in PBMCs were observed only at high concentrations of the compounds examined, which clearly shows that they may occur in this cell type only as a result of acute poisoning of human organism with these substances. PMID:27280764

  13. The Impact of Glyphosate, Its Metabolites and Impurities on Viability, ATP Level and Morphological changes in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Jarosiewicz, Paweł; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Huras, Bogumiła; Bukowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of herbicides to animals and human is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study has been undertaken to assess toxic effect of widely used pesticide—glyphosate, its metabolites: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and methylphosphonic acid and its impurities: N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), N-methylglyphosate, hydroxymethylphosphonic acid and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We have evaluated the effect of those compounds on viability, ATP level, size (FSC-A parameter) and granulation (SSC-A parameter) of the cells studied. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities (0.01–10 mM) for 4 and 24 h. It was found that investigated compounds caused statistically significant decrease in viability and ATP level of PBMCs. The strongest changes in cell viability and ATP level were observed after 24 h incubation of PBMCs with bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and particularly PMIDA. Moreover, all studied compounds changed cell granularity, while PMIDA and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine altered PBMCs size. It may be concluded that bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and PMIDA caused a slightly stronger damage to PBMCs than did glyphosate. Changes in the parameters studied in PBMCs were observed only at high concentrations of the compounds examined, which clearly shows that they may occur in this cell type only as a result of acute poisoning of human organism with these substances. PMID:27280764

  14. Cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment alter the somatostatin status of delta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → TGP52 cells display enhanced functionality in pseudoislet form. → Somatostatin content was reduced, but secretion increased in high glucose conditions. → Cellular interactions and environment alter the somatostatin status of TGP52 cells. -- Abstract: Introduction: Somatostatin, released from pancreatic delta cells, is a potent paracrine inhibitor of insulin and glucagon secretion. Islet cellular interactions and glucose homeostasis are essential to maintain normal patterns of insulin secretion. However, the importance of cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment in the regulation of somatostatin release remains unclear. Methods: This study employed the somatostatin-secreting TGP52 cell line maintained in DMEM:F12 (17.5 mM glucose) or DMEM (25 mM glucose) culture media. The effect of pseudoislet formation and culture medium on somatostatin content and release in response to a variety of stimuli was measured by somatostatin EIA. In addition, the effect of pseudoislet formation on cellular viability (MTT and LDH assays) and proliferation (BrdU ELISA) was determined. Results: TGP52 cells readily formed pseudoislets and showed enhanced functionality in three-dimensional form with increased E-cadherin expression irrespective of the culture environment used. However, culture in DMEM decreased cellular somatostatin content (P < 0.01) and increased somatostatin secretion in response to a variety of stimuli including arginine, calcium and PMA (P < 0.001) when compared with cells grown in DMEM:F12. Configuration of TGP52 cells as pseudoislets reduced the proliferative rate and increased cellular cytotoxicity irrespective of culture medium used. Conclusions: Somatostatin secretion is greatly facilitated by cell-to-cell interactions and E-cadherin expression. Cellular environment and extracellular glucose also significantly influence the function of delta cells.

  15. Evaluation of Periodontal Ligament Cell Viability in Three Different Storage Media: An in Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was undertaken to evaluate the viability of periodontal ligament (PDL cells of avulsed teeth in three different storage media.Materials and Methods: Forty-five premolars extracted for orthodontic therapeutic purposes were randomly and equally divided into three groups based on storage media used [Group I: milk (control; Group II: aloe vera (experimental; Group III: egg white (experimental]. Following extractions, the teeth were placed in one of the three different storage media for 30 minutes, following which the scrapings of the PDL from these teeth were collected in Falcon tubes containing collagenase enzyme in 2.5 mL of phosphate buffered saline. The tubes were subsequently incubated for 30 minutes and centrifuged for five minutes at 800 rpm. The obtained PDL cells were stained with Trypan Blue and were observed under optical microscope. The percentage of viable cells was calculated.Results: Aloe vera showed the highest percentage of viable cells (114.3±8.0, followed by egg white (100.9±6.3 and milk (101.1±7.3.Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it appears that aloe vera maintains PDL cell viability better than egg white or milk.

  16. Fibronectin-Alginate microcapsules improve cell viability and protein secretion of encapsulated Factor IX-engineered human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyar, Bahareh; Dodd, Megan; Marquez-Curtis, Leah; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Continuous delivery of proteins by engineered cells encapsu-lated in biocompatible polymeric microcapsules is of considerable therapeutic potential. However, this technology has not lived up to expectations due to inadequate cell--matrix interactions and subsequent cell death. In this study we hypoth-esize that the presence of fibronectin in an alginate matrix may enhance the viability and functionality of encapsulated human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) expressing the human Factor IX (FIX) gene. MSCs were encapsulated in alginate-PLL microcapsules containing 10, 100, or 500 μg/ml fibronectin to ameliorate cell survival. MSCs in microcapsules with 100 and 500 μg/ml fibronectin demonstrated improved cell viability and proliferation and higher FIX secretion compared to MSCs in non-supplemented microcapsules. In contrast, 10 μg/ml fibronectin did not significantly affect the viability and protein secretion from the encapsulated cells. Differentiation studies demonstrated osteogenic (but not chondrogenic or adipogenic) differentiation capability and efficient FIX secretion of the enclosed MSCs in the fibronectin-alginate suspension culture. Thus, the use of recombinant MSCs encapsulated in fibronectin-alginate microcapsules in basal or osteogenic cultures may be of practical use in the treatment of hemophilia B. PMID:24564349

  17. A MULTIPLEXED ASSAY FOR DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICANT EFFECTS ON SPONTANEOUS NETWORK ACTIVITY AND CELL VIABILITY FROM MICROELECTRODE ARRAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractTITLE: A MULTIPLEXED ASSAY FOR DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICANT EFFECTS ON SPONTANEOUS NETWORK ACTIVITY AND CELL VIABILITY FROM MICROELECTRODE ARRAYSABSTRACT BODY: Microelectrode array (MEA) recordings are increasingly being used as an in vitro method to detect and characte...

  18. Enhanced Viability of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells in Fibrin Microbeads for Sensor Vascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarel K. Gandhi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced vascularization at sensor interfaces can improve long-term function. Fibrin, a natural polymer, has shown promise as a biomaterial for sensor coating due to its ability to sustain endothelial cell growth and promote local vascularization. However, the culture of cells, particularly endothelial cells (EC, within 3D scaffolds for more than a few days is challenging due to rapid loss of EC viability. In this manuscript, a robust method for developing fibrin microbead scaffolds for long-term culture of encapsulated ECs is described. Fibrin microbeads are formed using sodium alginate as a structural template. The size, swelling and structural properties of the microbeads were varied with needle gauge and composition and concentration of the pre-gel solution. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs were suspended in the fibrin beads and cultured within a perfusion bioreactor system. The perfusion bioreactor enhanced ECFCs viability and genome stability in fibrin beads relative to static culture. Perfusion bioreactors enable 3D culture of ECs within fibrin beads for potential application as a sensor coating.

  19. Actin-myosin contractility is responsible for the reduced viability of dissociated human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guokai; Hou, Zhonggang; Gulbranson, Daniel R; Thomson, James A

    2010-08-01

    Human ESCs are the pluripotent precursor of the three embryonic germ layers. Human ESCs exhibit basal-apical polarity, junctional complexes, integrin-dependent matrix adhesion, and E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion, all characteristics shared by the epiblast epithelium of the intact mammalian embryo. After disruption of epithelial structures, programmed cell death is commonly observed. If individualized human ESCs are prevented from reattaching and forming colonies, their viability is significantly reduced. Here, we show that actin-myosin contraction is a critical effector of the cell death response to human ESC dissociation. Inhibition of myosin heavy chain ATPase, downregulation of myosin heavy chain, and downregulation of myosin light chain all increase survival and cloning efficiency of individualized human ESCs. ROCK inhibition decreases phosphorylation of myosin light chain, suggesting that inhibition of actin-myosin contraction is also the mechanism through which ROCK inhibitors increase cloning efficiency of human ESCs.

  20. The effect of spiritual healing on in vitro tumour cell proliferation and viability - an experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, R.; Hojgaard, L.; Zachariae, C.;

    2005-01-01

    ), and a nonadherent mouse B-lymphoid cell line (HB-94). Analyses of variance (ANOVAs) revealed no significant main or dose-related effects of spiritual healing compared to controls for either of the two cell lines or any of the assays (P-values between 0.09 and 0.96). When comparing healing and control across all......Alternative treatments such as spiritual healing and prayer are increasingly popular, especially among patients with life-threatening diseases such as cancer. According to theories of spiritual healing, this intervention is thought to influence living cells and organisms independently...... of the recipient's conscious awareness of the healer's intention. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that spiritual healing will reduce proliferation and viability of two cancer cell lines in vitro. Three controlled experiments were conducted with three different healers and randomised allocation...

  1. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  2. Cytokine-induced impairment of short-chain fatty acid oxidation and viability in human colonic epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, G; Saermark, T; Horn, T;

    2000-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines may directly influence the viability and metabolic function of colonic epithelial cells (CEC) as an early event in the development of inflammatory bowel disease. We report here that TNF-alpha+IFN-gamma induced a synergistic, concentration-dependent decline in butyrate...... oxidation, an essential energy supply, in HT-29 and DLD-1 cells. TNF-alpha+IFN-gamma induced a parallel profound decline in cell viability in HT-29 cells, but not in DLD-1 cells, where impairment of butyrate oxidation seemed to precede later occurrence of cell damage. TNF-alpha+INF-gamma induced CEC damage...

  3. Metabolic alterations in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Piva, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Bimbatti, Davide; Fantinel, Emanuela; Santini, Daniele; Cheng, Liang; Cascinu, Stefano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a metabolic disease, being characterized by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways involved in oxygen sensing (VHL/HIF pathway alterations and the subsequent up-regulation of HIF-responsive genes such as VEGF, PDGF, EGF, and glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4, which justify the RCC reliance on aerobic glycolysis), energy sensing (fumarate hydratase-deficient, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, mutations of HGF/MET pathway resulting in the metabolic Warburg shift marked by RCC increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate shunt, augmented lipogenesis, and reduced AMPK and Krebs cycle activity) and/or nutrient sensing cascade (deregulation of AMPK-TSC1/2-mTOR and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways). We analyzed the key metabolic abnormalities underlying RCC carcinogenesis, highlighting those altered pathways that may represent potential targets for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies.

  4. FEM-based oxygen consumption and cell viability models for avascular pancreatic islets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchwald Peter

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The function and viability of cultured, transplanted, or encapsulated pancreatic islets is often limited by hypoxia because these islets have lost their vasculature during the isolation process and have to rely on gradient-driven passive diffusion, which cannot provide adequate oxygen transport. Pancreatic islets (islets of Langerhans are particularly susceptible due to their relatively large size, large metabolic demand, and increased sensitivity to hypoxia. Here, finite element method (FEM based multiphysics models are explored to describe oxygen transport and cell viability in avascular islets both in static and in moving culture media. Methods Two- and three-dimensional models were built in COMSOL Multiphysics using the convection and diffusion as well as the incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics application modes. Oxygen consumption was assumed to follow Michaelis-Menten-type kinetics and to cease when local concentrations fell below a critical threshold; in a dynamic model, it was also allowed to increase with increasing glucose concentration. Results Partial differential equation (PDE based exploratory cellular-level oxygen consumption and cell viability models incorporating physiologically realistic assumptions have been implemented for fully scaled cell culture geometries with 100, 150, and 200 μm diameter islets as representative. Calculated oxygen concentrations and intra-islet regions likely to suffer from hypoxia-related necrosis obtained for traditional flask-type cultures, oxygen-permeable silicone-rubber membrane bottom cultures, and perifusion chambers with flowing media and varying incoming glucose levels are presented in detail illustrated with corresponding colour-coded figures and animations. Conclusion Results of the computational models are, as a first estimate, in good quantitative agreement with existing experimental evidence, and they confirm that during culture, hypoxia is often a problem for

  5. Perivascular Stem Cells Diminish Muscle Atrophy and Retain Viability in a Rotator Cuff Tear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasberg, Claire; Jensen, Andrew; Dar, Ayelet; Kowalski, Tomasz J.; Murray, Iain; Khan, Adam Z.; Natsuhara, Kyle; Garagozlo, Cameron; McAllister, David R.; Petrigliano, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are a common cause of shoulder pain and often necessitate surgical repair. Muscle changes including atrophy, fibrosis, and fatty degeneration can develop after RCTs, which may compromise surgical repair and clinical outcomes. Lipoaspirate-derived human perivascular stem cells (PSCs) have demonstrated myogenic and angiogenic potential in other small animal models of muscle injury. We hypothesized that the administration of PSCs following massive RCTs may help to diminish these muscle changes in a small animal model. Methods: A total of 90 immunodeficient mice were used (15 groups, N=6). Each was assigned to one of three surgical groups: i) sham, ii) supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon transection (TT), or iii) TT and suprascapular nerve denervation (TT+DN). PSCs were harvested from human lipoaspirate and sorted using fluorescence-activated cell sorting into small blood vessel residing pericytes (CD146+ CD34- CD45- CD31-) and large blood perivascular adventitial cells (CD146- CD34+ CD45- CD31-). Mice received either a) no injection, b) saline injection, c) pericyte injection, or d) adventitial cell injection at the time of the index procedure or at two weeks following index surgery. The supraspinatus muscles were harvested six weeks after the index procedure. Muscle atrophy was assessed by measuring percent wet muscle weight change for each sample. Muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), fibrosis, and fatty degeneration were analyzed using Image J™. Additionally, pericytes and adventitial cells were transduced with a luciferase-containing construct. Animals were given injections of luciferin and imaged using IVIS to track in vivo bioluminescence following injections to assess cell viability. Results: Treatment with PSC injection after TT resulted in less wet weight loss and greater muscle fiber CSA than control groups (PBioluminescence imaging demonstrated viability of the injected cells at three weeks following injections

  6. Sodium functionalized graphene oxide coated titanium plates for improved corrosion resistance and cell viability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface functionalization is an important process that has been adopted to well explore the applications of nanomaterials. In this context, we demonstrate the sodium functionalized graphene oxide (NaGO) as an excellent candidate for increasing the life time of titanium (Ti) based ortho-implants. As-prepared aqueous dispersion of NaGO was used to assemble NaGO sheets on commercially pure Ti (CpTi) plates by heat controlled spin coating. The resulting wrinkled NaGO sheets play a dual role in implant material, i.e., passive layer against corrosion and biocompatible scaffold for cell viability. The preparation, physicochemical properties, and biocompatibility of NaGO coatings formed on CpTi were reported. The electrochemical polarization studies demonstrate the relative susceptibility of control GO and NaGO coatings to corrosion, which outline that the NaGO coating act as a geometric blocking layer and hence prevent the implant surface from contacting corrosive media. The immunofluorescence and cell proliferation studies performed using human dermal fibroblasts cells showed that NaGO coatings significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced the cellular viability for longer in vitro culture period (15 days) than control GO and pristine CpTi.

  7. Adaptive response to starvation in the fish pathogen Flavobacterium columnare: cell viability and ultrastructural changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arias Covadonga R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ecology of columnaris disease, caused by Flavobacterium columnare, is poorly understood despite the economic losses that this disease inflicts on aquaculture farms worldwide. Currently, the natural reservoir for this pathogen is unknown but limited data have shown its ability to survive in water for extended periods of time. The objective of this study was to describe the ultrastructural changes that F. columnare cells undergo under starvation conditions. Four genetically distinct strains of this pathogen were monitored for 14 days in media without nutrients. Culturability and cell viability was assessed throughout the study. In addition, cell morphology and ultrastructure was analyzed using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Revival of starved cells under different nutrient conditions and the virulence potential of the starved cells were also investigated. Results Starvation induced unique and consistent morphological changes in all strains studied. Cells maintained their length and did not transition into a shortened, coccus shape as observed in many other Gram negative bacteria. Flavobacterium columnare cells modified their shape by morphing into coiled forms that comprised more than 80% of all the cells after 2 weeks of starvation. Coiled cells remained culturable as determined by using a dilution to extinction strategy. Statistically significant differences in cell viability were found between strains although all were able to survive in absence of nutrients for at least 14 days. In later stages of starvation, an extracellular matrix was observed covering the coiled cells. A difference in growth curves between fresh and starved cultures was evident when cultures were 3-months old but not when cultures were starved for only 1 month. Revival of starved cultures under different nutrients revealed that cells return back to their original elongated rod shape upon

  8. Cell spreading and viability on zein films may be facilitated by transglutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hemiao; Liu, Gang L; Padua, Graciela W

    2016-09-01

    Zein is a biocompatible corn protein potentially useful in the development of biomaterials. In this study, the deposition of zein on oxygen plasma treated glass cover slips significantly enhanced cell spreading and viability. The mechanism for cellular response to zein coated surfaces was thought to involve the polyglutamine peptides on the zein structure. We hypothesized that zein was a substrate for tissue transglutaminase (tTG), an extracellular enzyme involved in cell-surface interactions. SDS-PAGE results suggested an interaction between zein and tTG, where zein was the glutamine donor. Cross-linking between zein and tTG may be the first step in successful cell adhesion and spreading. PMID:27315332

  9. Magnetically induced electrostimulation of human osteoblasts results in enhanced cell viability and osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemer, Bettina; Ziebart, Josefin; Jonitz-Heincke, Anika; Grunert, Philip Christian; Su, Yukun; Hansmann, Doris; Bader, Rainer

    2016-07-01

    The application of electromagnetic fields to support the bone-healing processes is a therapeutic approach for patients with musculoskeletal disorders. The ASNIS-III s-series screw is a bone stimulation system providing electromagnetic stimulation; however, its influence on human osteoblasts (hOBs) has not been extensively investigated. Therefore, in the present study, the impact of this system on the viability and differentiation of hOBs was examined. We used the ASNIS-III s screw system in terms of a specific experimental test set-up. The ASNIS-III s screw system was used for the application of electromagnetic fields (EMF, 3 mT, 20 Hz) and electromagnetic fields combined with an additional alternating electric field (EMF + EF) (3 mT, 20 Hz, 700 mV). The stimulation of primary hOBs was conducted 3 times per day for 45 min over a period of 72 h. Unstimulated cells served as the controls. Subsequently, the viability, the gene expression of differentiation markers and pro-collagen type 1 synthesis of the stimulated osteoblasts and corresponding controls were investigated. The application of both EMF and EMF + EF using the ASNIS-III s screw system revealed a positive influence on bone cell viability and moderately increased the synthesis of pro-collagen type 1 compared to the unstimulated controls. Stimulation with EMF resulted in a slightly enhanced gene expression of type 1 collagen and osteocalcin; however, stimulation with EMF + EF resulted in a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase (1.4-fold) and osteocalcin (1.6-fold) levels, and a notable increase in the levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX-2; 1.54-fold). Our findings demonstrate that stimulation with electromagnetic fields and an additional alternating electric field has a positive influence on hOBs as regards cell viability and the expression of osteoblastic differentiation markers.

  10. Oxidative Stress in Retinal Muller Cells contributes to Dysfunction of Retinal Glutamate Uptake and Altered Protein Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Skytt, Dorte Marie; Kolko, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    minor, though significant, reduction of cell viability was seen after 1 and 24 hours of exposure to oxidative stress. The glutamate transporter, EAAT1, was significantly up-regulated at RNA-level after exposure to oxidative stress, whereas the alterations of superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) was time...

  11. Ex vivo non-invasive assessment of cell viability and proliferation in bio-engineered whole organ constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xi; Tapias, Luis F; Jank, Bernhard J; Mathisen, Douglas J; Lanuti, Michael; Ott, Harald C

    2015-06-01

    Decellularized organ scaffolds allow whole organ regeneration and study of cell behavior in three-dimensional culture conditions. Cell viability within the bio-engineered organ constructs is an essential parameter reflecting the performance of participating cells during long-term ex vivo culture, and is a prerequisite for further functional performance. Resazurin-based redox metabolic assays have been used to monitor cell viability in both two- and three-dimensional cell cultures. Here we developed a method for monitoring cell viability and proliferation in bio-engineered organ constructs using a resazurin perfusion assay. This method allows non-invasive, repetitive and rapid estimation of viable cell numbers during long-term ex vivo culture. As a proof-of-principle, we assessed the performance of two different endothelial sources and the impact of different perfusion programs on endothelial viability after re-endothelialization of decellularized lung scaffolds. The resazurin-based perfusion assay revealed changes in endothelial viability and proliferation during long-term ex vivo culture, which was consistent with histological assessment at different time points. Finally, we showed that this method could be used for assessment of proliferation and cytotoxicity after pharmacological treatment on a three-dimensional non-small cell lung cancer culture model.

  12. Impact of Axis of GHRH and GHRH Receptor on Cell Viability and Apoptosis of the Placental Choriocarcinoma Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, A-X; Zhang, D; Zhu, Y-M; Gao, H-J; Jiang, J-Y; Hu, X-L; Lv, P-P; Leung, P C K; Huang, H-F

    2016-01-01

    Although GHRH and GHRH-R are recognized as key factors in placental development, little is known about the mechanism(s) of the regulation in trophoblastic cells during placental development. The objective of this study is to determine the potential relationship between the expression levels of GHRH-R and the placental and JEG-3 cell function. Furthermore, we aim to investigate the downstream pathways of GHRH/GHRH-R axis in the control of the JEG-3 cell viability and apoptosis. In this study, we detected the expression pattern of GHRH-R in human chorionic villous tissues and JEG-3 cell. Then, we evaluated the effects of GHRH/GHRH-R and the downstream pathways by using GHRH antagonist (JMR-132) on JEG-3 cell. Our present study found the expressions of GHRH-R in placental villous tissues and JEG-3 cell, and the expression levels of GHRH-R was significantly lower in villous tissues of early pregnancy loss when compared to normal controls. JMR-132 inhibited cellular viability and induced apoptosis in JEG-3 cell in a time and dosedependent manners through activation of caspase-3, p38, and p53, as well as inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt. Interestingly, ER stress markers such as GRP78, ubiquitinated proteins and phospho-eIF2α were significantly increased in JEG-3 cell after being treated with JMR-132. Conversely, pretreated with salubrinal (a selective inhibition of protein phosphatase 1-mediated eIF2α dephosphorylation), JEG-3 cells were rescued from JMR-132-mediated cell growth inhibition, and abolished JMR-132-induced cleaved caspase-3, CHOP, phospho-p53, and ubiquitinated proteins accumulation. Knockdown of endogenous GHRH-R significantly abolished the JMR-132-induced cleaved caspase-3 and activation of p38. In conclusion, our results, for the first time, demonstrated the expression levels of GHRH-R were closely related to the placental function. Inhibition of GHRH-R by using GHRH antagonist in JEG-3 cell may reduce cell viability and induce apoptosis through

  13. Effect of flupirtine on the growth and viability of U373 malignant glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flupirtine is a non-opioid analgesic without antipyretic or antiphlogistic properties but with favorable tolerability in humans. This analgesic also exhibits neuroprotective activities. Furthermore, flupirtine antagonizes glutamate- and NMDA-induced intracellular levels of Ca2+ and counteracts the effects of focal cerebral ischemia. Although flupirtine has been used to relieve pain caused by different diseases and clinical procedures, information on the safety and efficacy of flupirtine is limited. The present study was conducted to investigate the neuroprotective effects of flupirtine on U373 malignant glioma (MG) cell lines. Cell viability and cell cycle analysis was performed by MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Variations in the growth of U373 MG cells in 5 mM N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), 1 mM flupirtine, and combined treatment indicated the antagonistic effects of NMDA and flupirtine on MG cell lines. The variation in the percentage of gated cell population in different cell cycle phases showed significant variations after 48 h of treatment. Flupirtine has neuroprotective effect of on U373 MG cells, which limits its use in the pain management of brain tumors. This property warrants further studies using animal models and large-scale clinical trials

  14. The effect of silver nanoparticles on Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm biomass and cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Khameneh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Bacterial biofilm has been considered responsible for many deaths and high health costs worldwide. Their better protection against antibacterial agents compared to free living cells leads to poor treatment efficiency. Nanotechnology is promising approach to combat biofilm infections. The aim of the present study was to eradicate Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm with silver nanoparticles (SNPs. Materials and Methods: SNPs were used at different concentrations (two fold dilutions and incubation times (24, 48, 72 h. The crystal violet staining and pour plate assays were used to assess biofilm biomass and bacterial viability, respectively. The ability of SNPs on biofilm matrix eradication was assessed through optical density ratio (ODr. Positive control was defined as an ODr =1.0. Results: The crystal violet assay indicated that the biofilm matrixes were intact at different concentrations of SNOs and incubation times. There were no significant differences between these parameters (P >0.05. Bacterial enumeration studies revealed that higher concentrations of SNPs were more effective in killing bacteria than lower ones. Although, longer incubation times  led to enhancement of anti-biofilm activity of SNPs. Conclusion: The anti-biofilm activity of SNPs was concentration- and time-dependent. The results of this study highlighted that SNPs were effective against cell viability; however they were ineffective against biomass.

  15. Pressurized liquid extraction of Aglaonema sp. iminosugars: Chemical composition, bioactivity, cell viability and thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, S; Martín-Ortiz, A; Carrero-Carralero, C; Ramos, S; Sanz, M L; Soria, A C

    2016-08-01

    Pressurized liquid extraction of Aglaonema sp. iminosugars has been optimized. A single cycle under optimal conditions (80mg, 100°C, 2min) was enough to extract ⩾96% of most iminosugars. Further incubation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for 5h removed coextracted interfering low molecular weight carbohydrates from extracts of different Aglaonema cultivars. A complete characterization of these extracts was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: three iminosugars were tentatively identified for the first time; α-homonojirimycin and 2,5-dideoxy-2,5-imino-d-mannitol were the major iminosugars determined. α-Glucosidase inhibition activity, cell viability and thermal stability of Aglaonema extracts were also evaluated. Extracts with IC50 for α-glucosidase activity in the 0.010-0.079mgmL(-1) range showed no decrease of Caco-2 cell viability at concentrations lower than 125μgmL(-1) and were stable at 50°C for 30days. These results highlight the potential of Aglaonema extracts as a source of bioactives to be used as functional ingredients.

  16. Altered calcium signaling in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Teneale A; Yapa, Kunsala T D S; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-10-01

    It is the nature of the calcium signal, as determined by the coordinated activity of a suite of calcium channels, pumps, exchangers and binding proteins that ultimately guides a cell's fate. Deregulation of the calcium signal is often deleterious and has been linked to each of the 'cancer hallmarks'. Despite this, we do not yet have a full understanding of the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with cancer. Such an understanding could aid in guiding the development of therapies specifically targeting altered calcium signaling in cancer cells during tumorigenic progression. Findings from some of the studies that have assessed the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with tumorigenesis and/or processes important in invasion and metastasis are presented in this review. The potential of new methodologies is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  17. Mycolic Acid Cyclopropanation is Essential for Viability, Drug Resistance, and Cell Wall Integrity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkan, Daniel; Liu, Zhen; Sacchettini, James C.; Glickman, Michael S.; (MSKCC); (TAM)

    2009-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection remains a major global health problem complicated by escalating rates of antibiotic resistance. Despite the established role of mycolic acid cyclopropane modification in pathogenesis, the feasibility of targeting this enzyme family for antibiotic development is unknown. We show through genetics and chemical biology that mycolic acid methyltransferases are essential for M. tuberculosis viability, cell wall structure, and intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. The tool compound dioctylamine, which we show acts as a substrate mimic, directly inhibits the function of multiple mycolic acid methyltransferases, resulting in loss of cyclopropanation, cell death, loss of acid fastness, and synergistic killing with isoniazid and ciprofloxacin. These results demonstrate that mycolic acid methyltransferases are a promising antibiotic target and that a family of virulence factors can be chemically inhibited with effects not anticipated from studies of each individual enzyme.

  18. Pulmonary surfactant preserves viability of alveolar type II cells exposed to polymyxin B in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Stichtenoth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exogenous surfactant derived from animal lungs is applied for treatment of surfactant deficiency. By means of its rapid spreading properties, it could transport pharmaceutical agents to the terminal air spaces. The antimicrobial peptide Polymyxin B (PxB is used as a topical antibiotic for inhalation therapy. Whereas it has been shown that PxB mixed with surfactant is not inhibiting surface activity while antimicrobiotic activity is preserved, little is known concerning the effects on synthesis of endogenous surfactant in alveolar type II cells (ATIIC. OBJECTIVE: To investigate ATIIC viability and surfactant-exocytosis depending on PxB and/or surfactant exposure. METHODS: ATIIC were isolated from rat lungs as previously described and were cultivated for 48 h. After incubation for a period of 1-5 h with either PxB (0.05 or 0.1 mg/ml, modified porcine surfactant (5 or 10 mg/ml or mixtures of both, viability and exocytosis (spontanously and after stimulation were determined by fluorescence staining of intracellular surfactant. RESULTS: PxB 0.1 mg/ml, but not porcine surfactant or porcine surfactant plus PxB reduces ATIIC-viability. Only PxB alone, but not in combination with porcine surfactant, rapidly reduces fluorescence in ATIIC at maximum within 3 h, indicating stimulation of exocytosis. Subsequent ionomycin-stimulation does not further increase exocytosis of PxB incubated ATIIC. In presence of surfactant, stimulating effects of PxB and ionomycin on exocytosis are reduced. CONCLUSION: PxB alone shows negative effects on ATIIC, which are counterbalanced in mixtures with surfactant. So far, our studies found no results discouraging the concept of a combined treatment with PxB and surfactant mixtures.

  19. Nanofibrous Chitosan-Polyethylene Oxide Engineered Scaffolds: A Comparative Study between Simulated Structural Characteristics and Cells Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazemi Pilehrood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D nanofibrous chitosan-polyethylene oxide (PEO scaffolds were fabricated by electrospinning at different processing parameters. The structural characteristics, such as pore size, overall porosity, pore interconnectivity, and scaffold percolative efficiency (SPE, were simulated by a robust image analysis. Mouse fibroblast cells (L929 were cultured in RPMI for 2 days in the presence of various samples of nanofibrous chitosan/PEO scaffolds. Cell attachments and corresponding mean viability were enhanced from 50% to 110% compared to that belonging to a control even at packed morphologies of scaffolds constituted from pores with nanoscale diameter. To elucidate the correlation between structural characteristics within the depth of the scaffolds’ profile and cell viability, a comparative analysis was proposed. This analysis revealed that larger fiber diameters and pore sizes can enhance cell viability. On the contrary, increasing the other structural elements such as overall porosity and interconnectivity due to a simultaneous reduction in fiber diameter and pore size through the electrospinning process can reduce the viability of cells. In addition, it was found that manipulation of the processing parameters in electrospinning can compensate for the effects of packed morphologies of nanofibrous scaffolds and can thus potentially improve the infiltration and viability of cells.

  20. Alterations in cell surface area and deformability of individual human red blood cells in stored blood

    CERN Document Server

    Park, HyunJoo; Lee, SangYun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Sohn, Yong-Hak; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    The functionality and viability of stored human red blood cells (RBCs) is an important clinical issue in transfusion. To systematically investigate changes in stored whole blood, the hematological properties of individual RBCs were quantified in blood samples stored for various periods with and without a preservation solution called CPDA-1. With 3-D quantitative phase imaging techniques, the optical measurements of the 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions and membrane fluctuations were done at the individual cell level. From the optical measurements, the morphological (volume, surface area and sphericity), biochemical (hemoglobin content and concentration), and mechanical parameters (dynamic membrane fluctuation) were simultaneously quantified to investigate the functionalities and their progressive alterations in stored RBCs. Our results show that the stored RBCs without CPDA-1 had a dramatic morphological transformation from discocytes to spherocytes within 2 weeks which was accompanied with significant ...

  1. The Effect of Sericin from Various Extraction Methods on Cell Viability and Collagen Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornanong Aramwit

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Silk sericin (SS can accelerate cell proliferation and attachment; however, SS can be extracted by various methods, which result in SS exhibiting different physical and biological properties. We found that SS produced from various extraction methods has different molecular weights, zeta potential, particle size and amino acid content. The MTT assay indicated that SS from all extraction methods had no toxicity to mouse fibroblast cells at concentrations up to 40 μg/mL after 24 h incubation, but SS obtained from some extraction methods can be toxic at higher concentrations. Heat-degraded SS was the least toxic to cells and activated the highest collagen production, while urea-extracted SS showed the lowest cell viability and collagen production. SS from urea extraction was severely harmful to cells at concentrations higher than 100 μg/mL. SS from all extraction methods could still promote collagen production in a concentration-dependent manner, even at high concentrations that are toxic to cells.

  2. Cell Attachment and Viability Study of PCL Nano-fiber Modified by Cold Atmospheric Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atyabi, Seyed Mohammad; Sharifi, Fereshteh; Irani, Shiva; Zandi, Mojgan; Mivehchi, Houri; Nagheh, Zahra

    2016-06-01

    The field of tissue engineering is an emerging discipline which applies the basic principles of life sciences and engineering to repair and restore living tissues and organs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cold and non-thermal plasma surface modification of poly (ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds on fibroblast cell behavior. Nano-fiber PCL was fabricated through electrospinning technique, and some fibers were then treated by cold and non-thermal plasma. The cell-biomaterial interactions were studied by culturing the fibroblast cells on nano-fiber PCL. Scaffold biocompatibility test was assessed using an inverted microscope. The growth and proliferation of fibroblast cells on nano-fiber PCL were analyzed by MTT viability assay. Cellular attachment on the nano-fiber and their morphology were evaluated using scanning electron microscope. The result of cell culture showed that nano-fiber could support the cellular growth and proliferation by developing three-dimensional topography. The present study demonstrated that the nano-fiber surface modification with cold plasma sharply enhanced the fibroblast cell attachment. Thus, cold plasma surface modification greatly raised the bioactivity of scaffolds.

  3. Impact of release dynamics of laser-irradiated polymer micropallets on the viability of selected adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huan; Mismar, Wael; Wang, Yuli; Small, Donald W.; Ras, Mat; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Sims, Christopher E.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2012-01-01

    We use time-resolved interferometry, fluorescence assays and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to examine the viability of confluent adherent cell monolayers to selection via laser microbeam release of photoresist polymer micropallets. We demonstrate the importance of laser microbeam pulse energy and focal volume position relative to the glass–pallet interface in governing the threshold energies for pallet release as well as the pallet release dynamics. Measurements using time-resolved interferometry show that increases in laser pulse energy result in increasing pallet release velocities that can approach 10 m s−1 through aqueous media. CFD simulations reveal that the pallet motion results in cellular exposure to transient hydrodynamic shear stress amplitudes that can exceed 100 kPa on microsecond timescales, and which produces reduced cell viability. Moreover, CFD simulation results show that the maximum shear stress on the pallet surface varies spatially, with the largest shear stresses occurring on the pallet periphery. Cell viability of confluent cell monolayers on the pallet surface confirms that the use of larger pulse energies results in increased rates of necrosis for those cells situated away from the pallet centre, while cells situated at the pallet centre remain viable. Nevertheless, experiments that examine the viability of these cell monolayers following pallet release show that proper choices for laser microbeam pulse energy and focal volume position lead to the routine achievement of cell viability in excess of 90 per cent. These laser microbeam parameters result in maximum pallet release velocities below 6 m s−1 and cellular exposure of transient hydrodynamic shear stresses below 20 kPa. Collectively, these results provide a mechanistic understanding that relates pallet release dynamics and associated transient shear stresses with subsequent cellular viability. This provides a quantitative, mechanistic basis for determining

  4. Diesel exhaust particulate extracts inhibit transcription of nuclear respiratory factor-1 and cell viability in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattingly, Kathleen A.; Klinge, Carolyn M. [University of Louisville School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Center for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Endothelial dysfunction precedes cardiovascular disease and is accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we tested the hypothesis that diesel exhaust particulate extracts (DEPEs), prepared from a truck run at different speeds and engine loads, would inhibit genomic estrogen receptor activation of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcription in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Additionally, we examined how DEPEs affect NRF-1-regulated TFAM expression and, in turn, Tfam-regulated mtDNA-encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI, MTCO1) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit I (NDI) expression as well as cell proliferation and viability. We report that 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}), 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), and raloxifene increased NRF-1 transcription in HUVECs in an ER-dependent manner. DEPEs inhibited NRF-1 transcription, and this suppression was not ablated by concomitant treatment with E{sub 2}, 4-OHT, or raloxifene, indicating that the effect was not due to inhibition of ER activity. While E{sub 2} increased HUVEC proliferation and viability, DEPEs inhibited viability but not proliferation. Resveratrol increased NRF-1 transcription in an ER-dependent manner in HUVECs, and ablated DEPE inhibition of basal NRF-1 expression. Given that NRF-1 is a key nuclear transcription factor regulating genes involved in mitochondrial activity and biogenesis, these data suggest that DEPEs may adversely affect mitochondrial function leading to endothelial dysfunction and resveratrol may block these effects. (orig.)

  5. The Effect of Saturated Fatty Acids on Methanogenesis and Cell Viability of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Saturated fatty acids (SFAs are known to suppress ruminal methanogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are not well known. In the present study, inhibition of methane formation, cell membrane permeability (potassium efflux, and survival rate (LIVE/DEAD staining of pure ruminal Methanobrevibacter ruminantium (DSM 1093 cell suspensions were tested for a number of SFAs. Methane production rate was not influenced by low concentrations of lauric (C12; 1 μg/mL, myristic (C14; 1 and 5 μg/mL, or palmitic (C16; 3 and 5 μg/mL acids, while higher concentrations were inhibitory. C12 and C14 were most inhibitory. Stearic acid (C18, tested at 10–80 μg/mL and ineffective at 37°C, decreased methane production rate by half or more at 50°C and ≥50 μg/mL. Potassium efflux was triggered by SFAs (C12 = C14 > C16 > C18 = control, corroborating data on methane inhibition. Moreover, the exposure to C12 and C14 decreased cell viability to close to zero, while 40% of control cells remained alive after 24 h. Generally, tested SFAs inhibited methanogenesis, increased cell membrane permeability, and decreased survival of M. ruminantium in a dose- and time-dependent way. These results give new insights into how the methane suppressing effect of SFAs could be mediated in methanogens.

  6. GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase is essential for cell wall integrity, morphogenesis and viability of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hechun; Ouyang, Haomiao; Zhou, Hui; Jin, Cheng

    2008-09-01

    GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPP) catalyses the synthesis of GDP-mannose, which is the precursor for the mannose residues in glycoconjugates, using mannose 1-phosphate and GTP as substrates. Repression of GMPP in yeast leads to phenotypes including cell lysis, defective cell wall, and failure of polarized growth and cell separation. Although several GMPPs have been isolated and characterized in filamentous fungi, the physiological consequences of their actions are not clear. In this study, Afsrb1, which is a homologue of yeast SRB1/PSA1/VIG9, was identified in the Aspergillus fumigatus genome. The Afsrb1 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and recombinant AfSrb1 was functionally confirmed as a GMPP. By the replacement of the native Afsrb1 promoter with an inducible Aspergillus nidulans alcA promoter, the conditional inactivation mutant strain YJ-gmpp was constructed. The presence of 3 % glucose completely blocked transcription of P(alcA)-Afsrb1, and was lethal to strain YJ-gmpp. Repression of Afsrb1 expression in strain YJ-gmpp led to phenotypes including hyphal lysis, defective cell wall, impaired polarity maintenance, and branching site selection. Also, rapid germination and reduced conidiation were documented. However, in contrast to yeast, strain YJ-gmpp retained the ability to direct polarity establishment and septation. Our results showed that the Afsrb1 gene is essential for cell wall integrity, morphogenesis and viability of Aspergillus fumigatus.

  7. Antioxidant potential of herbs extracts and impact on HepG2 cells viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gramza-Michałowska

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Mercury poisoning is responsible for inducing serious adverse effects in living organisms. One of protection factors could be substances proven to possess high antioxidant and metal chelating activity – plant polyphenols. There are many sources of polyphenols in plant kingdom but the most interesting for food industry could be widely consumed herbs. Aim of the research was to evaluate antioxidative potential of selected plant extracts and its influence on HepG2 cells in different conditions. Ethanolic herbs extracts were characterised by total polyphenol content. Antioxidant activity was estimated with use of DPPH• and ABTS+• radicals scavenging methods and FRAP. Research included cells viability estimation by the MTT assay and cells exposition to HgCl2, chemical agent inducing cell death. Analysis of herbs extracts antioxidative activity showed best potential represented thyme and marjoram, highest FRAP was evaluated in samples with mint and marjoram extracts. On the basis of received results it was found that examined plant extracts showed weak protection against Hg presence in examined cells environment.

  8. Biochemical evaluation of a 108-member deglycobleomycin library: viability of a selection strategy for identifying bleomycin analogues with altered properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Xu, Zhidong; Schroeder, Benjamin R; Sun, Wenyue; Wei, Fang; Hashimoto, Shigeki; Konishi, Kazuhide; Leitheiser, Christopher J; Hecht, Sidney M

    2007-10-17

    The bleomycins (BLMs) are clinically used glycopeptide antitumor antibiotics that have been shown to mediate the sequence-selective oxidative damage of both DNA and RNA. Previously, we described the solid-phase synthesis of a library of 108 unique analogues of deglycoBLM A6, a congener that cleaves DNA analogously to BLM itself. Each member of the library was assayed for its ability to effect single- and double-strand nicking of duplex DNA, sequence-selective DNA cleavage, and RNA cleavage in the presence and absence of a metal ion cofactor. All of the analogues tested were found to mediate concentration-dependent plasmid DNA relaxation to some extent, and a number exhibited double-strand cleavage with an efficiency comparable to or greater than deglycoBLM A6. Further, some analogues having altered linker and metal-binding domains mediated altered sequence-selective cleavage, and a few were found to cleave a tRNA3Lys transcript both in the presence and in the absence of a metal cofactor. The results provide insights into structural elements within BLM that control DNA and RNA cleavage. The present study also permits inferences to be drawn regarding the practicality of a selection strategy for the solid-phase construction and evaluation of large libraries of BLM analogues having altered properties.

  9. Overexpression of stress-related genes enhances cell viability and velum formation in Sherry wine yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro-Risco, Jesús; Rincón, Ana María; Benítez, Tahía; Codón, Antonio C

    2013-08-01

    Flor formation and flor endurance have been related to ability by Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts to resist hostile conditions such as oxidative stress and the presence of acetaldehyde and ethanol. Ethanol and acetaldehyde toxicity give rise to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of cell viability. Superoxide dismutases Sod1p and Sod2p and other proteins such as Hsp12p are involved in oxidative stress tolerance. In this study, genes SOD1, SOD2, and HSP12 were overexpressed in flor yeast strains FJF206, FJF414 and B16. In the SOD1 and SOD2 transformant strains superoxide dismutases encoded by genes SOD1 and SOD2 increased their specific activity considerably as a direct result of overexpression of genes SOD1 and SOD2, indirectly, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase activities increased too. The HSP12 transformant strains showed higher levels of glutathione peroxidase and reductase activities. These transformant strains showed an increase in intracellular glutathione content, a reduction in peroxidized lipid concentration, and higher resistance to oxidative stress conditions. As a result, flor formation by these strains took place more rapidly than by their parental strains, velum being thicker and with higher percentages of viable cells. In addition, a slight decrease in ethanol and glycerol concentrations, and an increase in acetaldehyde were detected in wines matured under velum formed by transformant strains, as compared to their parental strains. In the industry, velum formed by transformant strains with increased viability may result in acceleration of both metabolism and wine aging, thus reducing time needed for wine maturation. PMID:23553032

  10. Forced Trefoil Factor Family Peptide 3 (TFF3) Expression Reduces Growth, Viability, and Tumorigenicity of Human Retinoblastoma Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Große-Kreul, Jan; Busch, Maike; Winter, Claudia; Pikos, Stefanie; Stephan, Harald; Dünker, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides have been shown to effect cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion of normal cells and various cancer cell lines. In the literature TFF peptides are controversially discussed as tumor suppressors and potential tumor progression factors. In the study presented, we investigated the effect of TFF3 overexpression on growth, viability, migration and tumorigenicity of the human retinoblastoma cell lines Y-79, WERI-Rb1, RBL-13 and RBL-15. As revealed by WST-1 and TUNEL assays as well as DAPI and BrdU cell counts, recombinant human TFF3 significantly lowers retinoblastoma cell viability and increases apoptosis levels. Transient TFF3 overexpression likewise significantly increases RB cell apoptosis. Stable, lentiviral TFF3 overexpression lowers retinoblastoma cell viability, proliferation and growth and significantly increases cell death in retinoblastoma cells. Blockage experiments using a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor and capase-3 immunocytochemistry revealed the involvement of caspases in general and of caspase-3 in particular in TFF3 induced apoptosis in retinoblastoma cell lines. Soft agarose and in ovo chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays revealed that TFF3 overexpression influences anchorage independent growth and significantly decreases the size of tumors forming from retinoblastoma cells. Our study demonstrates that forced TFF3 expression exerts a significant pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and tumor suppressive effect in retinoblastoma cells, setting a starting point for new additive chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of retinoblastoma.

  11. Forced Trefoil Factor Family Peptide 3 (TFF3) Expression Reduces Growth, Viability, and Tumorigenicity of Human Retinoblastoma Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Claudia; Pikos, Stefanie; Stephan, Harald; Dünker, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides have been shown to effect cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion of normal cells and various cancer cell lines. In the literature TFF peptides are controversially discussed as tumor suppressors and potential tumor progression factors. In the study presented, we investigated the effect of TFF3 overexpression on growth, viability, migration and tumorigenicity of the human retinoblastoma cell lines Y-79, WERI-Rb1, RBL-13 and RBL-15. As revealed by WST-1 and TUNEL assays as well as DAPI and BrdU cell counts, recombinant human TFF3 significantly lowers retinoblastoma cell viability and increases apoptosis levels. Transient TFF3 overexpression likewise significantly increases RB cell apoptosis. Stable, lentiviral TFF3 overexpression lowers retinoblastoma cell viability, proliferation and growth and significantly increases cell death in retinoblastoma cells. Blockage experiments using a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor and capase-3 immunocytochemistry revealed the involvement of caspases in general and of caspase-3 in particular in TFF3 induced apoptosis in retinoblastoma cell lines. Soft agarose and in ovo chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays revealed that TFF3 overexpression influences anchorage independent growth and significantly decreases the size of tumors forming from retinoblastoma cells. Our study demonstrates that forced TFF3 expression exerts a significant pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and tumor suppressive effect in retinoblastoma cells, setting a starting point for new additive chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of retinoblastoma. PMID:27626280

  12. T315 Decreases Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Viability through a Combination of Apoptosis Induction and Autophagic Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chang-Fang; Weng, Jing-Ru; Jadhav, Appaso; Wu, Chia-Yung; Sargeant, Aaron M.; Bai, Li-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    T315, an integrin-linked kinase (ILK) inhibitor, has been shown to suppress the proliferation of breast cancer, stomach cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Here we demonstrate that T315 decreases cell viability of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines (HL-60 and THP-1) and primary leukemia cells from AML patients in a dose-responsive manner. Normal human bone marrow cells are less sensitive than leukemia cells to T315. T315 down regulates protein kinase B (Akt) and p-Akt and induces caspase activation, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage, apoptosis and autophagy through an ILK-independent manner. Interestingly, pretreatment with autophagy inhibitors rescues cells from apoptosis and concomitant PARP cleavage, which implicates a key role of autophagic cell death in T315-mediated cytotoxicity. T315 also demonstrates efficacy in vivo, suppressing the growth of THP-1 xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice when administered intraperitoneally. This study shows that autophagic cell death and apoptosis cooperatively contribute to the anticancer activity of T315 in AML cells. In conclusion, the complementary roles of apoptotic and autophagic cell death should be considered in the future assessment of the translational value of T315 in AML therapy. PMID:27537872

  13. The effect of modified polysialic acid based hydrogels on the adhesion and viability of primary neurons and glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haile, Yohannes; Berski, Silke; Dräger, Gerald; Nobre, Andrè; Stummeyer, Katharina; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Grothe, Claudia

    2008-04-01

    In this study we present the enzymatic and biological analysis of polysialic acid (polySia) based hydrogel in terms of its degradation and cytocompatibility. PolySia based hydrogel is completely degradable by endosialidase enzyme which may avoid second surgery after tissue recovery. Viability assay showed that soluble components of polySia hydrogel did not cause any toxic effect on cultured Schwann cells. Moreover, green fluorescence protein transfected neonatal and adult Schwann cells, neural stem cells and dorsal root ganglionic cells (unlabelled) were seeded on polySia hydrogel modified with poly-L-lysine (Pll), poly-L-ornithine-laminin (porn-laminin) or collagen. Water soluble tetrazolium salt assay revealed that modification of the hydrogel significantly improved cell adhesion and viability. These results infer that polySia based scaffolds in combination with cell adhesion molecules and cells genetically modified to express growth factors would potentially be promising alternative in reconstructive therapeutic strategies. PMID:18255143

  14. Dopamine agonist resistance-related endocan promotes angiogenesis and cells viability of prolactinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lin; Leng, Zhi Gen; Guo, Yu Hang; Lin, Shao Jian; Wu, Ze Rui; Su, Zhi Peng; Lu, Jiang Long; Wei, Li Fei; Zhuge, Qi Chuan; Jin, Kunlin; Wu, Zhe Bao

    2016-06-01

    Dopamine agonists (DAs) are the first-line treatment of prolactinomas. They function through the dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) in the tumor cells. Endocan, also called endothelial cell-specific molecule-1 (ESM1), has been described as a marker of neoangiogenesis. However, whether ESM1 promotes the resistance of prolactinomas to DA therapy is largely unknown. In our study, 25 patients with prolactinomas were divided into resistant- and sensitive- groups according to the clinical response to bromocriptine. We found that ESM1-microvessel density of resistant prolactinomas was significantly higher than that of sensitive prolactinomas (47.9 ± 11.6, n = 8, vs 13.1 ± 2.8, n = 17, p = 0.0006), indicating that ESM1 was a DA resistance-related gene. Immunostaining showed that ESM1 was expressed in tumor vessels and sporadic tumor cells, and ESM1 was overlapped with the Smooth Muscle Actin (SMA) and von Willebrand Factor (VWF) in the tumor vessels. Silencing of ESM1 markedly suppressed the viability of GH3 and MMQ cells in vitro, and furthermore, significantly increased the sensitivity of GH3 and MMQ cells to DA treatment. Additionally, silencing of ESM1 down-regulated the angiogenesis-associated genes, such as VEGFR2, FGF2, CD34, CD31, VWF, and EGFR. Knockdown of ESM1 decreased endothelial tube formation of HUVECs, and significantly increased the sensitivity of HUVECs to Avastin treatment. Therefore, we first demonstrate that DA resistance-related ESM1 promotes the angiogenesis and tumor cells growth of prolactinomas, suggesting that ESM1 may be a novel therapeutic target for prolactinomas. PMID:26662185

  15. In vitro effects of fetal rat cerebrospinal fluid on viability and neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabiuni Mohammad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fetal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contains many neurotrophic and growth factors and has been shown to be capable of supporting viability, proliferation and differentiation of primary cortical progenitor cells. Rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells have been widely used as an in vitro model of neuronal differentiation since they differentiate into sympathetic neuron-like cells in response to growth factors. This study aimed to establish whether PC12 cells were responsive to fetal CSF and therefore whether they might be used to investigate CSF physiology in a stable cell line lacking the time-specific response patterns of primary cells previously described. Methods In vitro assays of viability, proliferation and differentiation were carried out after incubation of PC12 cells in media with and without addition of fetal rat CSF. An MTT tetrazolium assay was used to assess cell viability and/or cell proliferation. Expression of neural differentiation markers (MAP-2 and β-III tubulin was determined by immunocytochemistry. Formation and growth of neurites was measured by image analysis. Results PC12 cells differentiate into neuronal cell types when exposed to bFGF. Viability and cell proliferation of PC12 cells cultured in CSF-supplemented medium from E18 rat fetuses were significantly elevated relative to the control group. Neuronal-like outgrowths from cells appeared following the application of bFGF or CSF from E17 and E19 fetuses but not E18 or E20 CSF. Beta-III tubulin was expressed in PC12 cells cultured in any media except that supplemented with E18 CSF. MAP-2 expression was found in control cultures and in those with E17 and E19 CSF. MAP2 was located in neurites except in E17 CSF when the whole cell was positive. Conclusions Fetal rat CSF supports viability and stimulates proliferation and neurogenic differentiation of PC12 cells in an age-dependent way, suggesting that CSF composition changes with age. This feature may be important

  16. Nanocoating of single cells: from maintenance of cell viability to manipulation of cellular activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Hun; Yang, Sung Ho; Lee, Juno; Ko, Eun Hyea; Hong, Daewha; Choi, Insung S

    2014-04-01

    The chronological progresses in single-cell nanocoating are described. The historical developments in the field are divided into biotemplating, cytocompatible nanocoating, and cells in nano-nutshells, depending on the main research focuses. Each subfield is discussed in conjunction with the others, regarding how and why to manipulate living cells by nanocoating at the single-cell level. PMID:24452932

  17. Low Doses of Cisplatin Induce Gene Alterations, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis in Human Promyelocytic Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velma, Venkatramreddy; Dasari, Shaloam R; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a known antitumor drug, but its mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In this research, we studied the anticancer potential of cisplatin at doses of 1, 2, or 3 µM using HL-60 cells as a test model. We investigated cisplatin effects at the molecular level using RNA sequencing, cell cycle analysis, and apoptotic assay after 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours of treatment. The results show that many genes responsible for molecular and cellular functions were significantly altered. Cisplatin treatment also caused the cells to be arrested at the DNA synthesis phase, and as the time increases, the cells gradually accumulated at the sub-G1 phase. Also, as the dose increases, a significant number of cells entered into the apoptotic and necrotic stages. Altogether, the data show that low doses of cisplatin significantly impact the viability of HL-60 cells, through modulation of gene expression, cell cycle, and apoptosis. PMID:27594783

  18. Cell viability of bovine spermatozoa subjected to DNA electroporation and DNAse I treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Paulo Varoni; Milazzotto, Marcella Pecora; Simões, Renata; Nichi, Marcilio; de Oliveira Barros, Flavia Regina; Visintin, Jose Antonio; Assumpção, Mayra Elena Ortiz D'Avila

    2016-04-15

    Many mechanisms involved in sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT) are still unknown. It is still a matter of debate whether exogenous DNA fragments incorporated by the embryo are originated from those bound to the sperm membrane or by those that penetrated the intracellular compartment. In an attempt to elucidate the transmission mechanism of exogenous DNA molecules by sperm, some authors suggested a treatment with DNAse I to remove DNA molecules outside the sperm. But little is known regarding the effects of DNAse I treatment on sperm viability and its impact on sperm organelles. An important aspect of the SMGT technique is the amount of exogenous DNA incubated with sperm, which may influence the internalization rate. Due to the inconsistencies found in literature, this work aimed to contribute to bovine sperm physiology knowledge evaluating the effects of different DNA concentrations, electroporation, and DNAse I treatments on sperm viability characteristics, DNA uptake, and IVF. For that, the effects of different concentrations of exogenous DNA (250, 500 and 1000 ng/10(6) cells) and incubation or electroporation were tested on sperm functional characteristics and in vitro embryo production. No effect of DNA concentration was observed on uptake, plasma membrane integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential. The addition of exogenous DNA induced a decrease on acrosomal lesion in the 500-ng group when compared to the control. Cells incubated with DNA, electroporated, and treated with DNAse I presented a deleterious influence on mitochondrial membrane potential. In vitro fertilization was made with 1000 ng of DNA, sperm cells incubated or electroporated followed by DNAse I treatment. No significant difference was found in cleavage rate. Blastocyst rates were 24.36% for the control; 19.65% for incubated; 3.5% for electroporated control; and 17.40% for electroporated. There is a significant difference in blastocyst rate between the control and electroporated

  19. Hyperglycaemia Alters Thymic Epithelial Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Alexandrovna Abramova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM is considered to be a consequence of unchecked auto-immune processes. Alterations in immune system responses are thought to be the cause of the disease, but the possibility that altered metabolite levels (glucose can establish the disease by specifically acting on and altering thymus stroma functions has not been investigated. Therefore, the direct effect of hyperglycaemia (HG on central tolerance mechanisms as a causative agent needs to be investigated.

  20. High Nutrient Levels and TORC1 Activity Reduce Cell Viability following Prolonged Telomere Dysfunction and Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Klermund

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cells challenged with DNA damage activate checkpoints to arrest the cell cycle and allow time for repair. Successful repair coupled to subsequent checkpoint inactivation is referred to as recovery. When DNA damage cannot be repaired, a choice between permanent arrest and cycling in the presence of damage (checkpoint adaptation must be made. While permanent arrest jeopardizes future lineages, continued proliferation is associated with the risk of genome instability. We demonstrate that nutritional signaling through target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1 influences the outcome of this decision. Rapamycin-mediated TORC1 inhibition prevents checkpoint adaptation via both Cdc5 inactivation and autophagy induction. Preventing adaptation results in increased cell viability and hence proliferative potential. In accordance, the ability of rapamycin to increase longevity is dependent upon the DNA damage checkpoint. The crosstalk between TORC1 and the DNA damage checkpoint may have important implications in terms of therapeutic alternatives for diseases associated with genome instability.

  1. Tracing Conidial Fate and Measuring Host Cell Antifungal Activity Using a Reporter of Microbial Viability in the Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Jhingran, Anupam; Mar, Katrina B.; Kumasaka, Debra K.; Sue E Knoblaugh; Ngo, Lisa Y.; Segal, Brahm H; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Lowell, Clifford A.; Hamerman, Jessica A.; Lin, Xin; Tobias M Hohl

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence can be harnessed to monitor microbial fate and to investigate functional outcomes of individual microbial cell-host cell encounters at portals of entry in native tissue environments. We illustrate this concept by introducing fluorescent Aspergillus reporter (FLARE) conidia that simultaneously report phagocytic uptake and fungal viability during cellular interactions with the murine respiratory innate immune system. Our studies using FLARE conidia reveal stepwise and cell-type-spe...

  2. Effect of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and Tween 80 on Cell Viability in an Air-Cathode Microbial Fuel Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Fregoso, Luisa

    2011-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) generate current via electrochemical reactions produced by bacteria attached to the anode that oxidize organic matter. Due to their high volume use in household products, some concentration of surfactant will reach wastewater treatment plants. The average surfactant concentration in wastewater ranges from 10 to 20 mg L-1, and up to 300 mg L-1, for domestic and industrial wastewaters, respectively. This study aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of enhancing power production by adding Tween 80 and SDS surfactants to air-cathode MFCs, and their effect in cell viability at the anodic biofilm. In order to analyze the effect of anionic and nonionic surfactants in MFCs performance, eight MFCs were spiked with two types of surfactants, the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and the nonionic surfactant Tween® 80 at two different concentrations 10 and 100 mg L-1. Cell viability at the anodic biofilms was examined using the LIVE/DEAD BacLight viability assay and images were visualized with a confocal laser scanning microscope. The electrochemical results demonstrate that, for an air-cathode MFC operating on 1 g L-1 acetate in a fed-batch mode, reactors where SDS was added show a lower overall performance, maximum PD of 544 mW m-2, CE of 12.3%, Rint of 322 Ω (10 mg L-1) and maximum PD of 265 mW m-2, CE of 9.4%, Rint of 758 Ω (100 mg L-1). Reactors where Tween 80 was added show quite stable performance, maximum PD of 623 mW m-2, CE of 15.4%, Rint of 216 Ω (10 mg L-1) and maximum PD of 591 mW m-2, CE of 10.8%, Rint of 279 Ω (100 mg L-1), compared with reactors operating at only acetate as a substrate, maximum PD of 574 mW m-2. Confocal microscopy images confirm this observation and biofilm viability appeared severely compromised in SDS reactors, especially at high concentrations. This study has opened up a whole new research area in determining which types of surfactants are toxic to the anodic biofilm and to further investigate the

  3. Prolonged Mitosis of Neural Progenitors Alters Cell Fate in the Developing Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilaz, Louis-Jan; McMahon, John J; Miller, Emily E; Lennox, Ashley L; Suzuki, Aussie; Salmon, Edward; Silver, Debra L

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic neocortical development depends on balanced production of progenitors and neurons. Genetic mutations disrupting progenitor mitosis frequently impair neurogenesis; however, the link between altered mitosis and cell fate remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that prolonged mitosis of radial glial progenitors directly alters neuronal fate specification and progeny viability. Live imaging of progenitors from a neurogenesis mutant, Magoh(+/-), reveals that mitotic delay significantly correlates with preferential production of neurons instead of progenitors, as well as apoptotic progeny. Independently, two pharmacological approaches reveal a causal relationship between mitotic delay and progeny fate. As mitotic duration increases, progenitors produce substantially more apoptotic progeny or neurons. We show that apoptosis, but not differentiation, is p53 dependent, demonstrating that these are distinct outcomes of mitotic delay. Together our findings reveal that prolonged mitosis is sufficient to alter fates of radial glia progeny and define a new paradigm to understand how mitosis perturbations underlie brain size disorders such as microcephaly.

  4. In vitro antioxidant and cell viability of Pyrostegia venusta (Ker Gawl. Miers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thales D. P. Altoé

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many diseases are associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory processes. The current research is directed toward evaluating the antioxidant potential and phytochemistry composition of P. venusta leaves. In this study, P. venusta leaves were dried and macerated, and the crude extract was partitioned. Phytochemical analysis was performed using standard methodologies, and the total flavonoid content was measured using a calibration curve with rutin. We evaluated the antioxidant potential of P. venusta leaves using 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, 2, 2’-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS, and a Trolox-like standard. Cell viability (CV assays were done using macrophage RAW 264.7 cell lines and compared to four commercial anti-inflammatories (acetylsalicylic acid, Indometacina, Betametasona, and Piroxicam. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of steroids, coumarins, and flavone. The flavonoid content was 148.5 ± 7.65 µg as a rutin equivalent/mg of crude extract. The ethyl acetate fraction showed the best antioxidant activity in the methodologies of DPPH inhibition (IC50 = 38.62 µg/mL and ABTS radical (IC50 = 28.58 µg/mL. Samples of P. venusta had CV values that were better than the commercial anti-inflammatory, which showed CV values below the negative control. The crude extract and the ethyl acetate fraction, showed CV values below the negative control and the hexane fraction obtained values above the negative control, these being best results.

  5. Harpagophytum procumbens prevents oxidative stress and loss of cell viability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Larissa Finger; Peroza, Luis Ricardo; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Fachinetto, Roselei; Wagner, Caroline

    2013-11-01

    Harpagophytum procumbens, popularly known as devil's claw, is a plant commonly used in the treatment of diseases of inflammatory origin. The anti-inflammatory effects of H. procumbens have been studied; however, the mechanism of action is not elucidated. It is known that excess of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species may contribute to increasing tissue damage due to inflammation. In the present study, we examined the effects of H. procumbens infusion, crude extract and fractions on lipid peroxidation (brain homogenates) induced by different pro-oxidants (Fe(2+) or sodium nitroprusside) and the effects of ethyl acetate fraction (rich in phenolic compounds) on antioxidant defenses (catalase activity and thiol levels) and cell damage (brain cortical slices) induced by different pro-oxidants. All tested extracts of H. procumbens inhibited lipid peroxidation in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the ethyl acetate fraction had the highest antioxidant effects either by decreasing lipid peroxidation and cellular damage or restoring thiols levels and catalase activity. Taken together, our results showed that H. procumbens acts either by preventing oxidative stress or loss of cell viability. Thus, the previously reported anti-inflammatory effect of H. procumbens could also be attributed to its antioxidant activity. PMID:23982320

  6. In vitro Effects of Lemongrass Extract on Candida albicans Biofilms, Human Cells Viability, and Denture Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Petrus L. B.; Carvalho, Letícia T.; Paschoal, Marco A. B.; de Sousa, Eduardo M.; Moffa, Eduardo B.; da Silva, Marcos A. dos Santos; Tavarez, Rudys de Jesus Rodolfo; Gonçalves, Letícia M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether immersion of a denture surface in lemongrass extract (LGE) has effects on C. albicans biofilms, human cell viability and denture surface. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) were performed for LGE against C. albicans. For biofilm analysis, discs were fabricated using a denture acrylic resin with surface roughness standardization. C. albicans biofilms were developed on saliva-coated discs, and the effects of LGE at MIC, 5XMIC, and 10XMIC were investigated during biofilm formation and after biofilm maturation. Biofilms were investigated for cell counting, metabolic activity, and microscopic analysis. The cytotoxicity of different concentrations of LGE to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was analyzed using MTT. The effects of LGE on acrylic resin were verified by measuring changes in roughness, color and flexural strength after 28 days of immersion. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, followed by a Tukey test at a 5% significance level. The minimal concentration of LGE required to inhibit C. albicans growth was 0.625 mg/mL, while MFC was 2.5 mg/mL. The presence of LGE during biofilm development resulted in a reduction of cell counting (p 0.05). There were no verified differences in color perception, roughness, or flexural strength after immersion in LGE at MIC compared to the control (p > 0.05). It could be concluded that immersion of the denture surface in LGE was effective in reducing C. albicans biofilms with no deleterious effects on acrylic properties at MIC. MIC was also an effective and safe concentration for use. PMID:27446818

  7. In vitro Effects of Lemongrass Extract on Candida albicans Biofilms, Human Cells Viability, and Denture Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Petrus L B; Carvalho, Letícia T; Paschoal, Marco A B; de Sousa, Eduardo M; Moffa, Eduardo B; da Silva, Marcos A Dos Santos; Tavarez, Rudys de Jesus Rodolfo; Gonçalves, Letícia M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether immersion of a denture surface in lemongrass extract (LGE) has effects on C. albicans biofilms, human cell viability and denture surface. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) were performed for LGE against C. albicans. For biofilm analysis, discs were fabricated using a denture acrylic resin with surface roughness standardization. C. albicans biofilms were developed on saliva-coated discs, and the effects of LGE at MIC, 5XMIC, and 10XMIC were investigated during biofilm formation and after biofilm maturation. Biofilms were investigated for cell counting, metabolic activity, and microscopic analysis. The cytotoxicity of different concentrations of LGE to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was analyzed using MTT. The effects of LGE on acrylic resin were verified by measuring changes in roughness, color and flexural strength after 28 days of immersion. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, followed by a Tukey test at a 5% significance level. The minimal concentration of LGE required to inhibit C. albicans growth was 0.625 mg/mL, while MFC was 2.5 mg/mL. The presence of LGE during biofilm development resulted in a reduction of cell counting (p 0.05). There were no verified differences in color perception, roughness, or flexural strength after immersion in LGE at MIC compared to the control (p > 0.05). It could be concluded that immersion of the denture surface in LGE was effective in reducing C. albicans biofilms with no deleterious effects on acrylic properties at MIC. MIC was also an effective and safe concentration for use. PMID:27446818

  8. Nutritional stress enhances cell viability of odontoblast-like cells subjected to low level laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of knowing that cells under stress are biostimulated by low level laser (LLL) irradiation, the ideal condition of stress to different cell lines has not yet been established. Consequently, the aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of a defined parameter of LLL irradiation applied on stressed odontoblast-like pulp cells (MDPC-23). The cells were seeded (12500 cells/cm2) in wells of 24-well plates using complete culture medium (DMEM) and incubated for 24 hours. Then, the DMEM was replaced by a new medium with low concentrations (nutritional stress condition) of fetal bovine serum (FBS) giving rise to the following experimental groups: G1: 2% FBS; G2: 5% FBS; and G3: 10% FBS. The cells were irradiated three times with LLL in specific parameters (808±3 nm, 100 mW, 1.5 J/cm2) every 24 hours. No irradiation was carried out in groups G4 (2% FBS-Control), G5 (5% FBS-Control), and G6 (10% FBS-Control). For all groups, the cell metabolism (MTT assay) and morphology (SEM) was evaluated. The experimental groups showed enhanced cell metabolism and normal cell morphology regardless of FBS concentration. A slight increase in the cell metabolism was observed only in group G2. It was concluded that cell nutritional stress caused by reducing the concentration of FBS to 5% is the most suitable method to assess the biostimulation of LLL irradiated MDPC-23 cells

  9. Emerging role of calcium-activated potassium channel in the regulation of cell viability following potassium ions challenge in HEK293 cells and pharmacological modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Tricarico

    Full Text Available Emerging evidences suggest that Ca(2+activated-K(+-(BK channel is involved in the regulation of cell viability. The changes of the cell viability observed under hyperkalemia (15 mEq/L or hypokalemia (0.55 mEq/L conditions were investigated in HEK293 cells expressing the hslo subunit (hslo-HEK293 in the presence or absence of BK channel modulators. The BK channel openers(10(-11-10(-3M were: acetazolamide(ACTZ, Dichlorphenamide(DCP, methazolamide(MTZ, bendroflumethiazide(BFT, ethoxzolamide(ETX, hydrochlorthiazide(HCT, quercetin(QUERC, resveratrol(RESV and NS1619; and the BK channel blockers(2 x 10(-7M-5 x 10(-3M were: tetraethylammonium(TEA, iberiotoxin(IbTx and charybdotoxin(ChTX. Experiments on cell viability and channel currents were performed using cell counting kit-8 and patch-clamp techniques, respectively. Hslo whole-cell current was potentiated by BK channel openers with different potency and efficacy in hslo-HEK293. The efficacy ranking of the openers at -60 mV(Vm was BFT> ACTZ >DCP ≥RESV≥ ETX> NS1619> MTZ≥ QUERC; HCT was not effective. Cell viability after 24 h of incubation under hyperkalemia was enhanced by 82+6% and 33+7% in hslo-HEK293 cells and HEK293 cells, respectively. IbTx, ChTX and TEA enhanced cell viability in hslo-HEK293. BK openers prevented the enhancement of the cell viability induced by hyperkalemia or IbTx in hslo-HEK293 showing an efficacy which was comparable with that observed as BK openers. BK channel modulators failed to affect cell currents and viability under hyperkalemia conditions in the absence of hslo subunit. In contrast, under hypokalemia cell viability was reduced by -22+4% and -23+6% in hslo-HEK293 and HEK293 cells, respectively; the BK channel modulators failed to affect this parameter in these cells. In conclusion, BK channel regulates cell viability under hyperkalemia but not hypokalemia conditions. BFT and ACTZ were the most potent drugs either in activating the BK current and in preventing the

  10. Emerging role of calcium-activated potassium channel in the regulation of cell viability following potassium ions challenge in HEK293 cells and pharmacological modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricarico, Domenico; Mele, Antonietta; Calzolaro, Sara; Cannone, Gianluigi; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Dinardo, Maria Maddalena; Latorre, Ramon; Conte Camerino, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidences suggest that Ca(2+)activated-K(+)-(BK) channel is involved in the regulation of cell viability. The changes of the cell viability observed under hyperkalemia (15 mEq/L) or hypokalemia (0.55 mEq/L) conditions were investigated in HEK293 cells expressing the hslo subunit (hslo-HEK293) in the presence or absence of BK channel modulators. The BK channel openers(10(-11)-10(-3)M) were: acetazolamide(ACTZ), Dichlorphenamide(DCP), methazolamide(MTZ), bendroflumethiazide(BFT), ethoxzolamide(ETX), hydrochlorthiazide(HCT), quercetin(QUERC), resveratrol(RESV) and NS1619; and the BK channel blockers(2 x 10(-7)M-5 x 10(-3)M) were: tetraethylammonium(TEA), iberiotoxin(IbTx) and charybdotoxin(ChTX). Experiments on cell viability and channel currents were performed using cell counting kit-8 and patch-clamp techniques, respectively. Hslo whole-cell current was potentiated by BK channel openers with different potency and efficacy in hslo-HEK293. The efficacy ranking of the openers at -60 mV(Vm) was BFT> ACTZ >DCP ≥RESV≥ ETX> NS1619> MTZ≥ QUERC; HCT was not effective. Cell viability after 24 h of incubation under hyperkalemia was enhanced by 82+6% and 33+7% in hslo-HEK293 cells and HEK293 cells, respectively. IbTx, ChTX and TEA enhanced cell viability in hslo-HEK293. BK openers prevented the enhancement of the cell viability induced by hyperkalemia or IbTx in hslo-HEK293 showing an efficacy which was comparable with that observed as BK openers. BK channel modulators failed to affect cell currents and viability under hyperkalemia conditions in the absence of hslo subunit. In contrast, under hypokalemia cell viability was reduced by -22+4% and -23+6% in hslo-HEK293 and HEK293 cells, respectively; the BK channel modulators failed to affect this parameter in these cells. In conclusion, BK channel regulates cell viability under hyperkalemia but not hypokalemia conditions. BFT and ACTZ were the most potent drugs either in activating the BK current and in preventing

  11. Evaluation of viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells cultured onto xenogenic tissue-engineered extracellular matrices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, Niall F

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the viability and proliferative activity of human urothelial cells (HUCs) cultured on tissue-engineered extracellular matrix scaffolds and to assess the potential of extracellular matrixes to support the growth of HUCs in their expected in vivo urine environment.

  12. Changes in Cell Viability of Wounded Fibroblasts following Laser Irradiation in Broad-Spectrum or Infrared Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. This study aimed to establish if broad-spectrum or infrared (IR) light in combination with laser therapy can assist phototherapy to improve the cell function of wounded cells. Background. The effect of laser light may be partly or completely reduced by broad-spectrum light. Methods. Wounded human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with 5 J/cm2 using a helium-neon laser, a diode laser, or an Nd:YAG laser in the dark, in the light, or in IR. Changes in cell viability were evaluated by cell morphology, ATP cell viability, LDH membrane integrity, and caspase 3/7 as an early marker of apoptosis. Results. Wounded cells exposed to 5 J/cm2 using 632.8 nm in the dark or 830 nm in the light or 1064 nm in the dark showed an increase in ATP viability, an increase in cytokine expression, and a decrease in LDH cytotoxicity indicating that the metabolic activity of the wounded cells was stimulated. Conclusion. Wounded cells irradiated in IR light showed an undesirable thermal effect that was proportional to the duration of exposure.

  13. DCT protects human melanocytic cells from UVR and ROS damage and increases cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainger, Stephen A; Yong, Xuan L; Wong, Shu S; Skalamera, Dubravka; Gabrielli, Brian; Leonard, J Helen; Sturm, Richard A

    2014-12-01

    Dopachrome tautomerase (DCT) is involved in the formation of the photoprotective skin pigment eumelanin and has also been shown to have a role in response to apoptotic stimuli and oxidative stress. The effect of DCT on UVR DNA damage responses and survival pathways in human melanocytic cells was examined by knockdown experiments using melanoma cells, neonatal foreskin melanoblasts (MB) in monoculture and in co-culture with human keratinocytes. MB cell strains genotyped as either MC1R WT or MC1R RHC homozygotes, which are known to be deficient in DCT, were transduced with lentivirus vectors for either DCT knockdown or overexpression. We found melanoma cell survival was reduced by DCT depletion and by UVR over time. UVR-induced p53 and pp53-Ser15 levels were reduced with DCT depletion. Knockdown of DCT in MC1R WT and MC1R RHC MB cells reduced their survival after UVR exposure, whereas increased DCT protein levels enhanced survival. DCT depletion reduced p53 and pp53-Ser15 levels in WM266-4 melanoma and MC1R WT MB cells, while MC1R RHC MB cells displayed variable levels. Both MC1R WT and RHC genotypes of MB cells were responsive to UVR at 3 h with increases in both p53 and pp53-Ser15 proteins. MC1R WT MB cell strains in coculture with keratinocytes have an increased cell survival after UVR exposure when compared to those in monoculture, a protective effect which appears to be conferred by the keratinocytes.

  14. δ-Catenin promotes prostate cancer cell growth and progression by altering cell cycle and survival gene profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yan-Hua

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background δ-Catenin is a unique member of β-catenin/armadillo domain superfamily proteins and its primary expression is restricted to the brain. However, δ-catenin is upregulated in human prostatic adenocarcinomas, although the effects of δ-catenin overexpression in prostate cancer are unclear. We hypothesized that δ-catenin plays a direct role in prostate cancer progression by altering gene profiles of cell cycle regulation and cell survival. Results We employed gene transfection and small interfering RNA to demonstrate that increased δ-catenin expression promoted, whereas its knockdown suppressed prostate cancer cell viability. δ-Catenin promoted prostate cancer cell colony formation in soft agar as well as tumor xenograft growth in nude mice. Deletion of either the amino-terminal or carboxyl-terminal sequences outside the armadillo domains abolished the tumor promoting effects of δ-catenin. Quantitative RT2 Profiler™ PCR Arrays demonstrated gene alterations involved in cell cycle and survival regulation. δ-Catenin overexpression upregulated cyclin D1 and cdc34, increased phosphorylated histone-H3, and promoted the entry of mitosis. In addition, δ-catenin overexpression resulted in increased expression of cell survival genes Bcl-2 and survivin while reducing the cell cycle inhibitor p21Cip1. Conclusion Taken together, our studies suggest that at least one consequence of an increased expression of δ-catenin in human prostate cancer is the alteration of cell cycle and survival gene profiles, thereby promoting tumor progression.

  15. The apoptosis linked gene ALG-2 is dysregulated in tumors of various origin and contributes to cancer cell viability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jonas; Høj, Berit Rahbek; Mollerup, Jens;

    2008-01-01

    The apoptosis linked gene-2 (ALG-2), discovered as a proapoptotic calcium binding protein, has recently been found upregulated in lung cancer tissue indicating that this protein may play a role in the pathology of cancer cells and/or may be a tumor marker. Using immunohistochemistry on tissue...... cancer. siRNA mediated ALG-2 downregulation led to a significant reduction in viability of HeLa cells indicating that ALG-2 may contribute to tumor development and expansion....

  16. Follicular Viability and Histological Alterations after nAuto-transplantation of Dog Ovaries by Experimentally Inducing Blood Sinus on Stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazhir Khoram

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:Currently, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are considered most effective methods forcancer treatment, however these strategies often result in fertility problems. A favorable alternativeto prevent fertility loss in cancer patients is the cryopreservation and transplantation of sexualtissues (ovaries and/or testes. There is a low rate of fertilization following cryopreservation ofovaries prior to implantation. Therefore, in our opinion, this low rate is caused by instable bloodflow during organ transplantation. Thus, this study researches a canine ovarian model that focuses ondirect exposure of ovaries with blood in an experimentally induced sinus-like cavity. We implantedthis tissue on the muscular layer of the stomach, which is its most vascularized region.Materials and Methods: Ovarian transplantation was conducted on T1 animals (n=5, bilateralovariectomy was performed on T2 animals (n=5, unilateral ovariectomy was conducted on T3 casesand animals in the control-sham group (n=5 did not undergo ovariectomy or transplantation.Results: All isotransplanted ovaries survived. Ovaries resumed follicular growth andrevascularization. Transplanted ovaries contained 75%-76% of survived small follicles (pre antralafter 60 days. The ovarian granulosa cells showed considerable resistance against ischemia. Afterday 30 no statistically significant differences in the level of estradiol and progesterone were observedbetween T1 animals and the T3 group. T1 animals showed considerably high levels of progesteroneand estradiol in comparison to T2 cases.Conclusion: This study showed that using blood sinus method for ovarian isotransplantation helpsovarian tissue to survive from post implantation ischemia which confirms with normal folliclespresentation and intact endocrine function of the implanted ovaries.

  17. Bisphenol S alters embryonic viability, development, gallbladder size, and messenger RNA expression in chicken embryos exposed via egg injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Doug; Chiu, Suzanne; Williams, Kim L

    2016-06-01

    Amid concerns about the toxicological effects and environmental prevalence of bisphenol A (BPA), efforts to find suitable, safer replacement alternatives are essential. Bisphenol S (BPS) is a potential chemical substitute for BPA; however, few studies are available confirming that it has a more desirable ecotoxicological profile. In the present study, BPS was injected into the air cell of unincubated, fertilized chicken embryos at 6 concentrations ranging from 0 μg/g to 207 μg/g egg to determine effects on pipping success, development, hepatic messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression, thyroid hormone levels, and circulating bile acid concentrations. Concentrations of BPS increased in a dose-dependent manner in whole-embryo homogenates, and exposure to the highest dose, 207 μg/g, resulted in decreased pipping success (estimated median lethal dose  = 279 μg/g; 95% confidence interval = 161-486 μg/g). Exposure to BPS also reduced growth metrics including embryo mass and tarsus length, whereas the most pronounced phenotypic effect was the concentration-dependent, significant increase in gallbladder size at concentrations ≥52.8 μg/g. These adverse phenotypic outcomes were associated with the modulation of gene targets from a chicken ToxChip polymerase chain reaction array, which are involved with xenobiotic metabolism, lipid homeostasis, bile acid synthesis, and the thyroid hormone pathway. Expression levels of 2 estrogen-responsive genes, apolipoprotein II and vitellogenin, were too low at the sampling time point assessed (i.e., pipping embryos) to quantify changes, and no effects were observed on circulating free thyroxine or bile acid concentrations. The present study provides novel, whole-animal toxicological data for a BPA replacement alternative that is not well characterized. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1541-1549. © 2015 SETAC.

  18. ZnO nanoparticles induced effects on nanomechanical behavior and cell viability of chitosan films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C., E-mail: a.jayasuriya@utoledo.edu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Aryaei, Ashkan; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H. [Departments of Mechanical Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The aim of this paper is to develop novel chitosan–zinc oxide nanocomposite films for biomedical applications. The films were fabricated with 1, 5, 10 and 15% w/w of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) incorporated with chitosan (CS) using a simple method. The prepared nanocomposite films were characterized using atomic force microscopy, Raman and X-ray diffraction studies. In addition, nano and micro mechanical properties were measured. It was found that the microhardness, nanohardness and its corresponding elastic modulus increased with the increase of ZnO NP percentage in the CS films. However, the ductility of films decreased as the percentage of ZnO NPs increased. Cell attachment and cytotoxicity of the prepared films at days two and five were evaluated in vitro using osteoblasts (OBs). It was observed that OB viability decreased in films with higher than 5% ZnO NPs. This result suggests that although ZnO NPs can improve the mechanical properties of pure CS films, only a low percentage of ZnO NPs can be applied for biomedical and bioengineering applications because of the cytotoxicity effects of these particles. Highlights: • Chitosan–zinc oxide nanocomposite films were fabricated using a simple method. • Material characterization methods showed that adding zinc oxide up to 15% does not change the crystal structure of chitosan. • Zinc oxide nanoparticles improve nano and micro mechanical properties of chitosan films. • Adding more than 5% w/w zinc oxide nanoparticles demonstrates cytotoxicity on osteoblast cells.

  19. Cell viability and dopamine secretion of 6-hydroxydopamine-treated PC12 cells co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells☆

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yue; Cui, Yongchun; Luo, Fuliang; Liu, Xiaopeng; Wang, XiaoJuan; Wu, Aili; Zhao, Junwei; Tian, Zhong; Wu, Like

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, PC12 cells induced by 6-hydroxydopamine as a model of Parkinson's Disease, were used to investigate the protective effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity and to verify whether the mechanism of action relates to abnormal α-synuclein accumulation in cells. Results showed that co-culture with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells enhanced PC12 cell viability and do...

  20. Intracellular trehalose and sorbitol synergistically promoting cell viability of a biocontrol yeast, Pichia anomala, for aflatoxin reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Sui Sheng T; Hernlem, Bradley J; Yokoyama, Wallace; Sarreal, Siov Bouy L

    2015-05-01

    Pichia anomala (Wickerhamomyces anomalus) WRL-076 was discovered by a visual screening bioassay for its antagonism against Aspergillus flavus. The yeast was shown to significantly inhibit aflatoxin production and the growth of A. flavus. P. anomala is a potential biocontrol agent for reduction of aflatoxin in the food chain. Maintaining the viability of biocontrol agents in formulated products is a great challenge for commercial applications. Four media, NYG, NYGS, NYGT and NYGST are described which support good growth of yeast cells and were tested as storage formulations. Post growth supplement of 5 % trehalose to NYGST resulted in 83 % viable yeast cells after 12 months in cold storage. Intracellular sorbitol and trehalose concentrations were determined by HPLC analysis at the beginning of the storage and at the end of 12 month. Correlation of cell viability to both trehalose and sorbitol suggested a synergistic effect. Bonferroni (Dunn) t Test, Tukey's Studentized Range (HSD) Test and Duncan's Multiple Range Test, all showed that yeast cell viability in samples with both intracellular trehalose and sorbitol were significantly higher than those with either or none, at a 95 % confidence level. DiBAC4(5) and CFDA-AM were used as the membrane integrity fluorescent stains to create a two-color vital staining scheme with red and green fluorescence, respectively. Yeast cells stored in formulations NYG and NYGS with no detectable trehalose, displayed mostly red fluorescence. Yeast cells in NYGST+5T showed mostly green fluorescence.

  1. Cell type and transfection reagent-dependent effects on viability, cell content, cell cycle and inflammation of RNAi in human primary mesenchymal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Hsiao Yin; Vonk, Lucienne A.; Licht, Ruud;

    2014-01-01

    not accompanied by concomitant changes in viability. However, changes in expression of marker genes for cell cycle inhibition or progression, such as p21 and PCNA, could not explain the changes in DNA content. Interestingly, aspecific upregulation of GAPDH activity was found, which was limited to cartilaginous......% amidation), for siRNA delivery into primary mesenchymal cells including nucleus pulposus cells, articular chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was used as an endogenous model gene to evaluate the extent of silencing by 20 nM or 200 nM siRNA at day......The application of RNA interference (RNAi) has great therapeutic potential for degenerative diseases of cartilaginous tissues by means of fine tuning the phenotype of cells used for regeneration. However, possible non-specific effects of transfection per se might be relevant for future clinical...

  2. Ginseng (Panax quinquefolius and Licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Root Extract Combinations Increase Hepatocarcinoma Cell (Hep-G2 Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Popovich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined cytoactive effects of American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius and licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis root extracts were investigated in a hepatocarcinoma cell line (Hep-G2. An isobolographic analysis was utilized to express the possibility of synergistic, additive or antagonistic interaction between the two extracts. Both ginseng and licorice roots are widely utilized in traditional Chinese medicine preparations to treat a variety of ailments. However, the effect of the herbs in combination is currently unknown in cultured Hep-G2 cells. Ginseng (GE and licorice (LE extracts were both able to reduce cell viability. The LC50 values, after 72 h, were found to be 0.64 ± 0.02 mg/mL (GE and 0.53 ± 0.02 mg/mL (LE. An isobologram was plotted, which included five theoretical LC50s calculated, based on the fixed fraction method of combination ginseng to licorice extracts to establish a line of additivity. All combinations of GE to LE (1/5, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, 4/5 produced an effect on Hep-G2 cell viability but they were all found to be antagonistic. The LC50 of fractions 1/3, 1/2, 2/3 were 23%, 21% and 18% above the theoretical LC50. Lactate dehydrogenase release indicated that as the proportion of GE to LE increased beyond 50%, the influence on membrane permeability increased. Cell-cycle analysis showed a slight but significant arrest at the G1 phase of cell cycle for LE. Both GE and LE reduced Hep-G2 viability independently; however, the combinations of both extracts were found to have an antagonistic effect on cell viability and increased cultured Hep-G2 survival.

  3. Spiclomazine induces apoptosis associated with the suppression of cell viability, migration and invasion in pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Zhao

    Full Text Available The effective treatment for pancreatic carcinoma remains critically needed. Herein, this current study showed that spiclomazine treatment caused a reduction in viability in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines CFPAC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 in vitro. It was notable in this regard that, compared with pancreatic carcinoma cells, normal human embryonic kidney (HEK-293 and liver (HL-7702 cells were more resistant to the antigrowth effect of spiclomazine. Biochemically, spiclomazine treatment regulated the expression of protein levels in the apoptosis related pathways. Consistent with this effect, spiclomazine reduced the mitochondria membrane potential, elevated reactive oxygen species, and activated caspase-3/9. In addition, a key finding from this study was that spiclomazine suppressed migration and invasion of cancer cells through down-regulation of MMP-2/9. Collectively, the proposed studies did shed light on the antiproliferation effect of spiclomazine on pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, and further clarified the mechanisms that spiclomazine induced apoptosis associated with the suppression of migration and invasion.

  4. Ethanol Extracts of Selected Cyathea Species Decreased Cell Viability and Inhibited Growth in MCF 7 Cell Line Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janakiraman, Narayanan; Johnson, Marimuthu

    2016-06-01

    Cancer is the cause of more than 6 million deaths worldwide every year. For centuries, medicinal plants have been used in the treatment of cancer. Chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery and acupuncture point stimulation are also used to treat cancer. The present study was intended to reveal the cytotoxic and anticancer potential of selected Cyathea species and to highlight their importance in the pharmaceutical industry for the development of cost-effective drugs. Cytotoxic studies using brine shrimp lethality bioassays and MCF 7 cell line cultures were carried out. Compared to petroleum ether, chloroform and acetone extracts, the ethanol extracts of selected Cyathea species were found to be more effective against brine shrimps. The ethanol extracts were further subjected to 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assays. A decrease in cell viability and an increase in growth inhibition were observed for the MCF 7 cell line. The maximum percentage of cell inhibition was observed in Cyathea crinit, followed by Cyathea nilgirensis and Cyathea gigantea. The results of the present study suggest that Cyathea species are an effective source of cytotoxic compounds. PMID:27342889

  5. The effect of the essential oils from five different Lippia species on the viability of tumor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayna da S. Gomide

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Several Lippia species have been used in folk medicine mainly for gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases. Their biological properties have been partially associated to the terpenoids found in their essential oils. According to the World Health Organization, cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide and is described as a complex group of diseases with several hallmarks. One of its acceptable defining features is the cell proliferation beyond their boundaries forming the tumors. Importantly, some drugs currently available were discovered by the investigation of plant secondary metabolites. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate in vitro cytotoxic effect of the essential oils extracted from five Lippia species against tumor cell lines. The results indicated that mouse colon carcinoma CT26.WT cell line viability was significantly reduced showing an IC50 of 19.05, 30.20 and 36.30 µg/ml when treated with the essential oils of L. sidoides, L. salviifolia and L. rotundifolia, respectively. Human lung carcinoma A549 cell line also had a compromised viability to the action of L. alba carvone chemotype essential oil. The tested essential oils did not compromise viability of the normal cell line CHO. These finds suggest that the studied Lippia essential oils might be good candidates for further in-depth studies.

  6. Data on cell viability of human lung fibroblasts treated with polyphenols-rich extract from Plinia trunciflora (O. Berg Kausel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Calloni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Jaboticaba (Plinia trunciflora (O. Berg Kausel is a Brazilian native berry, which presents high levels of polyphenols. Here we provide data related to the effects of the polyphenols-rich extract from jaboticaba on the cell viability, mitochondrial complex I (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide/CoQ oxidoreductase activity and ATP biosynthesis of human lung fibroblast cells (MRC-5 treated with amiodarone. The data presented in this article demonstrate that the polyphenols-rich extract from jaboticaba was able to reduce cell death as well as the decrease in complex I activity and ATP biosynthesis caused by amiodarone in MRC-5 cells.

  7. Using digital inline holographic microscopy and quantitative phase contrast imaging to assess viability of cultured mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missan, Sergey; Hrytsenko, Olga

    2015-03-01

    Digital inline holographic microscopy was used to record holograms of mammalian cells (HEK293, B16, and E0771) in culture. The holograms have been reconstructed using Octopus software (4Deep inwater imaging) and phase shift maps were unwrapped using the FFT-based phase unwrapping algorithm. The unwrapped phase shifts were used to determine the maximum phase shifts in individual cells. Addition of 0.5 mM H2O2 to cell media produced rapid rounding of cultured cells, followed by cell membrane rupture. The cell morphology changes and cell membrane ruptures were detected in real time and were apparent in the unwrapped phase shift images. The results indicate that quantitative phase contrast imaging produced by the digital inline holographic microscope can be used for the label-free real time automated determination of cell viability and confluence in mammalian cell cultures.

  8. Automated enumeration and viability measurement of canine stromal vascular fraction cells using fluorescence-based image cytometry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Leo Li-Ying; Cohen, Donald A; Kuksin, Dmitry; Paradis, Benjamin D; Qiu, Jean

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, the lipoaspirate collected from adipose tissue has been seen as a valuable source of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for autologous cellular therapy. For multiple applications, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells are isolated from the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue. Because the fresh stromal vascular fraction typically contains a heterogeneous mixture of cells, determining cell concentration and viability is a crucial step in preparing fraction samples for downstream processing. Due to a large amount of cellular debris contained in the SVF sample, as well as counting irregularities standard manual counting can lead to inconsistent results. Advancements in imaging and optics technologies have significantly improved the image-based cytometric analysis method. In this work, we validated the use of fluorescence-based image cytometry for SVF concentration and viability measurement, by comparing to standard flow cytometry and manual hemocytometer. The concentration and viability of freshly collected canine SVF samples are analyzed, and the results highly correlated between all three methods, which validated the image cytometry method for canine SVF analysis, and potentially for SVF from other species. PMID:24740550

  9. Evaluation of the viability of cultured corneal endothelial cells by quantitative electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaminos, M; Sanchez-Quevedo, M C; Muñoz-Avila, J I; García, J M; Crespo, P V; González-Andrades, M; Campos, A

    2007-06-01

    Construction of artificial organs and tissues by tissue engineering is strongly dependent on the availability of viable cells. For that reason, the viability and the physiological status of cells kept in culture must be evaluated before the cells can be used for clinical purposes. In this work, we determined the viability of isolated rabbit corneal endothelial cells by trypan blue staining and quantitative electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Our results showed that the ionic content of potassium in cultured corneal endothelial cells tended to rise initially, but significantly decreased in cells in the fifth (and final) subculture, especially in comparison to cells in the fourth subculture (P subculture than in the fourth subculture (P subculture (P = 0.031). These data imply a remarkable decrease in the K/Na ratio from the fourth to the fifth subculture. Our microanalytical results, along with the morphological differences between cells in the last two subcultures, are compatible with an early phase of the preapoptotic process in the fifth subculture, and suggest that cells of the first four subcultures would be better candidates for tissue engineering.

  10. Longitudinal, label-free, quantitative tracking of cell death and viability in a 3D tumor model with OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yookyung; Klein, Oliver J.; Wang, Hequn; Evans, Conor L.

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro tumor models are highly useful tools for studying tumor growth and treatment response of malignancies such as ovarian cancer. Existing viability and treatment assessment assays, however, face shortcomings when applied to these large, complex, and heterogeneous culture systems. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive, label-free, optical imaging technique that can visualize live cells and tissues over time with subcellular resolution and millimeters of optical penetration depth. Here, we show that OCT is capable of carrying out high-content, longitudinal assays of 3D culture treatment response. We demonstrate the usage and capability of OCT for the dynamic monitoring of individual and combination therapeutic regimens in vitro, including both chemotherapy drugs and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for ovarian cancer. OCT was validated against the standard LIVE/DEAD Viability/Cytotoxicity Assay in small tumor spheroid cultures, showing excellent correlation with existing standards. Importantly, OCT was shown to be capable of evaluating 3D spheroid treatment response even when traditional viability assays failed. OCT 3D viability imaging revealed synergy between PDT and the standard-of-care chemotherapeutic carboplatin that evolved over time. We believe the efficacy and accuracy of OCT in vitro drug screening will greatly contribute to the field of cancer treatment and therapy evaluation.

  11. Physiological alterations in UV-irradiated cells: liquid holding recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biochemical and physiological alterations that occur in ultraviolet irradiated cells, during liquid holding have been studied. Incubation in buffer acts not to interfer directly with the mechanic repairs but by promoting metabolic alterations that would block some irreversible and lethal physiological responses. (L.M.J.)

  12. Changes in Cell Viability of Wounded Fibroblasts following Laser Irradiation in Broad-Spectrum or Infrared Light

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkins, Denise; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2007-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to establish if broad-spectrum or infrared (IR) light in combination with laser therapy can assist phototherapy to improve the cell function of wounded cells. Background. The effect of laser light may be partly or completely reduced by broad-spectrum light. Methods. Wounded human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with 5 J/cm2 using a helium-neon laser, a diode laser, or an Nd:YAG laser in the dark, in the light, or in IR. Changes in cell viability were evaluated by ...

  13. Interferon-gamma produced by microglia and the neuropeptide PACAP have opposite effects on the viability of neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Johanna; Koivuniemi, Raili; Korhonen, Laura; Lindholm, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation is part of many neurological disorders and immune reactions may influence neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) contributing to the disease process. Our knowledge about the interplay between different cell types in brain inflammation are not fully understood. It is important to know the mechanisms and factors involved in order to enhance regeneration and brain repair. We show here that NPCs express receptors for interferon-gamma (IFNgamma), and IFNgamma activates the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) protein-1. IFNgamma reduced cell proliferation in NPCs by upregulation of the cell cycle protein p21 as well as induced cell death of NPCs by activating caspase-3. Studies of putative factors for rescue showed that the neuropeptide, Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) increased cell viability, the levels of p-Bad and reduced caspase-3 activation in the NPCs. Medium from cultured microglia contained IFNgamma and decreased the viability of NPCs, whilst blocking with anti-IFNgamma antibodies counteracted this effect. The results show that NPCs are negatively influenced by IFNgamma whereas PACAP is able to modulate its action. The interplay between IFNgamma released from immune cells and PACAP is of importance in brain inflammation and may affect the regeneration and recruitment of NPCs in immune diseases. The observed effects of IFNgamma on NPCs deserve to be taken into account in human anti-viral therapies particularly in children with higher rates of brain stem cell proliferation.

  14. N-Acetyl cysteine restores viability and function of rat odontoblast-like cells impaired by polymethylmethacrylate dental resin extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masahiro; Kojima, Norinaga; Att, Wael; Hori, Norio; Suzuki, Takeo; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2009-01-01

    There is concern that dental-resin materials directly loaded on a prepared tooth adversely affect dental pulp tissue by releasing the resin chemicals through dentinal tubes. This study determined whether self-curing polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-based dental resin extract adversely affected the viability and function of odontoblast-like cells and whether the cytotoxicity of this resin, if any, could be eliminated by N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant amino acid derivative. Odontoblast-like cells isolated from rat maxillary incisor dental pulp tissue were exposed to a PMMA resin extract with or without N-acetyl cysteine for 1 h and then cultured in osteoblastic media. The percentage of viable cells 24 h after seeding was 20% in cells exposed to the resin extract without N-acetyl cysteine, whereas 45% of cells were viable after exposure to the N-acetyl cysteine-supplemented extract. The cells that had been exposed to the extract showed a strong tendency for apoptosis associated with the increased reactive oxygen species production and decreased intracellular glutathione level, which was improved by the addition of N-acetyl cysteine. N-Acetyl cysteine supplementation almost completely restored the significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and matrix mineralization by the resin extract. These results conclusively demonstrated that exposure of odontoblast-like cells to the resin extract impaired the cell viability and function and, more intriguingly, N-acetyl cysteine supplementation to the extract significantly prevented these toxic effects.

  15. Interferon-gamma produced by microglia and the neuropeptide PACAP have opposite effects on the viability of neural progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Mäkelä

    Full Text Available Inflammation is part of many neurological disorders and immune reactions may influence neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs contributing to the disease process. Our knowledge about the interplay between different cell types in brain inflammation are not fully understood. It is important to know the mechanisms and factors involved in order to enhance regeneration and brain repair. We show here that NPCs express receptors for interferon-gamma (IFNgamma, and IFNgamma activates the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT protein-1. IFNgamma reduced cell proliferation in NPCs by upregulation of the cell cycle protein p21 as well as induced cell death of NPCs by activating caspase-3. Studies of putative factors for rescue showed that the neuropeptide, Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP increased cell viability, the levels of p-Bad and reduced caspase-3 activation in the NPCs. Medium from cultured microglia contained IFNgamma and decreased the viability of NPCs, whilst blocking with anti-IFNgamma antibodies counteracted this effect. The results show that NPCs are negatively influenced by IFNgamma whereas PACAP is able to modulate its action. The interplay between IFNgamma released from immune cells and PACAP is of importance in brain inflammation and may affect the regeneration and recruitment of NPCs in immune diseases. The observed effects of IFNgamma on NPCs deserve to be taken into account in human anti-viral therapies particularly in children with higher rates of brain stem cell proliferation.

  16. Raman spectroscopic study of a genetically altered kidney cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Joel; Garcia, Francisco; Centeno, Silvia P.; Joshi, N. V.

    2008-02-01

    A Raman spectroscopic investigation of a genetically altered Human Embryonic Kidney Cell (HEK293) along with a pathologically normal cell has been carried out by a conventional method. The genetic alteration was carried out with a standard protocol by using a Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP). Raman spectra show that there are dramatic differences between the spectrum obtained from a genetically altered cell and that obtained from a pathologically normal cell. The former shows three broad bands; meanwhile the latter shows several sharp peaks corresponding to the ring vibrational modes of Phen, GFP and DNA. The present analysis provides an indication that the force field near Phen located at 64, 65 and 66 was altered during the genetic transformation. The Raman spectrum could be a direct experimental evidence for substantial modifications triggered due to the expression of specific genes.

  17. Effect of methoxychlor on Ca2+ handling and viability in OC2 human oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Li-Ling; Shu, Su-Shung; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Chu, Sau-Tung; Chi, Chao-Chuan; Liang, Wei-Zhe; Ho, Chin-Man; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2011-05-01

    The effect of the insecticide methoxychlor on the physiology of oral cells is unknown. This study aimed to explore the effect of methoxychlor on cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) in human oral cancer cells (OC2) by using the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dye fura-2. Methoxychlor at 5-20 μM increased [Ca(2+)](i) in a concentration-dependent manner. The signal was reduced by 70% by removing extracellular Ca(2+). Methoxychlor-induced Ca(2+) entry was not affected by nifedipine, econazole, SK&F96365 and protein kinase C modulators but was inhibited by the phospholipase A2 inhibitor aristolochic acid. In Ca(2+)-free medium, treatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin or 2,5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone (BHQ) inhibited or abolished methoxychlor-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rise. Incubation with methoxychlor also inhibited thapsigargin- or BHQ-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rise. Inhibition of phospholipase C with U73122 did not alter methoxychlor-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rise. At 5-20 μM, methoxychlor killed cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxic effect of methoxychlor was not reversed by chelating cytosolic Ca(2+) with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid/AM (BAPTA/AM). Annexin V-FITC data suggest that methoxychlor (10 and 20 μM) evoked apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Together, in human OC2, methoxychlor induced a [Ca(2+)](i) rise probably by inducing phospholipase C-independent Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum and Ca(2+) entry via phospholipase A(2)-sensitive channels. Methoxychlor induced cell death that may involve apoptosis.

  18. Comparison of Cell Viability and Embryoid Body Size of Two Embryonic Stem Cell Lines After Different Exposure Times to Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4

    OpenAIRE

    Nehleh Zarei Fard; Tahereh Talaei-Khozani; Soghra Bahmanpour; Tahereh Esmaeilpour

    2015-01-01

    Background: Activation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) signaling pathway in embryonic stem (ES) cells plays an important role in controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Adverse effects of BMP4 occur in a time dependent manner; however, little is known about the effect of different time exposure of this growth factor on cell number in culture media. In this study, we investigated the role of two different exposure times to BMP4 in cell viability, embryoid body (E...

  19. Cadmium affects viability of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through membrane impairment, intracellular calcium elevation and DNA breakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abnosi Mohammad Hussein

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cadmium is an important heavy metal with occupational and environmental hazard. Cadmium toxicity results mainly in bone-related complication such as itai-itai disease. Mesenchymal stem cells of the bone marrow have the ability to differentiate to osteoblasts which ensure the well-being of the bone tissue. Thus the aim was to investigate the effect of cadmium on viability of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Materials and Methods: The rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were grown to confluency in DMEM medium supplemented with 15% fetal bovine serum and penicillin-streptomycin up to third passage. Then the cells were treated with 0, 5, 15, 25, 35, and 45 of CdCl 2 at 12, 24, 36, and 48 h, and their viability was investigated using trypan blue staining. In addition, after treatment with selected dose (15 and 45 μM and time (24 and 48 h the cell morphology, DNA damage and calcium content of the cells were evaluated. Data was analyzed using one and two-way ANOVA (Tukey test and the P2+ was observed. Conclusion: Cadmium chloride is a toxic compound which might affect the well-being of bone tissue through affecting the mesenchymal stem cells.

  20. Pore architecture and cell viability on freeze dried 3D recombinant human collagen-peptide (RHC)–chitosan scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Aimei; Deng, Aipeng [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Yang, Yang [Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Gao, Lihu; Zhong, Zhaocai [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Yang, Shulin, E-mail: yshulin@njust.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2015-04-01

    Pore architecture of 3D scaffolds used in tissue engineering plays a critical role in the maintenance of cell survival, proliferation and further promotion of tissue regeneration. We investigated the pore size and structure, porosity, swelling as well as cell viability of a series of recombinant human collagen-peptide–chitosan (RHCC) scaffolds fabricated by lyophilization. In this paper, freezing regime containing a final temperature of freezing (T{sub f}) and cooling rates was applied to obtain scaffolds with pore size ranging from 100 μm to 120 μm. Other protocols of RHC/chitosan suspension concentration and ratio modification were studied to produce more homogenous and appropriate structural scaffolds. The mean pore size decreased along with the decline of T{sub f} at a slow cooling rate of 0.7 °C/min; a more rapid cooling rate under 5 °C/min resulted to a smaller pore size and more homogenous microstructure. High concentration could reduce pore size and lead to thick well of scaffold, while improved the ratio of RHC, lamellar and fiber structure coexisted with cellular pores. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were seeded on these manufactured scaffolds, the cell viability represented a negative correlation to the pore size. This study provides an alternative method to fabricate 3D RHC–chitosan scaffolds with appropriate pores for potential tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Fabrication of recombinant human collagen-chitosan scaffolds by freezing drying • Influence of freeze drying protocols on lyophilized scaffolds • Pore size, microstructure, porosity, swelling and cell viability were compared. • The optimized porous scaffold is suitable for cell (HUVEC) seeding.

  1. Pore architecture and cell viability on freeze dried 3D recombinant human collagen-peptide (RHC)–chitosan scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pore architecture of 3D scaffolds used in tissue engineering plays a critical role in the maintenance of cell survival, proliferation and further promotion of tissue regeneration. We investigated the pore size and structure, porosity, swelling as well as cell viability of a series of recombinant human collagen-peptide–chitosan (RHCC) scaffolds fabricated by lyophilization. In this paper, freezing regime containing a final temperature of freezing (Tf) and cooling rates was applied to obtain scaffolds with pore size ranging from 100 μm to 120 μm. Other protocols of RHC/chitosan suspension concentration and ratio modification were studied to produce more homogenous and appropriate structural scaffolds. The mean pore size decreased along with the decline of Tf at a slow cooling rate of 0.7 °C/min; a more rapid cooling rate under 5 °C/min resulted to a smaller pore size and more homogenous microstructure. High concentration could reduce pore size and lead to thick well of scaffold, while improved the ratio of RHC, lamellar and fiber structure coexisted with cellular pores. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were seeded on these manufactured scaffolds, the cell viability represented a negative correlation to the pore size. This study provides an alternative method to fabricate 3D RHC–chitosan scaffolds with appropriate pores for potential tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Fabrication of recombinant human collagen-chitosan scaffolds by freezing drying • Influence of freeze drying protocols on lyophilized scaffolds • Pore size, microstructure, porosity, swelling and cell viability were compared. • The optimized porous scaffold is suitable for cell (HUVEC) seeding

  2. Caffeic Acid Reduces the Viability and Migration Rate of Oral Carcinoma Cells (SCC-25 Exposed to Low Concentrations of Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Dziedzic

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol increases the risk of carcinoma originated from oral epithelium, but the biological effects of ultra-low doses of ethanol on existing carcinoma cells in combination with natural substances are still unclear. A role for ethanol (EtOH, taken in small amounts as an ingredient of some beverages or mouthwashes to change the growth behavior of established squamous cell carcinoma, has still not been examined sufficiently. We designed an in vitro study to determine the effect of caffeic acid (CFA on viability and migration ability of malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes, exposed to ultra-low concentrations (maximum 100 mmol/L EtOH. MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-dimethyltetrazolium bromide and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase assays were used to assess the cytotoxic effect of EtOH/CFA and the viability of squamous carcinoma SCC-25 cells (ATCC CRL-1628, mobile part of the tongue. Tested EtOH concentrations were: 2.5, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 mmol/L, along with an equal CFA concentration of 50 μmol/L. Carcinoma cells’ migration was investigated by monolayer “wound” healing assay. We demonstrated that very low concentrations of EtOH ranging between 2.5 and 10 mmol/L may induce the viability of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells, while the results following addition of CFA reveal an antagonistic effect, attenuating pro-proliferative EtOH activity. The migration rate of oral squamous carcinoma cells can be significantly inhibited by the biological activity of caffeic acid.

  3. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Isegawa, Naohisa [Laboratory Animal Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Shirasawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: sirasawa@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  4. Slashing the timelines: Opting to generate high-titer clonal lines faster via viability-based single cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misaghi, Shahram; Shaw, David; Louie, Salina; Nava, Adrian; Simmons, Laura; Snedecor, Brad; Poon, Chungkee; Paw, Jonathan S; Gilmour-Appling, Laurie; Cupp, James E

    2016-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line development (CLD) is a long and laborious process, which requires up to 5 - 6 months in order to generate and bank CHO lines capable of stably expressing therapeutic molecules. Additionally, single cell cloning of these production lines is also necessary to confirm clonality of the production lines. Here we introduce the utilization of viability staining dye in combination with flow cytometer to isolate high titer clones from a pool of selected cells and single cell deposit them into the wells of culture plates. Our data suggests that a stringent selection procedure along with viability dye staining and flow cytometry-based sorting can be used to isolate high expressing clones with titers comparable to that of traditional CLD methods. This approach not only requires less labor and consumables, but it also shortens CLD timelines by at least 3 weeks. Furthermore, single cell deposition of selected cells by a flow sorter can be regarded as an additional clonality assurance factor that in combination with Day 0 imaging can ensure clonality of the production lines. PMID:26587808

  5. Low-level laser therapy: Effects on human face aged skin and cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezghani Sana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic and excessive exposure to UV radiation leads to photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. Adequate protection of the skin against the deleterious effects of UV irradiation is essential. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT is a light source in the red to near-infrared range that has been accepted in a variety of medical applications. In this study, we explored the effect of LLLT in human face aged skin and the cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiation. We found that LLLT significantly reduced visible wrinkles and the loss of firmness of facial skin in aging subjects. Additionally, treatment of cultured HeLa cells with LLLT prior to or post UVA or UVB exposure significantly protected cells from UV-mediated cell death. All results showed the beneficial effects of LLLT on relieving signs of skin aging and its prevention and protection of the cell viability against UV-induced damage.

  6. Aptamer–polymer functionalized silicon nanosubstrates for enhanced recovered circulating tumor cell viability and in vitro chemosensitivity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qinglin; Peng, Caixia; Zhan, Yan; Fan, Liang; Wang, Mengyi; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Jue; Lv, Xiaojuan; Tang, Qiu; Li, Jun; Huang, Xiaodong; Xia, Jiahong

    2016-01-01

    Selection of the optimal chemotherapy regimen for an individual cancer patient is challenging. The existing chemosensitivity tests are costly, time-consuming, and not amenable to wide utilization within a clinic. This limitation might be addressed by the recently proposed use of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), which provide an opportunity to noninvasively monitor response to therapy. Over the past few decades, various techniques were developed to capture and recover CTCs, but these techniques were often limited by a capture and recovery performance tradeoff between high viability and high efficiency. In this work, we used anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule coated aptamer–poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) functionalized silicon nanowire substrates to capture and release epithelial cell adhesion molecule-positive CTCs at 32°C and 4°C, respectively. Then, we applied the nuclease to digest the aptamer to release the captured CTCs (near or at the end of the polymer brush), which cannot be released by heating/cooling process. High viability and purity CTCs could be achieved by decreasing the heating/cooling cycles and enzymatic treatment rounds. Furthermore, the time-saving process is helpful to maintain the morphology and enhance vitality of the recovered CTCs and is beneficial to the subsequent cell culture in vitro. We validated the feasibility of chemosensitivity testing based on the recovered HCC827 cells using an adenosine triphosphate–tumor chemosensitivity assay, and the results suggested that our method can determine which agent and what concentration have the best chemosensitivity for the culturing recovered CTCs. So, the novel method capable of a highly effective capture and recovery of high viability CTCs will pave the way for chemosensitivity testing. PMID:27274239

  7. Altered features and increased chemosensitivity of human breast cancer cells mediated by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) represent heterogeneous cell population suitable for cell therapies in regenerative medicine. MSCs can also substantially affect tumor biology due to their ability to be recruited to the tumor stroma and interact with malignant cells via direct contacts and paracrine signaling. The aim of our study was to characterize molecular changes dictated by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AT-MSCs) and the effects on drug responses in human breast cancer cells SKBR3. The tumor cells were either directly cocultured with AT-MSCs or exposed to MSCs-conditioned medium (MSC-CM). Changes in cell biology were evaluated by kinetic live cell imaging, fluorescent microscopy, scratch wound assay, expression analysis, cytokine secretion profiling, ATP-based viability and apoptosis assays. The efficiency of cytotoxic treatment in the presence of AT-MSCs or MSCs-CM was analyzed. The AT-MSCs altered tumor cell morphology, induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, increased mammosphere formation, cell confluence and migration of SKBR3. These features were attributed to molecular changes induced by MSCs-secreted cytokines and chemokines in breast cancer cells. AT-MSCs significantly inhibited the proliferation of SKBR3 cells in direct cocultures which was shown to be dependent on the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling axis. MSC-CM-exposed SKBR3 or SKBR3 in direct coculture with AT-MSCs exhibited increased chemosensitivity and induction of apoptosis in response to doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil. Our work further highlights the multi-level nature of tumor-stromal cell interplay and demonstrates the capability of AT-MSCs and MSC-secreted factors to alter the anti-tumor drug responses

  8. Differential eosinophil and mast cell regulation: Mast cell viability and accumulation in inflammatory tissue are independent of proton-sensing receptor GPR65

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xiang; Mose, Eucabeth; Hogan, Simon P.; Zimmermann, Nives

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular acidification has been observed in allergic inflammatory diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that the proton-sensing receptor G protein-coupled receptor 65 (GPR65) regulates eosinophil survival in an acidic environment in vitro and eosinophil accumulation in an allergic lung inflammation model. For mast cells, another inflammatory cell type critical for allergic responses, it remains unknown whether GPR65 is expressed and/or regulates mast cell viability. Thus, in the present st...

  9. Tetracycline regulator expression alters the transcriptional program of mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hackl, Hubert; Rommer, Anna; Konrad, Torsten A; Nassimbeni, Christine; Wieser, Rotraud

    2010-01-01

    Tetracycline regulated ectopic gene expression is a widely used tool to study gene function. However, the tetracycline regulator (tetR) itself has been reported to cause certain phenotypic changes in mammalian cells. We, therefore, asked whether human myeloid U937 cells expressing the tetR in an autoregulated manner would exhibit alterations in gene expression upon removal of tetracycline.

  10. Comparative analysis of dynamic cell viability, migration and invasion assessments by novel real-time technology and classic endpoint assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Limame

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell viability and motility comprise ubiquitous mechanisms involved in a variety of (pathobiological processes including cancer. We report a technical comparative analysis of the novel impedance-based xCELLigence Real-Time Cell Analysis detection platform, with conventional label-based endpoint methods, hereby indicating performance characteristics and correlating dynamic observations of cell proliferation, cytotoxicity, migration and invasion on cancer cells in highly standardized experimental conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Dynamic high-resolution assessments of proliferation, cytotoxicity and migration were performed using xCELLigence technology on the MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer and A549 (lung cancer cell lines. Proliferation kinetics were compared with the Sulforhodamine B (SRB assay in a series of four cell concentrations, yielding fair to good correlations (Spearman's Rho 0.688 to 0.964. Cytotoxic action by paclitaxel (0-100 nM correlated well with SRB (Rho>0.95 with similar IC(50 values. Reference cell migration experiments were performed using Transwell plates and correlated by pixel area calculation of crystal violet-stained membranes (Rho 0.90 and optical density (OD measurement of extracted dye (Rho>0.95. Invasion was observed on MDA-MB-231 cells alone using Matrigel-coated Transwells as standard reference method and correlated by OD reading for two Matrigel densities (Rho>0.95. Variance component analysis revealed increased variances associated with impedance-based detection of migration and invasion, potentially caused by the sensitive nature of this method. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The xCELLigence RTCA technology provides an accurate platform for non-invasive detection of cell viability and motility. The strong correlations with conventional methods imply a similar observation of cell behavior and interchangeability with other systems, illustrated by the highly correlating kinetic invasion profiles on

  11. Cell viability and dopamine secretion of 6-hydroxydopamine-treated PC12 cells co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Tang; Yongchun Cui; Fuliang Luo; Xiaopeng Liu; Xiaojuan Wang; Aili Wu; Junwei Zhao; Zhong Tian; Like Wu

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, PC12 cells induced by 6-hydroxydopamine as a model of Parkinson's Disease, were used to investigate the protective effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity and to verify whether the mechanism of action relates to abnormal α-synuclein accumulation in cells. Results showed that co-culture with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells enhanced PC12 cell viability and dopamine secretion in a cell dose-dependent manner. MitoLight staining was used to confirm that PC12 cells co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells demonstrate reduced levels of cell apoptosis. Immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis found the quantity of α-synuclein accumulation was significantly reduced in PC12 cell and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell co-cultures. These results indicate that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells can attenuate 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cytotoxicity by reducing abnormal α-synuclein accumulation in PC12 cells.

  12. Estrogen Enhances the Cell Viability and Motility of Breast Cancer Cells through the ERα-ΔNp63-Integrin β4 Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jar-Yi Ho

    Full Text Available Estrogen induces ERα-positive breast cancer aggressiveness via the promotion of cell proliferation and survival, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and stem-like properties. Integrin β4 signaling has been implicated in estrogen/ERα-induced tumorigenicity and anti-apoptosis; however, this signaling cascade poorly understood. ΔNp63, an N-terminally truncated isoform of the p63 transcription factor, functions as a transcription factor of integrinβ4 and therefore regulates cellular adhesion and survival. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the estrogen-induced interaction between ERα, ΔNp63 and integrin β4 in breast cancer cells. In ERα-positive MCF-7 cells, estrogen activated ERα transcription, which induced ΔNp63 expression. And ΔNp63 subsequently induced integrin β4 expression, which resulted in AKT phosphorylation and enhanced cell viability and motility. Conversely, there was no inductive effect of estrogen on ΔNp63-integrinβ4-AKT signaling or on cell viability and motility in ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. ΔNp63 knockdown abolishes these estrogen-induced effects and reduces cell viability and motility in MCF-7 cells. Nevertheless, ΔNp63 knockdown also inhibited cell migration in MDA-MB-231 cells through reducing integrin β4 expression and AKT phosphorylation. In conclusion, estrogen enhances ERα-positive breast cancer cell viability and motility through activating the ERα-ΔNp63-integrin β4 signaling pathway to induce AKT phosphorylated activation. Those findings should be useful to elucidate the crosstalk between estrogen/ER signaling and ΔNp63 signaling and provide novel insights into the effects of estrogen on breast cancer progression.

  13. Role of different vehicles in carotenoids delivery and their influence on cell viability, cell cycle progression, and induction of apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowmya, Poorigali Raghavendra-Rao; Arathi, Bangalore Prabhashankar; Vijay, Kariyappa; Baskaran, Vallikannan; Lakshminarayana, Rangaswamy

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the role of different vehicles in carotenoids delivery and their influence on cell viability, cell cycle progression and induction of apoptosis in HeLa cells. Cells (5 × 10(3)) were treated with different concentrations (25-100 µM) of β-carotene (BC) or lutein (L) or astaxanthin (AST) dissolved in 0.5% of tetrahydrofuran (THF), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and fetal bovine serum (FBS), respectively. The effect of delivery vehicle on carotenoids uptake, cytotoxicity, oxidative status, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis was examined after 48 h of incubation. The results shown that, cell viability reduced significantly in a dose- and time-dependent manner irrespective of carotenoid delivered in vehicles. Cellular uptake of BC delivered in THF was higher by 49.1, 29.7% and L delivered through THF was higher by 41.7 and 37.5% than DMSO and FBS, respectively. While, AST delivered through DMSO was higher by 36.1 and 43.7% than the THF and FBS, respectively. In case of cells treated either with BC or L delivered through THF and AST in DMSO decreased the glutathione and increased the malondialdehyde levels. The net increase in the G 2/M phase percentage of cell cycle progression was observed in carotenoid-treated cells. The % induction of apoptosis by BC or L delivered with THF and AST in DMSO was higher than other treated groups. In conclusion, choice of suitable vehicle for specific carotenoids delivery is essential that in turn may influence on cell proliferation and cell-based assays.

  14. Differential eosinophil and mast cell regulation: mast cell viability and accumulation in inflammatory tissue are independent of proton-sensing receptor GPR65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiang; Mose, Eucabeth; Hogan, Simon P; Zimmermann, Nives

    2014-06-01

    Extracellular acidification has been observed in allergic inflammatory diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that the proton-sensing receptor G protein-coupled receptor 65 (GPR65) regulates eosinophil survival in an acidic environment in vitro and eosinophil accumulation in an allergic lung inflammation model. For mast cells, another inflammatory cell type critical for allergic responses, it remains unknown whether GPR65 is expressed and/or regulates mast cell viability. Thus, in the present study, we employed in vitro experiments and an intestinal anaphylaxis model in which both mastocytosis and eosinophilia can be observed, particularly in the gastrointestinal tract, to enable us to directly compare the effect of GPR65 expression on these two cell types. We identified GPR65 expression on mast cells; however, unlike eosinophil viability, mast cell viability in vitro is not affected by acidification or GPR65 expression. Mechanistically, we determined that mast cells do not respond to extracellular acidification with increased cAMP levels. Furthermore, in the intestinal anaphylaxis model, we observed a significant reduction of eosinophils (59.1 ± 9.2% decrease) in the jejunum of allergen-challenged GPR65-deficient mice compared with allergen-challenged wild-type mice, despite the degree of antigen sensitization and the expression levels of Th2 cytokines (Il4, Il13) and eosinophil chemokines (Ccl11, Ccl24) in the jejunum being comparable. In contrast, the accumulation of mast cells in allergen-challenged mice was not affected by GPR65 deficiency. In conclusion, our study demonstrates differential regulation of eosinophils and mast cells in inflammatory tissue, with mast cell viability and accumulation being independent of GPR65. PMID:24742990

  15. Pancreatic islet-cell viability, functionality and oxidative status remain unaffected at pharmacological concentrations of commonly used antibiotics in vitro

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yogita Shewade; Suraj Tirth; R R Bhonde

    2001-09-01

    Environmental factors such as diet, physical activity, drugs, pollution and life style play an important role in the progression and/or precipitation of diseases like diabetes, hypertension, obesity and cardiovascular disorders. Indiscriminate use of antibiotics to combat infectious diseases is one of the commonest forms of misuse of drugs. Antibiotics seem to have a correlation with diabetes and pancreatic function. There are controversial reports about the effect of antibiotics on the pancreatic islets; some suggesting their harmless action, some depicting a beneficial role and others indicating deleterious effect. Moreover, use of antibiotics is mandatory during islet isolation and cultivation to reduce incidences of microbial contamination. It is likely that antibiotic treatment may adversely affect islet viability and its functioning leading to failure of islet transplantation. The present in vitro study was undertaken to examine the effect of commonly used antibiotics such as gentamycin, penicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, neomycin, erythromycin and chloramphenicol on islet viability, its functioning and induction of oxidative stress if any. The viability and insulin production data showed that none of the antibiotics used in the present study affect the viability and the functioning of the islets at their pharmacological concentrations. Free radical levels measured in terms of melonyldialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and reduced glutathione (GSH) reveal that except for a marginal increase in lipid peroxidation with tetracycline and slight increase in NO levels with streptomycin, none of these antibiotics affect the oxidative status of the cells. Antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and catalase remain unaffected after this treatment. Our results reveal the innocuous nature of the antibiotics used at pharmacological concentrations, suggesting their safety whenever prescribed to combat infections and also during islet isolation procedures.

  16. The effect of spiritual healing on in vitro tumour cell proliferation and viability--an experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, R; Højgaard, L; Zachariae, C;

    2005-01-01

    ), and a nonadherent mouse B-lymphoid cell line (HB-94). Analyses of variance (ANOVAs) revealed no significant main or dose-related effects of spiritual healing compared to controls for either of the two cell lines or any of the assays (P-values between 0.09 and 0.96). When comparing healing and control across all......Alternative treatments such as spiritual healing and prayer are increasingly popular, especially among patients with life-threatening diseases such as cancer. According to theories of spiritual healing, this intervention is thought to influence living cells and organisms independently...... of the recipient's conscious awareness of the healer's intention. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that spiritual healing will reduce proliferation and viability of two cancer cell lines in vitro. Three controlled experiments were conducted with three different healers and randomised allocation...

  17. Tracing Conidial Fate and Measuring Host Cell Antifungal Activity Using a Reporter of Microbial Viability in the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Jhingran

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence can be harnessed to monitor microbial fate and to investigate functional outcomes of individual microbial cell-host cell encounters at portals of entry in native tissue environments. We illustrate this concept by introducing fluorescent Aspergillus reporter (FLARE conidia that simultaneously report phagocytic uptake and fungal viability during cellular interactions with the murine respiratory innate immune system. Our studies using FLARE conidia reveal stepwise and cell-type-specific requirements for CARD9 and Syk, transducers of C-type lectin receptor and integrin signals, in neutrophil recruitment, conidial uptake, and conidial killing in the lung. By achieving single-event resolution in defined leukocyte populations, the FLARE method enables host cell profiling on the basis of pathogen uptake and killing and may be extended to other pathogens in diverse model host organisms to query molecular, cellular, and pharmacologic mechanisms that shape host-microbe interactions.

  18. Radiation-induced motility alterations in medulloblastoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rieken, Stefan; Rieber, Juliane; Brons, Stephan; Habermehl, Daniel; Rief, Harald; Orschiedt, Lena; Lindel, Katja; Klaus J. Weber; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2015-01-01

    Photon irradiation has been repeatedly suspected of increasing tumor cell motility and promoting locoregional recurrence of disease. This study was set up to analyse possible mechanisms underlying the potentially radiation-altered motility in medulloblastoma cells. Medulloblastoma cell lines D425 and Med8A were analyzed in migration and adhesion experiments with and without photon and carbon ion irradiation. Expression of integrins was determined by quantitative FACS analysis. Matrix metallop...

  19. Effect of exogenous surfactants on viability and DNA synthesis in A549, immortalized mouse type II and isolated rat alveolar type II cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haller Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mechanically ventilated preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, exogenous surfactant application has been demonstrated both to decrease DNA-synthesis but also and paradoxically to increase epithelial cell proliferation. However, the effect of exogenous surfactant has not been studied directly on alveolar type II cells (ATII cells, a key cell type responsible for alveolar function and repair. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two commercially available surfactant preparations on ATII cell viability and DNA synthesis. Methods Curosurf® and Alveofact® were applied to two ATII cell lines (human A549 and mouse iMATII cells and to primary rat ATII cells for periods of up to 24 h. Cell viability was measured using the redox indicator resazurin and DNA synthesis was measured using BrdU incorporation. Results Curosurf® resulted in slightly decreased cell viability in all cell culture models. However, DNA synthesis was increased in A549 and rat ATII cells but decreased in iMATII cells. Alveofact® exhibited the opposite effects on A549 cells and had very mild effects on the other two cell models. Conclusion This study showed that commercially available exogenous surfactants used to treat preterm infants with RDS can have profound effects on cell viability and DNA synthesis.

  20. A novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, inhibits cell viability, colony formation, and migration of colon and liver cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenying; Jou, David; Wang, Yina; Ma, Haiyan; Xiao, Hui; Qin, Hua; Zhang, Cuntai; Lü, Jiagao; Li, Sheng; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is persistently activated in human liver and colon cancer cells and is required for cancer cell viability, survival and migration. Therefore, inhibition of STAT3 signaling may be a viable therapeutic approach for these two cancers. We recently designed a non-peptide small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, using in silico site-directed Fragment-based drug design (FBDD). The inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, cell viability, migration and colony forming ability by LY5 were examined in human liver and colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that LY5 inhibited constitutive Interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, STAT3 nuclear translocation, decreased STAT3 downstream targeted gene expression and induced apoptosis in liver and colon cancer cells. LY5 had little effect on STAT1 phosphorylation mediated by IFN-γ. Inhibition of persistent STAT3 phosphorylation by LY5 also inhibited colony formation, cell migration, and decreased the viability of liver cancer and colon cancer cells. Furthermore, LY5 inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed colon tumor growth in a mouse model in vivo. Our results suggest that LY5 is a potent STAT3 inhibitor and may be a potential drug candidate for liver and colon cancer therapy. PMID:26883202

  1. Metabolic alterations in cancer cells and therapeutic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naima Hammoudi; Kausar Begam Riaz Ahmed; Celia Garcia-Prieto; Peng Huang

    2011-01-01

    Cancer metabolism has emerged as an important area of research in recent years. Elucidation of the metabolic differences between cancer and normal cells and the underlying mechanisms will not only advance our understanding of fundamental cancer cell biology but also provide an important basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies and novel compounds to selectively eliminate cancer cells by targeting their unique metabolism. This article reviews several important metabolic alterations in cancer cells, with an emphasis on increased aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) and glutamine addiction, and discusses the mechanisms that may contribute to such metabolic changes. In addition, metabolic alterations in cancer stem cells, mitochondrial metabolism and its influence on drug sensitivity, and potential therapeutic strategies and agents that target cancer metabolism are also discussed.

  2. Low-level laser therapy: Effects on human face aged skin and cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Mezghani Sana; Hammami Amira; Amri Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Chronic and excessive exposure to UV radiation leads to photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. Adequate protection of the skin against the deleterious effects of UV irradiation is essential. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a light source in the red to near-infrared range that has been accepted in a variety of medical applications. In this study, we explored the effect of LLLT in human face aged skin and the cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiatio...

  3. Glucosylceramides are critical for cell-type differentiation and organogenesis, but not for cell viability in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msanne, Joseph; Chen, Ming; Luttgeharm, Kyle D; Bradley, Amanda M; Mays, Elizabeth S; Paper, Janet M; Boyle, Daniel L; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Schrick, Kathrin; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-10-01

    Glucosylceramides (GlcCer), glucose-conjugated sphingolipids, are major components of the endomembrane system and plasma membrane in most eukaryotic cells. Yet the quantitative significance and cellular functions of GlcCer are not well characterized in plants and other multi-organ eukaryotes. To address this, we examined Arabidopsis lines that were lacking or deficient in GlcCer by insertional disruption or by RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of the single gene for GlcCer synthase (GCS, At2g19880), the enzyme that catalyzes GlcCer synthesis. Null mutants for GCS (designated 'gcs-1') were viable as seedlings, albeit strongly reduced in size, and failed to develop beyond the seedling stage. Heterozygous plants harboring the insertion allele exhibited reduced transmission through the male gametophyte. Undifferentiated calli generated from gcs-1 seedlings and lacking GlcCer proliferated in a manner similar to calli from wild-type plants. However, gcs-1 calli, in contrast to wild-type calli, were unable to develop organs on differentiation media. Consistent with a role for GlcCer in organ-specific cell differentiation, calli from gcs-1 mutants formed roots and leaves on media supplemented with the glucosylated sphingosine glucopsychosine, which was readily converted to GlcCer independent of GCS. Underlying these phenotypes, gcs-1 cells had altered Golgi morphology and fewer cisternae per Golgi apparatus relative to wild-type cells, indicative of protein trafficking defects. Despite seedling lethality in the null mutant, GCS RNAi suppression lines with ≤2% of wild-type GlcCer levels were viable and fertile. Collectively, these results indicate that GlcCer are essential for cell-type differentiation and organogenesis, and plant cells produce amounts of GlcCer in excess of that required for normal development. PMID:26313010

  4. Aptamer-polymer functionalized silicon nanosubstrates for enhanced recovered circulating tumor cell viability and in vitro chemosensitivity testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen QL

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Qinglin Shen1,2,*, Caixia Peng2,3,*, Yan Zhan1, Liang Fan1, Mengyi Wang1, Qing Zhou4, Jue Liu2,4, Xiaojuan Lv1, Qiu Tang1, Jun Li1,2, Xiaodong Huang2, Jiahong Xia2 1Department of Oncology, 2Key Laboratory for Molecular Diagnosis of Hubei Province, 3Central Laboratory, 4Department of Pharmacy, The Central Hospital of Wuhan, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Selection of the optimal chemotherapy regimen for an individual cancer patient is challenging. The existing chemosensitivity tests are costly, time-consuming, and not amenable to wide utilization within a clinic. This limitation might be addressed by the recently proposed use of circulating tumor cells (CTCs, which provide an opportunity to noninvasively monitor response to therapy. Over the past few decades, various techniques were developed to capture and recover CTCs, but these techniques were often limited by a capture and recovery performance tradeoff between high viability and high efficiency. In this work, we used anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule coated aptamer–poly (N-isopropylacrylamide functionalized silicon nanowire substrates to capture and release epithelial cell adhesion molecule-positive CTCs at 32°C and 4°C, respectively. Then, we applied the nuclease to digest the aptamer to release the captured CTCs (near or at the end of the polymer brush, which cannot be released by heating/cooling process. High viability and purity CTCs could be achieved by decreasing the heating/cooling cycles and enzymatic treatment rounds. Furthermore, the time-saving process is helpful to maintain the morphology and enhance vitality of the recovered CTCs and is beneficial to the subsequent cell culture in vitro. We validated the feasibility of chemosensitivity testing based on the recovered HCC827 cells using an adenosine triphosphate–tumor chemosensitivity

  5. Effects of size and surface of zinc oxide and aluminum-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles on cell viability inferred by proteomic analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan CH

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chih-Hong Pan,1,2,* Wen-Te Liu,3,4,* Mauo-Ying Bien,4,5 I-Chan Lin,6 Ta-Chih Hsiao,7 Chih-Ming Ma,8 Ching-Huang Lai,2 Mei-Chieh Chen,9 Kai-Jen Chuang,10,11 Hsiao-Chi Chuang3,4 On behalf of the Taiwan CardioPulmonary Research (T-CPR Group 1Institute of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health, Ministry of Labor, 2School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, 3Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, 4School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, 5Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, 6Department of Ophthalmology, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 7Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan, 8Department of Cosmetic Application and Management, St Mary’s Junior College of Medicine, Nursing and Management, Sanxing, 9Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, 10Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, 11School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Although the health effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs on the ­respiratory system have been reported, the fate, potential toxicity, and mechanisms in biological cells of these particles, as related to particle size and surface characteristics, have not been well elucidated. To determine the physicochemical properties of ZnONPs that govern cytotoxicity, we investigated the effects of size, electronic properties, zinc concentration, and pH on cell viability using human alveolar-basal epithelial A549 cells as a model. We observed that a 2-hour or longer exposure to ZnONPs induced changes in cell viability. The alteration in cell viability was associated with the zeta potentials and pH values of the ZnONPs. Proteomic profiling of A549 exposed to Zn

  6. Altering adsorbed proteins or cellular gene expression in bone-metastatic cancer cells affects PTHrP and Gli2 without altering cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Page

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The contents of this data in brief are related to the article titled “Matrix Rigidity Regulates the Transition of Tumor Cells to a Bone-Destructive Phenotype through Integrin β3 and TGF-β Receptor Type II”. In this DIB we will present our supplemental data investigating Integrin expression, attachment of cells to various adhesion molecules, and changes in gene expression in multiple cancer cell lines. Since the interactions of Integrins with adsorbed matrix proteins are thought to affect the ability of cancer cells to interact with their underlying substrates, we examined the expression of Integrin β1, β3, and β5 in response to matrix rigidity. We found that only Iβ3 increased with increasing substrate modulus. While it was shown that fibronectin greatly affects the expression of tumor-produced factors associated with bone destruction (parathyroid hormone-related protein, PTHrP, and Gli2, poly-l-lysine, vitronectin and type I collagen were also analyzed as potential matrix proteins. Each of the proteins was independently adsorbed on both rigid and compliant polyurethane films which were subsequently used to culture cancer cells. Poly-l-lysine, vitronectin and type I collagen all had negligible effects on PTHrP or Gli2 expression, but fibronectin was shown to have a dose dependent effect. Finally, altering the expression of Iβ3 demonstrated that it is required for tumor cells to respond to the rigidity of the matrix, but does not affect other cell growth or viability. Together these data support the data presented in our manuscript to show that the rigidity of bone drives Integrinβ3/TGF-β crosstalk, leading to increased expression of Gli2 and PTHrP.

  7. Method and apparatus for sustaining viability of biological cells on a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2011-12-13

    A method for the transient transformation of a living biological cell having an intact cell membrane defining an intracellular domain, and an apparatus for the transient transformation of biological cells. The method and apparatus include introducing a compartmentalized extracellular component fixedly attached to a cellular penetrant structure to the intracellular domain of the cell, wherein the cell is fixed in a predetermined location and wherein the component is expressed within in the cell while being retained within the compartment and wherein the compartment restricts the mobility and interactions of the component within the cell and prevents transference of the component to the cell.

  8. Functional physico-chemical, ex vivo permeation and cell viability characterization of omeprazole loaded buccal films for paediatric drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sajjad; Trivedi, Vivek; Boateng, Joshua

    2016-03-16

    Buccal films were prepared from aqueous and ethanolic Metolose gels using the solvent casting approach (40°C). The hydration (PBS and simulated saliva), mucoadhesion, physical stability (20°C, 40°C), in vitro drug (omeprazole) dissolution (PBS and simulated saliva), ex vivo permeation (pig buccal mucosa) in the presence of simulated saliva, ex vivo bioadhesion and cell viability using MTT of films were investigated. Hydration and mucoadhesion results showed that swelling capacity and adhesion was higher in the presence of PBS than simulated saliva (SS) due to differences in ionic strength. Omeprazole was more stable at 20°C than 40°C whilst omeprazole release reached a plateau within 1h and faster in PBS than in SS. Fitting release data to kinetic models showed that Korsmeyer-Peppas equation best fit the dissolution data. Drug release in PBS was best described by zero order via non-Fickian diffusion but followed super case II transport in SS attributed to drug diffusion and polymer erosion. The amount of omeprazole permeating over 2h was 275 ug/cm(2) whilst the formulations and starting materials showed cell viability values greater than 95%, confirming their safety for potential use in paediatric buccal delivery. PMID:26802493

  9. Effects of triclosan and triclocarban on the growth inhibition, cell viability, genotoxicity and multixenobiotic resistance responses of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Yuan, Tao; Cheng, Peng; Bai, Qifeng; Zhou, Chuanqi; Ao, Junjie; Wang, Wenhua; Zhang, Haimou

    2015-11-01

    The information about adverse effects of emerging contaminants on aquatic protozoa is very scarce. The growth inhibition effect, cell viability, genotoxicity and multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) responses of two commonly used antimicrobial agents, triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) to protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila were investigated in this study. The results revealed that TCS and TCC can inhibit the growth of T. thermophila with 24h EC50 values of 1063 and 295μgL(-1), respectively. The impairment of plasma membrane was observed after 2h exposure of TCS or TCC at the level of mg/L. Furthermore, it is noticeable that at environmentally relevant concentration (1.0μgL(-1)), both TCS and TCC can lead to statistically significant DNA damage in T. thermophila, while the inhibition of growth and change of cell viability cannot be observed. Our results firstly provide the evidence for genotoxic effects of TCS and TCC on the freshwater protozoan. Additionally, both TCS and TCC were found to inhibit the efflux transporter activities, with the inhibitory potencies of 39% and 40% (using verapamil as a model inhibitor), respectively. Particularly, TCC could significantly down-regulate the expression of MXR related gene Abcb15, which encodes the membrane efflux protein that acting as P-gp in T. thermophila. The results raise the awareness of potential aquatic ecological and human health risks from the exposure of TCS and TCC, as they might potentiate the toxic effects by chemosensitizing with co-existing toxicants. PMID:26246462

  10. Bisphenol A and its analogs induce morphological and biochemical alterations in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michałowicz, Jaromir; Mokra, Katarzyna; Bąk, Agata

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have addressed the cellular effects of bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol AF (BPAF) on cells, and no study has been conducted to analyze the mechanism of action of bisphenols in blood cells. In this study, the effect of bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol F (BPF), BPS and BPAF on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was analyzed. It was shown that BPA, BPF and BPAF in particular, decreased cell viability, which was associated with depletion of intracellular ATP level and alterations in PBMCs size and granulation. Bisphenols enhanced ROS (including OH˙) formation, which led to damage to lipids and proteins in PBMCs. The most significant alterations in ROS level were induced by BPF, and particularly BPAF. Moreover, it was shown that BPAF most strongly provoked lipid peroxidation, while BPA and BPS caused the greatest damage to proteins. It may be concluded that BPA and its analogs were capable of inducing oxidative stress and damage in PBMCs in the concentrations ranging from 0.06 to 0.5 μM (0.02-0.1 μg/ml), which may be present in human blood as a result of environmental exposure. Although, most of bisphenols studied decreased cell viability, size and ATP level at higher concentrations, BPAF exhibited its cytotoxic potential at low concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 3 μM (0.1-1.0 μg/ml) that may correspond to concentrations in humans following occupational exposure.

  11. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genz, Berit [Institute for Experimental Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Thomas, Maria [Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Stuttgart (Germany); Pützer, Brigitte M. [Institute of Experimental Gene Therapy and Cancer Research, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg [Institute for Biostatistics and Informatics in Medicine and Ageing Research, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Vollmar, Brigitte [Institute for Experimental Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Abshagen, Kerstin, E-mail: kerstin.abshagen@uni-rostock.de [Institute for Experimental Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. - Highlights: • We performed adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 in primary hepatic stellate cells. • Hepatic stellate cells expressed stem cell markers during cultivation. • Cell migration and contractility was slightly hampered upon Lhx2 overexpression. • Lhx2 overexpression did not affect stem cell character of hepatic stellate cells.

  12. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. - Highlights: • We performed adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 in primary hepatic stellate cells. • Hepatic stellate cells expressed stem cell markers during cultivation. • Cell migration and contractility was slightly hampered upon Lhx2 overexpression. • Lhx2 overexpression did not affect stem cell character of hepatic stellate cells

  13. Influence of boron addition to Ti–13Zr–13Nb alloy on MG63 osteoblast cell viability and protein adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, P., E-mail: m.pallab@gmail.com [School of Mechanical Science, Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar (India); Singh, S.B. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India); Dhara, S. [School Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India); Chakraborty, M. [School of Mechanical Science, Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar (India)

    2015-01-01

    Cell proliferation, cell morphology and protein adsorption on near β-type Ti–13Zr–13Nb (TZN) alloy and Ti–13Zr–13Nb–0.5B (TZNB) composite have been investigated and compared to evaluate the effect of boron addition which has been added to the Ti alloy to improve their poor tribological properties by forming in situ TiB precipitates. MG63 cell proliferation on substrates with different chemistry but the same topography was compared. The MTT assay test showed that the cell viability on the TZN alloy was higher than the boron containing TZNB composite after 36 h of incubation and the difference was pronounced after 7 days. However, both the materials showed substantially higher cell attachment than the control (polystyrene). For the same period of incubation in fetal bovine serum (FBS), the amount of protein adsorbed on the surface of boron free TZN samples was higher than that in the case of boron containing TZNB composite. The presence of boron in the TZN alloy influenced protein adsorption and cell response and they are lower in TZNB than in TZN as a result of the associated difference in chemical characteristics. - Highlights: • The influence of boron addition on biocompatibility of Ti–13Zr–13Nb • Boron forms in situ TiB in TZN matrix and decreases cell proliferation on TZN surfaces. • Protein adsorption is lower in TZNB than in TZN. • Compared to TZNB composite, TZN alloy is more suitable for bone grafting applications.

  14. X-ray radiation effect of C-arm on adipose tissue-mesenchymal stem cell viability and population doubling time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad J. Rahyussalim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs are relatively easy in isolation procedure compared to bone marrow-derived. Minimally invasive MSC injections need C-arm as guidance that potentially influence the cell viability and doubling time. This study aimsed to determine the effect of C-arm X-ray exposure on AT-MSC viability and population doubling time (PDT.Methods: This experimental study used cryopreserved adipose tissue derived MSCs stored in Stem Cell Medical Technology Integrated Service Unit Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. Cells were thawed, propagated, and exposed to varying doses of C-arm X-ray radiation. Stem cell viability was measured, and then the cells were cultured to assess their PDT. Generalized linear models test was used to compare cell viability between post-thaw, post-propagation, post-radiation, post-culture post-radiation, and control and between radiation dose groups. Kruskal-Wallis test assessed PDT between various radiation doses in post-radiation groups. Wilcoxon test was used to assess PDT between pre-radiation and post-radiation groups.Results: Mean confluence period of adipose MSCs post- irradiation was 4.33 days. There was no statistically significant difference in MSC viability after X-ray exposure between pre- and post-irradiation groups (p=0.831. There was no correlation between post-irradiation viability and radiation dose (p=0.138, r=0.503. There were no significant differences in PDT between pre- and post-culture post-irradiation groups and between various radiation doses in post-irradiation groups (p=0.792.  Conclusion: MSC viability and PDT were not influenced by radiation exposure up to 32.34 mgray.

  15. Radiation-induced motility alterations in medulloblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieken, Stefan; Rieber, Juliane; Brons, Stephan; Habermehl, Daniel; Rief, Harald; Orschiedt, Lena; Lindel, Katja; Weber, Klaus J; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2015-05-01

    Photon irradiation has been repeatedly suspected of increasing tumor cell motility and promoting locoregional recurrence of disease. This study was set up to analyse possible mechanisms underlying the potentially radiation-altered motility in medulloblastoma cells. Medulloblastoma cell lines D425 and Med8A were analyzed in migration and adhesion experiments with and without photon and carbon ion irradiation. Expression of integrins was determined by quantitative FACS analysis. Matrix metalloproteinase concentrations within cell culture supernatants were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test. Both photon and carbon ion irradiation significantly reduced chemotactic medulloblastoma cell transmigration through 8-μm pore size membranes, while simultaneously increasing adherence to fibronectin- and collagen I- and IV-coated surfaces. Correspondingly, both photon and carbon ion irradiation downregulate soluble MMP9 concentrations, while upregulating cell surface expression of proadhesive extracellular matrix protein-binding integrin α5. The observed phenotype of radiation-altered motility is more pronounced following carbon ion than photon irradiation. Both photon and (even more so) carbon ion irradiation are effective in inhibiting medulloblastoma cell migration through downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 and upregulation of proadhesive cell surface integrin α5, which lead to increased cell adherence to extracellular matrix proteins. PMID:25736470

  16. Effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on tumor cells viability and formation of multicellular tumor spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymchuk, Olena M.; Perepelytsina, Olena M.; Dobrydnev, Alexey V.; Sydorenko, Mychailo V.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the impact of different concentrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on cell viability of breast adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 line, and formation of multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS). Chemical composition and purity of nanotubes is controlled by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The strength and direction of the influence of SWCNTs on the tumor cell population was assessed by cell counting and measurement of the volume of multicellular tumor spheroids. Effect of SWCNTs on the formation of multicellular spheroids was compared with the results obtained by culturing tumor cells with ultra dispersed diamonds (UDDs). Our results demonstrated that SWCNTs at concentrations ranging from 12.5 to 50 μg/ml did not have cytotoxic influence on tumor cells; instead, they had weak cytostatic effect. The increasing of SWCNTs concentration to 100 to 200 μg/ml stimulated proliferation of tumor cells, especially in suspension fractions. The result of this influence was in formation of more MTS in cell culture with SWCNTs compared with UDDs and control samples. In result, the median volume of MTS after cultivation with SWCNTs at 100 to 200 μg/ml concentrations is 3 to 5 times greater than that in samples which were incubated with the UDDs and is 2.5 times greater than that in control cultures. So, if SWCNTs reduced cell adhesion to substrate and stimulated formation of tumor cell aggregates volume near 7 · 10-3 mm3, at the same time, UDDs reduced adhesion and cohesive ability of cells and stimulated generation of cell spheroids volume no more than 4 · 10-3 mm3. Our results could be useful for the control of cell growth in three-dimensional culture.

  17. Enhancement of cell viability and alkaline polygalacturonate lyase production by sorbitol co-feeding with methanol in Pichia pastoris fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihao; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Dongxu; Li, Jianghua; Hua, Zhaozhe; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2010-02-01

    Alkaline polygalacturonate lyase (PGL) production by Pichia pastoris GS115 was used as a model to study the mechanism and strategy for enhancing heterologous protein production. In order to enhance cell viability and volumetric recombinant protein productivity, sorbitol, which had been confirmed to be a non-repressive carbon source, was added together with methanol during the induction phase. The resultant PGL activity was up to 1593 U mL(-1), which was enhanced 1.85-fold compared to the control (863 U mL(-1)) cultured with sorbitol added at a constant rate of 3.6 g h(-1)L(-1) after an induction period of 100 h. Further results revealed that an appropriate sorbitol co-feeding strategy not only decreased the cell mortality to 8.8% (the control is about 23.1%) in the end of fermentation, but also reduced the proteolytic degradation of PGL.

  18. The effect of UV-filters on the viability of neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniowska, Żaneta; Pomierny, Bartosz; Smaga, Irena; Filip, Małgorzata; Budziszewska, Bogusława

    2016-05-01

    Topical application of cosmetic products, containing ultraviolet filters (UV filters) are recommended as a protection against sunburns and in order to reduce the risk of skin cancer. However, some UV filters can be absorbed through skin and by consuming contaminated food. Among the chemical UV filters, benzophenone-3 (BP-3), 3-(4-methylbenzylidene)camphor (4-MBC) and 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (OMC) are absorbed through the skin to the greatest extent. So far, these lipophilic compounds were demonstrated to influence the gonadal and thyroid hormone function, but their effect on central nervous system cells has not been investigated, yet. In the present study, we investigated the effect of some UV filters on cell viability and caspase-3 activity in SH-SY5Y cells. It has been found that benzophenone-2 (BP-2), BP-3, 4-methylbenzophenone (4-MBP) and OMC present in the culture medium for 72h in high concentration (10(-5) and 10(-4)M) and 4-MBC only 10(-4)M produced a significant cytotoxic effect, as determined both by the MTT reduction test and LDH release assay. In contrast to necrotic changes, all tested UV filters increased caspase-3 activity in much lower concentrations (from 10(-8) to 10(-7)M). Proapoptotic properties of the test compounds were positively verified by Hoechst staining. The obtained results indicated that UV filters adversely affected the viability of nerve cells, most likely by enhancing the process of apoptosis. The most potent effect was exerted by BP-3 and 4-MBC and at concentrations that may be reached in vivo. Since human exposure to UV filters is significant these compound should be taken into consideration as one of the possible factors involved in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26965011

  19. The conditioned medium from osteo-differentiating human mesenchymal stem cells affects the viability of triple negative MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Librizzi, Mariangela; Tobiasch, Edda; Luparello, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of conditioned media (CM) from osteo-differentiating and adipo-differentiating human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from lipoaspirates of healthy female donors on the viability of triple-negative breast cancer cells MDA-MB231. The CM of undifferentiated and differentiating MSCs were collected after 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of culture. The effects of MSC CM on cell proliferation were assessed using an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay after 24 h. The effects of osteo-differentiating cell CM on apoptotic promotion, cell cycle impairment, mitochondrial transmembrane potential dissipation, production of reactive oxygen species and autophagosome accumulation were analysed by flow cytometry and Western blot. MTT assay showed that only CM collected from osteo-induced cells at day 28 (d28O-CM) reduced tumour cell viability. Treatment with d28O-CM restrained cell cycle progression through G2 phase, elicited a caspase-8-driven apoptotic effect already after 5 h of culture, and down-regulated autophagosome accumulation and beclin-1 expression. The finding that factor(s) secreted by osteo-differentiating MSCs shows properties of an apoptotic inducer and autophagy inhibitor on triple-negative breast cancer cells may have an important applicative potential that deserves further investigation.

  20. Apoptosis induction and mitochondria alteration in human HeLa tumour cells by photoproducts of Rose Bengal acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarini, Elisa; Tenuzzo, Bernadette; Palazzo, Fabio; Chionna, Alfonsina; Dini, Luciana

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the apoptosis induction and mitochondria alteration after photodamage exerted by incubation of HeLa cells with Rose Bengal acetate-derivative (RBAc) followed by irradiation for a total dose of 1.6 J/cm2. This treatment was previously demonstrated to reduce cell viability under mild treatment conditions, suggesting the restoration of the photoactive molecule in particularly sensitive cell sites. Indeed, Rose Bengal (RB) is a very efficient photosensitizer, whose photophysical properties are inactivated by addition of the quencher group acetate. The RBAc behaves as a fluorogenic substrate by entering easily the cells where the original, photoactive molecule is restored by specific esterases. Different intracellular sites of photodamage of RB are present. In particular, fluorescence imaging of Rodamine 123 and JC-1 labelled cells showed altered morphology and loss of potential membrane of mitochondria. MTT and NR assays gave indications of alteration of mitochondrial and lysosomal enzyme activities. These damaged sites were likely responsible for triggering apoptosis. Significant amount of apoptotic cell death (about 40%) was induced after light irradiation followed RBAc incubation as revealed by morphological (modification of cell shape and blebs formation), cytochemical (FITC-Annexin-V positive cells) and nuclear fragmentation assays.

  1. Effect of(12)C (+5) ion beam irradiation on cell viability and plant regeneration in callus, protoplasts and cell suspensions ofLavateva thuringiaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Tello, A; Uozumi, T; Hidaka, M; Kobayashi, Y; Watanabe, H

    1996-11-01

    The biological effects of irradiation with(12)C(+5) ion beam on plant cells have been analyzed. Protoplasts and cell suspensions ofLavatera thuringiaca, and a somatic hybrid callus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis +Lavatera thuringiaca), were irradiated with doses from 0.05 to 50 Gy, and the effects on cell growth, cell division, cell viability and embryogenesis rates were analyzed. Irradiation with(12)C(+5) ion beam at relatively very low doses (5.0 Gy) significantly inhibited cell division, yet the survival rate and regeneration capability of the cells through somatic embryogenesis were conserved in more than 70 and 50 %, respectively. These results indicate that cell division is the most sensitive parameter to irradiation, accounting for the inhibition of colony formation and callus growth. The potential use of the(12)C(+5) ion beam in asymmetric protoplast fusion experiments is discussed. PMID:24178652

  2. Trehalose-Based Eye Drops Preserve Viability and Functionality of Cultured Human Corneal Epithelial Cells during Desiccation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Hill-Bator

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the evaluation of cytoprotective ability of trehalose-based eye drops in comparison with commercially available preparations during the experimental desiccation of cultured human corneal epithelial cells. Cultured human corneal epithelial cells (hCEC underwent incubation with 7 different, commercially available medicaments used commonly in dry eye syndrome treatment, followed by desiccation trial performed on air under the flow hood for 5, 15, 30, and 45 minutes. Cell viability was quantified by live/dead fluorescent assay, while the presence of apoptotic cells was estimated by immunofluorescent staining for active caspase 3 protein. The preservation of membrane functions was evaluated using neutral red staining, while the preservation of proper morphology and phenotype was determined by fluorescent staining for actin filaments, nuclei, and p63 protein. The trehalose-based eye drops showed the highest efficiency in prevention of cell death from desiccation; moreover, this preparation preserved the normal cellular morphology, functions of cell membrane, and proliferative activity more effectively than other tested medicaments.

  3. A novel synthetic derivative of the natural product berbamine inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis of human osteosarcoma cells, associated with activation of JNK/AP-1 signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Fan; Nam, Sangkil; Zhao, Robin; Tian, Yan; Liu, Lucy; Horne, David A.; Jove, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor in children and adolescents. There is a critical need to find more potent drugs for patients with metastatic or recurrent disease. Berbamine (BBM) is a natural compound derived from the Berberis amurensis plants. BBM and its derivatives have been shown to have antitumor effects in several cancers. Here, we report that a novel synthetic berbamine derivative, BBMD3, inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis of G292, KHOS, and MG-63 human os...

  4. Kinetics of cadmium accumulation and its effects on microtubule integrity and cell viability in the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malea, Paraskevi, E-mail: malea@bio.auth.gr [Department of Botany, School of Biology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece); Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S. [Department of Botany, School of Biology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kevrekidis, Theodoros [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Education, Democritus University of Thrace, Nea Hili, GR-68100 Alexandroupolis (Greece)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Cd effect on microtubules and viability of seagrass leaf cells was assessed. •The Michaelis–Menten equation satisfactorily dercribed the kinetics of Cd uptake. •Cd depolymerized MTs after 3–9 d of exposure, cell death occurred at later time. •Toxicity appeared to depend on Cd uptake rate rather than on tissue Cd content. •MTs can be used as biomarker of Cd stress and uptake rate for predicting effects. -- Abstract: The kinetics of cadmium accumulation and its effects on microtubule cytoskeleton and cell viability in leaf blades of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa were investigated under laboratory conditions in exposure concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 40 mg L{sup −1}. An initial rapid accumulation of cadmium was followed by a steady state. The Michaelis–Menten model adequately described metal accumulation; equilibrium concentration and uptake velocity tended to increase, whereas bioconcentration factor at equilibrium to decrease, as the exposure concentration increased. Cadmium depolymerized microtubules after 3–9 d of exposure, depending on trace metal concentration, indicating that microtubules could be used as an early biomarker of cadmium stress; cell death, occurring at later time than microtubule disturbance, was also observed. Microtubule depolymerization expressed as percentage of reduction of fluorescence intensity and cell mortality expressed as percentage of live cells increased with time. The lowest experimental tissue concentration associated with the onset of microtubule depolymerization and cell death (98.5–128.9 μg g{sup −1} dry wt, 0.5 mg L{sup −1} treatment, 7th and 9th d) was within the wide range of reported cadmium concentrations in leaves of seagrass species from various geographical areas. This lowest tissue concentration was exceeded up to the 3rd d at higher exposure concentrations, but toxic effects were generally detected at later time. The time periods required for the onset of depolymerization and

  5. Differential concentration-specific effects of caffeine on cell viability, oxidative stress, and cell cycle in pulmonary oxygen toxicity in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Kirti Kumar; Chu, Chun; Couroucli, Xanthi; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Lingappan, Krithika, E-mail: lingappa@bcm.edu

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Caffeine at 0.05 mM decreases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 mM decreases cell viability, increases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 but not 0.05 mM, abrogates hyperoxia-induced G2/M arrest. - Abstract: Caffeine is used to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature neonates. Hyperoxia contributes to the development of BPD, inhibits cell proliferation and decreases cell survival. The mechanisms responsible for the protective effect of caffeine in pulmonary oxygen toxicity remain largely unknown. A549 and MLE 12 pulmonary epithelial cells were exposed to hyperoxia or maintained in room air, in the presence of different concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.1 and 1 mM) of caffeine. Caffeine had a differential concentration-specific effect on cell cycle progression, oxidative stress and viability, with 1 mM concentration being deleterious and 0.05 mM being protective. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during hyperoxia was modulated by caffeine in a similar concentration-specific manner. Caffeine at 1 mM, but not at the 0.05 mM concentration decreased the G2 arrest in these cells. Taken together this study shows the novel funding that caffeine has a concentration-specific effect on cell cycle regulation, ROS generation, and cell survival in hyperoxic conditions.

  6. Cell elasticity with altered cytoskeletal architectures across multiple cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Martha E; Composto, Russell J; Eckmann, David M

    2016-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is primarily responsible for providing structural support, localization and transport of organelles, and intracellular trafficking. The structural support is supplied by actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments, which contribute to overall cell elasticity to varying degrees. We evaluate cell elasticity in five different cell types with drug-induced cytoskeletal derangements to probe how actin filaments and microtubules contribute to cell elasticity and whether it is conserved across cell type. Specifically, we measure elastic stiffness in primary chondrocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells (HUVEC), hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HUH-7), and fibrosarcoma cells (HT 1080) subjected to two cytoskeletal destabilizers: cytochalasin D and nocodazole, which disrupt actin and microtubule polymerization, respectively. Elastic stiffness is measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the disruption of the cytoskeleton is confirmed using fluorescence microscopy. The two cancer cell lines showed significantly reduced elastic moduli values (~0.5kPa) when compared to the three healthy cell lines (~2kPa). Non-cancer cells whose actin filaments were disrupted using cytochalasin D showed a decrease of 60-80% in moduli values compared to untreated cells of the same origin, whereas the nocodazole-treated cells showed no change in elasticity. Overall, we demonstrate actin filaments contribute more to elastic stiffness than microtubules but this result is cell type dependent. Cancer cells behaved differently, exhibiting increased stiffness as well as stiffness variability when subjected to nocodazole. We show that disruption of microtubule dynamics affects cancer cell elasticity, suggesting therapeutic drugs targeting microtubules be monitored for significant elastic changes. PMID:26874250

  7. Effect of NPC15199 on [Ca²⁺]i and viability in SCM1 human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, He-Hsiung; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Liang, Wei-Zhe; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Chang, Hong-Tai; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Chen, I-S; Lu, Ti; Yu, C-C; Chen, Fu-An; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Shieh, Pochuen; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2016-10-31

    NPC15199 is a synthesized compound that inhibits inflammation in some models. However, whether NPC15199 affects Ca²⁺ homeostasis in human gastric cancer is unclear. This study examined the effect of NPC15199 on cytosolic free Ca²⁺ concentrations ([Ca²⁺]i) and viability in SCM1 human gastric cancer cells. The Ca²⁺-sensitive fluorescent dye fura-2 was used to measure [Ca²⁺]i. NPC15199 evoked [Ca²⁺]i rises concentration-dependently. The response was reduced by removing extracellular Ca²⁺. NPC15199-evoked Ca²⁺ entry was not inhibited by store-operated channel inhibitors (nifedipine, econazole and SKF96365) and protein kinase C (PKC) activator (phorbol 12-myristate 13 acetate, PMA), or PKC inhibitor (GF109203X). In Ca²⁺-free medium, treatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺ pump inhibitor thapsigargin or 2,5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone (BHQ) nearly abolished NPC15199-evoked [Ca²⁺]i rises. Conversely, treatment with NPC15199 also nearly abolished thapsigargin or BHQ-evoked [Ca²⁺]i rises. Inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) with U73122 did not affect NPC15199-evoked [Ca²⁺]i rises. NPC15199 at concentrations of 100-900 μM induced concentration-dependent, Ca²⁺-independent decrease in viability. Together, in SCM1 cells, NPC15199 induced [Ca²⁺]i rises that involved Ca²⁺ entry through PKC-insensitive non-store-operated Ca²⁺ channels and PLC-independent Ca²⁺ release from the endoplasmic reticulum. NPC15199 also induced Ca²⁺-independent cell death.

  8. Far-red fluorescence gene reporter tomography for determination of placement and viability of cell-based gene therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yujie; Darne, Chinmay D; Tan, I-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Hall, Mary A; Lazard, Zawaunyka W; Davis, Alan R; Simpson, Lashan; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M; Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth A

    2013-10-01

    Non-invasive injectable cellular therapeutic strategies based on sustained delivery of physiological levels of BMP-2 for spinal fusion are emerging as promising alternatives, which could provide sufficient fusion without the associated surgical risks. However, these injectable therapies are dependent on bone formation occurring only at the specific target region. In this study, we developed and deployed fluorescence gene reporter tomography (FGRT) to provide information on in vivo cell localization and viability. This information is sought to confirm the ideal placement of the materials with respect to the area where early bone reaction is required, ultimately providing three dimensional data about the future fusion. However, because almost all conventional fluorescence gene reporters require visible excitation wavelengths, current in vivo imaging of fluorescent proteins is limited by high tissue absorption and confounding autofluorescence. We previously administered fibroblasts engineered to produce BMP-2, but is difficult to determine 3-D information of placement prior to bone formation. Herein we used the far-red fluorescence gene reporter, IFP1.4 to report the position and viability of fibroblasts and developed 3-D tomography to provide placement information. A custom small animal, far-red fluorescence tomography system integrated into a commercial CT scanner was used to assess IFP1.4 fluorescence and to demark 3-D placement of encapsulated fibroblasts with respect to the vertebrae and early bone formation as assessed from CT. The results from three experiments showed that the placement of the materials within the spine could be detected. This work shows that in vivo fluorescence gene reporter tomography of cell-based gene therapy is feasible and could help guide cell-based therapies in preclinical models.

  9. Comparing the effects of tetrabromobisphenol-A, bisphenol A, and their potential replacement alternatives, TBBPA-bis(2,3-dibromopropyl ether) and bisphenol S, on cell viability and messenger ribonucleic acid expression in chicken embryonic hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Melissa; Crump, Doug; Farmahin, Reza; Kennedy, Sean W

    2015-02-01

    A market for alternative brominated flame retardants (BFRs) has emerged recently due to the phase out of persistent and inherently toxic BFRs. Several of these replacement compounds have been detected in environmental matrices, including wild birds. A chicken embryonic hepatocyte (CEH) assay was utilized to assess the effects of the BFR, tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), and its replacement alternative, tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl ether [TBBPA-DBPE]) on cell viability and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression. Bisphenol A (BPA) and 1 of its replacement alternatives, bisphenol S (BPS), were also screened for effects. Both TBBPA and BPA decreased CEH viability with calculated median lethal concentration (LC50) values of 40.6 μM and 61.7 μM, respectively. However, the replacement alternatives, TBBPA-DBPE and BPS, did not affect cell viability (up to 300 μM). Effects on mRNA expression were determined using an Avian ToxChip polymerse chain reaction (PCR) array and a real-time (RT)-PCR assay for the estrogen-responsive genes, apolipoproteinII (ApoII) and vitellogenin (Vtg). A luciferase reporter gene assay was used to assess dioxin-like effects. Tetrabromobisphenol-A altered mRNA levels of 4 genes from multiple toxicity pathways and increased luciferase activity in the luciferase reporter gene assay, whereas its alternative, TBBPA-DBPE, only altered 1 gene on the array, Cyp1a4, and increased luciferase activity. At 300 μM, a concentration that decreased cell viability for TBBPA and BPA, the BPA replacement, BPS, altered the greatest number of transcripts, including both ApoII and Vtg. Bisphenol A exposure did not alter any genes on the array but did up-regulate Vtg at 10 μM. Characterization of the potential toxicological and molecular-level effects of these compounds will ideally be useful to chemical regulators tasked with assessing the risk of new and existing chemicals.

  10. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV’s broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV’s neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a safe vector. Therefore, it is very important to understand the determinants of VSV tropism and develop strategies to alter it. VSV glycoprotein (G) and matrix (M) protein play major roles in its cell tropism. VSV G protein is responsible for VSV broad cell tropism and is often used for pseudotyping other viruses. VSV M affects cell tropism via evasion of antiviral responses, and M mutants can be used to limit cell tropism to cell types defective in interferon signaling. In addition, other VSV proteins and host proteins may function as determinants of VSV cell tropism. Various approaches have been successfully used to alter VSV tropism to benefit basic research and clinically relevant applications. PMID:23796410

  11. A machine vision system for automated non-invasive assessment of cell viability via dark field microscopy, wavelet feature selection and classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friehs Karl

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell viability is one of the basic properties indicating the physiological state of the cell, thus, it has long been one of the major considerations in biotechnological applications. Conventional methods for extracting information about cell viability usually need reagents to be applied on the targeted cells. These reagent-based techniques are reliable and versatile, however, some of them might be invasive and even toxic to the target cells. In support of automated noninvasive assessment of cell viability, a machine vision system has been developed. Results This system is based on supervised learning technique. It learns from images of certain kinds of cell populations and trains some classifiers. These trained classifiers are then employed to evaluate the images of given cell populations obtained via dark field microscopy. Wavelet decomposition is performed on the cell images. Energy and entropy are computed for each wavelet subimage as features. A feature selection algorithm is implemented to achieve better performance. Correlation between the results from the machine vision system and commonly accepted gold standards becomes stronger if wavelet features are utilized. The best performance is achieved with a selected subset of wavelet features. Conclusion The machine vision system based on dark field microscopy in conjugation with supervised machine learning and wavelet feature selection automates the cell viability assessment, and yields comparable results to commonly accepted methods. Wavelet features are found to be suitable to describe the discriminative properties of the live and dead cells in viability classification. According to the analysis, live cells exhibit morphologically more details and are intracellularly more organized than dead ones, which display more homogeneous and diffuse gray values throughout the cells. Feature selection increases the system's performance. The reason lies in the fact that feature

  12. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Yo-Han Han; Ji-Ye Kee; Dae-Seung Kim; Jeong-geon Mun; Mi-Young Jeong; Sang-Hyun Park; Byung-Min Choi; Sung-Joo Park; Hyun-Jung Kim; Jae-Young Um; Seung-Heon Hong

    2016-01-01

    Arctigenin (ARC) has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mese...

  13. Influence of conductive polymer doping on the viability of cardiac progenitor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gelmi, Amy; Kozak Ljunggren, Monika; Rafat, Mehrdad; Jager, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering via the use of stem cells is the future for repairing impaired heart function that results from a myocardial infarction. Developing an optimised platform to support the stem cells is vital to realising this, and through utilising new smart materials such as conductive polymers we can provide a multi-pronged approach to supporting and stimulating the stem cells via engineered surface properties, electrical, and electromechanical stimulation. Here we present a fundame...

  14. Cell motility, morphology, viability and proliferation in response to nanotopography on silicon black.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Łopacińska, Joanna M; Grǎdinaru, Cristian; Wierzbicki, Rafal; Købler, Carsten; Schmidt, Michael S; Madsen, Martin T; Skolimowski, Maciej; Dufva, Martin; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Mølhave, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of cells' interactions with nanostructured materials is fundamental for bio-nanotechnology. We present results for how individual mouse fibroblasts from cell line NIH3T3 respond to highly spiked surfaces of silicon black that were fabricated by maskless reactive ion etching (RIE). We did s

  15. Using amorphous silicon solar cells to boost the viability of luminescent solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, Daniel J. [Physics Department, Imperial College London, South Kensington campus, SW7 2AZ, London (United Kingdom); Sark, Wilfried G.J.H.M. van [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Utrecht University, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Science, Technology and Society, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands); Velthuijsen, Steven T.; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    We have, for the first time, designed and fabricated hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells to be used in conjunction with Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs). LSCs are planar plastic sheets doped with organic dyes that absorb solar illumination and down shift the energy to narrowband luminescence which is collected by solar cells attached to the sheet edge. We fabricated an LSC module with two bonded solar cells and performed characterisation with the cells connected in series and parallel configurations. We find that the LSC module has an optical collection efficiency of 9.5% and an optimum power conversion efficiency of approaching 1% when the cells are in a parallel connection. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Effects of hydroxyapatite nanostructure on channel surface of porcine acellular dermal matrix scaffold on cell viability and osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge S

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Shaohua Ge,1 Ning Zhao,1 Lu Wang,1 Hong Liu,2 Pishan Yang11Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine, Department of Periodontology, Shandong University; 2State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Center of Bio and Micro/Nano Functional Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: A new nanostructured hydroxyapatite-coated porcine acellular dermal matrix (HAp-PADM was fabricated by a biomimetic mineralization method. Human periodontal ligament stem cells were seeded on HAp-PADM and the effects of this scaffold on cell shape, cytoskeleton organization, cell viability, and osteogenic differentiation were examined. Periodontal ligament stem cells cultured on HAp-PADM exhibited different cell shape when compared with those on pure PADM. Moreover, HAp-PADM promoted cell viability and alkaline phosphatase activity significantly. Based on quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, the expression of bone-related markers runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2, osteopontin (OPN, and osteocalcin (OCN upregulated in the HAp-PADM scaffold. The enhancement of osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells on the HAp-PADM scaffold was proposed based on the research results. The results of this study highlight the micro-nano, two-level, three-dimensional HAp-PADM composite as a promising scaffold for periodontal tissue engineering.Keywords: hydroxyapatite, scaffold, nanostructure, proliferation, differentiation, tissue engineering

  17. Treatment of Leptothrix Cells with Ultrapure Water Poses a Threat to Their Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuki Kunoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Leptothrix, a type of Fe/Mn-oxidizing bacteria, is characterized by its formation of an extracellular and microtubular sheath. Although almost all sheaths harvested from natural aquatic environments are hollow, a few chained bacterial cells are occasionally seen within some sheaths of young stage. We previously reported that sheaths of Leptothrix sp. strain OUMS1 cultured in artificial media became hollow with aging due to spontaneous autolysis within the sheaths. In this study, we investigated environmental conditions that lead the OUMS1 cells to die. Treatment of the cells with ultrapure water or acidic buffers (pH 6.0 caused autolysis of the cells. Under these conditions, the plasma membrane and cytoplasm of cells were drastically damaged, resulting in leakage of intracellular electrolytes and relaxation of genomic DNA. The autolysis was suppressed by the presence of Ca2+. The hydrolysis of peptidoglycan by the lysozyme treatment similarly caused autolysis of the cells and was suppressed also by the presence of Ca2+. However, it remains unclear whether the acidic pH-dependent autolysis is attributable to damage of peptidoglycan. It was observed that L. discophora strain SP-6 cells also underwent autolysis when suspended in ultrapure water; it is however, uncertain whether this phenomenon is common among other members of the genus Leptothrix.

  18. A Viability Approach for Robustness Measurement, Organizational Autopoiesis, and Cell Turnover in a Multicellular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarr, Abdoulaye; Désilles, Anya; Fronville, Alexandra; Rodin, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    In this article, we use the potential of computational biology to highlight the key role of cell apoptosis for studying some tissue's properties through in silico experiments of morphogenesis. Our morphogenesis model is a new approach focusing on the deterministic program within cells that controls their placement and their differentiation at the beginning of the embryogenesis. Indeed, when the tissue is made by just a few pair of cells, we consider that cellular mechanisms are related neither to the influence of mechanical forces nor to the spread of chemicals. Dynamics are based on spatial and logical choices, the other factors being involved when the tissue contains a large number of cells. We had established a mathematical formulation of such a model and had enlightened the link between phenotype (cell placement and cell differentiation) and genotype (cell program) at the early embryogenesis. Indeed, that work allowed for generating any early tissue and the associated program that designs it. We propose now to study and assess some properties of these tissues for further selection and classification purposes. More precisely, we present in this article novel methods to measure tissue robustness based on the backward morphogenesis of our model. We also show some implementations of their self-maintenance properties, on the one hand to deal with environment disturbances through autopoiesis and on the other hand to achieve a dynamical steady state which ensures tissue renewal. PMID:26958901

  19. Altered cytoskeletal structures in transformed cells exhibiting obviously metastatic capabilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINZHONGXIANG; WUBINGQUAN; 等

    1990-01-01

    Cytoskeletal changes in transformed cells (LM-51) eshibiting obviously metastatic capabilities were investigated by utilization of double-fluorescent labelling through combinations of:(1) tubulin indirect immunofluorescence plus Rhodamine-phalloidin staining of F-actins;(2) indirect immunofluorescent staining with α-actinin polyclonal-and vinculin monoclonal antibodies.The LM-51 cells which showed metastatic index of >50% were derived from lung metastasis in nude mice after subcutaneous inoculation of human highly metastatic tumor DNA transfected NIH3T3 cell transformants.The parent NIH3T3 cells exhibited well-organized microtubules,prominent stress fibers and adhesion plaques while their transformants showed remarkable cytoskeletal alterations:(1)reduced microtubules but increased MTOC fluorescence;(2)disrupted stress fibers and fewer adhesion plaques with their protein components redistributed in the cytoplasm;(3)Factin-and α-actinin/vinculin aggregates appeared in the cytoplasm.These aggregates were dot-like,varied in size(0.1-0.4μm) and number,located near the ventral surface of the cells.TPA-induced actin/vinculin bodies were studied too.Indications that actin and α-actinin/vinculin redistribution might be important alterations involved in the expression of metastatic capabilities of LM-51 transformed cells were discussed.

  20. Increased viability of odontoblast-like cells subjected to low-level laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, C. F.; Basso, F. G.; Lins, E. C.; Kurachi, C.; Hebling, J.; Bagnato, V. S.; de Souza Costa, C. A.

    2010-07-01

    Studies have shown that the increase of cell metabolism depends on the low level laser therapy (LLLT) parameters used to irradiate the cells. However, the optimal laser dose to up-regulate pulp cell activity remains unknown. Consequently, the aim of this study was to evaluate the metabolic response of odontoblast-like cells (MDPC-23) exposed to different LLLT doses. Cells at 20000 cells/cm2 were seeded in 24-well plates using plain culture medium (DMEM) and were incubated in a humidified incubator with 5% CO2 at 37°C. After 24 h, the culture medium was replaced by fresh DMEM supplemented with 5% (stress by nutritional deficit) or 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). The cells were exposed to different laser doses from a near infrared diode laser prototype designed to provide a uniform irradiation of the wells. The experimental groups were: G1: 1.5 J/cm2 + 5% FBS; G2: 1.5 J/cm2 + 10% FBS; G3: 5 J/cm2 + 5% FBS; G4: 5 J/cm2 + 10% FBS; G5: 19 J/cm2 + 5% FBS; G6: 19 J/cm2 + 10% FBS. LLLT was performed in 3 consecutive irradiation cycles with a 24-hour interval. Non-irradiated cells cultured in DMEM supplemented with either 5 or 10% FBS served as control groups. The analysis of the metabolic response was performed by the MTT assay 3 h after the last irradiation. G1 presented an increase in SDH enzyme activity and differed significantly (Mann-Whitney test, p LLLT stimulated the metabolic activity of MDPC-23 cultured in DMEM supplemented with 5% FBS and exposed to a laser dose of 1.5 J/cm2. These findings are relevant for further studies on the action of near infrared lasers on cells with odontoblast phenotype.

  1. Viability and proliferation of L929, tumour and hybridoma cells in the culture media containing sericin protein as a supplement or serum substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2015-09-01

    Cell cultures often require the addition of animal serum and other supplements. In this study, silk sericin, a bioactive protein, recovered from the waste of silk floss production was hydrolysed into three pepsin-degraded sericin peptides with different ranges of molecular mass. Normal animal cells, tumour cells and hybridoma cells were cultured systematically in FBS culture media containing sericin as a supplement or serum substitute. The culture test and microscopic observation of L929 cells showed that the smaller molecular weight of the degraded sericin is most suitable for cell culture. The cell culture results showed that with the degradation of sericin, for normal mouse fibroblast L929 cells, addition of 0.75 % sericin into FBS culture medium yields cell viability that is superior to FBS culture medium alone. When all serum was replaced by sericin, cell viability in the sericin medium could reach about one half of that in FBS medium. When in a medium containing a mixture of FBS: sericin (6:4, v/v), the cell culture effect is about 80 %. For the cultures of four tumour and one hybridoma cells, regardless of the molecular weight range, these degraded sericin peptides could substitute all serum in FBS media. The cell viability and proliferation of these tumour and hybridoma cells are equivalent or superior to that in FBS medium. In other words, cell viability and proliferation of these tumour and hybridoma cells in sericin media are more preferable to serum media. The mechanism of the sericin protein to promote cell growth and proliferation will be further investigated later. PMID:25895088

  2. Role of surface-electrical properties on the cell-viability of carbon thin films grown in nanodomain morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Amjed; Kumar, Manish; Yoon, Seokyoung; Lee, Jung Heon; Tajima, Satomi; Hori, Masaru; Geon Han, Jeon

    2016-07-01

    Carbon thin films, having a combination of unique physical and chemical properties, exhibit an interesting biocompatibility and biological response to living entities. Here, the carbon films are developed in the morphology form of nano-domains with nanoscale inter-domain separations, tuned by plasma conditions in the facing target magnetron sputtering process. The wettability and surface energy are found to have a close relation to the inter-domain separations. The chemical structure of carbon films exhibited the relative enhancement of sp3 in comparison to sp2 with the increase of domain separations. The cell-viability of these films shows promising results for L929 mouse fibroblast and Saos-2 bone cells, when inter-domain separation is increased. Electrical conductivity and surface energy are identified to play the key role in different time-scales during the cell-proliferation process. The contribution from electrical conductivity is dominant in the beginning of the cultivation, whereas with the passage of time (~3–5 d) the surface energy takes control over conductivity to enhance the cell proliferation.

  3. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yo-Han; Kee, Ji-Ye; Kim, Dae-Seung; Mun, Jeong-Geon; Jeong, Mi-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Byung-Min; Park, Sung-Joo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2016-01-01

    Arctigenin (ARC) has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through increasing the expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expressions of mesenchymal markers; N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and Snail. Moreover, ARC inhibited migration and invasion through reducing of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 expressions. In an experimental metastasis model, ARC significantly inhibited lung metastasis of CT26 cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates the inhibitory effects of ARC on colorectal metastasis. PMID:27618887

  4. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yo-Han; Kee, Ji-Ye; Kim, Dae-Seung; Mun, Jeong-Geon; Jeong, Mi-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Byung-Min; Park, Sung-Joo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2016-08-27

    Arctigenin (ARC) has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through increasing the expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expressions of mesenchymal markers; N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and Snail. Moreover, ARC inhibited migration and invasion through reducing of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 expressions. In an experimental metastasis model, ARC significantly inhibited lung metastasis of CT26 cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates the inhibitory effects of ARC on colorectal metastasis.

  5. Delivery, Effect on Cell Viability, and Plasticity of Modified Aptamer Constructs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gissberg, Olof; Zaghloul, Eman M; Lundin, Karin E;

    2016-01-01

    AS1411 is a g-quadruplex-forming aptamer capable of selectively entering cancer cells by nucleolin receptor-mediated uptake. In this study, we investigated the cell internalization properties and plasticity of AS1411 carrying different locked nucleic acid-containing cargo oligonucleotides (ONs......) for delivery into A549 and U2OS cells. We found that internalization efficiency is highly governed by ON cargo chemistry and composition since the inherent antitumor properties of AS1411 were lost when attached to a nontoxic ON, noTox. However, a toxic ON, Tox, demonstrated potent cytotoxicity after aptamer......-mediated uptake in A549 cells. We also examined the effect of unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) modifications in the loop region of the aptamer, and how the cargo ONs and UNA incorporation affect the secondary structure of AS1411, in the presence or absence of two novel ellipticine derivatives. These findings add new...

  6. Effect of low-dimensional alumina structures on viability of L 929 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fomenko, Alla N., E-mail: alserova@ispms.tsc.ru; Korovin, Matvey S., E-mail: msk@ispms.tsc.ru; Bakina, Olga V., E-mail: ovbakina@ispms.tsc.ru; Kazantsev, Sergey O., E-mail: kzso@ispms.tsc.ru; Glazkova, Elena A., E-mail: eagl@ispms.tsc.ru; Svarovskaya, Natalia V., E-mail: nvsv@ispms.tsc.ru; Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S., E-mail: asl@ispms.tsc.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    In the study, we estimated the cytotoxicity of alumina nanoparticles differing in shape (nanofibers, nanoplates, nanosheets, agglomerates of nanosheets) and close in physicochemical properties (particle size, specific surface area, phase composition, and zeta potential). The alumina structures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) data, low-temperature nitrogen adsorption, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cytotoxicity was estimated on fibroblast cells of the L929 line. It was found that a more adverse effect on the cells was exerted by alumina nanofibers and nanosheets. The action of nanosheets on the cells was inhibitory and was of about the same level, irrespective of the observation period. The effect of alumina nanosheet agglomerates and nanoplates on the cell proliferation was weak even at an exposure time of 72 h.

  7. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo-Han Han

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Arctigenin (ARC has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC. In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT through increasing the expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expressions of mesenchymal markers; N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and Snail. Moreover, ARC inhibited migration and invasion through reducing of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions. In an experimental metastasis model, ARC significantly inhibited lung metastasis of CT26 cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates the inhibitory effects of ARC on colorectal metastasis.

  8. The Effect of Sericin from Various Extraction Methods on Cell Viability and Collagen Production

    OpenAIRE

    Pornanong Aramwit; Sorada Kanokpanont; Titpawan Nakpheng; Teerapol Srichana

    2010-01-01

    Silk sericin (SS) can accelerate cell proliferation and attachment; however, SS can be extracted by various methods, which result in SS exhibiting different physical and biological properties. We found that SS produced from various extraction methods has different molecular weights, zeta potential, particle size and amino acid content. The MTT assay indicated that SS from all extraction methods had no toxicity to mouse fibroblast cells at concentrations up to 40 μg/mL after 24 h incubation, b...

  9. Validation and reproducibility of computerised cell-viability analysis of tissue slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Janet AW

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of live cells using membrane integrity dyes has become a frequently used technique, especially with articular cartilage and chondrocytes in situ where tissue slices are used to assess cell recovery as a function of location. The development of a reproducible computerised method of cell evaluation would eliminate many variables associated with manual counting and significantly reduce the amount of time required to evaluate experimental results. Methods To validate a custom computerised counting program, intra-person and inter-person cell counts of nine human evaluators (three groups – unskilled, novice, and experienced were compared with repeated pixel counts of the custom program on 15 digitised images (in triplicate of chondrocytes in situ stained with fluorescent dyes. Results Results indicated increased reproducibility with increased experience within evaluators [Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC range = 0.67 (unskilled to 0.99 (experienced] and between evaluators [ICC = 0.47 (unskilled, 0.85 (novice, 0.93 (experienced]. The computer program had perfect reproducibility (ICC = 1.0. There was a significant relationship between the average of the experienced evaluators results and the custom program results (ICC = 0.77. Conclusions This study demonstrated that increased experience in cell counting resulted in increased reproducibility both within and between human evaluators but confirmed that the computer program was the most reproducible. There was a good correlation between the intact cell recovery determined by the computer program and the experienced human evaluators. The results of this study showed that the computer counting program was a reproducible tool to evaluate intact cell recovery after use of membrane integrity dyes on chondrocytes in situ. This and the significant decrease in the time used to count the cells by the computer program advocate its use in future studies because it has

  10. FAK and HAS Inhibition Synergistically Decrease Colon Cancer Cell Viability and Affect Expression of Critical Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Heffler, Melissa; Golubovskaya, Vita; Conroy, Jeffrey; Liu, Song; Wang, Dan; Cance, William; Dunn, Kelli B.

    2013-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), hyaluronan (HA), and hyaluronan synthase-3 (HAS3) have been implicated in cancer growth and progression. FAK inhibition with the small molecule inhibitor Y15 decreases colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. HAS3 inhibition in colon cancer cells decreases FAK expression and activation, and exogenous HA increases FAK activation. We sought to determine the genes affected by HAS and FAK inhibition and hypothesized that dual inhibition would synergistically inh...

  11. Improved viability and activity of neutrophils differentiated from HL-60 cells by co-culture with adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yoon Shin; Lim, Goh-Woon [Department of Pediatrics, Ewha Womans University, School of Medicine, Ewha Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Ah; Woo, So-Youn; Shin, Meeyoung [Department of Microbiology, Ewha Womans University, School of Medicine, Ewha Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Eun-Sun [Department of Pediatrics, Ewha Womans University, School of Medicine, Ewha Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chan Ra, Jeong [Stem Cell Research Center, RNL BIO, Seoul 153-768 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Kyung-Ha, E-mail: ykh@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Pediatrics, Ewha Womans University, School of Medicine, Ewha Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neutropenia is a principal complication of cancer treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of neutrophils with AD-MSC retained cell survival and proliferation and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis under serum starved conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC increased functions of neutrophil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC promoted the viability of neutrophils by enhancing respiratory burst through the expression of IFN-{alpha}, G-CSF, and TGF-{beta}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC can be used to improve immunity for neutropenia treatment. -- Abstract: Neutropenia is a principal complication of cancer treatment. We investigated the supportive effect of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) on the viability and function of neutrophils. Neutrophils were derived from HL-60 cells by dimethylformamide stimulation and cultured with or without AD-MSCs under serum-starved conditions to evaluate neutrophil survival, proliferation, and function. Serum starvation resulted in the apoptosis of neutrophils and decreased cell survival. The co-culture of neutrophils and AD-MSCs resulted in cell survival and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis under serum-starved conditions. The survival rate of neutrophils was prolonged up to 72 h, and the expression levels of interferon (IFN)-{alpha}, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta} in AD-MSCs were increased after co-culture with neutrophils. AD-MSCs promoted the viability of neutrophils by inhibiting apoptosis as well as enhancing respiratory burst, which could potentially be mediated by the increased expression of IFN-{alpha}, G-CSF, and TGF-{beta}. Thus, we conclude that the use of AD-MSCs may be a promising cell-based therapy for increasing immunity by accelerating neutrophil function.

  12. Improved viability and activity of neutrophils differentiated from HL-60 cells by co-culture with adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Neutropenia is a principal complication of cancer treatment. ► Co-culture of neutrophils with AD-MSC retained cell survival and proliferation and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis under serum starved conditions. ► AD-MSC increased functions of neutrophil. ► AD-MSC promoted the viability of neutrophils by enhancing respiratory burst through the expression of IFN-α, G-CSF, and TGF-β. ► AD-MSC can be used to improve immunity for neutropenia treatment. -- Abstract: Neutropenia is a principal complication of cancer treatment. We investigated the supportive effect of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) on the viability and function of neutrophils. Neutrophils were derived from HL-60 cells by dimethylformamide stimulation and cultured with or without AD-MSCs under serum-starved conditions to evaluate neutrophil survival, proliferation, and function. Serum starvation resulted in the apoptosis of neutrophils and decreased cell survival. The co-culture of neutrophils and AD-MSCs resulted in cell survival and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis under serum-starved conditions. The survival rate of neutrophils was prolonged up to 72 h, and the expression levels of interferon (IFN)-α, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in AD-MSCs were increased after co-culture with neutrophils. AD-MSCs promoted the viability of neutrophils by inhibiting apoptosis as well as enhancing respiratory burst, which could potentially be mediated by the increased expression of IFN-α, G-CSF, and TGF-β. Thus, we conclude that the use of AD-MSCs may be a promising cell-based therapy for increasing immunity by accelerating neutrophil function.

  13. Intracellular reactive oxygen species are essential for PI3K/Akt/mTOR-dependent IL-7-mediated viability of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A; Gírio, A; Cebola, I; Santos, C I; Antunes, F; Barata, J T

    2011-06-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) activates phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) pathway, thereby mediating viability, proliferation and growth of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be upregulated by growth factors and are known to regulate proliferation and viability. Here, we show that IL-7 upregulates ROS in T-ALL cells in a manner that is dependent on PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway activity and that relies on both NADPH oxidase and mitochondrial respiratory chain. Conversely, IL-7-induced activation of PI3K signaling pathway requires mitochondrial respiration and ROS. We have previously shown that IL-7-mediated activation of PI3K pathway drives the upregulation of the glucose transporter Glut1, promoting glucose uptake in T-ALL cells. Using phloretin to inhibit Glut function, we demonstrate that glucose uptake is mandatory for ROS upregulation in IL-7-treated T-ALL cells, suggesting that IL-7 stimulation leads to increased ROS via PI3K pathway activation and consequent upregulation of Glut1 and glucose uptake. Overall, our data reveal the existence of a critical crosstalk between PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and ROS that is essential for IL-7-mediated T-ALL cell survival, and that may constitute a novel target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21455214

  14. The role of ribosylated-BSA in regulating PC12 cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tsun-Yung; Huang, Chuen-Lin; Yang, Jung-Mou; Huang, Wei-Jung; Huang, Nai-Kuei; Chen, Yue-Wen; Lin, Ren-Jye; Yang, Ying-Chen

    2012-08-01

    Glycation, one of the post-translational modifications, is known to influence protein structure and biological function. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have been shown to cause pathologies of diabetes. Glycation levels in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are higher than in normal people. However, whether the glycation of susceptible proteins is a triggering event for cell damage or simply a result remains to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that ribose-conjugated BSA (Rib-BSA) directly induces PC12 cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC(50) is 4.6 μM. Unlike glucose-incubated BSA, Rib-BSA rapidly forms cytotoxic AGEs. PC12 is vulnerable to Rib-BSA. However, fructose can induce AGE formation, although no effect on cell survival was observed. This effect of Rib-BSA is reversed by pretreatment of pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, which belongs to thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ) ligands. Moreover, Rib-BSA upregulates inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cycloxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression, and p-38 phosphorylation and leaves extracellular regulated protein1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation unchanged. The Rib-BSA-induced signaling changes are blocked by rosiglitazone and confirmed by PPAR-γ small-interfering RNA transfection. The reduction of cell survival by Rib-BSA is blocked by the iNOS inhibitor and p38 inhibitor. No effect on cell survival was observed using the COX-2 inhibitor. Consequently, these results show that Rib-BSA directly inducing PC12 cell death is a triggering event and TZDs protect PC12 cell from Rib-BSA damage. Signaling molecules, such as PPAR-γ, P38, and iNOS, are involved in Rib-BSA-mediated cytotoxicity.

  15. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the inhibitory effects of CIL-102 on viability and invasiveness in human glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Chih-Chuan [Institute of Nursing and Department of Nursing, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China); Chronic Diseases and Health Promotion Research Center, CGUST, Taiwan (China); Institute of Basic Medicine Science, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Hsing-Chun [Institute of Nursing and Department of Nursing, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China); Chronic Diseases and Health Promotion Research Center, CGUST, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Sze, Chun-I, E-mail: szec@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Basic Medicine Science, Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy and Pathology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-01

    CIL-102 (1-[4-(furo[2,3-b]quinolin-4-ylamino)phenyl]ethanone), the major active agent of the alkaloid derivative, has been demonstrated to exert anticancer effects. Herein, we present an investigation focused on the identification of the target(s) of CIL-102's action and the mechanism of its action in apoptotic and anti-invasive pathways. Proteomic approaches were used to purify and identify the protein substrates using 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D SDS-PAGE) to assess changes in the expression of relevant protein treatment with CIL-102 that resulted in the inhibition of viability and invasion. Our results demonstrate that CIL-102 treatment of U87 cells decreased cell proliferation and invasiveness. CIL-102 dose-dependent induction of apoptosis and inhibitory invasiveness were accompanied by sustained phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and p70S6K as well as generation of the reactive oxygen species. In addition, differential proteins displayed between CIL-102-treated and untreated U87 were determined and validated. There were 11 differentially expressed proteins between the CIL-102-treated and untreated groups. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CIL-102 inhibited cancer cell proliferation and reduced anti-invasion properties by up-regulating the levels of FUMH (Fumarate hydratase). The investigation demonstrated that there was an increase in the cellular levels of FUMH in the CIL-102 reduction in viability and invasion via the activation of JNK1/2 and mTOR signaling modules. NAC administration and shRNA FUMH conferred resistance to CIL-102-inhibited HIF1α and MMP-2 levels via inhibition of JNK1/2 and mTOR activation. We concluded that CIL-102-induced an apoptosis cascade and decreased aggressiveness in astrocytoma cells by modulation of mitochondria function, providing a new mechanism for CIL-102 treatment. - Highlights: • We found the effect of CIL-102 on neuroblastoma cells. • Fumarate hydratase as a CIL-102's target by proteomic differential

  16. Membrane-based electrochemical nanobiosensor for Escherichia coli detection and analysis of cells viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming Soon; Lau, Suk Hiang; Chow, Vincent T; Toh, Chee-Seng

    2011-08-01

    A sensitive and selective membrane-based electrochemical nanobiosensor is developed for specific quantitative label-free detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells and analysis of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) E. coli cells which remain mostly undetected using current methods. The sensing mechanism relies on the blocking of nanochannels of a nanoporous alumina-membrane modified electrode, upon the formation of immune complexes at the nanoporous membrane. The resulting obstacle to diffusive mass transfer of a redox probe in the analysis solution to the underlying platinum electrode reduces the Faradaic signal response of the biosensor, measured using cyclic voltammetry. Antibody loading under conditions of varying antibody concentrations and pHs are optimized. The biosensor gives a low detection limit of 22 cfu mL(-1) (R(2) = 0.999) over a wide linear working range of 10 to 10(6) cfu mL(-1). It is specific toward E. coli with minimal cross-reactivity to two other pathogenic bacteria (commonly found in waters). Relative standard deviation (RSD) for triplicate measurements of 2.5% indicates reasonably useful level of reproducibility. Differentiation of live, VBNC, and dead cells are carried out after the cell capture and quantitation step, by simple monitoring of the cells' enzyme activity using the same redox probe in the analysis solution, in the presence of glucose. PMID:21688778

  17. Delivery, Effect on Cell Viability, and Plasticity of Modified Aptamer Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissberg, Olof; Zaghloul, Eman M; Lundin, Karin E; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Landras-Guetta, Corinne; Wengel, Jesper; Zain, Rula; Smith, C I Edvard

    2016-06-01

    AS1411 is a g-quadruplex-forming aptamer capable of selectively entering cancer cells by nucleolin receptor-mediated uptake. In this study, we investigated the cell internalization properties and plasticity of AS1411 carrying different locked nucleic acid-containing cargo oligonucleotides (ONs) for delivery into A549 and U2OS cells. We found that internalization efficiency is highly governed by ON cargo chemistry and composition since the inherent antitumor properties of AS1411 were lost when attached to a nontoxic ON, noTox. However, a toxic ON, Tox, demonstrated potent cytotoxicity after aptamer-mediated uptake in A549 cells. We also examined the effect of unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) modifications in the loop region of the aptamer, and how the cargo ONs and UNA incorporation affect the secondary structure of AS1411, in the presence or absence of two novel ellipticine derivatives. These findings add new insights to the design and future applications of aptamer-guided delivery of ON cargo to cancer cells. PMID:26859550

  18. Axitinib affects cell viability and migration of a primary foetal lung adenocarcinoma culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menna, Cecilia; De Falco, Elena; Pacini, Luca; Scafetta, Gaia; Ruggieri, Paola; Puca, Rosa; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Ciccone, Anna Maria; Rendina, Erino Angelo; Calogero, Antonella; Ibrahim, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Fetal lung adenocarcinoma (FLAC) is a rare variant of lung adenocarcinoma. Studies regarding FLAC have been based only on histopathological observations, thus representative in vitro models of FLAC cultures are unavailable. We have established and characterized a human primary FLAC cell culture, exploring its biology, chemosensitivity, and migration. FLAC cells and specimen showed significant upregulation of VEGF165 and HIF-1α mRNA levels. This observation was confirmed by in vitro chemosensitivity and migration assay, showing that only Axitinib was comparable to Cisplatin treatment. We provide a suitable in vitro model to further investigate the nature of this rare type of cancer. PMID:24380379

  19. The effect of CO2 laser beam welded AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel on the viability of fibroblast cells, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köse, Ceyhun; Kaçar, Ramazan; Zorba, Aslı Pınar; Bağırova, Melahat; Allahverdiyev, Adil M

    2016-03-01

    It has been determined by the literature research that there is no clinical study on the in vivo and in vitro interaction of the cells with the laser beam welded joints of AISI 316L biomaterial. It is used as a prosthesis and implant material and that has adequate mechanical properties and corrosion resistance characteristics. Therefore, the interaction of the CO2 laser beam welded samples and samples of the base metal of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel with L929 fibroblast cells as an element of connective tissue under in vitro conditions has been studied. To study the effect of the base metal and the laser welded test specimens on the viability of the fibroblast cells that act as an element of connective tissues in the body, they were kept in DMEMF-12 medium for 7, 14, 28 days and 18 months. The viability study was experimentally studied using the MTT method for 7, 14, 28 days. In addition, the direct interaction of the fibroblast cells seeded on 6 different plates with the samples was examined with an inverted microscope. The MTT cell viability experiment was repeated on the cells that were in contact with the samples. The statistical relationship was analyzed using a Tukey test for the variance with the GraphPad statistics software. The data regarding metallic ion release were identified with the ICP-MS method after the laser welded and main material samples were kept in cell culture medium for 18 months. The cell viability of the laser welded sample has been detected to be higher than that of the base metal and the control based on 7th day data. However, the laser welded sample's viability of the fibroblast cells has diminished by time during the test period of 14 and 28 days and base metal shows better viability when compared to the laser welded samples. On the other hand, the base metal and the laser welded sample show better cell viability effect when compared to the control group. According to the ICP-MS results of the main material and laser welded

  20. Impact of Cyanidin-3-Glucoside on Glycated LDL-Induced NADPH Oxidase Activation, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cell Viability in Cultured Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueping Xie

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Elevated levels of glycated low density lipoprotein (glyLDL are frequently detected in diabetic patients. Previous studies demonstrated that glyLDL increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, activated NADPH oxidase (NOX and suppressed mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC enzyme activities in vascular endothelial cells (EC. The present study examined the effects of cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G, a type of anthocyanin abundant in dark-skinned berries, on glyLDL-induced ROS production, NOX activation and mETC enzyme activity in porcine aortic EC (PAEC. Co-treatment of C3G prevented glyLDL-induced upregulation of NOX4 and intracellular superoxide production in EC. C3G normalized glyLDL-induced inhibition on the enzyme activities of mETC Complex I and III, as well as the abundances of NADH dehydrogenase 1 in Complex I and cytochrome b in Complex III in EC. Blocking antibody for the receptor of advanced glycation end products (RAGE prevented glyLDL-induced changes in NOX and mETC enzymes. Combination of C3G and RAGE antibody did not significantly enhance glyLDL-induced inhibition of NOX or mETC enzymes. C3G reduced glyLDL-induced RAGE expression with the presence of RAGE antibody. C3G prevented prolonged incubation with the glyLDL-induced decrease in cell viability and the imbalance between key regulators for cell viability (cleaved caspase 3 and B cell Lyphoma-2 in EC. The findings suggest that RAGE plays an important role in glyLDL-induced oxidative stress in vascular EC. C3G may prevent glyLDL-induced NOX activation, the impairment of mETC enzymes and cell viability in cultured vascular EC.

  1. Influence of carvacrol and 1,8-cineole on cell viability, membrane integrity, and morphology of Aeromonas hydrophila cultivated in a vegetable-based broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; de Oliveira, Kataryne Árabe Rimá; de Figueiredo, Regina Celia Bressan Queiroz; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of carvacrol (CAR) and 1,8-cineole (CIN) alone (at the MIC) or in combination at subinhibitory amounts (both at 1/8 MIC) on the cell viability, membrane permeability, and morphology of Aeromonas hydrophila INCQS 7966 (A. hydrophila) cultivated in a vegetable-based broth. CAR and CIN alone or in combination severely affected the viability of the bacteria and caused dramatic changes in the cell membrane permeability, leading to cell death, as observed by confocal laser microscopy. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy images of bacterial cells exposed to CAR or CIN or the mixture of both compounds revealed severe changes in cell wall structure, rupture of the plasma membrane, shrinking of cells, condensation of cytoplasmic content, leakage of intracellular material, and cell collapse. These findings suggest that CAR and CIN alone or in combination at subinhibitory amounts could be applied to inhibit the growth of A. hydrophila in foods, particularly as sanitizing agents in vegetables.

  2. Increased viability and resilience of haemolymph cells in blue mussels following pre-treatment with acute high-dose gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeschke, B. [Stockholm University (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    In an initial experiment, blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) were exposed to a range of acute high doses of gamma radiation in the laboratory. Haemolymph was extracted and the haemocytes (blood cells) were scored for cell viability (% living cells) under a microscope, directly after irradiation (0.04, 0.4 or 4 Gy) and again after a subsequent treatment with hydrogen peroxide in vitro (final H{sub 2}O{sub 2} conc.: 0.2 μM). Cell viability in controls (0 Gy) was approximately 100% and no cell death was observable from radiation exposure alone. When treated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} a decrease in cell viability was seen across all treatments, however this decrease in viability was reduced with increasing radiation pre-treatment (0 Gy = 53%; 0.04 Gy = 66%; 0.4 Gy = 75%; 4 Gy = 83%). To investigate the mechanism for this therapeutic effect observed, the experiment was repeated. Using mussels from a different location, the same, but more extensive method of irradiation (0[control], 0.04, 0.4 Gy, 5 or 40 Gy) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment was used. Additional haemolymph sub-samples were taken for analysis of catalase concentration. In this second experiment, viability of cells from controls was only 62%, indicating the mussels were in a poorer condition than those of the previous experiment. The lowest level of radiation exposure (0.04 Gy) further decreased the viability (56%). However, at higher doses the viability was increased compared to control, which then gradually declined with increasing dose (0.4 Gy = 75%; 5 Gy = 72%; 40 Gy = 65%). Catalase analysis demonstrated a complimentary pattern of activity of the antioxidant in the haemolymph, directly correlating with radiation dose (0 Gy = 0.2 U; 0.04 Gy = 0.1 U; 0.4 Gy = 1.3 U; 5 Gy = 0.9 U; 40 Gy = 0.1 Gy). Treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decreased cell viability across all treatments, but no pattern between radiation treatments was discernable. The results indicate that an acute dose of radiation not only has negligible

  3. Cell alterations induced by a biotherapic for influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Nelson Couceiro

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Influenza viruses have been responsible for highly contagious acute respiratory illnesses with high mortality, mainly in the elderly, which encourages the development of new drugs for the treatment of human flu. The biotherapics are medicines prepared from biological products, which are not chemically defined. They are compounded following the homeopathic procedures indicated for infectious diseases with known etiology [1]. Aim: The purpose of the present study is to verify cellular alterations induced by a biotherapic prepared from the infectious influenza A virus. Methodology: This biotherapic was prepared for this study in the homeopathic potency of 30X according to the Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopeia [2]. The concentration of 10% was not cytotoxic to cells, as verified by neutral red assay. The cellular alterations observed in MDCK cells were analyzed by optical microscopy for the quantification of mitosis, nucleoli and lipid bodies. The mitochondrial activity was assessed by MTT assay and the phosphosfructokinase-1 (PFK-1 enzyme activity was analyzed on the MDCK cells treated for 5, 10 and 30 days. Macrophages J778.G8 were treated with this biotherapic to evaluate the immunostimulatory cytokine release. Results: The cellular alterations observed in MDCK cells were verified by optical microscopy. The number of lipid bodies present in MDCK cells stimulated for 10 days was significantly lower (p <0.05 when compared to controls. The biotherapic significantly increased (p <0.05 the number of mitosis and the mitochondrial activity of MDCK cells stimulated for 10 and 30 days. These changes were confirmed by a significant reduction (p <0.05 on the PFK-1 activity. These results suggest that the biotherapic was able to activate the Krebs cycle and pentose-phosphate metabolism to the generation of amino acids and nucleotides, situations common to cells whose rate of mitosis is increased. The quantification of immunostimulatory

  4. Poly-I:C Decreases Dendritic Cell Viability Independent of PKR Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Hjalte List; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination with tumor-antigen pulsed, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) has emerged as a promising strategy in cancer immunotherapy. The standard DC maturation cocktail consists of a combination of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)/interleukin (IL)-1β/IL-6 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2...

  5. Cry1Ab treatment has no effects on viability of cultured porcine intestinal cells, but triggers Hsp70 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Bondzio

    Full Text Available In vitro testing can contribute to reduce the risk that the use of genetically modified (GM crops and their proteins show unintended toxic effects. Here we introduce a porcine intestinal cell culture (IPEC-J2 as appropriate in vitro model and tested the possible toxic potential of Cry1Ab protein, commonly expressed in GM-maize. For comprehensive risk assessment we used WST-1 conversion and ATP content as metabolic markers for proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase release as indicator for cells with compromised membrane and transepithelial electrical resistance as parameter indicating membrane barrier function. The results were compared to the effects of valinomycin, a potassium ionophore, known to induce cytotoxic effects in most mammalian cell types. Whereas no toxicity was observed after Cry1Ab treatment, valinomycin induced a decrease in IPEC-J2 viability. This was confirmed by dynamic monitoring of cellular responses. Additionally, two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis was performed. Only three proteins were differentially expressed. The functions of these proteins were associated with responses to stress. The up-regulation of heat shock protein Hsp70 was verified by Western blotting as well as by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and may be related to a protective function. These findings suggest that the combination of in vitro testing and proteomic analysis may serve as a promising tool for mechanism based safety assessment.

  6. Novel role of KCNQ2/3 channels in regulating neuronal cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Wei, J; Song, M; Francis, K; Yu, S P

    2011-03-01

    Overactivation of certain K(+) channels can mediate excessive K(+) efflux and intracellular K(+) depletion, which are early ionic events in apoptotic cascade. The present investigation examined a possible role of the KCNQ2/3 channel or M-channel (also named Kv7.2/7.3 channels) in the pro-apoptotic process. Whole-cell recordings detected much larger M-currents (212 ± 31 pA or 10.5 ± 1.5 pA/pF) in cultured hippocampal neurons than that in cultured cortical neurons (47 ± 21 pA or 2.4 ± 0.8 pA/pF). KCNQ2/3 channel openers N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and flupirtine caused dose-dependent K(+) efflux, intracellular K(+) depletion, and cell death in hippocampal cultures, whereas little cell death was induced by NEM in cortical cultures. The NEM-induced cell death was antagonized by co-applied KCNQ channel inhibitor XE991 (10 μM), or by elevated extracellular K(+) concentration. Supporting a mediating role of KCNQ2/3 channels in apoptosis, expression of KCNQ2 or KCNQ2/3 channels in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells initiated caspase-3 activation. Consistently, application of NEM (20 μM, 8 h) in hippocampal cultures similarly caused caspase-3 activation assessed by immunocytochemical staining and western blotting. NEM increased the expression of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), induced mitochondria membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, formation of apoptosome complex, and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) translocation into nuclear. All these events were attenuated by blocking KCNQ2/3 channels. These findings provide novel evidence that KCNQ2/3 channels could be an important regulator in neuronal apoptosis. PMID:20885443

  7. Influence of Cu–Ti thin film surface properties on antimicrobial activity and viability of living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojcieszak, Damian, E-mail: damian.wojcieszak@pwr.edu.pl [Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland); Kaczmarek, Danuta [Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland); Antosiak, Aleksandra [Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, Rudolfa Weigla 12, 53-114 Wrocław (Poland); Mazur, Michal [Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland); Rybak, Zbigniew; Rusak, Agnieszka; Osekowska, Malgorzata [Department for Experimental Surgery and Biomaterials Research, Wroclaw Medical University, Poniatowskiego 2, 50-326 Wroclaw (Poland); Poniedzialek, Agata [Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland); Gamian, Andrzej; Szponar, Bogumila [Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, Rudolfa Weigla 12, 53-114 Wrocław (Poland)

    2015-11-01

    The paper describes properties of thin-film coatings based on copper and titanium. Thin films were prepared by co-sputtering of Cu and Ti targets in argon plasma. Deposited coatings consist of 90 at.% of Cu and 10 at.% of Ti. Characterization of the film was made on the basis of investigations of microstructure and physicochemical properties of the surface. Methods such as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray microanalysis, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical profilometry and wettability measurements were used to assess the properties of deposited thin films. An impact of Cu–Ti coating on the growth of selected bacteria and viability of the living cells (line L929, NCTC clone 929) was described in relation to the structure, surface state and wettability of the film. It was found that as-deposited films were amorphous. However, in such surroundings the nanocrystalline grains of 10–15 nm and 25–35 nm size were present. High surface active area with a roughness of 8.9 nm, had an effect on receiving relatively high water contact angle value (74.1°). Such wettability may promote cell adhesion and result in an increase of the probability of copper ion transfer from the film surface into the cell. Thin films revealed bactericidal and fungicidal effects even in short term-contact. High activity of prepared films was directly related to high amount (ca. 51 %) of copper ions at 1+ state as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results have shown. - Graphical abstract: Bactericidal and fungicidal effects of time contact with surface of Cu–Ti thin films. - Highlights: • Antimicrobial activity and cytotoxic effect (viability of L929 cell line) of metallic Cu–Ti films • Thin films were prepared by co-sputtering of Cu and Ti. • As-deposited Cu–Ti films were amorphous and homogenous. • Bactericidal and fungicidal effects even in short term-contact were observed.

  8. Extracellular matrix production by nucleus pulposus and bone marrow stem cells in response to altered oxygen and glucose microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syeda M; Buckley, Conor T

    2015-12-01

    Bone marrow (BM) stem cells may be an ideal source of cells for intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration. However, the harsh biochemical microenvironment of the IVD may significantly influence the biological and metabolic vitality of injected stem cells and impair their repair potential. This study investigated the viability and production of key matrix proteins by nucleus pulposus (NP) and BM stem cells cultured in the typical biochemical microenvironment of the IVD consisting of altered oxygen and glucose concentrations. Culture-expanded NP cells and BM stem cells were encapsulated in 1.5% alginate and ionically crosslinked to form cylindrical hydrogel constructs. Hydrogel constructs were maintained under different glucose concentrations (1, 5 and 25 mM) and external oxygen concentrations (5 and 20%). Cell viability was measured using the Live/Dead® assay and the production of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), and collagen was quantified biochemically and histologically. For BM stem cells, IVD-like micro-environmental conditions (5 mM glucose and 5% oxygen) increased the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. In contrast, low glucose conditions (1 mM glucose) combined with 5% external oxygen concentration promoted cell death, inhibiting proliferation and the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. NP-encapsulated alginate constructs were relatively insensitive to oxygen concentration or glucose condition in that they accumulated similar amounts of sGAG under all conditions. Under IVD-like microenvironmental conditions, NP cells were found to have a lower glucose consumption rate compared with BM cells and may in fact be more suitable to adapt and sustain the harsh microenvironmental conditions. Considering the highly specialised microenvironment of the central NP, these results indicate that IVD-like concentrations of low glucose and low oxygen are critical and influential for the survival and biological behaviour of stem cells. Such findings may promote and accelerate

  9. Genetic alterations in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic alterations observed in head and neck cancer are mainly due to oncogene activation (gain of function mutations and tumor suppressor gene inactivation (loss of function mutations, leading to deregulation of cell proliferation and death. These genetic alterations include gene amplification and overexpression of oncogenes such as myc, erbB-2, EGFR and cyclinD1 and mutations, deletions and hypermethylation leading to p16 and TP53 tumor suppressor gene inactivation. In addition, loss of heterozygosity in several chromosomal regions is frequently observed, suggesting that other tumor suppressor genes not yet identified could be involved in the tumorigenic process of head and neck cancers. The exact temporal sequence of the genetic alterations during head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC development and progression has not yet been defined and their diagnostic or prognostic significance is controversial. Advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of head and neck cancer should help in the identification of new markers that could be used for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of the disease.

  10. The effect of silver nanoparticles on Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm biomass and cell viability

    OpenAIRE

    Bahman Khameneh; Hamed Zarei; Bibi Sedigheh Fazly Bazzaz

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Bacterial biofilm has been considered responsible for many deaths and high health costs worldwide. Their better protection against antibacterial agents compared to free living cells leads to poor treatment efficiency. Nanotechnology is promising approach to combat biofilm infections. The aim of the present study was to eradicate Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm with silver nanoparticles (SNPs). Materials and Methods: SNPs were used at different concentrations (two fold dilutio...

  11. Rv3351c, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene that affects bacterial growth and alveolar epithelial cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Fine-Coulson, Kari; Gupta, Tuhina; Quinn, Frederick D; Posey, James E; Willby, Melisa; Castro-Garza, Jorge; Karls, Russell K

    2015-12-01

    Despite the interactions known to occur between various lower respiratory tract pathogens and alveolar epithelial cells (AECs), few reports examine factors influencing the interplay between Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli and AECs during infection. Importantly, in vitro studies have demonstrated that the M. tuberculosis hbha and esxA gene products HBHA and ESAT6 directly or indirectly influence AEC survival. In this report, we identify Rv3351c as another M. tuberculosis gene that impacts the fate of both the pathogen and AEC host. Intracellular replication of an Rv3351c mutant in the human AEC type II pneumocyte cell line A549 was markedly reduced relative to the complemented mutant and parent strain. Deletion of Rv3351c diminished the release of lactate dehydrogenase and decreased uptake of trypan blue vital stain by host cells infected with M. tuberculosis bacilli, suggesting attenuated cytotoxic effects. Interestingly, an isogenic hbha mutant displayed reductions in AEC killing similar to those observed for the Rv3351c mutant. This opens the possibility that multiple M. tuberculosis gene products interact with AECs. We also observed that Rv3351c aids intracellular replication and survival of M. tuberculosis in macrophages. This places Rv3351c in the same standing as HBHA and ESAT6, which are important factors in AECs and macrophages. Defining the mechanism(s) by which Rv3351c functions to aid pathogen survival within the host may lead to new drug or vaccine targets.

  12. Effects of depsidones from Hypogymnia physodes on HeLa cell viability and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, I Z; Najman, S; Jovanović, O; Petrović, G; Najdanović, J; Vasiljević, P; Smelcerović, A

    2014-01-01

    The anti-proliferative activitiy of Hypogymnia physodes methanol extracts (ME) and its main constituents, physodalic acid (P1), physodic acid (P2), and 3-hydroxy physodic acid (P3), was tested on human cancer HeLa cell lines. Three lichen depsidones, P1, P2 and P3, were isolated from H. physodes ME using column chromatography and their structures were determined by UV, ESI TOF MS, 1H and 13C NMR. The content of P1, P2 and P3 in ME was determined using reversed-phase highperformance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. P1-3 represented even 70 % of the studied extract. The HeLa cells were incubated during 24 and 72 h in the presence of ME and depsidones P1, P2 and P3, at concentrations of 10-1000 μg/ml. Compounds P2 and P3 showed higher activity than compound P1. Half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50, μg/ml) of P1, P2, P3 and ME for 24-h incubation were 964, 171, 97 and 254 μg/ml, respectively, while for 72-h incubation they were 283, 66, 63 and 68 μg/ml. As far as we know, this is the first report on the effect of H. physodes ME and their depsidones on HeLa cells. PMID:24785112

  13. In Vitro Study of the Effect of Vitamin E on Viability, Morphological Changes and Induction of Osteogenic Differentiation in Adult Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Soleimani Mehranjani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vitamin E as a strong antioxidant plays an important role in inhibiting free radicals. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of vitamin E on the viability, morphology and osteogenic differentiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells of an adult rat. Methods: The bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were extracted using the flashing-out method. At the end of the third passage, cells were divided into groups of control and experimental. Experimental cells were treated withVitamin E (5,10,15,25,50,100,150μM for a period of 21 days in the osteogenic media containing 10% of fetal bovine serum. The cell viability, bone matrix mineralization, intercellular and extracellular calcium deposition, alkaline phosphatase activity, expression of genes and synthesis of proteins of osteopontin and osteocalcin as well as morphological changes of the cells were investigated. The study data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA and T-Test setting the significant P value at P<0.05. Results: Within vitamin- E treated cells, the mean viability, mean bone matrix mineralization, calcium deposition, alkaline phosphatase activity, expression and synthesis of osteopontin and osteocalcin of the mesenchymal stem cells treated with vitamin E significantly increased in a dose dependent manner. Also cytoplasm extensions were observed in the cells treated with vitamin E. Conclusion: Since vitamin E caused a significant increase in cell viability and osteogenic differentiation in the mesenchymal stem cells, therefore it can be utilized in order to increase cell differentiation and cell survival.

  14. Combination of carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide, and sulforaphane, reduces the viability and growth of bronchial carcinoid cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronchial carcinoids are pulmonary neuroendocrine cell-derived tumors comprising typical (TC) and atypical (AC) malignant phenotypes. The 5-year survival rate in metastatic carcinoid, despite multiple current therapies, is 14-25%. Hence, we are testing novel therapies that can affect the proliferation and survival of bronchial carcinoids. In vitro studies were used for the dose–response (AlamarBlue) effects of acetazolamide (AZ) and sulforaphane (SFN) on clonogenicity, serotonin-induced growth effect and serotonin content (LC-MS) on H-727 (TC) and H-720 (AC) bronchial carcinoid cell lines and their derived NOD/SCID mice subcutaneous xenografts. Tumor ultra structure was studied by electron microscopy. Invasive fraction of the tumors was determined by matrigel invasion assay. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to study the effect of treatment(s) on proliferation (Ki67, phospho histone-H3) and neuroendocrine phenotype (chromogranin-A, tryptophan hydroxylase). Both compounds significantly reduced cell viability and colony formation in a dose-dependent manner (0–80 μM, 48 hours and 7 days) in H-727 and H-720 cell lines. Treatment of H-727 and H-720 subcutaneous xenografts in NOD/SCID mice with the combination of AZ + SFN for two weeks demonstrated highly significant growth inhibition and reduction of 5-HT content and reduced the invasive capacity of H-727 tumor cells. In terms of the tumor ultra structure, a marked reduction in secretory vesicles correlated with the decrease in 5-HT content. The combination of AZ and SFN was more effective than either single agent. Since the effective doses are well within clinical range and bioavailability, our results suggest a potential new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of bronchial carcinoids

  15. The C-terminal subunit of artificially truncated human cathepsin B mediates its nuclear targeting and contributes to cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallner Claudia

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Splicing variants of human cathepsinB primary transcripts (CB(-2,3 result in an expression product product which lacks the signal peptide and parts of the propeptide. This naturally truncated Δ51CB is thus unable to follow the regular CB processing and sorting pathway. It is addressed to the mitochondria through an activated N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signal instead. Although Δ51CB is supposed to be devoid of the typical CB enzymatic activity, it might play a role in malignancies and trigger cell death/apoptosis independent from the function of the regular enzyme. Cytoplasmic presence of the mature CB might occur as a result of lysosomal damage. Results We investigated such "aberrant" proteins by artificial CB-GFP chimeras covering various sequence parts in respect to their enzymatic activity, their localization in different cell types, and the effects on the cell viability. Unlike the entire full length CB form, the artificial single chain form was not processed and did not reveal typical enzymatic CB activity during transient overexpression in large cell lung carcinoma cells. Δ51CB was found predominantly in mitochondria. In contrast, the shorter artificial CB constructs localized in the cytoplasm, inside the cell nucleus, and in the midbodies of dividing cells. Bleaching experiments revealed both mobile and immobile fractions of these constructs in the nucleus. Nuclear accumulation of artificially truncated CB variants led to disintegration of nuclei, followed by cell death. Conclusion We propose that cell death associated with CB is not necessarily triggered by its regular enzymatic activity but alternatively by a yet unknown activity profile of truncated CB. Cytoplasmic CB might be able to enter the cell nucleus. According to a mutational analysis, the part of CB that mediates its nuclear import is a signal patch within its heavy chain domain. The results suggest that besides the N-terminal signal peptide also

  16. Altered B cell receptor signaling in human systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Scott A.; Sanz, Iñaki

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of B cell receptor signaling is essential for the development of specific immunity while retaining tolerance to self. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by a loss of B cell tolerance and the production of anti-self antibodies. Accompanying this break down in tolerance are alterations in B cell receptor signal transduction including elevated induced calcium responses and increased protein phosphorylation. Specific pathways that negatively regulate B cell signaling have been shown to be impaired in some SLE patients. These patients have reduced levels of the kinase Lyn in lipid raft microdomains and this reduction is inversely correlated with increased CD45 in lipid rafts. Function and expression of the inhibitory immunoglobulin receptor FcγRIIB is also reduced in Lupus IgM- CD27+ memory cells. Because the relative contribution of different memory and transitional B cell subsets can be abnormal in SLE patients, we believe studies targeted to well defined B cell subsets will be necessary to further our understanding of signaling abnormalities in SLE. Intracellular flow cytometric analysis of signaling is a useful approach to accomplish this goal. PMID:18723129

  17. Alterations induced in Escherichia Coli cells by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappke, J.; Schelin, H.R.; Paschuk, S.A.; Denyak, V.; Silva, E.R. da [Federal University of Technology of Parana (CPGEI/UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mails: jaquekap@yahoo.com.br; schelin@cpgei.cefetpr.br; sergei@utfpr.edu.br; Jesus, E.F.O. de; Lopes, R.T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mails: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br; edgar@lin.ufrj.br; Carlin, N.; Toledo, E.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]. E-mail: nelson.carlin@dfn.if.usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Modifications occurred in Escherichia coli cells exposed to gamma radiation ({sup 60}Co source) were investigated. The irradiations were done at the LIN-COPPE laboratory of the UFRJ and the analysis at the Biology Department of the UTFPR. The E. coli cells were irradiated with 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, 300, 480, 600 e 750 Gy doses. The samples were analyzed with Gram-stain, biochemical tests in EPM, MIO and Lysine Broth, Simmons Cytrate Medium and Rhamnose Broth, antibiogram and isolation of auxotrophic mutants. It was observed that for the received doses the E. coli did not show morphological alterations in the tests. Some E. Coli cells showed to be able to deaminade the L-tryptophan or they changed their sensibility for amoxillin and cephaloonine after the irradiation. The existence of aauxotrophic mutants after irradiation was also verified. (author)

  18. Phytochemicals isolated from leaves of Chromolaena odorata: impact on viability and clonogenicity of cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouamé, Prevost Bi-Koffi; Jacques, Camille; Bedi, Gustave; Silvestre, Virginie; Loquet, Denis; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Robins, Richard J; Tea, Illa

    2013-06-01

    The leaves of Chromolaena odorata (Asteraceae) are exploited extensively in West and Central African ethnopharmacy for the treatment of a wide range of conditions, despite this being a non-native species established in the last 50 years. With the objective of seeking bioactive principles, the nonvolatile compounds, an ethanolic (80% v/v) extract was made and fractionated. From the hexane-soluble fraction, three compounds were isolated. Two of these, 5-hydroxy-7,4'-dimethoxyflavanone and 2'-hydroxy-4,4',5',6'-tetramethoxychalcone, have previously been identified in C. odorata leaves. The third was fully characterised spectroscopically and found to be 1,6-dimethyl-4-(1-methylethyl)naphthalene (cadalene), not previously isolated from the Asteraceae. All three compounds were tested for their cytotoxicity and anticancer properties. 2'-Hydroxy-4,4',5',6'-tetramethoxychalcone was found to be both cytotoxic and anticlonogenic at 20 µm in cell lines Cal51, MCF7 and MDAMB-468, and to act synergistically with the Bcl2 inhibitor ABT737 to enhance apoptosis in Cal51 breast cancer cells. PMID:22899281

  19. Inactivation of E. Coli cell viability and DNA Photo-breakage by Pulsed Nitrogen Laser Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutagenic and lethal effect of nitrogen laser radiation: 337.1 nm wave length, 1.5 millijoul pulse energy, 10 nanosecond pulse with and pulse repetition rate range from 1 to 50 Pulse/ second was evaluated on E. Coli cells. Results indicated that irradiation of E. coli JMP39 with pulse repetition of 8 , 16 , 32 pulse/sec, for 1, 5 , 10, 25 min respectively led to a significant decrease in cell count proportional to irradiation dose with significant increase in lacmutation frequency accompanied with some mutations in pattern of antibiotic resistance. The effect of nitrogen laser on the genomic content of the strain JMP39 was also studied by irradiating the total DNA with 30 pulse/second for 1 ,5, 15 , 30 min then subjected to both agarose gel electrophoresis and scanning spectrophotometry. The first technique revealed to DNA photo breakage and significant decrease in DNA absorbency was noticed by scanning spectrophotometry. This could be attributed to photo-decomposition resulted from multi-photo-excitation of UV-Laser pulses

  20. Effect of laser treatment on the attachment and viability of mesenchymal stem cell responses on shape memory NiTi alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, C.W., E-mail: c.w.chan@qub.ac.uk [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hussain, I. [School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, Lincolnshire LN6 7TU (United Kingdom); Waugh, D.G.; Lawrence, J. [Laser Engineering and Manufacturing Research Group, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Parkgate Road, Chester, CH1 4BJ (United Kingdom); Man, H.C. [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of laser-induced surface features on the morphology, attachment and viability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) at different periods of time, and to evaluate the biocompatibility of different zones: laser-melted zone (MZ), heat-affected zone (HAZ) and base metal (BM) in laser-treated NiTi alloy. The surface morphology and composition were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The cell morphology was examined by SEM while the cell counting and viability measurements were done by hemocytometer and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay. The results indicated that the laser-induced surface features, such as surface roughening, presence of anisotropic dendritic pattern and complete surface Ni oxidation were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility of NiTi as evidenced by the highest cell attachment (4 days of culture) and viability (7 days of culture) found in the MZ. The biocompatibility of the MZ was the best, followed by the BM with the HAZ being the worst. The defective and porous oxide layer as well as the coarse grained structure might attribute to the inferior cell attachment (4 days of culture) and viability (7 days of culture) on the HAZ compared with the BM which has similar surface morphology. - Highlights: • Laser-treated surface induces a more spreading cell morphology than the non-treated. • Laser-treated surface shows higher cell attachment and viability than the non-treated. • Laser surface treatment is a feasible method to improve the responses of MSCs. • The improvement is attributed to the surface features induced by laser treatment.

  1. Increase in cell viability by polyamines through stimulation of the synthesis of ppGpp regulatory protein and ω protein of RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terui, Yusuke; Akiyama, Mariko; Sakamoto, Akihiko; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira; Igarashi, Kazuei; Kashiwagi, Keiko

    2012-02-01

    It is known that polyamines increase cell growth through stimulation of the synthesis of several kinds of proteins encoded by the so-called "polyamine modulon". We recently reported that polyamines also increase cell viability at the stationary phase of cell growth through stimulation of the synthesis of ribosome modulation factor, a component of the polyamine modulon. Accordingly, we looked for other proteins involved in cell viability whose synthesis is stimulated by polyamines. It was found that the synthesis of ppGpp regulatory protein (SpoT) and ω protein of RNA polymerase (RpoZ) was stimulated by polyamines at the level of translation. Stimulation of the synthesis of SpoT and RpoZ by polyamines was due to an inefficient initiation codon UUG in spoT mRNA and an unusual location of a Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence in rpoZ mRNA. Accordingly, the spoT and rpoZ genes are components of the polyamine modulon involved in cell viability. Reduced cell viability caused by polyamine deficiency was prevented by modified spoT and rpoZ genes whose synthesis was not influenced by polyamines. Under these conditions, the level of ppGpp increased in parallel with increase of SpoT protein. The results indicate that polyamine stimulation of synthesis of SpoT and RpoZ plays important roles for cell viability through stimulation of ppGpp synthesis by SpoT and modulation of RNA synthesis by ppGpp-RpoZ complex.

  2. Fabrication, bioactivity, in vitro cytotoxicity and cell viability of cryo-treated nanohydroxyapatite–gelatin–polyvinyl alcohol macroporous scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjaya Kumar Swain

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Freeze casting and cryogenic treatment both low temperature process have been employed to fabricate nanobiocomposite hydroxyapatite (HA–gelatin–polyvinyl alcohol (PVA macroporous scaffolds from synthesized three different spherical, rod and fibrous HA nanoparticles and composition optimized vis-á-vis porosity architecture, content and compressive strength. A critical HA morphology, solid loading and liquid nitrogen interaction time have a significant effect to enhance the mechanical response of developed scaffolds. Cryo-treated 40 wt.% nanorod HA–gelatin–PVA scaffold posses interconnected pore structure with 80 vol.% porosity, average pore diameter 50–200 μm and highest 5.8 MPa compressive strength. Different degree of the apatite deposition phenomenon in simulated body fluid solution at 37 °C and pH ∼ 7.4 varies with respect to time. In vitro cytotoxicity and L929 mouse fibroblast cell culture in the presence of Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium and 10% Fetal Bovine Serum at 37 °C and 5% CO2 atmosphere exhibit excellent cytocompatibility and cell viability at low extract concentration up to 25%.

  3. Novel role of KCNQ2/3 channels in regulating neuronal cell viability

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, X.; Wei, J; Song, M; Francis, K.; Yu, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Overactivation of certain K+ channels can mediate excessive K+ efflux and intracellular K+ depletion, which are early ionic events in apoptotic cascade. The present investigation examined a possible role of the KCNQ2/3 channel or M-channel (also named Kv7.2/7.3 channels) in the pro-apoptotic process. Whole-cell recordings detected much larger M-currents (212±31 pA or 10.5±1.5 pA/pF) in cultured hippocampal neurons than that in cultured cortical neurons (47±21 pA or 2.4±0.8 pA/pF). KCNQ2/3 cha...

  4. Viability of fibroblasts in cell culture after treatment with different chemical retraction agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopac, I; Batista, U; Cvetko, E; Marion, L

    2002-01-01

    Prior to fixed prosthodontic impression procedures, temporary horizontal retraction of the free gingival tissue should be accomplished apically to the preparation finishing line. The mechanical-chemical method using cotton retraction cords of various sizes impregnated with various retraction chemicals is the most commonly employed retraction technique. Most retraction agents have pH values from 0.8 to 0.3, and are therefore hazardous to the cut dentine and periodontal tissues. Sympathomimetic vasoconstrictors introduced recently have a pH of 5.6, and are free of systemic side-effects. The present study using the dye exclusion test, colony forming ability test and colorimetric assay was undertaken to evaluate cytotoxic effects of four chemical retraction agents on cultured V-79 fibroblasts, and the dependence of cytotoxicity on the agent concentration and time of exposure. Original concentrations of retraction agents produced stronger cytotoxic effects than dilutions of 1:1 and 1:10. The most aggressive agent, 25% aluminium chloride, took only 1 min to damage all cell cultures. The proportion of cells damaged after 10 min of exposure to tetrahydrozoline was 60%, which was significantly less compared with other chemicals tested. With the colony forming ability test using retraction agents diluted to 1:10 the greatest number of colonies emerged in samples treated with tetrahydrozoline (statistical significance: P < 0.01). The colorimetric assay showed equal cytotoxic effects for 25% aluminium sulphate and tetrahydrozoline. The colorimetric test used in the study has proved an ergonomic, accurate and reliable test for cytotoxicity determination.

  5. Viability of fibroblasts in cell culture after treatment with different chemical retraction agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopac, I; Batista, U; Cvetko, E; Marion, L

    2002-01-01

    Prior to fixed prosthodontic impression procedures, temporary horizontal retraction of the free gingival tissue should be accomplished apically to the preparation finishing line. The mechanical-chemical method using cotton retraction cords of various sizes impregnated with various retraction chemicals is the most commonly employed retraction technique. Most retraction agents have pH values from 0.8 to 0.3, and are therefore hazardous to the cut dentine and periodontal tissues. Sympathomimetic vasoconstrictors introduced recently have a pH of 5.6, and are free of systemic side-effects. The present study using the dye exclusion test, colony forming ability test and colorimetric assay was undertaken to evaluate cytotoxic effects of four chemical retraction agents on cultured V-79 fibroblasts, and the dependence of cytotoxicity on the agent concentration and time of exposure. Original concentrations of retraction agents produced stronger cytotoxic effects than dilutions of 1:1 and 1:10. The most aggressive agent, 25% aluminium chloride, took only 1 min to damage all cell cultures. The proportion of cells damaged after 10 min of exposure to tetrahydrozoline was 60%, which was significantly less compared with other chemicals tested. With the colony forming ability test using retraction agents diluted to 1:10 the greatest number of colonies emerged in samples treated with tetrahydrozoline (statistical significance: P < 0.01). The colorimetric assay showed equal cytotoxic effects for 25% aluminium sulphate and tetrahydrozoline. The colorimetric test used in the study has proved an ergonomic, accurate and reliable test for cytotoxicity determination. PMID:11844038

  6. Biocorrosion behavior and cell viability of adhesive polymer coated magnesium based alloys for medical implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdal-hay, Abdalla [Departmentt of Bionano System Engineering, College of Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Mechanical Design Engineering, Advanced wind power system research institute, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Dewidar, Montasser [Department of Materials and Mechanical Design, Faculty of Energy Engineering, South Valley University, Aswan (Egypt); Lim, Jae Kyoo, E-mail: jklim@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Design Engineering, Advanced wind power system research institute, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion behavior of magnesium for orthopedic applications is extremely poor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solvent (DCM, THF and DMF) had a strong effect on the coatings performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg bar alloy coated with PVAc/DCM layers provided an excellent bonding strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treated samples indicated significant damping for the degradation rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytocompatibility on MC3T3 cells of the PVAc/DCM samples revealed a good behavior. - Abstract: The present study was ultimately aimed to design novel adhesive biodegradable polymer, poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc), coatings onto Mg based alloys by the dip-coating technique in order to control the degradation rate and enhance the biocompatibility of magnesium alloys. The influence of various solvents on PVAc surface topography and their protection of Mg alloys were dramatically studied in vitro. Electrochemical polarization, degradation, and PVAc film cytocompatibility were also tested. Our results showed that the solvent had a significant effect on coating quality. PVAc/dichloromethane solution showed a porous structure and solution concentration could control the porous size. The coatings prepared using tetrahydrofuran and dimethylformamide solvents are exceptional in their ability to generate porous morphology even at low polymer concentration. In general, the corrosion performance appears to be different on different PVAc-solvent system. Immersion tests illustrated that the porous morphology on PVAc stabilized corrosion rates. A uniform corrosion attack in artificial simulation body fluid was also exhibited. The cytocompatibility of osteoblast cells (MC3T3) revealed high adherence, proliferation, and survival on the porous structure of PVAc coated Mg alloy, which was not observed for the uncoated samples. This novel PVAc coating is a promising candidate for biodegradable implant materials, which might

  7. Severe insulin resistance alters metabolism in mesenchymal progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balhara, Bharti; Burkart, Alison; Topcu, Vehap; Lee, Youn-Kyoung; Cowan, Chad; Kahn, C Ronald; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2015-06-01

    Donohue syndrome (DS) is characterized by severe insulin resistance due to mutations in the insulin receptor (INSR) gene. To identify molecular defects contributing to metabolic dysregulation in DS in the undifferentiated state, we generated mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a 4-week-old female with DS and a healthy newborn male (control). INSR mRNA and protein were significantly reduced in DS MPC (for β-subunit, 64% and 89% reduction, respectively, P consumption in both the basal state (87% higher, P =.09) and in response to the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide-p-triflouromethoxyphenylhydrazone (2-fold increase, P =.06). Although mitochondrial DNA or mass did not differ, oxidative phosphorylation protein complexes III and V were increased in DS (by 37% and 6%, respectively; P < .05). Extracellular acidification also tended to increase in DS (91% increase, P = .07), with parallel significant increases in lactate secretion (34% higher at 4 h, P < .05). In summary, DS MPC maintain signaling downstream of the INSR, suggesting that IGF-1R signaling may partly compensate for INSR mutations. However, alterations in receptor expression and pathway-specific defects in insulin signaling, even in undifferentiated cells, can alter cellular oxidative metabolism, potentially via transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:25811318

  8. Diabetes alters intracellular calcium transients in cardiac endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Q Sheikh

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM is a diabetic complication, which results in myocardial dysfunction independent of other etiological factors. Abnormal intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+](i homeostasis has been implicated in DCM and may precede clinical manifestation. Studies in cardiomyocytes have shown that diabetes results in impaired [Ca(2+](i homeostasis due to altered sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ ATPase (SERCA and sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX activity. Importantly, altered calcium homeostasis may also be involved in diabetes-associated endothelial dysfunction, including impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation and a diminished capacity to generate nitric oxide (NO, elevated cell adhesion molecules, and decreased angiogenic growth factors. However, the effect of diabetes on Ca(2+ regulatory mechanisms in cardiac endothelial cells (CECs remains unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of diabetes on [Ca(2+](i homeostasis in CECs in the rat model (streptozotocin-induced of DCM. DCM-associated cardiac fibrosis was confirmed using picrosirius red staining of the myocardium. CECs isolated from the myocardium of diabetic and wild-type rats were loaded with Fura-2, and UTP-evoked [Ca(2+](i transients were compared under various combinations of SERCA, sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ ATPase (PMCA and NCX inhibitors. Diabetes resulted in significant alterations in SERCA and NCX activities in CECs during [Ca(2+](i sequestration and efflux, respectively, while no difference in PMCA activity between diabetic and wild-type cells was observed. These results improve our understanding of how diabetes affects calcium regulation in CECs, and may contribute to the development of new therapies for DCM treatment.

  9. n Vitro Immunomodulatory Effect of R10 Fraction of Garlic on Viability and Production of TNF-? in CD8+ T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ghazanfari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: -cells, especially CD8+ T lymphocytes are the most important cells in anti-tumor response. Previously R10 fraction of garlic extract was reported as an immuno-modulator which induced an effective cellular immunity and Th1 responses. In this study the in vitro immunomodulatory effect of R10 on CD8+ T cells viability and production of TNF-? were evaluated. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study, using monoclonal antibodies attached to magnetic beads with isolating columns by magnetic bead method, CD8+ T cells from spleen cells of Balb/C mice were isolated. R10 fraction based on molecular weight was prepared using Ultra filtration. MTT assay was used to evaluate cell viability. TNF-? level was meas-ured in the supernatant of culture of CD8+ T cells by ELISA. Obtained data was compared and analyzed using Nonparametric Test and Keraskel & Wanny's Test tests.. Results: The findings indicate that all dilutions of R10 fraction increased cell viability of CD8+ T cells in comparison with the negative control group and in the presence of ConA with dilution of 1:50 of R10 fraction significantly increased cell viability of CD8+ T Cells com-pared to ConA alone. Secretion of TNF-? significantly increased by all dilutions of R10 frac-tion. Conclusion: These findings suggest that R10 fraction of garlic can be used as an Immuno-modulator drug candidate for induction of cellular Immunity in tumor therapy. Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 20 (4:273-279

  10. Metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells and induced a time-dependent metabolic and transcriptional alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiaojiao; Wang, Ke; Zheng, Ningning; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2015-11-30

    Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug with potential anti-tumor activity. However, little is known about its global metabolic and transcriptional impacts on tumor cells. In current study, we performed a metabolic profiling on human-derived colon cancer LoVo cells treated by 10 mM metformin for 8, 24 and 48 h. An obvious time-dependent metabolic alteration was observed from 8 to 48 h, prior to the reduction of cell viability. A total of 47, 45 and 66 differential metabolites were identified between control and metformin-treated cells at three time points. Most of the metabolites were up-regulated at 8 h, but down-regulated at 24 and 48 h by metformin. These metabolites were mainly involved in carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides metabolism pathways. Meanwhile, the transcirptomic profile revealed 134 and 3061 differentially expressed genes at 8 and 24 h by metformin. In addition to the cancer signaling pathways, expression of genes involved in cell energy metabolism pathways was significantly altered, which were further validated with genes in glucose metabolism pathway. Altogether, our current data indicate that metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells, which may be due to the modulation on cell energy metabolism at both metabolic and transcriptional levels in a time-dependent way.

  11. Limited energy supply in Müller cells alters glutamate uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Skytt, Dorte Marie; Poulsen, Kristian Arild;

    2014-01-01

    The viability of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) is essential for the maintenance of visual function. RGC homeostasis is maintained by the surrounding retinal glial cells, the Müller cells, which buffer the extracellular concentration of neurotransmitters and provide the RGCs with energy. This study...

  12. Biocorrosion behavior and cell viability of adhesive polymer coated magnesium based alloys for medical implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdal-hay, Abdalla; Dewidar, Montasser; Lim, Jae Kyoo

    2012-11-01

    The present study was ultimately aimed to design novel adhesive biodegradable polymer, poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc), coatings onto Mg based alloys by the dip-coating technique in order to control the degradation rate and enhance the biocompatibility of magnesium alloys. The influence of various solvents on PVAc surface topography and their protection of Mg alloys were dramatically studied in vitro. Electrochemical polarization, degradation, and PVAc film cytocompatibility were also tested. Our results showed that the solvent had a significant effect on coating quality. PVAc/dichloromethane solution showed a porous structure and solution concentration could control the porous size. The coatings prepared using tetrahydrofuran and dimethylformamide solvents are exceptional in their ability to generate porous morphology even at low polymer concentration. In general, the corrosion performance appears to be different on different PVAc-solvent system. Immersion tests illustrated that the porous morphology on PVAc stabilized corrosion rates. A uniform corrosion attack in artificial simulation body fluid was also exhibited. The cytocompatibility of osteoblast cells (MC3T3) revealed high adherence, proliferation, and survival on the porous structure of PVAc coated Mg alloy, which was not observed for the uncoated samples. This novel PVAc coating is a promising candidate for biodegradable implant materials, which might widen the use of Mg based implants.

  13. Eugenol alters the integrity of cell membrane and acts against the nosocomial pathogen Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, K Pandima; Sakthivel, R; Nisha, S Arif; Suganthy, N; Pandian, S Karutha

    2013-03-01

    Eugenol, a member of the phenylpropanoids class of chemical compounds, is a clear to pale yellow oily liquid extracted from certain essential oils especially from clove oil, nutmeg, cinnamon, and bay leaf. The antibacterial activity of eugenol and its mechanism of bactericidal action against Proteus mirabilis were evaluated. Treatment with eugenol at their minimum inhibitory concentration [0.125 % (v/v)] and minimum bactericidal concentration [0.25 % (v/v)] reduced the viability and resulted in complete inhibition of P. mirabilis. A strong bactericidal effect on P. mirabilis was also evident, as eugenol inactivated the bacterial population within 30 min exposure. Chemo-attractant property and the observance of highest antibacterial activity at alkaline pH suggest that eugenol can work more effectively when given in vivo. Eugenol inhibits the virulence factors produced by P. mirabilis as observed by swimming motility, swarming behavior and urease activity. It interacts with cellular membrane of P. mirabilis and makes it highly permeable, forming nonspecific pores on plasma membrane, which in turn directs the release of 260 nm absorbing materials and uptake of more crystal violet from the medium into the cells. SDS-polyacrylamide gel, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis further proves the disruptive action of eugenol on the plasma membrane of P. mirabilis. The findings reveal that eugenol shows an excellent bactericidal activity against P. mirabilis by altering the integrity of cell membrane. PMID:23444040

  14. Rabbit model of intervertebral disc degeneration by external compression device characterized by X-ray, MRI, histology, and cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Ismail

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate experimental animal models, which mimic the degenerative process occurring in human intervertebral disc (IVD breakdown and can be used for new treatment studies such as tissue engineering or disc distraction are lacking. We studied the external compression device that used by Kroeber et al to create intervertebral disc degeneration in rabbit model characterized by X-ray, MRI, Histology, and Cell Viability. Ten NZW rabbit were randomly assigned to one of five groups. Intervertebral disc VL4-L5 are compressed using an external loading device, 1.9 MPa. First group rabbit are loaded for 14 days, second loaded for 28 days, thirth group are loaded for 14 days, and unloaded for 14 days, fourth group loaded for 28 days and unloaded for 28 days. The fifth group, rabbits underwent a sham operation. Additional, rabbits were used as sample for cell viability study. In disc height : sample in group one have biggest decreasing of disc height, that is 23.9 unit. In MRI assessment, the worst grade is grade 3. In histological score, the worst group is group three (58.69, and the best is group 4 (45.69. Group one have the largest dead cell, that are 403.5, and the smallest is group four (124.75. Trypan blue staining showed that group four have better viable cell (91.1 compare than group three (86.4. The study conclude disc degeneration can be created by external axial loading for 14 days in rabbit intervertebral disc. Duration of 28 days unloading gave better result for cells to recover. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:199-207  Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Keywords: Rabbit model –intervertebral disc degeneration- external compression device-X-ray, MRI, Histology, and Cell viabilty /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso

  15. Effect of Procyanidin-rich Extract from Natural Cocoa Powder on Cellular Viability, Cell Cycle Progression, and Chemoresistance in Human Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taparia, Shruti; Khanna, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Over the last 400 years, cocoa and chocolate have been described as having potential medicinal value, being consumed as a beverage or eaten as food. Concentration–dependant, antiproliferation, and cytotoxic effects of some of their polyphenolic constituents have been demonstrated against various cancers. Such an effect remains to be demonstrated in ovarian cancer Objective: To investigate the effect of cocoa procyanidins against ovarian cancer in vitro using OAW42 and OVCAR3 cell lines. Materials and Methods: Cocoa procyanidins were extracted and enriched from non alkalized cocoa powder. The polyphenolic content and antioxidant activity were determined. Effect on cell viability was determined after the treatment with ≤1000 μg/mL cocoa procyanidin-rich extract on OAW42 and OVCAR3 and normal human dermal fibroblasts. Similarly, chemosensitization effect was determined by pretreating cancer cell lines with extract followed by doxorubicin hydrochloride treatment. The effect of treatment on cell cycle and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression was determined using flow cytometry. Results: The cocoa extract showed high polyphenolic content and antioxidant activity. Treatment with extract caused cytotoxicity and chemosensitization in OAW42 and OVCAR3 cell lines. Normal dermal fibroblasts showed an increase in cell viability post treatment with extract. Treatment with extract affected the cell cycle and an increasing percentage of cells in hypodiploid sub-G1/G0 phase was observed. Treatment of OVCAR3 with the extract caused reduction of P-gp expression. Conclusion: Cocoa procyanidins were found to be selectively cytotoxic against epithelial ovarian cancer, interfered with the normal cell cycle and sensitized cells to subsequent chemotherapeutic treatment. Chemosensitization was found to be associated with P-gp reduction in OVCAR3 cells. SUMMARY Among the naturally occurring flavonoids, procyanidins have been shown to be effective against cancersNon alkalized

  16. Effects of G6PD activity inhibition on the viability, ROS generation and mechanical properties of cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zishui; Jiang, Chengrui; Feng, Yi; Chen, Rixin; Lin, Xiaoying; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Han, Luhao; Chen, Xiaodan; Li, Hongyi; Guo, Yibin; Jiang, Weiying

    2016-09-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has been revealed to be involved in the efficacy to anti-cancer therapy but the mechanism remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the anti-cancer mechanism of G6PD deficiency. In our study, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and shRNA technology were used for inhibiting the activity of G6PD of cervical cancer cells. Peak Force QNM Atomic Force Microscopy was used to assess the changes of topography and biomechanical properties of cells and detect the effects on living cells in a natural aqueous environment. Flow cytometry was used to detect the apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe cell morphology. Moreover, a laser scanning confocal microscope was used to observe the alterations in cytoskeleton to explore the involved mechanism. When G6PD was inhibited by DHEA or RNA interference, the abnormal Young's modulus and increased roughness of cell membrane were observed in HeLa cells, as well as the idioblasts. Simultaneously, G6PD deficiency resulted in decreased HeLa cells migration and proliferation ability but increased ROS generation inducing apoptosis. What's more, the inhibition of G6PD activity caused the disorganization of microfilaments and microtubules of cytoskeletons and cell shrinkage. Our results indicated the anti-cervix cancer mechanism of G6PD deficiency may be involved with the decreased cancer cells migration and proliferation ability as a result of abnormal reorganization of cell cytoskeleton and abnormal biomechanical properties caused by the increased ROS. Suppression of G6PD may be a promising strategy in developing novel therapeutic methods for cervical cancer. PMID:27217331

  17. High modulus biodegradable polyurethanes for applications in cardiovascular stents: Evaluation of in-vitro degradation and cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa eSagarito

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported the mechanical properties and hydrolytic degradation behaviour of a series of NovoSorb™ [1] biodegradable polyurethanes (PUs prepared by varying the hard segment (HS weight percentage from 60-100. In this study the in-vitro degradation behaviour of the PUs with and without extracellular matrix (ECM coating was investigated under accelerated hydrolytic degradation (phosphate buffer saline; PBS/70°C conditions to allow complete degradation. The mass loss at different time intervals and the effect of aqueous degradation products on the viability and growth of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC were examined.The results showed that for most PUs in the series the degradation medium turned acidic and the extent of this was dependent on the HS percentage. As the HS decreased, a drop in pH was observed, suggesting that the by-products of soft segment (SS degradation causing the solution to be acidic. Most of the samples were completely eroded by 18 weeks, except PU containing more than 70% HS which only showed partial degradation with no significant change in appearance. The cytotoxicity tests on HUVEC cells of the aqueous extracts obtained after 18 weeks incubation showed that toxicity was dependent on 3 factors: dose, percentage of HS and degradation time. HUVEC growth is similar to but not identical to that observed with tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS standard. The results from this in-vitro cytotoxicity study suggest that the mixture of degradation products formed during the accelerated degradation of this PU series are not toxic to cells under the experimental conditions used.

  18. Genetic alterations in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magić Zvonko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although the patients with diagnosed B-NHL are classified into the same disease stage on the basis of clinical, histopathological, and immunological parameters, they respond significantly different to the applied treatment. This points out the possibility that within the same group of lymphoma there are different diseases at molecular level. For that reason many studies deal with the detection of gene alterations in lymphomas to provide a better framework for diagnosis and treatment of these hematological malignancies. Aim. To define genetic alterations in the B-NHL with highest possibilities for diagnostic purposes and molecular detection of MRD. Methods. Formalin fixed and paraffin embedded lymph node tissues from 45 patients were examined by different PCR techniques for the presence of IgH and TCR γ gene rearrangement; K-ras and H-ras mutations; c-myc amplification and bcl-2 translocation. There were 34 cases of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (B-NHL, 5 cases of T-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (T-NHL and 6 cases of chronic lymphadenitis (CL. The mononuclear cell fraction of the peripheral blood of 12 patients with B-NHL was analyzed for the presence of monoclonality at the time of diagnosis and in 3 to 6 months time intervals after an autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Results. The monoclonality of B-lymphocytes, as evidenced by DNA fragment length homogeneity, was detected in 88 % (30/34 of B-NHL, but never in CL, T-NHL, or in normal PBL. Bcl-2 translocation was detected in 7/31 (22.6% B-NHL specimens, c-myc amplification 9/31 (29%, all were more than doubled, K-ras mutations in 1/31 (3.23% and H-ras mutations in 2/31 (6.45% of the examined B-NHL samples. In the case of LC and normal PBL, however, these gene alterations were not detected. All the patients (12 with B-NHL had dominant clone of B-lymphocyte in the peripheral blood at the time of diagnosis while only in 2 of 12 patients MRD was detected 3 or 6 months after

  19. Graphene-Based Interfaces Do Not Alter Target Nerve Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Scaini, Denis; León, Verónica; Vázquez, Ester; Cellot, Giada; Privitera, Giulia; Lombardi, Lucia; Torrisi, Felice; Tomarchio, Flavia; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Bosi, Susanna; Ferrari, Andrea C; Ballerini, Laura; Prato, Maurizio

    2016-01-26

    Neural-interfaces rely on the ability of electrodes to transduce stimuli into electrical patterns delivered to the brain. In addition to sensitivity to the stimuli, stability in the operating conditions and efficient charge transfer to neurons, the electrodes should not alter the physiological properties of the target tissue. Graphene is emerging as a promising material for neuro-interfacing applications, given its outstanding physico-chemical properties. Here, we use graphene-based substrates (GBSs) to interface neuronal growth. We test our GBSs on brain cell cultures by measuring functional and synaptic integrity of the emerging neuronal networks. We show that GBSs are permissive interfaces, even when uncoated by cell adhesion layers, retaining unaltered neuronal signaling properties, thus being suitable for carbon-based neural prosthetic devices. PMID:26700626

  20. Simulated Hypergravity Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Shameka; Bettis, Barika; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular effects of gravity are poorly understood due to its constancy and nonavailability of altered gravitational models. Such an understanding is crucial for prolonged space flights. In these studies, we assessed the influence of centrifugation at 6G (HGrav) on vascular smooth muscle (SMC) mobility and proliferation. Cells were: (a) plated at low density and subjected to HGrav for 24-72 hr for proliferation studies, or (b) grown to confluency, subjected to HGrav, mechanically denuded and monitored for cell movement into the denuded area. Controls were maintained under normogravity. SMC showed a 50% inhibition of growth under HGrav and 10% serum; HGrav and low serum resulted in greater growth inhibition. The rate of movement of SMC into the denuded area was 2-3-fold higher under HGrav in low serum compared to controls, but similar in 10% serum. These studies show that HGrav has significant effects on SMC growth and mobility, which are dependent on serum levels.

  1. Hypertension alters phosphorylation of VASP in brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlier, Zulfikar; Basar, Murat; Kocamaz, Erdogan; Kiraz, Kemal; Tanriover, Gamze; Kocer, Gunnur; Arlier, Sefa; Giray, Semih; Nasırcılar, Seher; Gunduz, Filiz; Senturk, Umit K; Demir, Necdet

    2015-04-01

    Hypertension impairs cerebral vascular function. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) mediates active reorganization of the cytoskeleton via membrane ruffling, aggregation and tethering of actin filaments. VASP regulation of endothelial barrier function has been demonstrated by studies using VASP(-/-) animals under conditions associated with tissue hypoxia. We hypothesize that hypertension regulates VASP expression and/or phosphorylation in endothelial cells, thereby contributing to dysfunction in the cerebral vasculature. Because exercise has direct and indirect salutary effects on vascular systems that have been damaged by hypertension, we also investigated the effect of exercise on maintenance of VASP expression and/or phosphorylation. We used immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry to examine the effect of hypertension on VASP expression and phosphorylation in brain endothelial cells in normotensive [Wistar-Kyoto (WKY)] and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats under normal and exercise conditions. In addition, we analyzed VASP regulation in normoxia- and hypoxia-induced endothelial cells. Brain endothelial cells exhibited significantly lower VASP immunoreactivity and phosphorylation at the Ser157 residue in SHR versus WKY rats. Exercise reversed hypertension-induced alterations in VASP phosphorylation. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry indicated reduction in VASP phosphorylation in hypoxic versus normoxic endothelial cells. These results suggest that diminished VASP expression and/or Ser157 phosphorylation mediates endothelial changes associated with hypertension and exercise may normalize these changes, at least in part, by restoring VASP phosphorylation. PMID:24894047

  2. Gestational protein restriction alters cell proliferation in rat placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelato, Hércules Jonas; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marreto; de Sousa Righi, Eloá Fernanda; Catisti, Rosana

    2016-04-01

    We recently showed that gestational protein restriction (GPR) alters the structure of the rat placenta on day 19 of gestation (dG). The aim of the study was to investigate the spatial and temporal immunolocalization of proliferating cell antigen Ki67 in normal and GPR placental development. Pregnant Wistar rats were divided into two groups: normal (NP, 17 % casein) or low-protein diet (LP, 6 % casein). Placentas and fetus were collected and weighed at 15, 17, 19 and 21 dG. Morphological, morphometric and ultrastructural analyses were performed. Immunoperoxidase was used to identify nuclear antigen Ki67 in placental sections. We observed a significant reduction in the number of trophoblast giant cells and glycogen cells in the LP group. Placental weight was significantly reduced only at 17 dG in the LP group, in parallel to a decrease in glycogen cells. From 15 to 21 dG, the thickness of the junctional zone (JZ) decreased in NP and LP animals, while that of the labyrinth zone (LZ) increased in parallel to a reduction in the number of proliferating cells in this LZ zone. GPR significantly inhibits cell proliferation in the JZ, especially at 15 and 17 dG. The ultrastructural appearance of the cytoplasm of giant and cytotrophoblastic cells indicates degeneration from 15 to 21 dG and this effect is enhanced in LP animals suggesting early aging. Offspring of NP dams were significantly heavier than offspring of LP dams at 21 dG. GPR causes modifications in specific regions of the placenta, cell proliferation inhibition and fetal growth restriction.

  3. Alterations of proteins in MDCK cells during acute potassium deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerapen, Paleerath; Ausakunpipat, Nardtaya; Chanchaem, Prangwalai; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-06-01

    Chronic K(+) deficiency can cause hypokalemic nephropathy associated with metabolic alkalosis, polyuria, tubular dilatation, and tubulointerstitial injury. However, effects of acute K(+) deficiency on the kidney remained unclear. This study aimed to explore such effects by evaluating changes in levels of proteins in renal tubular cells during acute K(+) deficiency. MDCK cells were cultivated in normal K(+) (NK) (K(+)=5.3 mM), low K(+) (LK) (K(+)=2.5 mM), or K(+) depleted (KD) (K(+)=0 mM) medium for 24 h and then harvested. Cellular proteins were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and visualized by SYPRO Ruby staining (5 gels per group). Spot matching and quantitative intensity analysis revealed a total 48 protein spots that had significantly differential levels among the three groups. Among these, 46 and 30 protein spots had differential levels in KD group compared to NK and LK groups, respectively. Comparison between LK and NK groups revealed only 10 protein spots that were differentially expressed. All of these differentially expressed proteins were successfully identified by Q-TOF MS and/or MS/MS analyses. The altered levels of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), ezrin, lamin A/C, tubulin, chaperonin-containing TCP1 (CCT1), and calpain 1 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Global protein network analysis showed three main functional networks, including 1) cell growth and proliferation, 2) cell morphology, cellular assembly and organization, and 3) protein folding in which the altered proteins were involved. Further investigations on these networks may lead to better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of low K(+)-induced renal injury.

  4. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Affects Acetic Acid Production during Anaerobic Fermentation of Waste Activated Sludge by Altering Activity and Viability of Acetogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingyang; Chen, Yinguang; Feng, Leiyu

    2016-07-01

    Till now, almost all the studies on anaerobic fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) for bioproducts generation focused on the influences of operating conditions, pretreatment methods and sludge characteristics, and few considered those of widespread persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in sludge, for example, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Herein, phenanthrene, which was a typical PAH and widespread in WAS, was selected as a model compound to investigate its effect on WAS anaerobic fermentation for short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) accumulation. Experimental results showed that the concentration of SCFAs derived from WAS was increased in the presence of phenanthrene during anaerobic fermentation. The yield of acetic acid which was the predominant SCFA in the fermentation reactor with the concentration of 100 mg/kg dry sludge was 1.8 fold of that in the control. Mechanism exploration revealed that the present phenanthrene mainly affected the acidification process of anaerobic fermentation and caused the shift of the microbial community to benefit the accumulation of acetic acid. Further investigation showed that both the activities of key enzymes (phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase) involved in acetic acid production and the quantities of their corresponding encoding genes were enhanced in the presence of phenanthrene. Viability tests by determining the adenosine 5'-triphosphate content and membrane potential confirmed that the acetogens were more viable in anaerobic fermentation systems with phenanthrene, which resulted in the increased production of acetic acid. PMID:27267805

  5. Assessment on Functionality and Viability of Beta Cells Following Repetitive Dosage Administration of Ethanolic Extracts of Andrographis paniculata on Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Zaini, A; A Mariam; Amirin, S; Abdul Razak, K

    2010-01-01

    The study was done at the aim to assess the functionality and viability of the beta cells of the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats model following repetitive dosage of administration of ethanolic extracts of Andrographis paniculata. Materials and Methods: The diabetic rats were treated with the extracts for fourteen days and at the dose given was 500 mg/kg twice daily. The assessments were made on fasting blood glucose, insulin, and immunohistochemical aspect of beta cells before and after...

  6. Epigenetic alterations differ in phenotypically distinct human neuroblastoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epigenetic aberrations and a CpG island methylator phenotype have been shown to be associated with poor outcomes in children with neuroblastoma (NB). Seven cancer related genes (THBS-1, CASP8, HIN-1, TIG-1, BLU, SPARC, and HIC-1) that have been shown to have epigenetic changes in adult cancers and play important roles in the regulation of angiogenesis, tumor growth, and apoptosis were analyzed to investigate the role epigenetic alterations play in determining NB phenotype. Two NB cell lines (tumorigenic LA1-55n and non-tumorigenic LA1-5s) that differ in their ability to form colonies in soft agar and tumors in nude mice were used. Quantitative RNA expression analyses were performed on seven genes in LA1-5s, LA1-55n and 5-Aza-dC treated LA1-55n NB cell lines. The methylation status around THBS-1, HIN-1, TIG-1 and CASP8 promoters was examined using methylation specific PCR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was used to examine histone modifications along the THBS-1 promoter. Luciferase assay was used to determine THBS-1 promoter activity. Cell proliferation assay was used to examine the effect of 5-Aza-dC on NB cell growth. The soft agar assay was used to determine the tumorigenicity. Promoter methylation values for THBS-1, HIN-1, TIG-1, and CASP8 were higher in LA1-55n cells compared to LA1-5s cells. Consistent with the promoter methylation status, lower levels of gene expression were detected in the LA1-55n cells. Histone marks associated with repressive chromatin states (H3K9Me3, H3K27Me3, and H3K4Me3) were identified in the THBS-1 promoter region in the LA1-55n cells, but not the LA1-5s cells. In contrast, the three histone codes associated with an active chromatin state (acetyl H3, acetyl H4, and H3K4Me3) were present in the THBS-1 promoter region in LA1-5s cells, but not the LA1-55n cells, suggesting that an accessible chromatin structure is important for THBS-1 expression. We also show that 5-Aza-dC treatment of LA1-55n cells alters the DNA methylation

  7. Comparison of Cell Viability and Embryoid Body Size of Two Embryonic Stem Cell Lines After Different Exposure Times to Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehleh Zarei Fard

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Activation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4 signaling pathway in embryonic stem (ES cells plays an important role in controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Adverse effects of BMP4 occur in a time dependent manner; however, little is known about the effect of different time exposure of this growth factor on cell number in culture media. In this study, we investigated the role of two different exposure times to BMP4 in cell viability, embryoid body (EB, size, and cavitation of ES cells. Methods: Embryonic stem cells (R1 and B1 lines were released from the feeder cell layers and were cultured using EBs protocol by using the hanging drop method and monolayer culture system. The cells were cultured for 5 days with 100 ng/mL BMP4 from the beginning (++BMP4 or after 48 h (+BMP4 of culture and their cell number were counted by trypan blue staining. The data were analyzed using non-parametric two-tailed Mann-Whitney test. P<0.05 was considered as significant. Results: In EB culture protocol, cell number significantly decreased in +BMP4 culture condition with greater cavity size compared to the ++BMP4 condition at day 5 (P=0.009. In contrast, in monolayer culture system, there was no significant difference in the cell number between all groups (P=0.91. Conclusion: The results suggest that short-term exposure of BMP4 is required to promote cavitation in EBs according to lower cell number in +BMP4 condition. Different cell lines showed different behavior in cavitation formation.

  8. Viabilitas sel fibroblas BHK-21 pada permukaan resin akrilik rapid heat cured (Viability of fibroblast BHK-21 cells to the surface of rapid heat cured acrylic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Yuliati

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Acrylic resins are widely used in the fabrication of denture bases and have been shown to be cytotoxic as a result of substances that leach from the resin. Numerous reports suggest that residual monomer may be responsible for mucosal irritation and sensitization of tissues. This information is important in eddition to the information of the biologiced effect of such materials. The purpose of this study was to know the viability of fibroblast BHK-21cells to the surface of rapid heat cured acrylic resins. The sample of 5 mm in diameter and 1 mm thickness was cured in water bath for 20, 30, and 40 minutes at 100° C. BHK-21 cells were grown in medium eagle to be 2 × 105 cell/ml in 96 well micro titer plates as the added sample and incubated at 37° C for 24 hour. Five hours before the end of the incubation MTT solutionwas added from step one to each well containing cells. Viability cells were measured by spectrophotometer at 550 nm. The data were statistically analyzed by using one-way analysis of variance followed by LSD test. The result indicated that viability of fibroblast BHK-21 cells did not decrease to the surface of resin acrylic rapid heat cured.

  9. Mugil cephalus roe oil obtained by supercritical fluid extraction affects the lipid profile and viability in cancer HeLa and B16F10 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, A; Piras, A; Nieddu, M; Putzu, D; Cesare Marincola, F; Falchi, A M

    2016-09-14

    We explored the changes in viability and lipid profile occurring in cancer cells, murine melanoma cells (B16F10 cells) and human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa cells), when exposed to 24 h-treatments with an n-3 PUFA-rich oil obtained by supercritical extraction with CO2 from Mugil cephalus processed roe (bottarga). The composition of the major lipid classes of bottarga oil was determined by the (13)C NMR technique. Reversed-phase HPLC with DAD/ELSD detection was performed to analyze cells' total fatty acid profile and the levels of phospholipids, total/free cholesterol, triacylglycerols, and cholesteryl esters. Cell-based fluorescent measurements of intracellular membranes and lipid droplets were performed on bottarga oil-treated cells using the Nile red staining technique. The treatments of cancer cells with bottarga oil reduced the viability and affected the fatty acid profile, with a significant n-3 PUFA increase in treated cells. Mullet roe oil uptake modulated the cancer cell lipid composition, inducing a remarkable incorporation of health beneficial n-3 PUFA in the polar and neutral lipid fractions. Bottarga oil treatment influenced the synthesis of intracellular membranes and accumulation of cytoplasmic lipid droplets in cancer cells. PMID:27603212

  10. Alterations of red cell membrane properties in neuroacanthocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Siegl

    Full Text Available Neuroacanthocytosis (NA refers to a group of heterogenous, rare genetic disorders, namely chorea acanthocytosis (ChAc, McLeod syndrome (MLS, Huntington's disease-like 2 (HDL2 and pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration (PKAN, that mainly affect the basal ganglia and are associated with similar neurological symptoms. PKAN is also assigned to a group of rare neurodegenerative diseases, known as NBIA (neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, associated with iron accumulation in the basal ganglia and progressive movement disorder. Acanthocytosis, the occurrence of misshaped erythrocytes with thorny protrusions, is frequently observed in ChAc and MLS patients but less prevalent in PKAN (about 10% and HDL2 patients. The pathological factors that lead to the formation of the acanthocytic red blood cell shape are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether NA/NBIA acanthocytes differ in their functionality from normal erythrocytes. Several flow-cytometry-based assays were applied to test the physiological responses of the plasma membrane, namely drug-induced endocytosis, phosphatidylserine exposure and calcium uptake upon treatment with lysophosphatidic acid. ChAc red cell samples clearly showed a reduced response in drug-induced endovesiculation, lysophosphatidic acid-induced phosphatidylserine exposure, and calcium uptake. Impaired responses were also observed in acanthocyte-positive NBIA (PKAN red cells but not in patient cells without shape abnormalities. These data suggest an "acanthocytic state" of the red cell where alterations in functional and interdependent membrane properties arise together with an acanthocytic cell shape. Further elucidation of the aberrant molecular mechanisms that cause this acanthocytic state may possibly help to evaluate the pathological pathways leading to neurodegeneration.

  11. 2,2',4,4'-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether injures cell viability and mitochondrial function of mouse spermatocytes by decreasing mitochondrial proteins Atp5b and Uqcrc1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shaoping; Wang, Jing; Cui, Yiqiang

    2016-09-01

    Our object was to explore direct effects and mechanism of BDE47 on GC2 (immortalized mouse spermatocyte). GC2 were exposed to DMSO, 0.1, 1, 10, 100μM BDE47 for 48h. Cell viability was detected by trypan-blue exclusion; ultrastructure by electron-microscopy; cell cycle, mitochondrial membrane motential (MMP), reactive oxygen species (ROS) by flow-cytometry; ATP production by luminometer; Atp5b, Uqcrc1, Bcl-2 level by WB. To explore whether the decreased mitochondrial proteins play an important role in apoptosis, MMP and apoptosis were detected after Atp5b or Uqcrc1 knockdown in GC2. Results showed BDE47 reduced cell viability, caused condensation of nuclear and vacuolated mitochondria, decreased MMP and ATP, induced ROS, cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phase, reduced Atp5b, Uqcrc1, Bcl-2 in GC2. Knockdown of Atp5b or Uqcrc1 decreased MMP, induced apoptosis in GC2. Results suggested that BDE47 reduced cell viability, injured mitochondria in spermatocytes probably by decreasing mitochondrial protein Atp5b and Uqcrc1. PMID:27525561

  12. CPT1α over-expression increases long-chain fatty acid oxidation and reduces cell viability with incremental palmitic acid concentration in 293T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To test the cellular response to an increased fatty acid oxidation, we generated a vector for an inducible expression of the rate-limiting enzyme carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1α (CPT1α). Human embryonic 293T kidney cells were transiently transfected and expression of the CPT1α transgene in the tet-on vector was activated with doxycycline. Fatty acid oxidation was measured by determining the conversion of supplemented, synthetic cis-10-heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n-7) to C15:ln-7. CPT1α over-expression increased mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation about 6-fold. Addition of palmitic acid (PA) decreased viability of CPT1α over-expressing cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Both, PA and CPT1α over-expression increased cell death. Interestingly, PA reduced total cell number only in cells over-expressing CPT1α, suggesting an effect on cell proliferation that requires PA translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This inducible expression system should be well suited to study the roles of CPT1 and fatty acid oxidation in lipotoxicity and metabolism in vivo

  13. Alterations in integrin expression modulates invasion of pancreatic cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factors mediating the invasion of pancreatic cancer cells through the extracellular matrix (ECM) are not fully understood. METHODS: In this study, sub-populations of the human pancreatic cancer cell line, MiaPaCa-2 were established which displayed differences in invasion, adhesion, anoikis, anchorage-independent growth and integrin expression. RESULTS: Clone #3 displayed higher invasion with less adhesion, while Clone #8 was less invasive with increased adhesion to ECM proteins compared to MiaPaCa-2. Clone #8 was more sensitive to anoikis than Clone #3 and MiaPaCa-2, and displayed low colony-forming efficiency in an anchorage-independent growth assay. Integrins beta 1, alpha 5 and alpha 6 were over-expressed in Clone #8. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA), integrin beta1 knockdown in Clone #8 cells increased invasion through matrigel and fibronectin, increased motility, decreased adhesion and anoikis. Integrin alpha 5 and alpha 6 knockdown also resulted in increased motility, invasion through matrigel and decreased adhesion. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that altered expression of integrins interacting with different extracellular matrixes may play a significant role in suppressing the aggressive invasive phenotype. Analysis of these clonal populations of MiaPaCa-2 provides a model for investigations into the invasive properties of pancreatic carcinoma.

  14. Withaferin a alters intermediate filament organization, cell shape and behavior.

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    Boris Grin

    Full Text Available Withaferin A (WFA is a steroidal lactone present in Withania somnifera which has been shown in vitro to bind to the intermediate filament protein, vimentin. Based upon its affinity for vimentin, it has been proposed that WFA can be used as an anti-tumor agent to target metastatic cells which up-regulate vimentin expression. We show that WFA treatment of human fibroblasts rapidly reorganizes vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF into a perinuclear aggregate. This reorganization is dose dependent and is accompanied by a change in cell shape, decreased motility and an increase in vimentin phosphorylation at serine-38. Furthermore, vimentin lacking cysteine-328, the proposed WFA binding site, remains sensitive to WFA demonstrating that this site is not required for its cellular effects. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, viscometry, electron microscopy and sedimentation assays we show that WFA has no effect on VIF assembly in vitro. Furthermore, WFA is not specific for vimentin as it disrupts the cellular organization and induces perinuclear aggregates of several other IF networks comprised of peripherin, neurofilament-triplet protein, and keratin. In cells co-expressing keratin IF and VIF, the former are significantly less sensitive to WFA with respect to inducing perinuclear aggregates. The organization of microtubules and actin/microfilaments is also affected by WFA. Microtubules become wavier and sparser and the number of stress fibers appears to increase. Following 24 hrs of exposure to doses of WFA that alter VIF organization and motility, cells undergo apoptosis. Lower doses of the drug do not kill cells but cause them to senesce. In light of our findings that WFA affects multiple IF systems, which are expressed in many tissues of the body, caution is warranted in its use as an anti-cancer agent, since it may have debilitating organism-wide effects.

  15. Cell proliferation, viability, and in vitro differentiation of equine mesenchymal stem cells seeded on bacterial cellulose hydrogel scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The culture of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells on natural biopolymers holds great promise for treatments of connective tissue disorders such as osteoarthritis. The safety and performance of such therapies relies on the systematic in vitro evaluation of the developed stem cell-biomaterial constructs prior to in vivo implantation. This study evaluates bacterial cellulose (BC), a biocompatible natural polymer, as a scaffold for equine-derived bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (EqMSCs) for application in bone and cartilage tissue engineering. An equine model was chosen due to similarities in size, load and types of joint injuries suffered by horses and humans. Lyophilized and critical point dried BC hydrogel scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to confirm nanostructure morphology which demonstrated that critical point drying induces fibre bundling unlike lyophilisation. EqMSCs positively expressed the undifferentiated pluripotent mesenchymal stem cell surface markers CD44 and CD90. The BC scaffolds were shown to be cytocompatible, supporting cellular adhesion and proliferation, and allowed for osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of EqMSCs. The cells seeded on the BC hydrogel were shown to be viable and metabolically active. These findings demonstrate that the combination of a BC hydrogel and EqMSCs are promising constructs for musculoskeletal tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: ► Critical point drying induces fibre bundling unlike lyophilisation. ► Cells positively expressed undifferentiated pluripotent stem cell markers. ► BCs were cytocompatible, supported cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation ► Cells seeded on BC scaffolds were viable and metabolically active. ► Findings demonstrate that BC and EqMSCs are promising tissue engineered constructs

  16. Cell proliferation, viability, and in vitro differentiation of equine mesenchymal stem cells seeded on bacterial cellulose hydrogel scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favi, Pelagie M.; Benson, Roberto S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Neilsen, Nancy R. [Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Hammonds, Ryan L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Bates, Cassandra C. [Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Stephens, Christopher P. [Department of Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Center for Materials Processing, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Dhar, Madhu S., E-mail: mdhar@utk.edu [Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The culture of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells on natural biopolymers holds great promise for treatments of connective tissue disorders such as osteoarthritis. The safety and performance of such therapies relies on the systematic in vitro evaluation of the developed stem cell-biomaterial constructs prior to in vivo implantation. This study evaluates bacterial cellulose (BC), a biocompatible natural polymer, as a scaffold for equine-derived bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (EqMSCs) for application in bone and cartilage tissue engineering. An equine model was chosen due to similarities in size, load and types of joint injuries suffered by horses and humans. Lyophilized and critical point dried BC hydrogel scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to confirm nanostructure morphology which demonstrated that critical point drying induces fibre bundling unlike lyophilisation. EqMSCs positively expressed the undifferentiated pluripotent mesenchymal stem cell surface markers CD44 and CD90. The BC scaffolds were shown to be cytocompatible, supporting cellular adhesion and proliferation, and allowed for osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of EqMSCs. The cells seeded on the BC hydrogel were shown to be viable and metabolically active. These findings demonstrate that the combination of a BC hydrogel and EqMSCs are promising constructs for musculoskeletal tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: ► Critical point drying induces fibre bundling unlike lyophilisation. ► Cells positively expressed undifferentiated pluripotent stem cell markers. ► BCs were cytocompatible, supported cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation ► Cells seeded on BC scaffolds were viable and metabolically active. ► Findings demonstrate that BC and EqMSCs are promising tissue engineered constructs.

  17. Effect of All-Trans Retinoic Acid (ATRA on Viability, Proliferation, Activation and Lineage-Specific Transcription Factors of CD4+ T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayoon Bidad

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, as an active metabolite of vitamin A, has been shown to affect immune cells. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of ATRA on viability, proliferation, activation and lineage-specific transcription factors of CD4+ T cells. CD4+ T cells were  separated  from  heparinized  blood  of  healthy  donors  and  were  cultured  in conditions, some with, some without ATRA.Viability was assessed by PI  flowcytometry and proliferation was measured by MTT assay. CD69 expression was determined by flowcytometry as a measure of cell activation. Lineage-specific transcription  factors  (FOXP3,  RORγt  and  T-bet  were  examined  by intracellular staining and flowcytometry. High doses of ATRA (0.1-1 mM caused extensive cell death in both PBMCs and CD4+ T cells. Doses of ATRA equal to or lower than 10 µM did not  adversely affect cell viability and proliferation in comparison to  culture medium without ATRA.Doses of ATRA between 10 µM and 1nM significantly increased cell activation when compared  to  culture medium without  ATRA. ATRA could increase FOXP3+  and also FOXP3+RORγt+ T cells while it decreased RORγt+ and T-bet+ T cells. This study showed that doses of ATRA up to 10 µM are safe when using with CD4+  T cells in terms of cell viability, proliferation and activation.We  could  also  show  that  ATRA  diverts  the  human  immune  response  in  neutral conditions (without adding polarizing cytokines by increasing FOXP3+  cells and decreasing RORγt+  cells. ATRA could be regarded as a potential therapy in inflammatory conditions and autoimmunities.

  18. Influence of nanocrystalline structure and surface properties of TiO2 thin films on the viability of L929 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osękowska Małgorzata

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the physicochemical and biological properties of nanocrystalline TiO2 thin films were investigated. Thin films were prepared by magnetron sputtering method. Their properties were examined by X-ray diffraction, photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical transmission method and optical profiler. Moreover, surface wettability and scratch resistance were determined. It was found that as-deposited coatings were nanocrystalline and had TiO2-anatase structure, built from crystallites in size of 24 nm. The surface of the films was homogenous, composed of closely packed grains and hydrophilic. Due to nanocrystalline structure thin films exhibited good scratch resistance. The results were correlated to the biological activity (in vitro of thin films. Morphological changes of mouse fibroblasts (L929 cell line after contact with the surface of TiO2 films were evaluated with the use of a contrast-phase microscope, while their viability was tested by MTT colorimetric assay. The viability of cell line upon contact with the surface of nanocrystalline TiO2 film was comparable to the control sample. L929 cells had homogenous cytoplasm and were forming a confluent monofilm, while lysis and inhibition of cell growth was not observed. Moreover, the viability in contact with surface of examined films was high. This confirms non-cytotoxic effect of TiO2 film surface on mouse fibroblasts.

  19. Individual and combined effects of ochratoxin A and citrinin on viability and DNA fragmentation in cultured Vero cells and on chromosome aberrations in mice bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) and citrinin (CTN) are two common contaminant mycotoxins which can occur jointly in a wide range of food commodities. Both mycotoxins have several toxic effects but share a significant nephrotoxic and carcinogenic potential since OTA and CTN were reported to be responsible for naturally occurring human and animal kidney diseases and tumors. Considering the concomitant production of OTA and CTN, it is very likely that humans and animals are always exposed to the mixture rather than to individual compounds. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, in vivo and in vitro, whether DNA damage is enhanced by combination of both mycotoxins as compared to their effect separately. To this end, we have assessed their effects individually or combined on cell proliferation and DNA fragmentation in cultured Vero cells and in vivo by monitoring the induction of chromosome aberrations. Our results clearly showed that cultured renal cells respond to OTA and CTN exposure by a moderate and weak inhibition of cell proliferation, respectively. However, when combined, they exert a significant increase in inhibition of cell viability. Similar results were found for the investigated genotoxicity endpoints (DNA fragmentation and chromosome aberrations). Altogether, our study showed that OTA and CTN combination effects are clearly synergistic. The synergistic induction of DNA damage observed with OTA and CTN taken concomitantly could be relevant to explain the molecular basis of the renal diseases and tumorogenesis induced by naturally occurring mycotoxins

  20. Altered expression of Mg(2+) transport proteins during Parkinson's disease-like dopaminergic cell degeneration in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Yutaka; Yamanaka, Ryu; Suzuki, Koji; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2016-08-01

    Mg(2+) is an essential cation to maintain cellular functions, and intracellular Mg(2+) concentration ([Mg(2+)]i) is regulated by Mg(2+) channels and transporters. In our previous study, we demonstrated that MPP(+) elicits Mg(2+) influx across the cell membrane and Mg(2+) mobilization from mitochondria, and the resulting [Mg(2+)]i is an important determinants of the cell viability in MPP(+) model of Parkinson's disease (PD). It indicates that cellular Mg(2+) transport is one of the important factors to determine the progress of PD. However, whether the expression levels of Mg(2+) transport proteins change in the progress of PD has still been obscure. In this study, we estimated the mRNA expression levels of Mg(2+) transport proteins upon the exposure to MPP(+). In thirteen Mg(2+) transport proteins examined, mRNA expression level of SLC41A2 was increased and that of ACDP2, NIPA1 and MMgT2 were decreased. Knockdown of SLC41A2, ACDP2 or NIPA1 accelerated the MPP(+)-induced cell degeneration, and overexpression attenuated it. The decrease in the mRNA expression levels of NIPA1 and MMgT2 were also elicited by rotenone, H2O2 and FCCP, indicating that mitochondrial dysfunction related to this down-regulation. The increase in that of SLC41A2 was induced by an uncoupler, FCCP, as well as MPP(+), suggesting that it is an intrinsic protection mechanism against depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential and/or cellular ATP depletion. Our results shown here indicate that alteration of Mg(2+) transport proteins is implicated in the MPP(+) model of PD, and it affects cell degeneration. PMID:27157538

  1. NucleoCounter-An efficient technique for the determination of cell number and viability in animal cell culture processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dimpalkumar; Naciri, Mariam; Clee, Paul; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2006-05-01

    The NucleoCounter is a novel, portable cell counting device based on the principle of fluorescence microscopy. The present work establishes its use with animal cells and checks its reliability, consistency and accuracy in comparison with other cytometric techniques. The main advantages of this technique are its ability to handle a large number of samples with a high degree of precision and its simplicity and specificity in detecting viable cells quantitatively in a heterogeneous culture. The work addresses and overcomes the problems of subjectivity, and some of the inherent sampling errors associated with using the traditional haemocytometer and Trypan Blue exclusion method. NucleoCounter offers reduced intra- and inter-observer variation as well as consistency in repetitive analysis that establishes it as an efficient and highly potential device for at-line monitoring of animal cell processes. Furthermore, since the only manual steps required are sample aspiration and mixing with two reagents, it is feasible that the whole method could be automated and brought on-line for process monitoring and control. PMID:19002893

  2. Evaluation of antibacterial activity and osteoblast-like cell viability of TiN, ZrN and (Ti1-xZrx)N coating on titanium

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Min-Kyung; Park, Sang-Won; Lee, Kwangmin; Kang, In-Chol; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Kim, Hyun-Seung; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate antibacterial activity and osteoblast-like cell viability according to the ratio of titanium nitride and zirconium nitride coating on commercially pure titanium using an arc ion plating system. MATERIALS AND METHODS Polished titanium surfaces were used as controls. Surface topography was observed by scanning electron microscopy, and surface roughness was measured using a two-dimensional contact stylus profilometer. Antibacterial activity was evalu...

  3. α-Mangostin Suppresses the Viability and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Pancreatic Cancer Cells by Downregulating the PI3K/Akt Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinhong Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available α-Mangostin, a natural product isolated from the pericarp of the mangosteen fruit, has been shown to inhibit the growth of tumor cells in various types of cancers. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unclear. Here, we report that α-mangostin suppressed the viability and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT of pancreatic cancer cells through inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Treatment of pancreatic cancer BxPc-3 and Panc-1 cells with α-mangostin resulted in loss of cell viability, accompanied by enhanced cell apoptosis, cell cycle arrest at G1 phase, and decrease of cyclin-D1. Moreover, Transwell and Matrigel invasion assays showed that α-mangostin significantly reduced the migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. Consistent with these results, α-mangostin decreased the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, N-cadherin, and vimentin and increased the expression of E-cadherin. Furthermore, we found that α-mangostin suppressed the activity of the PI3K/Akt pathway in pancreatic cancer cells as demonstrated by the reduction of the Akt phosphorylation by α-mangostin. Finally, α-mangostin significantly inhibited the growth of BxPc-3 tumor mouse xenografts. Our results suggest that α-mangostin may be potentially used as a novel adjuvant therapy or complementary alternative medicine for the management of pancreatic cancers.

  4. Effects of two fast-setting calcium-silicate cements on cell viability and angiogenic factor release in human pulp-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chooryung J; Kim, Euiseong; Song, Minju; Park, Jeong-Won; Shin, Su-Jung

    2016-05-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is considered a pulp-capping agent of choice, but has the drawback of a long setting time. This study aimed to assess two different types of calcium-silicate cements as pulp-capping agents, by investigating their in vitro cytotoxicity and angiogenic effects in human pulp cells. ProRoot MTA, Endocem Zr, and Retro MTA were prepared as set or freshly mixed pellets. Human pulp-derived cells were grown in direct contact with these three cements, Dycal, or no cement, for 7 days. Initial cell attachment, viability, calcium release, and the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiogenin, and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) were evaluated statistically using a linear mixed model (P calcium concentration compared with the control group (P  0.05). We demonstrate that Retro MTA, which has a short setting time, has similar biocompatibility and angiogenic effects on human pulp cells, and can therefore potentially be as effective in pulp capping as ProRoot MTA. Endocem Zr showed intermittent cytotoxicity and elicited lower levels of VEGF and angiogenin expression. PMID:25596932

  5. Solid lipid nanoparticles for hydrophilic biotech drugs: optimization and cell viability studies (Caco-2 & HEPG-2 cell lines).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, Patrícia; Andreani, Tatiana; Jäger, Alessandro; Chaud, Marco V; Santana, Maria Helena A; Silva, Amélia M; Souto, Eliana B

    2014-06-23

    Insulin was used as model protein to developed innovative Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs) for the delivery of hydrophilic biotech drugs, with potential use in medicinal chemistry. SLNs were prepared by double emulsion with the purpose of promoting stability and enhancing the protein bioavailability. Softisan(®)100 was selected as solid lipid matrix. The surfactants (Tween(®)80, Span(®)80 and Lipoid(®)S75) and insulin were chosen applying a 2(2) factorial design with triplicate of central point, evaluating the influence of dependents variables as polydispersity index (PI), mean particle size (z-AVE), zeta potential (ZP) and encapsulation efficiency (EE) by factorial design using the ANOVA test. Therefore, thermodynamic stability, polymorphism and matrix crystallinity were checked by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Wide Angle X-ray Diffraction (WAXD), whereas the effect of toxicity of SLNs was check in HepG2 and Caco-2 cells. Results showed a mean particle size (z-AVE) width between 294.6 nm and 627.0 nm, a PI in the range of 0.425-0.750, ZP about -3 mV, and the EE between 38.39% and 81.20%. After tempering the bulk lipid (mimicking the end process of production), the lipid showed amorphous characteristics, with a melting point of ca. 30 °C. The toxicity of SLNs was evaluated in two distinct cell lines (HEPG-2 and Caco-2), showing to be dependent on the concentration of particles in HEPG-2 cells, while no toxicity in was reported in Caco-2 cells. SLNs were stable for 24 h in in vitro human serum albumin (HSA) solution. The resulting SLNs fabricated by double emulsion may provide a promising approach for administration of protein therapeutics and antigens.

  6. Organically Modified Silica Nanoparticles Interaction with Macrophage Cells: Assessment of Cell Viability on the Basis of Physicochemical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhiraj; Mutreja, Isha; Keshvan, Prashant C; Bhat, Madhusudan; Dinda, Amit K; Mitra, Susmita

    2015-11-01

    Silica nanoparticles have drawn a lot of attention for nanomedicine application, and this is attributed to their biocompatibility and ease of surface functionalization. However, successful utilization of these inorganic systems for biomedical application depends on their physicochemical properties. This study, therefore, discusses in vitro toxicity of organically modified silica nanoparticles on the basis of size, shape, and surface properties of silica nanoparticles. Spherical- and oval-shaped nanoparticles having hydroxyl and amine groups were synthesized in Tween 80 micelles using different organosilanes. Nanoparticles of similar size and morphology were considered for comparative assessment. "As-prepared" nanoparticles were characterized in terms of size, shape, and surface properties using ZetaSizer, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared to establish the above parameters. In vitro analysis in terms of nanoparticle-based toxicity was performed on J-774 (macrophage) cell line using propidium iodide-4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindol and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays. Fluorescent dye-entrapped nanoparticles were used to visualize the uptake of the nanoparticles by macrophage cells. Results from cell studies suggested low levels of toxicity for different nanoparticle formulations studied, therefore are suitable for nanocarrier application for poorly soluble molecules. On the contrary, the nanoparticles of similar size and shape, having amine groups and low net negative charge, do not exhibit any in vitro cytotoxicity.

  7. Adhesion defective BHK cell mutant has cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan of altered properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Austria, R; Woods, A;

    1988-01-01

    sulfation, reduced affinity for fibronectin and decreased half-life on the cell surface when compared to the normal counterpart. Our conclusions based on this data are that these altered properties may, in part, account for the adhesion defect in the ricin-resistant mutant. Whether this results from......In the light of accumulating data that implicate cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) with a role in cell interactions with extracellular matrix molecules such as fibronectin, we have compared the properties of these molecules in wild-type BHK cells and an adhesion-defective ricin......-resistant mutant (RicR14). Our results showed that the mutant, unlike BHK cells, cannot form focal adhesions when adherent to planar substrates in the presence of serum. Furthermore, while both cell lines possess similar amounts of cell surface HSPG with hydrophobic properties, that of RicR14 cells had decreased...

  8. Cell viability, pigments and photosynthetic performance of Arctic phytoplankton in contrasting ice-covered and open-water conditions during the spring-summer transition

    KAUST Repository

    Alou-Font, E

    2015-12-02

    © Inter-Research 2016. We examined phytoplankton biomass and community composition (mostly based on pigments) as well as cell viability with the cell digestion assay in surface waters of the Canadian Beaufort Sea during the spring-summer transition. Our aim was to understand phytoplankton responses to the large environmental changes (irradiance, temperature and nutrients) occurring during this period. Two categories of stations were visited in May and June 2008: ice-covered (IC), exposed to low irradiances, and open-water (OW), exposed to higher irradiances. We observed a large variation in the percentage of living cells (%LC) relative to the total community. No relationship was found between %LC and nitrate concentration (the nutrient potentially limiting in this environment). The in situ irradiance influenced the status of the cells at OW stations. Mean surface mixed layer irradiances >600 μmol photons m-2 s-1 were associated with low cell viability and a decline in photosynthetic performance (Fv/Fm). For IC stations, %LC declined at temperatures above 0°C, whereas for OW stations, it increased, suggesting that ice melting resulted in the release into surface waters of unhealthy cells from the bottom ice in one case, and that seasonal warming favored the communities present in open waters. A chlorophyll degradation pigment tentatively identified as pyropheophorbide a-\\'like\\' showed a significant negative relationship between its concentration (relative to chlorophyll a) and the %LC and Fv/Fm. Our results suggest that the melting conditions influence the distribution of this pigment and that it may be useful as a marker for low cell viability of ice algae being released into surface waters.

  9. Evaluation of Osteoblast-Like Cell Viability and Differentiation on the Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser Peptide Immobilized Titanium Dioxide Nanotube via Chemical Grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ga-Hyun; Kim, Il-Shin; Park, Sang-Won; Lee, Kwangmin; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Kim, Hyun-Seung; Oh, Gye-Jeong; Ji, Min-Kyung; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the effect of the immobilization of the Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS) peptide on titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube via chemical grafting on osteoblast-like cell (MG-63) viability and differentiation. The specimens were divided into two groups; TiO2 nanotubes and GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes. The surface characteristics of GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes were observed by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The morphology of cells on specimens was observed by FE-SEM after 2 hr and 24 hr. The level of cell viability was investigated via a tetrazolium (XTT) assay after 2 and 4 days. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was evaluated to measure the cell differentiation after 4 and 7 days. The presence of nitrogen up-regulation or C==O carbons con- firmed that TiO2 nanotubes were immobilized with GRGDS peptides. Cell adhesion was enhanced on the GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes compared to TiO2 nanotubes. Furthermore, significantly increased cell spreading and proliferation were observed with the cells grown on GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes (P nanotubes and TiO2 nanotubes. These results suggest that the GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes might be effective in improving the osseointegration of dental implants.

  10. Altered cell cycle regulation helps stem-like carcinoma cells resist apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton Stephen; Chappell James

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Reemergence of carcinomas following chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy is not well understood, but a recent study in BMC Cancer suggests that resistance to apoptosis resulting from altered cell cycle regulation is crucial. See research article: http://biomedcentral.com/1471-2407/10/166

  11. Altered expression of epithelial cell surface glycoconjugates and intermediate filaments at the margins of mucosal wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Grøn, B; Mandel, U;

    1998-01-01

    Alterations in cell to cell adhesion are necessary to enable the type of cell movements that are associated with epithelial wound healing and malignant invasion. Several studies of transformed cells have related epithelial cell movement to changes in the cell surface expression of the carbohydrat...

  12. A novel synthetic derivative of the natural product berbamine inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis of human osteosarcoma cells, associated with activation of JNK/AP-1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Nam, Sangkil; Zhao, Robin; Tian, Yan; Liu, Lucy; Horne, David A; Jove, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor in children and adolescents. There is a critical need to find more potent drugs for patients with metastatic or recurrent disease. Berbamine (BBM) is a natural compound derived from the Berberis amurensis plants. BBM and its derivatives have been shown to have antitumor effects in several cancers. Here, we report that a novel synthetic berbamine derivative, BBMD3, inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis of G292, KHOS, and MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells. Induction of apoptosis in these tumor cells depends on activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Since pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) and caspase-9 inhibitor (Z-LEHD-FMK) could block the cleavage of PARP, the apoptosis induced by BBMD3 is through intrinsic signaling pathway. BBMD3 increased phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK), resulting in increase of phosphorylated c-Jun and total c-Fos, the major components of transcriptional factor AP-1. JNK inhibitor could partially suppress antitumor effect of BBMD3 on osteosarcoma cells. BBMD3 increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS scavenger, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), could block the phosphorylation of JNK and c-Jun induced by BBMD3. BBMD3 increased the expression of the pro-apototic gene Bad, associated with apoptosis induction. Finally, BBMD3 also decreased the expression of cyclin D1 and D2, the positive cell cycle regulators, which is correlated with growth inhibition in osteosarcoma cells. Collectively, these findings indicate that BBMD3 is a potentially promising drug for the treatment of human osteosarcoma. PMID:24025361

  13. The surfactant protein C mutation A116D alters cellular processing, stress tolerance, surfactant lipid composition, and immune cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarbock Ralf

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant protein C (SP-C is important for the function of pulmonary surfactant. Heterozygous mutations in SFTPC, the gene encoding SP-C, cause sporadic and familial interstitial lung disease (ILD in children and adults. Mutations mapping to the BRICHOS domain located within the SP-C proprotein result in perinuclear aggregation of the proprotein. In this study, we investigated the effects of the mutation A116D in the BRICHOS domain of SP-C on cellular homeostasis. We also evaluated the ability of drugs currently used in ILD therapy to counteract these effects. Methods SP-CA116D was expressed in MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells. We assessed in vitro the consequences for cellular homeostasis, immune response and effects of azathioprine, hydroxychloroquine, methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Results Stable expression of SP-CA116D in MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells resulted in increased intracellular accumulation of proSP-C processing intermediates. SP-CA116D expression further led to reduced cell viability and increased levels of the chaperones Hsp90, Hsp70, calreticulin and calnexin. Lipid analysis revealed decreased intracellular levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC and increased lyso-PC levels. Treatment with methylprednisolone or hydroxychloroquine partially restored these lipid alterations. Furthermore, SP-CA116D cells secreted soluble factors into the medium that modulated surface expression of CCR2 or CXCR1 receptors on CD4+ lymphocytes and neutrophils, suggesting a direct paracrine effect of SP-CA116D on neighboring cells in the alveolar space. Conclusions We show that the A116D mutation leads to impaired processing of proSP-C in alveolar epithelial cells, alters cell viability and lipid composition, and also activates cells of the immune system. In addition, we show that some of the effects of the mutation on cellular homeostasis can be antagonized by application of pharmaceuticals commonly applied in ILD therapy

  14. Influence of extracellular pH on growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity, and intracellular pH of Lactococcus lactis in batch fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Gunda; Johansen, Claus Lindvald; Marten, Gunvor; Wilmes, Jacqueline; Jespersen, Lene; Arneborg, Nils

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of three extracellular pH (pHex) values (i.e., 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5) on the growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity in milk, and intracellular pH (pHi) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DGCC1212 during pH-controlled batch fermentations. A universal parameter (e.g., linked to pHi) for the description or prediction of viability, specific acidification activity, or growth behavior at a given pHex was not identified. We found viability as determined by flow cytometry to remain high during all growth phases and irrespectively of the pH set point. Furthermore, regardless of the pHex, the acidification activity per cell decreased over time which seemed to be linked to cell shrinkage. Flow cytometric pHi determination demonstrated an increase of the averaged pHi level for higher pH set points, while the pH gradient (pHi-pHex) and the extent of pHi heterogeneity decreased. Cells maintained positive pH gradients at a low pHex of 5.5 and even during substrate limitation at the more widely used pHex 6.5. Moreover, the strain proved able to grow despite small negative or even absent pH gradients at a high pHex of 7.5. The larger pHi heterogeneity at pHex 5.5 and 6.5 was associated with more stressful conditions resulting, e.g., from higher concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid, while the low pHi heterogeneity at pHex 7.5 most probably corresponded to lower concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid which facilitated the cells to reach the highest maximum active cell counts of the three pH set points. PMID:27020293

  15. IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ or TNF-α enhances BAFF-stimulated cell viability and survival by activating Erk1/2 and S6K1 pathways in neoplastic B-lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Lin; Zeng, Qingyu; Xu, Zhigang; Zhang, Hai; Qin, Shanshan; Liu, Chunxiao; Xu, Chong; Qian, Zhou; Zhang, Shuangquan; Huang, Shile; Chen, Long

    2016-08-01

    B-cell activating factor of the TNF family (BAFF) has been documented to act as a critical factor in the development of aggressive B lymphocytes and autoimmune diseases. However, the effect of various cytokines on BAFF-elicited neoplastic B-lymphoid cells is not known. In this study, we exhibited that administration of human soluble BAFF (hsBAFF), IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ, or TNF-α alone increased cell viability and survival in Raji cells concentration-dependently, yet a more robust viability/survival was seen in the cells co-treatment of IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ, or TNF-α with hsBAFF, respectively. Further research revealed that both Erk1/2 and S6K1 signaling pathways were essential for IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ, or TNF-α enhancement of the viability/survival in the hsBAFF-stimulated cells, as inhibition of Erk1/2 with U0126 or down-regulation of Erk1/2, or blockage of S6K1 with rapamycin or silencing S6K1, or silencing S6K1/Erk1/2, respectively, reduced the cell viability/survival in the cells treated with/without hsBAFF±IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ, or TNF-α. These findings indicate that IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ or TNF-α enhances BAFF-stimulated cell viability/survival by activating Erk1/2 and S6K1 signaling in neoplastic B-lymphoid cells. Our data suggest that modulation of IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ and/or TNF-α levels, or inhibitors of Erk1/2 or S6K1 may be a new approach to prevent BAFF-induced aggressive B-cell malignancies.

  16. A gene-alteration profile of human lung cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    R. Blanco; Iwakawa, R.; Tang, M; Kohno, T.; Angulo, B; Pio, R. (Rubén); Montuenga, L M; Minna, J D; Yokota, J; Sanchez-Cespedes, M.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Aberrant proteins encoded from genes altered in tumors drive cancer development and may also be therapeutic targets. Here we derived a comprehensive gene-alteration profile of lung cancer cell lines. We tested 17 genes in a panel of 88 lung cancer cell lines and found the rates of alteration to be higher than previously thought. Nearly all cells feature inactivation at TP53 and CDKN2A or RB1, whereas BRAF, MET, ERBB2, and NRAS alterations were infrequent. A p...

  17. Epigallocatechin Gallate-Mediated Alteration of the MicroRNA Expression Profile in 5α-Dihydrotestosterone-Treated Human Dermal Papilla Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Shanghun; Kim, Karam; Lee, Myung Joo; Lee, Jeongju; Choi, Sungjin; Kim, Kyung-Suk; Ko, Jung-Min; Han, Hyunjoo; Kim, Su Young; Youn, Hae Jeong; Ahn, Kyu Joong; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan

    2016-01-01

    Background Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) induces androgenic alopecia by shortening the hair follicle growth phase, resulting in hair loss. We previously demonstrated how changes in the microRNA (miRNA) expression profile influenced DHT-mediated cell death, cell cycle arrest, cell viability, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and senescence. Protective effects against DHT have not, however, been elucidated at the genome level. Objective We showed that epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major component of green tea, protects DHT-induced cell death by regulating the cellular miRNA expression profile. Methods We used a miRNA microarray to identify miRNA expression levels in human dermal papilla cells (DPCs). We investigated whether the miRNA expression influenced the protective effects of EGCG against DHT-induced cell death, growth arrest, intracellular ROS levels, and senescence. Results EGCG protected against the effects of DHT by altering the miRNA expression profile in human DPCs. In addition, EGCG attenuated DHT-mediated cell death and growth arrest and decreased intracellular ROS levels and senescence. A bioinformatics analysis elucidated the relationship between the altered miRNA expression and EGCG-mediated protective effects against DHT. Conclusion Overall, our results suggest that EGCG ameliorates the negative effects of DHT by altering the miRNA expression profile in human DPCs. PMID:27274631

  18. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells.

  19. Retinal Targets ALDH Positive Cancer Stem Cell and Alters the Phenotype of Highly Metastatic Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Mu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH is a cancer stem cell marker. Retinoic acid has antitumor properties, including the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation. Retinal, the precursor of retinoic acid, can be oxidized to retinoic acid by dehydrogenases, including ALDH. We hypothesized that retinal could potentially be transformed to retinoic acid with higher efficiency by cancer stem cells, due to the higher ALDH activity. We previously observed that ALDH activity is greater in highly metastatic K7M2 osteosarcoma (OS cells than in nonmetastatic K12 OS cells. We also demonstrated that ALDH activity correlates with clinical metastases in bone sarcoma patients, suggesting that ALDH may be a therapeutic target specific to cells with high metastatic potential. Our current results demonstrated that retinal preferentially affected the phenotypes of ALDH-high K7M2 cells in contrast to ALDH-low K12 cells, which could be mediated by the more efficient transformation of retinal to retinoic acid by ALDH in K7M2 cells. Retinal treatment of highly metastatic K7M2 cells decreased their proliferation, invasion capacity, and resistance to oxidative stress. Retinal altered the expression of metastasis-related genes. These observations indicate that retinal may be used to specifically target metastatic cancer stem cells in OS.

  20. A novel Atoh1 "self-terminating" mouse model reveals the necessity of proper Atoh1 level and duration for hair cell differentiation and viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Pan

    Full Text Available Atonal homolog1 (Atoh1 is a bHLH transcription factor essential for inner ear hair cell differentiation. Targeted expression of Atoh1 at various stages in development can result in hair cell differentiation in the ear. However, the level and duration of Atoh1 expression required for proper hair cell differentiation and maintenance remain unknown. We generated an Atoh1 conditional knockout (CKO mouse line using Tg(Atoh1-cre, in which the cre expression is driven by an Atoh1 enhancer element that is regulated by Atoh1 protein to "self-terminate" its expression. The mutant mice show transient, limited expression of Atoh1 in all hair cells in the ear. In the organ of Corti, reduction and delayed deletion of Atoh1 result in progressive loss of almost all the inner hair cells and the majority of the outer hair cells within three weeks after birth. The remaining cells express hair cell marker Myo7a and attract nerve fibers, but do not differentiate normal stereocilia bundles. Some Myo7a-positive cells persist in the cochlea into adult stages in the position of outer hair cells, flanked by a single row of pillar cells and two to three rows of disorganized Deiters cells. Gene expression analyses of Atoh1, Barhl1 and Pou4f3, genes required for survival and maturation of hair cells, reveal earlier and higher expression levels in the inner compared to the outer hair cells. Our data show that Atoh1 is crucial for hair cell mechanotransduction development, viability, and maintenance and also suggest that Atoh1 expression level and duration may play a role in inner vs. outer hair cell development. These genetically engineered Atoh1 CKO mice provide a novel model for establishing critical conditions needed to regenerate viable and functional hair cells with Atoh1 therapy.

  1. Effect of Ichnocarpus frutescens (L.) R.Br. hexane extract on preadipocytes viability and lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Saravanan; S Ignacimuthu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the crude extracts of Ichnocarpus frutescens (I. frutescens) for antiobesity effect. Methods: Leaves of I. frutescens were sequentially extracted with hexane, ethyl acetate, and methanol and their effect on viability of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were evaluated. Based on this the apoptosis on preadipocytes was confirmed by DNA fragmentation and LDH (Lactate dehydrogenase) leakage assays. Anti-adipogenesis was performed by oil red O (ORO) staining and free glycerol release in the medium of differentiated adipocytes. Results: The hexane extract of I. frutescens (IFHE) inhibited cell viability in a time- and dose-related manner. An increased release of LDH, as a marker of membrane integrity, was observed at a dose of 200 μg/mL. The discontinuous DNA fragments on agarose gel electrophoresis showed the apoptotic effect of the IFHE. Morphological observations of cells stained with ORO showed a decrease in cellular lipid content at the concentrations tested compared to the induced control cells. In the experiment of lipolytic activity, treatment with IFHE enhanced glycerol secretion with the rates of approximately 28%, 55%, and 46% at the concentrations of 100, 200 and 300 μg/mL, respectively. Conclusions:The observed properties clearly revealed the medicinal property of I. frutescens in the treatment of obesity.

  2. Alterations in regulatory T-cells: rediscovered pathways in immunotoxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Corsini, E; Oukka, M; Pieters, R; Kerkvliet, N.I.; Ponce, R.; Germolec, D R

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the effector T-cells subsets, T-cells can also differentiate into cells that play a suppressive or regulatory role in adaptive immune responses. The cell types currently identified as regulatory T-cells (Tregs) include natural or thymic-derived Tregs, T-cells which express Foxp3+CD25+CD4+ and can suppress immune responses to autoreactive T-cells, as well as inducible Tregs, that are generated from naïve T-cells in the periphery after interaction with antigens presented by dendr...

  3. Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells harbor alterations in the major tumor suppressor pathways and cell-cycle checkpoints: analyses using tissue microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Juan F; Camacho, Francisca I; Morente, Manuel; Fraga, Máximo; Montalbán, Carlos; Alvaro, Tomás; Bellas, Carmen; Castaño, Angel; Díez, Ana; Flores, Teresa; Martin, Carmen; Martinez, Miguel A; Mazorra, Francisco; Menárguez, Javier; Mestre, Maria J; Mollejo, Manuela; Sáez, Ana I; Sánchez, Lydia; Piris, Miguel A

    2003-01-15

    Tumoral cells in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) display an increased growth fraction and diminished apoptosis, implying a profound disturbance of the cell cycle and apoptosis regulation. However, limitations of molecular techniques have prevented the analysis of the tumor suppressor pathways and cell-cycle checkpoints. Tissue microarray (TMA) is a powerful tool for analyzing a large number of molecular variables in a large series of tumors, although the feasibility of this technique has not yet been demonstrated in heterogeneous tumors. The expression of 29 genes regulating the cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in 288 HL biopsies using TMA. The sensitivity of the technique was validated by comparing the results with those obtained in standard tissue sections. The results revealed multiple alterations in different pathways and checkpoints, including G1/S and G2/M transition and apoptosis. Striking findings were the overexpression of cyclin E, CDK2, CDK6, STAT3, Hdm2, Bcl2, Bcl-X(L), survivin, and NF-kappaB proteins. A multiparametric analysis identified proteins associated with increased growth fraction (Hdm2, p53, p21, Rb, cyclins A, B1, D3, and E, CDK2, CDK6, SKP2, Bcl-X(L), survivin, STAT1, and STAT3), and proteins associated with apoptosis (NF-kappaB, STAT1, and RB). The analysis also demonstrated that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive cases displayed a characteristic profile, confirming the pathogenic role of EBV in HL. Survival probability depends on multiple biologic factors, including overexpression of Bcl2, p53, Bax, Bcl-X(L), MIB1, and apoptotic index. In conclusion, Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells harbor concurrent and overlapping alterations in the major tumor suppressor pathways and cell-cycle checkpoints. This appears to determine the viability of the tumoral cells and the clinical outcome.

  4. Cell type and transfection reagent-dependent effects on viability, cell content, cell cycle and inflammation of RNAi in human primary mesenchymal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Hsiao-yin; Vonk, Lucienne A; Licht, Ruud; van Boxtel, Antonetta M G; Bekkers, Joris E J; Kragten, Angela H M; Hein, San; Varghese, Oommen P; Howard, Kenneth A; Öner, F Cumhur; Dhert, Wouter J A; Creemers, Laura B

    2014-01-01

    The application of RNA interference (RNAi) has great therapeutic potential for degenerative diseases of cartilaginous tissues by means of fine tuning the phenotype of cells used for regeneration. However, possible non-specific effects of transfection per se might be relevant for future clinical appl

  5. Depolarization Alters Phenotype, Maintains Plasticity of Predifferentiated Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sundelacruz, Sarah; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    Although adult stem cell transplantation has been implemented as a therapy for tissue repair, it is limited by the availability of functional adult stem cells. A potential approach to generate stem and progenitor cells may be to modulate the differentiated status of somatic cells. Therefore, there is a need for a better understanding of how the differentiated phenotype of mature cells is regulated. We hypothesize that bioelectric signaling plays an important role in the maintenance of the dif...

  6. Alterations in Cell Signaling Pathways in Breast Cancer Cells after Environmental Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulp, K; McCutcheon-Maloney, S M; Bennett, L M

    2003-02-01

    Recent human epidemiological studies suggest that up to 75% of human cancers can be attributed to environmental exposures. Understanding the biologic impact of being exposed to a lifetime of complex environmental mixtures that may not be fully characterized is currently a major challenge. Functional endpoints may be used to assess the gross health consequences of complex mixture exposures from groundwater contamination, superfund sites, biologic releases, or nutritional sources. Such endpoints include the stimulation of cell growth or the induction of a response in an animal model. An environmental exposure that upsets normal cell growth regulation may have important ramifications for cancer development. Stimulating cell growth may alter an individual's cancer risk by changing the expression of genes and proteins that have a role in growth regulatory pathways within cells. Modulating the regulation of these genes and their products may contribute to the initiation, promotion or progression of disease in response to environmental exposure. We are investigating diet-related compounds that induce cell proliferation in breast cancer cell lines. These compounds, PhIP, Flor-Essence{reg_sign} and Essiac{reg_sign}, may be part of an everyday diet. PhIP is a naturally occurring mutagen that is formed in well-cooked muscle meats. PhIP consistently causes dose-dependent breast tumor formation in rats and consumption of well-done meat has been linked to increased risk of breast cancer in women. Flor-Essence{reg_sign} and Essiac{reg_sign} herbal tonics are complementary and alternative medicines used by women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer as an alternative therapy for disease treatment and prevention. The long-term goal of this work is to identify those cellular pathways that are altered by a chemical or biologic environmental exposure and understand how those changes correlate with and or predict changes in human health risk. This project addressed this goal

  7. Altering β-cell number through stable alteration of miR-21 and miR-34a expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backe, Marie Balslev; Novotny, Guy Wayne; Christensen, Dan Ploug;

    2014-01-01

    RNAs, miR-21 and miR-34a, may be involved in mediating cytokine-induced β-cell dysfunction. Therefore, manipulation of miR-21 and miR-34a levels may potentially be beneficial to β cells. To study the effect of long-term alterations of miR-21 or miR-34a levels upon net β-cell number, we stably overexpressed...... miR-21 and knocked down miR-34a, and investigated essential cellular processes. Materials and Methods: miRNA expression was manipulated using Lentiviral transduction of the β-cell line INS-1. Stable cell lines were generated, and cell death, NO synthesis, proliferation, and total cell number were...... monitored in the absence or presence of cytokines. Results: Overexpression of miR-21 decreased net β-cell number in the absence of cytokines, and increased apoptosis and NO synthesis in the absence and presence of cytokines. Proliferation was increased upon miR-21 overexpression. Knockdown of miR-34a...

  8. IL-1beta-Induced iNOS Expression, NO Release and Loss in Metabolic Cell Viability Are Resistant to Inhibitors of Ceramide Synthase and Sphingomyelinase in INS 832/13 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajakrishnan Veluthakal

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Emerging evidence indicates regulatory roles for ceramide in the metabolic dysfunction of the islet beta cell. Recently, potential similarities between IL-1beta and ceramide on their effects on islet beta cell have been reported, including reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and loss in metabolic cell viability.Objective Herein, we investigated whether IL-1beta-induced nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS expression, nitric oxide (NO release and loss in metabolic cell viability require ceramide biosynthesis either via the activation of sphingomyelinase or ceramide synthase.Setting Insulin-secreting INS 832/13 cells.Results We found that two structurally-distinct inhibitors of sphingomyelinase activation (e.g., 3-O-methylsphingomyelin or desipramine or ceramide biosynthesis inhib-itor (e.g., fumonisin failed to exert clear effects on IL-1beta-induced iNOS expression, NO release and loss in cell viability.Conclusions Taken together, our findings indicate that neither the sphingomyelinase nor the ceramide synthase activation is required for IL-1beta-induced metabolic abnormalities in insulin-secreting INS 832/13 cells.

  9. Far-infrared radiation protects viability in a cell model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia by preventing polyQ protein accumulation and improving mitochondrial function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Hoel, Fredrik; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Liu, Ko-Hung; Hsieh, Mingli; Hoel, August; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Yan, Kuo-Chia; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Lin, Wei-Yong; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Su, Shih-Li; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-01-01

    Far infrared radiation (FIR) is currently investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy in various diseases though the mechanism is unknown. Presently, we tested if FIR mediates beneficial effects in a cell model of the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3). SCA3 is caused by a mutation leading to an abnormal polyglutamine expansion (PolyQ) in ataxin-3 protein. The consequent aggregation of mutant ataxin-3 results in disruption of vital cell functions. In this study, neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) was transduced to express either non-pathogenic ataxin-3-26Q or pathogenic ataxin-3-78Q proteins. The cells expressing ataxin-3-78Q demonstrated decreased viability, and increased sensitivity to metabolic stress in the presence rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. FIR exposure was found to protect against these effects. Moreover, FIR improved mitochondrial respiratory function, which was significantly compromised in ataxin-3-78Q and ataxin-3-26Q expressing cells. This was accompanied by decreased levels of mitochondrial fragmentation in FIR treated cells, as observed by fluorescence microscopy and protein expression analysis. Finally, the expression profile LC3-II, Beclin-1 and p62 suggested that FIR prevent the autophagy inhibiting effects observed in ataxin-3-78Q expressing cells. In summary, our results suggest that FIR have rescuing effects in cells expressing mutated pathogenic ataxin-3, through recovery of mitochondrial function and autophagy. PMID:27469193

  10. Far-infrared radiation protects viability in a cell model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia by preventing polyQ protein accumulation and improving mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Hoel, Fredrik; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Liu, Ko-Hung; Hsieh, Mingli; Hoel, August; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Yan, Kuo-Chia; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Lin, Wei-Yong; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Su, Shih-Li; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-01-01

    Far infrared radiation (FIR) is currently investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy in various diseases though the mechanism is unknown. Presently, we tested if FIR mediates beneficial effects in a cell model of the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3). SCA3 is caused by a mutation leading to an abnormal polyglutamine expansion (PolyQ) in ataxin-3 protein. The consequent aggregation of mutant ataxin-3 results in disruption of vital cell functions. In this study, neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) was transduced to express either non-pathogenic ataxin-3-26Q or pathogenic ataxin-3-78Q proteins. The cells expressing ataxin-3-78Q demonstrated decreased viability, and increased sensitivity to metabolic stress in the presence rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. FIR exposure was found to protect against these effects. Moreover, FIR improved mitochondrial respiratory function, which was significantly compromised in ataxin-3-78Q and ataxin-3-26Q expressing cells. This was accompanied by decreased levels of mitochondrial fragmentation in FIR treated cells, as observed by fluorescence microscopy and protein expression analysis. Finally, the expression profile LC3-II, Beclin-1 and p62 suggested that FIR prevent the autophagy inhibiting effects observed in ataxin-3-78Q expressing cells. In summary, our results suggest that FIR have rescuing effects in cells expressing mutated pathogenic ataxin-3, through recovery of mitochondrial function and autophagy. PMID:27469193

  11. Effects of a discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on the viability and proliferation of undifferentiated human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-na; Watson, Devon; Thames, Kyle; Primus, Carolyn M; Bergeron, Brian E; Jiao, Kai; Bortoluzzi, Eduardo A; Cutler, Christopher W; Chen, Ji-hua; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2015-11-30

    Discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement has been formulated to overcome the timely problem of tooth discoloration reported in the clinical application of bismuth oxide-containing hydraulic cements. The present study examined the effects of this experimental cement (Quick-Set2) on the viability and proliferation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) by comparing the cellular responses with commercially available calcium silicate cement (white mineral trioxide aggregate; WMTA) after different aging periods. Cell viability and proliferation were examined using assays that examined plasma membrane integrity, leakage of cytosolic enzyme, caspase-3 activity for early apoptosis, oxidative stress, mitochondrial metabolic activity and intracellular DNA content. Results of the six assays indicated that both Quick-Set2 and WMTA were initially cytotoxic to hDPSCs after setting for 24 h, with Quick-Set2 being comparatively less cytotoxic than WMTA at this stage. After two aging cycles, the cytotoxicity profiles of the two hydraulic cements were not significantly different and were much less cytotoxic than the positive control (zinc oxide-eugenol cement). Based on these results, it is envisaged that any potential beneficial effect of the discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on osteogenesis by differentiated hDPSCs is more likely to be revealed after outward diffusion and removal of its cytotoxic components.

  12. Antimicrobial and cell viability measurement of bovine serum albumin capped silver nanoparticles (Ag/BSA) loaded collagen immobilized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakare, Rotimi; Hawthrone, Samantha; Vails, Carmen; Gugssa, Ayele; Karim, Alamgir; Stubbs, John; Raghavan, Dharmaraj

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial infection of orthopedic devices has been a major concern in joint replacement procedures. Therefore, this study is aimed at formulating collagen immobilized poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) film loaded with bovine serum albumin capped silver nanoparticles (Ag/BSA NPs) to inhibit bacterial growth while retaining/promoting osteoblast cells viability. The nanoparticles loaded collagen immobilized PHBV film was characterized for its composition by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Anodic Stripping Voltammetry. The extent of loading of Ag/BSA NPs on collagen immobilized PHBV film was found to depend on the chemistry of the functionalized PHBV film and the concentration of Ag/BSA NPs solution used for loading nanoparticles. Our results showed that more Ag/BSA NPs were loaded on higher molecular weight collagen immobilized PHEMA-g-PHBV film. Maximum loading of Ag/BSA NPs on collagen immobilized PHBV film was observed when 16ppm solution was used for adsorption studies. Colony forming unit and optical density measurements showed broad antimicrobial activity towards Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at significantly lower concentration i.e., 0.19 and 0.31μg/disc, compared to gentamicin and sulfamethoxazole trimethoprim while MTT assay showed that released nanoparticles from Ag/BSA NPs loaded collagen immobilized PHBV film has no impact on MCTC3-E1 cells viability.

  13. Effects of a discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on the viability and proliferation of undifferentiated human dental pulp stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-na; Watson, Devon; Thames, Kyle; Primus, Carolyn M.; Bergeron, Brian E.; Jiao, Kai; Bortoluzzi, Eduardo A.; Cutler, Christopher W.; Chen, Ji-hua; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2015-01-01

    Discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement has been formulated to overcome the timely problem of tooth discoloration reported in the clinical application of bismuth oxide-containing hydraulic cements. The present study examined the effects of this experimental cement (Quick-Set2) on the viability and proliferation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) by comparing the cellular responses with commercially available calcium silicate cement (white mineral trioxide aggregate; WMTA) after different aging periods. Cell viability and proliferation were examined using assays that examined plasma membrane integrity, leakage of cytosolic enzyme, caspase-3 activity for early apoptosis, oxidative stress, mitochondrial metabolic activity and intracellular DNA content. Results of the six assays indicated that both Quick-Set2 and WMTA were initially cytotoxic to hDPSCs after setting for 24 h, with Quick-Set2 being comparatively less cytotoxic than WMTA at this stage. After two aging cycles, the cytotoxicity profiles of the two hydraulic cements were not significantly different and were much less cytotoxic than the positive control (zinc oxide–eugenol cement). Based on these results, it is envisaged that any potential beneficial effect of the discoloration-resistant calcium aluminosilicate cement on osteogenesis by differentiated hDPSCs is more likely to be revealed after outward diffusion and removal of its cytotoxic components. PMID:26617338

  14. Troxerutin induces protective effects against ultraviolet B radiation through the alteration of microRNA expression in human HaCaT keratinocyte cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Sik; Cha, Hwa Jun; Lee, Ghang Tai; Lee, Kun Kook; Hong, Jin Tae; Ahn, Kyu Joong; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan; Bae, Seunghee

    2014-04-01

    Ultraviolet light B (UVB), contained in sunlight, induces damaging effects on skin by impairing cells in the epidermis and dermis. In particular, keratinocytes in the epidermis are those cells which are mainly affected by UVB light. UVB radiation induces cell death, growth arrest, DNA damage and restricts cell migration. Various phytochemicals have been shown to alleviate UVB-induced cellular damage. Troxerutin is a natural flavonoid rutin mainly found in extracts of Sophora japonica, and is a well-known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound used in experimental mouse models. In this study, we examined the effects of troxerutin on UVB-induced damage in HaCaT cells. HaCaT cells were pre-treated with troxerutin (0-10 µM) and then exposed to UVB radiation (50 mJ/cm2). Cell viability, cell cycle and migration assays were performed to determine the protective effects of troxerutin on the cells. DNA repair activity was also measured. Troxerutin protected the cells against UVB-induced damage, such as cell death, growth arrest, restriction of cell migration and decreased DNA repair activity in HaCaT cells. Analyses of microRNA (miRNA) expression demonstrated that the protective effects of troxerutin correlated with alterations in miRNA expression, as indicated by Gene Ontology analyses of putative target genes. Overall, our data demonstrate that troxerutin exerts protective effects against UVB-induced damage by regulating miRNA expression.

  15. Heat-induced alterations in the cell nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperthermia may kill eukaryotic cells and may also enhance the radiosensitivity of those cells that survive the heat treatment. Clinically, the possible use of hyperthermia as an adjuvant in the radiotherapeutic treatment of cancer needs the understanding of mechanisms that underlay heat-induced cell death and radiosensitization. By in vitro heating of established human (HeLaS3) and rodent (Ehrlich Ascites Tumor and LM fibroblast) cell lines, both killing and radiosensitization were investigated. (author). 1067 refs.; 76 figs.; 19 tabs

  16. Alemtuzumab treatment alters circulating innate immune cells in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmetspahic, Diana; Ruck, Tobias; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Schwarte, Kathrin; Jörgens, Silke; Scheu, Stefanie; Windhagen, Susanne; Graefe, Bettina; Melzer, Nico; Klotz, Luisa; Arolt, Volker; Wiendl, Heinz; Meuth, Sven G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize changes in myeloid and lymphoid innate immune cells in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) during a 6-month follow-up after alemtuzumab treatment. Methods: Circulating innate immune cells including myeloid cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) were analyzed before and 6 and 12 months after onset of alemtuzumab treatment. Furthermore, a potential effect on granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)–23 production by myeloid cells and natural killer (NK) cell cytolytic activity was determined. Results: In comparison to CD4+ T lymphocytes, myeloid and lymphoid innate cell subsets of patients with MS expressed significantly lower amounts of CD52 on their cell surface. Six months after CD52 depletion, numbers of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) and conventional DCs were reduced compared to baseline. GM-CSF and IL-23 production in DCs remained unchanged. Within the ILC compartment, the subset of CD56bright NK cells specifically expanded under alemtuzumab treatment, but their cytolytic activity did not change. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that 6 months after alemtuzumab treatment, specific DC subsets are reduced, while CD56bright NK cells expanded in patients with MS. Thus, alemtuzumab specifically restricts the DC compartment and expands the CD56bright NK cell subset with potential immunoregulatory properties in MS. We suggest that remodeling of the innate immune compartment may promote long-term efficacy of alemtuzumab and preserve immunocompetence in patients with MS. PMID:27766281

  17. Arsenite induces apoptosis in human mesenchymal stem cells by altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by activating intrinsic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Environmental exposure to arsenic is an important public health issue. The effects of arsenic on different tissues and organs have been intensively studied. However, the effects of arsenic on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have not been reported. This study is designed to investigate the cell death process caused by arsenite and its related underlying mechanisms on MSCs. The rationale is that absorbed arsenic in the blood circulation can reach to the bone marrow and may affect the cell survival of MSCs. Methods: MSCs of passage 1 were purchased from Tulane University, grown till 70% confluency level and plated according to the experimental requirements followed by treatment with arsenite at various concentrations and time points. Arsenite (iAsIII) induced cytotoxic effects were confirmed by cell viability and cell cycle analysis. For the presence of canonic apoptosis markers; DNA damage, exposure of intramembrane phosphotidylserine, protein and m-RNA expression levels were analyzed. Results: iAsIII induced growth inhibition, G2-M arrest and apoptotic cell death in MSCs, the apoptosis induced by iAsIII in the cultured MSCs was, via altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by involving intrinsic pathway. Conclusion: iAsIII can induce apoptosis in bone marrow-derived MSCs via Bcl-2 family proteins, regulating intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Due to the multipotency of MSC, acting as progenitor cells for a variety of connective tissues including bone, adipose, cartilage and muscle, these effects of arsenic may be important in assessing the health risk of the arsenic compounds and understanding the mechanisms of arsenic-induced harmful effects.

  18. Transplantation of progenitor cells after reperfused acute myocardial infarction: evaluation of perfusion and myocardial viability with FDG-PET and thallium SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doebert, Natascha; Berner, Uwe; Menzel, Christian; Hamscho, Nadja; Gruenwald, Frank [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Britten, Martina; Assmus, Birgit; Lehmann, Ralf; Schaechinger, Volker; Zeiher, Andreas M. [Department of Cardiology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Dimmeler, Stefanie [Department of Molecular Cardiology, University of Frankfurt (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    Clinical outcome after myocardial infarction depends on the extent of irreversibly damaged myocardium. Implantation of bone marrow-/circulating blood-derived progenitor cells has been shown to improve contractile cardiac function after myocardial infarction in both experimental and initial clinical studies. In the present study, first observations of the effect of local intracoronary progenitor cell infusion on the regeneration of infarcted cardiac tissue after acute myocardial infarction was evaluated by means of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) and {sup 201}Tl single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Twenty-six patients underwent intracoronary infusion of bone marrow-derived (BMCs) (15 patients) or circulating blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) (11 patients) 4{+-}2 days after acute myocardial infarction. Based on a left ventricular segmentation model (17 segments), mean signal intensities as a parameter of viability and perfusion in the infarct zone and non-infarct areas were calculated quantitatively by PET and SPECT at baseline and at 4 months of follow-up. Transplantation of progenitor cells was associated with a significant increase in the mean signal intensity (MSI) in the infarct zone from 54.5% (25th and 75th percentiles: 47.7%, 60.0%) to 58.0% (52.7%, 66.7%) on PET (P=0.013) and from 58.0% (49.5%, 63.0%) to 61.5% (52.5%, 70.2%) on SPECT (P=0.005). Global left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) increased from 53.5% (42.6%, 60.0%) to 58.0% (53.0%, 65.8%) (P<0.001). In the five patients without an increase in MSI on PET, LVEF changed from 60.0% (50.0%, 64.0%) to 72.0% (64.0%, 75.5%) at follow-up. PET and SPECT did not show any significant changes in MSI in the non-infarct areas [from 73% (68.5%, 76.2%) to 73% (69.7%, 78.0%) for PET and from 72.0% (66.5%, 77.6%) to 73.0% (67.5%, 78.2%) for SPECT]. There were no significant differences in myocardial viability and perfusion between BMC and EPC infusion

  19. Altered effector function of peripheral cytotoxic cells in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corne Jonathan M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is mounting evidence that perforin and granzymes are important mediators in the lung destruction seen in COPD. We investigated the characteristics of the three main perforin and granzyme containing peripheral cells, namely CD8+ T lymphocytes, natural killer (NK; CD56+CD3- cells and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were isolated and cell numbers and intracellular granzyme B and perforin were analysed by flow cytometry. Immunomagnetically selected CD8+ T lymphocytes, NK (CD56+CD3- and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells were used in an LDH release assay to determine cytotoxicity and cytotoxic mechanisms were investigated by blocking perforin and granzyme B with relevant antibodies. Results The proportion of peripheral blood NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells in smokers with COPD (COPD subjects was significantly lower (0.6% than in healthy smokers (smokers (2.8%, p +CD3- cells from COPD subjects were significantly less cytotoxic than in smokers (16.8% vs 51.9% specific lysis, p +CD3+ cells (16.7% vs 52.4% specific lysis, p +CD3- and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells from smokers and HNS. Conclusion In this study, we show that the relative numbers of peripheral blood NK (CD56+CD3- and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells in COPD subjects are reduced and that their cytotoxic effector function is defective.

  20. Chidamide, a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, inhibits the viability of MDS and AML cells by suppressing JAK2/STAT3 signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sida; Guo, Juan; Zhao, Youshan; Fei, Chengming; Zheng, Qingqing; Li, Xiao; Chang, Chunkang

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have indicated that histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity is always increased in a lot of human tumors, and inhibition of HDAC activity is a promising new strategy in the treatment of cancers. Chidamide, a novel HDAC inhibitor of the benzamide class, is currently under clinical trials. In this study, we aimed to investigate the antitumor activity of Chidamide on myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines and explore the possible mechanism. Chidamide exhibited efficient anti-proliferative activity on MDS and AML cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, accompanied by cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and cell apoptosis. Importantly, Chidamide possessed potent HDAC inhibition property, as evaluated by HDAC activity analysis and acetylation of histone H3 and H4. Moreover, Chidamide significantly increased the expression of Suppressors of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), reduced the expression of Janus activated kinases 2 (JAK2) and Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and inhibited STAT3 downstream genes, including c-Myc, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1, which are involved in cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis. Therefore, we demonstrate that Chidamide exhibits potent inhibitory effect on cell viability of MDS and AML cells, and the possible mechanism may lie in the downregulation of JAK2/STAT3 signaling through SOCS3 upregulation. Our data provide rationale for clinical investigations of Chidamide in MDS and AML. PMID:27508038

  1. Bio-green synthesis of Ag-GO, Au-GO and Ag-Au-GO nanocomposites using Azadirachta indica: its application in SERS and cell viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hareesh, K.; Williams, J. F.; Dhole, N. A.; Kodam, K. M.; Bhoraskar, V. N.; Dhole, S. D.

    2016-07-01

    Silver-graphene oxide, Gold-graphene oxide, Silver-Gold-graphene oxide nanocomposites were synthesized from Neem leaves (Azadirachta indica) extract using a bio-green one-pot method. The synthesized bio-green nanocomposites were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, x-ray diffractogram, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results indicated the decoration of ˜10 nm of silver, ˜20 nm of gold and ˜15 nm of silver-gold nanoparticles on a graphene oxide sheet. The synthesized nanocomposites showed enhancement in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy with alizarin and also enhancement in cell viability of Chang liver cell lines which may be due to a synergetic effect of nanoparticles and graphene oxide.

  2. Real-time direct cell concentration and viability determination using a fully automated microfluidic platform for standalone process monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues de Sousa Nunes, Pedro André; Kjaerulff, S.; Dufva, Martin;

    2015-01-01

    and thereby ensure optimal cell production, by prolonging the fermentation cycle and increasing the bioreactor output. In this work, we report on the development of a fully automated microfluidic system capable of extracting samples directly from a bioreactor, diluting the sample, staining the cells......The industrial production of cells has a large unmet need for greater process monitoring, in addition to the standard temperature, pH and oxygen concentration determination. Monitoring the cell health by a vast range of fluorescence cell-based assays can greatly improve the feedback control......, and determining the total cell and dead cells concentrations, within a time frame of 10.3 min. The platform consists of custom made stepper motor actuated peristaltic pumps and valves, fluidic interconnections, sample to waste liquid management and image cytometry-based detection. The total concentration of cells...

  3. Carbofuran alters centrosome and spindle organization, and delays cell division in oocytes and mitotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Ozgur; Semiz, Olcay; Can, Alp

    2015-04-01

    Although many countries banned of its usage, carbofuran (CF) is still one of the most commonly used carbamate derivative insecticides against insects and nematodes in agriculture and household, threatening the human and animal health by contaminating air, water, and food. Our goal was to evaluate the potential toxic effects of CF on mammalian oocytes besides mitotic cells. Caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway was assessed by immunofluorescence and western blot techniques. Alterations in the meiotic spindle formation after CF exposure throughout the in vitro maturation of mice oocyte-cumulus complexes (COCs) were analyzed by using a 3D confocal laser microscope. Maturation efficiency and kinetics were assessed by direct observation of the COCs. Results indicated that the number of TUNEL-positive cells increased in CF-exposed groups, particularly higher doses (>250 µM) in a dose-dependent fashion. The ratio of anticleaved caspase-3 labeled cells in those groups positively correlated with TUNEL-positivity. Western blot analysis confirmed a significant increase in active caspase-3 activity. CF caused a dose-dependent accumulation of oocytes at prometaphase-I (PM-I) of meiosis. Partial loss of spindle microtubules (MTs) was noted, which consequently gave rise to a diamond shape spindle. Aberrant pericentrin foci were noted particularly in PM-I and metaphase-I (M-I) stages. Conclusively, CF (1) induces programmed cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and (2) alters spindle morphology most likely through a mechanism that interacts with MT assembly and/or disorientation of pericentriolar proteins. Overall, data suggest that CF could give rise to aneuploidy or cell death in higher doses, therefore reduce fertilization and implantation rates.

  4. Arsenic trioxide inhibits viability of pancreatic cancer stem cells in culture and in a xenograft model via binding to SHH-Gli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han JB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Jin-bin Han,1,2 Feng Sang,3 Jin-jia Chang,1,4 Yong-qiang Hua,1,2 Wei-dong Shi,1,2 Li-hua Tang,1,2 Lu-ming Liu1,2 1Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, 3The Center for AIDS Research of the First Affiliated Hospital of Henan University of TCM, Zhengzhou, 4Department of Medical Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Objective: Overexpression of the sonic hedgehog (SHH signaling pathway is an essential characteristic of pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs and arsenic trioxide (ATO is described as a SHH inhibitor. This study evaluates whether ATO has the potential to inhibit viability of PCSCs via binding to SHH-Gli proteins. Methods: Cell counting kit-8 and flow cytometry were used for analyzing apoptosis in cells in vitro. The animal model was an athymic nude mouse model bearing subcutaneous xenografts of SW1990 pancreatic cancer cells. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay and immunohistochemistry were used for tumor tissue analysis. The interaction between Gli1 and ATO was examined by a confocal system and an ultraviolet absorption spectrum assay. Results: ATO induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells, especially CD24+CD44+ cells in vitro. Combination treatment of ATO and low dose gemcitabine inhibited tumor growth by 60.9% (P = 0.004, and decreased the expression of CD24, CD44, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family, member A1 significantly in vivo. ATO changed the structure of the recombinant Gli1 zinc finger peptides in a cell-free condition and the binding action of ATO to recombinant Gli1 was observed in cultured pancreatic cancer cells. Conclusion: ATO may have the potential to inhibit viability of PCSCs via binding to SHH-Gli proteins in vitro and in vivo. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, stem cells, gemcitabine, arsenic trioxide, sonic

  5. Bio-hybrid interfaces to study neuromorphic functionalities: New multidisciplinary evidences of cell viability on poly(anyline) (PANI), a semiconductor polymer with memristive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez-Hernandez, Leon J; Cornella, Nicola; Pasquardini, Laura; Battistoni, Silvia; Vidalino, Laura; Vanzetti, Lia; Caponi, Silvia; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Iannotta, Salvatore; Pederzolli, Cecilia; Macchi, Paolo; Musio, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The interfacing of artificial devices with biological systems is a challenging field that crosses several disciplines ranging from fundamental research (biophysical chemistry, neurobiology, material and surface science) to frontier technological application (nanotechnology, bioelectronics). The memristor is the fourth fundamental circuit element, whose electrical properties favor applications in signal processing, neural networks, and brain-computer interactions and it represents a new frontier for technological applications in many fields including the nanotechnologies, bioelectronics and the biosensors. Using multidisciplinary approaches, covering surface science, cell biology and electrophysiology, we successfully implemented a living bio-hybrid system constituted by cells adhering to films of poly(aniline) (PANI), a semiconductor polymer having memristive properties assembled with polyelectrolytes. Here we tested whether the PANI devices could support survivor, adhesion and differentiation of several cell lines, including the neuron-like SHSY5Y cells. Moreover, we performed electrophysiology on these cells showing that the biophysical properties are retained with differences occurring in the recorded ion currents. Taken together, the cell viability here reported is the key requirement to design and develop a reliable functional memristor-based bio-hybrid able to mimic neuronal activity and plasticity. PMID:26263829

  6. Restored viability and function of dental pulp cells on poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based dental resin supplemented with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, N; Yamada, M; Paranjpe, A; Tsukimura, N; Kubo, K; Jewett, A; Ogawa, T

    2008-12-01

    This study examines cytotoxicity of poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based dental temporary filling resin to dental pulp cells, and the potential amelioration of the toxicity with an anti-oxidant amino-acid, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Dental pulp cells extracted from rat maxillary incisors were cultured on the resin material with or without NAC incorporation, or on the polystyrene. The cultures were supplied with osteoblastic media, containing dexamethasone. Forty five percent of cells on the PMMA dental resin were necrotic at 24h after seeding. However, this percentage was reduced to 27% by incorporating NAC in the resin, which was the level equivalent to that in the culture on polystyrene. The culture on the untreated resin was found to be negative for alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity at days 5 and 10 or von Kossa mineralized nodule formation at day 20. In contrast, some areas of the cultures on NAC-incorporated resin substrates were ALP and von Kossa positive. Collagen I and dentin sialoprotein genes were barely expressed in day 7 culture on the untreated resin. However, those genes were expressed in the culture on the resin with NAC. These results suggest that the decreased cell viability and the nearly completely suppressed odontoblast-like cell phenotype of dental pulp cells cultured on PMMA dental resin can be salvaged to a biologically significant degree by the incorporation of NAC in the resin.

  7. Bio-hybrid interfaces to study neuromorphic functionalities: New multidisciplinary evidences of cell viability on poly(anyline) (PANI), a semiconductor polymer with memristive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez-Hernandez, Leon J; Cornella, Nicola; Pasquardini, Laura; Battistoni, Silvia; Vidalino, Laura; Vanzetti, Lia; Caponi, Silvia; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Iannotta, Salvatore; Pederzolli, Cecilia; Macchi, Paolo; Musio, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The interfacing of artificial devices with biological systems is a challenging field that crosses several disciplines ranging from fundamental research (biophysical chemistry, neurobiology, material and surface science) to frontier technological application (nanotechnology, bioelectronics). The memristor is the fourth fundamental circuit element, whose electrical properties favor applications in signal processing, neural networks, and brain-computer interactions and it represents a new frontier for technological applications in many fields including the nanotechnologies, bioelectronics and the biosensors. Using multidisciplinary approaches, covering surface science, cell biology and electrophysiology, we successfully implemented a living bio-hybrid system constituted by cells adhering to films of poly(aniline) (PANI), a semiconductor polymer having memristive properties assembled with polyelectrolytes. Here we tested whether the PANI devices could support survivor, adhesion and differentiation of several cell lines, including the neuron-like SHSY5Y cells. Moreover, we performed electrophysiology on these cells showing that the biophysical properties are retained with differences occurring in the recorded ion currents. Taken together, the cell viability here reported is the key requirement to design and develop a reliable functional memristor-based bio-hybrid able to mimic neuronal activity and plasticity.

  8. Cell surface glycan alterations in epithelial mesenchymal transition process of Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Due to recurrence and metastasis, the mortality of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is high. It is well known that the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT and glycan of cell surface glycoproteins play pivotal roles in tumor metastasis. The goal of this study was to identify HCC metastasis related differential glycan pattern and their enzymatic basis using a HGF induced EMT model. METHODOLOGY: HGF was used to induce HCC EMT model. Lectin microarray was used to detect the expression of cell surface glycan and the difference was validated by lectin blot and fluorescence cell lectin-immunochemistry. The mRNA expression levels of glycotransferases were determined by qRT-PCR. RESULTS: After HGF treatment, the Huh7 cell lost epithelial characteristics and obtained mesenchymal markers. These changes demonstrated that HGF could induce a typical cell model of EMT. Lectin microarray analysis identified a decreased affinity in seven lectins ACL, BPL, JAC, MPL, PHA-E, SNA, and SBA to the glycan of cell surface glycoproteins. This implied that glycan containing T/Tn-antigen, NA2 and bisecting GlcNAc, Siaα2-6Gal/GalNAc, terminal α or βGalNAc structures were reduced. The binding ability of thirteen lectins, AAL, LCA, LTL, ConA, NML, NPL, DBA, HAL, PTL II, WFL, ECL, GSL II and PHA-L to glycan were elevated, and a definite indication that glycan containing terminal αFuc and ± Sia-Le, core fucose, α-man, gal-β(α GalNAc, β1,6 GlcNAc branching and tetraantennary complex oligosaccharides structures were increased. These results were further validated by lectin blot and fluorescence cell lectin-immunochemistry. Furthermore, the mRNA expression level of Mgat3 decreased while that of Mgat5, FucT8 and β3GalT5 increased. Therefore, cell surface glycan alterations in the EMT process may coincide with the expression of glycosyltransferase. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study systematically clarify the alterations of cell surface

  9. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B;

    1996-01-01

    transfected. Parvalbumin-transfected and mock-transfected cells were loaded with the calcium indicator fura-2 and were exposed, in the same dish, to different concentrations of the calcium ionophore A23187 or to KCI. The results show that parvalbumin-transfected PCC7 cells had much better calcium buffering...

  10. Effects of altered gravity on the cell cycle, actin cytoskeleton and proteome in Physarum polycephalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Gao, Yong; Li, Shuijie; Sun, Yeqing

    Some researchers suggest that the changes of cell cycle under the effect of microgravity may be associated with many serious adverse physiological changes. In the search for underlying mechanisms and possible new countermeasures, we used the slime mold Physarum polycephalum in which all the nuclei traverse the cell cycle in natural synchrony to study the effects of altered gravity on the cell cycle, actin cytoskeleton and proteome. In parallel, the cell cycle was analyzed in Physarum incubated (1) in altered gravity for 20 h, (2) in altered gravity for 40 h, (3) in altered gravity for 80 h, and (4) in ground controls. The cell cycle, the actin cytoskeleton, and proteome in the altered gravity and ground controls were examined. The results indicated that the duration of the G2 phase was lengthened 20 min in high aspect ratio vessel (HARV) for 20 h, and prolonged 2 h in altered gravity either for 40 h or for 80 h, whereas the duration of other phases in the cell cycle was unchanged with respect to the control. The microfilaments in G2 phase had a reduced number of fibers and a unique abnormal morphology in altered gravity for 40 h, whereas the microfilaments in other phases of cell cycle were unchanged when compared to controls. Employing classical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), we examined the effect of the altered gravity on P. polycephalum proteins. The increase in the duration of G2 phase in altered gravity for 40 h was accompanied by changes in the 2-DE protein profiles, over controls. Out of a total of 200 protein spots investigated in G2 phase, which were reproducible in repeated experiments, 72 protein spots were visually identified as specially expressed, and 11 proteins were up-regulated by 2-fold and 28 proteins were down-regulated by 2-fold over controls. Out of a total of three low-expressed proteins in G2 phase in altered gravity for 40 h, two proteins were unknown proteins, and one protein was spherulin 3b by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS

  11. xCELLigence system for real-time label-free monitoring of growth and viability of cell lines from hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Serra, Jordi; Gutierrez, Antonio; Muñoz-Capó, Saúl; Navarro-Palou, María; Ros, Teresa; Amat, Juan Carlos; Lopez, Bernardo; Marcus, Toni F; Fueyo, Laura; Suquia, Angela G; Gines, Jordi; Rubio, Francisco; Ramos, Rafael; Besalduch, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The xCELLigence system is a new technological approach that allows the real-time cell analysis of adherent tumor cells. To date, xCELLigence has not been able to monitor the growth or cytotoxicity of nonadherent cells derived from hematological malignancies. The basis of its technology relies on the use of culture plates with gold microelectrodes located in their base. We have adapted the methodology described by others to xCELLigence, based on the pre-coating of the cell culture surface with specific substrates, some of which are known to facilitate cell adhesion in the extracellular matrix. Pre-coating of the culture plates with fibronectin, compared to laminin, collagen, or gelatin, significantly induced the adhesion of most of the leukemia/lymphoma cells assayed (Jurkat, L1236, KMH2, and K562). With a fibronectin substrate, nonadherent cells deposited in a monolayer configuration, and consequently, the cell growth and viability were robustly monitored. We further demonstrate the feasibility of xCELLigence for the real-time monitoring of the cytotoxic properties of several antineoplastic agents. In order to validate this technology, the data obtained through real-time cell analysis was compared with that obtained from using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. This provides an excellent label-free tool for the screening of drug efficacy in nonadherent cells and discriminates optimal time points for further molecular analysis of cellular events associated with treatments, reducing both time and costs. PMID:24959085

  12. Altered Membrane Potential and Electrolyte in Sickle Cell Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JK Nnodim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study has been to evaluate the level of membrane potential and electrolyte in sickle cell disease patients. Material and methods: 100 sickle cell patients in steady state ages 5 to 30 years attending General Hospital Owerri were used in the study while 100 normal subjects (HbAA were used as control. Also 30 HbSS in crisis have been involved. Results: The results obtained showed that the level of membrane potential was significantly lower in sickle cell anemia as compared to the controls. Also, the level of the electrolyte was found significantly decreased in HbSS when compared with HbAA at P<0.05. Conclusion: The membrane potential translates to energy which means that there is less energy in sickle cell disease which is linked to electrolyte imbalance. Hence people with sickle disease should be monitored closely for their electrolytes to avoid crisis.

  13. Inhibition of CXCL12/CXCR4 autocrine/paracrine loop reduces viability of human glioblastoma stem-like cells affecting self-renewal activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells (TICs) drive glioblastoma (GBM) development, invasiveness and drug resistance. Distinct molecular pathways might regulate CSC biology as compared to cells in the bulk tumor mass, representing potential therapeutic targets. Chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 control proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in GBM cell lines and primary cultures, but little is known about their activity in GBM CSCs. We demonstrate that CSCs, isolated from five human GBMs, express CXCR4 and release CXCL12 in vitro, although different levels of expression and secretion were observed in individual cultures, as expected for the heterogeneity of GBMs. CXCL12 treatment induced Akt-mediated significant pro-survival and self-renewal activities, while proliferation was induced at low extent. The role of CXCR4 signaling in CSC survival and self-renewal was further demonstrated using the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 that reduced self-renewal and survival with greater efficacy in the cultures that released higher CXCL12 amounts. The specificity of CXCL12 in sustaining CSC survival was demonstrated by the lack of AMD3100-dependent inhibition of viability in differentiated cells derived from the same GBMs. These findings, although performed on a limited number of tumor samples, suggest that the CXCL12/CXCR4 interaction mediates survival and self-renewal in GBM CSCs with high selectivity, thus emerging as a candidate system responsible for maintenance of cancer progenitors, and providing survival benefits to the tumor

  14. Alteration of mammalian cell metabolism by dynamic nutrient feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Weichang; Rehm, Jutta; Europa, Anna; Hu, Wei-Shou

    1997-01-01

    The metabolism of hybridoma cells was controlled to reduce metabolic formation in fed-batch cultures by dynamically feeding a salt-free nutrient concentrate. For this purpose, on-line oxygen uptake rate (OUR) measurement was used to estimate the metabolic demand of hybridoma cells and to determine the feeding rate of a concentrated solution of salt-free DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with other medium components. The ratios among glucose, glutamine and other medium components in the feeding nut...

  15. Alterations in auxin homeostasis suppress defects in cell wall function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaire J Steinwand

    Full Text Available The plant cell wall is a highly dynamic structure that changes in response to both environmental and developmental cues. It plays important roles throughout plant growth and development in determining the orientation and extent of cell expansion, providing structural support and acting as a barrier to pathogens. Despite the importance of the cell wall, the signaling pathways regulating its function are not well understood. Two partially redundant leucine-rich-repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs, FEI1 and FEI2, regulate cell wall function in Arabidopsis thaliana roots; disruption of the FEIs results in short, swollen roots as a result of decreased cellulose synthesis. We screened for suppressors of this swollen root phenotype and identified two mutations in the putative mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α homolog, IAA-Alanine Resistant 4 (IAR4. Mutations in IAR4 were shown previously to disrupt auxin homeostasis and lead to reduced auxin function. We show that mutations in IAR4 suppress a subset of the fei1 fei2 phenotypes. Consistent with the hypothesis that the suppression of fei1 fei2 by iar4 is the result of reduced auxin function, disruption of the WEI8 and TAR2 genes, which decreases auxin biosynthesis, also suppresses fei1 fei2. In addition, iar4 suppresses the root swelling and accumulation of ectopic lignin phenotypes of other cell wall mutants, including procuste and cobra. Further, iar4 mutants display decreased sensitivity to the cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor isoxaben. These results establish a role for IAR4 in the regulation of cell wall function and provide evidence of crosstalk between the cell wall and auxin during cell expansion in the root.

  16. Genetic Alterations in Gliosarcoma and Giant Cell Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Eun; Ohta, Takashi; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Satomi, Kaishi; Capper, David; Pierscianek, Daniela; Sure, Ulrich; Vital, Anne; Paulus, Werner; Mittelbronn, Michel; Antonelli, Manila; Kleihues, Paul; Giangaspero, Felice; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The majority of glioblastomas develop rapidly with a short clinical history (primary glioblastoma IDH wild-type), whereas secondary glioblastomas progress from diffuse astrocytoma or anaplastic astrocytoma. IDH mutations are the genetic hallmark of secondary glioblastomas. Gliosarcomas and giant cell glioblastomas are rare histological glioblastoma variants, which usually develop rapidly. We determined the genetic patterns of 36 gliosarcomas and 19 giant cell glioblastomas. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations were absent in all 36 gliosarcomas and in 18 of 19 giant cell glioblastomas analyzed, indicating that they are histological variants of primary glioblastoma. Furthermore, LOH 10q (88%) and TERT promoter mutations (83%) were frequent in gliosarcomas. Copy number profiling using the 450k methylome array in 5 gliosarcomas revealed CDKN2A homozygous deletion (3 cases), trisomy chromosome 7 (2 cases), and monosomy chromosome 10 (2 cases). Giant cell glioblastomas had LOH 10q in 50% and LOH 19q in 42% of cases. ATRX loss was detected immunohistochemically in 19% of giant cell glioblastomas, but absent in 17 gliosarcomas. These and previous results suggest that gliosarcomas are a variant of, and genetically similar to, primary glioblastomas, except for a lack of EGFR amplification, while giant cell glioblastoma occupies a hybrid position between primary and secondary glioblastomas. PMID:26443480

  17. NS1-binding protein abrogates the elevation of cell viability by the influenza A virus NS1 protein in association with CRKL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •NS1 induced excessive phosphorylation of ERK and elevated cell viability. •NS1-BP expression and CRKL knockdown abolished survival effect of NS1. •NS1-BP and NS1 formed the complex through the interaction with CRKL-SH3(N). -- Abstract: The influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a multifunctional virulence factor consisting of an RNA binding domain and several Src-homology (SH) 2 and SH3 binding motifs, which promotes virus replication in the host cell and helps to evade antiviral immunity. NS1 modulates general host cell physiology in association with various cellular molecules including NS1-binding protein (NS1-BP) and signaling adapter protein CRK-like (CRKL), while the physiological role of NS1-BP during influenza A virus infection especially in association with NS1 remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the intracellular association of NS1-BP, NS1 and CRKL to elucidate the physiological roles of these molecules in the host cell. In HEK293T cells, enforced expression of NS1 of A/Beijing (H1N1) and A/Indonesia (H5N1) significantly induced excessive phosphorylation of ERK and elevated cell viability, while the over-expression of NS1-BP and the abrogation of CRKL using siRNA abolished such survival effect of NS1. The pull-down assay using GST-fusion CRKL revealed the formation of intracellular complexes of NS1-BP, NS1 and CRKL. In addition, we identified that the N-terminus SH3 domain of CRKL was essential for binding to NS1-BP using GST-fusion CRKL-truncate mutants. This is the first report to elucidate the novel function of NS1-BP collaborating with viral protein NS1 in modulation of host cell physiology. In addition, an alternative role of adaptor protein CRKL in association with NS1 and NS1-BP during influenza A virus infection is demonstrated

  18. AKT2-knockdown suppressed viability with enhanced apoptosis, and attenuated chemoresistance to temozolomide of human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Y

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yong Cui,1,* Jing Lin,1,* Jianling Zuo,2 Lei Zhang,1 Yan Dong,1 Guohan Hu,1 Chun Luo,1 Juxiang Chen,1 Yicheng Lu1 1Department of Neurosurgery, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The AKT2 kinase (protein kinase Bβ is overexpressed in high-grade gliomas. Upregulation of the AKT2 gene has been previously observed in glioblastoma patients suffering from chemotherapy failure and tumor progress. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of AKT2 on viability and chemoresistance in the human glioblastoma cell line U251. The U251 cell line was stably transfected with short hairpin RNA (shRNA targeting AKT2. U251 cells underexpressing AKT2 were then examined for viability with temozolomide (TMZ treatment, and tested for cell apoptosis both in vitro and in tumor-implanted mice. Next, expressions of several chemoresistance-related molecules were measured by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. The results showed that the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 of AKT2 shRNA-transfected cells was significantly lower compared with Lenti-GFP-transfected and nontransfected controls and that the tumor growth of the AKT2-shRNA and TMZ combined-treated mice was obviously suppressed in either mass or volume. Concomitantly, the apoptosis of TMZ-treated tumor cells was significantly enhanced after knockdown of AKT2, as measured by flow cytometry and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL analysis. Furthermore, AKT2-inhibition in TMZ-treated glioblastoma U251 cells upregulated apoptotic effector caspase-3, whereas it downregulated antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, DNA repairing protein MGMT, and drug efflux pump protein MRP1. Our study

  19. NS1-binding protein abrogates the elevation of cell viability by the influenza A virus NS1 protein in association with CRKL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Masaya [Department of Cancer Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Nishihara, Hiroshi, E-mail: hnishihara@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Translational Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Hasegawa, Hideki [Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Tashiro, Masato [Influenza Virus Research Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Sinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Wang, Lei [Department of Translational Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Kimura, Taichi; Tanino, Mishie; Tsuda, Masumi [Department of Cancer Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Tanaka, Shinya [Department of Cancer Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Department of Translational Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •NS1 induced excessive phosphorylation of ERK and elevated cell viability. •NS1-BP expression and CRKL knockdown abolished survival effect of NS1. •NS1-BP and NS1 formed the complex through the interaction with CRKL-SH3(N). -- Abstract: The influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a multifunctional virulence factor consisting of an RNA binding domain and several Src-homology (SH) 2 and SH3 binding motifs, which promotes virus replication in the host cell and helps to evade antiviral immunity. NS1 modulates general host cell physiology in association with various cellular molecules including NS1-binding protein (NS1-BP) and signaling adapter protein CRK-like (CRKL), while the physiological role of NS1-BP during influenza A virus infection especially in association with NS1 remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the intracellular association of NS1-BP, NS1 and CRKL to elucidate the physiological roles of these molecules in the host cell. In HEK293T cells, enforced expression of NS1 of A/Beijing (H1N1) and A/Indonesia (H5N1) significantly induced excessive phosphorylation of ERK and elevated cell viability, while the over-expression of NS1-BP and the abrogation of CRKL using siRNA abolished such survival effect of NS1. The pull-down assay using GST-fusion CRKL revealed the formation of intracellular complexes of NS1-BP, NS1 and CRKL. In addition, we identified that the N-terminus SH3 domain of CRKL was essential for binding to NS1-BP using GST-fusion CRKL-truncate mutants. This is the first report to elucidate the novel function of NS1-BP collaborating with viral protein NS1 in modulation of host cell physiology. In addition, an alternative role of adaptor protein CRKL in association with NS1 and NS1-BP during influenza A virus infection is demonstrated.

  20. Lipid body accumulation alters calcium signaling dynamics in immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greineisen, William E; Speck, Mark; Shimoda, Lori M N; Sung, Carl; Phan, Nolwenn; Maaetoft-Udsen, Kristina; Stokes, Alexander J; Turner, Helen

    2014-09-01

    There is well-established variability in the numbers of lipid bodies (LB) in macrophages, eosinophils, and neutrophils. Similarly to the steatosis observed in adipocytes and hepatocytes during hyperinsulinemia and nutrient overload, immune cell LB hyper-accumulate in response to bacterial and parasitic infection and inflammatory presentations. Recently we described that hyperinsulinemia, both in vitro and in vivo, drives steatosis and phenotypic changes in primary and transformed mast cells and basophils. LB reach high numbers in these steatotic cytosols, and here we propose that they could dramatically impact the transcytoplasmic signaling pathways. We compared calcium release and influx responses at the population and single cell level in normal and steatotic model mast cells. At the population level, all aspects of FcɛRI-dependent calcium mobilization, as well as activation of calcium-dependent downstream signaling targets such as NFATC1 phosphorylation are suppressed. At the single cell level, we demonstrate that LB are both sources and sinks of calcium following FcɛRI cross-linking. Unbiased analysis of the impact of the presence of LB on the rate of trans-cytoplasmic calcium signals suggest that LB enrichment accelerates calcium propagation, which may reflect a Bernoulli effect. LB abundance thus impacts this fundamental signaling pathway and its downstream targets.

  1. Bactericidal Antibiotics Increase Hydroxyphenyl Fluorescein Signal by Altering Cell Morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulander, Wilhelm; Wang, Ying; Folkesson, Sven Anders;

    2014-01-01

    It was recently proposed that for bactericidal antibiotics a common killing mechanism contributes to lethality involving indirect stimulation of hydroxyl radical (OH center dot) formation. Flow cytometric detection of OH center dot by hydroxyphenyl fluorescein (HPF) probe oxidation was used...... to support this hypothesis. Here we show that increased HPF signals in antibiotics-exposed bacterial cells are explained by fluorescence associated with increased cell size, and do not reflect reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration. Independently of antibiotics, increased fluorescence was seen...... for elongated cells expressing the oxidative insensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP). Although our data question the role of ROS in lethality of antibiotics other research approaches point to important interplays between basic bacterial metabolism and antibiotic susceptibility. To underpin...

  2. Bioactive and biocompatible copper containing glass-ceramics with remarkable antibacterial properties and high cell viability designed for future in vivo trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, R A; Magyari, K; Vulpoi, A; Trandafir, D L; Licarete, E; Todea, M; Ştefan, R; Voica, C; Vodnar, D C; Simon, S; Papuc, I; Baia, L

    2016-07-19

    In the present study our interest is focused on finding the efficiency of 60SiO2·(32 - x)CaO·8P2O5·xCuO (mol%) glass-ceramics, with 0 ≤ x ≤ 4 mol%, in terms of bioactivity, biocompatibility, antibacterial properties and cell viability in order to determine the most appropriate composition for their further use in in vivo trials. The sol-gel synthesized samples show a preponderantly amorphous structure with a few crystallization centers associated with the formation of an apatite and calcium carbonate crystalline phases. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectra revealed slightly modified absorption bands due to the addition of copper oxide, while the information derived from the measurements performed by transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showed the presence of ions and metallic copper species. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis indicated the presence of copper metallic species, in a reduced amount, only on the sample surface with the highest Cu content. Regarding in vitro assessment of bioactivity, the results obtained by X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, demonstrated the formation of a calcium phosphate layer on all investigated sample surfaces. The inhibitory effect of the investigated samples was more significant on the Pseudomonas aeruginosa than the Staphylococcus aureus strain, the sample with the lowest concentration of copper oxide (0.5 mol%) being also the most efficient in both bacterial cultures. This sample also exhibits a very good bactericidal activity, for the other samples it was necessary to use a higher quantity to inhibit and kill the bacterial species. The secondary structure of adsorbed albumin presents few minor changes, indicating the biocompatibility of the glass-ceramics. The cell viability assay shows a good proliferation rate on samples with 0.5 and 1.5 mol% CuO, although all glass-ceramic samples exhibited a good in vivo

  3. Partially Purified Extracts of Sea Anemone Anemonia viridis Affect the Growth and Viability of Selected Tumour Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulati, Matteo; Longo, Alessandra; Vlah, Sara; Bennici, Carmelo; Bonura, Angela; Tagliavia, Marcello; Mazzola, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, marine species have been investigated for the presence of natural products with anticancer activity. Using reversed phase chromatography, low molecular weight proteins were fractionated from the sea anemone Anemonia viridis. Four different fractions were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity by means of erythrocyte haemolysis test, MTS, and LDH assays. Finally, the antiproliferative activities of three of these fractions were studied on PC3, PLC/PRF/5, and A375 human cancer cell lines. Our analysis revealed that the four fractions showed different protein contents and diverse patterns of activity towards human PBMC and cancer cell lines. Interestingly, fractions III and IV exerted cytotoxic effects on human cells. Conversely, fractions I and II displayed very low toxic effects associated with antiproliferative activities on cancer cell lines. PMID:27725939

  4. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B;

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...

  5. Lowering extracellular chloride concentration alters outer hair cell shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecola, R P; Bobbin, R P

    1992-08-01

    In general, increasing external K+ concentration, as well as exposure to hypotonic medium, induces a shortening of outer hair cells (OHCs) accompanied by an increase in width and volume. One possible mechanism suggested for these changes is a movement of Cl- and/or water across the cell membrane. We therefore examined the role of Cl- in OHC volume maintenance by testing the effect of decreasing extracellular Cl- concentration on OHC length and shape. In addition, the effect of hypotonic medium was examined. OHCs were isolated from guinea pig cochleae, mechanically dissociated and dispersed, and placed in a modified Hanks balanced salt solution (HBS). Exposing the cells to a Cl(-)-free HBS produced an initial shortening, which was rapidly followed by an increase in length. After about 9 min of exposure to Cl(-)-free HBS, the cells appeared to lose all water and collapsed. Upon return to normal HBS, the OHCs returned to their normal shape. We speculate that the collapse of the OHCs may be due to the loss of intracellular Cl-, which, in turn, resulted in the loss of intracellular K+ and water. The results indicate that Cl- contributes greatly to the maintenance of OHC volume. In addition, we confirmed that isolated OHCs swell in hypotonic medium and maintain their swollen state until returned to normal medium. The mechanism for maintenance of the swollen state is unknown.

  6. Fucoidan from Sargassum sp. and Fucus vesiculosus reduces cell viability of lung carcinoma and melanoma cells in vitro and activates natural killer cells in mice in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ale, Marcel Tutor; Maruyama, Hiroko; Tamauchi, Hidekazu;

    2011-01-01

    Fucoidan is known to exhibit crucial biological activities, including anti-tumor activity. In this study, we examined the influence of crude fucoidan extracted from Sargassum sp. (MTA) and Fucus vesiculosus (SIG) on Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LCC) and melanoma B16 cells (MC). In vitro studies were...

  7. The role of the CNOT1 subunit of the CCR4-NOT complex in mRNA deadenylation and cell viability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kentaro Ito; Akinori Takahashi; Masahiro Morita; Toru Suzuki; Tadashi Yamamoto

    2011-01-01

    The human CCR4-NOT deadenylase complex consists of at least nine enzymatic and non-enzymatic subunits.Accumulating evidence suggests that the non-enzymatic subunits are involved in the regulation of mRNA deadenylation,although their precise roles remain to be established.In this study,we addressed the function of the CNOT1 subunit by depleting its expression in HeLa cells.Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the sub G1 fraction was increased in CNOT1-depleted cells.Virtually,the same level of the sub G1 fraction was seen when cells were treated with a mixture of siRNAs targeted against all enzymatic subunits,suggesting that CNOT1 depletion induces apoptosis by destroying the CCR4-NOT-associated deadenylase activity.Further analysis revealed that CNOT1 depletion leads to a reduction in the amount of other CCR4-NOT subunits.Importantly,the specific activity of the CNOT6L immunoprecipitates-associated deadenylase from CNOT1-depleted cells was less than that from control cells.The formation of P-bodies,where mRNA decay is reported to take place,was largely suppressed in CNOT1-depleted cells.Therefore,CNOT1 has an important role in exhibiting enzymatic activity of the CCR4-NOT complex,and thus is critical in control of mRNA deadenylation and mRNA decay.We further showed that CNOT1 depletion enhanced CHOP mRNA levels and activated caspase-4,which is associated with endoplasmic reticulum ER stress-induced apoptosie.Taken together,CNOT1 depletion structurally and functionally deteriorates the CCR4-NOT complex and induces stabilization of mRNAs,which results in the increment of translation causing ER stress-mediated apoptosie.We conclude that CNOT1 contributes to cell viability by securing the activity of the CCR4-NOT deadenylase.

  8. JNK1/2 Activation by an Extract from the Roots of Morus alba L. Reduces the Viability of Multidrug-Resistant MCF-7/Dox Cells by Inhibiting YB-1-Dependent MDR1 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn Kyung Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells acquire anticancer drug resistance during chemotherapy, which aggravates cancer disease. MDR1 encoded from multidrug resistance gene 1 mainly causes multidrug resistance phenotypes of different cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrate that JNK1/2 activation by an extract from the root of Morus alba L. (White mulberry reduces doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7/Dox cell viability by inhibiting YB-1 regulation of MDR1 gene expression. When MCF-7 or MCF-7/Dox cells, where MDR1 is highly expressed were treated with an extract from roots or leaves of Morus alba L., respectively, the root extract from the mulberry (REM but not the leaf extract (LEM reduced cell viabilities of both MCF-7 and MCF-7/Dox cells, which was enhanced by cotreatment with doxorubicin. REM but not LEM further inhibited YB-1 nuclear translocation and its regulation of MDR1 gene expression. Moreover, REM promoted phosphorylation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2 and JNK1/2 inhibitor, SP600125 and rescued REM inhibition of both MDR1 expression and viabilities in MCF-7/Dox cells. Consistently, overexpression of JNK1, c-Jun, or c-Fos inhibited YB-1-dependent MDR1 expression and reduced viabilities in MCF-7/Dox cells. In conclusion, our data indicate that REM-activated JNK-cJun/c-Fos pathway decreases the viability of MCF-7/Dox cells by inhibiting YB-1-dependent MDR1 gene expression. Thus, we suggest that REM may be useful for treating multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

  9. The effect of red-allotrope selenium nanoparticles on head and neck squamous cell viability and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Christopher E; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Given their low toxicity and natural presence in the human diet, selenium nanoparticles have been established as potential candidates for the treatment of numerous cancers. Red-allotrope selenium nanoparticles (rSeNPs) were synthesized and characterized in this study. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells were cultured and exposed to rSeNPs at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100 μg rSeNP/mL media for 1-3 days. The toxicity of rSeNP toward HNSCC and HDFs was analyzed. Results indicated that the particles were approximately four times as cytotoxic toward HNSCC compared to HDFs, with their respective IC50 values at 19.22 and 59.61 μg rSeNP/mL media. Using statistical analysis, an effective dosage range for killing HNSCC cells while simultaneously minimizing damage to HDFs over a 3-day incubation period was established at 20-55 μg rSeNP/mL media. Observations showed that doses of rSeNP lysosomes and mitochondria. Analysis of cell morphology showed that the rSeNPs primarily induced HNSCC apoptosis. Collectively, these results indicated that rSeNPs are a promising option for treating HNSCC without adversely affecting healthy cells and without resorting to the use of harmful chemotherapeutics. PMID:27536104

  10. Butachlor, a suspected carcinogen, alters growth and transformation characteristics of mouse liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Y H; Chung, P C; Chang, Y C; Ngo, F Q; Hsu, K Y; Chen, F D

    2000-12-01

    Butachlor is a widely used herbicide in Asia and South America. Previous investigations have indicated that it is a suspected carcinogen. To understand more about the biological effects of butachlor on cultured cells and the mechanism(s) of its carcinogenicity, we studied the alteration of the growth characteristics that was induced by butachlor in normal mouse liver cells (BNL CL2). This study demonstrates that butachlor decreases the population-doubling time of BNL CL2 cells, suggesting that it stimulates cell proliferation. To support this finding, a thymidine incorporation assay was conducted and a similar result that butachlor stimulates cell proliferation was elucidated. In addition, we show that butachlor increases the saturation density of the BNL CL2 cells. When combined with the tumor initiator N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), butachlor transforms cells efficiently, as demonstrated by loss of contact inhibition. These findings indicate that butachlor alters the growth characteristics of BNL CL2 cells and suggest that butachlor may induce malignant transformation through stimulation of cell proliferation, alteration of cell cycle regulation, and suppression of cell density-dependent inhibition of proliferation.

  11. Use of Genetically Altered Stem Cells for the Treatment of Huntington’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T. Crane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of stem cells for the treatment of Huntington’s disease (HD garnered much attention prior to the turn of the century. Several studies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have indicated that these cells have enormous therapeutic potential in HD and other disorders. Advantages of using MSCs for cell therapies include their ease of isolation, rapid propagation in culture, and favorable immunomodulatory profiles. However, the lack of consistent neuronal differentiation of transplanted MSCs has limited their therapeutic efficacy to slowing the progression of HD-like symptoms in animal models of HD. The use of MSCs which have been genetically altered to overexpress brain derived neurotrophic factor to enhance support of surviving cells in a rodent model of HD provides proof-of-principle that these cells may provide such prophylactic benefits. New techniques that may prove useful for cell replacement therapies in HD include the use of genetically altering fate-restricted cells to produce induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. These iPSCs appear to have certain advantages over the use of embryonic stem cells, including being readily available, easy to obtain, less evidence of tumor formation, and a reduced immune response following their transplantation. Recently, transplants of iPSCs have shown to differentiate into region-specific neurons in an animal model of HD. The overall successes of using genetically altered stem cells for reducing neuropathological and behavioral deficits in rodent models of HD suggest that these approaches have considerable potential for clinical use. However, the choice of what type of genetically altered stem cell to use for transplantation is dependent on the stage of HD and whether the end-goal is preserving endogenous neurons in early-stage HD, or replacing the lost neurons in late-stage HD. This review will discuss the current state of stem cell technology for treating the different stages of HD and

  12. Zeolite inorganic scaffolds for novel biomedical application: Effect of physicochemical characteristic of zeolite membranes on cell adhesion and viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavolaro, Palmira; Catalano, Silvia; Martino, Guglielmo; Tavolaro, Adalgisa

    2016-09-01

    The design, preparation and selection of inorganic materials useful as functional scaffolds for cell adhesion is a complex question based both on the understanding of the chemical behavior of the materials and individual cells, and on their interactions. Pure zeolite membranes formed from synthetic crystals offer chemically-capable being modulated silanolic surfaces that are amenable to adhesion and growth of fibroblasts. We report the facile preparation of reusable, very longlasting, biocompatible, easily sterilized synthetic scaffolds in a zeolite membrane configuration, which are very stable in aqueous media (apart from ionic strength and pH values), able to adsorb pollutant species and to confine undesired toxic ions (present in culture media). This may ultimately lead to the development of cell supports for economic antibiotic-free culture media.

  13. Light parameters influence cell viability in antifungal photodynamic therapy in a fluence and rate fluence-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prates, Renato A.; da Silva, Eriques G.; Yamada, Aécio M.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Paula, Claudete R.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of light parameters on yeast cells. It has been proposed for many years that photodynamic therapy (PDT) can inactivate microbial cells. A number of photosensitizer and light sources were reported in different light parameters and in a range of dye concentrations. However, much more knowledge concerning the importance of fluence, fluence rate and exposure time are required for a better understanding of the photodynamic efficiency. Suspensions (106 CFU/mL) of Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii were used. Two fluence rates, 100 and 300 mW/cm2 were compared at 3, 6, and 9 min of irradiation, resulting fluences from 18 to 162 J/cm2. The light source was a laser emitting at λ = 660 nm with output power adjusted at 30 and 90 mW. As photosensitizer, one hundred-μM methylene blue was used. Temperature was monitored to verify possible heat effect and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was evaluated. The same fluence in different fluence rates showed dissimilar levels of inactivation on yeast cells as well as in ROS formation. In addition, the increase of the fluence rate showed an improvement on cell photoinactivation. PDT was efficient against yeast cells (6 log reduction), and no significant temperature increase was observed. Fluence per se should not be used as an isolate parameter to compare photoinactivation effects on yeast cells. The higher fluence rate was more effective than the lower one. Furthermore, an adequate duration of light exposure cannot be discarded.

  14. The effect of red-allotrope selenium nanoparticles on head and neck squamous cell viability and growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan CE

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Christopher E Hassan,1 Thomas J Webster1,2 1Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 2Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Given their low toxicity and natural presence in the human diet, selenium nanoparticles have been established as potential candidates for the treatment of numerous cancers. Red-allotrope selenium nanoparticles (rSeNPs were synthesized and characterized in this study. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC and human dermal fibroblast (HDF cells were cultured and exposed to rSeNPs at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100 µg rSeNP/mL media for 1–3 days. The toxicity of rSeNP toward HNSCC and HDFs was analyzed. Results indicated that the particles were approximately four times as cytotoxic toward HNSCC compared to HDFs, with their respective IC50 values at 19.22 and 59.61 µg rSeNP/mL media. Using statistical analysis, an effective dosage range for killing HNSCC cells while simultaneously minimizing damage to HDFs over a 3-day incubation period was established at 20–55 µg rSeNP/mL media. Observations showed that doses of rSeNP <5 µg rSeNP/mL media resulted in cell proliferation. Transmission electron microscopy images of HNSCC and HDF cells, both treated with rSeNPs, revealed that the rSeNPs became localized in the cytoplasm near the lysosomes and mitochondria. Analysis of cell morphology showed that the rSeNPs primarily induced HNSCC apoptosis. Collectively, these results indicated that rSeNPs are a promising option for treating HNSCC without adversely affecting healthy cells and without resorting to the use of harmful chemotherapeutics. Keywords: selenium, nanotechnology, biomaterials, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, human dermal fibroblasts, cancer 

  15. Production of savinase and population viability of Bacillus clausii during high-cell-density fed-batch cultivations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Torben; Michaelsen, S.; Wumpelmann, M.;

    2003-01-01

    The growth and product formation of a Savinase-producing Bacillus clausii were investigated in high-cell-density fed-batch cultivations with both linear and exponential feed profiles. The highest specific productivity of Savinase was observed shortly after the end of the initial batch phase for a...

  16. Alteration of cardiac progenitor cell potency in GRMD dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, M; Berardi, E; Crippa, S; Toelen, J; Barthelemy, I; Micheletti, R; Chuah, M; Vandendriessche, T; Debyser, Z; Blot, S; Sampaolesi, M

    2012-01-01

    Among the animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dog is considered the best model in terms of size and pathological onset of the disease. As in human patients presenting with DMD or Becker muscular dystrophies (BMD), the GRMD is related to a spontaneous X-linked mutation of dystrophin and is characterized by myocardial lesions. In this respect, GRMD is a useful model to explore cardiac pathogenesis and for the development of therapeutic protocols. To investigate whether cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) isolated from healthy and GRMD dogs may differentiate into myocardial cell types and to test the feasibility of cell therapy for cardiomyopathies in a preclinical model of DMD, CPCs were isolated from cardiac biopsies of healthy and GRMD dogs. Gene profile analysis revealed an active cardiac transcription network in both healthy and GRMD CPCs. However, GRMD CPCs showed impaired self-renewal and cardiac differentiation. Population doubling and telomerase analyses highlighted earlier senescence and proliferation impairment in progenitors isolated from GRMD cardiac biopsies. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that only wt CPCs showed efficient although not terminal cardiac differentiation, consistent with the upregulation of cardiac-specific proteins and microRNAs. Thus, the pathological condition adversely influences the cardiomyogenic differentiation potential of cardiac progenitors. Using PiggyBac transposon technology we marked CPCs for nuclear dsRed expression, providing a stable nonviral gene marking method for in vivo tracing of CPCs. Xenotransplantation experiments in neonatal immunodeficient mice revealed a valuable contribution of CPCs to cardiomyogenesis with homing differences between wt and dystrophic progenitors. These results suggest that cardiac degeneration in dystrophinopathies may account for the progressive exhaustion of local cardiac progenitors and shed light on cardiac stemness in

  17. Cigarette Smoke Alters the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Siggins

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Effects of tobacco smoke on hematologic derangements have received little attention. This study employed a mouse model of cigarette smoke exposure to explore the effects on bone marrow niche function. While lung cancer is the most widely studied consequence of tobacco smoke exposure, other malignancies, including leukemia, are associated with tobacco smoke exposure. Animals received cigarette smoke exposure for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for 9 months. Results reveal that the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC pool size is reduced by cigarette smoke exposure. We next examined the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on one supporting cell type of the niche, the mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. Smoke exposure decreased the number of MSCs. Transplantation of naïve HSPCs into irradiated mice with cigarette smoke exposure yielded fewer numbers of engrafted HSPCs. This result suggests that smoke-exposed mice possess dysfunctional niches, resulting in abnormal hematopoiesis. Co-culture experiments using MSCs isolated from control or cigarette smoke-exposed mice with naïve HSPCs in vitro showed that MSCs from cigarette smoke-exposed mice generated marked expansion of naïve HSPCs. These data show that cigarette smoke exposure decreases in vivo MSC and HSC number and also increases pro-proliferative gene expression by cigarette smoke-exposed MSCs, which may stimulate HSPC expansion. These results of this investigation are clinically relevant to both bone marrow donors with a history of smoking and bone marrow transplant (BMT recipients with a history of smoking.

  18. PDGF induced microRNA alterations in cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Minghai; Rossi, Simona; Chelladurai, Bhadrani; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Ntukogu, Obiageli; Ivan, Mircea; Calin, George A.; Matei, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) regulates gene transcription by binding to specific receptors. PDGF plays a critical role in oncogenesis in brain and other tumors, regulates angiogenesis, and remodels the stroma in physiologic conditions. Here, we show by using microRNA (miR) arrays that PDGFs regulate the expression and function of miRs in glioblastoma and ovarian cancer cells. The two PDGF ligands AA and BB affect expression of several miRs in ligand-specific manner; the most robust c...

  19. Members of the synaptobrevin/vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) family in Drosophila are functionally interchangeable in vivo for neurotransmitter release and cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Stewart, Bryan A; Niemeyer, Barbara A; Burgess, Robert W; McCabe, Brian D; Lin, Peter; Boulianne, Gabrielle; O'Kane, Cahir J; Schwarz, Thomas L

    2002-10-15

    Synaptobrevins or VAMPs are vesicle-associated membrane proteins, often called v-SNARES, that are important for vesicle transport and fusion at the plasma membrane. Drosophila has two characterized members of this gene family: synaptobrevin (syb) and neuronal synaptobrevin (n-syb). Mutant phenotypes and gene-expression patterns indicate that n-Syb is exclusively neuronal and required only for synaptic vesicle secretion, whereas Syb is ubiquitous and, as shown here, essential for cell viability. When the eye precursor cells were made homozygous for syb(-), the eye failed to develop. In contrast, n-syb(-) eye clones developed appropriately but failed to activate downstream neurons. To determine whether the two proteins are structurally specialized to accomplish these distinct in vivo functions, we have driven the expression of each gene in the absence of the other to look for phenotypic rescue. We find that expression of n-syb during eye development can rescue the cell lethality of the syb mutations, as can rat VAMP2 and cellubrevin. Expression of syb can restore synaptic transmission to n-syb mutants as assayed both by electroretinogram and recordings of excitatory junctional currents at the neuromuscular junction. Therefore, we find that Syb, which usually is not involved in synaptic function, can mediate Ca(2+)-triggered synaptic activity and that no particular specialization of the v-SNARE is required to differentiate synaptic exocytosis from other forms.

  20. Radiation-induced alterations of histone post-translational modification levels in lymphoblastoid cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced alterations in posttranslational histone modifications (PTMs) may affect the cellular response to radiation damage in the DNA. If not reverted appropriately, altered PTM patterns may cause long-term alterations in gene expression regulation and thus lead to cancer. It is therefore important to characterize radiation-induced alterations in PTM patterns and the factors affecting them. A lymphoblastoid cell line established from a normal donor was used to screen for alterations in methylation levels at H3K4, H3K9, H3K27, and H4K20, as well as acetylation at H3K9, H3K56, H4K5, and H4K16, by quantitative Western Blot analysis at 15 min, 1 h and 24 h after irradiation with 2 Gy and 10 Gy. The variability of alterations in acetylation marks was in addition investigated in a panel of lymphoblastoid cell lines with differing radiosensitivity established from lung cancer patients. The screening procedure demonstrated consistent hypomethylation at H3K4me3 and hypoacetylation at all acetylation marks tested. In the panel of lymphoblastoid cell lines, however, a high degree of inter-individual variability became apparent. Radiosensitive cell lines showed more pronounced and longer lasting H4K16 hypoacetylation than radioresistant lines, which correlates with higher levels of residual γ-H2AX foci after 24 h. So far, the factors affecting extent and duration of radiation-induced histone alterations are poorly defined. The present work hints at a high degree of inter-individual variability and a potential correlation of DNA damage repair capacity and alterations in PTM levels

  1. Toxoplasma gondii: effects of {sup 60} Co ionizing radiation in the viability and infectivity, detected in vitro in LLC-MK2 cells and in vivo in C57BL/6J mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiramoto, Roberto M.; Almeida, Beatriz S.V.; Cardoso, Roselaine P.A.; Andrade Junior, Heitor F. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1997-12-01

    Toxoplasmosis, caused by Toxoplasma gondii, promotes devasting disease in fetus and AIDS patients. The longlife immunity of natural infection is inefficient in eliminate tissue infective cysts. Few immunization programs were tested, mostly with attenuated strains. Ionizing radiation were used with successful in vaccine production, without reproductive ability with a relatively normal physiology until reproduction. Here, we tested several schedules of {sup 60} Co irradiation of tachzoites from RH strain of T. gondii, from peritoneal exudate or suspensions of LLC-MK2 infected cells, to optimize the viability and sterility of the irradiated agents. The tachzoites were exposed to 50, 100 and 200 Gy in a GammaCell 220 at 366 Gy/h. The viability was tested by motility, integrity and Trypan Blue dye exclusion. All irradiation schedules maintained a high (>90%) viability of the parasites. Dilutions were injected in C57Bl/6j mice with induction of specific antibodies, no clinical disease but uncertain sterility. Infection of LLC--MK2 cells showed that viable and reproductive parasites were often found in 50 Gy irradiated cells, rarely found in 100 Gy irradiated cells, rarely found in 100 Gy irradied cells, with no growth occuring with 200 Gy irradiated tachzoites. Our data show that 200 Gy {sup 60} Co irradiation blocks the reproductive capacity without affecting the short term viability of tachzoites of T. gondii. (author). 11 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Prenatal cadmium exposure alters postnatal immune cell development and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Miranda L.; Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu

    2012-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is generally found in low concentrations in the environment due to its widespread and continual use, however, its concentration in some foods and cigarette smoke is high. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. This study was designed to investigate the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd on the immune system of the offspring. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at two time points following birth (2 and 7 weeks of age). Thymocyte and splenocyte phenotypes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Prenatal Cd exposure did not affect thymocyte populations at 2 and 7 weeks of age. In the spleen, the only significant effect on phenotype was a decrease in the number of macrophages in male offspring at both time points. Analysis of cytokine production by stimulated splenocytes demonstrated that prenatal Cd exposure decreased IL-2 and IL-4 production by cells from female offspring at 2 weeks of age. At 7 weeks of age, splenocyte IL-2 production was decreased in Cd-exposed males while IFN-γ production was decreased from both male and female Cd-exposed offspring. The ability of the Cd-exposed offspring to respond to immunization with a S. pneumoniae vaccine expressing T-dependent and T-independent streptococcal antigens showed marked increases in the levels of both T-dependent and T-independent serum antibody levels compared to control animals. CD4{sup +}FoxP3{sup +}CD25{sup +} (nTreg) cell percentages were increased in the spleen and thymus in all Cd-exposed offspring except in the female spleen where a decrease was seen. CD8{sup +}CD223{sup +} T cells were markedly decreased in the spleens in all offspring at 7 weeks of age. These findings suggest that even very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can

  3. xCELLigence system for real-time label-free monitoring of growth and viability of cell lines from hematological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez-Serra J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Jordi Martinez-Serra,1 Antonio Gutierrez,1 Saúl Muñoz-Capó,1 María Navarro-Palou,1 Teresa Ros,1 Juan Carlos Amat,1 Bernardo Lopez,1 Toni F Marcus,1 Laura Fueyo,2 Angela G Suquia,2 Jordi Gines,3 Francisco Rubio,1 Rafael Ramos,4 Joan Besalduch11Department of Hematology, 2Department of Clinical Analysis, 3Department of Pharmacy, 4Department of Pathology, University Hospital Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Balearic Islands, SpainAbstract: The xCELLigence system is a new technological approach that allows the real-time cell analysis of adherent tumor cells. To date, xCELLigence has not been able to monitor the growth or cytotoxicity of nonadherent cells derived from hematological malignancies. The basis of its technology relies on the use of culture plates with gold microelectrodes located in their base. We have adapted the methodology described by others to xCELLigence, based on the pre-coating of the cell culture surface with specific substrates, some of which are known to facilitate cell adhesion in the extracellular matrix. Pre-coating of the culture plates with fibronectin, compared to laminin, collagen, or gelatin, significantly induced the adhesion of most of the leukemia/lymphoma cells assayed (Jurkat, L1236, KMH2, and K562. With a fibronectin substrate, nonadherent cells deposited in a monolayer configuration, and consequently, the cell growth and viability were robustly monitored. We further demonstrate the feasibility of xCELLigence for the real-time monitoring of the cytotoxic properties of several antineoplastic agents. In order to validate this technology, the data obtained through real-time cell analysis was compared with that obtained from using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. This provides an excellent label-free tool for the screening of drug efficacy in nonadherent cells and discriminates optimal time points for further molecular analysis of cellular events associated with treatments

  4. Endothelial Cell Morphology and Migration are Altered by Changes in Gravitational Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhado, Caroline; Sanford, Gary; Harris-Hooker, Sandra

    1997-01-01

    Many of the physiological changes of the cardiovascular system during space flight may originate from the dysfunction of basic biological mechanisms caused by microgravity. The weightlessness affects the system when blood and other fluids move to the upper body causing the heart to enlarge to handle the increased blood flow to the upper extremities and decrease circulating volume. Increase arterial pressure triggers baroreceptors which signal the brain to adjust heart rate. Hemodynarnic studies indicate that the microgravity-induced headward fluid redistribution results in various cardiovascular changes such as; alteration of vascular permeability resulting in lipid accumulation in the lumen of the vasculature and degeneration of the the vascular wall, capillary alteration with extensive endothelial invagination. Achieving a true microgravity environment in ground based studies for prolonged periods is virtually impossible. The application of vector-averaged gravity to mammalian cells using horizontal clinostat produces alterations of cellular behavior similar to those observed in microgravity. Similarly, the low shear, horizontally rotating bioreactor (originally designed by NASA) also duplicates several properties of microgravity. Additionally, increasing gravity, i.e., hypcrgravity is easily achieved. Hypergravity has been found to increase the proliferation of several different cell lines (e.g., chick embryo fibroblasts) while decreasing cell motility and slowing liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy. The effect of altered gravity on cells maybe similar to those of other physical forces, i.e. shear stress. Previous studies examining laminar flow and shear stress on endothelial cells found that the cells elongate, orient with the direction of flow, and reorganize their F-actin structure, with concomitant increase in cell stiffness. These studies suggest that alterations in the gravity environment will change the behavior of most cells, including

  5. Cohesin acetyltransferase Esco2 is a cell viability factor and is required for cohesion in pericentric heterochromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Whelan, Gabriela; Kreidl, Emanuel; Wutz, Gordana; Egner, Alexander; Peters, Jan-Michael; Eichele, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Sister chromatid cohesion, mediated by cohesin and regulated by Sororin, is essential for chromosome segregation. In mammalian cells, cohesion establishment and Sororin recruitment to chromatin‐bound cohesin depends on the acetyltransferases Esco1 and Esco2. Mutations in Esco2 cause Roberts syndrome, a developmental disease in which mitotic chromosomes have a ‘railroad’ track morphology. Here, we show that Esco2 deficiency leads to termination of mouse development at pre‐ and post‐implantatio...

  6. Targeting atypical protein kinase C iota reduces viability in glioblastoma stem-like cells via a notch signaling mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Emma; Lang, Verena; Bohlen, Jonathan; Bethke, Frederic; Puccio, Laura; Tichy, Diana; Herold-Mende, Christel; Hielscher, Thomas; Lichter, Peter; Goidts, Violaine

    2016-10-15

    In a previous study, Protein Kinase C iota (PRKCI) emerged as an important candidate gene for glioblastoma (GBM) stem-like cell (GSC) survival. Here, we show that PKCι is overexpressed and activated in patient derived GSCs compared with normal neural stem cells and normal brain lysate, and that silencing of PRKCI in GSCs causes apoptosis, along with loss of clonogenicity and reduced proliferation. Notably, PRKCI silencing reduces tumor growth in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. PKCι has been intensively studied as a therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer, resulting in the identification of an inhibitor, aurothiomalate (ATM), which disrupts the PKCι/ERK signaling axis. However, we show that, although sensitive to pharmacological inhibition via a pseudosubstrate peptide inhibitor, GSCs are much less sensitive to ATM, suggesting that PKCι acts along a different signaling axis in GSCs. Gene expression profiling of PRKCI-silenced GSCs revealed a novel role of the Notch signaling pathway in PKCι mediated GSC survival. A proximity ligation assay showed that Notch1 and PKCι are in close proximity in GSCs. Targeting PKCι in the context of Notch signaling could be an effective way of attacking the GSC population in GBM. PMID:27299852

  7. Toxoplasma gondii is dependent on glutamine and alters migratory profile of infected host bone marrow derived immune cells through SNAT2 and CXCR4 pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ping Lee

    Full Text Available The obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, disseminates through its host inside infected immune cells. We hypothesize that parasite nutrient requirements lead to manipulation of migratory properties of the immune cell. We demonstrate that 1 T. gondii relies on glutamine for optimal infection, replication and viability, and 2 T. gondii-infected bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs display both "hypermotility" and "enhanced migration" to an elevated glutamine gradient in vitro. We show that glutamine uptake by the sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2 is required for this enhanced migration. SNAT2 transport of glutamine is also a significant factor in the induction of migration by the small cytokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 in uninfected DCs. Blocking both SNAT2 and C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4; the unique receptor for SDF-1 blocks hypermotility and the enhanced migration in T. gondii-infected DCs. Changes in host cell protein expression following T. gondii infection may explain the altered migratory phenotype; we observed an increase of CD80 and unchanged protein level of CXCR4 in both T. gondii-infected and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated DCs. However, unlike activated DCs, SNAT2 expression in the cytosol of infected cells was also unchanged. Thus, our results suggest an important role of glutamine transport via SNAT2 in immune cell migration and a possible interaction between SNAT2 and CXCR4, by which T. gondii manipulates host cell motility.

  8. Influence of low contents of superhydrophilic MWCNT on the properties and cell viability of electrospun poly (butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Bruno V M; Silva, Aline S; Melo, Gabriela F S; Vasconscellos, Luana M R; Marciano, Fernanda R; Lobo, Anderson O

    2016-02-01

    The use of poly (butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) in tissue engineering, more specifically in bone regeneration, has been underexplored to date due to its poor mechanical resistance. In order to overcome this drawback, this investigation presents an approach into the preparation of electrospun nanocomposite fibers from PBAT and low contents of superhydrophilic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (sMWCNT) (0.1-0.5wt.%) as reinforcing agent. We employed a wide range of characterization techniques to evaluate the properties of the resulting electrospun nanocomposites, including Field Emission Scanning Electronic Microscopy (FE-SEM), Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM), tensile tests, contact angle measurements (CA) and biological assays. FE-SEM micrographs showed that while the addition of sMWCNT increased the presence of beads on the electrospun fibers' surfaces, the increase of the neat charge density due to their presence reduced the fibers' average diameter. The tensile test results pointed that sMWCNT acted as reinforcement in the PBAT electrospun matrix, enhancing its tensile strength (from 1.3 to 3.6MPa with addition of 0.5wt.% of sMWCNT) and leading to stiffer materials (lower elongation at break). An evaluation using MG63 cells revealed cell attachment into the biomaterials and that all samples were viable for biomedical applications, once no cytotoxic effect was observed. MG-63 cells osteogenic differentiation, measured by ALP activity, showed that mineralized nodules formation was increased in PBAT/0.5%CNTs when compared to control group (cells). This investigation demonstrated a feasible novel approach for producing electrospun nanocomposites from PBAT and sMWCNT with enhanced mechanical properties and adequate cell viability levels, which allows for a wide range of biomedical applications for these materials. PMID:26652433

  9. Mitochondrial aquaporin-8 knockdown in human hepatoma HepG2 cells causes ROS-induced mitochondrial depolarization and loss of viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchissio, Maria Julia; Francés, Daniel Eleazar Antonio; Carnovale, Cristina Ester; Marinelli, Raúl Alberto, E-mail: rmarinel@unr.edu.ar

    2012-10-15

    Human aquaporin-8 (AQP8) channels facilitate the diffusional transport of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} across membranes. Since AQP8 is expressed in hepatic inner mitochondrial membranes, we studied whether mitochondrial AQP8 (mtAQP8) knockdown in human hepatoma HepG2 cells impairs mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release, which may lead to organelle dysfunction and cell death. We confirmed AQP8 expression in HepG2 inner mitochondrial membranes and found that 72 h after cell transfection with siRNAs targeting two different regions of the human AQP8 molecule, mtAQP8 protein specifically decreased by around 60% (p < 0.05). Studies in isolated mtAQP8-knockdown mitochondria showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release, assessed by Amplex Red, was reduced by about 45% (p < 0.05), an effect not observed in digitonin-permeabilized mitochondria. mtAQP8-knockdown cells showed an increase in mitochondrial ROS, assessed by dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (+ 120%, p < 0.05) and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (− 80%, p < 0.05), assessed by tetramethylrhodamine-coupled quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoTempol prevented ROS accumulation and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential. Cyclosporin A, a mitochondrial permeability transition pore blocker, also abolished the mtAQP8 knockdown-induced mitochondrial depolarization. Besides, the loss of viability in mtAQP8 knockdown cells verified by MTT assay, LDH leakage, and trypan blue exclusion test could be prevented by cyclosporin A. Our data on human hepatoma HepG2 cells suggest that mtAQP8 facilitates mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release and that its defective expression causes ROS-induced mitochondrial depolarization via the mitochondrial permeability transition mechanism, and cell death. -- Highlights: ► Aquaporin-8 is expressed in mitochondria of human hepatoma HepG2 cells. ► Aquaporin-8 knockdown impairs mitochondrial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} release and increases ROS. ► Aquaporin

  10. Alterations of FHIT Gene and P16 Gene in Nickel Transformed Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI-DONG JI; JIA-KUN CHEN; JIA-CHUN LU; ZHONG-LIANG WU; FEI YI; SU-MEI FENG

    2006-01-01

    To study the alterations of FHIT gene and P16 gene in malignant transformed human bronchial epithelial cells induced by crystalline nickel sulfide using an immoral human bronchial epithelial cell line, and to explore the molecular mechanism of nickel carcinogenesis. Methods 16HBE cells were treated 6 times with different concentrations of NiS in vitro, and the degree of malignant transformation was determined by assaying the anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity. Malignant transformed cells and tumorigenic cells were examined for alterations of FHIT gene and P16 gene using RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, silver staining PCR-SSCP and Western blotting. Results NiS-treated cells exhibited overlapping growth. Compared with that of negative control cells, soft agar colony formation efficiency of NiS-treated cells showed significant increases (P<0.01) and dose-dependent effects. NiS-treated cells could form tumors in nude mice, and a squamous cell carcinoma was confirmed by histopathological examination. No mutation of exon 2 and exons 2-3, no abnormal expression in p16 gene and mutation of FHIT exons 5-8 and exons 1-4 or exons 5-9 were observed in transformed cells and tumorigenic cells. However, aberrant transcripts or loss of expression of the FHIT gene and Fhit protein was observed in transformed cells and tumorigenic cells. One of the aberrant transcripts in the FHIT gene was confirmed to have a deletion of exon 6, exon 7, exon 8, and an insertion of a 36 bp sequence replacing exon 6-8. Conclusions The FHIT gene rather than the P16 gene, plays a definite role in nickel carcinogenesis. Alterations of the FHIT gene induced by crystalline NiS may be a molecular event associated with carcinogen, chromosome fragile site instability and cell malignant transformation. FHIT may be an important target gene activated by nickel and other exotic carcinogens.

  11. Altered Cell Mechanics from the Inside: Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Integrate with and Restructure Actin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad F. Islam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics.

  12. Survival and viability of cells from iron depositing bacterial strains in pretests for the EXPOSE-R2-Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Feyh, N.; de Vera, J.P.; Szewzyk, U

    2014-01-01

    Five environmental isolates (Pseudomonas sp. BS1, Hyphomonas sp. BS2, Tetrasphaera sp. FL1, Pedomicrobium sp. FL6 and Leptothrix sp. OT_B_406) were chosen for EXPOSE-R2 including pretests (EVT1/2, SVT) due to their ability to form Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide-containing biofilms as observed for natural communities of iron depositing bacteria. Samples were produced by drying iron-containing cell aggregates on Mars regolith simulant mixtures (S-/P-MRS) (Böttger et al., 2012). Different Mars- and ...

  13. Sonic hedgehog enhances somite cell viability and formation of primary slow muscle fibers in avian segmented mesoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, G M; Lee, J W; Stockdale, F E

    1999-09-01

    Primary skeletal muscle fibers first form in the segmented portions of paraxial mesoderm called somites. Although the neural tube and notochord are recognized as crucial in patterning myogenic cell lineages during avian and mammalian somitic myogenesis, the source, identities, and actions of the signals governing this process remain controversial. It has been shown that signals emanating from the ventral neural tube and/or notochord alone or Shh alone serve to activate MyoD expression in somites. However, beyond a role in initiating MyoD expression, little is known about the effects of Shh on primary muscle fiber formation in somites of higher vertebrates. The studies reported here investigate how the ventral neural tube promotes myogenesis and compare the effects of the ventral neural tube with those of purified Shh protein on fiber formation in somites. We show that purified Shh protein mimics actions of the ventral neural tube on somites including initiation of muscle fiber formation, enhancement of numbers of primary muscle fibers, and particularly, the formation of primary fibers that express slow myosin. There is a marked increase in slow myosin expression in fibers in response to Shh as somites mature. The effects of ventral neural tube on fiber formation can be blocked by disrupting the Shh signaling pathway by increasing the activity of somitic cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that apoptosis is a dominant fate of somite cells, but not somitic muscle fibers, when cultured in the absence of the neural tube, and that application of Shh protein to somites reduced apoptosis. The block to apoptosis by Shh is a manifestation of the maturity of the somite with a progressive increase in the block as somites are displaced rostrally from somite III forward. We conclude that purified Shh protein in mimicking the effects of the ventral neural tube on segmented mesoderm can exert pleiotropic effects during primary myogenesis

  14. Effect of starch-based biomaterials on the in vitro proliferation and viability of osteoblast-like cells

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, A.P.; Cruz, H. R.; Coutinho, O P; Reis, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of starch-based polymers was investigated using different methodologies. Poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) was used as a control for comparison purposes. Extracts of four different starch-based blends (corn starch and ethylene vinyl alcohol (SEVA-C), corn starch and cellulose acetate (SCA), corn starch and polycaprolactone (SPCL) and starch and poly-lactic acid (SPLA70) were prepared in culture medium and their toxicity was analysed. Osteoblast-like cells (SaOs-2) were incubated with...

  15. Alterations in radioresistance of eucaryotic cells after the transfer of genomic wildtype DNA and metallothionein genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presented paper describes experiments concerning the alteration of radiosensitivity of eucaryotic cells after gene transfer. Ionizing radiation (γ- or X-ray) induces DNA single- or double strand breaks, which are religated by an unknown repair system. Repair deficient cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. In the experiments described, cells from a patient with the heritable disease Ataxia telangiectasia were used as well as two X-ray sensitive CHO mutant cell lines. After gene transfer of an intact human DNA repair gene or a metallothionein gene the cells should regain radioresistance. (orig.)

  16. Effects of Corroded and Non-Corroded Biodegradable Mg and Mg Alloys on Viability, Morphology and Differentiation of MC3T3-E1 Cells Elicited by Direct Cell/Material Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostofi, Sepideh; Bonyadi Rad, Ehsan; Wiltsche, Helmar; Fasching, Ulrike; Szakacs, Gabor; Ramskogler, Claudia; Srinivasaiah, Sriveena; Ueçal, Muammer; Willumeit, Regine; Weinberg, Annelie-Martina; Schaefer, Ute

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of biodegradable Mg and Mg alloys on selected properties of MC3T3-E1 cells elicited by direct cell/material interaction. The chemical composition and morphology of the surface of Mg and Mg based alloys (Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd) were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDX, following corrosion in cell culture medium for 1, 2, 3 and 8 days. The most pronounced difference in surface morphology, namely crystal formation, was observed when Pure Mg and Mg2Ag were immersed in cell medium for 8 days, and was associated with an increase in atomic % of oxygen and a decrease of surface calcium and phosphorous. Crystal formation on the surface of Mg10Gd was, in contrast, negligible at all time points. Time-dependent changes in oxygen, calcium and phosphorous surface content were furthermore not observed for Mg10Gd. MC3T3-E1 cell viability was reduced by culture on the surfaces of corroded Mg, Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd in a corrosion time-independent manner. Cells did not survive when cultured on 3 day pre-corroded Pure Mg and Mg2Ag, indicating crystal formation to be particular detrimental in this regard. Cell viability was not affected when cells were cultured on non-corroded Mg and Mg alloys for up to 12 days. These results suggest that corrosion associated changes in surface morphology and chemical composition significantly hamper cell viability and, thus, that non-corroded surfaces are more conducive to cell survival. An analysis of the differentiation potential of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on non-corroded samples based on measurement of Collagen I and Runx2 expression, revealed a down-regulation of these markers within the first 6 days following cell seeding on all samples, despite persistent survival and proliferation. Cells cultured on Mg10Gd, however, exhibited a pronounced upregulation of collagen I and Runx2 between days 8 and 12, indicating an enhancement of osteointegration by this alloy that could be valuable for in vivo orthopedic

  17. Effects of Corroded and Non-Corroded Biodegradable Mg and Mg Alloys on Viability, Morphology and Differentiation of MC3T3-E1 Cells Elicited by Direct Cell/Material Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Mostofi

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of biodegradable Mg and Mg alloys on selected properties of MC3T3-E1 cells elicited by direct cell/material interaction. The chemical composition and morphology of the surface of Mg and Mg based alloys (Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and EDX, following corrosion in cell culture medium for 1, 2, 3 and 8 days. The most pronounced difference in surface morphology, namely crystal formation, was observed when Pure Mg and Mg2Ag were immersed in cell medium for 8 days, and was associated with an increase in atomic % of oxygen and a decrease of surface calcium and phosphorous. Crystal formation on the surface of Mg10Gd was, in contrast, negligible at all time points. Time-dependent changes in oxygen, calcium and phosphorous surface content were furthermore not observed for Mg10Gd. MC3T3-E1 cell viability was reduced by culture on the surfaces of corroded Mg, Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd in a corrosion time-independent manner. Cells did not survive when cultured on 3 day pre-corroded Pure Mg and Mg2Ag, indicating crystal formation to be particular detrimental in this regard. Cell viability was not affected when cells were cultured on non-corroded Mg and Mg alloys for up to 12 days. These results suggest that corrosion associated changes in surface morphology and chemical composition significantly hamper cell viability and, thus, that non-corroded surfaces are more conducive to cell survival. An analysis of the differentiation potential of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on non-corroded samples based on measurement of Collagen I and Runx2 expression, revealed a down-regulation of these markers within the first 6 days following cell seeding on all samples, despite persistent survival and proliferation. Cells cultured on Mg10Gd, however, exhibited a pronounced upregulation of collagen I and Runx2 between days 8 and 12, indicating an enhancement of osteointegration by this alloy that could be valuable for

  18. Effect of anaesthetics and dichlorodifluoromethane on the viability of the cells of Escherichia coli and the activities of some of its enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverty, D.M.; Fennema, O.

    1985-01-01

    Three anaesthetics (halothane, CF/sub 3/CHClBr; Ethrane, F/sub 2/ HCOF/sub 2/CCHClF; cyclopropane) and one other halogenated, short-chain hydrocarbon (F-12, Cl/sub 2/F/sub 2/C) were tested under various conditions to determine their effects on the viability of cells of Escherichia coli and the activities of some of its enzymes. When any of the test chemicals were applied for 60 min at concentrations slightly in excess of saturation, the number of surviving cells decreased substantially, with halothane being the most biocidal of the four chemicals and F-12 the least. Three enzymes (malate dehydrogenase, MD; NADH dehydrogenase; glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, GPD) were tested for activity after treatment of E. coli with the test chemicals. In all instances, GPD was least resistant to inactivation and MD was most resistant. Halothane was most inhibitory followed in order by Ethrane, cyclopropane and F-12. Treatment of E. coli with halothane for 60 min at 23 degrees C and a concentration slightly in excess of saturation, resulted in nearly complete inhibition of all three enzymes.

  19. PLGA-based microparticles loaded with bacterial-synthesized prodigiosin for anticancer drug release: Effects of particle size on drug release kinetics and cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayemi, J D; Danyuo, Y; Dozie-Nwachukwu, S; Odusanya, O S; Anuku, N; Malatesta, K; Yu, W; Uhrich, K E; Soboyejo, W O

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and physicochemical characterization of biodegradable poly (d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based microparticles that are loaded with bacterial-synthesized prodigiosin drug obtained from Serratia marcescens subsp. Marcescens bacteria for controlled anticancer drug delivery. The micron-sized particles were loaded with anticancer drugs [prodigiosin (PG) and paclitaxel (PTX) control] using a single-emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The encapsulation was done in the presence of PLGA (as a polymer matrix) and poly-(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) (as an emulsifier). The effects of processing conditions (on the particle size and morphology) are investigated along with the drug release kinetics and drug-loaded microparticle degradation kinetics. The localization and apoptosis induction by prodigiosin in breast cancer cells is also elucidated along with the reduction in cell viability due to prodigiosin release. The implication of this study is for the potential application of prodigiosin PLGA-loaded microparticles for controlled delivery of cancer drug and treatment to prevent the regrowth or locoregional recurrence, following surgical resection of triple negative breast tumor. PMID:27207038

  20. Spontaneous loss and alteration of antigen receptor expression in mature CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The T-cell receptor CD3 (TCR/CD3) complex plays a central role in antigen recognition and activation of mature T cells, and therefore abnormalities in the expression of the complex should induce unresponsiveness of T cells to antigen stimulus. Using flow cytometry, we detected and enumerated variant cells with loss or alteration of surface TCR/CD3 expression among human mature CD4+ T cells. The presence of variant CD4+ T cells was demonstrated by isolating and cloning them from peripheral blood, and their abnormalities can be accounted for by alterations in TCR expression such as defects of protein expression and partial protein deletion. The variant frequency in peripheral blood increased with aging in normal donors and was highly elevated in patients with ataxia telangiectasia, an autosomal recessive inherited disease with defective DNA repair and variable T-cell immunodeficiency. These findings suggest that such alterations in TCR expression are induced by somatic mutagenesis of TCR genes and can be important factors related to age-dependent and genetic disease-associated T-cell dysfunction. (author)

  1. Study of internalization and viability of multimodal nanoparticles for labeling of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells; Estudo de internalizacao e viabilidade de nanoparticulas multimodal para marcacao de celulas-tronco mesenquimais de cordao umbilical humano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyaki, Liza Aya Mabuchi [Faculdade de Enfermagem, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sibov, Tatiana Tais; Pavon, Lorena Favaro; Mamani, Javier Bustamante; Gamarra, Lionel Fernel, E-mail: tatianats@einstein.br [Instituto do Cerebro - InCe, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    Objective: To analyze multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B in culture media for cell labeling, and to establish a study of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B detection at labeled cells evaluating they viability at concentrations of 10 {mu}g Fe/mL and 100{mu}g Fe/mL. Methods: We performed the analysis of stability of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B in different culture media; the mesenchymal stem cells labeling with multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B; the intracellular detection of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B in mesenchymal stem cells, and assessment of the viability of labeled cells by kinetic proliferation. Results: The stability analysis showed that multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B had good stability in cultured Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's-Low Glucose medium and RPMI 1640 medium. The mesenchymal stem cell with multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B described location of intracellular nanoparticles, which were shown as blue granules co-localized in fluorescent clusters, thus characterizing magnetic and fluorescent properties of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles Rhodamine B. Conclusion: The stability of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B found in cultured Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's-Low Glucose medium and RPMI 1640 medium assured intracellular mesenchymal stem cells labeling. This cell labeling did not affect viability of labeled mesenchymal stem cells since they continued to proliferate for five days. (author)

  2. Viabilidade de células de levedura em massas congeladas de pão francês Leavening cells viability in frozen French bread dough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Pereira Kechinski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A elaboração e o armazenamento de pães crus congelados têm se mostrado vantajosos para os pontos de venda e para o consumidor final. O primeiro, pela redução da perda e menor exigência de espaço físico e mão-de-obra especializada, e o segundo, por disponibilizar pães sempre frescos. O presente trabalho objetivou verificar a influência do armazenamento sobre a viabilidade das células de levedura em massas congeladas de pão francês. Para tanto, as massas foram elaboradas seguindo a metodologia de massa direta: os ingredientes (pré-mistura para pão francês, fermento fresco e água foram misturados até o desenvolvimento completo do glúten; então foi dividida em porções de 60g e modelada. O congelamento foi realizado em ultracongelador a -32°C, e o armazenamento foi feito em câmaras com temperaturas de -18°C e -40°C. Para a estimativa de vida de prateleira, analisou-se a cinética da redução da viabilidade das leveduras. Esse teste foi realizado em placas de Petri contendo meio Sabouraud acrescido de cloranfenicol 0,2% a 28°C durante cinco dias. A cinética de redução das células de levedura seguiu uma reação de primeira ordem, cujas constantes de velocidades foram 0,027 dias-1 (R²=0,931 e 0,026 dias-¹ (R²=0,938 para as temperaturas de -18°C e -40°C, respectivamente. Para ambas as temperaturas, a redução em 50% da população de leveduras se deu em aproximadamente 25 dias.The preparation and storage of frozen bread has proved to be advantageous for the market and to the final consumer. First because of loss reduction and need for smaller physical storage space and workforce, second because it provides always fresh bread. This study aimed to investigate the influence of storage on the viability of yeast cells in frozen French bread. In order to that, frozen French breads were prepared by the direct-dough method: the ingredients (premix for French bread, fresh yeast and water were mixed until the dough was

  3. Knock-down of methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2 causes alterations in cell proliferation and nuclear lamins expression in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babbio Federica

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MeCP2 (CpG-binding protein 2 is a nuclear multifunctional protein involved in se