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Sample records for altered cardiovascular structure

  1. Growth hormone receptor deficiency in mice results in reduced systolic blood pressure and plasma renin, increased aortic eNOS expression, and altered cardiovascular structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egecioglu, E; Andersson, I J; Bollano, E

    2007-01-01

    To study the role of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in the development of cardiovascular structure and function, female GHR gene-disrupted or knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice at age 18 wk were used. GHR KO mice had lower plasma renin levels (12 +/- 2 vs. 20 +/- 4 mGU/ml, P ... to acetylcholine (P functional and morphological changes in both heart and vasculature that are beyond the observed alterations in body size...

  2. [Cardiovascular alterations associated with doping].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, D; Büttner, A

    2015-05-01

    Doping -the abuse of anabolic-androgenic steroids in particular- is widespread in amateur and recreational sports and does not solely represent a problem of professional sports. Excessive overdose of anabolic steroids is well documented in bodybuilding or powerlifting leading to significant side effects. Cardiovascular damages are most relevant next to adverse endocrine effects.Clinical cases as well as forensic investigations of fatalities or steroid consumption in connection with trafficking of doping agents provide only anecdotal evidence of correlations between side effects and substance abuse. Analytical verification and self-declarations of steroid users have repeatedly confirmed the presumption of weekly dosages between 300 and 2000 mg, extra to the fact that co-administration of therapeutics to treat side-effects represent a routine procedure. Beside the most frequent use of medications used to treat erectile dysfunction or estrogenic side-effects, a substantial number of antihypertensive drugs of various classes, i.e. beta-blockers, diuretics, angiotensin II receptor antagonists, calcium channel blockers, as well as ACE inhibitors were recently confiscated in relevant doping cases. The presumptive correlation between misuse of anabolic steroids and self-treatment of cardiovascular side effects was explicitly confirmed by detailed user statements.Two representative fatalities of bodybuilders were introduced to outline characteristic, often lethal side effects of excessive steroid abuse. Moreover, illustrative autopsy findings of steroid acne, thrombotic occlusion of Ramus interventricularis anterior and signs of cardiac infarctions are presented.A potential steroid abuse should be carefully considered in cases of medical consultations of patients exhibiting apparent constitutional modifications and corresponding adverse effects. Moreover, common self-medications -as frequently applied by steroid consumers- should be taken into therapeutic considerations.

  3. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction and altered autophagy in cardiovascular aging and disease: from mechanisms to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Csiszar, Anna; Dutta, Debapriya; Balagopal, Gauthami; Calvani, Riccardo; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-08-15

    Advanced age is associated with a disproportionate prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Intrinsic alterations in the heart and the vasculature occurring over the life course render the cardiovascular system more vulnerable to various stressors in late life, ultimately favoring the development of CVD. Several lines of evidence indicate mitochondrial dysfunction as a major contributor to cardiovascular senescence. Besides being less bioenergetically efficient, damaged mitochondria also produce increased amounts of reactive oxygen species, with detrimental structural and functional consequences for the cardiovascular system. The age-related accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondrial likely results from the combination of impaired clearance of damaged organelles by autophagy and inadequate replenishment of the cellular mitochondrial pool by mitochondriogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about relevant mechanisms and consequences of age-related mitochondrial decay and alterations in mitochondrial quality control in the cardiovascular system. The involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular conditions especially prevalent in late life and the emerging connections with neurodegeneration are also illustrated. Special emphasis is placed on recent discoveries on the role played by alterations in mitochondrial dynamics (fusion and fission), mitophagy, and their interconnections in the context of age-related CVD and endothelial dysfunction. Finally, we discuss pharmacological interventions targeting mitochondrial dysfunction to delay cardiovascular aging and manage CVD.

  4. Multiphoton imaging of cardiovascular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenke-Layland, Katja; Opitz, Florian; Riemann, Iris; Stock, Ulrich A.; Konig, Karsten

    2004-09-01

    Near infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser imaging systems represent a novel and very promising diagnostic technology for non-invasive cross-sectional analysis of living biological tissues. In this study 3D multiphoton imaging with submicron resolution has been performed for non-invasive analysis of living native and tissue-engineered (TE) heart valves and blood vessels. High-resolution autofluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) images of collagenous structures and elastic fibers were demonstrated using multiphoton excitation at two different wavelengths. Non-invasive optical sections have been obtained without the need of staining or embedding. The quality of the resulting three-dimensional images allowed exact differentiation between collagenous structures and elastic fibers. These experimental results are very encouraging for NIR femtosecond laser scanning microscopy as a useful tool for future non-destructive monitoring and characterization of vital and intact TE cardiovascular structures.

  5. Chronic fluoxetine treatment alters cardiovascular functions in unanesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestani, Carlos C; Tavares, Rodrigo F; Guimarães, Franscisco S; Correa, Fernando M A; Joca, Sâmia R L; Resstel, Leonardo B M

    2011-11-30

    In the present study, we investigated the effects induced by fluoxetine treatment (10 mg/kg) for either 1 or 21 consecutive days on arterial pressure and heart rate basal levels, baroreflex activity, hemodynamic responses to vasoactive agents and cardiovascular responses to acute restraint stress. Mild hypertension was observed after 21 days of treatment, but not after administration for 1 day. Moreover, chronic treatment affected the baroreflex control of heart rate, which was characterized by a reduced reflex tachycardia and an enhanced bradycardiac baroreflex response. The pressor responses to systemic administration of the selective α(1)-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine, as well as the depressor responses to systemic infusion of the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, were reduced after chronic fluoxetine treatment. Fluoxetine treatment for 21 days reduced both the pressor and tachycardiac responses evoked by acute restraint stress. In conclusion, the results indicate the development of mild hypertension after chronic fluoxetine treatment. This effect was followed by changes in the baroreflex control of heart rate and altered vascular responsiveness to pressor and depressor agents, which may explain, at least in part, the increase in arterial pressure. Chronic fluoxetine treatment also affected cardiovascular responses to restraint stress, thus indicating that fluoxetine may affect cardiovascular adaptation under conditions of stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Alteration in Cardiovascular Regulation and Function During Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Alterations in cardiovascular regulation and function that occur during and after space flight have been reported. These alterations are manifested, for example, by reduced orthostatic tolerance upon reentry to the earth's gravity from space. However, the precise physiologic mechanisms responsible for these alterations remain to be fully elucidated. Perhaps, as a result, effective countermeasures have yet to be developed. In this project we apply a powerful, new method - cardiovascular system identification (CSI) - for the study of the effects of space flight on the cardiovascular system so that effective countermeasures can be developed. CSI involves the mathematical analysis of second-to-second fluctuations in non-invasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV - respiratory activity) in order to characterize quantitatively the physiologic mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these signals. Through the characterization of all the physiologic mechanisms coupling these signals, CSI provides a model of the closed-loop cardiovascular regulatory state in an individual subject. The model includes quantitative descriptions of the heart rate baroreflex, autonomic function, as well as other important physiologic mechanisms. We are in the process of incorporating beat-to-beat fluctuations of stroke volume into the CSI technique in order to quantify additional physiologic mechanisms such as those involved in control of peripheral vascular resistance and alterations in cardiac contractility. We apply CSI in conjunction with the two general protocols of the Human Studies Core project. The first protocol involves ground-based, human head down tilt bed rest to simulate microgravity and acute stressors - upright tilt, standing and bicycle exercise - to provide orthostatic and exercise challenges. The second protocol is intended to be the same as the first but with the addition of sleep deprivation to determine whether

  7. Methamphetamine Alters Brain Structures, Impairs Mental Flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Methamphetamine Alters Brain Structures, Impairs Mental Flexibility Email Facebook Twitter March 20, 2014 A new study adds to the copious existing evidence that chronic exposure to addictive drugs alters the brain in ways that make ...

  8. The altered complexity of cardiovascular regulation in depressed patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Steffen; Voss, Andreas; Koschke, Mandy; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Major depressive disorders (MDD) are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Even if it is known that MDD are accompanied by an autonomic dysbalance with increased sympathetic and/or reduced parasympathetic activity, to date only limited information is available about the degree and complexity of cardiovascular regulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of MDD on the autonomous nervous system and cardiovascular complexity by means of linear and nonlinear indices from heart rate and blood pressure variability (HRV, BPV). From 57 non-medicated patients and 57 matched healthy controls with respect to age and gender HRV and BPV in time and frequency domain, symbolic dynamics, compression entropy, multiscale entropy, detrended fluctuation analysis, Poincaré plot analysis and baroreflex sensitivity were analysed from 30 min short-term recordings. Complexity indices from nonlinear dynamics demonstrated considerable changes in autonomous regulation due to MDD. For the first time we could show that non-medicated depressed patients who were matched with respect to age and gender reveal a significantly changed short-term as well as long-term complexity of cardiovascular regulation. These results suggest substantial changes in autonomic control probably due to a change of interactions between different physiological control loops in MDD

  9. Does ECT alter brain structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanand, D P; Dwork, A J; Hutchinson, E R; Bolwig, T G; Sackeim, H A

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether ECT causes structural brain damage. The literature review covered the following areas: cognitive side effects, structural brain imaging, autopsies of patients who had received ECT, post-mortem studies of epileptic subjects, animal studies of electroconvulsive shock (ECS) and epilepsy, and the neuropathological effects of the passage of electricity, heat generation, and blood-brain barrier disruption. ECT-induced cognitive deficits are transient, although spotty memory loss may persist for events immediately surrounding the ECT course. Prospective computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies show no evidence of ECT-induced structural changes. Some early human autopsy case reports from the unmodified ECT era reported cerebrovascular lesions that were due to agonal changes or undiagnosed disease. In animal ECS studies that used a stimulus intensity and frequency comparable to human ECT, no neuronal loss was seen when appropriate control animals, blind ratings, and perfusion fixation techniques were employed. Controlled studies using quantitative cell counts have failed to show neuronal loss even after prolonged courses of ECS. Several well-controlled studies have demonstrated that neuronal loss occurs only after 1.5 to 2 hours of continuous seizure activity in primates, and adequate muscle paralysis and oxygenation further delay these changes. These conditions are not approached during ECT. Other findings indicate that the passage of electricity, thermal effects, and the transient disruption of the blood-brain barrier during ECS do not result in structural brain damage. There is no credible evidence that ECT causes structural brain damage.

  10. Chronic fluoxetine treatment alters cardiovascular functions in unanesthetized rats

    OpenAIRE

    Crestani, Carlos Cesar [UNESP; Tavares, Rodrigo F.; Guimaraes, Franscisco S.; Correa, Fernando M. A.; Joca, Samia R. L.; Resstel, Leonardo B. M.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects induced by fluoxetine treatment (10 mg/kg) for either 1 or 21 consecutive days on arterial pressure and heart rate basal levels, baroreflex activity, hemodynamic responses to vasoactive agents and cardiovascular responses to acute restraint stress. Mild hypertension was observed after 21 days of treatment, but not after administration for 1 day. Moreover, chronic treatment affected the baroreflex control of heart rate, which was characterized ...

  11. Endothelium and Its Alterations in Cardiovascular Diseases: Life Style Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Favero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The endothelium, which forms the inner cellular lining of blood vessels and lymphatics, is a highly metabolically active organ that is involved in many physiopathological processes, including the control of vasomotor tone, barrier function, leukocyte adhesion, and trafficking and inflammation. In this review, we summarized and described the following: (i endothelial cell function in physiological conditions and (ii endothelial cell activation and dysfunction in the main cardiovascular diseases (such as atherosclerosis, and hypertension and to diabetes, cigarette smoking, and aging physiological process. Finally, we presented the currently available evidence that supports the beneficial effects of physical activity and various dietary compounds on endothelial functions.

  12. Geophysical Identification of Hydrothermally Altered Structures That ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research study uses geophysical method (aeromagnetic) to identify hydrothermally altered structures which favour the inflow of hydrothermal fluid that usually brings about gold mineralisation in Egbe-Isanlu Schist Belt Area, North Central Nigeria. The application of data enhancement filtering algorithm such as ...

  13. Clinical and cardiovascular alterations produced by scorpion envenomation in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. F. Cordeiro

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Scorpionism is a common problem that occurs in tropical and subtropical countries and assumes great medical-sanitary importance due to its fatal effect on sensitive individuals, being able to lead children and aged people to death. The envenomation lethal potential is responsible for the serious cardiopulmonary alterations the scorpion toxin produces in its victims. The present research evaluated the effects of Tityus serrulatus venom on dogs, using two distinct doses: a dose that simulates natural envenomation (0.4 mg/total dose, and an experimental dose (0.25 mg/kg. General clinical signs were observed at different moments after envenomation, and specific data related to the cardiopulmonary system were evaluated by systemic arterial pressure measurement, CK-MB enzymatic activity dosage, and radiographic, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic examinations. Results demonstrated that the scorpion venom, in experimental doses, was able to cause acute and reversible cardiac injury in few days, and, in the dose that simulated natural accident, it produced clinical signs of light envenomation, such as local pain, hyperesthesia, sialorrhea, vomiting, diarrhea, sneeze and prostration.

  14. Bisphenol A alters the cardiovascular response to hypoxia in Danio rerio embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cypher, Alysha D; Ickes, Jessica R; Bagatto, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the cardiovascular response to hypoxia was altered by the presence of bisphenol A (BPA) in Danio rerio embryos. It was expected that BPA exposure would affect cardiovascular parameters during hypoxia more than normoxia due to an interaction between BPA and the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α) pathway. We demonstrate that BPA exposure has a minimal effect during normoxia but can severely affect the cardiovascular system during a hypoxic event. Cardiovascular response was measured in vivo using video microscopy and digital motion analysis. RBC density increased 35% in hypoxia alone but decreased 48% with addition of 0.25mg/L BPA. Tissue vascularization (% coverage) was unaffected by hypoxia alone but decreased 37% with addition of 0.25mg/L BPA. The diameter and RBC velocity of arteries were more sensitive than veins to BPA exposure during both normoxia and hypoxia. Arterial RBC velocity decreased 42% during normoxia and 52% during hypoxia with 1mg/L BPA. This decrease in velocity may in part be due to the 86% decrease in heart rate (ƒH) observed during co-exposure to hypoxia and 5mg/L BPA. While stroke volume (SV) was unaffected by treatment, cardiac output (Q) decreased by 69% with co-exposure. ƒH and Q were not affected by BPA exposure during normoxia. Development ultimately slowed by 146% and mortality rates were 95% during hypoxia when exposed to 5mg/L BPA. Our results show for the first time that BPA exposure alters the cardiovascular system during hypoxia more so than normoxia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Total sleep deprivation alters cardiovascular reactivity to acute stressors in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Durocher, John J; Larson, Robert A; Dellavalla, Joseph P; Carter, Jason R

    2012-09-01

    Exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity to mental stress (MS) and cold pressor test (CPT) has been linked to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Recent epidemiological studies identify sleep deprivation as an important risk factor for hypertension, yet the relations between sleep deprivation and cardiovascular reactivity remain equivocal. We hypothesized that 24-h total sleep deprivation (TSD) would augment cardiovascular reactivity to MS and CPT and blunt the MS-induced forearm vasodilation. Because the associations between TSD and hypertension appear to be stronger in women, a secondary aim was to probe for sex differences. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were recorded during MS and CPT in 28 young, healthy subjects (14 men and 14 women) after normal sleep (NS) and 24-h TSD (randomized, crossover design). Forearm vascular conductance (FVC) was recorded during MS. MAP, FVC, and MSNA (n = 10) responses to MS were not different between NS and TSD (condition × time, P > 0.05). Likewise, MAP and MSNA (n = 6) responses to CPT were not different between NS and TSD (condition × time, P > 0.05). In contrast, increases in HR during both MS and CPT were augmented after TSD (condition × time, P ≤ 0.05), and these augmented HR responses persisted during both recoveries. When analyzed for sex differences, cardiovascular reactivity to MS and CPT was not different between sexes (condition × time × sex, P > 0.05). We conclude that TSD does not significantly alter MAP, MSNA, or forearm vascular responses to MS and CPT. The augmented tachycardia responses during and after both acute stressors provide new insight regarding the emerging links among sleep deprivation, stress, and cardiovascular risk.

  16. Altered structural connectome in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSalvo, Matthew N; Douw, Linda; Tanaka, Naoaki; Reinsberger, Claus; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2014-03-01

    To study differences in the whole-brain structural connectomes of patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and healthy control subjects. This study was approved by the institutional review board, and all individuals gave signed informed consent. Sixty-direction diffusion-tensor imaging and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MP-RAGE) magnetic resonance imaging volumes were analyzed in 24 patients with left TLE and in 24 healthy control subjects. MP-RAGE volumes were segmented into 1015 regions of interest (ROIs) spanning the entire brain. Deterministic white matter tractography was performed after voxelwise tensor calculation. Weighted structural connectivity matrices were generated by using the pairwise density of connecting fibers between ROIs. Graph theoretical measures of connectivity networks were compared between groups by using linear models with permutation testing. Patients with TLE had 22%-45% reduced (P < .01) distant connectivity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex, temporal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus, compared with that in healthy subjects. However, local connectivity, as measured by means of network efficiency, was increased by 85%-270% (P < .01) in the medial and lateral frontal cortices, insular cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, and occipital cortex in patients with TLE as compared with healthy subjects. This study suggests that TLE involves altered structural connectivity in a network that reaches beyond the temporal lobe, especially in the default mode network.

  17. STRUCTURAL ALTERATIONS OF SKELETAL MUSCLE IN COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita eMathur

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a respiratory disease associated with a systemic inflammatory response. Peripheral muscle dysfunction has been well characterized in individuals with COPD and results from a complex interaction between systemic and local factors. Objective: In this narrative review, we will describe muscle wasting in people with COPD, the associated structural changes, muscle regenerative capacity and possible mechanisms for muscle wasting. We will also discuss how structural changes relate to impaired muscle function and mobility in people with COPD. Key Observations: Approximately 30-40% of individuals with COPD experience muscle mass depletion. Furthermore, muscle atrophy is a predictor of physical function and mortality in this population. Associated structural changes include a decreased proportion and size of type-I fibers, reduced oxidative capacity and mitochondrial density mainly in the quadriceps. Observations related to impaired muscle regenerative capacity in individuals with COPD include a lower proportion of central nuclei in the presence or absence of muscle atrophy and decreased maximal telomere length, which has been correlated with reduced muscle cross-sectional area. Potential mechanisms for muscle wasting in COPD may include excessive production of reactive oxygen species, altered amino acid metabolism and lower expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma-coactivator 1-alpha mRNA. Despite a moderate relationship between muscle atrophy and function, impairments in oxidative metabolism only seems weakly related to muscle function. Conclusion: This review article demonstrates the cellular modifications in the peripheral muscle of people with COPD and describes the evidence of its relationship to muscle function. Future research will focus on rehabilitation strategies to improve muscle wasting and maximize function.

  18. Cardiovascular and respiratory alterations in dogs during cervical myelography using ioversol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R.A. Melo e Silva

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid infusion of most contrast mediums and the steps involved in performing a cervical myelography have adverse affects that can discourage its use in the radiographic diagnosis of spinal cord diseases. Thus, the cardiovascular and respiratory alterations associated with neck flexion, subarachnoid puncture, and cerebrospinal fluid drainage during subarachnoid infusion of ioversol (320mgI/mL in dogs under general anesthesia using isoflurane were evaluated. The dogs received subarachnoid infusion of autologous cerebrospinal fluid kept at 38°C - control group (GC; ioversol 0.3mL/kg at 25°C (GI25 and ioversol 0.3mL/kg heated to 38°C (GI38. Each dog had its heart rate (HR, systolic arterial pressure (SAP, diastolic arterial pressure (DAP, respiratory rate (RR, oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2 and electrocardiography readings (PR and QT intervals recorded. Group comparisons showed no statistical difference regarding neck positioning, subarachnoid puncture, and subarachnoid infusion of contrast medium on HR, RR and SaO2, cardiac rhythm or conduction. However, isoflurane significantly increased PR and QT intervals. Based on these findings, it is concluded that the steps involved in cervical myelography and the use of ioversol 320mgI/mL at 0.3mL/kg (25ºC and 38ºC during cervical myelography did not result in relevant cardiovascular and respiratory alterations, except for an elevation in arterial pressure after injection of ioversol.

  19. Increased plasma soluble endoglin levels as an indicator of cardiovascular alterations in hypertensive and diabetic patients

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    Martínez-Salgado Carlos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endoglin is involved in the regulation of endothelial function, but there are no studies concerning its relation with hypertension- and diabetes-associated pathologies. Thus, we studied the relationship between plasma levels of soluble endoglin and cardiovascular alterations associated with hypertension and diabetes. Methods We analyzed 288 patients: 64 with type 2 diabetes, 159 with hypertension and 65 healthy patients. We assessed the relationship of soluble endoglin plasma levels measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with basal glycemia, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood pressure, endothelial dysfunction (assessed by pressure wave velocity, hypertensive retinopathy (by Keith-Wagener classification, left ventricular hypertrophy (by Cornell and Sokolow indexes, cardiovascular risk and target organ (heart, vascular, kidney damage. Results There are significant correlations between endoglin and glycemia, systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, pressure wave velocity and electrocardiographically assessed left ventricular hypertrophy. Endoglin levels were significantly higher in patients with diabetes who had nondipper and extreme dipper circadian blood pressure patterns than in dipper circadian patterns, in patients with hypertension and diabetes who had riser pattern than in the other patients, and in patients with diabetes but not hypertension who had extreme dipper pattern than in dipper, nondipper and riser groups. There was also a significant correlation between plasma-soluble endoglin and lower levels of systolic night-day ratio. Higher endoglin levels were found in patients with diabetes who had retinopathy, in patients with diabetes who had a high probability of 10-year cardiovascular risk, and in patients with diabetes and hypertension who had three or more damaged target organs (heart, vessels, kidney than in those with no organs affected. Conclusions This study shows that endoglin is an indicator of

  20. Cardiovascular alterations do exist in children with stage-2 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşdemir, Mehmet; Eroğlu, Ayşe Güler; Canpolat, Nur; Konukoğlu, Dildar; Ağbaş, Ayşe; Sevim, Meltem Dönmez; Çalışkan, Salim; Sever, Lale

    2016-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an important complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. However, it is not well known when and how cardiovascular alterations start. This cross-sectional, controlled study consisted of 25 patients and 28 healthy controls. 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and carotid distensibility (distensibility coefficient and β stiffness index), and echocardiography were assessed to evaluate CVD. Routine biochemical parameters, fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) and high sensitive C- reactive protein were measured to determine cardiovascular risk factors. Hypertension was found in 12 patients (48 %). Patients had higher FGF23 levels and aPWV-standard deviation score (SDS) as compared to the controls (p = 0.003 and p = 0.002, respectively). Aortic PWV-SDS was predicted by increased daytime systolic blood pressure load (β = 0.512, p = 0.009, R 2  = 0.262). Neither cIMT nor distensibility differed between the groups; however, older age and high level of FGF23 were independent predictors of β stiffness index in patients (β = 0.507, p = 0.005, R 2  = 0.461 and β = 0.502, p = 0.005, R 2  = 0.461, respectively). As compared to controls, patients had worse left ventricular diastolic function [lower E/A ratio p = 0.006) and increased left atrial dimension (p children with stage-2 CKD. Good control of BP and decreasing the level of FGF23 may be useful to slow down the progression of cardiovascular complications.

  1. Shifting cardiovascular care to nurses results in structured chronic care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nouwens, E.; Lieshout, J. van; Hombergh, P. van den; Laurant, M.; Wensing, M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore nurse involvement in cardiovascular risk management (CVRM) in primary care and how this involvement was associated with the degree of structured chronic illness care. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional observational study in 7 European countries. METHODS: Five aspects of nurse

  2. Structural identifiability analysis of a cardiovascular system model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pironet, Antoine; Dauby, Pierre C; Chase, J Geoffrey; Docherty, Paul D; Revie, James A; Desaive, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The six-chamber cardiovascular system model of Burkhoff and Tyberg has been used in several theoretical and experimental studies. However, this cardiovascular system model (and others derived from it) are not identifiable from any output set. In this work, two such cases of structural non-identifiability are first presented. These cases occur when the model output set only contains a single type of information (pressure or volume). A specific output set is thus chosen, mixing pressure and volume information and containing only a limited number of clinically available measurements. Then, by manipulating the model equations involving these outputs, it is demonstrated that the six-chamber cardiovascular system model is structurally globally identifiable. A further simplification is made, assuming known cardiac valve resistances. Because of the poor practical identifiability of these four parameters, this assumption is usual. Under this hypothesis, the six-chamber cardiovascular system model is structurally identifiable from an even smaller dataset. As a consequence, parameter values computed from limited but well-chosen datasets are theoretically unique. This means that the parameter identification procedure can safely be performed on the model from such a well-chosen dataset. Thus, the model may be considered suitable for use in diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lung Deflation and Cardiovascular Structure and Function in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Ian S; Barnes, Neil C; James, Wai-Yee; Midwinter, Dawn; Boubertakh, Redha; Follows, Richard; John, Leonette; Petersen, Steffen E

    2016-04-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease develop increased cardiovascular morbidity with structural alterations. To investigate through a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study the effect of lung deflation on cardiovascular structure and function using cardiac magnetic resonance. Forty-five hyperinflated patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were randomized (1:1) to 7 (maximum 14) days inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2-agonist fluticasone furoate/vilanterol 100/25 μg or placebo (7-day minimum washout). Primary outcome was change from baseline in right ventricular end-diastolic volume index versus placebo. There was a 5.8 ml/m(2) (95% confidence interval, 2.74-8.91; P deflation on intrinsic myocardial function. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01691885).

  4. Impacts of fat fromruminants’ meat on cardiovascular health and possible strategies to alter its lipid composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vargas-Bello-Pérez, Einar; Larraín, Rafael E.

    2017-01-01

    intake of fat, saturated FAs and cholesterol as a means of reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. Interestingly, ruminant meat has some bioactive lipids such as C18:1t11 and C18:2 c9, t11 which have been reported to have positive effects on human health. In order to improve muscle fat composition......In the last few decades there has been increased consumer interest in the fatty acid (FA) composition of ruminant meat due to its content of saturated FAs, which have been implicated in diseases associated with modern life. However, recent studies have questioned the recommendations to reduce...... from a human health standpoint, oilseeds, plant oils andmarine oils can be used in ruminant diets. On the other hand,molecular mechanisms play an important role in the alteration of the FA composition of muscle fat. Genetics offer a wide range of possibilities for improvement of muscle fat...

  5. [Autonomic nervous system alteration in multiple sclerosis patients with urinary symptoms. Clinical, urodynamic and cardiovascular study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarenco, G; Raibaut, P; Hubeaux, K; Jousse, M; Sheikh Ismaël, S; Lapeyre, E

    2013-12-01

    To assess symptoms related to autonomic nervous system alteration in a population of patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS) and presenting with urinary symptoms. We investigated 65 patients (mean age 47.5 years) suffering from MS, and presenting with urological dysfunction by means of symptom scores, urodynamic investigation, cardiovascular autonomic function tests (orthostatic hypotension testing, Valsalva test, deep breath test, cold pressor test) and sympathetic skin responses. Forty-five (69%) patients suffered from overactive bladder, 48 (73%) from voiding dysfunction, 14 (21%) from urinary retention and 13 (20%) from fecal incontinence. Urodynamic investigation demonstrated overactive detrusor in 46 (70%) cases, and underactive detrusor in four (6%) cases. Twenty-five (38%) patients had dysautonomia without correlation neither with clinical or urodynamic data, nor gravity of multiple sclerosis (EDSS). In this series, the prevalence of dysautonomia was high in patients suffering from MS and presenting with urinary disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. High molecular weight barley β-glucan alters gut microbiota toward reduced cardiovascular disease risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan eWang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The physiological cholesterol-lowering benefits of β-glucan have been well documented, however, whether modulation of gut microbiota by β-glucan is associated with these physiological effects remains unknown. The objectives of this study were therefore to determine the impact of β-glucan on the composition of gut microbiota in mildly hypercholesterolemic individuals and to identify if the altered microbiota are associated with bioactivity of β-glucan in improving risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Using a randomized, controlled crossover study design, individuals received for 5-week either a treatment breakfast containing 3g high molecular weight (HMW, 3g low molecular weight (LMW, 5g LMW barley β-glucan or wheat and rice (WR. The American Heart Association (AHA diet served as the background diet for all treatment groups. Phases were separated by 4-week washout periods. Fecal samples were collected at the end of each intervention phase and subjected to Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Results revealed that at the phylum level, supplementation of 3g/d HMW β-glucan increased Bacteroidetes and decreased Firmicutes abundances compared to control (P < 0.001. At the genus level, consumption of 3g/d HMW β-glucan increased Bacteroides (P < 0.003, tended to increase Prevotella (P < 0.1 but decreased Dorea (P < 0.1, whereas diets containing 5g LMW β-glucan and 3g LMW β-glucan failed to alter the gut microbiota composition. Bacteroides, Prevotella, and Dorea composition correlated (P < 0.05 with shifts of CVD risk factors, including body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, as well as triglyceride levels. Our data suggest that consumption of HMW β-glucan favourably alters the composition of the gut microbiota and this altered microbiota profile associates with a reduction of CVD risk markers. Together, our study suggests that β-glucan induced shifts in gut microbiota in a MW-dependent manner and that might be one of

  7. Total sleep deprivation alters cardiovascular reactivity to acute stressors in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Huan; Durocher, John J.; Larson, Robert A.; DellaValla, Joseph P.; Carter, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    Exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity to mental stress (MS) and cold pressor test (CPT) has been linked to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Recent epidemiological studies identify sleep deprivation as an important risk factor for hypertension, yet the relations between sleep deprivation and cardiovascular reactivity remain equivocal. We hypothesized that 24-h total sleep deprivation (TSD) would augment cardiovascular reactivity to MS and CPT and blunt the MS-induced forearm vasodilat...

  8. Triclosan alterations of estuarine phytoplankton community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinckney, James L; Thompson, Laura; Hylton, Sarah

    2017-06-15

    Antimicrobial additives in pharmaceutical and personal care products are a major environmental concern due to their potential ecological impacts on aquatic ecosystems. Triclosan (TCS) has been used as an antiseptic, disinfectant, and preservative in various media. The sublethal and lethal effects of TCS on estuarine phytoplankton community composition were investigated using bioassays of natural phytoplankton communities to measure phytoplankton responses to different concentrations of TCS ranging from 1 to 200μgl -1 . The EC 50 (the concentration of an inhibitor where the growth is reduced by half) for phytoplankton groups (diatoms, chlorophytes, cryptophytes) examined in this ranged from 10.7 to 113.8μg TCS l -1 . Exposures resulted in major shifts in phytoplankton community composition at concentrations as low as 1.0μg TCS l -1 . This study demonstrates estuarine ecosystem sensitivity to TCS exposure and highlights potential alterations in phytoplankton community composition at what are typically environmental concentrations of TCS in urbanized estuaries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Kalpaamruthaa ameliorates mitochondrial and metabolic alterations in diabetes mellitus induced cardiovascular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latha, Raja; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanadham

    2014-12-01

    Efficacy of Kalpaamruthaa on the activities of lipid and carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, electron transport chain complexes and mitochondrial ATPases were studied in heart and liver of experimental rats. Cardiovascular damage (CVD) was developed in 8 weeks after type 2 diabetes mellitus induction with high fat diet (2 weeks) and low dose of streptozotocin (2 × 35 mg/kg b.w. i.p. in 24 hr interval). In CVD-induced rats, the activities of total lipase, cholesterol ester hydrolase and cholesterol ester synthetase were increased, while lipoprotein lipase and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activities were decreased. The activities of lipid-metabolizing enzymes were altered by Kalpaamruthaa in CVD-induced rats towards normal. Kalpaamruthaa modulated the activities of glycolytic enzymes (hexokinase, phosphogluco-isomerase, aldolase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), gluconeogenic enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase) and glycogenolytic enzyme (glycogen phosphorylase) along with increased glycogen content in the liver of CVD-induced rats. The activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, Complexes and ATPases (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase) were decreased in CVD-induced rats, which were ameliorated by the treatment with Kalpaamruthaa. This study ascertained the efficacy of Kalpaamruthaa for the treatment of CVD in diabetes through the modulation of metabolizing enzymes and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  10. Structural and functional cardiac changes in myotonic dystrophy type 1: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermans Mieke CE

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (MD1 is a neuromuscular disorder with potential involvement of the heart and increased risk of sudden death. Considering the importance of cardiomyopathy as a predictor of prognosis, we aimed to systematically evaluate and describe structural and functional cardiac alterations in patients with MD1. Methods Eighty MD1 patients underwent physical examination, electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Blood samples were taken for determination of NT-proBNP plasma levels and CTG repeat length. Results Functional and structural abnormalities were detected in 35 patients (44%. Left ventricular systolic dysfunction was found in 20 cases, left ventricular dilatation in 7 patients, and left ventricular hypertrophy in 6 patients. Myocardial fibrosis was seen in 10 patients (12.5%. In general, patients had low left ventricular mass indexes. Right ventricular involvement was uncommon and only seen together with left ventricular abnormalities. Functional or structural cardiac involvement was associated with age (p = 0.04, male gender (p Conclusions CMR can be useful to detect early structural and functional myocardial abnormalities in patients with MD1. Myocardial involvement is strongly associated with conduction abnormalities, but a normal ECG does not exclude myocardial alterations. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that MD1 patients have a complex cardiac phenotype, including both myocardial and conduction system alteration.

  11. Altered permeability barrier structure in cholesteatoma matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, Viggo; Halkier-Sørensen, Lars; Rasmussen, Gurli

    2002-01-01

    lipid structures filling the intercellular spaces mainly control the barrier function. The barrier in cholesteatoma epithelium is several times thicker than in unaffected skin but presents distinctive features of a defective barrier as seen in other scaling skin diseases. The intercellular spaces appear...... frequently occur. The corneocytes are shed in clusters, not as single cells. Further, lipid droplets and intracellular membranous material are occasionally seen. In spite of these clear signs of barrier dysfunction, it is unknown whether the thickness of the barrier compensates for the defect in barrier...

  12. Rare earth impact on glass structure and alteration kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molieres, E.

    2012-01-01

    This work is related to the question of the geological deep repository of high-level waste glass. These wastes include fission products and minor actinides, elements which can be simulated by rare earths. As new glass compositions could enable increased rare earth concentrations, it is crucial to know and understand rare earth impact on glass structure on the one hand, and on glass alteration kinetics or their incorporation into an altered layer. This work studied simplified borosilicate glasses in order to limit synergetic effects between rare earths and other elements. Various complementary techniques were used to characterize pristine and altered glasses (solid-high resolution NMR, Raman spectroscopy, fluorescence, SIMS, SAXS). Firstly, the structural role of a rare earth is discussed and is compared to a calcium cation. The local environment of rare earths is also probed. Secondly, rare earth (nature and concentration) impact on several alteration regimes was studied (initial rate, rate drop). Then, after alteration, rare earth elements being retained within the altered layer, the structural impact of rare earth elements (and their local environment) in this alteration layer was also investigated. (author) [fr

  13. Red wine polyphenols prevent metabolic and cardiovascular alterations associated with obesity in Zucker fatty rats (Fa/Fa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelali Agouni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with increased risks for development of cardiovascular diseases. Epidemiological studies report an inverse association between dietary flavonoid consumption and mortality from cardiovascular diseases. We studied the potential beneficial effects of dietary supplementation of red wine polyphenol extract, Provinols, on obesity-associated alterations with respect to metabolic disturbances and cardiovascular functions in Zucker fatty (ZF rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ZF rats or their lean littermates received normal diet or supplemented with Provinols for 8 weeks. Provinols improved glucose metabolism by reducing plasma glucose and fructosamine in ZF rats. Moreover, it reduced circulating triglycerides and total cholesterol as well as LDL-cholesterol in ZF rats. Echocardiography measurements demonstrated that Provinols improved cardiac performance as evidenced by an increase in left ventricular fractional shortening and cardiac output associated with decreased peripheral arterial resistances in ZF rats. Regarding vascular function, Provinols corrected endothelial dysfunction in aortas from ZF rats by improving endothelium-dependent relaxation in response to acetylcholine (Ach. Provinols enhanced NO bioavailability resulting from increased nitric oxide (NO production through enhanced endothelial NO-synthase (eNOS activity and reduced superoxide anion release via decreased expression of NADPH oxidase membrane sub-unit, Nox-1. In small mesenteric arteries, although Provinols did not affect the endothelium-dependent response to Ach; it enhanced the endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factor component of the response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Use of red wine polyphenols may be a potential mechanism for prevention of cardiovascular and metabolic alterations associated with obesity.

  14. Aging alters muscle reflex control of autonomic cardiovascular responses to rhythmic contractions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Simranjit K; Weavil, Joshua C; Venturelli, Massimo; Rossman, Matthew J; Gmelch, Benjamin S; Bledsoe, Amber D; Richardson, Russell S; Amann, Markus

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the influence of aging on the group III/IV muscle afferents in the exercise pressor reflex-mediated cardiovascular response to rhythmic exercise. Nine old (OLD; 68 ± 2 yr) and nine young (YNG; 24 ± 2 yr) males performed single-leg knee extensor exercise (15 W, 30 W, 80% max) under control conditions and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing feedback from group III/IV leg muscle afferents. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output, leg blood flow (QL), systemic (SVC) and leg vascular conductance (LVC) were continuously determined. With no hemodynamic effect at rest, fentanyl blockade during exercise attenuated both cardiac output and QL ∼17% in YNG, while the decrease in cardiac output in OLD (∼5%) was significantly smaller with no impact on QL (P = 0.8). Therefore, in the face of similar significant ∼7% reduction in MAP during exercise with fentanyl blockade in both groups, LVC significantly increased ∼11% in OLD, but decreased ∼8% in YNG. The opposing direction of change was reflected in SVC with a significant ∼5% increase in OLD and a ∼12% decrease in YNG. Thus while cardiac output seems to account for the majority of group III/IV-mediated MAP responses in YNG, the impact of neural feedback on the heart may decrease with age and alterations in SVC become more prominent in mediating the similar exercise pressor reflex in OLD. Interestingly, in terms of peripheral hemodynamics, while group III/IV-mediated feedback plays a clear role in increasing LVC during exercise in the YNG, these afferents seem to actually reduce LVC in OLD. These peripheral findings may help explain the limited exercise-induced peripheral vasodilation often associated with aging. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor structural alterations in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutinho, Cátia; Mateus, Ana R; Milanezi, Fernanda; Carneiro, Fátima; Seruca, Raquel; Suriano, Gianpaolo

    2008-01-01

    EGFR overexpression has been described in many human tumours including gastric cancer. In NSCLC patients somatic EGFR mutations, within the kinase domain of the protein, as well as gene amplification were associated with a good clinical response to EGFR inhibitors. In gastric tumours data concerning structural alterations of EGFR remains controversial. Given its possible therapeutic relevance, we aimed to determine the frequency and type of structural alterations of the EGFR gene in a series of primary gastric carcinomas. Direct sequencing of the kinase domain of the EGFR gene was performed in a series of 77 primary gastric carcinomas. FISH analysis was performed in 30 cases. Association studies between EGFR alterations and the clinical pathological features of the tumours were performed. Within the 77 primary gastric carcinomas we found two EGFR somatic mutations and several EGFR polymorphisms in exon 20. Six different intronic sequence variants of EGFR were also found. Four gastric carcinomas showed balanced polysomy or EGFR gene amplification. We verified that gastric carcinoma with alterations of EGFR (somatic mutations or copy number variation) showed a significant increase of tumour size (p = 0.0094) in comparison to wild-type EGFR carcinomas. We demonstrate that EGFR structural alterations are rare in gastric carcinoma, but whenever present, it leads to tumour growth. We considered that searching for EGFR alterations in gastric cancer is likely to be clinically important in order to identify patients susceptible to respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors

  16. Acrolein Inhalation Alters Arterial Blood Gases and Triggers Carotid Body Mediated Cardiovascular Responses in Hypertensive Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to air pollution increases risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in individuals with underlying cardiopulmonary disease. While the mechanisms accounting for these effects are unclear, several epidemiological studies have reported decreases in oxygen ...

  17. Shifting cardiovascular care to nurses results in structured chronic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouwens, Elvira; van Lieshout, Jan; van den Hombergh, Pieter; Laurant, Miranda; Wensing, Michel

    2014-07-01

    To explore nurse involvement in cardiovascular risk management (CVRM) in primary care and how this involvement was associated with the degree of structured chronic illness care. A cross-sectional observational study in 7 European countries. Five aspects of nurse involvement in CVRM and 35 specific components of structured chronic illness care were documented in 202 primary care practices in Austria, Belgium, Germany, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain, and Switzerland. An overall measure for chronic care management, range 0 to 5, was constructed, derived from elements of the Chronic Care Model (CCM). Random coefficient regression modeling was used to explore associations. A majority of practices involved nurses for organization of CVRM in administrative tasks (82.2 %), risk factor monitoring (78.5%) and patient education (57.1%). Fewer practices involved nurses in defining protocol and the organization for CVRM (45%) or diagnosis and treatment (34.6%). With an increasing number of tasks handled by nurses, overall median adoption of CCM increased from 2.7 (95% CI, 1.5-3.6) to 4.2 (95% CI, 3.8-4.1). When the number of nurse tasks increased by 1, the adoption of CCM increased by 0.13 (P involvement had high adoption of CCM, while variation of adoption of CCM across practices reduced substantially with an increasing level of nurse involvement. Nurses were involved in the delivery of CVRM in varying degrees. Higher involvement of nurses was associated with higher degree of structured chronic illness care, with less variation.

  18. Altered Resting Brain Function and Structure in Professional Badminton Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Xin; Zhu, Senhua; Wang, Pin; Ye, Zhuoer; Zhou, Ke; Zhuo, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Neuroimaging studies of professional athletic or musical training have demonstrated considerable practice-dependent plasticity in various brain structures, which may reflect distinct training demands. In the present study, structural and functional brain alterations were examined in professional badminton players and compared with healthy controls using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and resting-state functional MRI. Gray matter concentration (GMC) was assessed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), and resting-brain functions were measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and seed-based functional connectivity. Results showed that the athlete group had greater GMC and ALFF in the right and medial cerebellar regions, respectively. The athlete group also demonstrated smaller ALFF in the left superior parietal lobule and altered functional connectivity between the left superior parietal and frontal regions. These findings indicate that badminton expertise is associated with not only plastic structural changes in terms of enlarged gray matter density in the cerebellum, but also functional alterations in fronto-parietal connectivity. Such structural and functional alterations may reflect specific experiences of badminton training and practice, including high-capacity visuo-spatial processing and hand-eye coordination in addition to refined motor skills. PMID:22840241

  19. Structural Alterations of the Glomerular Wall And Vessels in Early ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Structural Alterations of the Glomerular Wall And Vessels in Early Stages of Diabetes Mellitus: Light and Transmission Electron Microscopic Study. ... The second group of 20 (the experimental group) was injected intraperitoneally by a single dose of streptozotocin to induce hyperglycemia. Rats were sacrificed after ten days, ...

  20. Subclinical depressive symptoms during late midlife and structural brain alterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Sørensen, Lauge; Rozing, Maarten

    2018-01-01

    at age 51, 56, and 59 years, magnetic resonance imaging was performed at age 59. All data processing was performed using the Freesurfer software package except for the texture-scores that were computed using in-house software. Structural brain alterations and associations between depressive symptoms......We explored whether depressive symptoms measured three times during midlife were associated with structural brain alterations quantified using magnetic resonance imaging measurements of volume, cortical thickness, and intensity texture. In 192 men born in 1953 with depressive symptoms measured...... and brain structure outcomes were tested using Pearson's correlation, t test, and linear regression. Depressive symptoms at age 51 showed clear inverse correlations with total gray matter, pallidum, and hippocampal volume with the strongest estimate for hippocampal volume (r = -.22, p 

  1. Local Reasoning about Programs that Alter Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Hearn, Peter W.; Reynolds, John Clifton; Yang, Hongseok

    2001-01-01

    We describe an extension of Hoare's logic for reasoning about programs that alter data structures. We consider a low-level storage model based on a heap with associated lookup, update, allocation and deallocation operations, and unrestricted address arithmetic. The assertion language is based....... Through these and a number of examples we show that the formalism supports local reasoning: A speci-cation and proof can concentrate on only those cells in memory that a program accesses. This paper builds on earlier work by Burstall, Reynolds, Ishtiaq and O'Hearn on reasoning about data structures....

  2. Preterm birth and structural brain alterations in early adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Nosarti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in cortical development and impaired neurodevelopmental outcomes have been described following very preterm (VPT birth in childhood and adolescence, but only a few studies to date have investigated grey matter (GM and white matter (WM maturation in VPT samples in early adult life. Using voxel-based morphometry (VBM we studied regional GM and WM volumes in 68 VPT-born individuals (mean gestational age 30 weeks and 43 term-born controls aged 19–20 years, and their association with cognitive outcomes (Hayling Sentence Completion Test, Controlled Oral Word Association Test, Visual Reproduction test of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised and gestational age. Structural MRI data were obtained with a 1.5 Tesla system and analysed using the VBM8 toolbox in SPM8 with a customized study-specific template. Similarly to results obtained at adolescent assessment, VPT young adults compared to controls demonstrated reduced GM volume in temporal, frontal, insular and occipital areas, thalamus, caudate nucleus and putamen. Increases in GM volume were noted in medial/anterior frontal gyrus. Smaller subcortical WM volume in the VPT group was observed in temporal, parietal and frontal regions, and in a cluster centred on posterior corpus callosum/thalamus/fornix. Larger subcortical WM volume was found predominantly in posterior brain regions, in areas beneath the parahippocampal and occipital gyri and in cerebellum. Gestational age was associated with GM and WM volumes in areas where VPT individuals demonstrated GM and WM volumetric alterations, especially in temporal, parietal and occipital regions. VPT participants scored lower than controls on measures of IQ, executive function and non-verbal memory. When investigating GM and WM alterations and cognitive outcome scores, subcortical WM volume in an area beneath the left inferior frontal gyrus accounted for 14% of the variance of full-scale IQ (F = 12.9, p < 0.0001. WM volume in posterior corpus

  3. Altered structural brain changes and neurocognitive performance in pediatric HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K. Yadav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric HIV patients often suffer with neurodevelopmental delay and subsequently cognitive impairment. While tissue injury in cortical and subcortical regions in the brain of adult HIV patients has been well reported there is sparse knowledge about these changes in perinatally HIV infected pediatric patients. We analyzed cortical thickness, subcortical volume, structural connectivity, and neurocognitive functions in pediatric HIV patients and compared with those of pediatric healthy controls. With informed consent, 34 perinatally infected pediatric HIV patients and 32 age and gender matched pediatric healthy controls underwent neurocognitive assessment and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI on a 3 T clinical scanner. Altered cortical thickness, subcortical volumes, and abnormal neuropsychological test scores were observed in pediatric HIV patients. The structural network connectivity analysis depicted lower connection strengths, lower clustering coefficients, and higher path length in pediatric HIV patients than healthy controls. The network betweenness and network hubs in cortico-limbic regions were distorted in pediatric HIV patients. The findings suggest that altered cortical and subcortical structures and regional brain connectivity in pediatric HIV patients may contribute to deficits in their neurocognitive functions. Further, longitudinal studies are required for better understanding of the effect of HIV pathogenesis on brain structural changes throughout the brain development process under standard ART treatment.

  4. Disease-associated mutations that alter the RNA structural ensemble.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Halvorsen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS often identify disease-associated mutations in intergenic and non-coding regions of the genome. Given the high percentage of the human genome that is transcribed, we postulate that for some observed associations the disease phenotype is caused by a structural rearrangement in a regulatory region of the RNA transcript. To identify such mutations, we have performed a genome-wide analysis of all known disease-associated Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs from the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD that map to the untranslated regions (UTRs of a gene. Rather than using minimum free energy approaches (e.g. mFold, we use a partition function calculation that takes into consideration the ensemble of possible RNA conformations for a given sequence. We identified in the human genome disease-associated SNPs that significantly alter the global conformation of the UTR to which they map. For six disease-states (Hyperferritinemia Cataract Syndrome, beta-Thalassemia, Cartilage-Hair Hypoplasia, Retinoblastoma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, and Hypertension, we identified multiple SNPs in UTRs that alter the mRNA structural ensemble of the associated genes. Using a Boltzmann sampling procedure for sub-optimal RNA structures, we are able to characterize and visualize the nature of the conformational changes induced by the disease-associated mutations in the structural ensemble. We observe in several cases (specifically the 5' UTRs of FTL and RB1 SNP-induced conformational changes analogous to those observed in bacterial regulatory Riboswitches when specific ligands bind. We propose that the UTR and SNP combinations we identify constitute a "RiboSNitch," that is a regulatory RNA in which a specific SNP has a structural consequence that results in a disease phenotype. Our SNPfold algorithm can help identify RiboSNitches by leveraging GWAS data and an analysis of the mRNA structural ensemble.

  5. Editor's Choice - Acute Cardiovascular Care Association Position Paper on Intensive Cardiovascular Care Units: An update on their definition, structure, organisation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoy-Cudraz, Eric; Bueno, Hector; Casella, Gianni; De Maria, Elia; Fitzsimons, Donna; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Hassager, Christian; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Magdy, Ahmed; Marandi, Toomas; Mimoso, Jorge; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Price, Susana; Rokyta, Richard; Roubille, Francois; Serpytis, Pranas; Shimony, Avi; Stepinska, Janina; Tint, Diana; Trendafilova, Elina; Tubaro, Marco; Vrints, Christiaan; Walker, David; Zahger, Doron; Zima, Endre; Zukermann, Robert; Lettino, Maddalena

    2018-02-01

    Acute cardiovascular care has progressed considerably since the last position paper was published 10 years ago. It is now a well-defined, complex field with demanding multidisciplinary teamworking. The Acute Cardiovascular Care Association has provided this update of the 2005 position paper on acute cardiovascular care organisation, using a multinational working group. The patient population has changed, and intensive cardiovascular care units now manage a large range of conditions from those simply requiring specialised monitoring, to critical cardiovascular diseases with associated multi-organ failure. To describe better intensive cardiovascular care units case mix, acuity of care has been divided into three levels, and then defining intensive cardiovascular care unit functional organisation. For each level of intensive cardiovascular care unit, this document presents the aims of the units, the recommended management structure, the optimal number of staff, the need for specially trained cardiologists and cardiovascular nurses, the desired equipment and architecture, and the interaction with other departments in the hospital and other intensive cardiovascular care units in the region/area. This update emphasises cardiologist training, referring to the recently updated Acute Cardiovascular Care Association core curriculum on acute cardiovascular care. The training of nurses in acute cardiovascular care is additionally addressed. Intensive cardiovascular care unit expertise is not limited to within the unit's geographical boundaries, extending to different specialties and subspecialties of cardiology and other specialties in order to optimally manage the wide scope of acute cardiovascular conditions in frequently highly complex patients. This position paper therefore addresses the need for the inclusion of acute cardiac care and intensive cardiovascular care units within a hospital network, linking university medical centres, large community hospitals, and smaller

  6. Phenotype- and genotype-specific structural alterations in spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Serena; Battistella, Giovanni; Huddleston, Hailey; Scharf, Rebecca; Fleysher, Lazar; Rumbach, Anna F; Frucht, Steven J; Blitzer, Andrew; Ozelius, Laurie J; Simonyan, Kristina

    2017-04-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia is a focal dystonia characterized by involuntary spasms in the laryngeal muscles that occur selectively during speaking. Although hereditary trends have been reported in up to 16% of patients, the causative etiology of spasmodic dysphonia is unclear, and the influences of various phenotypes and genotypes on disorder pathophysiology are poorly understood. In this study, we examined structural alterations in cortical gray matter and white matter integrity in relationship to different phenotypes and putative genotypes of spasmodic dysphonia to elucidate the structural component of its complex pathophysiology. Eighty-nine patients with spasmodic dysphonia underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging to examine cortical thickness and white matter fractional anisotropy in adductor versus abductor forms (distinct phenotypes) and in sporadic versus familial cases (distinct genotypes). Phenotype-specific abnormalities were localized in the left sensorimotor cortex and angular gyrus and the white matter bundle of the right superior corona radiata. Genotype-specific alterations were found in the left superior temporal gyrus, supplementary motor area, and the arcuate portion of the left superior longitudinal fasciculus. Our findings suggest that phenotypic differences in spasmodic dysphonia arise at the level of the primary and associative areas of motor control, whereas genotype-related pathophysiological mechanisms may be associated with dysfunction of regions regulating phonological and sensory processing. Identification of structural alterations specific to disorder phenotype and putative genotype provides an important step toward future delineation of imaging markers and potential targets for novel therapeutic interventions for spasmodic dysphonia. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  7. Buspirone maintenance does not alter the reinforcing, subjective, and cardiovascular effects of intranasal methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Anna R; Strickland, Justin C; Stoops, William W; Lile, Joshua A; Rush, Craig R

    2017-12-01

    Medications development efforts for methamphetamine-use disorder have targeted central monoamines because these systems are directly involved in the effects of methamphetamine. Buspirone is a dopamine autoreceptor and D3 receptor antagonist and partial agonist at serotonin 1A receptors, making it a logical candidate medication for methamphetamine-use disorder. Buspirone effects on abuse-related behaviors of methamphetamine have been mixed in clinical and preclinical studies. Experimental research using maintenance dosing, which models therapeutic use, is limited. This study evaluated the influence of buspirone maintenance on the reinforcing effects of methamphetamine using a self-administration procedure, which has predictive validity for clinical efficacy. The impact of buspirone maintenance on the subjective and cardiovascular response to methamphetamine was also determined. Eight research participants (1 female) reporting recent illicit stimulant use completed a placebo-controlled, crossover, double-blind protocol in which the pharmacodynamic effects of intranasal methamphetamine (0, 15, and 30mg) were assessed after at least 6days of buspirone (0 and 45mg/day) maintenance. Intranasal methamphetamine functioned as a reinforcer and produced prototypical stimulant-like subjective (e.g., increased ratings of Good Effects and Like Drug) and cardiovascular (e.g., elevated blood pressure) effects. These effects of methamphetamine were similar under buspirone and placebo maintenance conditions. Maintenance on buspirone was well tolerated and devoid of effects when administered alone. These data suggest that buspirone is unlikely to be an effective pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine-use disorder. Given the central role of monoamines in methamphetamine-use disorder, it is reasonable for future studies to continue to target these systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Gray matter structural networks are associated with cardiovascular risk factors in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharabian Masouleh, Shahrzad; Beyer, Frauke; Lampe, Leonie; Loeffler, Markus; Luck, Tobias; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Schroeter, Matthias L; Stumvoll, Michael; Villringer, Arno; Witte, A Veronica

    2018-02-01

    While recent 'big data' analyses discovered structural brain networks that alter with age and relate to cognitive decline, identifying modifiable factors that prevent these changes remains a major challenge. We therefore aimed to determine the effects of common cardiovascular risk factors on vulnerable gray matter (GM) networks in a large and well-characterized population-based cohort. In 616 healthy elderly (258 women, 60-80 years) of the LIFE-Adult-Study, we assessed the effects of obesity, smoking, blood pressure, markers of glucose and lipid metabolism as well as physical activity on major GM-networks derived using linked independent component analysis. Age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, white matter hyperintensities, education and depression were considered as confounders. Results showed that smoking, higher blood pressure, and higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were independently associated with lower GM volume and thickness in GM-networks that covered most areas of the neocortex. Higher waist-to-hip ratio was independently associated with lower GM volume in a network of multimodal regions that correlated negatively with age and memory performance. In this large cross-sectional study, we found selective negative associations of smoking, higher blood pressure, higher glucose, and visceral obesity with structural covariance networks, suggesting that reducing these factors could help to delay late-life trajectories of GM aging.

  9. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy? NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

  10. Island tameness: an altered cardiovascular stress response in Galápagos marine iguanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, Maren N; Romero, L Michael; Tarlow, Elisa; Cyr, Nicole E; Wikelski, Martin

    2010-03-30

    Island tameness is a widely documented phenomenon in which island species, particularly those that have evolved with no or few natural predators, show a greatly reduced behavioral response when faced with unfamiliar predators. This insufficient anti-predator response has led to widespread population declines among many island species exposed to novel predators, and has become a serious conservation problem. Despite its prevalence, the underlying physiology of island tameness is not known. Here we report that although Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) initiated flight from an evolutionarily recent and unfamiliar potential predator (humans), they failed to show the cardiovascular stress response that facilitates successful escape, even after a prior capture experience. In contrast, when approached by a native predator (the Galápagos hawk; Buteo galapagoensis), marine iguanas show markedly increased heart rate independent of initiating escape movement. The secretion of catecholamines appears to be central to the initiation of escape behavior: naïve animals remotely injected with epinephrine immediately increased flight initiation distance, whereas those injected with corticosterone did not. Our results provide the first evidence that muted escape behavior in predator-naïve species is indicative of both a cognitive deficit in recognizing potential predators and a catecholamine deficit in response. Understanding how the response to predators differs in predator-naïve species could enable the design of maximally effective techniques for inducing an anti-predator response in these vulnerable species. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Altered Nocturnal Cardiovascular Control in Children With Sleep-Disordered Breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hamad, Fatima; Immanuel, Sarah; Liu, Xiao; Pamula, Yvonne; Kontos, Anna; Martin, James; Kennedy, Declan; Kohler, Mark; Porta, Alberto; Baumert, Mathias

    2017-10-01

    To assess cardiovascular control during sleep in children with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and the effect of adenotonsillectomy in comparison to healthy nonsnoring children. Cardiorespiratory signals obtained from overnight polysomnographic recordings of 28 children with SDB and 34 healthy nonsnoring children were analyzed. We employed an autoregressive closed-loop model with heart period (RR) and pulse transit time (PTT) as outputs and respiration as an external input to obtain estimates of respiratory gain and baroreflex gain. Mean and variability of PTT were increased in children with SDB across all stages of sleep. Low frequency power of RR and PTT were attenuated during non-rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Baroreflex sensitivity was reduced in children with SDB in stage 2 sleep, while respiratory gain was increased in slow wave sleep. After adenotonsillectomy, these indices normalized in the SDB group attaining values comparable to those of healthy children. In children with mild-to-moderate SDB, vasomotor activity is increased and baroreflex sensitivity decreased during quiet, event-free non-REM sleep. Adenotonsillectomy appears to reverse this effect. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Structural brain alterations associated with dyslexia predate reading onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschle, Nora Maria; Chang, Maria; Gaab, Nadine

    2011-08-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported reduced activation in parietotemporal and occipitotemporal areas in adults and children with developmental dyslexia compared to controls during reading and reading related tasks. These patterns of regionally reduced activation have been linked to behavioral impairments of reading-related processes (e.g., phonological skills and rapid automatized naming). The observed functional and behavioral differences in individuals with developmental dyslexia have been complemented by reports of reduced gray matter in left parietotemporal, occipitotemporal areas, fusiform and lingual gyrus and the cerebellum. An important question for education is whether these neural differences are present before reading is taught. Developmental dyslexia can only be diagnosed after formal reading education starts. However, here we investigate whether the previously detected gray matter alterations in adults and children with developmental dyslexia can already be observed in a small group of pre-reading children with a family-history of developmental dyslexia compared to age and IQ-matched children without a family-history (N = 20/mean age: 5:9 years; age range 5:1-6:5 years). Voxel-based morphometry revealed significantly reduced gray matter volume indices for pre-reading children with, compared to children without, a family-history of developmental dyslexia in left occipitotemporal, bilateral parietotemporal regions, left fusiform gyrus and right lingual gyrus. Gray matter volume indices in left hemispheric occipitotemporal and parietotemporal regions of interest also correlated positively with rapid automatized naming. No differences between the two groups were observed in frontal and cerebellar regions. This discovery in a small group of children suggests that previously described functional and structural alterations in developmental dyslexia may not be due to experience-dependent brain changes but may be present at birth or

  13. Altered cardiovascular reactivity and osmoregulation during hyperosmotic stress in adult rats developmentally exposed to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Ashini; Coburn, Cary G.; Watson-Siriboe, Abena; Whitley, Rebecca; Shahidzadeh, Anoush; Gillard, Elizabeth R.; Nichol, Robert; Leon-Olea, Martha; Gaertner, Mark; Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.; Curras-Collazo, Margarita C.

    2011-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and the structurally similar chemicals polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) disrupt the function of multiple endocrine systems. PCBs and PBDEs disrupt the secretion of vasopressin (VP) from the hypothalamus during osmotic activation. Since the peripheral and central vasopressinergic axes are critical for osmotic and cardiovascular regulation, we examined whether perinatal PBDE exposure could impact these functions during physiological activation. Rats were perinatally dosed with a commercial PBDE mixture, DE-71. Dams were given 0 (corn oil control), 1.7 (low dose) or 30.6 mg/kg/day (high dose) in corn oil from gestational day (GD) 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21 by oral gavage. In the male offspring exposed to high dose PBDE plasma thyroxine and triiodothyronine levels were reduced at PND 21 and recovered to control levels by PND 60 when thyroid stimulating hormone levels were elevated. At 14-18 months of age, cardiovascular responses were measured in four groups of rats: Normal (Oil, normosmotic condition), Hyper (Oil, hyperosmotic stress), Hyper PBDE low (1.7 mg/kg/day DE-71 perinatally, hyperosmotic stress), and Hyper PBDE high (30.6 mg/kg/day DE-71 perinatally, hyperosmotic stress). Systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, and heart rate (HR) were determined using tail cuff sphygmomanometry and normalized to pretreatment values (baseline) measured under basal conditions. Hyperosmotic treatment yielded significant changes in systolic BP in PBDE exposed rats only. Hyper PBDE low and high dose rats showed 36.1 and 64.7% greater systolic BP responses at 3 h post hyperosmotic injection relative to pretreatment baseline, respectively. No treatment effects were measured for diastolic BP and HR. Hyper and Hyper PBDE rats showed increased mean plasma osmolality values by 45 min after injection relative to normosmotic controls. In contrast to Hyper rats, Hyper PBDE (high) rats showed a further increase in mean plasma osmolality at 3

  14. Gestational Diabetes Alters Functions in Offspring's Umbilical Cord Cells With Implications for Cardiovascular Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrithraj, Ajith Isaac; Kodali, Anjaneyulu; Nguyen, Linh; Teo, Adrian Kee Keong; Chang, Cheng Wei; Karnani, Neerja; Ng, Kai Lyn; Gluckman, Peter D; Chong, Yap Seng; Stünkel, Walter

    2017-07-01

    Because noncommunicable diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus have their roots in prenatal development and conditions such as maternal gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), we aimed to test this hypothesis in primary cells derived from the offspring of mothers with GDM compared with control subjects. We have assessed primary umbilical cord-derived cells such as human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells from the offspring of mothers with and without GDM. We have compared the primary isolates in cell-based assays measuring proliferation, mitochondrial oxygen consumption, and the ability to support blood vessel growth. We conducted gene expression microarray studies with subsequent pathway analysis and candidate gene validation. We observed striking differences between the two groups, such as lower metabolic rates and impairment of endothelial tube formation in cells with GDM background. HUVECs from subjects with maternal GDM have lower expression of the antiapoptotic protein BCL-xL, suggesting compromised angiogenic capabilities. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed blood vessel formation as a major pathway enriched in the GDM-derived HUVECs with the surface marker CD44 as a gene underexpressed in the GDM group. Functional validation of CD44 revealed that it regulates tube formation in HUVECs, thereby providing insights into a pathway imprinted in primary umbilical cord-derived cells from GDM offspring. Our data demonstrate that primary cells isolated from the umbilical cord of offspring born to mothers with GDM maintain metabolic and molecular imprints of maternal hyperglycemia, reflecting an increased risk for cardiovascular disease later in life. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  15. Synthetic cannabinoids found in "spice" products alter body temperature and cardiovascular parameters in conscious male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Charles W; Gramling, Benjamin R; Justinova, Zuzana; Thorndike, Eric B; Baumann, Michael H

    2017-10-01

    The misuse of synthetic cannabinoids is a persistent public health concern. Because these drugs target the same cannabinoid receptors as the active ingredient of marijuana, Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), we compared the effects of synthetic cannabinoids and THC on body temperature and cardiovascular parameters. Biotelemetry transmitters for the measurement of body temperature or blood pressure (BP) were surgically implanted into separate groups of male rats. THC and the synthetic cannabinoids CP55,940, JWH-018, AM2201 and XLR-11 were injected s.c., and rats were placed into isolation cubicles for 3h. THC and synthetic cannabinoids produced dose-related decreases in body temperature that were most prominent in the final 2h of the session. The rank order of potency was CP55,940>AM2201=JWH-018>THC=XLR-11. The cannabinoid inverse agonist rimonabant antagonized the hypothermic effect of all compounds. Synthetic cannabinoids elevated BP in comparison to vehicle treatment during the first h of the session, while heart rate was unaffected. The rank order of potency for BP increases was similar to that seen for hypothermia. Hypertensive effects of CP55,940 and JWH-018 were not antagonized by rimonabant or the neutral antagonist AM4113. However, the BP responses to both drugs were antagonized by pretreatment with either the ganglionic blocker hexamethonium or the α 1 adrenergic antagonist prazosin. Our results show that synthetic cannabinoids produce hypothermia in rats by a mechanism involving cannabinoid receptors, while they increase BP by a mechanism independent of these sites. The hypertensive effect appears to involve central sympathetic outflow. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Altered osteoblast structure and function in parabolic flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong-Quan, Dai; Ying-Hui, Li; Fen, Yang; Bai, Ding; Ying-Jun, Tan

    Introduction Bone loss has a significant impact on astronauts during spaceflight being one of the main obstacles preventing interplanetary missions However the exact mechanism is not well understood In the present study we investigated the effects of acute gravitational changes generated by parabolic flight on the structure and function of osteoblasts ROS17 2 8 carried by airbus A300 Methods The alteration of microfilament cytoskeleton was observed by the Texas red conjugated Phalloidin and Alexa Fluor 488 conjugated DNase I immunofluorescence stain ALP activity and expression COL1A1 expression osteocalcin secrete which presenting the osteoblast function were detected by modified calcium and cobalt method RT-PCR and radioimmunity methods respectively Results The changed gravity induced the reorganization of microfilament cytoskeleton of osteoblast After 3 hours parabolic flight F-actin of osteoblast cytoskeleton became more thickness and directivity whereas G-actin reduced and relatively concentrated at the edge of nucleus observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy This phenomenon is identical with structure alternation observed in hypergravity but the osteoblast function decrease The excretion of osteocalcin the activity and mRNA expression of ALP decrease but the COL1A1 expression has no changes These results were similar to the changes in simulated or real microgravity Conclusion Above results suggest that short time gravity alternative change induce osteoblast structure and function

  17. Addition of electrophilic lipids to actin alters filament structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayarre, Javier; Sanchez, David; Sanchez-Gomez, Francisco J.; Terron, Maria C.; Llorca, Oscar; Perez-Sala, Dolores

    2006-01-01

    Pathophysiological processes associated with oxidative stress lead to the generation of reactive lipid species. Among them, lipids bearing unsaturated aldehyde or ketone moieties can form covalent adducts with cysteine residues and modulate protein function. Through proteomic techniques we have identified actin as a target for the addition of biotinylated analogs of the cyclopentenone prostaglandins 15-deoxy-Δ 12,14 -PGJ 2 (15d-PGJ 2 ) and PGA 1 in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. This modification could take place in vitro and mapped to the protein C-terminal end. Other electrophilic lipids, like the isoprostane 8-iso-PGA 1 and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, also bound to actin. The C-terminal region of actin is important for monomer-monomer interactions and polymerization. Electron microscopy showed that actin treated with 15d-PGJ 2 or 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal formed filaments which were less abundant and displayed shorter length and altered structure. Streptavidin-gold staining allowed mapping of biotinylated 15d-PGJ 2 at sites of filament disruption. These results shed light on the structural implications of actin modification by lipid electrophiles

  18. The structure of alteration layers on cast glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oversby, V.M.; Phinney, D.L.

    1991-11-01

    Alteration layers developed on SRL-165 simulated waste glasses in dilute sodium silicate/bicarbonate leaching solutions have been examined by Secondary Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) using fine-scale, multiple-element depth profiling. Selected samples were examined with an imaging detector system, which demonstrated the horizontal homogeneity of the layer development at all depths within the layer. After 1 day of reaction at 90 degrees C the reaction layer shows depletion of glass elements to a depth of 0.2 μm. The surface of the layer in contact with the solution shows enrichment of Si, Al, and alkali elements even at this short reaction time, suggesting the early stages of development of secondary aluminosilicate phases. With increased reaction time, the layer thickens to about 1.3 μm at 91 days, while the evidence for aluminosilicate development at the surface of the layer becomes more prominent. Penetration of hydrogen into the ''unreacted'' glass proceeds to a depth of about 0.5 μm deeper than the alkali depletion zone. This suggests the mechanism of initial reaction of the glass is by attack of the silicate structure by molecular water or hydroxide ion rather than by alkali-hydrogen ion exchange. The simple structure of the layers developed in the silicate solution is in contrast to the complexity of layer structure found when glasses are reacted in deionized water. Since the conditions for geologic disposal will be closer to those used in the silicate leaching experiments, these results hold promise for the ability to model the system to predict long-term performance after disposal in a repository

  19. Body water distribution and risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in a healthy population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Nikoline Nygård; Kjærulff, Thora Majlund; Ward, Leigh Cordwin

    2014-01-01

    Early alterations in the cardiovascular structure and function may change normal body water distribution. The resulting fluid shifts may thus serve as an early marker for cardiovascular disease. However, studies examining this in healthy populations are absent.......Early alterations in the cardiovascular structure and function may change normal body water distribution. The resulting fluid shifts may thus serve as an early marker for cardiovascular disease. However, studies examining this in healthy populations are absent....

  20. Computational medical imaging and hemodynamics framework for functional analysis and assessment of cardiovascular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kelvin K L; Wang, Defeng; Ko, Jacky K L; Mazumdar, Jagannath; Le, Thu-Thao; Ghista, Dhanjoo

    2017-03-21

    Cardiac dysfunction constitutes common cardiovascular health issues in the society, and has been an investigation topic of strong focus by researchers in the medical imaging community. Diagnostic modalities based on echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, chest radiography and computed tomography are common techniques that provide cardiovascular structural information to diagnose heart defects. However, functional information of cardiovascular flow, which can in fact be used to support the diagnosis of many cardiovascular diseases with a myriad of hemodynamics performance indicators, remains unexplored to its full potential. Some of these indicators constitute important cardiac functional parameters affecting the cardiovascular abnormalities. With the advancement of computer technology that facilitates high speed computational fluid dynamics, the realization of a support diagnostic platform of hemodynamics quantification and analysis can be achieved. This article reviews the state-of-the-art medical imaging and high fidelity multi-physics computational analyses that together enable reconstruction of cardiovascular structures and hemodynamic flow patterns within them, such as of the left ventricle (LV) and carotid bifurcations. The combined medical imaging and hemodynamic analysis enables us to study the mechanisms of cardiovascular disease-causing dysfunctions, such as how (1) cardiomyopathy causes left ventricular remodeling and loss of contractility leading to heart failure, and (2) modeling of LV construction and simulation of intra-LV hemodynamics can enable us to determine the optimum procedure of surgical ventriculation to restore its contractility and health This combined medical imaging and hemodynamics framework can potentially extend medical knowledge of cardiovascular defects and associated hemodynamic behavior and their surgical restoration, by means of an integrated medical image diagnostics and hemodynamic performance analysis framework.

  1. Structural equation modeling for alteration of occlusal plane inclination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeta, Yuko; Ogawa, Takumi; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Ando, Eriko; Hirabayashi, Rio; Ikawa, Tomoko

    2015-07-01

    Occlusal plane inclination is important to maintain a normal opening closing/biting function. However, there can be several causes that lead to alterations of the occlusal plane. The purpose of this study was to observe variations of occlusal plane inclination in adult patients, and to uncover the factors affecting changes in occlusal plane inclination with aging. Subjects were 143 patients. A cephalometric image was taken of these patients. In this study, our inquiry points were age, 3 variables on intra-oral findings, and 7 variables on cephalometric analysis. To evaluate the possible causes that affect occlusal plane inclination, factor analysis was carried out, and each component was treated as factors, which were then statistically applied to a structural equation model. Statistical analysis was carried out through the SPSS 20.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, USA). In all patients, Camper-occlusal plane angle (COA) ranged from -25.7 to -4.9° (Mean±SD: -6.4±5.36). In the 60 patients who had no missing teeth, COA ranged from -11.6 to -4.9° (Mean±SD: -3.3±3.31). From the results of the structural analysis, it was suggested that the occlusal plane changes to counter-clockwise (on the right lateral cephalograms) with aging. In this study, variations of occlusal plane inclination in adult patients were observed, and the factors affecting changes in occlusal plane inclination with aging were investigated via factor analysis. From our results, it was suggested that the mandibular morphology change and loss of teeth with aging influence occlusal plane inclination. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Increased visceral adipose tissue and altered adiposity distribution in premenopausal lupus patients: correlation with cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguro, L P C; Paupitz, J A; Caparbo, V F; Bonfa, E; Pereira, R M R

    2018-01-01

    Objective Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) correlates with cardiovascular risk factors and has never been assessed in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our aim was to evaluate VAT in premenopausal SLE patients. Methods Sixty-three premenopausal SLE patients and 186 age-matched healthy women were included. Demographic, anthropometric, disease and treatment parameters were evaluated. VAT was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) with APEX 4.0 software. Results SLE patients had a disease duration of 5.25 ± 3.80 years, SLEDAI activity score of 4.35 ± 5.13, SLICC/ACR-DI of 0.70 ± 0.80, current prednisone dose of 11.60 ± 12.10 mg/day and cumulative glucocorticoid dose of 22.34 ± 12.94 g. Overweight/obese SLE patients and controls had similar VAT parameters ( p > 0.05). Among individuals with BMI  0.05) but patients had higher values of VAT parameters (VAT mass: 260.60 ± 117.23 vs. 194.77 ± 71.42 g, p = 0.001; VAT area: 54.05 ± 24.30 vs. 40.40 ± 14.82 cm 2 , p = 0.001; VAT volume: 281.75 ± 126.81 vs. 210.61 ± 77.29 cm 3 , p = 0.001) and trunk/limb fat mass ratio (0.78 ± 0.21 vs. 0.67 ± 0.12, p = 0.002) compared to controls. In SLE, VAT area correlated with weight ( r = 0.66, p  0.05). Conclusion This study provides original evidence that SLE is associated with increased VAT and altered adiposity distribution. The correlation with traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, independent of current glucocorticoid dose and disease activity, suggests the role of visceral fat as an additional tool for risk assessment in these young patients.

  3. Ayahuasca Alters Structural Parameters of the Rat Aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitol, Dimitrius L; Siéssere, Selma; Dos Santos, Rafael G; Rosa, Maria L N M; Hallak, Jaime E C; Scalize, Priscilla H; Pereira, Bruno F; Iyomasa, Melina M; Semprini, Marisa; Riba, Jordi; Regalo, Simone C H

    2015-07-01

    Ayahuasca is a hallucinogenic brew traditionally used by Northwestern Amazonian indigenous groups for therapeutic purposes. It is prepared by the decoction of Banisteriopsis caapi with the leaves of Psychotria viridis. Banisteriopsis caapi contains β-carbolines that are inhibitors of monoamine oxidase and P. viris is rich in dimethyltryptamine, a 5-HT(1A/2A/2C) agonist. Acute ayahuasca administration produces moderate cardiovascular effects in healthy volunteers, but information regarding long-term use is lacking. This study investigated the effects of ayahuasca (2-4 mL/kg) in the rat aorta after acute and chronic (14 days) administration. Ayahuasca caused flattening and stretching of vascular smooth muscle cells and changes in the arrangement and distribution of collagen and elastic fibers. Chronic treatment with the higher dose significantly increased media thickness and the ratio of media thickness to lumen diameter. More research is needed on the cardiovascular function of long-term ayahuasca consumers.

  4. Sex-specific cardiovascular structure and function in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori, Mauro; Lam, Carolyn S. P.; Gupta, Deepak K.; Santos, Angela B. S.; Cheng, Susan; Shah, Amil M.; Claggett, Brian; Zile, Michael R.; Kraigher-Krainer, Elisabeth; Pieske, Burkert; Voors, Adriaan A.; Packer, Milton; Bransford, Toni; Lefkowitz, Martin; McMurray, John J. V.; Solomon, Scott D.

    Aims Women are more likely to develop heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) than men. We studied the relationship between sex and cardiovascular structure and function in patients with HFpEF. Methods and resultsThe study included 279 participants from the PARAMOUNT study (57% women)

  5. Association between renal function and cardiovascular structure and function in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori, Mauro; Senni, Michele; Gupta, Deepak K.; Charytan, David M.; Kraigher-Krainer, Elisabeth; Pieske, Burkert; Claggett, Brian; Shah, Amil M.; Santos, Angela B. S.; Zile, Michael R.; Voors, Adriaan A.; McMurray, John J. V.; Packer, Milton; Bransford, Toni; Lefkowitz, Martin; Solomon, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Renal dysfunction is a common comorbidity in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We sought to determine whether renal dysfunction was associated with measures of cardiovascular structure/function in patients with HFpEF. Methods We studied 217 participants from

  6. Altered TGFβ signaling and cardiovascular manifestations in patients with autosomal recessive cutis laxa type I caused by fibulin-4 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Marjolijn; Holm, Tammy; Veith, Regan; Callewaert, Bert L; Adès, Lesley C; Baspinar, Osman; Pickart, Angela; Dasouki, Majed; Hoyer, Juliane; Rauch, Anita; Trapane, Pamela; Earing, Michael G; Coucke, Paul J; Sakai, Lynn Y; Dietz, Harry C; De Paepe, Anne M; Loeys, Bart L

    2010-01-01

    Fibulin-4 is a member of the fibulin family, a group of extracellular matrix proteins prominently expressed in medial layers of large veins and arteries. Involvement of the FBLN4 gene in cardiovascular pathology was shown in a murine model and in three patients affected with cutis laxa in association with systemic involvement. To elucidate the contribution of FBLN4 in human disease, we investigated two cohorts of patients. Direct sequencing of 17 patients with cutis laxa revealed no FBLN4 mutations. In a second group of 22 patients presenting with arterial tortuosity, stenosis and aneurysms, FBLN4 mutations were identified in three patients, two homozygous missense mutations (p.Glu126Lys and p.Ala397Thr) and compound heterozygosity for missense mutation p.Glu126Val and frameshift mutation c.577delC. Immunoblotting analysis showed a decreased amount of fibulin-4 protein in the fibroblast culture media of two patients, a finding sustained by diminished fibulin-4 in the extracellular matrix of the aortic wall on immunohistochemistry. pSmad2 and CTGF immunostaining of aortic and lung tissue revealed an increase in transforming growth factor (TGF)β signaling. This was confirmed by pSmad2 immunoblotting of fibroblast cultures. In conclusion, patients with recessive FBLN4 mutations are predominantly characterized by aortic aneurysms, arterial tortuosity and stenosis. This confirms the important role of fibulin-4 in vascular elastic fiber assembly. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence for the involvement of altered TGFβ signaling in the pathogenesis of FBLN4 mutations in humans. PMID:20389311

  7. An alter-centric perspective on employee innovation: The importance of alters' creative self-efficacy and network structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosser, Travis J; Venkataramani, Vijaya; Labianca, Giuseppe Joe

    2017-09-01

    While most social network studies of employee innovation behavior examine the focal employees' ("egos'") network structure, we employ an alter-centric perspective to study the personal characteristics of employees' network contacts-their "alters"-to better understand employee innovation. Specifically, we examine how the creative self-efficacy (CSE) and innovation behavior of employees' social network contacts affects their ability to generate and implement novel ideas. Hypotheses were tested using a sample of 144 employees in a U.S.-based product development organization. We find that the average CSE of alters in an employee's problem solving network is positively related to that employee's innovation behavior, with this relationship being mediated by these alters' average innovation behavior. The relationship between the alters' average innovation behavior and the employee's own innovation behavior is strengthened when these alters have less dense social networks. Post hoc results suggest that having network contacts with high levels of CSE also leads to an increase in ego's personal CSE 1 year later in cases where the employee's initial level of CSE was relatively low. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Cardiac structure and function in humans: a new cardiovascular physiology laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Su; Burleson, Paul D.; Passo, Stanley; Messina, Edward J.; Levine, Norman; Thompson, Carl I.; Belloni, Francis L.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Ojaimi, Caroline; Kaley, Gabor

    2009-01-01

    As the traditional cardiovascular control laboratory has disappeared from the first-year medical school curriculum, we have recognized the need to develop another “hands-on” experience as a vehicle for wide-ranging discussions of cardiovascular control mechanisms. Using an echocardiograph, an automatic blood pressure cuff, and a reclining bicycle, we developed protocols to illustrate the changes in cardiac and vascular function that occur with changes in posture, venous return, and graded exercise. We use medical student volunteers and a professional echocardiographer to generate and acquire data, respectively. In small-group sessions, we developed an interactive approach to discuss the data and to make a large number of calculations from a limited number of measurements. The sequence of cardiac events and cardiac structure in vivo were illustrated with the volunteers lying down, standing, and then with their legs raised passively above the heart to increase venous return. Volunteers were then asked to peddle the bicycle to achieve steady-state heart rates of 110 and 150 beats/min. Data were collected in all these states, and calculations were performed and used as the basis of a small-group discussion to illustrate physiological principles. Information related to a surprisingly large number of cardiovascular control mechanisms was derived, and its relevance to cardiovascular dysfunction was explored. This communication describes our experience in developing a new cardiovascular control laboratory to reinforce didactic material presented in lectures and small-group sessions. PMID:19745049

  9. Acrolein inhalation alters arterial blood gases and triggers carotid body-mediated cardiovascular responses in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Christina M; Hazari, Mehdi S; Ledbetter, Allen D; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Carll, Alex P; Cascio, Wayne E; Winsett, Darrell W; Costa, Daniel L; Farraj, Aimen K

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution exposure affects autonomic function, heart rate, blood pressure and left ventricular function. While the mechanism for these effects is uncertain, several studies have reported that air pollution exposure modifies activity of the carotid body, the major organ that senses changes in arterial oxygen and carbon dioxide levels, and elicits downstream changes in autonomic control and cardiac function. We hypothesized that exposure to acrolein, an unsaturated aldehyde and mucosal irritant found in cigarette smoke and diesel exhaust, would activate the carotid body chemoreceptor response and lead to secondary cardiovascular responses in rats. Spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats were exposed once for 3 h to 3 ppm acrolein gas or filtered air in whole body plethysmograph chambers. To determine if the carotid body mediated acrolein-induced cardiovascular responses, rats were pretreated with an inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), an enzyme essential for carotid body signal transduction. Acrolein exposure induced several cardiovascular effects. Systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure increased during exposure, while cardiac contractility decreased 1 day after exposure. The cardiovascular effects were associated with decreases in pO2, breathing frequency and expiratory time, and increases in sympathetic tone during exposure followed by parasympathetic dominance after exposure. The CSE inhibitor prevented the cardiovascular effects of acrolein exposure. Pretreatment with the CSE inhibitor prevented the cardiovascular effects of acrolein, suggesting that the cardiovascular responses with acrolein may be mediated by carotid body-triggered changes in autonomic tone. (This abstract does not reflect EPA policy.).

  10. Methods for study of cardiovascular adaptation of small laboratory animals during exposure to altered gravity. [hypothermia for cardiovascular control and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, V.

    1973-01-01

    Several new techniques are reported for studying cardiovascular circulation in small laboratory animals kept in metabolic chambers. Chronical cannulation, miniaturized membrane type heart-lung machines, a prototype walking chamber, and a fluorocarbon immersion method to simulate weightlessness are outlined. Differential hypothermia work on rat cancers provides localized embedding of radionuclides and other chemotherapeutical agents in tumors and increases at the same time blood circulation through the warmed tumor as compared to the rest of the cold body. Some successful clinical applications of combined chemotherapy and differential hypothermia in skin cancer, mammary tumors, and brain gliomas are described.

  11. The prodromal phase of obesity-related chronic kidney disease: early alterations in cardiovascular and renal function in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyon, Anke; Schaefer, Franz

    2013-11-01

    Childhood overweight and obesity is a relevant health condition with multi-organ involvement. Obesity shows significant tracking into adult life and is associated with an increased risk of serious adverse health outcomes both during childhood and later adulthood. The classical sequelae of obesity such as hypertension, metabolic syndrome and inflammation do develop at a paediatric age. Cardiovascular consequences, such as increased carotid intima-media thickness, and left ventricular hypertrophy, as well as functional alterations of the heart and arteries, are commonly traceable at an early age. Renal involvement can occur at a young age and is associated with a high probability of progressive chronic kidney disease. There is solid evidence suggesting that consequent treatment including both lifestyle changes and pharmacological therapy can reduce cardiovascular, metabolic and renal risks in obese children and adolescents.

  12. A structural model of health behavior modification among patients with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goong, Hwasoo; Ryu, Seungmi; Xu, Lijuan

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to test a structural equation model in which social support, health beliefs, and stage of change predict the health behaviors of patients with cardiovascular disease. A cross-sectional correlational design was used. Using convenience sampling, a survey about social support, health belief, stage of change, and health behavior was completed by 314 adults with cardiovascular disease from outpatient clinics in 2 university hospitals in Korea. Data were analyzed using a structural equation model with the Analysis of Moment program. The participants were aged 53.44±13.19 years (mean±SD), and about 64% of them were male. The proposed model fit the data from the study well, explaining 19% and 60% of the variances in the stage of change and health behavior, respectively. The findings indicate that the performance of health behavior modification among the patients with cardiovascular disease can be explained by social support, health belief, and stage of change based on a health-belief and stage-of-change model. Further studies are warranted to confirm the efficacy of health-promoting strategies in initiating and maintaining the performance of health behaviors by providing social support from family and medical staff and enhancing health belief. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Altered intrahemispheric structural connectivity in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS is a common developmental neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by tics and frequent psychiatric comorbidities, often causing significant disability. Tic generation has been linked to disturbed networks of brain areas involved in planning, controlling and execution of actions, particularly structural and functional disorders in the striatum and cortico–striato–thalamo–cortical loops. We therefore applied structural diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to characterize changes in intrahemispheric white matter connectivity in cortico-subcortical circuits engaged in motor control in 15 GTS patients without psychiatric comorbidities. White matter connectivity was analyzed by probabilistic fiber tractography between 12 predefined cortical and subcortical regions of interest. Connectivity values were combined with measures of clinical severity rated by the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS. GTS patients showed widespread structural connectivity deficits. Lower connectivity values were found specifically in tracts connecting the supplementary motor areas (SMA with basal ganglia (pre-SMA–putamen, SMA–putamen and in frontal cortico-cortical circuits. There was an overall trend towards negative correlations between structural connectivity in these tracts and YGTSS scores. Structural connectivity of frontal brain networks involved in planning, controlling and executing actions is reduced in adult GTS patients which is associated with tic severity. These findings are in line with the concept of GTS as a neurodevelopmental disorder of brain immaturity.

  14. Associations between personal exposures to VOCs and alterations in cardiovascular physiology: Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) - presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: An adult cohort consisting of 63 participants engaged in the US EPA’s recent Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) and a University of Michigan cardiovascular sub-study conducted during summer and winter periods over 3 years between 2004 and 2007...

  15. Associations between Personal Exposures to VOCs and Alterations in Cardiovascular Physiology: Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: An adult cohort consisting of 63 participants engaged in the US EPA’s recent Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) and a University of Michigan cardiovascular sub-study conducted during summer and winter periods over 3 years between 2004 and 2007 (5 seas...

  16. Adaptive mutations alter antibody structure and dynamics during affinity maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Yu, Wayne; Oda, Masayuki; Walker, Ross C; Chen, Tingjian; Stanfield, Robyn L; Wilson, Ian A; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2015-03-24

    While adaptive mutations can bestow new functions on proteins via the introduction or optimization of reactive centers, or other structural changes, a role for the optimization of protein dynamics also seems likely but has been more difficult to evaluate. Antibody (Ab) affinity maturation is an example of adaptive evolution wherein the adaptive mutations may be identified and Abs may be raised to specific targets that facilitate the characterization of protein dynamics. Here, we report the characterization of three affinity matured Abs that evolved from a common germline precursor to bind the chromophoric antigen (Ag), 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS). In addition to characterizing the sequence, molecular recognition, and structure of each Ab, we characterized the dynamics of each complex by determining their mechanical response to an applied force via three-pulse photon echo peak shift (3PEPS) spectroscopy and deconvoluting the response into elastic, anelastic, and plastic components. We find that for one Ab, affinity maturation was accomplished via the introduction of a single functional group that mediates a direct contact with MPTS and results in a complex with little anelasticity or plasticity. In the other two cases, more mutations were introduced but none directly contact MPTS, and while their effects on structure are subtle, their effects on anelasticity and plasticity are significant, with the level of plasticity correlated with specificity, suggesting that the optimization of protein dynamics may have contributed to affinity maturation. A similar optimization of structure and dynamics may contribute to the evolution of other proteins.

  17. THC alters alters morphology of neurons in medial prefrontal cortex, orbital prefrontal cortex, and nucleus accumbens and alters the ability of later experience to promote structural plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Bryan; Li, Yilin; Robinson, Terry; Parker, Linda A

    2018-03-01

    Psychoactive drugs have the ability to alter the morphology of neuronal dendrites and spines and to influence later experience-dependent structural plasticity. If rats are given repeated injections of psychomotor stimulants (amphetamine, cocaine, nicotine) prior to being placed in complex environments, the drug experience interferes with the ability of the environment to increase dendritic arborization and spine density. Repeated exposure to Delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) changes the morphology of dendrites in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc). To determine if drugs other than psychomotor stimulants will also interfere with later experience-dependent structural plasticity we gave Long-Evans rats THC (0.5 mg/kg) or saline for 11 days before placing them in complex environments or standard laboratory caging for 90 days. Brains were subsequently processed for Golgi-Cox staining and analysis of dendritic morphology and spine density mPFC, orbital frontal cortex (OFC), and NAcc. THC altered both dendritic arborization and spine density in all three regions, and, like psychomotor stimulants, THC influenced the effect of later experience in complex environments to shape the structure of neurons in these three regions. We conclude that THC may therefore contribute to persistent behavioral and cognitive deficits associated with prolonged use of the drug. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Maternal educational level and blood pressure, aortic stiffness, cardiovascular structure and functioning in childhood : The generation R study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.H. Bouthoorn (Selma); F.J. van Lenthe (Frank); L.L. de Jonge (Layla); A. Hofman (Albert); L. van Osch-Gevers (Lennie); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); H. Raat (Hein)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractbackground In adults, low level of education was shown to be associated with higher blood pressure levels and alterations in cardiac structures and function. It is currently unknown whether socioeconomic inequalities in arterial and cardiac alterations originate in childhood. Therefore,

  19. Do edaphic aspects alter vegetation structures in the Brazilian restinga?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Soares Santos-Filho

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The vegetation of the Brazilian restinga (coastal woodland presents a variety of species and different characteristics, encompassing fields, fruit groves and forests on quartzarenic neosols. We hypothesised that the structure of the restinga landscape along the coast of the state of Piauí is influenced by edaphic factors and presents a pattern similar to that of other northeastern restingas. We evaluated three restingas in Piauí, using the quarter method to determine their structure. Composite soil samples were collected to determine their chemical and physical properties. Edaphic variables were correlated with plant species by canonical correspondence analysis (CCA. Phytosociological data for all three areas indicated regenerating vegetation comprising several small individuals, 82.5% of which showed a diameter at ground level < 13 cm. We also observed considerable tillering. In two of the areas, there was a predominance of Fabaceae species, such as Caesalpinia pyramidalis and Copaifera martii. Although the structural characteristics of the restingas studied were similar to those of other northeastern restingas, the former showed lower Shannon diversity indices (2.18-2.44. The CCA indicated that species distribution was influenced by edaphic factors such as pH, aluminium content and amount of organic matter. The restingas studied were similar to others along the Brazilian coast.

  20. Propionyl-L-carnitine Corrects Metabolic and Cardiovascular Alterations in Diet-Induced Obese Mice and Improves Liver Respiratory Chain Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingorance, Carmen; Duluc, Lucie; Chalopin, Matthieu; Simard, Gilles; Ducluzeau, Pierre-Henri; Herrera, Maria Dolores; Alvarez de Sotomayor, Maria; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2012-01-01

    Aims Obesity is a primary contributor to acquired insulin resistance leading to the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular alterations. The carnitine derivate, propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC), plays a key role in energy control. Our aim was to evaluate metabolic and cardiovascular effects of PLC in diet-induced obese mice. Methods C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet for 9 weeks and then divided into two groups, receiving either free- (vehicle-HF) or PLC-supplemented water (200 mg/kg/day) during 4 additional weeks. Standard diet-fed animals were used as lean controls (vehicle-ST). Body weight and food intake were monitored. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were assessed, as well as the HOMAIR, the serum lipid profile, the hepatic and muscular mitochondrial activity and the tissue nitric oxide (NO) liberation. Systolic blood pressure, cardiac and endothelial functions were also evaluated. Results Vehicle-HF displayed a greater increase of body weight compared to vehicle-ST that was completely reversed by PLC treatment without affecting food intake. PLC improved the insulin-resistant state and reversed the increased total cholesterol but not the increase in free fatty acid, triglyceride and HDL/LDL ratio induced by high-fat diet. Vehicle-HF exhibited a reduced cardiac output/body weight ratio, endothelial dysfunction and tissue decrease of NO production, all of them being improved by PLC treatment. Finally, the decrease of hepatic mitochondrial activity by high-fat diet was reversed by PLC. Conclusions Oral administration of PLC improves the insulin-resistant state developed by obese animals and decreases the cardiovascular risk associated to this metabolic alteration probably via correction of mitochondrial function. PMID:22457831

  1. Propionyl-L-carnitine corrects metabolic and cardiovascular alterations in diet-induced obese mice and improves liver respiratory chain activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Mingorance

    Full Text Available AIMS: Obesity is a primary contributor to acquired insulin resistance leading to the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular alterations. The carnitine derivate, propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC, plays a key role in energy control. Our aim was to evaluate metabolic and cardiovascular effects of PLC in diet-induced obese mice. METHODS: C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet for 9 weeks and then divided into two groups, receiving either free- (vehicle-HF or PLC-supplemented water (200 mg/kg/day during 4 additional weeks. Standard diet-fed animals were used as lean controls (vehicle-ST. Body weight and food intake were monitored. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were assessed, as well as the HOMA(IR, the serum lipid profile, the hepatic and muscular mitochondrial activity and the tissue nitric oxide (NO liberation. Systolic blood pressure, cardiac and endothelial functions were also evaluated. RESULTS: Vehicle-HF displayed a greater increase of body weight compared to vehicle-ST that was completely reversed by PLC treatment without affecting food intake. PLC improved the insulin-resistant state and reversed the increased total cholesterol but not the increase in free fatty acid, triglyceride and HDL/LDL ratio induced by high-fat diet. Vehicle-HF exhibited a reduced cardiac output/body weight ratio, endothelial dysfunction and tissue decrease of NO production, all of them being improved by PLC treatment. Finally, the decrease of hepatic mitochondrial activity by high-fat diet was reversed by PLC. CONCLUSIONS: Oral administration of PLC improves the insulin-resistant state developed by obese animals and decreases the cardiovascular risk associated to this metabolic alteration probably via correction of mitochondrial function.

  2. Propionyl-L-carnitine corrects metabolic and cardiovascular alterations in diet-induced obese mice and improves liver respiratory chain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingorance, Carmen; Duluc, Lucie; Chalopin, Matthieu; Simard, Gilles; Ducluzeau, Pierre-Henri; Herrera, Maria Dolores; Alvarez de Sotomayor, Maria; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a primary contributor to acquired insulin resistance leading to the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular alterations. The carnitine derivate, propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC), plays a key role in energy control. Our aim was to evaluate metabolic and cardiovascular effects of PLC in diet-induced obese mice. C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet for 9 weeks and then divided into two groups, receiving either free- (vehicle-HF) or PLC-supplemented water (200 mg/kg/day) during 4 additional weeks. Standard diet-fed animals were used as lean controls (vehicle-ST). Body weight and food intake were monitored. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were assessed, as well as the HOMA(IR), the serum lipid profile, the hepatic and muscular mitochondrial activity and the tissue nitric oxide (NO) liberation. Systolic blood pressure, cardiac and endothelial functions were also evaluated. Vehicle-HF displayed a greater increase of body weight compared to vehicle-ST that was completely reversed by PLC treatment without affecting food intake. PLC improved the insulin-resistant state and reversed the increased total cholesterol but not the increase in free fatty acid, triglyceride and HDL/LDL ratio induced by high-fat diet. Vehicle-HF exhibited a reduced cardiac output/body weight ratio, endothelial dysfunction and tissue decrease of NO production, all of them being improved by PLC treatment. Finally, the decrease of hepatic mitochondrial activity by high-fat diet was reversed by PLC. Oral administration of PLC improves the insulin-resistant state developed by obese animals and decreases the cardiovascular risk associated to this metabolic alteration probably via correction of mitochondrial function.

  3. White matter structure alterations in HIV-1-infected men with sustained suppression of viraemia on treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tanja; Caan, Matthan W A; Wit, Ferdinand W N M; Schouten, Judith; Geurtsen, Gert J; Cole, James H; Sharp, David J; Vos, Frans M; Prins, Maria; Portegies, Peter; Reiss, Peter; Majoie, Charles B

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent in HIV-1-infected (HIV+) patients, despite adequate suppression of viral replication by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Cerebral white matter structure alterations are often associated with cognitive impairment and have commonly been reported in the natural course of HIV infection. However, the existence of these alterations in adequately treated HIV+ patients remains unknown, as well as its possible association with cognitive impairment. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate whether white matter structure alterations exist in HIV+ patients with sustained suppressed viral replication on cART, and if such alterations are related to HIV-associated cognitive deficits. We compared 100 aviraemic HIV+ men on cART with 70 HIV-uninfected, otherwise comparable men. Clinical and neuropsychological assessments were performed. From DTI data, white matter fractional anisotropy and mean diffusion were calculated. Subsequently, tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was performed, with and without masking out white matter lesions. HIV+ patients showed diffuse white matter structure alterations as compared with HIV-uninfected controls, observed as widespread decreased fractional anisotropy and an increased mean diffusion. These white matter structure alterations were associated with the number of years spent with a CD4 cell count below 500 cells/μl, but not with HIV-associated cognitive deficits. Cerebral white matter structure alterations are found in middle-aged HIV+ men with sustained suppression of viraemia on cART, and may result from periods with immune deficiency when viral toxicity and host-inflammatory responses were at their peak. These white matter structure alterations were not associated with the observed subtle HIV-associated cognitive deficits. .

  4. Cardiovascular effects of obesity: implications for critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peavy, Wendy C

    2009-09-01

    Obesity has become a global health crisis. The effects of obesity on the cardiovascular system pose a unique challenge for the critical care nurse. This article reviews the scope of the problem, the alterations in the cardiovascular structures and function, and the implications for critical care nursing.

  5. Bedfordshire County Structure Plan. Proposed alterations. Results of public consultation. Policy 97: Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The document refers to Alterations to the County Structure Plan, proposed by Bedfordshire County Council and submitted to the Secretary of State for the Environment. An additional Alteration initiated at the County Council's meeting, dealing with nuclear waste, had not been the subject of prior public consultation. Consultation had since been arranged, and the present document summarises the responses that have been received, and describes the next action to be taken. (U.K.)

  6. Bedfordshire County Structure Plan. Proposed alterations -Public participation statement. Policy 97: Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The document describes steps taken, in accord with the Town and Country Planning Act 1971, by Bedfordshire County Council, submitting proposed Alterations to the County Structure Plan to the Secretary of State for the Environment. When approving the submission the Council decided to add an additional Alteration dealing with nuclear waste: as this had not been the subject of public consultation the Council decided to seek the public's views on the proposal before submitting the Alteration. The arrangements for consultation and a list of persons and organizations consulted are given, together with the arrangements for considering comments. (U.K.)

  7. Noninvasive multiphoton imaging of cardiovascular structures using NIR femtosecond laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenke-Layland, Katja; Riemann, Iris; Stock, Ulrich A.; Konig, Karsten

    2004-07-01

    Near infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser scanning microscopy represents a novel and very promising medical diagnostic imaging technology for non-invasive cross-sectional analysis of living biological tissues. In this study multiphoton imaging has been performed to analyze the structural features of extracellular matrix (ECM) components, e.g. collagen and elastin, of living pulmonary and aortic heart valves. High-resolution autofluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) images of collagenous and elastic fibers were demonstrated using multifluorophore, multiphoton excitation at two different wavelengths and non-invasive optical sectioning, without the need of embedding or staining. The quality of the resulting three-dimensional images allowed exact differentiation of the ECM components. These experimental results indicated that NIR femtosecond laser scanning microscopy may prove to be a useful tool for the non-destructive monitoring and characterization of cardiovascular structures.

  8. Mice long-term high-fat diet feeding recapitulates human cardiovascular alterations: an animal model to study the early phases of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián D Calligaris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIM: Hypercaloric diet ingestion and sedentary lifestyle result in obesity. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of clinical features secondary to obesity, considered as a pre-diabetic condition and recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. To better understand the relationship between obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease as well as for the development of novel therapeutic strategies, animal models that reproduce the etiology, course and outcomes of these pathologies are required. The aim of this work was to characterize the long-term effects of high-fat diet-induced obesity on the mice cardiovascular system, in order to make available a new animal model for diabetic cardiomyopathy. METHODS/RESULTS: Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with a standardized high-fat diet (obese or regular diet (normal for 16 months. Metabolic syndrome was evaluated testing plasma glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, insulin, and glucose tolerance. Arterial pressure was measured using a sphygmomanometer (non invasive method and by hemodynamic parameters (invasive method. Cardiac anatomy was described based on echocardiography and histological studies. Cardiac function was assessed by cardiac catheterization under a stress test. Cardiac remodelling and metabolic biomarkers were assessed by RT-qPCR and immunoblotting. As of month eight, the obese mice were overweight, hyperglycaemic, insulin resistant, hyperinsulinemic and hypercholesterolemic. At month 16, they also presented normal arterial pressure but altered vascular reactivity (vasoconstriction, and cardiac contractility reserve reduction, heart mass increase, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis, and heart metabolic compensations. By contrast, the normal mice remained healthy throughout the study. CONCLUSIONS: Mice fed with a high-fat diet for prolonged time recapitulates the etiology, course and outcomes of the early phases of human diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  9. Asexual Endophytes and Associated Alkaloids Alter Arthropod Community Structure and Increase Herbivore Abundances on a Native Grass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispite their minute biomass, microbial symbionts of plants potentially alter herbivory, diversity and community structure. Infection of grasses by asexual endophytic fungi often decreases herbivore loads and alters arthropod diverisy. However, most studies to date have involved agronomic grasses ...

  10. Dissociation and Alterations in Brain Function and Structure: Implications for Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause-Utz, Annegret; Frost, Rachel; Winter, Dorina; Elzinga, Bernet M

    2017-01-01

    Dissociation involves disruptions of usually integrated functions of consciousness, perception, memory, identity, and affect (e.g., depersonalization, derealization, numbing, amnesia, and analgesia). While the precise neurobiological underpinnings of dissociation remain elusive, neuroimaging studies in disorders, characterized by high dissociation (e.g., depersonalization/derealization disorder (DDD), dissociative identity disorder (DID), dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder (D-PTSD)), have provided valuable insight into brain alterations possibly underlying dissociation. Neuroimaging studies in borderline personality disorder (BPD), investigating links between altered brain function/structure and dissociation, are still relatively rare. In this article, we provide an overview of neurobiological models of dissociation, primarily based on research in DDD, DID, and D-PTSD. Based on this background, we review recent neuroimaging studies on associations between dissociation and altered brain function and structure in BPD. These studies are discussed in the context of earlier findings regarding methodological differences and limitations and concerning possible implications for future research and the clinical setting.

  11. Cold-induced alteration in the global structure of the male sex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In Drosophila melanogaster, dosage compensation occurs through hypertranscription of sex-linked genes in males. ... [Kulkarni-Shukla S., Barge A. P., Vartak R. S. and Kar A. 2008 Cold-induced alteration in the global structure of the male sex chromosome ..... forms acetylated at specific lysine residues define individual.

  12. Expression and structural-functional alterations of α-1-acid glycoprotein at the pathological state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulinich A. O.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The review analyzes up-to-date knowledge on structure and biological functions of α-acid glycoprotein. The special attention is given to alterations of fucosylation, sialylation and branching of orosomucoid at the acute, chronic inflammation and oncotransformations.

  13. White matter structure alterations in HIV-1-infected men with sustained suppression of viraemia on treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Tanja; Caan, Matthan W. A.; Wit, Ferdinand W. N. M.; Schouten, Judith; Geurtsen, Gert J.; Cole, James H.; Sharp, David J.; Vos, Frans M.; Prins, Maria; Portegies, Peter; Reiss, Peter; Majoie, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent in HIV-1-infected (HIV+) patients, despite adequate suppression of viral replication by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Cerebral white matter structure alterations are often associated with cognitive impairment and have commonly been reported in

  14. Cardiovascular health in young adulthood and structural brain MRI in midlife: The CARDIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancks, Michael P; Allen, Norrina B; Dubey, Prachi; Launer, Lenore J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Reis, Jared P; Sidney, Stephen; Yano, Yuichiro; Schreiner, Pamela J

    2017-08-15

    To examine the association between the American Heart Association (AHA) Life's Simple 7 (LS7) metric and brain structure. We determined cardiovascular health (CVH) according to the AHA LS7, assigning 0, 1, or 2 points for meeting poor, intermediate, or ideal criteria for the 7 components (range 0-14) at baseline (aged 18-30 years in 1985-1986) and year 25 follow-up examination for 518 participants of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) brain MRI substudy. Visit-based CVH score and average score was assessed in relation to percent of intracranial volume of normal tissue of the whole brain, gray matter, and white matter, and abnormal tissue volume of white matter at year 25 using multivariable linear, logistic, and quantile regression, after adjustment for age, sex, race, field center, educational attainment, and alcohol consumption. Mean percentage of whole brain volume, normal gray matter, and normal white matter was 81.3% (±2.5), 42.9% (±2.0), and 38.4% (±2.0). Greater CVH score at baseline (per each additional point at year 0: 0.1%, 95% confidence limits 0.01-0.3; p brain volume (per each additional point in average score: 0.2%, 95% confidence limits 0.04-0.3; p gray or white matter volume or abnormal white matter volume. Maintaining ideal levels of cardiovascular health, determined by the LS7, in young adulthood is associated with greater whole brain volume in middle age but not regional differences in structure. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Experimental alteration of artificial and natural impact melt rock from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declercq, J.; Dypvik, H.; Aagaard, Per; Jahren, J.; Ferrell, R.E.; Horton, J. Wright

    2009-01-01

    The alteration or transformation of impact melt rock to clay minerals, particularly smectite, has been recognized in several impact structures (e.g., Ries, Chicxulub, Mj??lnir). We studied the experimental alteration of two natural impact melt rocks from suevite clasts that were recovered from drill cores into the Chesapeake Bay impact structure and two synthetic glasses. These experiments were conducted at hydrothermal temperature (265 ??C) in order to reproduce conditions found in meltbearing deposits in the first thousand years after deposition. The experimental results were compared to geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) of the same alteration and to original mineral assemblages in the natural melt rock samples. In the alteration experiments, clay minerals formed on the surfaces of the melt particles and as fine-grained suspended material. Authigenic expanding clay minerals (saponite and Ca-smectite) and vermiculite/chlorite (clinochlore) were identified in addition to analcime. Ferripyrophyllite was formed in three of four experiments. Comparable minerals were predicted in the PHREEQC modeling. A comparison between the phases formed in our experiments and those in the cores suggests that the natural alteration occurred under hydrothermal conditions similar to those reproduced in the experiment. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  16. Relating Education, Brain Structure, and Cognition: The Role of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyra E. Mortby

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective effect of education on cognitive and brain health is well established. While the direct effects of individual cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors (i.e., hypertension, smoking, diabetes, and obesity on cerebral structure have been investigated, little is understood about the possible interaction between the protective effect of education and the deleterious effects of CVD risk factors in predicting brain ageing and cognition. Using data from the PATH Through Life study (N=266, we investigated the protective effect of education on cerebral structure and function and tested a possible mediating role of CVD risk factors. Higher education was associated with larger regional grey/white matter volumes in the prefrontal cortex in men only. The association between education and cognition was mediated by brain volumes but only for grey matter and only in relation to information processing speed. CVD risk factors did not mediate the association between regional volumes and cognition. This study provides additional evidence in support for a protective effect of education on cerebral structures and cognition. However, it does not provide support for a mediating role of CVD risk factors in these associations.

  17. Navy Bean and Rice Bran Intake Alters the Plasma Metabolome of Children at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J. Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal cholesterol in childhood predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD risk in adulthood. Navy beans and rice bran have demonstrated efficacy in regulating blood lipids in adults and children; however, their effects on modulating the child plasma metabolome has not been investigated and warrants investigation. A pilot, randomized-controlled, clinical trial was conducted in 38 children (10 ± 0.8 years old with abnormal cholesterol. Participants consumed a snack for 4 weeks containing either: no navy bean or rice bran (control; 17.5 g/day cooked navy bean powder; 15 g/day heat-stabilized rice bran; or 9 g/day navy beans and 8 g/day rice bran. Plasma metabolites were extracted using 80% methanol for global, non-targeted metabolic profiling via ultra-high performance liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Differences in plasma metabolite levels after 4 weeks of dietary intervention compared to control and baseline were analyzed using analysis of variance and Welch’s t-tests (p ≤ 0.05. Navy bean and/or rice bran consumption influenced 71 plasma compounds compared to control (p ≤ 0.05, with lipids representing 46% of the total plasma metabolome. Significant changes were determined for 18 plasma lipids in the navy bean group and 10 plasma lipids for the rice bran group compared to control, and 48 lipids in the navy bean group and 40 in the rice bran group compared to baseline. These results support the hypothesis that consumption of these foods impact blood lipid metabolism with implications for reducing CVD risk in children. Complementary and distinct lipid pathways were affected by the diet groups, including acylcarnitines and lysolipids (navy bean, sphingolipids (rice bran, and phospholipids (navy bean + rice bran. Navy bean consumption decreased free fatty acids associated with metabolic diseases (palmitate and arachidonate and increased the relative abundance of endogenous anti-inflammatory lipids

  18. Early vascular alterations in SLE and RA patients--a step towards understanding the associated cardiovascular risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Santos

    Full Text Available Accelerated atherosclerosis represents a major problem in both systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients, and endothelial damage is a key feature of atherogenesis. We aimed to assess early endothelial changes in SLE and RA female patients (127 SLE and 107 RA without previous CV events. Biomarkers of endothelial cell activation (intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1, thrombomodulin (TM, and tissue factor (TF were measured and endothelial function was assessed using peripheral artery tonometry. Reactive hyperemia index (RHI, an indicator of microvascular reactivity, and augmentation index (AIx, a measure of arterial stiffness, were obtained. In addition, traditional CV risk factors, disease activity and medication were determined. Women with SLE displayed higher sICAM-1 and TM and lower TF levels than women with RA (p = 0.001, p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively. These differences remained significant after controlling for CV risk factors and medication. Serum levels of vascular biomarkers were increased in active disease and a moderate correlation was observed between sVCAM-1 levels and lupus disease activity (rho = 0.246 and between TF levels and RA disease activity (rho = 0.301. Although RHI was similar across the groups, AIx was higher in lupus as compared to RA (p = 0.04. Also in active SLE, a trend towards poorer vasodilation was observed (p = 0.06. In conclusion, women with SLE and RA present with distinct patterns of endothelial cell activation biomarkers not explained by differences in traditional CV risk factors. Early vascular alterations are more pronounced in SLE which is in line with the higher CV risk of these patients.

  19. Cardiovascular alterations at different stages of hypertension development during ethanol consumption: Time-course of vascular and autonomic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crestani, Carlos C.; Lopes da Silva, Andréia; Scopinho, América A.; Ruginsk, Silvia G.; Uchoa, Ernane T.; Correa, Fernando M.A.; Elias, Lucila L.K.; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Resstel, Leonardo B.M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to establish a time-course correlation between vascular and autonomic changes that contribute to the development of hypertension during ethanol ingestion in rats. For this, male Wistar rats were subjected to the intake of increasing ethanol concentrations in their drinking water during four weeks. Ethanol effects were investigated at the end of each week. Mild hypertension was already observed at the first week of treatment, and a progressive blood pressure increase was observed along the evaluation period. Increased pressor response to phenylephrine was observed from first to fourth week. α 1 -adrenoceptor protein in the mesenteric bed was enhanced at the first week, whereas β 2 -adrenoceptor protein in the aorta was reduced after the second week. In the third week, ethanol intake facilitated the depressor response to sodium nitroprusside, whereas in the fourth week it reduced nitrate content in aorta and increased it plasma. The bradycardic component of the baroreflex was impaired, whereas baroreflex tachycardia was enhanced at the third and fourth weeks. AT 1A receptor and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) mRNAs in the nucleus tractus solitarius were increased at the fourth week. These findings suggest that increased vascular responsiveness to vasoconstrictor agents is possibly a link factor in the development and maintenance of the progressive hypertension induced by ethanol consumption. Additionally, baroreflex changes are possibly mediated by alterations in angiotensinergic mechanisms and CNP content within the brainstem, which contribute to maintaining the hypertensive state in later phases of ethanol ingestion. Facilitated vascular responsiveness to nitric oxide seems to counteract ethanol-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Mild hypertension was observed during the entire period of ethanol ingestion. • Ethanol facilitated vascular reactivity to vasoactive agents. • Changes in baroreflex activity contribute to

  20. Cardiovascular alterations at different stages of hypertension development during ethanol consumption: Time-course of vascular and autonomic changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crestani, Carlos C. [Department of Natural Active Principles and Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Univ. Estadual Paulista—UNESP (Brazil); Lopes da Silva, Andréia [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Scopinho, América A. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ruginsk, Silvia G.; Uchoa, Ernane T. [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Correa, Fernando M.A. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Elias, Lucila L.K.; Antunes-Rodrigues, José [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Resstel, Leonardo B.M., E-mail: leoresstel@yahoo.com.br [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of the present work was to establish a time-course correlation between vascular and autonomic changes that contribute to the development of hypertension during ethanol ingestion in rats. For this, male Wistar rats were subjected to the intake of increasing ethanol concentrations in their drinking water during four weeks. Ethanol effects were investigated at the end of each week. Mild hypertension was already observed at the first week of treatment, and a progressive blood pressure increase was observed along the evaluation period. Increased pressor response to phenylephrine was observed from first to fourth week. α{sub 1}-adrenoceptor protein in the mesenteric bed was enhanced at the first week, whereas β{sub 2}-adrenoceptor protein in the aorta was reduced after the second week. In the third week, ethanol intake facilitated the depressor response to sodium nitroprusside, whereas in the fourth week it reduced nitrate content in aorta and increased it plasma. The bradycardic component of the baroreflex was impaired, whereas baroreflex tachycardia was enhanced at the third and fourth weeks. AT{sub 1A} receptor and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) mRNAs in the nucleus tractus solitarius were increased at the fourth week. These findings suggest that increased vascular responsiveness to vasoconstrictor agents is possibly a link factor in the development and maintenance of the progressive hypertension induced by ethanol consumption. Additionally, baroreflex changes are possibly mediated by alterations in angiotensinergic mechanisms and CNP content within the brainstem, which contribute to maintaining the hypertensive state in later phases of ethanol ingestion. Facilitated vascular responsiveness to nitric oxide seems to counteract ethanol-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Mild hypertension was observed during the entire period of ethanol ingestion. • Ethanol facilitated vascular reactivity to vasoactive agents. • Changes in baroreflex activity

  1. Structural genomic alterations in primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twa, David D W; Steidl, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma that displays phenotypic and genotypic similarity to Hodgkin lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Studies using genome-wide discovery tools have revealed specific, recurrent structural aberrations as critical somatic events in the pathogenesis of PMBCL. These structural alterations prominently include transcript and protein altering rearrangements and copy number variations of the programmed death ligands 1 (CD274) and 2 (PDCD1LG2), CIITA, JAK2 and REL. Importantly, evidence is emerging that these acquired structural genomic changes, in synergy with other somatic alterations, contribute to PMBCL pathogenesis by influencing tumor microenvironment interactions that favor malignant B-cell growth. The means by which these rearrangements arise are not well understood. However, analysis of breakpoint junctions at base-pair resolution provides preliminary insight into putative rearrangement mechanisms. As the field also anticipates predictive value and therapeutic targeting of structural changes involving programmed death ligands and JAK2, a review of therapies that will likely shape future lymphoma treatment is needed.

  2. Structural model for quality of life of patients with chronic cardiovascular disease in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kuem Sun; Lee, Sook Ja; Park, Eun Sook; Park, Young-Joo; Cheol, Kang Hyun

    2005-01-01

    Health promotion among those with chronic illness has been proposed as a strategy to contain health care cost and enhance quality of life (QOL), but little research has been done in Korea on QOL focused on health promotion of patients with chronic cardiovascular disease (CCVD). This study was designed to estimate a structural model to represent the QOL of patients with CCVD, on the basis of a literature review and Pender's health promotion model (HPM). Data were collected by questionnaire from 436 patients with CCVD in a university hospital in Seoul from August 2001 to July 2002. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and covariance structural analysis. As the fit of the hypothetical model to the data was only moderate, it was modified by excluding 10 paths and including free parameters. The modified model with path showed a good fit to the empirical data (chi = 508.12, p = .001, GFI = .95, AGFI = .93, NFI = .98, NNFI = .98, RMSEA = .04). Health-promoting behavior (HPB) and self-efficacy were found to have a significant direct effect on QOL. Health perception, self-esteem, perceived barriers to action, and preference were found to have indirect effects on QOL. The variables of this model explain 63% of the variance in QOL. The modified model is considered appropriate to explain and predict QOL of patients with CCVD. Therefore, it can effectively be used as a reference model for further studies and to suggest directions in nursing practice.

  3. Packaging and structural phenotype of brome mosaic virus capsid protein with altered N-terminal β-hexamer structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wispelaere, Melissanne de; Chaturvedi, Sonali; Wilkens, Stephan; Rao, A.L.N.

    2011-01-01

    The first 45 amino acid region of brome mosaic virus (BMV) capsid protein (CP) contains RNA binding and structural domains that are implicated in the assembly of infectious virions. One such important structural domain encompassing amino acids 28 QPVIV 32 , highly conserved between BMV and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), exhibits a β-hexamer structure. In this study we report that alteration of the β-hexamer structure by mutating 28 QPVIV 32 to 28 AAAAA 32 had no effect either on symptom phenotype, local and systemic movement in Chenopodium quinoa and RNA profile of in vivo assembled virions. However, sensitivity to RNase and assembly phenotypes distinguished virions assembled with CP subunits having β-hexamer from those of wild type. A comparison of 3-D models obtained by cryo electron microscopy revealed overall similar structural features for wild type and mutant virions, with small but significant differences near the 3-fold axes of symmetry.

  4. Human muscle-specific A-kinase anchoring protein (mAKAP) polymorphisms modulate the susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases by altering cAMP/ PKA signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryavanshi, Santosh V; Jadhav, Shweta M; Anderson, Kody L; Katsonis, Panagiotis; Lichtarge, Olivier; McConnell, Bradley K

    2018-03-30

    One of the crucial cardiac signaling pathways is cAMP-mediated PKA signal transduction which is regulated by a family of scaffolding proteins, A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Muscle-specific AKAP (mAKAP) partly regulates cardiac cAMP/PKA signaling by binding to PKA and phosphodiesterase4D3 (PDE4D3) among other proteins and plays a central role in modulating cardiac remodeling. Moreover, genetics plays an incomparable role in modifying the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Especially, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in various proteins have been shown to predispose individuals to CVDs. Hence, we hypothesized that human mAKAP polymorphisms found in humans with CVDs alter cAMP/PKA pathway influencing the susceptibility of individuals to CVDs. Our computational analyses revealed two mAKAP SNPs found in cardiac disease related patients with highest predicted deleterious effects, Ser(S) 1653 Arg(R) and Glu(E) 2124 Gly(G). Co-immunoprecipitation data in HEK293T cells showed that S1653R SNP, present in the PDE4D3 binding domain of mAKAP, changed the binding of PDE4D3 to mAKAP and E2124G SNP, flanking the 3'-PKA binding domain, changed the binding of PKA before and after stimulation with isoproterenol. These SNPs significantly altered intracellular cAMP levels, global PKA activity and cytosolic PDE activity when compared with the wild-type (WT) before and after isoproterenol stimulation. PKA-mediated phosphorylation of pathological markers was found to be up-regulated after cell stimulation in both mutants. In conclusion, human mAKAP polymorphisms may influence the propensity of developing CVDs by affecting cAMP/PKA signaling supporting the clinical significance of PKA-mAKAP-PDE4D3 interactions.

  5. In Situ Polymorphic Alteration of Filler Structures for Biomimetic Mechanically Adaptive Elastomer Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Tamil Selvan; Okamoto, Shigeru; Stöckelhuber, Klaus Werner; Wießner, Sven; Reuter, Uta; Fischer, Dieter; Ghosh, Anik Kumar; Heinrich, Gert; Das, Amit

    2018-04-30

    A mechanically adaptable elastomer composite is prepared with reversible soft-stiff properties that can be easily controlled. By the exploitation of different morphological structures of calcium sulfate, which acts as the active filler in a soft elastomer matrix, the magnitude of filler reinforcement can be reversibly altered, which will be reflected in changes of the final stiffness of the material. The higher stiffness, in other words, the higher modulus of the composites, is realized by the in situ development of fine nanostructured calcium sulfate dihydrate crystals, which are formed during exposure to water and, further, these highly reinforcing crystals can be transformed to a nonreinforcing hemihydrate mesocrystalline structure by simply heating the system in a controlled way. The Young's modulus of the developed material can be reversibly altered from ∼6 to ∼17 MPa, and the dynamic stiffness (storage modulus at room temperature and 10 Hz frequency) alters its value in the order of 1000%. As the transformation is related to the presence of water molecules in the crystallites, a hydrophilic elastomer matrix was selected, which is a blend of two hydrophilic polymers, namely, epichlorohydrin-ethylene oxide-allyl glycidyl ether terpolymer and a terpolymer of ethylene oxide-propylene oxide-allyl glycidyl ether. For the first time, this method also provides a route to regulate the morphology and structure of calcium sulfate nanocrystals in a confined ambient of cross-linked polymer chains.

  6. Editor's Choice : acute cardiovascular care association position paper on intensive cardiovascular care units : an update on their definition, structure, organisation and function

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnefoy-Cudraz, Eric; Bueno, Hector; Casella, Gianni; De Maria, Elia; Fitzsimons, Donna; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Hassager, Christian; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Magdy, Ahmed; Marandi, Toomas; Mimoso, Jorge; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Price, Susana; Rokyta, Richard; Roubille, Francois

    2018-01-01

    Abstract: Acute cardiovascular care has progressed considerably since the last position paper was published 10 years ago. It is now a well-defined, complex field with demanding multidisciplinary teamworking. The Acute Cardiovascular Care Association has provided this update of the 2005 position paper on acute cardiovascular care organisation, using a multinational working group. The patient population has changed, and intensive cardiovascular care units now manage a large range of conditions ...

  7. Structure and composition of altered riparian forests in an agricultural Amazonian landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, R Chelsea; Porder, Stephen; Neill, Christopher; Brando, Paulo; Quintino, Raimundo Mota; do Nascimento, Sebastiâo Aviz

    2015-09-01

    Deforestation and fragmentation influence the microclimate, vegetation structure, and composition of remaining patches of tropical forest. In the southern Amazon, at the frontier of cropland expansion, forests are converted and fragmented in a pattern that leaves standing riparian forests whose dimensions are mandated by the Brazilian National Forest Code. These altered riparian forests share many characteristics of well-studied upland forest fragments, but differ because they remain connected to larger areas of forest downstream, and because they may experience wetter soil conditions because reduction of forest cover in the surrounding watershed raises groundwater levels and increases stream runoff. We compared forest regeneration, structure, composition, and diversity in four areas of intact riparian forest and four areas each of narrow, medium, and wide altered riparian forests that have been surrounded by agriculture since the early 1980s. We found that seedling abundance was reduced by as much as 64% and sapling abundance was reduced by as much as 67% in altered compared to intact riparian forests. The most pronounced differences between altered and intact forest occurred near forest edges and within the narrowest sections of altered riparian forests. Woody plant species composition differed and diversity was reduced in altered forests compared to intact riparian forests. However, despite being fragmented for several decades, large woody plant biomass and carbon storage, the number of live or dead large woody plants, mortality rates, and the size distribution of woody plants did not differ significantly between altered and intact riparian forests. Thus, even in these relatively narrow forests with high edge: area ratios, we saw no evidence of the increases in mortality and declines in biomass that have been found in other tropical forest fragment studies. However, because of the changes in both species community and reduced regeneration, it is unclear how long

  8. Altered modular organization of structural cortical networks in children with autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Shi

    Full Text Available Autism is a complex developmental disability that characterized by deficits in social interaction, language skills, repetitive stereotyped behaviors and restricted interests. Although great heterogeneity exists, previous findings suggest that autism has atypical brain connectivity patterns and disrupted small-world network properties. However, the organizational alterations in the autistic brain network are still poorly understood. We explored possible organizational alterations of 49 autistic children and 51 typically developing controls, by investigating their brain network metrics that are constructed upon cortical thickness correlations. Three modules were identified in controls, including cortical regions associated with brain functions of executive strategic, spatial/auditory/visual, and self-reference/episodic memory. There are also three modules found in autistic children with similar patterns. Compared with controls, autism demonstrates significantly reduced gross network modularity, and a larger number of inter-module connections. However, the autistic brain network demonstrates increased intra- and inter-module connectivity in brain regions including middle frontal gyrus, inferior parietal gyrus, and cingulate, suggesting one underlying compensatory mechanism associated with brain functions of self-reference and episodic memory. Results also show that there is increased correlation strength between regions inside frontal lobe, as well as impaired correlation strength between frontotemporal and frontoparietal regions. This alteration of correlation strength may contribute to the organization alteration of network structures in autistic brains.

  9. Cardiovascular Structure and Function in Children With Middle Aortic Syndrome and Renal Artery Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumman, Rawan K; Slorach, Cameron; Hui, Wei; Matsuda-Abedini, Mina; Langlois, Valerie; Radhakrishnan, Seetha; Lorenzo, Armando J; Amaral, Joao; Mertens, Luc; Parekh, Rulan S

    2017-12-01

    Middle aortic syndrome (MAS) is a narrowing of the abdominal aorta, often in conjunction with renal artery stenosis (RAS). Structure and function of the cardiovascular system are not well understood. In a prospective cross-sectional study, 35 children with MAS or RAS or both (MAS/RAS) were compared with 140 age-, sex-, and body surface area-matched healthy children. Vascular assessment included carotid intima-media thickness and carotid distensibility using B-mode ultrasound and central and peripheral pulse wave velocities using applanation tonometry. Left ventricular structure and function were assessed by 2-dimensional and speckle-tracking echocardiography. Children with MAS or RAS were 12.5±3.0 years old at enrollment, and 50% were men. Carotid intima-media thickness (0.54±0.10 versus 0.44±0.05 mm; P children with disease compared with healthy children; however, after adjustment for systolic blood pressure z score, only carotid intima-media thickness remained significantly higher in the MAS/RAS group compared with the controls (β=0.07 [0.03, 0.10]). Peripheral pulse wave velocities and carotid distensibility were normal. Children with disease had significantly increased left ventricular mass and changes in diastolic function (lower E/a ratio and lower e' velocities). Systolic parameters, including ejection fraction, global longitudinal and circumferential strain, were similar to controls. Our findings demonstrate that children with MAS or RAS have evidence of carotid and left ventricular remodeling, without peripheral arterial involvement, which suggests a localized disease process. Left ventricular systolic function is preserved; however, subtle changes in diastolic function are observed. Carotid vessel changes are consistent with a 5- to 10-year aging, which underscores the importance of blood pressure control. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Structural Basis for the Altered PAM Specificities of Engineered CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Seiichi; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-03-17

    The RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 cleaves double-stranded DNA targets bearing a PAM (protospacer adjacent motif) and complementarity to the guide RNA. A recent study showed that, whereas wild-type Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) recognizes the 5'-NGG-3' PAM, the engineered VQR, EQR, and VRER SpCas9 variants recognize the 5'-NGA-3', 5'-NGAG-3', and 5'-NGCG-3' PAMs, respectively, thus expanding the targetable sequences in Cas9-mediated genome editing applications. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structures of the three SpCas9 variants in complexes with a single-guide RNA and its altered PAM-containing, partially double-stranded DNA targets. A structural comparison of the three SpCas9 variants with wild-type SpCas9 revealed that the multiple mutations synergistically induce an unexpected displacement in the phosphodiester backbone of the PAM duplex, thereby allowing the SpCas9 variants to directly recognize the altered PAM nucleotides. Our findings explain the altered PAM specificities of the SpCas9 variants and establish a framework for further rational engineering of CRISPR-Cas9. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Partial IGF-1 deficiency is sufficient to reduce heart contractibility, angiotensin II sensibility, and alter gene expression of structural and functional cardiac proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Guerra, José Luis; Castilla-Cortazar, Inma; Aguirre, Gabriel A; Muñoz, Úrsula; Martín-Estal, Irene; Ávila-Gallego, Elena; Granado, Miriam; Puche, Juan E; García-Villalón, Ángel Luis

    2017-01-01

    Circulating levels of IGF-1 may decrease under several circumstances like ageing, metabolic syndrome, and advanced cirrhosis. This reduction is associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, progression to type 2 diabetes, and increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. However, underlying mechanisms between IGF-1 deficiency and cardiovascular disease remain elusive. The specific aim of the present work was to study whether the partial IGF-1 deficiency influences heart and/or coronary circulation, comparing vasoactive factors before and after of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). In addition, histology of the heart was performed together with cardiac gene expression for proteins involved in structure and function (extracellular matrix, contractile proteins, active peptides); carried out using microarrays, followed by RT-qPCR confirmation of the three experimental groups. IGF-1 partial deficiency is associated to a reduction in contractility and angiotensin II sensitivity, interstitial fibrosis as well as altered expression pattern of genes involved in extracellular matrix proteins, calcium dynamics, and cardiac structure and function. Although this work is descriptive, it provides a clear insight of the impact that partial IGF-1 deficiency on the heart and establishes this experimental model as suitable for studying cardiac disease mechanisms and exploring therapeutic options for patients under IGF-1 deficiency conditions.

  12. Kinetics of radiation-induced structural alterations in electron-irradiated polymer-based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaikin, Yu.A.; Potanin, A.S.; Koztaeva, U.P.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. In our previous studies measurements of internal friction temperature dependence were used for characterization of thermally activated and radiation-induced structural evolution in different types of polymer-based composites. This paper supplements these measurements with kinetic studies of internal friction (IF) parameters and EPR signals in a glass-cloth epoxy-filled laminate ST-ETF after electron irradiation up to doses of 1-10 MGy. Experiment have shown that the lifetime of free radicals in this composite considerably exceeds the characteristic time of molecular structural rearrangement due to scission and cross-linking after irradiation, as determined from IF measurements. This result is explained by slow proceeding of sterically hindered disproportionation reactions that stabilize the end groups of the macro-chain disrupt during irradiation and finally fix the act of scission. A mathematical model is formulated for description of structural evolution and alterations of IF parameters in polymer-based composites during and after electron irradiation. The description is based on the track model of radiation damage in polymers and phenomenological theory of radiation-induced structural transformations. General description does not give details of radiation-chemical conversion in different structural components of composites but indicates the direction of their structural evolution. In the model considered a composite material was divided into three parts (binder, filler, and a boundary layer). It was supposed that after primary distribution of radiation energy radiation-chemical conversion proceeds independently in each of these regions. It was also suggested that all the radical reactions were of the second order. On the example of glass-cloth laminate ST-ETF it is shown that this model allows to describe alterations in composite structural characteristics during irradiation and in the course of their self-organization after

  13. Non-concomitant cortical structural and functional alterations in sensorimotor areas following incomplete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Pan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain plasticity, including anatomical changes and functional reorganization, is the physiological basis of functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI. The correlation between brain anatomical changes and functional reorganization after SCI is unclear. This study aimed to explore whether alterations of cortical structure and network function are concomitant in sensorimotor areas after incomplete SCI. Eighteen patients with incomplete SCI (mean age 40.94 ± 14.10 years old; male:female, 7:11 and 18 healthy subjects (37.33 ± 11.79 years old; male:female, 7:11 were studied by resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Gray matter volume (GMV and functional connectivity were used to evaluate cortical structure and network function, respectively. There was no significant alteration of GMV in sensorimotor areas in patients with incomplete SCI compared with healthy subjects. Intra-hemispheric functional connectivity between left primary somatosensory cortex (BA1 and left primary motor cortex (BA4, and left BA1 and left somatosensory association cortex (BA5 was decreased, as well as inter-hemispheric functional connectivity between left BA1 and right BA4, left BA1 and right BA5, and left BA4 and right BA5 in patients with SCI. Functional connectivity between both BA4 areas was also decreased. The decreased functional connectivity between the left BA1 and the right BA4 positively correlated with American Spinal Injury Association sensory score in SCI patients. The results indicate that alterations of cortical anatomical structure and network functional connectivity in sensorimotor areas were non-concomitant in patients with incomplete SCI, indicating the network functional changes in sensorimotor areas may not be dependent on anatomic structure. The strength of functional connectivity within sensorimotor areas could serve as a potential imaging biomarker for assessment and prediction of sensory function in patients with incomplete SCI

  14. Globally altered structural brain network topology in grapheme-color synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänggi, Jürgen; Wotruba, Diana; Jäncke, Lutz

    2011-04-13

    Synesthesia is a perceptual phenomenon in which stimuli in one particular modality elicit a sensation within the same or another sensory modality (e.g., specific graphemes evoke the perception of particular colors). Grapheme-color synesthesia (GCS) has been proposed to arise from abnormal local cross-activation between grapheme and color areas because of their hyperconnectivity. Recently published studies did not confirm such a hyperconnectivity, although morphometric alterations were found in occipitotemporal, parietal, and frontal regions of synesthetes. We used magnetic resonance imaging surface-based morphometry and graph-theoretical network analyses to investigate the topology of structural brain networks in 24 synesthetes and 24 nonsynesthetes. Connectivity matrices were derived from region-wise cortical thickness correlations of 2366 different cortical parcellations across the whole cortex and from 154 more common brain divisions as well. Compared with nonsynesthetes, synesthetes revealed a globally altered structural network topology as reflected by reduced small-worldness, increased clustering, increased degree, and decreased betweenness centrality. Connectivity of the fusiform gyrus (FuG) and intraparietal sulcus (IPS) was changed as well. Hierarchical modularity analysis revealed increased intramodular and intermodular connectivity of the IPS in GCS. However, connectivity differences in the FuG and IPS showed a low specificity because of global changes. We provide first evidence that GCS is rooted in a reduced small-world network organization that is driven by increased clustering suggesting global hyperconnectivity within the synesthetes' brain. Connectivity alterations were widespread and not restricted to the FuG and IPS. Therefore, synesthetic experience might be only one phenotypic manifestation of the globally altered network architecture in GCS.

  15. Structural health monitoring (vibration) as a tool for identifying structural alterations of the lumbar spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawchuk, Gregory N; Hartvigsen, Jan; Edgecombe, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an engineering technique used to identify mechanical abnormalities not readily apparent through other means. Recently, SHM has been adapted for use in biological systems, but its invasive nature limits its clinical application. As such, the purpose...

  16. The impact of obesity on cardiovascular structure and function: the fetal programming era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Pierre J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Julie St-Pierre1, Luigi Bouchard2,3, Paul Poirier41Department of Pediatrics, Chicoutimi Hospital, Saguenay, QC, Canada; 2Department of Biochemistry, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada; 3ECOGENE-21 and Lipid Clinic, Chicoutimi Hospital, Saguenay, QC, Canada; 4Quebec Heart and Lungs Institute, Université Laval, Quebec, QC, CanadaAbstract: The burden of obesity is now well established as a precursor of cardiovascular disease and other disorders. Although better clinical guidelines exist to prevent and treat obesity, the prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents is increasing alarmingly. Primary prevention remains the gold standard to significantly reduce the public health concerns associated with obesity. Traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors (such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, type 2 diabetes for cardiovascular disease among children and adolescents are known. The scope of this review is thus to discuss new and emerging obesity and associated-disease risk factors. Evaluation of the coronary plaque formation, diastolic dysfunction, carotid intima-media thickness and heart rate variability represent interesting tools with clinical relevance. Beyond these new cardiovascular disease risk factors, recent evidence suggests that a detrimental fetal environment, associated with for example, maternal obesity, insulin resistance, and physical inactivity, imprints fetal metabolic programming via epigenetic mechanisms that predisposes the newborn to obesity and cardiovascular disease later in life. This information may impact on the future management of maternal health, as well as for those high-risk children.Keywords: cardiovascular disease, pediatrics, risk factors

  17. A Viral RNA Structural Element Alters Host Recognition of Nonself RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, J. L.; Gardner, C. L.; Kimura, T.; White, J. P.; Liu, G.; Trobaugh, D. W.; Huang, C.; Tonelli, M.; Paessler, S.; Takeda, K.; Klimstra, W. B.; Amarasinghe, G. K.; Diamond, M. S.

    2014-01-30

    Although interferon (IFN) signaling induces genes that limit viral infection, many pathogenic viruses overcome this host response. As an example, 2'-O methylation of the 5' cap of viral RNA subverts mammalian antiviral responses by evading restriction of Ifit1, an IFN-stimulated gene that regulates protein synthesis. However, alphaviruses replicate efficiently in cells expressing Ifit1 even though their genomic RNA has a 5' cap lacking 2'-O methylation. We show that pathogenic alphaviruses use secondary structural motifs within the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of their RNA to alter Ifit1 binding and function. Mutations within the 5'-UTR affecting RNA structural elements enabled restriction by or antagonism of Ifit1 in vitro and in vivo. These results identify an evasion mechanism by which viruses use RNA structural motifs to avoid immune restriction.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons alter the structure of oceanic and oligotrophic microbial food webs

    KAUST Repository

    Cerezo, Maria Isabel

    2015-11-01

    One way organic pollutants reach remote oceanic regions is by atmospheric transport. During the Malaspina-2010 expedition, across the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans, we analyzed the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) effects on oceanic microbial food webs. We performed perturbation experiments adding PAHs to classic dilution experiments. The phytoplankton growth rates were reduced by more than 5 times, being Prochlorococcus spp. the most affected. 62% of the experiments showed a reduction in the grazing rates due to the presence of PAHs. For the remaining experiments, grazing usually increased likely due to cascading effects. We identified changes in the slope of the relation between the growth rate and the dilution fraction induced by the pollutants, moving from no grazing to V-shape, or to negative slope, indicative of grazing increase by cascade effects and alterations of the grazers\\' activity structure. Our perturbation experiments indicate that PAHs could influence the structure oceanic food-webs structure.

  19. Systematic review with meta-analysis: risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease suggest a shared altered metabolic and cardiovascular profile between lean and obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookoian, S; Pirola, C J

    2017-07-01

    The pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is closely associated with the co-occurrence of multiple pathological conditions characterising the metabolic syndrome (MetS), obesity in particular. However, NAFLD also develops in lean subjects, whose risk factors remain poorly defined. We performed a meta-analysis of 15 studies, along with the data pertaining to our own population (n=336 patients). Data from lean (n=1966) and obese (n=5938) patients with NAFLD were analysed; lean (n=9946) and obese (n=6027) subjects without NAFLD served as controls. Relative to the lean non-NAFLD controls, lean patients with NAFLD were older (3.79±0.72 years, P=1.36×10 -6 ) and exhibited the entire spectrum of the MetS risk factors. Specifically, they had a significant (P=10 -10 ) increase in plasma glucose levels (6.44±1.12 mg/dL) and HOMA-IR (0.52±0.094-unit increment), blood lipids (triglycerides: 48.37±3.6, P=10 -10 and total cholesterol: 7.04±3.8, mg/dL, P=4.2×10 -7 ), systolic (5.64±0.7) and diastolic (3.37±0.9) blood pressure (mm Hg), P=10 -10 , and waist circumference (5.88±0.4 cm, P=10 -10 ); values denote difference in means±SE. Nevertheless, the overall alterations in the obese group were much more severe when compared to lean subjects, regardless of the presence of NAFLD. Meta-regression suggested that NAFLD is a modifier of the level of blood lipids. Lean and obese patients with NAFLD share a common altered metabolic and cardiovascular profile. The former, while having normal body weight, showed excess of abdominal adipose tissue as well as other MetS features. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. 4D cardiovascular magnetic resonance velocity mapping of alterations of right heart flow patterns and main pulmonary artery hemodynamics in tetralogy of Fallot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background To assess changes in right heart flow and pulmonary artery hemodynamics in patients with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF) we used whole heart, four dimensional (4D) velocity mapping (VM) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods CMR studies were performed in 11 subjects with rTOF (5M/6F; 20.1 ± 12.4 years) and 10 normal volunteers (6M/4F; 34.2 ± 13.4 years) on clinical 1.5T and 3.0T MR scanners. 4D VM-CMR was performed using PC VIPR (Phase Contrast Vastly undersampled Isotropic Projection Reconstruction). Interactive streamline and particle trace visualizations of the superior and inferior vena cava (IVC and SVC, respectively), right atrium (RA), right ventricle (RV), and pulmonary artery (PA) were generated and reviewed by three experienced readers. Main PA net flow, retrograde flow, peak flow, time-to-peak flow, peak acceleration, resistance index and mean wall shear stress were quantified. Differences in flow patterns between the two groups were tested using Fisher's exact test. Differences in quantitative parameters were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Results 4D VM-CMR was successfully performed in all volunteers and subjects with TOF. Right heart flow patterns in rTOF subjects were characterized by (a) greater SVC/IVC flow during diastole than systole, (b) increased vortical flow patterns in the RA and in the RV during diastole, and (c) increased helical or vortical flow features in the PA's. Differences in main PA retrograde flow, resistance index, peak flow, time-to-peak flow, peak acceleration and mean wall shear stress were statistically significant. Conclusions Whole heart 4D VM-CMR with PC VIPR enables detection of both normal and abnormal right heart flow patterns, which may allow for comprehensive studies to evaluate interdependencies of post-surgically altered geometries and hemodynamics. PMID:22313680

  1. Asporin-deficient mice have tougher skin and altered skin glycosaminoglycan content and structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Maccarana

    Full Text Available The main structural component of connective tissues is fibrillar, cross-linked collagen whose fibrillogenesis can be modulated by Small Leucine-Rich Proteins/Proteoglycans (SLRPs. Not all SLRPs' effects on collagen and extracellular matrix in vivo have been elucidated; one of the less investigated SLRPs is asporin. Here we describe the successful generation of an Aspn-/- mouse model and the investigation of the Aspn-/- skin phenotype. Functionally, Aspn-/- mice had an increased skin mechanical toughness, although there were no structural changes present on histology or immunohistochemistry. Electron microscopy analyses showed 7% thinner collagen fibrils in Aspn-/- mice (not statistically significant. Several matrix genes were upregulated, including collagens (Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, matrix metalloproteinases (Mmp2, Mmp3 and lysyl oxidases (Lox, Loxl2, while lysyl hydroxylase (Plod2 was downregulated. Intriguingly no differences were observed in collagen protein content or in collagen cross-linking-related lysine oxidation or hydroxylation. The glycosaminoglycan content and structure in Aspn-/- skin was profoundly altered: chondroitin/dermatan sulfate was more than doubled and had an altered composition, while heparan sulfate was halved and had a decreased sulfation. Also, decorin and biglycan were doubled in Aspn-/- skin. Overall, asporin deficiency changes skin glycosaminoglycan composition, and decorin and biglycan content, which may explain the changes in skin mechanical properties.

  2. Structural and functional alterations of catalase induced by acriflavine, a compound causing apoptosis and necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Farnoosh; Khavari-Nejad, Sarah; Keyhani, Jacqueline; Keyhani, Ezzatollah

    2009-08-01

    Acriflavine is an antiseptic agent causing both apoptosis and necrosis in yeast. In this work, its effect on the structure and function of catalase, a vital enzyme actively involved in protection against oxidative stress, was investigated. In vitro kinetic studies showed that acriflavine inhibited the enzymatic activity in a competitive manner. The residual activity detectable after preincubation of catalase (1.5 nmol/L) with various concentrations of acriflavine went from 50% to 20% of the control value as the acriflavine concentration increased from 30 to 90 micromol/L. Correlatively with the decrease in activity, alterations in the enzyme's conformation were observed as indicated by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and electronic absorption spectroscopy. The enzyme's intrinsic fluorescence obtained upon excitation at either 297 nm (tryptophan residues) or 280 nm (tyrosine and tryptophan residues) decreased as a function of acriflavine concentration. Circular dichroism studies showed alterations of the protein structure by acriflavine with up to 13% decrease in alpha helix, 16% increase in beta-sheet content, 17% increase in random coil, and 4% increase in beta turns. Spectrophotometric studies showed a blueshift and modifications in the chromicity of catalase at 405 nm, corresponding to an absorbance band due to the enzyme's prosthetic group. Thus, acriflavine induced in vitro a profound change in the structure of catalase so that the enzyme could no longer function. Our results showed that acriflavine, a compound producing apoptosis and necrosis, can have a direct effect on vital functions in cells by disabling key enzymes.

  3. [Metabolic syndrome and ageing: cognitive impairment and structural alterations of the central nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, B; Jurado, M A

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of vascular risk factors, including: hypertension, insulin resistance, low levels of high density lipoproteins, high levels of triglycerides and obesity. Nowadays the prevalence of the syndrome in the developmental societies increases and it is related to aging. To review the relation of metabolic syndrome to the cognitive impairment and cerebrovascular alterations during the aging. The syndrome involves higher risk of vascular pathologies and recently has been related to the pathological aging, including cognitive impairment and structural damage in the central nervous system. Specifically the studies about metabolic syndrome have described a profile of higher general cognitive impairment and higher risk of dementia, as well as concrete neuropsychological deficits probably related to white matter alterations. The independent effects of vascular risk factors in cognition have been studied before as well as their influences in structural integrity of the brain. Nowadays further research is necessary to know if the metabolic syndrome effects on cognition and brain are greater than the sum of the effect of his components. In the future the knowledge about the cognitive and structural damage due to the syndrome could be useful to design prevention programs and promote the healthy aging.

  4. Structural Basis for the Altered PAM Recognition by Engineered CRISPR-Cpf1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Yamano, Takashi; Gao, Linyi; Zhang, Feng; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2017-07-06

    The RNA-guided Cpf1 nuclease cleaves double-stranded DNA targets complementary to the CRISPR RNA (crRNA), and it has been harnessed for genome editing technologies. Recently, Acidaminococcus sp. BV3L6 (AsCpf1) was engineered to recognize altered DNA sequences as the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM), thereby expanding the target range of Cpf1-mediated genome editing. Whereas wild-type AsCpf1 recognizes the TTTV PAM, the RVR (S542R/K548V/N552R) and RR (S542R/K607R) variants can efficiently recognize the TATV and TYCV PAMs, respectively. However, their PAM recognition mechanisms remained unknown. Here we present the 2.0 Å resolution crystal structures of the RVR and RR variants bound to a crRNA and its target DNA. The structures revealed that the RVR and RR variants primarily recognize the PAM-complementary nucleotides via the substituted residues. Our high-resolution structures delineated the altered PAM recognition mechanisms of the AsCpf1 variants, providing a basis for the further engineering of CRISPR-Cpf1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Swimming exercise reverses aging-related contractile abnormalities of female heart by improving structural alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Nihal; Olgar, Yusuf; Er, Hakan; Kucuk, Murathan; Ozdemir, Semir

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of swimming exercise on aging-related Ca2+ handling alterations and structural abnormalities of female rat heart. For this purpose, 4-month and 24-month old female rats were used and divided into three following groups: sedentary young (SY), sedentary old (SO), and exercised old (Ex-O). Swimming exercise was performed for 8 weeks (60 min/day, 5 days/week). Myocyte shortening, L-type Ca2+ currents and associated Ca2+ transients were measured from ventricular myocytes at 36 ± 1°C. NOX-4 levels, aconitase activity, glutathione measurements and ultrastructural examination by electron microscopy were conducted in heart tissue. Swimming exercise reversed the reduced shortening and slowed kinetics of aged cardiomyocytes. Although the current density was similar for all groups, Ca2+ transients were higher in SO and Ex-O myocytes with respect to the SY group. Caffeine-induced Ca2+ transients and the integrated NCX current were lower in cardiomyocytes of SY rats compared with other groups, suggesting an increased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content in an aged heart. Aging led to upregulated cardiac NOX-4 along with declined aconitase activity. Although it did not reverse these oxidative parameters, swimming exercise achieved a significant increase in glutathione levels and improved structural alterations of old rats' hearts. We conclude that swimming exercise upregulates antioxidant defense capacity and improves structural abnormalities of senescent female rat heart, although it does not change Ca2+ handling alterations further. Thereby, it improves contractile function of aged myocardium by mitigating detrimental effects of oxidative stress.

  6. Functional and structural neural alterations in Internet gaming disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan-Wei; Liu, Lu; Ma, Shan-Shan; Shi, Xin-Hui; Zhou, Nan; Zhang, Jin-Tao; Potenza, Marc N

    2017-12-01

    This meta-analytic study aimed to identify the common and specific neural alterations in Internet gaming disorder (IGD) across different domains and modalities. Two separate meta-analyses for functional neural activation and gray-matter volume were conducted. Sub-meta-analyses for the domains of reward, cold-executive, and hot-executive functions were also performed, respectively. IGD subjects, compared with healthy controls, showed: (1) hyperactivation in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, caudate, posterior inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), which were mainly associated with studies measuring reward and cold-executive functions; and, (2) hypoactivation in the anterior IFG in relation to hot-executive function, the posterior insula, somatomotor and somatosensory cortices in relation to reward function. Furthermore, IGD subjects showed reduced gray-matter volume in the anterior cingulate, orbitofrontal, dorsolateral prefrontal, and premotor cortices. These findings suggest that IGD is associated with both functional and structural neural alterations in fronto-striatal and fronto-cingulate regions. Moreover, multi-domain assessments capture different aspects of neural alterations in IGD, which may be helpful for developing effective interventions targeting specific functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Structural learning difficulties implicate altered hippocampal functioning in adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Melanie; Derwent, Claire L T; Gaigg, Sebastian B; Bowler, Dermot M

    2017-08-01

    Structural learning is fundamental to the formation of cognitive maps that are necessary for learning, memory, and spatial navigation. It also enables successful navigation of the social world, which is something that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) find particularly difficult. To master these situations, a person needs to bind pieces of information to one another and to consider the context in which experiences happen. Such binding is a capacity of the hippocampus. Although altered hippocampal function has for long been suspected to play a role in the etiology of ASD, the relevant evidence has remained inconclusive because few behavioral tests that are known to specifically necessitate preserved hippocampal function have been employed in studies of ASD. To address this gap in the literature, a total sample of 57 pairs of age and ability matched ASD and comparison participants was divided into 3 subsamples who were asked either to complete structural learning, or 1 of 2 configural learning control tasks (biconditional discrimination and transverse patterning) drawn from animal research. As predicted, ASD adults demonstrated specific difficulty with structural learning but not with other forms of configural learning. These differences were not attributable to decreased attentional shifting or increased perseveration, which would have indicated atypical frontal modulation of hippocampal processes. Instead, the observations implicate atypical hippocampal functioning as the source of structural learning difficulties in ASD. The data suggest that disturbances in domain-general cognitive processes such as structural learning, caused by altered hippocampal function, play a critical role in the etiology of ASD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Structural brain alterations in patients with lumbar disc herniation: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Luchtmann

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is one of the most common health complaints in industrial nations. For example, chronic low back pain (cLBP disables millions of people across the world and generates a tremendous economic burden. While previous studies provided evidence of widespread functional as well as structural brain alterations in chronic pain, little is known about cortical changes in patients suffering from lumbar disc herniation. We investigated morphometric alterations of the gray and white matter of the brain in patients suffering from LDH. The volumes of the gray and white matter of 12 LDH patients were determined in a prospective study and compared to the volumes of healthy controls to distinguish local differences. High-resolution MRI brain images of all participants were performed using a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate local differences in gray and white matter volume between patients suffering from LDH and healthy controls. LDH patients showed significantly reduced gray matter volume in the right anterolateral prefrontal cortex, the right temporal lobe, the left premotor cortex, the right caudate nucleus, and the right cerebellum as compared to healthy controls. Increased gray matter volume, however, was found in the right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, the left precuneal cortex, the left fusiform gyrus, and the right brainstem. Additionally, small subcortical decreases of the white matter were found adjacent to the left prefrontal cortex, the right premotor cortex and in the anterior limb of the left internal capsule. We conclude that the lumbar disk herniation can lead to specific local alterations of the gray and white matter in the human brain. The investigation of LDH-induced brain alterations could provide further insight into the underlying nature of the chronification processes and could possibly identify prognostic factors that may improve the conservative as well as the operative treatment of the

  9. Myocardial Structural Alteration and Systolic Dysfunction in Preclinical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Kai Hang; Atsma, Douwe E.; Delgado, Victoria; Ng, Arnold C. T.; Witkowski, Tomasz G.; Ewe, See Hooi; Auger, Dominique; Holman, Eduard R.; van Mil, Anneke M.; Breuning, Martijn H.; Tse, Hung Fat; Bax, Jeroen J.; Schalij, Martin J.; Marsan, Nina Ajmone

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the presence of myocardial structural alterations and subtle myocardial dysfunction during familial screening in asymptomatic mutation carriers without hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype. Methods and Findings Sixteen HCM families with pathogenic mutation were studied and 46 patients with phenotype expression (Mut+/Phen+) and 47 patients without phenotype expression (Mut+/Phen−) were observed. Twenty-five control subjects, matched with the Mut+/Phen− group, were recruited for comparison. Echocardiography was performed to evaluate conventional parameters, myocardial structural alteration by calibrated integrated backscatter (cIBS) and global and segmental longitudinal strain by speckle tracking analysis. All 3 groups had similar left ventricular dimensions and ejection fraction. Basal anteroseptal cIBS was the highest in Mut+/Phen+ patients (−14.0±4.6 dB, p−19.0 dB basal anteroseptal cIBS or >−18.0% basal anteroseptal longitudinal strain had a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 72% in differentiating Mut+/Phen− group from controls. Conclusion The use of cIBS and segmental longitudinal strain can differentiate HCM Mut+/Phen− patients from controls with important clinical implications for the family screening and follow-up of these patients. PMID:22574137

  10. Altered brain structural networks in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children revealed by cortical thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian; Chen, Yanni; Li, Chenxi; Li, Youjun; Wang, Jue

    2017-07-04

    This study investigated the cortical thickness and topological features of human brain anatomical networks related to attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Data were collected from 40 attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children and 40 normal control children. Interregional correlation matrices were established by calculating the correlations of cortical thickness between all pairs of cortical regions (68 regions) of the whole brain. Further thresholds were applied to create binary matrices to construct a series of undirected and unweighted graphs, and global, local, and nodal efficiencies were computed as a function of the network cost. These experimental results revealed abnormal cortical thickness and correlations in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and showed that the brain structural networks of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder subjects had inefficient small-world topological features. Furthermore, their topological properties were altered abnormally. In particular, decreased global efficiency combined with increased local efficiency in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children led to a disorder-related shift of the network topological structure toward regular networks. In addition, nodal efficiency, cortical thickness, and correlation analyses revealed that several brain regions were altered in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients. These findings are in accordance with a hypothesis of dysfunctional integration and segregation of the brain in patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and provide further evidence of brain dysfunction in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients by observing cortical thickness on magnetic resonance imaging.

  11. Structure and component alteration of rabbit Achilles tendon in tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Yoshinao; Ueda, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Tadatsugu; Suzuki, Daisuke; Matsuda, Naoya; Takehana, Kazushige

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate alterations of cultured tendon tissues to determine whether tissue culture is a useful method for biological analyses of the tendon. Tendon tissues for tissue culture were isolated from Achilles tendons of rabbits. The tendon segments were placed one segment per well and incubated in growth medium consisting of Dullbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum at 37 degrees C in a humidified atmosphere with 5% CO(2) for various periods. The alignment of collagen fibrils was preserved for 48 h, but tendon structure has disintegrated at 96 h. Alcian blue staining and gelatine zymography revealed that proteoglycan markedly diminished and that matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) activity was upregulated sharply at 72 and 96 h. The ratio of collagen fibrils with large diameter had increased and the mean diameter and mass average diameter value had reached maximum at 48 h. The values then decreased and mean diameters at 72 and 96 h were significantly different from that at 48 h. At 96 h, the ratio of collagen fibrils with small diameters had increased and collagen fibrils with large diameters had disappeared. These findings indicate that structural alteration is possible to be induced by disintegration of collagen fibrils and disappearance of glycosaminoglycans from extracellular matrix (ECM), subsequent of upregulation of MMPs activity. Although the study period is limited, the tissue culture method is available for investigating cell-ECM interaction in tendons.

  12. Structural brain alterations in primary open angle glaucoma: a 3T MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieqiong; Li, Ting; Sabel, Bernhard A.; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wen, Hongwei; Li, Jianhong; Xie, Xiaobin; Yang, Diya; Chen, Weiwei; Wang, Ningli; Xian, Junfang; He, Huiguang

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is not only an eye disease but is also associated with degeneration of brain structures. We now investigated the pattern of visual and non-visual brain structural changes in 25 primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients and 25 age-gender-matched normal controls using T1-weighted imaging. MRI images were subjected to volume-based analysis (VBA) and surface-based analysis (SBA) in the whole brain as well as ROI-based analysis of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), visual cortex (V1/2), amygdala and hippocampus. While VBA showed no significant differences in the gray matter volumes of patients, SBA revealed significantly reduced cortical thickness in the right frontal pole and ROI-based analysis volume shrinkage in LGN bilaterally, right V1 and left amygdala. Structural abnormalities were correlated with clinical parameters in a subset of the patients revealing that the left LGN volume was negatively correlated with bilateral cup-to-disk ratio (CDR), the right LGN volume was positively correlated with the mean deviation of the right visual hemifield, and the right V1 cortical thickness was negatively correlated with the right CDR in glaucoma. These results demonstrate that POAG affects both vision-related structures and non-visual cortical regions. Moreover, alterations of the brain visual structures reflect the clinical severity of glaucoma. PMID:26743811

  13. Quantitative analysis of nanoscale intranuclear structural alterations in hippocampal cells in chronic alcoholism via transmission electron microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Peeyush; Shukla, Pradeep K.; Ghimire, Hemendra M.; Almabadi, Huda M.; Tripathi, Vibha; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Rao, Radhakrishna; Pradhan, Prabhakar

    2017-04-01

    Chronic alcoholism is known to alter the morphology of the hippocampus, an important region of cognitive function in the brain. Therefore, to understand the effect of chronic alcoholism on hippocampal neural cells, we employed a mouse model of chronic alcoholism and quantified intranuclear nanoscale structural alterations in these cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of hippocampal neurons were obtained, and the degree of structural alteration in terms of mass density fluctuation was determined using the light-localization properties of optical media generated from TEM imaging. The results, which were obtained at length scales ranging from ~30 to 200 nm, show that 10-12 week-old mice fed a Lieber-DeCarli liquid (alcoholic) diet had a higher degree of structural alteration than control mice fed a normal diet without alcohol. The degree of structural alteration became significantly distinguishable at a sample length of ~100 nm, which is the typical length scale of the building blocks of cells, such as DNA, RNA, proteins and lipids. Interestingly, different degrees of structural alteration at such length scales suggest possible structural rearrangement of chromatin inside the nuclei in chronic alcoholism.

  14. Age-associated changes in cardiovascular structure and function: a fertile milieu for future disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, James

    2015-01-01

    Important changes occur in the cardiovascular system with advancing age, even in apparently healthy individuals. Thickening and stiffening of the large arteries develop due to collagen and calcium deposition and loss of elastic fibers in the medial layer. These arterial changes cause systolic blood pressure to rise with age, while diastolic blood pressure generally declines after the sixth decade. In the left ventricle, modest concentric wall thickening occurs due to cellular hypertrophy, but cavity size does not change. Although left ventricular systolic function is preserved across the age span, early diastolic filling rate declines 30–50% between the third and ninth decades. Conversely, an age-associated increase in late diastolic filling due to atrial contraction preserves end-diastolic volume. Aerobic exercise capacity declines approximately 10% per decade in cross-sectional studies; in longitudinal studies, however, this decline is accelerated in the elderly. Reductions in peak heart rate and peripheral oxygen utilization but not stroke volume appear to mediate the age-associated decline in aerobic capacity. Deficits in both cardiac b-adrenergic receptor density and in the efficiency of postsynaptic b-adrenergic signaling contribute significantly to the reduced cardiovascular performance during exercise in older adults. Although these cardiovascular aging changes are considered “normative”, they lower the threshold for the development of cardiovascular disease, which affects the majority of older adults. PMID:21809160

  15. Age-associated changes in cardiovascular structure and function: a fertile milieu for future disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleg, Jerome L; Strait, James

    2012-09-01

    Important changes occur in the cardiovascular system with advancing age, even in apparently healthy individuals. Thickening and stiffening of the large arteries develop due to collagen and calcium deposition and loss of elastic fibers in the medial layer. These arterial changes cause systolic blood pressure to rise with age, while diastolic blood pressure generally declines after the sixth decade. In the left ventricle, modest concentric wall thickening occurs due to cellular hypertrophy, but cavity size does not change. Although left ventricular systolic function is preserved across the age span, early diastolic filling rate declines 30-50% between the third and ninth decades. Conversely, an age-associated increase in late diastolic filling due to atrial contraction preserves end-diastolic volume. Aerobic exercise capacity declines approximately 10% per decade in cross-sectional studies; in longitudinal studies, however, this decline is accelerated in the elderly. Reductions in peak heart rate and peripheral oxygen utilization but not stroke volume appear to mediate the age-associated decline in aerobic capacity. Deficits in both cardiac β-adrenergic receptor density and in the efficiency of postsynaptic β-adrenergic signaling contribute significantly to the reduced cardiovascular performance during exercise in older adults. Although these cardiovascular aging changes are considered "normative", they lower the threshold for the development of cardiovascular disease, which affects the majority of older adults.

  16. Alteration of human serum albumin tertiary structure induced by glycation. Spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkudlarek, A; Maciążek-Jurczyk, M; Chudzik, M; Równicka-Zubik, J; Sułkowska, A

    2016-01-15

    The modification of human serum albumin (HSA) structure by non-enzymatic glycation is one of the underlying factors that contribute to the development of complications of diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present work was to estimate how glycation of HSA altered its tertiary structure. Changes of albumin conformation were investigated by comparison of glycated (gHSA) and non-glycated human serum albumin (HSA) absorption spectra, red edge excitation shift (REES) and synchronous spectra. Effect of glycation on human serum albumin tertiary structure was also investigated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Formation of gHSA Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) caused absorption of UV-VIS light between 310 nm and 400 nm while for non-glycated HSA in this region no absorbance has been registered. Analysis of red edge excitation shift effect allowed for observation of structural changes of gHSA in the hydrophobic pocket containing the tryptophanyl residue. Moreover changes in the microenvironment of tryptophanyl and tyrosyl residues brought about AGEs on the basis of synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy have been confirmed. The influence of glycation process on serum albumin binding to 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonamide (DNSA), 2-(p-toluidino) naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid (TNS), has been studied. Fluorescence analysis showed that environment of both binding site I and II is modified by galactose glycation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A multivariate pattern analysis study of the HIV-related white matter anatomical structural connections alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenchao; Liu, Zhenyu; Li, Ruili; Cui, Xinwei; Li, Hongjun; Dong, Enqing; Tian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    It's widely known that HIV infection would cause white matter integrity impairments. Nevertheless, it is still unclear that how the white matter anatomical structural connections are affected by HIV infection. In the current study, we employed a multivariate pattern analysis to explore the HIV-related white matter connections alterations. Forty antiretroviraltherapy- naïve HIV patients and thirty healthy controls were enrolled. Firstly, an Automatic Anatomical Label (AAL) atlas based white matter structural network, a 90 × 90 FA-weighted matrix, was constructed for each subject. Then, the white matter connections deprived from the structural network were entered into a lasso-logistic regression model to perform HIV-control group classification. Using leave one out cross validation, a classification accuracy (ACC) of 90% (P=0.002) and areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.96 was obtained by the classification model. This result indicated that the white matter anatomical structural connections contributed greatly to HIV-control group classification, providing solid evidence that the white matter connections were affected by HIV infection. Specially, 11 white matter connections were selected in the classification model, mainly crossing the regions of frontal lobe, Cingulum, Hippocampus, and Thalamus, which were reported to be damaged in previous HIV studies. This might suggest that the white matter connections adjacent to the HIV-related impaired regions were prone to be damaged.

  18. Altered myofilament structure and function in dogs with Duchenne muscular dystrophy cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Mou, Younss; Lacampagne, Alain; Irving, Thomas; Scheuermann, Valérie; Blot, Stéphane; Ghaleh, Bijan; de Tombe, Pieter P.; Cazorla, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    Aim Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is associated with progressive depressed left ventricular (LV) function. However, DMD effects on myofilament structure and function are poorly understood. Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) is a dog model of DMD recapitulating the human form of DMD. Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate myofilament structure and function alterations in GRMD model with spontaneous cardiac failure. Methods and results We have employed synchrotron X-rays diffraction to evaluate myofilament lattice spacing at various sarcomere lengths (SL) on permeabilized LV myocardium. We found a negative correlation between SL and lattice spacing in both sub-epicardium (EPI) and sub-endocardium (ENDO) LV layers in control dog hearts. In the ENDO of GRMD hearts this correlation is steeper due to higher lattice spacing at short SL (1.9 μm). Furthermore, cross-bridge cycling indexed by the kinetics of tension redevelopment (ktr) was faster in ENDO GRMD myofilaments at short SL. We measured post-translational modifications of key regulatory contractile proteins. S-glutathionylation of cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C (cMyBP-C) was unchanged and PKA dependent phosphorylation of the cMyBP-C was significantly reduced in GRMD ENDO tissue and more modestly in EPI tissue. Conclusions We found a gradient of contractility in control dogs' myocardium that spreads across the LV wall, negatively correlated with myofilament lattice spacing. Chronic stress induced by dystrophin deficiency leads to heart failure that is tightly associated with regional structural changes indexed by increased myofilament lattice spacing, reduced phosphorylation of regulatory proteins and altered myofilament contractile properties in GRMD dogs.

  19. Structural alterations of the superior temporal gyrus in schizophrenia: Detailed subregional differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, K; Matsuda, Y; Shimada, T; Yasuyama, T; Oshima, K; Sawai, K; Kihara, H; Nitta, Y; Okubo, H; Uehara, T; Kawasaki, Y

    2016-05-01

    Reduced gray matter volumes in the superior temporal gyrus (STG) have been reported in patients with schizophrenia. Such volumetric abnormalities might denote alterations in cortical thickness, surface area, local gyrification or all of these factors. The STG can be anatomically divided into five subregions using automatic parcellation in FreeSurfer: lateral aspect of the STG, anterior transverse temporal gyrus of Heschl gyrus (HG), planum polare (PP) of the STG, planum temporale (PT) of the STG and transverse temporal sulcus. We acquired magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 3T scans from 40 age- and sex-matched patients with schizophrenia and 40 healthy subjects, and the scans were automatically processed using FreeSurfer. General linear models were used to assess group differences in regional volumes and detailed thickness, surface area and local gyrification. As expected, patients with schizophrenia had significantly smaller bilateral STG volumes than healthy subjects. Of the five subregions in the STG, patients with schizophrenia showed significantly and marginally reduced volumes in the lateral aspect of the STG and PT of the STG bilaterally compared with healthy subjects. The volumetric alteration in bilateral lateral STG was derived from both the cortical thickness and surface area but not local gyrification. There was no significant laterality of the alteration in the lateral STG between patients and controls and no correlation among the structures and clinical characteristics. These findings suggest that of five anatomical subregions in the STG, the lateral STG is one of the most meaningful regions for brain pathophysiology in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. alpha-Globin genes: thalassemic and structural alterations in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R.S.C. Wenning

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Seven unrelated patients with hemoglobin (Hb H disease and 27 individuals with alpha-chain structural alterations were studied to identify the alpha-globin gene mutations present in the population of Southeast Brazil. The -alpha3.7, --MED and -(alpha20.5 deletions were investigated by PCR, whereas non-deletional alpha-thalassemia (alphaHphalpha, alphaNcoIalpha, aaNcoI, alphaIcalpha and alphaTSaudialpha was screened with restriction enzymes and by nested PCR. Structural alterations were identified by direct DNA sequencing. Of the seven patients with Hb H disease, all of Italian descent, two had the -(alpha20.5/-alpha3.7 genotype, one had the --MED/-alpha3.7 genotype, one had the --MED/alphaHphalpha genotype and three showed interaction of the -alpha3.7 deletion with an unusual, unidentified form of non-deletional alpha-thalassemia [-alpha3.7/(aaT]. Among the 27 patients with structural alterations, 15 (of Italian descent had Hb Hasharon (alpha47Asp->His associated with the -alpha3.7 deletion, 4 (of Italian descent were heterozygous for Hb J-Rovigo (alpha53Ala->Asp, 4 (3 Blacks and 1 Caucasian were heterozygous for Hb Stanleyville-II (alpha78Asn->Lys associated with the alpha+-thalassemia, 1 (Black was heterozygous for Hb G-Pest (alpha74Asp->Asn, 1 (Caucasian was heterozygous for Hb Kurosaki (alpha7Lys->Glu, 1 (Caucasian was heterozygous for Hb Westmead (alpha122His->Gln, and 1 (Caucasian was the carrier of a novel silent variant (Hb Campinas, alpha26Ala->Val. Most of the mutations found reflected the Mediterranean and African origins of the population. Hbs G-Pest and Kurosaki, very rare, and Hb Westmead, common in southern China, were initially described in individuals of ethnic origin differing from those of the carriers reported in the present study and are the first cases to be reported in the Brazilian population.

  1. Vorinostat differentially alters 3D nuclear structure of cancer and non-cancerous esophageal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, Vivek; Hansen, Nanna; Glenn, Honor L; Han, Jessica H; Helland, Stephanie; Hernandez, Kathryn; Senechal, Patti; Johnson, Roger H; Bussey, Kimberly J; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2016-08-09

    The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat has received significant attention in recent years as an 'epigenetic' drug used to treat solid tumors. However, its mechanisms of action are not entirely understood, particularly with regard to its interaction with the aberrations in 3D nuclear structure that accompany neoplastic progression. We investigated the impact of vorinostat on human esophageal epithelial cell lines derived from normal, metaplastic (pre-cancerous), and malignant tissue. Using a combination of novel optical computed tomography (CT)-based quantitative 3D absorption microscopy and conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, we show that subjecting malignant cells to vorinostat preferentially alters their 3D nuclear architecture relative to non-cancerous cells. Optical CT (cell CT) imaging of fixed single cells showed that drug-treated cancer cells exhibit significant alterations in nuclear morphometry. Confocal microscopy revealed that vorinostat caused changes in the distribution of H3K9ac-marked euchromatin and H3K9me3-marked constitutive heterochromatin. Additionally, 3D immuno-FISH showed that drug-induced expression of the DNA repair gene MGMT was accompanied by spatial relocation toward the center of the nucleus in the nuclei of metaplastic but not in non-neoplastic cells. Our data suggest that vorinostat's differential modulation of 3D nuclear architecture in normal and abnormal cells could play a functional role in its anti-cancer action.

  2. Experience-dependent plasticity in white matter microstructure: Reasoning training alters structural connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson P Mackey

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI techniques have made it possible to investigate white matter plasticity in humans. Changes in DTI measures, principally increases in fractional anisotropy (FA, have been observed following training programs as diverse as juggling, meditation, and working memory. Here, we sought to test whether three months of reasoning training could alter white matter microstructure. We recruited participants (n=23 who were enrolled in a course to prepare for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT, a test that places strong demands on reasoning skills, as well as age- and IQ-matched controls planning to take the LSAT in the future (n=22. DTI data were collected at two scan sessions scheduled three months apart. In trained participants but not controls, we observed decreases in radial diffusivity (RD in white matter connecting frontal cortices, and in mean diffusivity (MD within frontal and parietal lobe white matter. Further, participants exhibiting larger gains on the LSAT exhibited greater decreases in MD in the right internal capsule. In summary, reasoning training altered multiple measures of white matter structure in young adults. While the cellular underpinnings are unknown, these results provide evidence of experience-dependent white matter changes that may not be limited to myelination.

  3. Nitric oxide and oxidative stress is associated with severity of diabetic retinopathy and retinal structural alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shashi; Saxena, Sandeep; Srivastav, Khushboo; Shukla, Rajendra K; Mishra, Nibha; Meyer, Carsten H; Kruzliak, Peter; Khanna, Vinay K

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to determine plasma nitric oxide (NO) and lipid peroxide (LPO) levels in diabetic retinopathy and its association with severity of disease. Prospective observational study. A total of 60 consecutive cases and 20 healthy controls were included. Severity of retinopathy was graded according to early treatment diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS) classification. Photoreceptor inner segment ellipsoid band (ISel) disruption and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) alteration were graded using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Data were statistically analyzed. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, NO assay and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured using standard protocol. Increased severity of diabetic retinopathy was significantly associated with increase in plasma levels of LPO (P diabetic retinopathy. For the first time, it has been demonstrated that increased plasma LPO, NO and decreased GSH levels are associated with in vivo structural changes in inner segment ellipsoid and RPE. © 2015 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  4. Altered topological organization of white matter structural networks in patients with neuromyelitis optica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaou Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the topological alterations of the whole-brain white-matter (WM structural networks in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO. METHODS: The present study involved 26 NMO patients and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. WM structural connectivity in each participant was imaged with diffusion-weighted MRI and represented in terms of a connectivity matrix using deterministic tractography method. Graph theory-based analyses were then performed for the characterization of brain network properties. A multiple linear regression analysis was performed on each network metric between the NMO and control groups. RESULTS: The NMO patients exhibited abnormal small-world network properties, as indicated by increased normalized characteristic path length, increased normalized clustering and increased small-worldness. Furthermore, largely similar hub distributions of the WM structural networks were observed between NMO patients and healthy controls. However, regional efficiency in several brain areas of NMO patients was significantly reduced, which were mainly distributed in the default-mode, sensorimotor and visual systems. Furthermore, we have observed increased regional efficiency in a few brain regions such as the orbital parts of the superior and middle frontal and fusiform gyri. CONCLUSION: Although the NMO patients in this study had no discernible white matter T2 lesions in the brain, we hypothesize that the disrupted topological organization of WM networks provides additional evidence for subtle, widespread cerebral WM pathology in NMO.

  5. Brain structural alterations in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients with autogenous and reactive obsessions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Subirà

    Full Text Available Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is a clinically heterogeneous condition. Although structural brain alterations have been consistently reported in OCD, their interaction with particular clinical subtypes deserves further examination. Among other approaches, a two-group classification in patients with autogenous and reactive obsessions has been proposed. The purpose of the present study was to assess, by means of a voxel-based morphometry analysis, the putative brain structural correlates of this classification scheme in OCD patients. Ninety-five OCD patients and 95 healthy controls were recruited. Patients were divided into autogenous (n = 30 and reactive (n = 65 sub-groups. A structural magnetic resonance image was acquired for each participant and pre-processed with SPM8 software to obtain a volume-modulated gray matter map. Whole-brain and voxel-wise comparisons between the study groups were then performed. In comparison to the autogenous group, reactive patients showed larger gray matter volumes in the right Rolandic operculum. When compared to healthy controls, reactive patients showed larger volumes in the putamen (bilaterally, while autogenous patients showed a smaller left anterior temporal lobe. Also in comparison to healthy controls, the right middle temporal gyrus was smaller in both patient subgroups. Our results suggest that autogenous and reactive obsessions depend on partially dissimilar neural substrates. Our findings provide some neurobiological support for this classification scheme and contribute to unraveling the neurobiological basis of clinical heterogeneity in OCD.

  6. Small artery structure is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events in essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, Ole Norling; Buus, Niels Henril; Sihm, Inger

    2007-01-01

    in uncomplicated essential hypertensive patients. Recently, high M: L was demonstrated as a prognostic marker in patients at high cardiovascular risk, including normotensive type 2 diabetic patients. Since diabetes is associated with pressure-independent changes in M: L, the relevance of this finding to essential...... hypertension has been uncertain. Methods We conducted a follow-up survey of 159 essential hypertensive patients, who had previously been submitted to a M: L evaluation while participating in a clinical trial. They composed a homogeneous moderate-risk group, with no concomitant diseases, and represented 1661...... years of follow-up. Results Thirty patients suffered a documented predefined cardiovascular event during follow-up. Increased relative risk (RR) was associated withM: L>-0.083 (mean level of the hypertensive cohort), RRU2.34 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-4.95], and with M: L>-0.098 (mean level...

  7. Altered structural and functional thalamocortical networks in secondarily generalized extratemporal lobe seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syu-Jyun Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural and functional abnormalities in the thalamocortical network in primary generalized epilepsies or mesial temporal lobe epilepsy have recently been identified by voxel-wise analyses of neuroimaging. However, evidence is needed regarding the profiles of the thalamocortical network in patients with secondarily generalized seizures from focal neocortical sources. We used high-resolution T1-weighted, diffusion-tensor and resting-state functional MR imaging (rs-fMRI to examine 16 patients with secondarily generalized extratemporal lobe seizures and 16 healthy controls. All the patients were medically effective and MRI-negative. Using whole brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM to compare the patients with the normal controls, we observed significantly decreased gray matter (GM density in the thalamus and 3 frontal gyri and significantly reduced white matter (WM fractional anisotropy (FA in the bilateral anterior corona radiata of the patients. Alterations in the thalamocortical functional connectivity with different cortices were identified by the rs-fMRI analysis seeding of the whole thalamus. The prefrontal gyri with the greatest functional connectivity were also traced by seeding a sub-thalamic region that is demarcated in an atlas, in which the thalamic parcellation is based on the WM connectivity to the cortices. This sub-thalamic region anatomically contains the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus where, concordantly, there was a significant decrease in thalamic GM density in the VBM study. In contrast to the negative correlation between the disease duration and reduced thalamic densities and subcortical FA values, the strength of the functional thalamocortical connectivity had a paradoxical correlation. Our results conclusively indicate that generalized seizures with a focal cortical source are associated with structural and functional alterations in the thalamocortical network.

  8. Do neural tube defects lead to structural alterations in the human bladder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Helena M F; Lobo, Márcio Luiz de P; Costa, Waldemar S; Sampaio, Francisco J B; Cardoso, Luis Eduardo M; Favorito, Luciano Alves

    2011-05-01

    Anencephaly is the most severe neural tube defect in human fetuses. The objective of this paper is to analyze the structure of the bladder in anencephalic human fetuses. We studied 40 bladders of normal human fetuses (20 male and 20 female, aged 14 to 23 WPC) and 12 bladders of anencephalic fetuses (5 male and 7 female, aged 18 to 22 WPC). The bladders were removed and processed by routine histological techniques. Stereological analysis of collagen, elastic system fibers and smooth muscle was performed in sections. Data were expressed as volumetric density (Vv-%). The images were captured with Olympus BX51 microscopy and Olympus DP70 camera. The stereological analysis was done using the software Image Pro and Image J. For biochemical analysis, samples were fixed in acetone, and collagen concentrations were expressed as micrograms of hydroxyproline per mg of dry tissue. Means were statistically compared using the unpaired t-test (p<0.05). We observed a significant increase (p<0.0001) in the Vv of collagen in the bladders of anencephalic fetuses (69.71%) when compared to normal fetuses (52.74%), and a significant decrease (p<0.0001) in the Vv of smooth muscle cells in the bladders of anencephalic fetuses (23.96%) when compared to normal fetuses (38.35%). The biochemical analyses showed a higher concentration of total collagen in the bladders of anencephalic fetuses (37354 µg/mg) when compared to normal fetuses (48117 µg/mg, p<0.02). The structural alterations of the bladder found in this study may suggest the existence of functional alterations in the bladder of anencephalic human fetuses.

  9. Different methods to alter surface morphology of high aspect ratio structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leber, M., E-mail: moritz.leber@utah.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Shandhi, M.M.H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hogan, A. [Blackrock Microsystems, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Solzbacher, F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Bhandari, R.; Negi, S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Blackrock Microsystems, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: Surface engineering of high aspect ratio silicon structures. - Highlights: • Multiple roughening techniques for high aspect ratio devices were investigated. • Modification of surface morphology of high aspect ratio silicon devices (1:15). • Decrease of 76% in impedance proves significant increase in surface area. - Abstract: In various applications such as neural prostheses or solar cells, there is a need to alter the surface morphology of high aspect ratio structures so that the real surface area is greater than geometrical area. The change in surface morphology enhances the devices functionality. One of the applications of altering the surface morphology is of neural implants such as the Utah electrode array (UEA) that communicate with single neurons by charge injection induced stimulation or by recording electrical neural signals. For high selectivity between single cells of the nervous system, the electrode surface area is required to be as small as possible, while the impedance is required to be as low as possible for good signal to noise ratios (SNR) during neural recording. For stimulation, high charge injection and charge transfer capacities of the electrodes are required, which increase with the electrode surface. Traditionally, researchers have worked with either increasing the roughness of the existing metallization (platinum grey, black) or other materials such as Iridium Oxide and PEDOT. All of these previously investigated methods lead to more complicated metal deposition processes that are difficult to control and often have a critical impact on the mechanical properties of the metal films. Therefore, a modification of the surface underneath the electrode's coating will increase its surface area while maintaining the standard and well controlled metal deposition process. In this work, the surfaces of the silicon micro-needles were engineered by creating a defined microstructure on the electrodes surface using several

  10. Assessing river regime alteration due to flood detention structures in dry and semi-dry regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaraghi, Navid; Torabihaghighi, Ali; Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Fazel, Nasim; Rossi, Pekka. M.; Klöve, Björn

    2017-04-01

    In dry and semi-dry climate, flood detention structures are used for flood control and managed aquifer recharge. These damps basin runoff response decreasing the maximum flows and increasing the runoff duration through wet seasons. In this study, a framework to quantify the role of flood detention dams in headwater tributaries on total water balance of major basin and alteration of flow pattern in the main river has been presented. The study contains four main subroutines: rainfall-runoff model, reservoir flood routing, river analysis system and seepage analysis. The flood hydrographs with different return periods are estimated based on the climatic data and geomorphology of headwater basin. River flow analysis below the flood detention structure is carried out for two unsteady flow scenarios, first with the hydrographs of natural system (as pre-impact: quick flood with significant peak flow) and second the routed hydrographs due to detention process in the reservoir (as post-impact: damped flood lower peak with longer duration time). Two sets of dynamic water surface along the river (from the location of detention structure (x=0) to the confluence point with main river (x=L) are developed based on two hydrologic conditions as results of river analysis system. The results of framework define the impact of flood detention structure by comparing the timing, magnitude and variability of flow. The Kamal Abad artificial groundwater recharge in Mahrloo Lake basin in Southern Iran was selected as case study to demonstrate the application of the created framework. Through the probability analysis, the return period for hydrological drought would be compared in pre and post impact condition. The results clearly showed how embankments influence floods in tributaries and in some cases the flow reduced significantly and disappears in tributaries.

  11. Epileptic seizures induce structural and functional alterations on brain tissue membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turker, Sevgi; Severcan, Mete; Ilbay, Gul; Severcan, Feride

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by disruption of balance between cerebral excitation and inhibition, leading to recurrent and unprovoked convulsions. Studies are still underway to understand mechanisms lying epileptic seizures with the aim of improving treatment strategies. In this context, the research on brain tissue membranes gains importance for generation of epileptic activities. In order to provide additional information for this field, we have investigated the effects of pentylenetetrazol-induced and audiogenetically susceptible epileptic seizures on structure, content and function of rat brain membrane components using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The findings have shown that both two types of epileptic seizures stimulate the variations in the molecular organization of membrane lipids, which have potential to influence the structures in connection with functions of membrane proteins. Moreover, less fluid lipid structure and a decline in content of lipids obtained from the ratio of CH3 asym/lipid, CH2 asym/lipid, CO/lipid, and olefinicCH/lipid and the areas of the PO2 symmetric and asymmetric modes were observed. Moreover, based on IR data the changes in the conformation of proteins were predicted by neural network (NN) analysis, and displayed as an increase in random coil despite a decrease in beta sheet. Depending on spectral parameters, we have successfully differentiated treated samples from the control by principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis. In summary, FT-IR spectroscopy may offer promising attempt to identify compositional, structural and functional alterations in brain tissue membranes resulting from epileptic activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Is pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in celiac disease related to structural alterations in pancreatic parenchyma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Surinder S; Dambalkar, Arvind; Chhabra, Puneet; Sharma, Ravi; Nada, Ritambhra; Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Satyavati; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2016-01-01

    Although exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) has been reported in a number of patients with celiac disease (CD), it is not clear if this is primarily a functional or a structural defect. We studied pancreatic structural abnormalities by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in adult CD patients with EPI. Pancreatic exocrine function was prospectively assessed in 36 recently diagnosed CD patients (mean age: 29.8 years) by measuring fecal elastase. Pancreatic structural changes were assessed in CD patients with EPI by EUS and elastography. Exocrine functions were reassessed after 3 months of gluten-free diet. Of the 36 CD patients included, 30 (83%) had anemia, 21 (58%) diarrhea, and 7 (19%) hypothyroidism. Ten (28%) patients had EPI with mean elastase levels of 141.6 μg/g of stool, of whom only one had a history of recurrent acute pancreatitis while the rest 9 patients had no history of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Of these 10 patients, 8 (80%) had diarrhea, 8 (80%) anemia, and 2 (20%) hypothyroidism. EUS was done in 8 patients which showed: normal pancreas in 5 (50%), hyperechoic strands in 3 (30%), and hyperechoic foci without shadowing in 2 (20%) patients. None had lobularity or parenchymal calcification. All patients except the patient with recurrent pancreatitis had normal strain ratio. Follow-up fecal elastase was within normal range in 6 of 7 (86%) patients. EPI, assessed by fecal elastase levels in adult CD patients, possibly does not relate to structural alterations in the pancreatic parenchyma and may be reversible by following a gluten-free diet.

  13. [The value of double contrast arthrotomography combined with cinematography in the diagnosis of functional and structural TMJ alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, W; Grossniklaus, B; Sailer, H F

    1991-01-01

    Double contrast arthrotomography combined with cinematography as a diagnostic instrument establishing functional and structural TMJ alterations is evaluated for its diagnostic value and reliability within the chain of diagnostic measures applied. In 131 patients double-contrast arthrotomography was followed by a comprehensive history of joint problems, and verification of the clinical findings as well as the arthrographic diagnosis and the post-arthrographic TMJ alterations. Our interest was focussed, among others, on the question whether arthrography alone would have any therapeutic effect or produce an alteration in TMJ function.

  14. Diabetic polyneuropathy, sensory neurons, nuclear structure and spliceosome alterations: a role for CWC22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Kobayashi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Unique deficits in the function of adult sensory neurons as part of their early neurodegeneration might account for progressive polyneuropathy during chronic diabetes mellitus. Here, we provide structural and functional evidence for aberrant pre-mRNA splicing in a chronic type 1 model of experimental diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN. Cajal bodies (CBs, unique nuclear substructures involved in RNA splicing, increased in number in diabetic sensory neurons, but their expected colocalization with survival motor neuron (SMN proteins was reduced – a mislocalization described in motor neurons of spinal muscular atrophy. Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs, also participants in the spliceosome, had abnormal multiple nuclear foci unassociated with CBs, and their associated snRNAs were reduced. CWC22, a key spliceosome protein, was aberrantly upregulated in diabetic dorsal root ganglia (DRG, and impaired neuronal function. CWC22 attenuated sensory neuron plasticity, with knockdown in vitro enhancing their neurite outgrowth. Further, axonal delivery of CWC22 siRNA unilaterally to locally knock down the aberrant protein in diabetic nerves improved aspects of sensory function in diabetic mice. Collectively, our findings identify subtle but significant alterations in spliceosome structure and function, including dysregulated CBs and CWC22 overexpression, in diabetic sensory neurons that offer new ideas regarding diabetic sensory neurodegeneration in polyneuropathy.

  15. Warming alters energetic structure and function but not resilience of soil food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Benjamin; Barnes, Andrew D.; Thakur, Madhav P.; Brose, Ulrich; Ciobanu, Marcel; Reich, Peter B.; Rich, Roy L.; Rosenbaum, Benjamin; Stefanski, Artur; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2017-12-01

    Climate warming is predicted to alter the structure, stability, and functioning of food webs1-5. Yet, despite the importance of soil food webs for energy and nutrient turnover in terrestrial ecosystems, the effects of warming on these food webs—particularly in combination with other global change drivers—are largely unknown. Here, we present results from two complementary field experiments that test the interactive effects of warming with forest canopy disturbance and drought on energy flux in boreal-temperate ecotonal forest soil food webs. The first experiment applied a simultaneous above- and belowground warming treatment (ambient, +1.7 °C, +3.4 °C) to closed-canopy and recently clear-cut forest, simulating common forest disturbance6. The second experiment crossed warming with a summer drought treatment (-40% rainfall) in the clear-cut habitats. We show that warming reduces energy flux to microbes, while forest canopy disturbance and drought facilitates warming-induced increases in energy flux to higher trophic levels and exacerbates the reduction in energy flux to microbes, respectively. Contrary to expectations, we find no change in whole-network resilience to perturbations, but significant losses in ecosystem functioning. Warming thus interacts with forest disturbance and drought, shaping the energetic structure of soil food webs and threatening the provisioning of multiple ecosystem functions in boreal-temperate ecotonal forests.

  16. Aspirin-mediated acetylation induces structural alteration and aggregation of bovine pancreatic insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Reza; Taheri, Behnaz; Alavi, Parnian; Shahsavani, Mohammad Bagher; Asadi, Zahra; Ghahramani, Maryam; Niazi, Ali; Alavianmehr, Mohammad Mehdi; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    The simple aggregation of insulin under various chemical and physical stresses is still an important challenge for both pharmaceutical production and clinical formulation. In the storage form, this protein is subjected to various chemical modifications which alter its physicochemical and aggregation properties. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) which is the most widely used medicine worldwide has been indicated to acetylate a large number of proteins both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, as insulin treated with aspirin at 37°C, a significant level of acetylation was observed by flourescamine and o-phthalaldehyde assay. Also, different spectroscopic techniques, gel electrophoresis, and microscopic assessment were applied to compare the structural variation and aggregation/fibrillation propensity among acetylated and non-acetylated insulin samples. The results of spectroscopic assessments elucidate that acetylation induces insulin unfolding which is accompanied with the exposure of protein hydrophobic patches, a transition from alpha-helix to beta-sheet and increased propensity of the protein for aggregation. The kinetic studies propose that acetylation increases aggregation rate of insulin under both thermal and chemical stresses. Also, gel electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering experiments suggest that acetylation induces insulin oligomerization. Additionally, the results of Thioflavin T fluorescence study, Congo red absorption assessment, and microscopic analysis suggest that acetylation with aspirin enhances the process of insulin fibrillation. Overall, the increased susceptibility of acetylated insulin for aggregation may reflect the fact that this type of modification has significant structural destabilizing effect which finally makes the protein more vulnerable for pathogenic aggregation/fibrillation.

  17. CHOROIDAL STRUCTURE ALTERED BY DEGENERATION OF RETINA IN EYES WITH RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hiroki; Sonoda, Shozo; Saito, Shiro; Terasaki, Hiroto; Sakamoto, Taiji

    2017-11-01

    To compare the structural characteristics of the choroid in the areas with greater retinal degeneration to the areas with less retinal degeneration in eyes with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Patients with RP who had a hyperautofluorescent ring were studied. The choroidal images obtained by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography located 7,500 μm from the optic disk in the horizontal plane were analyzed. The cross-sectional areas of the total, luminal, and stromal choroid were measured. The area within the hyperautofluorescent ring was defined as the "central choroid" with less retinal degeneration. Thirty-seven eyes of 24 patients with RP were studied. The cross-sectional area of the total choroid was significantly smaller in the RP eyes than that in the control eyes (P < 0.01). The stromal areas of the choroid were not significantly different from the stromal areas of the controls. However, the luminal areas of the nasal and temporal choroid in the RP eyes were significantly smaller than that of the corresponding areas of the controls. The ratio of the luminal area to the total choroidal area in the central choroid was 68.0 ± 3.3% which was significantly larger than that of the nasal or the temporal choroid (P < 0.01). The choroidal structure is differentially altered in eyes with RP. The changes in the choroid were dependent on whether they were located within the hyperautofluorescent or outside the hyperautofluorescent ring.

  18. Structural alterations in the male reproductive system of the freshwater crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus (Decapoda, Parastacidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugnot, Ana B; López Greco, Laura S

    2009-10-01

    No diseases affecting reproductive performance have been previously reported in freshwater crayfishes. This study aims to characterise one reproductive system abnormality found in males of Cherax quadricarinatus reared in captivity. Fifteen adult males of C. quadricarinatus (70-110 g) were purchased from San Mateo S.A. farm (Entre Ríos, Argentina) each season during 2007. Macroscopic analysis showed that 26.6% of the animals sacrificed in winter presented brownish distal vasa deferentia. Histological analysis showed different levels of structural abnormality in the epithelium of the vasa deferentia and spermatophore. Granular and hyaline haemocytes were identified within the vasa deferentia but no significant differences were found in the sperm count between normal and brownish vas deferens. Histological analysis of the crayfishes sacrificed in autumn also showed these modifications in 22% of the animals, however, they did not show the brownish colour under macroscopic analysis. The similarities between the male reproductive system syndrome in shrimps and the abnormalities found in C. quadricarinatus are notable. An unspecific response to thermic stress is a possible explanation of these structural alterations.

  19. Structural alterations in rat myocardium induced by chronic l-arginine and l-NAME supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Abdussalam Ali A. Hmaid

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Structural changes affecting cardiomyocyte function may contribute to the pathophysiological remodeling underlying cardiac function impairment. Recent reports have shown that endogenous nitric oxide (NO plays an important role in this process. In order to examine the role of NO in cardiomyocyte remodeling, male rats were acclimated to room temperature (22 ± 1 °C or cold (4 ± 1 °C and treated with 2.25% l-arginine·HCl or 0.01% l-NAME (Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester·HCl for 45 days. Untreated groups served as controls. Right heart ventricles were routinely prepared for light microscopic examination. Stereological estimations of volume densities of cardiomyocytes, surrounding blood vessels and connective tissue, as well as the morphometric measurements of cardiomyocyte diameters were performed. Tissue sections were also analyzed for structural alterations. We observed that both l-arginine and l-NAME supplementation induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, regardless of ambient temperature. However, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was associated with fibrosis and extra collagen deposition only in the l-NAME treated group. Taken together, our results suggest that NO has a modulatory role in right heart ventricle remodeling by coordinating hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes and fibrous tissue preventing cardiac fibrosis. Keywords: Cardiomyocyte, Cardiac hypertrophy, l-Arginine, l-NAME, Myocardium

  20. Human hemoglobin structural and functional alterations and heme degradation upon interaction with benzene: A spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-03-15

    Here, the effect of benzene on hemoglobin structure, stability and heme prosthetic group integrity was studied by different methods. These included UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry, normal and synchronous fluorescence techniques, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Our results indicated that benzene has high hemolytic potential even at low concentrations. The UV-vis spectroscopic results demonstrated that benzene altered both the globin chain and the heme prosthetic group of hemoglobin increasing met- and deoxy-Hb, while decreasing oxy-Hb. However, with increasing benzene the concentration of all species decreased due to heme destruction. The spectrophotometric results show that benzene has a high potential for penetrating the hydrophobic pocket of hemoglobin. These results were consistent with the molecular docking simulation results of benzene-hHb. Aggregation and thermal denaturation studies show that the increased benzene concentration induced hemoglobin aggregation with a decrease in stability, which is consistent with the DSC results. Conventional fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the heme degradation species were produced in the presence of benzene. The results of constant wavelength synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (CWSFS) indicated that at least five heme-degraded species were produced. Together, our results indicated that benzene has adverse effects on hemoglobin structure and function, and heme degradation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of glycan structure alterations on cell membrane proteins in desoxyepothilone B resistant leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Miyako; Saldanha, Rohit; Göbel, Anja; Kavallaris, Maria; Packer, Nicolle H

    2011-11-01

    Resistance to tubulin-binding agents used in cancer is often multifactorial and can include changes in drug accumulation and modified expression of tubulin isotypes. Glycans on cell membrane proteins play important roles in many cellular processes such as recognition and apoptosis, and this study investigated whether changes to the glycan structures on cell membrane proteins occur when cells become resistant to drugs. Specifically, we investigated the alteration of glycan structures on the cell membrane proteins of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cells that were selected for resistance to desoxyepothilone B (CEM/dEpoB). The glycan profile of the cell membrane glycoproteins was obtained by sequential release of N- and O-glycans from cell membrane fraction dotted onto polyvinylidene difluoride membrane with PNGase F and β-elimination respectively. The released glycan alditols were analyzed by liquid chromatography (graphitized carbon)-electrospray ionization tandem MS. The major N-glycan on CEM cell was the core fucosylated α2-6 monosialo-biantennary structure. Resistant CEM/dEpoB cells had a significant decrease of α2-6 linked sialic acid on N-glycans. The lower α2-6 sialylation was caused by a decrease in activity of β-galactoside α2-6 sialyltransferase (ST6Gal), and decreased expression of the mRNA. It is clear that the membrane glycosylation of leukemia cells changes during acquired resistance to dEpoB drugs and that this change occurs globally on all cell membrane glycoproteins. This is the first identification of a specific glycan modification on the surface of drug resistant cells and the mechanism of this downstream effect on microtubule targeting drugs may offer a route to new interventions to overcome drug resistance.

  2. Structural Alterations within Cerebellar Circuitry Are Associated with General Liability for Common Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, Adrienne L.; Knodt, Annchen R.; Houts, Renate; Brigidi, Bartholomew D.; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Caspi, Avshalom; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating mental health research encourages a shift in focus towards transdiagnostic dimensional features that are shared across categorical disorders. In support of this shift, recent studies have identified a general liability factor for psychopathology – sometimes called the ‘p factor’ – that underlies shared risk for a wide range of mental disorders. Identifying neural correlates of this general liability would substantiate its importance in characterizing the shared origins of mental disorders and help us begin to understand the mechanisms through which the ‘p factor’ contributes to risk. Here we first replicate the ‘p factor’ using cross-sectional data from a volunteer sample of 1,246 university students, and then, using high-resolution multimodal structural neuroimaging, demonstrate that individuals with higher ‘p factor’ scores show reduced structural integrity of white matter pathways, as indexed by lower fractional anisotropy values, uniquely within the pons. Whole-brain analyses further revealed that higher ‘p factor’ scores are associated with reduced gray matter volume in the occipital lobe and left cerebellar lobule VIIb, which is functionally connected with prefrontal regions supporting cognitive control. Consistent with the preponderance of cerebellar afferents within the pons, we observed a significant positive correlation between the white matter integrity of the pons and cerebellar gray matter volume associated with higher ‘p factor’ scores. The results of our analyses provide initial evidence that structural alterations in cortico-cerebellar circuitry supporting core functions related to the basic integration, coordination, and monitoring of information may contribute to a general liability for common mental disorders. PMID:28397842

  3. Structural Chromosomal Alterations Induced by Dietary Bioflavonoids in Fanconi Anemia Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Guevara

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionFanconi anemia is an autosomal recessive diseasecharacterized by a variety of congenital abnormalities,progressive bone marrow failure,increased chromosomal instability and higherrisk to acute myeloid leukemia, solid tumors. Thisentity can be considered an appropriate biologicalmodel to analyze natural substances with possiblegenotoxic effect. The aims of this study wereto describe and quantify structural chromosomalaberrations induced by 5 flavones, 2 isoflavonesand a topoisomerase II chemotherapeutic inhibitorin Fanconi anemia lymphocytes in order todetermine chromosomal numbers changes and/or type of chromosomal damage.Materials and methodsChromosomes stimulated by phytohaemagglutininM, from Fanconi anemia lymphocytes,were analysed by conventional cytogenetic culture.For each chemical substance and controls,one hundred metaphases were evaluated. Chromosomalalterations were documented by photographyand imaging analyzer. To statisticalanalysis was used chi square test to identify significantdifferences between frequencies of chromosomaldamage of basal and exposed cellcultured a P value less than 0.05.ResultsThere were 431 chromosomal alterations in1000 metaphases analysed; genistein was themore genotoxic bioflavonoid, followed in descendentorder by genistin, fisetin, kaempferol,quercetin, baicalein and miricetin. Chromosomalaberrations observed were: chromatidbreaks, chromosomal breaks, cromatid andchromosomal gaps, quadriratials exchanges,dicentrics chromosome and complex rearrangements.ConclusionBioflavonoids as genistein, genistin and fisetin,which are commonly present in the human diet,showed statistical significance in the number ofchromosomal aberrations in Fanconi anemialymphocytes, regarding the basal damage.

  4. Functionally Distinct Tendons From Elastin Haploinsufficient Mice Exhibit Mild Stiffening and Tendon-Specific Structural Alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eekhoff, Jeremy D; Fang, Fei; Kahan, Lindsey G; Espinosa, Gabriela; Cocciolone, Austin J; Wagenseil, Jessica E; Mecham, Robert P; Lake, Spencer P

    2017-11-01

    Elastic fibers are present in low quantities in tendon, where they are located both within fascicles near tenocytes and more broadly in the interfascicular matrix (IFM). While elastic fibers have long been known to be significant in the mechanics of elastin-rich tissue (i.e., vasculature, skin, lungs), recent studies have suggested a mechanical role for elastic fibers in tendons that is dependent on specific tendon function. However, the exact contribution of elastin to properties of different types of tendons (e.g., positional, energy-storing) remains unknown. Therefore, this study purposed to evaluate the role of elastin in the mechanical properties and collagen alignment of functionally distinct supraspinatus tendons (SSTs) and Achilles tendons (ATs) from elastin haploinsufficient (HET) and wild type (WT) mice. Despite the significant decrease in elastin in HET tendons, a slight increase in linear stiffness of both tendons was the only significant mechanical effect of elastin haploinsufficiency. Additionally, there were significant changes in collagen nanostructure and subtle alteration to collagen alignment in the AT but not the SST. Hence, elastin may play only a minor role in tendon mechanical properties. Alternatively, larger changes to tendon mechanics may have been mitigated by developmental compensation of HET tendons and/or the role of elastic fibers may be less prominent in smaller mouse tendons compared to the larger bovine and human tendons evaluated in previous studies. Further research will be necessary to fully elucidate the influence of various elastic fiber components on structure-function relationships in functionally distinct tendons.

  5. Hair structures are effectively altered during 810 nm diode laser hair epilation at low fluences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelles, Mario A; Urdiales, Fernándo; Al-Zarouni, Marwan

    2010-03-01

    Diode lasers with high fluence and cooling technology are effective at removing unwanted hair but are also associated with discomfort and morbidity, especially when treating dark or tanned skins. Thirty patients with skin phototypes IV and V (range: 23-62 years of age; average: 39 years) underwent a single hair removal treatment using a new diode laser (810 nm) technology that incorporates low fluence but very high average power. The treatment technique employed multiple, in-motion, repetitive laser passes on a 100 cm(2) area of the skin. A 5mm punch biopsy was carried out before and after a single treatment. Tissue samples were harvested and stained with haematoxylin-eosin. The physical integrity of hair follicles was altered with inflammatory infiltrate, hair shaft detachment from its sheath, and perifollicular oedema, related to incipient necrosis. Low fluence but high average power diode laser technology yields significant changes in hair structure and architecture in patients with dark skin types. The procedure caused low levels of discomfort and was well tolerated.

  6. Structural alterations in the prefrontal cortex mediate the relationship between Internet gaming disorder and depressed mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jihye; Cho, Hyun; Kim, Jin-Young; Jung, Dong Jin; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kang, Hang-Bong; Choi, Jung-Seok; Chun, Ji-Won; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2017-04-28

    Adaptive gaming use has positive effects, whereas depression has been reported to be prevalent in Internet gaming disorder (IGD). However, the neural correlates underlying the association between depression and Internet gaming remain unclear. Moreover, the neuroanatomical profile of the striatum in IGD is relatively less clear despite its important role in addiction. We found lower gray matter (GM) density in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in the IGD group than in the Internet gaming control (IGC) group and non-gaming control (NGC) group, and the GM density was associated with lifetime usage of Internet gaming, depressed mood, craving, and impulsivity in the gaming users. Striatal volumetric analysis detected a significant reduction in the right nucleus accumbens (NAcc) in the IGD group and its association with lifetime usage of gaming and depression. These findings suggest that alterations in the brain structures involved in the reward system are associated with IGD-related behavioral characteristics. Furthermore, the DLPFC, involved in cognitive control, was observed to serve as a mediator in the association between prolonged gaming and depressed mood. This finding may provide insight into an intervention strategy for treating IGD with comorbid depression.

  7. Altered gray matter organization in children and adolescents with ADHD: a structural covariance connectome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, K R; Grieve, S M; Kohn, M R; Clarke, S; Williams, L M; Korgaonkar, M S

    2016-11-08

    Although multiple studies have reported structural deficits in multiple brain regions in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), we do not yet know if these deficits reflect a more systematic disruption to the anatomical organization of large-scale brain networks. Here we used a graph theoretical approach to quantify anatomical organization in children and adolescents with ADHD. We generated anatomical networks based on covariance of gray matter volumes from 92 regions across the brain in children and adolescents with ADHD (n=34) and age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n=28). Using graph theory, we computed metrics that characterize both the global organization of anatomical networks (interconnectivity (clustering), integration (path length) and balance of global integration and localized segregation (small-worldness)) and their local nodal measures (participation (degree) and interaction (betweenness) within a network). Relative to Controls, ADHD participants exhibited altered global organization reflected in more clustering or network segregation. Locally, nodal degree and betweenness were increased in the subcortical amygdalae in ADHD, but reduced in cortical nodes in the anterior cingulate, posterior cingulate, mid temporal pole and rolandic operculum. In ADHD, anatomical networks were disrupted and reflected an emphasis on subcortical local connections centered around the amygdala, at the expense of cortical organization. Brains of children and adolescents with ADHD may be anatomically configured to respond impulsively to the automatic significance of stimulus input without having the neural organization to regulate and inhibit these responses. These findings provide a novel addition to our current understanding of the ADHD connectome.

  8. Local adaptation in Trinidadian guppies alters stream ecosystem structure at landscape scales despite high environmental variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Troy N.; Bassar, Ronald D.; Binderup, Andrew J.; Flecker, Alex S.; Freeman, Mary C.; Gilliam, James F.; Marshall, Michael C.; Thomas, Steve A.; Travis, Joseph; Reznick, David N.; Pringle, Catherine M.

    2017-01-01

    While previous studies have shown that evolutionary divergence alters ecological processes in small-scale experiments, a major challenge is to assess whether such evolutionary effects are important in natural ecosystems at larger spatial scales. At the landscape scale, across eight streams in the Caroni drainage, we found that the presence of locally adapted populations of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) is associated with reduced algal biomass and increased invertebrate biomass, while the opposite trends were true in streams with experimentally introduced populations of non-locally adapted guppies. Exclusion experiments conducted in two separate reaches of a single stream showed that guppies with locally adapted phenotypes significantly reduced algae with no effect on invertebrates, while non-adapted guppies had no effect on algae but significantly reduced invertebrates. These divergent effects of phenotype on stream ecosystems are comparable in strength to the effects of abiotic factors (e.g., light) known to be important drivers of ecosystem condition. They also corroborate the results of previous experiments conducted in artificial streams. Our results demonstrate that local adaptation can produce phenotypes with significantly different effects in natural ecosystems at a landscape scale, within a tropical watershed, despite high variability in abiotic factors: five of the seven physical and chemical parameters measured across the eight study streams varied by more than one order of magnitude. Our findings suggest that ecosystem structure is, in part, an evolutionary product and not simply an ecological pattern.

  9. Thirty days of spaceflight does not alter murine calvariae structure despite increased Sost expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R. Macaulay

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Previously our laboratory documented increases in calvaria bone volume and thickness in mice exposed to 15 days of spaceflight aboard the NASA Shuttle mission STS-131. However, the tissues were not processed for gene expression studies to determine what bone formation pathways might contribute to these structural adaptations. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate both the structural and molecular changes in mice calvariae after a longer duration of spaceflight. The primary purpose was to determine the calvaria bone volume and thickness of mice exposed to 30 days of spaceflight using micro-computed tomography for comparison with our previous findings. Because sclerostin, the secreted glycoprotein of the Sost gene, is a potent inhibitor of bone formation, our second aim was to quantify Sost mRNA expression using quantitative PCR. Calvariae were obtained from six mice aboard the Russian 30-day Bion-M1 biosatellite and seven ground controls. In mice exposed to 30 days of spaceflight, calvaria bone structure was not significantly different from that of their controls (bone volume was about 5% lower in spaceflight mice, p = 0.534. However, Sost mRNA expression was 16-fold (16.4 ± 0.4, p < 0.001 greater in the spaceflight group than that in the ground control group. Therefore, bone formation may have been suppressed in mice exposed to 30 days of spaceflight. Genetic responsiveness (e.g. sex or strain of animals or in-flight environmental conditions other than microgravity (e.g. pCO2 levels may have elicited different bone adaptations in STS-131 and Bion-M1 mice. Although structural results were not significant, this study provides biochemical evidence that calvaria mechanotransduction pathways may be altered during spaceflight, which could reflect vascular and interstitial fluid adaptations in non-weight bearing bones. Future studies are warranted to elucidate the processes that mediate these effects and the factors responsible

  10. Boldenone-induced apoptotic, structural, and functional alterations in the liver of rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.F. Mayada

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Boldenone undecylenate (BOL is an anabolic androgenic steroid used in livestock to improve growth and food conversion. This study investigated the actions of BOL on structure and functions of rabbit liver as well as the effects of its withdrawal. Eighteen mature male New Zealand rabbits were divided into 2 groups: Control group (n=6 were injected with 0.25 mL corn oil/kg body weight (BW, while BOL group (n=12 received 3 intramuscular injections, 2 wk apart, of BOL (4.5 mg/kg BW. Animals were scarified 1 d after last injection except for 6 rabbits from BOL group that served as the BOL-withdrawal group (4 wk after the 3rd injection. Intramuscular injection of BOL increased (P<0.05 malondialdehyde (MDA level, but markedly lowered activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT and reduced glutathione (GSH concentration compared to both control and BOL-withdrawal groups. Treatment with BOL significantly (P<0.05 increased serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST compared to the control group. BOL injection caused different histopathological alterations and apoptosis in liver, but these changes were less evident in the BOL-withdrawal group. Expression of p53 and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α genes was up regulated in BOL compared to control group, while the expressions of p53 and TNF-α were down regulated in BOL-withdrawal group in comparison with BOL group. In conclusion, BOL injection induced structural and functional changes in the liver of rabbits, increasing oxidative stress and mediators of apoptosis such as ROS, p53 and TNF-α. All these parameters returned to near the control values after withdrawal.

  11. The Z mutation alters the global structural dynamics of α1-antitrypsin.

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    Victoria A Hughes

    Full Text Available α1-Antitrypsin (α1AT deficiency, the most common serpinopathy, results in both emphysema and liver disease. Over 90% of all clinical cases of α1AT deficiency are caused by the Z variant in which Glu342, located at the top of s5A, is replaced by a Lys which results in polymerization both in vivo and in vitro. The Glu342Lys mutation removes a salt bridge and a hydrogen bond but does not effect the thermodynamic stability of Z α1AT compared to the wild type protein, M α1AT, and so it is unclear why Z α1AT has an increased polymerization propensity. We speculated that the loss of these interactions would make the native state of Z α1AT more dynamic than M α1AT and that this change renders the protein more polymerization prone. We have used hydrogen/deuterium exchange combined with mass spectrometry (HXMS to determine the structural and dynamic differences between native Z and M α1AT to reveal the molecular basis of Z α1AT polymerization. Our HXMS data shows that the Z mutation significantly perturbs the region around the site of mutation. Strikingly the Z mutation also alters the dynamics of regions distant to the mutation such as the B, D and I helices and specific regions of each β-sheet. These changes in global dynamics may lead to an increase in the likelihood of Z α1AT sampling a polymerogenic structure thereby causing disease.

  12. Exposure to the endocrine disruptor nonylphenol alters structure and function of thyroid gland in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yue; Li, Dehua; San, Wei

    2013-08-10

    Nonylphenol (NP) is an estrogenic-like compound which can induce vitellogenin synthesis in males and immature teleostean species. Known as an endocrine disruptor, it has been reported to affect endocrine glands; however, little is known about its effects on thyroid function. The present study aimed to evaluate whether exposure to NP alters the structure and function of the thyroid gland of rats and/or the underlying mechanisms. Rats were gavaged with NP (40, 80 and 200 mg/kg/d) for 15 days. Serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone were determined by radioimmunoassay. Ultramicroscopic structure of follicular cells was examined by a transmission electron microscope. Histopathology was conducted with hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. We found that NP exposure induced a decrease in serum levels of free tetraiodothyronine (FT) 3 and FT4 while it induced an increase in serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in a dose-dependent manner. There was a negative correlation between different doses of NP with serum levels of FT3 and FT4 (FT4 r=-0.932; FT3 r=-0.926) and a positive correlation with serum levels of TSH (r=0.967). Histological and morphometric study in the NP-exposed group revealed dilation of endoplasmic reticulum into cystic in thyroid follicular cells. Mitochondrion was damaged in the 80 and 200 mg/kg/d groups. Exposure to NP may lead to thyroid dysfunction. It may be a potential contributor to thyroid disruption. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The rat intervertebral disk degeneration pain model: relationships between biological and structural alterations and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Li, Xin; An, Howard S; Buvanendran, Asokumar; Yan, Dongyao; Tuman, Kenneth J; van Wijnen, Andre J; Chen, Di; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Degeneration of the interverterbral disk is as a cause of low-back pain is increasing. To gain insight into relationships between biological processes, structural alterations and behavioral pain, we created an animal model in rats. Disk degeneration was induced by removal of the nucleus pulposus (NP) from the lumbar disks (L4/L5 and L5/L6) of Sprague Dawley rats using a 0.5-mm-diameter microsurgical drill. The degree of primary hyperalgesia was assessed by using an algometer to measure pain upon external pressure on injured lumbar disks. Biochemical and histological assessments and radiographs of injured disks were used for evaluation. We investigated therapeutic modulation of chronic pain by administering pharmaceutical drugs in this animal model. After removal of the NP, pressure hyperalgesia developed over the lower back. Nine weeks after surgery we observed damaged or degenerated disks with proteoglycan loss and narrowing of disk height. These biological and structural changes in disks were closely related to the sustained pain hyperalgesia. A high dose of morphine (6.7 mg/kg) resulted in effective pain relief. However, high doses of pregabalin (20 mg/kg), a drug that has been used for treatment of chronic neuropathic pain, as well as the anti-inflammatory drugs celecoxib (50 mg/kg; a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2)) and ketorolac (20 mg/kg; an inhibitor of COX-1 and COX-2), did not have significant antihyperalgesic effects in our disk injury animal model. Although similarities in gene expression profiles suggest potential overlap in chronic pain pathways linked to disk injury or neuropathy, drug-testing results suggest that pain pathways linked to these two chronic pain conditions are mechanistically distinct. Our findings provide a foundation for future research on new therapeutic interventions that can lead to improvements in the treatment of patients with back pain due to disk degeneration.

  14. The Structure of Fats and Fatty Acid Consumption in Elderly People with Cardiovascular System Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skop-Lewandowska, Agata; Kolarzyk, Emilia; Zając, Joanna; Jaworska, Jagoda; Załęska-Żyłka, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cardiovascular system diseases having their origin in arteriosclerosis require special dietetic treatment. Among many nutritional components, fats in the diet (both their quantity and quality) play a very important role in primary and secondary prevention of these diseases. The aim of the study was the estimation of total fats participation (saturated fatty acids, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol) in the Daily Nutritional Ration (DNR) of elderly people with cardiovascular system diseases. The study included 128 persons (66 women and 62 men, mean age 73.2 ± 6.9) hospitalized in the 1st Clinic of Cardiology and Hypertension, UJCM in Kraków. Daily intakes of energy were estimated using the 24-h nutritional recall and Food Frequency Questionnaire. A higher consumption of fats and fatty acids was observed in men's diet than in women's diet. The percentage of energy from saturated fatty acids (10.6% M and W) was higher than dietary recommendations. The consumption of monounsaturated fatty acids was in accordance with nutritional recommendations. The participation in the diet of polyunsaturated fatty acids was insufficient versus the newest nutritional recommendations and was determined as 4.6% of energy in DNR in men and 4.1% of energy of DNR in women. The excessive amount of saturated fatty acids together with the insufficient amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the diet are the result of the excessive consumption of products which are a source of animal fat and insufficient consumption of plant fat, fish and seafood.

  15. Compared study of the local structure of alteration products of SON 68 glass and natural gels; Etude comparee de la structure locale des produits d'alteration du verre SON 68 et de gels naturels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrin, E

    2000-07-01

    This study is a contribution in the understanding of the long time behavior of alteration products of the glass SON 68, used to simulate the nuclear glass R7T7. The local structure around Zirconium and iron has been probed using X-ray absorption spectroscopy in altered surface layer of glass SON 68. Alteration products of this glass have been prepared for short (3 hours to 7 days) and long (17 months) time, using various indexes of saturation for the leaching solution with respect to the Si content of the glass (from 0 to 90 %). The evolution of the local structure around Fe has also been studied in recent and old natural ferric gels. Zr, Fe- L{sub 2,3} XANES and Zr, Fe-K EXAFS spectroscopies have shown that, in the pristine glass, these elements are connected to the polymeric network. Zr is found in an environment close to that of a zircon-silicate containing Na and Ca. Trivalent Fe is a network former. The leached layer of glass SON 68 is constituted of poorly ordered Zr-and Fe-(oxi-hydr)oxides that may have been formed by a mechanism of dissolution/precipitation; a relict phase with the same Zr local structure as that observed in the pristine glass, probably obtained thanks to in-situ solid condensation. The structural characteristics of the leached layer are observed from the first steps of alteration for Zr and Fe. Conversely to Fe, the structural status of Zr depends on the leaching kinetic as well as the contents of Ca and Si in the solid. Fe-K EXAFS results in recent natural ferri-hydrides present a clear structural similarity with that determined in glass SON 68 leached products. The study of old paleosols (between 1,800 and 200,000 years) has demonstrated the long time stability of ferric gels, although an increase of medium range order around Fe is seen. (author)

  16. Prenatal nicotine exposure evokes alterations of cell structure in hippocampus and somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Tara Sankar; Seidler, Frederic J; Slotkin, Theodore A

    2002-01-01

    Offspring of women who smoke during pregnancy show behavioral abnormalities, including increased incidence of attentional deficit, learning disabilities, and cognitive dysfunction. Animal models indicate that nicotine elicits changes in neural cell replication and differentiation, leading to deficits in synaptic neurochemistry and behavioral performance, many of which first emerge at adolescence. We evaluated cellular morphology and regional architecture in the juvenile and adolescent hippocampus and the somatosensory cortex in rats exposed to nicotine prenatally. Pregnant rats were given nicotine throughout gestation via minipump infusion of 2 mg/kg/day, a regimen that elicits nicotine plasma levels comparable with those found in smokers. On postnatal days 21 and 30, brains were perfusion-fixed, coronal slices were taken between the anterior commissure and median eminence, and the morphology of the dorsal hippocampus and somatosensory cortex was characterized. In the hippocampal CA3 region and dentate gyrus, we found a substantial decrease in cell size, with corresponding decrements in cell layer thickness, and increments in cell packing density. Smaller, transient changes were seen in CA1. In layer 5 of the somatosensory cortex, although there was no significant decrement in the average cell size, there was a reduction in the proportion of medium-sized pyramidal neurons, and an increase in the proportion of smaller, nonpyramidal cells. All regions showed elevated numbers of glia. Taken together with previous work on neurochemical and functional defects, these data demonstrate that prenatal nicotine exposure compromises neuronal maturation, leading to long-lasting alterations in the structure of key brain regions involved in cognition, learning, and memory.

  17. Structural myocardial alterations in diabetes and hypertension: the role of galectin-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferovic, Jelena P; Lalic, Nebojsa M; Floridi, Federico; Tesic, Milorad; Seferovic, Petar M; Giga, Vojislav; Lalic, Katarina; Jotic, Aleksandra; Jovicic, Snezana; Colak, Emina; Salerno, Gerardo; Cardelli, Patrizia; Di Somma, Salvatore

    2014-10-01

    Galectin-3 is a protein widely distributed in the heart, brain and blood vessels, and has a regulatory role in inflammation, immunology and cancer. Many studies demonstrated that the increased level of galectin-3 is associated with progressive fibrosis and stiffening of the myocardium. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of galectin-3 in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and/or arterial hypertension (HT). Study population included 189 patients, with no coronary artery disease, divided into three groups: group 1 (T2D), group 2 (T2D+HT), and group 3 (HT). All subjects underwent routine laboratory tests, as well as specific biomarkers assessment [galectin-3, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), N- terminal fragment B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP)]. Cardiological evaluation included physical examination, transthoracic tissue Doppler echocardiography and stress echocardiography. The results of this study demonstrated significantly increased levels of galectin-3, blood glucose, and HbA1c in group 2. Also, echocardiographicaly, left ventricular (LV) diameters and IVS thickness were increased in this group of patients. Furthermore, in the same cohort a positive correlation between galectin-3 and NT-pro BNP, and galectin-3 and LV mass were demonstrated. In addition, a negative correlation between galectin-3 and LV end-diastolic diameter was revealed. This study revealed that levels of galectin-3 were higher in patients with both T2D and HT, and correlated with LV mass, indicating the potential role of this biomarker for early detection of myocardial structural and functional alterations.

  18. Electronic cigarette vapor alters the lateral structure but not tensiometric properties of calf lung surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyla, Rebecca J; Wright, Jason; Parthiban, Rajan; Nazemidashtarjandi, Saeed; Kaya, Savas; Farnoud, Amir M

    2017-11-17

    Despite their growing popularity, the potential respiratory toxicity of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) remains largely unknown. One potential aspect of e-cigarette toxicity is the effect of e-cigarette vapor on lung surfactant function. Lung surfactant is a mixture of lipids and proteins that lines the alveolar region. The surfactant layer reduces the surface tension of the alveolar fluid, thereby playing a crucial role in lung stability. Due to their small size, particulates in e-cigarette vapor can penetrate the deep lungs and come into contact with the lung surfactant. The current study sought to examine the potential adverse effects of e-cigarette vapor and conventional cigarette smoke on lung surfactant interfacial properties. Infasurf ® , a clinically used and commercially available calf lung surfactant extract, was used as lung surfactant model. Infasurf ® films were spread on top of an aqueous subphase in a Langmuir trough with smoke particulates from conventional cigarettes or vapor from different flavors of e-cigarettes dispersed in the subphase. Surfactant interfacial properties were measured in real-time upon surface compression while surfactant lateral structure after exposure to smoke or vapor was examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). E-cigarette vapor regardless of the dose and flavoring of the e-liquid did not affect surfactant interfacial properties. In contrast, smoke from conventional cigarettes had a drastic, dose-dependent effect on Infasurf ® interfacial properties reducing the maximum surface pressure from 65.1 ± 0.2 mN/m to 46.1 ± 1.3 mN/m at the highest dose. Cigarette smoke and e-cigarette vapor both altered surfactant microstructure resulting in an increase in the area of lipid multilayers. Studies with individual smoke components revealed that tar was the smoke component most disruptive to surfactant function. While both e-cigarette vapor and conventional cigarette smoke affect surfactant lateral structure

  19. Early ultrastructural alterations in adult dermatomyositis. Capillary abnormalities precede other structural changes in muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, M.; Emslie-Smith, A. M.; Engel, A. G.

    1989-01-01

    In 6 adults with dermatomyositis, minimally weak or nonweak muscles that showed inconclusive light-microscopic alterations were examined by electron microscopy. In all 6 specimens, this revealed pathologic changes in endomysial capillaries. The endothelial cells harbored microtubular inclusions and

  20. Assessment of the structural brain network reveals altered connectivity in children with unilateral cerebral palsy due to periventricular white matter lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Pannek

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: This study shows that network-based analysis of structural connectivity can identify alterations in FA in unilateral CP, and that these alterations in FA are related to clinical function. Application of this connectome-based analysis to investigate alterations in connectivity following treatment may elucidate the neurological correlates of improved functioning due to intervention.

  1. Mutational destabilization of the critical interface water cluster in Scapharca dimeric hemoglobin: structural basis for altered allosteric activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardanani, A; Gambacurta, A; Ascoli, F; Royer, W E

    1998-12-04

    A cluster of interface ordered water molecules has been proposed to act as a key mediator of intersubunit communication in the homodimeric hemoglobin of Scapharca inaequivalvis. Mutations of Thr72 to Val and Ile, which lack the hydroxyl group to hydrogen bond the deoxy interface water molecules, result in sharply altered functional properties. We have determined the high resolution (1.6-1. 8 A) crystal structures of these two mutants in both the deoxygenated and CO-liganded states. These structures show minimal protein structural changes relative to the same native derivatives, despite greater than 40-fold increases in oxygen affinity. In the deoxy state of both mutants two water molecules at the periphery of the water cluster are lost, and the remaining cluster water molecules are destabilized. The CO-liganded structures show key differences between the two mutants including a more optimal interface packing involving Ile72 that acts to stabilize its high affinity (R) state. This additional stabilization allows rationalization of its lowered cooperativity within the context of a two-state model. These studies support a key role of ordered water in cooperative functioning and illustrate how subtle structural alterations can result in significantly altered functional properties in an allosteric molecule. Copyright 1998 Academic Press

  2. Exploring patterns of alteration in Alzheimer’s disease brain networks: a combined structural and functional connectomics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvia Palesi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a severe derangement of cognitive functions, primarily memory, in elderly subjects. As far as the functional impairment is concerned, growing evidence supports the disconnection syndrome hypothesis. Recent investigations using fMRI have revealed a generalized alteration of resting state networks in patients affected by AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI. However, it was unclear whether the changes in functional connectivity were accompanied by corresponding structural network changes. In this work, we have developed a novel structural/functional connectomic approach: resting state fMRI was used to identify the functional cortical network nodes and diffusion MRI to reconstruct the fiber tracts to give a weight to internodal subcortical connections. Then, local and global efficiency were determined for different networks, exploring specific alterations of integration and segregation patterns in AD and MCI patients compared to healthy controls (HC. In the default mode network (DMN, that was the most affected, axonal loss and reduced axonal integrity appeared to compromise both local and global efficiency along posterior-anterior connections. In the basal ganglia network (BGN, disruption of white matter integrity implied that main alterations occurred in local microstructure. In the anterior insular network (AIN, neuronal loss probably subtended a compromised communication with the insular cortex. Cognitive performance, evaluated by neuropsychological examinations, revealed a dependency on integration and segregation of brain networks. These findings are indicative of the fact that cognitive deficits in AD could be associated not only with cortical alterations (revealed by fMRI but also with subcortical alterations (revealed by diffusion MRI that extend beyond the areas primarily damaged by neurodegeneration, towards the support of an emerging concept of AD as a

  3. Postirradiation cardiovascular dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, R.N.; Cockerham, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    Cardiovascular dysfunction may be defined as the inability of any element of the cardiovascular system to perform adequately upon demand, leading to inadequate performance and nutritive insufficiency of various parts of the body. Exposure to supralethal doses of radiation (accidental and therapeutic) has been show to induce significant alterations in cardiovascular function in man. These findings indicate that, after irradiation, cardiovascular function is a major determinant of continued performance and even survival. For the two persons who received massive radiation doses (45 and 88 Gy, respectively) in criticality accidents, the inability to maintain systematic arterial blood pressure (AP) was the immediate cause of death. In a study of cancer patients given partial-body irradiation, two acute lethalities were attributed to myocardial infarction after an acute hypotensive episode during the first few hours postexposure. Although radiation-induced cardiovascular dysfunction has been observed in many species, its severity, duration, and even etiology may vary with the species, level of exposure, and dose rate. For this reason, our consideration of the effects of radiation on cardiovascular performance is limited to the circulatory derangements that occur in rat, dog, and monkey after supralethal doses and lead to radiation-induced cardiovascular dysfunction in these experimental models. The authors consider other recent data as they pertain to the etiology of cardiovascular dysfunction in irradiated animals

  4. Anabolic steroids and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Peter; Chester, Neil; Green, Danny; Somauroo, John; Whyte, Greg; George, Keith

    2012-02-01

    Recent reports from needle exchange programmes and other public health initiatives have suggested growing use of anabolic steroids (AS) in the UK and other countries. Data indicate that AS use is not confined to body-builders or high-level sportsmen. Use has spread to professionals working in emergency services, casual fitness enthusiasts and subelite sportsmen and women. Although the precise health consequences of AS use is largely undefined, AS use represents a growing public health concern. Data regarding the consequences of AS use on cardiovascular health are limited to case studies and a modest number of small cohort studies. Numerous case studies have linked AS use with a variety of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events or endpoints, including myocardial infarction, stroke and death. Large-scale epidemiological studies to support these links are absent. Consequently, the impact of AS use upon known CVD risk factors has been studied in relatively small, case-series studies. Data relating AS use to elevated blood pressure, altered lipid profiles and ECG abnormalities have been reported, but are often limited in scope, and other studies have often produced equivocal outcomes. The use of AS has been linked to the appearance of concentric left ventricular hypertrophy as well as endothelial dysfunction but the data again remains controversial. The mechanisms responsible for the negative effect of AS on cardiovascular health are poorly understood, especially in humans. Possibilities include direct effects on myocytes and endothelial cells, reduced intracellular Ca2+ levels, increased release of apoptogenic factors, as well as increased collagen crosslinks between myocytes. New data relating AS use to cardiovascular health risks are emerging, as novel technologies are developed (especially in non-invasive imaging) that can assess physiological structure and function. Continued efforts to fully document the cardiovascular health consequences of AS use is important to

  5. Flood-Induced Surface Blooms Alter Deep Chlorophyll Maxima Community Structure in Lake Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, C.; Cuhel, R. L.; Seline, L.

    2008-12-01

    Watershed-wide floods can bring increased nutrients and phytoplankton to receiving waters. This input can alter physical, chemical and phytoplankton community structure in a major way. Phytoplankton species composition and size distribution are key factors in their use as ecological indicators. Since 2003, phytoplankton communities in Lake Michigan have shifted from diatom and big cell (>10μm)- dominated to small cell picocyanobacteria-dominated phytoplankton (Quagga Mussels, dampened seasonal cycling of silicate indicated a basin-wide reduction of diatom production, and unicellular Cyanobacteria became dominant in deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) zones. In the DCM, Synechococcus-like cells reached populations of at least 210,000 cells/ml. DCM chlorophyll (chl) remained similar (3-4μg/l) but late summer species composition changed dramatically to mostly 10μm fraction increased from previous years, and over 75% of the particulate Si was also in this size fraction. Because of the rapid sinking of diatoms during calm weather of late June-early July of 2008, particulate Si did not reach high values in surfaces waters (ca. 1.5μM) but remained at a consistently higher level than in 2007. Sinking of diatoms from the surface depleted chl in a progression from inshore to offshore during July 2008. In July surface chl was higher 40-70 km offshore than in the coastal zone. Surface phytoplankton waxed and waned in population density as if a wave or lens moved continuously further offshore, with sinking cells depleting the surface algae following behind the crest. In the wake, strong DCM populations with higher chl and particulate Si accumulated in the 30-45m zone at the bottom of the thermocline. However, in 2008 DCM zones, picocyanobacteria attained only 70,000 cells/mL, one-third of the same dates in 2007. The ratio of chlorophyll per Synechococcus cell in 2008 was about 5-fold higher than in 2007, corroborating microscopic observations of lowered picoplanktonic abundance

  6. Zearalenone altered the cytoskeletal structure via ER stress- autophagy- oxidative stress pathway in mouse TM4 Sertoli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wanglong; Wang, Bingjie; Si, Mengxue; Zou, Hui; Song, Ruilong; Gu, Jianhong; Yuan, Yan; Liu, Xuezhong; Zhu, Guoqiang; Bai, Jianfa; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, ZongPing

    2018-02-20

    The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the destruction of cytoskeletal structure by Zearalenone (ZEA) in mouse-derived TM4 cells. In order to investigate the role of autophagy, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum(ER) stress in the process of destruction of cytoskeletal structure, the effects of ZEA on the cell viability, cytoskeletal structure, autophagy, oxidative stress, ER stress, MAPK and PI3K- AKT- mTOR signaling pathways were studied. The data demonstrated that ZEA damaged the cytoskeletal structure through the induction of autophagy that leads to the alteration of cytoskeletal structure via elevated oxidative stress. Our results further showed that the autophagy was stimulated by ZEA through PI3K-AKT-mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways in TM4 cells. In addition, ZEA also induced the ER stress which was involved in the induction of the autophagy through inhibiting the ERK signal pathway to suppress the phosphorylation of mTOR. ER stress was involved in the damage of cytoskeletal structure through induction of autophagy by producing ROS. Taken together, this study revealed that ZEA altered the cytoskeletal structure via oxidative stress - autophagy- ER stress pathway in mouse TM4 Sertoli cells.

  7. Variabilidad de la frecuencia cardiaca y alteraciones del ritmo cardiaco asociados a la terapia con células progenitoras en enfermedad cardiovascular Heart rate variability and cardiac rhythm alterations associated with stem cell therapy in cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Orrego

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: en los pacientes con falla cardiaca y cardiopatía isquémica elegibles para la terapia de células progenitoras derivadas de la médula ósea, se ha demostrado la disminución de la variabilidad de la frecuencia cardiaca [medida por la desviación estándar del intervalo RR (NN SDNN, siglas en inglés], situación que se relaciona con un aumento del riesgo cardiovascular y de eventos arrítmicos, como consecuencia de una disfunción del sistema nervioso autónomo. Métodos: se analizaron los pacientes que recibieron trasplante autólogo derivado de la médula ósea y que tenían enfermedad cardiaca isquémica aguda o crónica con fracción de eyección menor del 45%, susceptibles o no de revascularización quirúrgica y zonas de tejido miocárdico necrótico y viable. Se les realizó monitoreo Holter de 24 horas pre-trasplante, a los dos, seis y doce meses posteriores a la intervención. Resultados: se analizaron los datos de 16 pacientes, en lo referente al promedio de la frecuencia cardiaca máxima, mínima y media, la variabilidad de la frecuencia cardiaca y la aparición de arritmias ventriculares malignas. La terapia con células progenitoras derivadas de la médula ósea, se asoció con una mejoría estadísticamente significativa en la variabilidad de la frecuencia cardiaca (SDNN pasando de 65,44 ± 27 ms a 102,12 ± 37,88 ms (p= 0,004 y 100,23 ± 42,88 ms (p= 0,013 a los dos y seis meses respectivamente. En cuanto a la clasificación de riesgo cardiovascular de acuerdo con la variabilidad de la frecuencia cardiaca (SDNN, todos los pacientes considerados de alto riesgo (SDNN Introduction: in patients with chronic heart failure and ischemic cardiopathy eligible for therapy with stem cells derived from bone marrow, it has been demonstrated that there is a decrease in Heart Rate Variability (HRV, measured by the standard deviation of RR interval (NN SDNN, situation related to an increase of cardiovascular risk and arrhythmic

  8. Evaluating the effects of sevelamer carbonate on cardiovascular structure and function in chronic renal impairment in Birmingham: the CRIB-PHOS randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steeds Richard P

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serum phosphate is an independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease and the general population. There is accumulating evidence that phosphate promotes arterial stiffening through structural vascular alterations such as medial calcification, which are already apparent in the early stages of chronic kidney disease. Aim To determine the effects of phosphate binding with sevelamer carbonate on left ventricular mass and function together with arterial stiffness in patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease. Methods/Design A single-centre, prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 120 subjects with stage 3 chronic kidney disease recruited from University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust. Baseline investigations include transthoracic echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to assess ventricular mass, volumes and function, applanation tonometry to determine pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis as surrogate measures of arterial stiffness and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning to determine bone density. During an open-label run in phase, subjects will receive 1600 mg sevelamer carbonate with meals for four weeks. They will then be randomised to either continue sevelamer carbonate or receive an identical placebo (60 subjects per arm for the remaining 36 weeks. Four-weekly monitoring of serum electrolytes and bone biochemistry will be performed. All baseline investigations will be repeated at the end of the treatment period. The primary endpoint of the study is a reduction in left ventricular mass after 40 weeks of treatment. Secondary endpoints are: i change in aortic compliance; ii change in arterial stiffness; iii change in arterial elastance; iv change in left ventricular systolic and diastolic elastance; v change in left ventricular function; and vi change in bone density. Trial Registration This trial is

  9. Leukocyte Subtype Counts and Its Association with Vascular Structure and Function in Adults with Intermediate Cardiovascular Risk. MARK Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Sanchez, Leticia; García-Ortiz, Luis; Recio-Rodríguez, José I.; Patino-Alonso, Maria C.; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Rigo, Fernando; Ramos, Rafel; Martí, Ruth; Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the relationship between leukocyte subtype counts and vascular structure and function based on carotid intima-media thickness, pulse wave velocity, central augmentation index and cardio-ankle vascular index by gender in intermediate cardiovascular risk patients. Methods This study analyzed 500 subjects who were included in the MARK study, aged 35 to 74 years (mean: 60.3±8.4), 45.6% women. Measurement: Brachial ankle Pulse Wave Velocity (ba-PWV) estimate by equation, Cardio-AnkleVascular Index (CAVI) using the VaSera device and Carotid ultrasound was used to measure carotid Intima Media Thickness (IMT). The Mobil-O-Graph was used to measure the Central Augmentation Index (CAIx). Results Total leukocyte, neutrophil and monocyte counts were positively correlated with IMT (p leukocyte counts and vascular structure and function, although small, may be different by gender. In men, the neutrophil count was positively correlated with IMT and in women, the monocyte count with CAIx, in a large sample of intermediate-risk patients. These association were maintained after adjusting for age and other confounders. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01428934 PMID:25885665

  10. Excitatory amino acid receptor blockade within the caudal pressor area and rostral ventrolateral medulla alters cardiovascular responses to nucleus raphe obscurus stimulation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva N.F.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressor responses elicited by stimulation of the nucleus raphe obscurus (NRO depend on the integrity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM. Therefore, to test the participation of excitatory amino acid (EAA receptors in the cardiovascular responses evoked by NRO stimulation (1 ms, 100 Hz, 40-70 µA, for 10 s, the EAA antagonist kynurenic acid (Kyn was microinjected at different sites in the ventrolateral medullar surface (2.7 nmol/200 nl of male Wistar rats (270-320 g, N = 39 and NRO stimulation was repeated. The effects of NRO stimulation were: hypertension (deltaMAP = +43 ± 1 mmHg, P<0.01, bradycardia (deltaHR = -30 ± 7 bpm, P<0.01 and apnea. Bilateral microinjection of Kyn into the RVLM, which did not change baseline parameters, almost abolished the bradycardia induced by NRO stimulation (deltaHR = -61 ± 3 before vs -2 ± 3 bpm after Kyn, P<0.01, N = 7. Unilateral microinjection of Kyn into the CVLM did not change baseline parameters or reduce the pressor response to NRO stimulation (deltaMAP = +46 ± 5 before vs +48 ± 5 mmHg after Kyn, N = 6. Kyn bilaterally microinjected into the caudal pressor area reduced blood pressure and heart rate and almost abolished the pressor response to NRO stimulation (deltaMAP = +46 ± 4 mmHg before vs +4 ± 2 mmHg after Kyn, P<0.01, N = 7. These results indicate that EAA receptors on the medullary ventrolateral surface play a role in the modulation of the cardiovascular responses induced by NRO stimulation, and also suggest that the RVLM participates in the modulation of heart rate responses and that the caudal pressor area modulates the pressor response following NRO stimulation.

  11. Antioxidants from diet or supplements do not alter inflammatory markers in adults with cardiovascular disease risk. A pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewell, Antonella; Tsao, Philip; Rigdon, Joseph; Gardner, Christopher D

    2018-02-01

    Antioxidants have been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects, but there is a lack of research comparing food to supplement antioxidant sources. The aim of this study was to determine if increases in intake of foods naturally rich in antioxidants would lower blood levels of inflammatory markers more than consuming antioxidant supplements among adults with cardiovascular disease risk factors. Eighty-eight generally healthy adults with ≥1 elevated risk factor for cardiovascular disease were randomized in a single-blind (diets)/double-blind (supplements), parallel-group study for 8 weeks. Participants consumed (1) usual diet and placebo pills (n = 29), (2) usual diet and antioxidant supplements (n = 29), or (3) antioxidant-rich foods closely matched to antioxidant content of supplements and placebo (n = 30). Usual diet combined with antioxidant supplements or increased antioxidant-rich food intake was designed to approximately double daily habitual antioxidant intake. Antioxidant pills included carotenoids, mixed tocopherols, vitamin C, and selenium. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for inflammatory marker concentrations of interleukin-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Participants in the intervention groups successfully doubled most antioxidants as verified by diet records and elevated blood concentrations in treatment groups. Baseline levels of inflammatory markers for the entire study group were 110 ± 65 pg/mL for monocyte chemotactic protein-1, 0.9 ± 0.7 pg/mL for interleukin-6, and 217 ± 56 ng/mL for soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (means ± standard deviation) and did not differ by treatment arm. After 8 weeks, there were no significant within-group changes or between-group 8-week change differences in inflammatory marker concentrations. In conclusion, no beneficial effects were detected on the inflammatory markers investigated in response to antioxidants from foods or supplements. Copyright

  12. Altered Primary Motor Cortex Structure, Organization, and Function in Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Ju; O'Connell, Neil E; Beckenkamp, Paula R; Alhassani, Ghufran; Liston, Matthew B; Schabrun, Siobhan M

    2018-04-01

    Chronic pain can be associated with movement abnormalities. The primary motor cortex (M1) has an essential role in the formulation and execution of movement. A number of changes in M1 function have been reported in studies of people with chronic pain. This review systematically evaluated the evidence for altered M1 structure, organization, and function in people with chronic pain of neuropathic and non-neuropathic origin. Database searches were conducted and a modified STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology checklist was used to assess the methodological quality of included studies. Meta-analyses, including preplanned subgroup analyses on the basis of condition were performed where possible. Sixty-seven studies (2,290 participants) using various neurophysiological measures were included. There is conflicting evidence of altered M1 structure, organization, and function for neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain conditions. Meta-analyses provided evidence of increased M1 long-interval intracortical inhibition in chronic pain populations. For most measures, the evidence of M1 changes in chronic pain populations is inconclusive. This review synthesizes the evidence of altered M1 structure, organization, and function in chronic pain populations. For most measures, M1 changes are inconsistent between studies and more research with larger samples and rigorous methodology is required to elucidate M1 changes in chronic pain populations. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fetal Programming and Cardiovascular Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Barbara T.; Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira

    2016-01-01

    Low birth weight serves as a crude proxy for impaired growth during fetal life and indicates a failure for the fetus to achieve its full growth potential. Low birth weight can occur in response to numerous etiologies that include complications during pregnancy, poor prenatal care, parental smoking, maternal alcohol consumption or stress. Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrate that birth weight is inversely associated with blood pressure and coronary heart disease. Sex and age impact the developmental programming of hypertension. In addition, impaired growth during fetal life also programs enhanced vulnerability to a secondary insult. Macrosomia, which occurs in response to maternal obesity, diabetes and excessive weight gain during gestation, is also associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Yet, the exact mechanisms that permanently change the structure, physiology and endocrine health of an individual across their lifespan following altered growth during fetal life are not entirely clear. Transmission of increased risk from one generation to the next in the absence of an additional prenatal insult indicates an important role for epigenetic processes. Experimental studies also indicate that the sympathetic nervous system, the renin angiotensin system, increased production of oxidative stress and increased endothelin play an important role in the developmental programming of blood pressure in later life. Thus, this review will highlight how adverse influences during fetal life and early development program an increased risk for cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure and provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the fetal origins of cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25880521

  14. Fetal programming and cardiovascular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Barbara T; Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira

    2015-04-01

    Low birth weight serves as a crude proxy for impaired growth during fetal life and indicates a failure for the fetus to achieve its full growth potential. Low birth weight can occur in response to numerous etiologies that include complications during pregnancy, poor prenatal care, parental smoking, maternal alcohol consumption, or stress. Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrate that birth weight is inversely associated with blood pressure and coronary heart disease. Sex and age impact the developmental programming of hypertension. In addition, impaired growth during fetal life also programs enhanced vulnerability to a secondary insult. Macrosomia, which occurs in response to maternal obesity, diabetes, and excessive weight gain during gestation, is also associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Yet, the exact mechanisms that permanently change the structure, physiology, and endocrine health of an individual across their lifespan following altered growth during fetal life are not entirely clear. Transmission of increased risk from one generation to the next in the absence of an additional prenatal insult indicates an important role for epigenetic processes. Experimental studies also indicate that the sympathetic nervous system, the renin angiotensin system, increased production of oxidative stress, and increased endothelin play an important role in the developmental programming of blood pressure in later life. Thus, this review will highlight how adverse influences during fetal life and early development program an increased risk for cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure and provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the fetal origins of cardiovascular pathology. © 2015 American Physiological Society.

  15. Crystal structure of cathepsin A, a novel target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreuder, Herman A., E-mail: herman.schreuder@sanofi.com; Liesum, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.liesum@sanofi.com; Kroll, Katja, E-mail: katja.kroll@sanofi.com; Böhnisch, Britta, E-mail: britta.boehnisch@sanofi.com; Buning, Christian, E-mail: christian.buning@sanofi.com; Ruf, Sven, E-mail: sven.ruf@sanofi.com; Sadowski, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.sadowski@sanofi.com

    2014-03-07

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The structures of active cathepsin A and the inactive precursor are very similar. • The only major difference is the absence of a 40 residue activation domain. • The termini of the active catalytic core are held together by a disulfide bond. • Compound 1 reacts with the catalytic Ser150, building a tetrahedral intermediate. • Compound 2 is cleaved by the enzyme and a fragment remained bound. - Abstract: The lysosomal serine carboxypeptidase cathepsin A is involved in the breakdown of peptide hormones like endothelin and bradykinin. Recent pharmacological studies with cathepsin A inhibitors in rodents showed a remarkable reduction in cardiac hypertrophy and atrial fibrillation, making cathepsin A a promising target for the treatment of heart failure. Here we describe the crystal structures of activated cathepsin A without inhibitor and with two compounds that mimic the tetrahedral intermediate and the reaction product, respectively. The structure of activated cathepsin A turned out to be very similar to the structure of the inactive precursor. The only difference was the removal of a 40 residue activation domain, partially due to proteolytic removal of the activation peptide, and partially by an order–disorder transition of the peptides flanking the removed activation peptide. The termini of the catalytic core are held together by the Cys253–Cys303 disulfide bond, just before and after the activation domain. One of the compounds we soaked in our crystals reacted covalently with the catalytic Ser150 and formed a tetrahedral intermediate. The other compound got cleaved by the enzyme and a fragment, resembling one of the natural reaction products, was found in the active site. These studies establish cathepsin A as a classical serine proteinase with a well-defined oxyanion hole. The carboxylate group of the cleavage product is bound by a hydrogen-bonding network involving one aspartate and two glutamate side chains

  16. Exercise and cardiovascular outcomes in hypertensive patients in relation to structure and function of left ventricular hypertrophy: the LIFE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boman, Kurt; Gerdts, Eva; Wachtell, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    (P = 0.016); and larger left atrium (P = 0.006). Systolic variables did not differ. In Cox regression analysis, physically active compared with sedentary patients had lower risk of primary composite endpoint [odds ratio (OR): 0.42, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.26-0.68, P cardiovascular......BACKGROUND: Exercise lowers blood pressure and improves cardiovascular function, but little is known about whether exercise impacts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality independent of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and LV geometry. DESIGN: Observational analysis of prospectively obtained...... (never exercise), intermediate (30 min twice/week). During 4.8-year follow-up, 105 patients suffered the primary composite endpoint of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, or cardiovascular death. MI occurred in 39, stroke in 60, and cardiovascular death in 33 patients. RESULTS: Sedentary individuals (n...

  17. Structural Alterations of the Glomerular Wall And Vessels in Early Stages of Diabetes Mellitus: Light and Transmission Electron Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dkhil MA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The capillary changes at the initial stage of diabetes may show an angioarchitecture clearly different from those of later stages and,/or very severe glomerular change. However, the onset of alterations in the early phases is unclear. This study attempts to determine the functional and structural alterations of the glomerular wall and vesicles in the early stage of diabetes.Material and Methods: Twenty-five adult rats were used in this study. They were divided into two groups: the first group of five was used as a control .The second group of 20 (the experimental group was injected intraperitoneally by a single dose of streptozotocin to induce hyperglycemia. Rats were sacrificed after ten days, two months, and four months.Five rats at two months of age with hyperglycemia were treated with insulin for eight weeks. Renal tissues were prepared by routine technique for light and transmission electron microscopic evaluation. Results: By light microscopy after ten days of induced hyperglycemia, there were no structural modifications detected either in renal glomerular fine vessels or in the glomerular basement membrane of the glomerular capillaries. After two months, there was a moderate glomerular enlargement and dilatation of glomerular capillaries, afferent, and efferent arterioles. After four months, glomerular basement membrane thickening was the only structural alteration observed. Recovery of the glomerular alterations was observed after two months of treatment with insulin. Conclusion: In early stages of diabetes mellitus in rats, there was an increase in the diameter of glomerular vessels. In later stages of the disease, the reverse was seen, but insulin treatment had a positive role in reversing these changes in the study subjects.

  18. Alterations in upper limb muscle synergy structure in chronic stroke survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymer, William Z.; Perreault, Eric J.; Yoo, Seng Bum; Beer, Randall F.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies in neurologically intact subjects have shown that motor coordination can be described by task-dependent combinations of a few muscle synergies, defined here as a fixed pattern of activation across a set of muscles. Arm function in severely impaired stroke survivors is characterized by stereotypical postural and movement patterns involving the shoulder and elbow. Accordingly, we hypothesized that muscle synergy composition is altered in severely impaired stroke survivors. Using an isometric force matching protocol, we examined the spatial activation patterns of elbow and shoulder muscles in the affected arm of 10 stroke survivors (Fugl-Meyer synergies were identified using non-negative matrix factorization. In both groups, muscle activation patterns could be reconstructed by combinations of a few muscle synergies (typically 4). We did not find abnormal coupling of shoulder and elbow muscles within individual muscle synergies. In stroke survivors, as in controls, two of the synergies were comprised of isolated activation of the elbow flexors and extensors. However, muscle synergies involving proximal muscles exhibited consistent alterations following stroke. Unlike controls, the anterior deltoid was coactivated with medial and posterior deltoids within the shoulder abductor/extensor synergy and the shoulder adductor/flexor synergy in stroke was dominated by activation of pectoralis major, with limited anterior deltoid activation. Recruitment of the altered shoulder muscle synergies was strongly associated with abnormal task performance. Overall, our results suggest that an impaired control of the individual deltoid heads may contribute to poststroke deficits in arm function. PMID:23155178

  19. Altering the trajectory of early postnatal cortical development can lead to structural and behavioural features of autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chomiak Taylor

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism is a behaviourally defined neurodevelopmental disorder with unknown etiology. Recent studies in autistic children consistently point to neuropathological and functional abnormalities in the temporal association cortex (TeA and its associated structures. It has been proposed that the trajectory of postnatal development in these regions may undergo accelerated maturational alterations that predominantly affect sensory recognition and social interaction. Indeed, the temporal association regions that are important for sensory recognition and social interaction are one of the last regions to mature suggesting a potential vulnerability to early maturation. However, direct evaluation of the emerging hypothesis that an altered time course of early postnatal development can lead to an ASD phenotype remains lacking. Results We used electrophysiological, histological, and behavioural techniques to investigate if the known neuronal maturational promoter valproate, similar to that in culture systems, can influence the normal developmental trajectory of TeA in vivo. Brain sections obtained from postnatal rat pups treated with VPA in vivo revealed that almost 40% of cortical cells in TeA prematurely exhibited adult-like intrinsic electrophysiological properties and that this was often associated with gross cortical hypertrophy and a reduced predisposition for social play behaviour. Conclusions The co-manifestation of these functional, structural and behavioural features suggests that alteration of the developmental time course in certain high-order cortical networks may play an important role in the neurophysiological basis of autism.

  20. The influence of stress on neuroinflammation and alterations in brain structure and function in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Ku; Won, Eunsoo

    2017-06-30

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a condition which has often been associated with chronic stress. The sympathetic nervous system is continuously activated without the normal counteraction of the parasympathetic nervous system under the influence of chronic stress. As a result, epinephrine and norepinephrine levels are increased, and acetylcholine levels are decreased, which in turn can increase the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Peripheral inflammatory responses can access the brain, with neuroinflammation contributing to the increase in neurotoxic kynurenine pathway metabolites such as 3-hydroxykynurenine, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid and quinolinic acid, and decrease in neuroprotective metabolites such as kynurenic acid. Pro-inflammatory cytokines can also exert direct neurotoxic effects on specific brain regions. Previous imaging studies have reported associations between pro-inflammatory states and alterations in brain regions involved in emotional regulation, including the hippocampus, amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex. Alterations in structure and function of such brain areas due to the neurotoxic effects of increased inflammation may be associated with the pathophysiology of depression. This review focuses the influence of stress on neuroinflammation which may cause alterations in brain structure and function in MDD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Alterations in brain structures related to taste reward circuitry in ill and recovered anorexia nervosa and in bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Guido K; Shott, Megan E; Hagman, Jennifer O; Mittal, Vijay A

    2013-10-01

    The pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa remains obscure, but structural brain alterations could be functionally important biomarkers. The authors assessed taste pleasantness and reward sensitivity in relation to brain structure, which may be related to food avoidance commonly seen in eating disorders. The authors used structural MR imaging to study gray and white matter volumes in women with current restricting-type anorexia nervosa (N=19), women recovered from restricting-type anorexia nervosa (N=24), women with bulimia nervosa (N=19), and healthy comparison women (N=24). All eating disorder groups exhibited increased gray matter volume of the medial orbitofrontal cortex (gyrus rectus). Manual tracing confirmed larger gyrus rectus volume, and volume predicted taste pleasantness ratings across all groups. Analyses also indicated other morphological differences between diagnostic categories. Antero-ventral insula gray matter volumes were increased on the right side in the anorexia nervosa and recovered anorexia nervosa groups and on the left side in the bulimia nervosa group relative to the healthy comparison group. Dorsal striatum volumes were reduced in the recovered anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa groups and predicted sensitivity to reward in all three eating disorder groups. The eating disorder groups also showed reduced white matter in right temporal and parietal areas relative to the healthy comparison group. The results held when a range of covariates, such as age, depression, anxiety, and medications, were controlled for. Brain structure in the medial orbitofrontal cortex, insula, and striatum is altered in eating disorders and suggests altered brain circuitry that has been associated with taste pleasantness and reward value.

  2. Cocoa Consumption Alters the Global DNA Methylation of Peripheral Leukocytes in Humans with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Crescenti

    Full Text Available DNA methylation regulates gene expression and can be modified by different bioactive compounds in foods, such as polyphenols. Cocoa is a rich source of polyphenols, but its role in DNA methylation is still unknown. The objective was to assess the effect of cocoa consumption on DNA methylation and to determine whether the enzymes involved in the DNA methylation process participate in the mechanisms by which cocoa exerts these effects in humans. The global DNA methylation levels in the peripheral blood were evaluated in 214 volunteers who were pre-hypertensive, stage-1 hypertensive or hypercholesterolemic. The volunteers were divided into two groups: 110 subjects who consumed cocoa (6 g/d for two weeks and 104 control subjects. In addition, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from six subjects were treated with a cocoa extract to analyze the mRNA levels of the DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR, and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR genes. Cocoa consumption significantly reduced the DNA methylation levels (2.991±0.366 vs. 3.909±0.380, p<0.001. Additionally, we found an association between the cocoa effects on DNA methylation and three polymorphisms located in the MTHFR, MTRR, and DNMT3B genes. Furthermore, in PBMCs, the cocoa extract significantly lowered the mRNA levels of the DNMTs, MTHFR, and MTRR. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the consumption of cocoa decreases the global DNA methylation of peripheral leukocytes in humans with cardiovascular risk factors. In vitro experiments with PBMCs suggest that cocoa may exert this effect partially via the down-regulation of DNMTs, MTHFR and MTRR, which are key genes involved in this epigenetic process.Clinicaltrials.govNCT00511420 and NCT00502047.

  3. Is pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in celiac disease related to structural alterations in pancreatic parenchyma?

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Surinder S.; Dambalkar, Arvind; Chhabra, Puneet; Sharma, Ravi; Nada, Ritambhra; Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Satyavati; Bhasin, Deepak K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) has been reported in a number of patients with celiac disease (CD), it is not clear if this is primarily a functional or a structural defect. We studied pancreatic structural abnormalities by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in adult CD patients with EPI. Methods Pancreatic exocrine function was prospectively assessed in 36 recently diagnosed CD patients (mean age: 29.8 years) by measuring fecal elastase. Pancreatic structural changes wer...

  4. Mineralogical and structural transformations related to alterations in hydrothermal and climatological conditions of basic vulcanic rocks from northern Parana (Ribeirao Preto region, SP, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, N.M.M.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed studies of the basic vulcanic rocks of northern Parana basin (Region of Ribeirao Preto, SP) reveled that these rocks were affected by pre-meteoric activity (hydrothermal alteration) before being exposed to the supergene system of alteration linked to the lithosphere/atmosphere interface. Mineralogical and structural transformation are studied. The appearance of sequential crystalline-chemical paragenesis in zones suggest that the hydrothermal activity occurred during two successives processes of alteration: the expulsion of the water from the rock during the later stages of magma cooling and the continous process of dissolution of the rock wall and the ionic diffusion involving the rock sistem of structural voids. The hydro-thermal action was followed by weathering action developing a thin 'front' of superficial alteration. This alteration system, can lead to the formation of three major levels of alteration horizons and superficial accumulations: alterites, glebular and suil surface materials. (C.D.G.) [pt

  5. Global analysis of somatic structural genomic alterations and their impact on gene expression in diverse human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Bhadury, Joydeep; Karlsson, Joakim W; Nilsson, Jonas A; Larsson, Erik

    2016-11-29

    Tumor genomes are mosaics of somatic structural variants (SVs) that may contribute to the activation of oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressors, for example, by altering gene copy number amplitude. However, there are multiple other ways in which SVs can modulate transcription, but the general impact of such events on tumor transcriptional output has not been systematically determined. Here we use whole-genome sequencing data to map SVs across 600 tumors and 18 cancers, and investigate the relationship between SVs, copy number alterations (CNAs), and mRNA expression. We find that 34% of CNA breakpoints can be clarified structurally and that most amplifications are due to tandem duplications. We observe frequent swapping of strong and weak promoters in the context of gene fusions, and find that this has a measurable global impact on mRNA levels. Interestingly, several long noncoding RNAs were strongly activated by this mechanism. Additionally, SVs were confirmed in telomere reverse transcriptase (TERT) upstream regions in several cancers, associated with elevated TERT mRNA levels. We also highlight high-confidence gene fusions supported by both genomic and transcriptomic evidence, including a previously undescribed paired box 8 (PAX8)-nuclear factor, erythroid 2 like 2 (NFE2L2) fusion in thyroid carcinoma. In summary, we combine SV, CNA, and expression data to provide insights into the structural basis of CNAs as well as the impact of SVs on gene expression in tumors.

  6. Altered Protein Expression of Cardiac CYP2J and Hepatic CYP2C, CYP4A, and CYP4F in a Mouse Model of Type II Diabetes—A Link in the Onset and Development of Cardiovascular Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Drolet

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Arachidonic acid can be metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP450 enzymes in a tissue- and cell-specific manner to generate vasoactive products such as epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs-cardioprotective and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs-cardiotoxic. Type II diabetes is a well-recognized risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease. A mouse model of Type II diabetes (C57BLKS/J-db/db was used. After sacrifice, livers and hearts were collected, washed, and snap frozen. Total proteins were extracted. Western blots were performed to assess cardiac CYP2J and hepatic CYP2C, CYP4A, and CYP4F protein expression, respectively. Significant decreases in relative protein expression of cardiac CYP2J and hepatic CYP2C were observed in Type II diabetes animals compared to controls (CYP2J: 0.80 ± 0.03 vs. 1.05 ± 0.06, n = 20, p < 0.001; (CYP2C: 1.56 ± 0.17 vs. 2.21 ± 0.19, n = 19, p < 0.01. In contrast, significant increases in relative protein expression of both hepatic CYP4A and CYP4F were noted in Type II diabetes mice compared to controls (CYP4A: 1.06 ± 0.09 vs. 0.18 ± 0.01, n = 19, p < 0.001; (CYP4F: 2.53 ± 0.22 vs. 1.10 ± 0.07, n = 19, p < 0.001. These alterations induced by Type II diabetes in the endogenous pathway (CYP450 of arachidonic acid metabolism may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease by disrupting the fine equilibrium between cardioprotective (CYP2J/CYP2C-generated and cardiotoxic (CYP4A/CYP4F-generated metabolites of arachidonic acid.

  7. Rainfall and hydrological stability alter the impact of top predators on food web structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Nicholas A C; Srivastava, Diane S; MacDonald, A Andrew M; Leal, Juliana S; Campos, Alice B A; Farjalla, Vinicius F

    2017-02-01

    Climate change will alter the distribution of rainfall, with potential consequences for the hydrological dynamics of aquatic habitats. Hydrological stability can be an important determinant of diversity in temporary aquatic habitats, affecting species persistence and the importance of predation on community dynamics. As such, prey are not only affected by drought-induced mortality but also the risk of predation [a non-consumptive effect (NCE)] and actual consumption by predators [a consumptive effect (CE)]. Climate-induced changes in rainfall may directly, or via altered hydrological stability, affect predator-prey interactions and their cascading effects on the food web, but this has rarely been explored, especially in natural food webs. To address this question, we performed a field experiment using tank bromeliads and their aquatic food web, composed of predatory damselfly larvae, macroinvertebrate prey and bacteria. We manipulated the presence and consumption ability of damselfly larvae under three rainfall scenarios (ambient, few large rainfall events and several small rainfall events), recorded the hydrological dynamics within bromeliads and examined the effects on macroinvertebrate colonization, nutrient cycling and bacterial biomass and turnover. Despite our large perturbations of rainfall, rainfall scenario had no effect on the hydrological dynamics of bromeliads. As a result, macroinvertebrate colonization and nutrient cycling depended on the hydrological stability of bromeliads, with no direct effect of rainfall or predation. In contrast, rainfall scenario determined the direction of the indirect effects of predators on bacteria, driven by both predator CEs and NCEs. These results suggest that rainfall and the hydrological stability of bromeliads had indirect effects on the food web through changes in the CEs and NCEs of predators. We suggest that future studies should consider the importance of the variability in hydrological dynamics among habitats as

  8. Structural and biochemical alterations of human diabetic dermis studied by 3H-lysine incorporation and microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moczar, M.; Allard, R.; Ouzilou, J.; Robert, L.; Pieraggi, M.-T.; Bouissou, H.; Julian, M.

    1976-01-01

    The alteration of the structural organization of dermal connective tissue was studied by light and electron microscopy and by biochemical techniques in normal human and in diabetic patients using skin biopsies. Part of the tissue was used for light and electron microscopy, the rest was incubated in the presence of 3 H-lysine for four hours. The 3 H-lysine labelled biopsies were submitted to a sequential extraction procedure in order to obtain representative macromolecular fractions containing the matrix macromolecules. The extracts were analyzed for their chemical composition and radioactivity. Electron microscopy revealed microstructural modifications of the fibroblasts, of the collagen and elastic fibers in the diabetic dermis. The incorporation pattern of 3 H-lysine into the macromolecular fractions was different in the normal and diabetic skin biopsies. The percentage of total radioactivity incorporated increased significantly in the 1M CaCl 2 extractable fraction and in the 6M urea extractable fraction and decreased significantly in the collagenase and elastase extracts in diabetic skin biopsy. These results demonstrate the existence of morphological and biochemical alterations in diabetic connective tissue (dermis) reflecting alterations in the relative rates of synthesis and/or degradation of the intercellular matrix macromolecules as well as of their microarchitectural arrangement

  9. Is meditation associated with altered brain structure? A systematic review and meta-analysis of morphometric neuroimaging in meditation practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Kieran C R; Nijeboer, Savannah; Dixon, Matthew L; Floman, James L; Ellamil, Melissa; Rumak, Samuel P; Sedlmeier, Peter; Christoff, Kalina

    2014-06-01

    Numerous studies have begun to address how the brain's gray and white matter may be shaped by meditation. This research is yet to be integrated, however, and two fundamental questions remain: Is meditation associated with altered brain structure? If so, what is the magnitude of these differences? To address these questions, we reviewed and meta-analyzed 123 brain morphology differences from 21 neuroimaging studies examining ∼300 meditation practitioners. Anatomical likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis found eight brain regions consistently altered in meditators, including areas key to meta-awareness (frontopolar cortex/BA 10), exteroceptive and interoceptive body awareness (sensory cortices and insula), memory consolidation and reconsolidation (hippocampus), self and emotion regulation (anterior and mid cingulate; orbitofrontal cortex), and intra- and interhemispheric communication (superior longitudinal fasciculus; corpus callosum). Effect size meta-analysis (calculating 132 effect sizes from 16 studies) suggests a global 'medium' effect size (Cohen's d¯=0.46; r¯=.19). Publication bias and methodological limitations are strong concerns, however. Further research using rigorous methods is required to definitively link meditation practice to altered brain morphology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Factor Structure of Indices of the Second Derivative of the Finger Photoplethysmogram with Metabolic Components and Other Cardiovascular Risk Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Kawada

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe second derivative of the finger photoplethysmogram (SDPTG is an indicator of arterial stiffness. The present study was conducted to clarify the factor structure of indices of the SDPTG in combination with components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS, to elucidate the significance of the SDPTG among various cardiovascular risk factors.MethodsThe SDPTG was determined in the second forefinger of the left hand in 1,055 male workers (mean age, 44.2±6.4 years. Among 4 waves of SDPTG components, the ratios of the height of the "a" wave to that of the "b" and "d" waves were expressed as b/a and d/a, and used as SDPTG indices for the analysis.ResultsPrincipal axis factoring analysis was conducted using age, SDPTG indices, components of MetS, and the serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP and uric acid. Three factors were extracted, and the SDPTG indices were categorized in combination with age as the third factor. Metabolic components and the SDPTG indices were independently categorized. These three factors explained 44.4% of the total variation. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed age, d/a, serum uric acid, serum CRP, and regular exercise as independent determinants of the risk of MetS. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals were 1.08 (1.04 to 1.11, 0.10 (0.01 to 0.73, 1.24 (1.06 to 1.44, 3.59 (2.37 to 5.42, and 0.48 (0.28 to 0.82, respectively.ConclusionThe SDPTG indices were categorized in combination with age, and they differed in characteristics from components of MetS or inflammatory markers. In addition, this cross-sectional study also revealed decrease of the d/a as a risk factor for the development of MetS.

  11. Altered time structure of neuro-endocrine-immune system function in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carughi Stefano

    2010-06-01

    TcS1 was decreased in cancer patients. The melatonin/cortisol mean nocturnal level ratio was decreased in cancer patients. Conclusion The altered secretion and loss of circadian rhythmicity of many studied factors observed in the subjects suffering from neoplastic disease may be expression of gradual alteration of the integrated function of the neuro-immune-endocrine system

  12. Intracranial structural alteration predicts treatment outcome in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hanna; Lee, Mi Ji; Choi, Hyun Ah; Cha, Jihoon; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2018-02-01

    Background Intracranial structural dislocation in spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) can be measured by various intracranial angles and distances. We aimed to identify the clinical significance of structural dislocation in relation to treatment outcome in patients with SIH. Methods In this retrospective analysis, we identified patients with SIH who received an epidural blood patch (EBP) at Samsung Medical Center from January 2005 to March 2015. Structural dislocation in pretreatment MRIs of SIH patients was assessed by measuring tonsillar herniation, mamillopontine distance, the angle between the vein of Galen and straight sinus (vG/SS angle), the pontomesencephalic angle, and the lateral ventricular angle. After the first EBP, poor response was defined as the persistence of symptoms that prompted a repeat EBP. Results Out of the 95 patients included, 31 (32.6%) showed poor response. Among the radiological markers of structural dislocation, the vG/SS angle was associated with poor response (49.82 ± 16.40° vs 66.58 ± 26.08°, p = 0.002). Among clinical variables, premorbid migraine ( p = 0.036) was related to poor response. In multivariate analysis, reduced vG/SS angle was independently associated with poor response (OR 1.04 [95% CI 1.01 - 1.07] per 1° decrease, p = 0.006). In 23 patients who underwent MRI after successful treatment, the vG/SS angle significantly increased after the EBP ( p < 0.001, by paired t-test), while two patients with aggravation or recurrence showed a further reduction of their vG/SS angles. Conclusions Intracranial structural dislocation, measured by the vG/SS angle, is associated with poor response to the first EBP in patients with SIH. Successful treatment can reverse the structural dislocation.

  13. Altered structural connectivity of cortico-striato-pallido-thalamic networks in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worbe, Yulia; Marrakchi-Kacem, Linda; Lecomte, Sophie; Valabregue, Romain; Poupon, Fabrice; Guevara, Pamela; Tucholka, Alan; Mangin, Jean-François; Vidailhet, Marie; Lehericy, Stephane; Hartmann, Andreas; Poupon, Cyril

    2015-02-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a childhood-onset syndrome characterized by the presence and persistence of motor and vocal tics. A dysfunction of cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical networks in this syndrome has been supported by convergent data from neuro-pathological, electrophysiological as well as structural and functional neuroimaging studies. Here, we addressed the question of structural integration of cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical networks in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. We specifically tested the hypothesis that deviant brain development in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome could affect structural connectivity within the input and output basal ganglia structures and thalamus. To this aim, we acquired data on 49 adult patients and 28 gender and age-matched control subjects on a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We used and further implemented streamline probabilistic tractography algorithms that allowed us to quantify the structural integration of cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical networks. To further investigate the microstructure of white matter in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, we also evaluated fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity in these pathways, which are both sensitive to axonal package and to myelin ensheathment. In patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome compared to control subjects, we found white matter abnormalities in neuronal pathways connecting the cerebral cortex, the basal ganglia and the thalamus. Specifically, striatum and thalamus had abnormally enhanced structural connectivity with primary motor and sensory cortices, as well as paracentral lobule, supplementary motor area and parietal cortices. This enhanced connectivity of motor cortex positively correlated with severity of tics measured by the Yale Global Tics Severity Scale and was not influenced by current medication status, age or gender of patients. Independently of the severity of tics, lateral and medial orbito

  14. Regional vulnerability of longitudinal cortical association connectivity: Associated with structural network topology alterations in preterm children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceschin, Rafael; Lee, Vince K; Schmithorst, Vince; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    alteration in eigenvector centrality, clustering coefficient (inter-regional) and participation co-efficient (inter-modular) alterations of frontal-striatal and fronto-limbic nodes suggesting re-organization of these pathways. Both along tract and structural topology network measurements correlated strongly with motor and visual clinical outcome scores. This study shows the value of combining along-tract analysis and structural network topology in depicting not only selective parietal occipital regional vulnerability but also reorganization of frontal-striatal and frontal-limbic pathways in preterm children with cerebral palsy. These finding also support the concept that widespread, but selective posterior-anterior neural network connectivity alterations in preterm children with cerebral palsy likely contribute to the pathogenesis of neurosensory and cognitive impairment in this group.

  15. Cardiovascular Deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.; Fritsch-Yelle, Janice M.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Wood, Margie L.; Brown, Troy E.; Fortner, G. William

    1999-01-01

    Spaceflight causes adaptive changes in cardiovascular function that may deleteriously affect crew health and safety. Over the last three decades, symptoms of cardiovascular changes have ranged from postflight orthostatic tachycardia and decreased exercise capacity to serious cardiac rhythm disturbances during extravehicular activities (EVA). The most documented symptom of cardiovascular dysfunction, postflight orthostatic intolerance, has affected a significant percentage of U.S. Space Shuttle astronauts. Problems of cardiovascular dysfunction associated with spaceflight are a concern to NASA. This has been particularly true during Shuttle flights where the primary concern is the crew's physical health, including the pilot's ability to land the Orbiter, and the crew's ability to quickly egress and move to safety should a dangerous condition arise. The study of astronauts during Shuttle activities is inherently more difficult than most human research. Consequently, sample sizes have been small and results have lacked consistency. Before the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP), there was a lack of normative data on changes in cardiovascular parameters during and after spaceflight. The EDOMP for the first time allowed studies on a large enough number of subjects to overcome some of these problems. There were three primary goals of the Cardiovascular EDOMP studies. The first was to establish, through descriptive studies, a normative data base of cardiovascular changes attributable to spaceflight. The second goal was to determine mechanisms of cardiovascular changes resulting from spaceflight (particularly orthostatic hypotension and cardiac rhythm disturbances). The third was to evaluate possible countermeasures. The Cardiovascular EDOMP studies involved parallel descriptive, mechanistic, and countermeasure evaluations.

  16. Current density reversibly alters metabolic spatial structure of exoelectrogenic anode biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dan; Cheng, Shaoan; Zhang, Fang; Logan, Bruce E.

    2017-07-01

    Understanding how current densities affect electrogenic biofilm activity is important for wastewater treatment as current densities can substantially decrease at COD concentrations greater than those suitable for discharge to the environment. We examined the biofilm's response, in terms of viability and enzymatic activity, to different current densities using microbial electrolysis cells with a lower (0.7 V) or higher (0.9 V) added voltage to alter current production. Viability was assessed using florescent dyes, with dead cells identified on the basis of dye penetration due to a compromised cell outer-membrane (red), and live cells (intact membrane) fluorescing green. Biofilms operated with 0.7 V produced 2.4 ± 0.2 A m-2, and had an inactive layer near the electrode and a viable layer at the biofilm-solution interface. The lack of cell activity near the electrode surface was confirmed by using an additional dye that fluoresces only with enzymatic activity. Adding 0.9 V increased the current by 61%, and resulted in a single, more homogeneous and active biofilm layer. Switching biofilms between these two voltages produced outcomes associated with the new current rather than the previous biofilm conditions. These findings suggest that maintaining higher current densities will be needed to ensure long-term viability electrogenic biofilms.

  17. Non-dipper treated hypertensive patients do not have increased cardiac structural alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magrini Fabio

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-dipping pattern in hypertensive patients has been shown to be associated with an excess of target organ damage and with an adverse outcome. The aim of our study was to assess whether a reduced nocturnal fall in blood pressure (BP, established on the basis of a single 24-h BP monitoring, in treated essential hypertensives is related to more prominent cardiac alterations. Methods We enrrolled 229 treated hypertensive patients attending the out-patient clinic of our hypertension centre; each patient was subjected to the following procedures : 1 clinic BP measurement; 2 blood and urine sampling for routine blood chemistry and urine examination; 3 standard 12-lead electrocardiogram; 4 echocardiography; 5 ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM. For the purpose of this study ABPM was carried-out in three subgroups with different clinic BP profile : 1 patients with satisfactory BP control (BP 2 in men and 110 g/m2 in women, ≥51/gm2.7 in men and 47/g/m2.7 in women. Results Of the 229 study participants 119 (51.9% showed a fall in SBP/DBP Conclusions In treated essential hypertensives with or without BP control the extent of nocturnal BP decrease is not associated with an increase in LV mass or LVH prevalence; therefore, the non-dipping profile, diagnosed on the basis of a single ABPM, does not identify hypertensive patients with greater cardiac damage.

  18. Alteration of mammalian-cell toxicity of pesticides by structural iron(II) in ferruginous smectite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Kara C; Stucki, Joseph W; Warner, Richard E; Plewa, Michael J

    2004-08-15

    The ultimate concern over pesticides in the environment is their toxic impact on nontarget organisms, including humans. Soil clays are known to interact with pesticides in ways that decrease the concentration of the parent compound in the soil solution (adsorption, sequestration, degradation). These phenomena are generally regarded as beneficial, but toxicological verification is lacking. In this study, mammalian-cell cytotoxicity of four commonly used agricultural chemicals (2,4-D, alachlor, dicamba, and oxamyl) was assessed after exposure to either reduced or oxidized ferruginous smectite (SWa-1). Results revealed that treatment with reduced smectite produced differential effects on mammalian-cell viability, depending on the pesticide. Oxamyl and alachlor reacted with reduced SWa-1 showed a significant decrease in their overall cytotoxic potential. Dicamba reacted with the reduced-clay treatment and generated products that were more toxic than the parent pesticide. Finally, no differences were observed between redox treatments for 2,4-D. The significance of these results is that oxidized smectites have virtually no influence on the toxicity of pesticides, whereas reduced-Fe smectite plays an important role in altering the cytotoxic potential of agricultural pesticides. The Fe oxidation state of clay minerals should, therefore, be taken into account in pesticide management programs.

  19. Asporin-deficient mice have tougher skin and altered skin glycosaminoglycan content and structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarana, Marco; Svensson, René B; Knutsson, Anki

    2017-01-01

    The main structural component of connective tissues is fibrillar, cross-linked collagen whose fibrillogenesis can be modulated by Small Leucine-Rich Proteins/Proteoglycans (SLRPs). Not all SLRPs' effects on collagen and extracellular matrix in vivo have been elucidated; one of the less investigat...

  20. Cassia alata alters Liver Structure in Rat | Amao | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Casia alata is a common plant in South West and its parts are freely used as herbs by the natives. Concomitantly, the prevalence of chronic liver disease is on the increase, thus the study was designed to investigate the effects of its crude extract on the rat liver structure. The methanolic extract of Cassia alata was ...

  1. Carcinogenesis: alterations in reciprocal interactions of normal functional structure of biologic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydyan, Garri

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of biologic systems (BS) includes functional mechanisms that in some conditions may lead to the development of cancer. Using mathematical group theory and matrix analysis, previously, it was shown that normally functioning BS are steady functional structures regulated by three basis regulatory components: reciprocal links (RL), negative feedback (NFB) and positive feedback (PFB). Together, they form an integrative unit maintaining system's autonomy and functional stability. It is proposed that phylogenetic development of different species is implemented by the splitting of "rudimentary" characters into two relatively independent functional parts that become encoded in chromosomes. The functional correlate of splitting mechanisms is RL. Inversion of phylogenetic mechanisms during ontogenetic development leads cell differentiation until cells reach mature states. Deterioration of reciprocal structure in the genome during ontogenesis gives rise of pathological conditions characterized by unsteadiness of the system. Uncontrollable cell proliferation and invasive cell growth are the leading features of the functional outcomes of malfunctioning systems. The regulatory element responsible for these changes is RL. In matrix language, pathological regulation is represented by matrices having positive values of diagonal elements ( TrA  > 0) and also positive values of matrix determinant ( detA  > 0). Regulatory structures of that kind can be obtained if the negative entry of the matrix corresponding to RL is replaced with the positive one. To describe not only normal but also pathological states of BS, a unit matrix should be added to the basis matrices representing RL, NFB and PFB. A mathematical structure corresponding to the set of these four basis functional patterns (matrices) is a split quaternion (coquaternion). The structure and specific role of basis elements comprising four-dimensional linear space of split quaternions help to understand what

  2. Alteration of Gills and Liver Histological Structure of Cyprinus carpio Exposed to Leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Dewi Kusumaningrum Pribadi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems in the waste management in Indonesia is the treatment of leachate, which mostly dumped to the river This research is aimed to obtain information of histological alteration in gills and liver of C. carpio L. exposed to leachate. Measurements on the water quality parameters comprised water temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen (DO. This research was conducted by exposing leachate to C. carpio for 96 hours. The concentration of leachate were 0 ppm, 80 ppm, and 100 ppm. Histological preparation were made on the gills and liver using 10% fixative Neutral Buffered Formalin and Ehrlich Hematoxylin-Eosin staining with qualitative observation descriptive analyses for discussion. The result showed that increasing water temperature is directly proportional to the leachate concentration in the aquaria, while the value of pH and DO inversely proportional to the leachate concentration. Damages on the gills with 80 ppm leachate concentrasion were identified as follows: fusion of secondary gill filaments and hyperplasia of epithelial cell, along with karyorrhexis and hydropic degeneration on the liver. Damages on the gills of fishes exposed to leachate with 100 ppm concentrasion were identified as follows: fusion of secondary gill filaments, hyperplasia of epithelial cell, congestion, and edema along with karyorrhexis, hydropic degeneration and melanomacrophage centre (MMC found on the liver. The results of this study can be used as an overview of the impact of an environmental pollution by leachate as indicated from histological damage to the gills and liver of C. carpio, thus contribute significan information to aquaculture sector and endorse better waste management

  3. The Latarjet coracoid process transfer procedure: alterations in the neurovascular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freehill, Michael T; Srikumaran, Umasuthan; Archer, Kristin R; McFarland, Edward G; Petersen, Steve A

    2013-05-01

    The Latarjet coracoid process transfer procedure is an established, reliable treatment for glenoid deficiency associated with recurrent anterior shoulder instability, but changes in neurovascular anatomy resulting from the procedure are a concern. The purpose of our cadaveric study was to identify changes in the neurovascular anatomy after a Latarjet procedure. We obtained 4 paired, fresh-frozen cadaveric forequarters (8 shoulders) from the Maryland State Anatomy Board. In each shoulder, we preoperatively measured the distances from the midanterior glenoid rim to the musculocutaneous nerve, axillary nerve, and axillary artery in 2 directions (lateral to medial and superior to inferior) and with the arm in 2 positions (0° abduction/neutral rotation; 30° abduction/30° external rotation), for a total of 12 measurements. We then created a standardized bony defect in the anterior-inferior glenoid, reconstructed it with the Latarjet procedure, and repeated the same measurements. Two examiners independently took each measurement twice. Inter-rater reliability was adequate, allowing pre-Latarjet measurements to be combined, averaged, and compared with combined and averaged post-Latarjet measurements by using paired Student t tests (significance, P ≤ .05). We found (1) significant differences in the location of the musculocutaneous nerve in the superior-to-inferior direction for both arm positions, (2) notably lax and consistently overlapping musculocutaneous and axillary nerves, and (3) an unchanged axillary artery location. The Latarjet procedure resulted in consistent and clinically significant alterations in the anatomic relationships of the musculocutaneous and axillary nerves, which may make them vulnerable to injury during revision surgery. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural alteration of hexagonal birnessite by aqueous Mn(II): Impacts on Ni(II) sorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkowitz, Joshua P.; Elzinga, Evert J.

    2017-09-01

    We studied the impacts of aqueous Mn(II) (1 mM) on the sorption of Ni(II) (200 μM) by hexagonal birnessite (0.1 g L- 1) at pH 6.5 and 7.5 with batch experiments and XRD, ATR-FTIR and Ni K-edge EXAFS analyses. In the absence of Mn(II)aq, sorbed Ni(II) was coordinated predominantly as triple corner-sharing complexes at layer vacancies at both pH values. Introduction of Mn(II)aq into Ni(II)-birnessite suspensions at pH 6.5 caused Ni(II) desorption and led to the formation of edge-sharing Ni(II) complexes. This was attributed to competitive displacement of Ni(II) from layer vacancies by either Mn(II) or by Mn(III) formed through interfacial Mn(II)-Mn(IV) comproportionation, and/or incorporation of Ni(II) into the birnessite lattice promoted by Mn(II)-catalyzed recrystallization of the sorbent. Similar to Mn(II)aq, the presence of HEPES or MES caused the formation of edge-sharing Ni(II) sorption complexes in Ni(II)-birnessite suspensions, which was attributed to partial reduction of the sorbent by the buffers. At pH 7.5, interaction with aqueous Mn(II) caused reductive transformation of birnessite into secondary feitknechtite that incorporated Ni(II), enhancing removal of Ni(II) from solution. These results demonstrate that reductive alteration of phyllomanganates may significantly affect the speciation and solubility of Ni(II) in anoxic and suboxic environments.

  5. Structure alterations in Al-Y-based metallic glasses with La and Ni addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, X. M.; Wang, X. D.; Yu, Q.; Cao, Q. P.; Zhang, D. X.; Zhang, J.; Hu, T. D.; Lai, L. H.; Xie, H. L.; Xiao, T. Q.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2016-03-01

    The atomic structures of Al89Y11, Al90Y6.5La3.5, and Al82.8Y6.07Ni8La3.13 metallic glasses have been studied by using high energy X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption fine structure combined with the ab initio molecular dynamics and reverse Monte Carlo simulations. It is demonstrated that the partial replacement of Y atoms by La has limited improvement of the glass forming ability (GFA), although La atoms reduce the ordering around Y atoms and also the fractions of icosahedron-like polyhedra centered by Al atoms. In contrast, Ni atoms can significantly improve the GFA, which are inclined to locate in the shell of polyhedra centered by Al, Y, and La atoms, mainly forming Ni-centered icosahedron-like polyhedra to enhance the spatial connectivity between clusters and suppress the crystallization.

  6. Pathological and Pathophysiological Alterations in Temporal Lobe Structures After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-31

    motif) ligand 7 TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor I serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade A (alpha-I antiproteinase, antitrypsin). member 3 lipocalin 2...voltage-gated, type VII, alpha CD84 molecule ribonuclease T2 ubiquitin specific peptidase 18 fYN binding protein meiosis-specific nuclear structural I...containing 2 membrane-spanning 4-domains. subfamily A. member 6A receptor (chemosensory) transporter protein 4 CD180 molecule serpin peptidase

  7. Time-Varying Estimation of Crop Insurance Program in Altering North Dakota Farm Economic Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, Jane A.; Shaik, Saleem

    2009-01-01

    This study examines how federal farm policies, specifically crop insurance, have affected the farm economic structure of North Dakota’s agriculture sector. The system of derived input demand equations is estimated to quantify the changes in North Dakota farmers’ input use when they purchase crop insurance. Further, the cumulative rolling regression technique is applied to capture the varying effects of the farm policies over time. Empirical results from the system of input demand functions in...

  8. Ataxin-1 with an expanded glutamine tract alters nuclear matrix-associated structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, P J; Koshy, B T; Cummings, C J

    1997-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is one of several neurodegenerative disorders caused by an expansion of a polyglutamine tract. It is characterized by ataxia, progressive motor deterioration, and loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. To understand the pathogenesis of SCA1, we examined the subcel......Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is one of several neurodegenerative disorders caused by an expansion of a polyglutamine tract. It is characterized by ataxia, progressive motor deterioration, and loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. To understand the pathogenesis of SCA1, we examined.......5 microm across, whereas the expanded ataxin-1 localizes to a single approximately 2-microm structure, before the onset of ataxia. Mutant ataxin-1 localizes to a single nuclear structure in affected neurons of SCA1 patients. Similarly, COS-1 cells transfected with wild-type or mutant ataxin-1 show...... a similar pattern of nuclear localization; with expanded ataxin-1 occurring in larger structures that are fewer in number than those of normal ataxin-1. Colocalization studies show that mutant ataxin-1 causes a specific redistribution of the nuclear matrix-associated domain containing promyelocytic...

  9. [Sex difference of functional and structural alterations in the myocardium of rats with hypothyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khara, M R; Pavlovych, S I; Mykhaĭliuk, V M

    2013-01-01

    In experiments on sexually mature rats we studied specific cholinergic regulations of the heart and the degree of its structural damage in hypothyroidism, depending on gender and hormone-productive activity of the gonads. Hypothyroidism in sexually mature males and females was modelled with mercazolil intragastric administration (75 mg/kg) daily during 15 days. We also studied the intensity of bradycardia, which occurred in response to electrical stimulation of vagus nerve and intravenous acetylcholine administration. The degree of structural heart damage was assessed by the percentage of damaged cardiomyocytes in the ventricles of myocardium. It was found that one of the mechanisms of bradycardia in merkazolil-induced hypothyroidism is an increase of the sensitivity of sinus node cholinergic receptors and release of more quanta of acetylcholine from stimulated nerves vagus endings, what was more intense in females. The intensity of bradycardia in hypothyroidism was more significant in gonadectomized animals than in individuals with preserved gonads. The mechanisms of its occurrence in males consist of release of greater amount of acetylcholine from the endings of the nerves vagus, and in females it was the result of significant increase of the sensitivity of sinus node cholinergic receptors. Regardless of the gonads activity, structural damage of the myocardium in merkazolil-induced hypothyroidism was more intensive in female rats.

  10. Structural brain alterations in hemifacial spasm: A voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ye; Yu, Tian; Wei, Yongxu; Sun, Kun; Zhao, Weiguo; Yu, Buwei

    2016-02-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is characterized by involuntary, irregular clonic or tonic movement of muscles innervated by the facial nerve. We evaluated structural reorganization in brain gray matter and white matter and whether neuroplasticity is linked to clinical features in HFS patients. High-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data were acquired by 3.0 T MRI from 42 patients with HFS and 30 healthy subjects. The severity of the spasm was assessed according to Jankovic disability rating scale. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis were performed to identify regional grey matter volume (GMV) changes and whole-brain microstructural integrity disruption measured by fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD). The VBM analysis showed that patients with HFS reduced GMV in the right inferior parietal lobule and increased GMV in the cerebellar lobule VIII, when compared with healthy subjects. Furthermore, within the HFS disease group, GMV decreased with the disease duration in the right inferior parietal lobule. TBSS did not identify group differences in diffusivity parameters. While no white matter integrity disruption was detected in the brain of patients with HFS, our study identified evident GMV changes in brain areas which were known to be involved in motor control. Our results suggest that HFS, a chronic neurovascular conflict disease, is related to structural reorganization in the brain. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Physical disturbance to ecological niches created by soil structure alters community composition of methanotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaresan, Deepak; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Abell, Guy C J; Bodrossy, Levente; Murrell, J Colin

    2011-10-01

    Aggregates of different sizes and stability in soil create a composite of ecological niches differing in terms of physico-chemical and structural characteristics. The aim of this study was to identify, using DNA-SIP and mRNA-based microarray analysis, whether shifts in activity and community composition of methanotrophs occur when ecological niches created by soil structure are physically perturbed. Landfill cover soil was subject to three treatments termed: 'control' (minimal structural disruption), 'sieved' (sieved soil using 2 mm mesh) and 'ground' (grinding using mortar and pestle). 'Sieved' and 'ground' soil treatments exhibited higher methane oxidation potentials compared with the 'control' soil treatment. Analysis of the active community composition revealed an effect of physical disruption on active methanotrophs. Type I methanotrophs were the most active methanotrophs in 'sieved' and 'ground' soil treatments, whereas both Type I and Type II methanotrophs were active in the 'control' soil treatment. The result emphasize that changes to a particular ecological niche may not result in an immediate change to the active bacterial composition and change in composition will depend on the ability of the bacterial communities to respond to the perturbation. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. STRUCTURAL CHANGES OF THE HEART DURING SEVERE SEPSIS OR SEPTIC SHOCK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeding, Lonneke; Plotz, Frans B.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan; Kneyber, Martin C. J.

    Cardiovascular dysfunction is common in severe sepsis or septic shock. Although functional alterations are often described, the elevated serum levels of cardiac proteins and autopsy findings of myocardial immune cell infiltration, edema, and damaged mitochondria suggest that structural changes to

  13. Effects of glucose ingestion on autonomic and cardiovascular measures during rest and mental challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Synowski, S.J.; Kop, W.J.; Warwick, Z.S.; Waldstein, S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background High levels of dietary sugar consumption may result in dysregulated glucose metabolism and lead to elevated cardiovascular disease risk via autonomic nervous system and cardiovascular dysfunction. Altered cardiovascular function can be examined using perturbation tasks such as mental

  14. Convergent Findings of Altered Functional and Structural Brain Connectivity in Individuals with High Functioning Autism: A Multimodal MRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Mueller

    Full Text Available Brain tissue changes in autism spectrum disorders seem to be rather subtle and widespread than anatomically distinct. Therefore a multimodal, whole brain imaging technique appears to be an appropriate approach to investigate whether alterations in white and gray matter integrity relate to consistent changes in functional resting state connectivity in individuals with high functioning autism (HFA. We applied diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, voxel-based morphometry (VBM and resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI to assess differences in brain structure and function between 12 individuals with HFA (mean age 35.5, SD 11.4, 9 male and 12 healthy controls (mean age 33.3, SD 9.0, 8 male. Psychological measures of empathy and emotionality were obtained and correlated with the most significant DTI, VBM and fcMRI findings. We found three regions of convergent structural and functional differences between HFA participants and controls. The right temporo-parietal junction area and the left frontal lobe showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA values along with decreased functional connectivity and a trend towards decreased gray matter volume. The bilateral superior temporal gyrus displayed significantly decreased functional connectivity that was accompanied by the strongest trend of gray matter volume decrease in the temporal lobe of HFA individuals. FA decrease in the right temporo-parietal region was correlated with psychological measurements of decreased emotionality. In conclusion, our results indicate common sites of structural and functional alterations in higher order association cortex areas and may therefore provide multimodal imaging support to the long-standing hypothesis of autism as a disorder of impaired higher-order multisensory integration.

  15. Collagen structural alterations contribute to stiffening of tissue after split-thickness skin grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, Nicole L; Agabalyan, Natacha; Olsen, Katherine; Martufi, Giampaol; Gabriel, Vincent; Biernaskie, Jeff; Di Martino, Elena S

    2016-03-01

    The gold standard treatment for full thickness injuries of the skin is autologous split-thickness skin grafting. This involves harvesting the epidermis and superficial dermis from healthy skin and transplanting it onto the prepared wound bed. The donor site regenerates spontaneously, but the appendages and cellular components from the dermal layer are excluded from the graft. As a result, the new tissue is inferior; the healed graft site is dry/itchy, has decreased elasticity, increased fragility, and altered sensory function. Because this dermal layer is composed of collagen and other extracellular matrix proteins, the aim was to characterize the changes in the dermal collagen after split thickness grafting that could contribute to a deficit in functionality. This will serve as a baseline for future studies designed to improve skin function using pharmacological or cell-based therapies for skin repair. A xenograft model whereby human split-thickness grafts were implanted into full-thickness defects on immunocompromised (athymic Nu/Nu) mice was used. The grafts were harvested 4 and 8 weeks later. The collagen microstructure was assessed with second harmonic generation with dual-photon microscopy and light polarization analysis. Collagen fiber stiffness and engagement stretch were estimated by fitting the results of biaxial mechanical tensile tests to a histo-mechanical constitutive model. The stiffness of the collagen fibril-proteoglycan complex increased from 682 ± 226 kPa/sr to 1016 ± 324 kPa/sr between 4 and 8 weeks postgrafting. At the microstructural level there were significant decreases in both thickness of collagen fibers (3.60 ± 0.34 μm vs. 2.10 ± 0.27 μm) and waviness ratio (2.04 ± 0.17 vs. 1.43 ± 0.08) of the collagen fibers postgrafting. The decrease of the macroscopic engagement stretch from 1.19 ± 0.11 to 1.09 ± 0.08 over time postgrafting mirrored the decrease in waviness measured at the microscopic level

  16. Ultrasound evidence of altered lumbar connective tissue structure in human subjects with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Helene M; Stevens-Tuttle, Debbie; Fox, James R; Badger, Gary J; Bouffard, Nicole A; Krag, Martin H; Wu, Junru; Henry, Sharon M

    2009-12-03

    Although the connective tissues forming the fascial planes of the back have been hypothesized to play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic low back pain (LBP), there have been no previous studies quantitatively evaluating connective tissue structure in this condition. The goal of this study was to perform an ultrasound-based comparison of perimuscular connective tissue structure in the lumbar region in a group of human subjects with chronic or recurrent LBP for more than 12 months, compared with a group of subjects without LBP. In each of 107 human subjects (60 with LBP and 47 without LBP), parasagittal ultrasound images were acquired bilaterally centered on a point 2 cm lateral to the midpoint of the L2-3 interspinous ligament. The outcome measures based on these images were subcutaneous and perimuscular connective tissue thickness and echogenicity measured by ultrasound. There were no significant differences in age, sex, body mass index (BMI) or activity levels between LBP and No-LBP groups. Perimuscular thickness and echogenicity were not correlated with age but were positively correlated with BMI. The LBP group had approximately 25% greater perimuscular thickness and echogenicity compared with the No-LBP group (ANCOVA adjusted for BMI, p<0.01 and p<0.001 respectively). This is the first report of abnormal connective tissue structure in the lumbar region in a group of subjects with chronic or recurrent LBP. This finding was not attributable to differences in age, sex, BMI or activity level between groups. Possible causes include genetic factors, abnormal movement patterns and chronic inflammation.

  17. Wheat and Rice Growth Stages and Fertilization Regimes Alter Soil Bacterial Community Structure, but Not Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jichen Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining soil fertility and the microbial communities that determine fertility is critical to sustainable agricultural strategies, and the use of different organic fertilizer regimes represents an important practice in attempts to preserve soil quality. However, little is known about the dynamic response of bacterial communities to fertilization regimes across crop growth stages. In this study, we examined microbial community structure and diversity across eight representative growth stages of wheat-rice rotation under four different fertilization treatments: no nitrogen fertilizer (NNF, chemical fertilizer (CF, organic-inorganic mixed fertilizer (OIMF and organic fertilizer (OF. Quantitative PCR (QPCR and high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that growth stage as the best predictor of bacterial community abundance and structure. Additionally, bacterial community compositions differed between wheat and rice rotations. Relative to soils under wheat rotation, soils under rice rotation contained higher relative abundances (RA of anaerobic and mesophilic microbes and lower RA of aerophilic microbes. With respect to fertilization regime, NNF plots had a higher abundance of nitrogen–fixing Cyanobacteria. OIMF had a lower abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota compared with CF. Application of chemical fertilizers (CF and OIMF treatments significantly increased the abundance of some generally oligotrophic bacteria such those belonging to the Acidobacteria, while more copiotrophic of the phylum Proteobacteria increased with organic fertilizer application. A high correlation coefficient was found when comparing RA of Acidobacteria based upon QPCR versus sequence analysis, yet poor correlations were found for the Alpha- and Beta- Proteobacteria, highlighting the caution required when interpreting these molecular data. In total, crop, fertilization scheme and plant developmental stage all influenced soil

  18. Effect of pulse electron beam characteristics on internal friction and structural alterations in epoxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaikin, Yu.A. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan)]. E-mail: drzaykin@mail.ru; Ismailova, G.A. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Al-Sheikhly, M. [University of Maryland, College Park (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Temperature dependence of internal friction is experimentally studied in epoxy irradiated by 2.5 MeV pulse electron beam to different doses. Time dependence of internal friction characteristics associated with radiation-induced processes of polymer scission and cross-linking is analyzed and discussed. Experimental data on kinetics of structural transformations in epoxy are interpreted on the base of analytical solutions of differential equations for free radical accumulation during and after irradiation subject to the pulse irradiation mode and an arbitrary effective order of radical recombination.

  19. Cyanobacteria contain a structural homologue of the Hfq protein with altered RNA binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Andreas; Overgaard, Martin; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    regulating mRNA turnover in eukaryotes. However, bacterial Hfq proteins are homohexameric, whereas eukaryotic Sm/Lsm proteins are heteroheptameric. Recently, Hfq proteins with poor sequence conservation were identified in archaea and cyanobacteria. In this article, we describe crystal structures of the Hfq...... proteins from the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena PCC 7120 at 1.3 and 2.3 A resolution, respectively, and show that they retain the classic Sm fold despite low sequence conservation. In addition, the intersubunit contacts and RNA-binding site are divergent, and we show biochemically...

  20. Cyanobacteria contain a structural homologue of the Hfq protein with altered RNA-binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Andreas; Overgaard, Martin; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    regulating mRNA turnover in eukaryotes. However, bacterial Hfq proteins are homohexameric, whereas eukaryotic Sm/Lsm proteins are heteroheptameric. Recently, Hfq proteins with poor sequence conservation were identified in archaea and cyanobacteria. In this article, we describe crystal structures of the Hfq...... proteins from the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena PCC 7120 at 1.3 and 2.3 A resolution, respectively, and show that they retain the classic Sm fold despite low sequence conservation. In addition, the intersubunit contacts and RNA-binding site are divergent, and we show biochemically...

  1. Effect of pulse electron beam characteristics on internal friction and structural alterations in epoxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaikin, Yu.A.; Ismailova, G.A.; Al-Sheikhly, M.

    2007-01-01

    Temperature dependence of internal friction is experimentally studied in epoxy irradiated by 2.5 MeV pulse electron beam to different doses. Time dependence of internal friction characteristics associated with radiation-induced processes of polymer scission and cross-linking is analyzed and discussed. Experimental data on kinetics of structural transformations in epoxy are interpreted on the base of analytical solutions of differential equations for free radical accumulation during and after irradiation subject to the pulse irradiation mode and an arbitrary effective order of radical recombination

  2. Exposure to Hycanthone alters chromatin structure around specific gene functions and specific repeats in Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eRoquis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni is a parasitic plathyhelminth responsible for intestinal schistosomiasis (or bilharziasis, a disease affecting 67 million people worldwide and causing an important economic burden. The schistosomicides hycanthone, and its later proxy oxamniquine, were widely used for treatments in endemic areas during the 20th century. Recently, the mechanism of action, as well as the genetic origin of a stably and Mendelian inherited resistance for both drugs was elucidated in two strains. However, several observations suggested early on that alternative mechanisms might exist, by which resistance could be induced for these two drugs in sensitive lines of schistosomes. This induced resistance appeared rapidly, within the first generation, but was metastable (not stably inherited. Epigenetic inheritance could explain such a phenomenon and we therefore re-analyzed the historical data with our current knowledge of epigenetics. In addition, we performed new experiments such as ChIP-seq on hycanthone treated worms. We found distinct chromatin structure changes between sensitive worms and induced resistant worms from the same strain. No specific pathway was discovered, but genes in which chromatin structure modification were observed are mostly associated with transport and catabolism, which makes sense in the context of the elimination of the drug. Specific differences were observed in the repetitive compartment of the genome. We finally describe what types of experiments are needed to understand the complexity of heritability that can be based on genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms for drug resistance in schistosomes.

  3. Alcohol dehydrogenase, SDR and MDR structural stages, present update and altered era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörnvall, Hans; Landreh, Michael; Östberg, Linus J

    2015-06-05

    It is now about half a century since molecular research on alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) and medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR) started. During this time, at least four stages of research can be distinguished, which led to many ADH, SDR and MDR structures from which their origins could be traced. An introductory summary of these stages is given, followed by a current update on the now known structures, including the present pattern of mammalian MDR-ADH enzymes into six classes and their evolutionary relationships. In spite of the wide spread in evolutionary changes from the "constant" class III to the more "variable" other classes, the change in class V (only confirmed as a transcript in humans) and class VI (absent in humans) are also restricted. Such spread in variability is visible also in other dehydrogenases, but not always so restricted in other co-evolving proteins we have studied. Finally, the shift in era of present ADH research is highlighted, as well as levels of likely future continuation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Structure alterations in Al-Y-based metallic glasses with La and Ni addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, X. M.; Wang, X. D., E-mail: wangxd@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn; Yu, Q.; Cao, Q. P.; Jiang, J. Z., E-mail: wangxd@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM), Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhang, D. X. [State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhang, J.; Hu, T. D. [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Lai, L. H.; Xie, H. L.; Xiao, T. Q. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203 (China)

    2016-03-21

    The atomic structures of Al{sub 89}Y{sub 11}, Al{sub 90}Y{sub 6.5}La{sub 3.5}, and Al{sub 82.8}Y{sub 6.07}Ni{sub 8}La{sub 3.13} metallic glasses have been studied by using high energy X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption fine structure combined with the ab initio molecular dynamics and reverse Monte Carlo simulations. It is demonstrated that the partial replacement of Y atoms by La has limited improvement of the glass forming ability (GFA), although La atoms reduce the ordering around Y atoms and also the fractions of icosahedron-like polyhedra centered by Al atoms. In contrast, Ni atoms can significantly improve the GFA, which are inclined to locate in the shell of polyhedra centered by Al, Y, and La atoms, mainly forming Ni-centered icosahedron-like polyhedra to enhance the spatial connectivity between clusters and suppress the crystallization.

  5. Altered Structural and Functional Connectivity of Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy: An fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengqing Zhong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the structural and functional connectivity (FC of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI. High-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and rs-fMRI data were collected in 25 patients with JME and in 24 control subjects. A FC analysis was subsequently performed, with seeding at the regions that demonstrated between-group differences in gray matter volume (GMV. Then, the observed structural and FCs were associated with the clinical manifestations. The decreased GMV regions were found in the bilateral anterior cerebellum, the right orbital superior frontal gyrus, the left middle temporal gyrus, the left putamen, the right hippocampus, the bilateral caudate, and the right thalamus. The changed FCs were mainly observed in the motor-related areas and the cognitive-related areas. The significant findings of this study revealed an important role for the cerebellum in motor control and cognitive regulation in JME patients, which also have an effect on the activity of the occipital lobe. In addition, the changed FCs were related to the clinical features of JME patients. The current observations may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of JME.

  6. Perturbation of the Secondary Structure of the Scrapie Prion Protein Under Conditions that Alter Infectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasset, Maria; Baldwin, Michael A.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    1993-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of the scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) generates PrP 27-30, which polymerizes into amyloid. By attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, PrP 27-30 polymers contained 54% β-sheet, 25% α-helix, 10% turns, and 11% random coil; dispersion into detergent-lipid-protein-complexes preserved infectivity and secondary structure. Almost 60% of the β-sheet was low-frequency infrared-absorbing, reflecting intermolecular aggregation. Decreased low-frequency β-sheet and increased turn content were found after SDS/PAGE, which disassembled the amyloid polymers, denatured PrP 27-30, and diminished scrapie infectivity. Acid-induced transitions were reversible, whereas alkali produced an irreversible transition centered at pH 10 under conditions that diminished infectivity. Whether PrPSc synthesis involves a transition in the secondary structure of one or more domains of the cellular prion protein from α-helical, random coil, or turn into β-sheet remains to be established.

  7. Gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol alters cardiac structure/function, protein expression and DNA methylation in adult male mice progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Rami; Kasneci, Amanda; Mepham, Kathryn; Sebag, Igal A.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women, and thus their fetuses, are exposed to many endocrine disruptor compounds (EDCs). Fetal cardiomyocytes express sex hormone receptors making them potentially susceptible to re-programming by estrogenizing EDCs. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a proto-typical, non-steroidal estrogen. We hypothesized that changes in adult cardiac structure/function after gestational exposure to the test compound DES would be a proof in principle for the possibility of estrogenizing environmental EDCs to also alter the fetal heart. Vehicle (peanut oil) or DES (0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 μg/kg/da.) was orally delivered to pregnant C57bl/6n dams on gestation days 11.5–14.5. At 3 months, male progeny were left sedentary or were swim trained for 4 weeks. Echocardiography of isoflurane anesthetized mice revealed similar cardiac structure/function in all sedentary mice, but evidence of systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation after swim training at higher DES doses. The calcium homeostasis proteins, SERCA2a, phospholamban, phospho-serine 16 phospholamban and calsequestrin 2, are important for cardiac contraction and relaxation. Immunoblot analyses of ventricle homogenates showed increased expression of SERCA2a and calsequestrin 2 in DES mice and greater molecular remodeling of these proteins and phospho-serine 16 phospholamban in swim trained DES mice. DES increased cardiac DNA methyltransferase 3a expression and DNA methylation in the CpG island within the calsequestrin 2 promoter in heart. Thus, gestational DES epigenetically altered ventricular DNA, altered cardiac function and expression, and reduced the ability of adult progeny to cardiac remodel when physically challenged. We conclude that gestational exposure to estrogenizing EDCs may impact cardiac structure/function in adult males. -- Highlights: ► Gestational DES changes cardiac SERCA2a and CASQ2 expression. ► Echocardiography identified systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation. ► DES

  8. Structure alteration and immunological properties of {sup 60}Co gamma rays irradiated bothropstoxin-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Janaina A.; Yonamine, Camila Myiagui; Caproni, Priscila; Casare, Murilo; Spencer, Patrick Jack; Nascimento, Nanci do [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: janabap@gmail.com; Andrade Junior, Heitor Franco de; Vieira, Daniel Perez; Galisteo Junior, Andres Jimenez [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Medicina Tropical de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Protozoologia

    2007-07-01

    About 20000 ophidic accidents are registered every year in Brazil. Serum therapy with equine antisera is the only efficient treatment. The venoms employed for immunization are fairly toxic and some venoms present low immunogenicity. Thus, the obtention of modified antigens with lower toxicity and preserved or improved immunogenicity would be useful. These toxins, when submitted to gamma radiation, in aqueous solution, present structural modifications. This occurs due to reactions with the radiolysis products of water. Some scavenger substances, such as NaNO{sub 3} and t-butanol, remove selectively the water radiolysis products. Ionizing radiation has proven to be a powerful tool to attenuate snake venoms toxicity without affecting and even increasing their immunogenic properties. However, the immune mechanisms involved in recognition, processing and presentation of irradiated antigens are yet unclear. In the present work, we investigated the immunological behavior of bothropstoxin-I (Bthx-1), before and after irradiation, in the presence of selective scavengers. Isogenic mice were immunized with either the native or the irradiated toxin, either with or without scavengers. After three immunizations, serum samples were collected and the antibody titers and isotypes were determined by Enzyme Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay. The antigenic characterization of native and irradiated bothropstoxin-I was performed by Western blot. The detection of expression of murine cytokines (IFN-{gamma} and IL-10) was analyzed by RT-PCR (Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction). According to our data, irradiation process has promoted structural modifications in the toxin, characterized by higher molecular weight forms of the protein (aggregates and oligomers). Our data also indicate that irradiated toxins, alone or in the presence of NaNO{sub 3}, an aqueous electron scavenger, were immunogenic and the antibodies elicited by them were able to recognize the native toxin. On the other

  9. Microbial functional diversity alters the structure and sensitivity of oxygen deficient zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Justin; Weber, Thomas; Deutsch, Curtis

    2016-09-01

    Oxygen deficient zones (ODZs) below the ocean surface regulate marine productivity by removing bioavailable nitrogen (N). A complex microbial community mediates N loss, but the interplay of its diverse metabolisms is poorly understood. We present an ecosystem model of the North Pacific ODZ that reproduces observed chemical distributions yet predicts different ODZ structure, rates, and climatic sensitivity compared to traditional geochemical models. An emergent lower O2 limit for aerobic nitrification lies below the upper O2 threshold for anaerobic denitrification, creating a zone of microbial coexistence that causes a larger ODZ but slower total rates of N loss. The O2-dependent competition for the intermediate nitrite produces gradients in its oxidation versus reduction, anammox versus heterotrophic denitrification, and the net ecological stoichiometry of N loss. The latter effect implies that an externally driven ODZ expansion should favor communities that more efficiently remove N, increasing the sensitivity of the N cycle to climate change.

  10. Zearalenone impairs the male reproductive system functions via inducing structural and functional alterations of sertoli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, WangLong; Pan, ShunYe; Wang, Guangguang; Wang, Ya Jun; Liu, Qing; Gu, JianHong; Yuan, Yan; Liu, Xue Zhong; Liu, Zong Ping; Bian, Jian Chun

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ZEA on the cytoskeletal structure, and factors specifically expressed by Sertoli cells. Primary Sertoli cells from rats aged 18-21 days were exposed to increasing ZEA concentrations (0, 5, 10, 20 μg mL(-1)) for 24 h. The results of immunofluorescence showed disruption of α-tubulin filaments and F-actin bundles, and damage to the nucleus of Sertoli cells on exposure to ZEA. In the control group, the protein level expression of androgen-binding protein (ABP), transferrin, vimentin, N-cadherin, and follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) were decreased significantly (pfunctions of Sertoli cells, which may be an underlying cause of ZEA-induced reproductive toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Historical Population Structure of Central Valley Steelhead and Its Alteration by Dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T. Lindley

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Effective conservation and recovery planning for Central Valley steelhead requires an understanding of historical population structure. We describe the historical structure of the Central Valley steelhead evolutionarily significant unit using a multi-phase modeling approach. In the first phase, we identify stream reaches possibly suitable for steelhead spawning and rearing using a habitat model based on environmental envelopes (stream discharge, gradient, and temperature that takes a digital elevation model and climate data as inputs. We identified 151 patches of potentially suitable habitat with more than 10 km of stream habitat, with a total of 25,500 km of suitable habitat. We then measured the distances among habitat patches, and clustered together patches within 35 km of each other into 81 distinct habitat patches. Groups of fish using these 81 patches are hypothesized to be (or to have been independent populations for recovery planning purposes. Consideration of climate and elevation differences among the 81 habitat areas suggests that there are at least four major subdivisions within the Central Valley steelhead ESU that correspond to geographic regions defined by the Sacramento River basin, Suisun Bay area tributaries, San Joaquin tributaries draining the Sierra Nevada, and lower-elevation streams draining to the Buena Vista and Tulare basins, upstream of the San Joaquin River. Of these, it appears that the Sacramento River basin was the main source of steelhead production. Presently, impassable dams block access to 80% of historically available habitat, and block access to all historical spawning habitat for about 38% of the historical populations of steelhead.

  12. Large herbivores affect forest ecosystem functions by altering the structure of dung beetle communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Taichi; Soga, Masashi; Koike, Shinsuke

    2018-04-01

    Dramatic increases in populations of large mammalian herbivores have become a major ecological issue, particularly in the northern hemisphere, due to their substantial impacts on both animal and plant communities through processes such as grazing, browsing, and trampling. However, little is known about the consequences of these population explosions on ecosystem functions. Here, we experimentally investigated how the population density of sika deer (Cervus nippon) in temperate deciduous forest areas in Japan affected the decomposition of mammal dung by dung beetles, which is a key process in forest ecosystems. We measured a range of environmental variables (e.g., vegetation cover, soil hardness) and the dung decomposition rate, measured as the amount of deer dung decomposed during one week, and sampled dung beetles at 16 study sites with three different deer densities (high/intermediate/low). We then used structural equation modeling to investigate the relationships between deer density, environmental variables, the biomass of dung beetles (classified into small or large species), and the dung decomposition rate. We found that the biomass of small species increased with increasing deer density, whereas that of large species was not related to deer density. Furthermore, the dung decomposition rate was positively related to the biomass of small species but unrelated to that of large species. Overall, our results showed that an increase in deer density affects the decomposition rate of mammal dung by changing the structure of dung beetle communities (i.e., increasing the number of small dung beetles). Such an understanding of how increases in large herbivore populations affect ecosystem functions is important for accurately evaluating the ecological consequences of their overabundance and ultimately managing their populations appropriately.

  13. Ligand and cation-induced structural alterations of the leukocyte integrin LFA-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Mehmet; Koksal, Adem C; Yuki, Koichi; Wang, Jianchuan; Springer, Timothy A

    2018-03-05

    In αI integrins including leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), ligand-binding function is delegated to the αI domain, requiring extra steps in the relay of signals that activate ligand binding and coordinate it with cytoplasmic signals. Crystal structures reveal great variation in orientation between the αI domain and the remainder of the integrin head. Here, we investigated the mechanisms involved in signal relay to the αI domain, including whether binding of the ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) to the αI domain is linked to headpiece opening and engenders a preferred αI domain orientation. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and negative-stain EM we define structures of ICAM-1, LFA-1, and their complex, and the effect of activation by Mn 2+ Headpiece opening was substantially stabilized by substitution of Mg 2+ with Mn 2+ and became complete upon ICAM-1 addition. These agents stabilized αI-headpiece orientation, resulting in a well-defined orientation of ICAM-1 such that its tandem Ig-like domains pointed in the opposite direction from the β-subunit leg of LFA-1. Mutations in the integrin βI domain α1/α1` helix stabilizing either the open or the closed βI-domain conformation indicated that α1/α1` helix movements are linked to ICAM-1 binding by the αI domain and to the extended-open conformation of the ectodomain. The LFA-1--ICAM-1 orientation described here with ICAM-1 pointing anti-parallel to the LFA-1 β-subunit leg is the same orientation that would be stabilized by tensile force transmitted between the ligand and the actin cytoskeleton, and is consistent with the cytoskeletal force model of integrin activation. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Common hydraulic fracturing fluid additives alter the structure and function of anaerobic microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, Adam C.; Akob, Denise M.; Klinges, J. Grace; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2018-01-01

    The development of unconventional oil and gas (UOG) resources results in the production of large volumes of wastewater containing a complex mixture of hydraulic fracturing chemical additives and components from the formation. The release of these wastewaters into the environment poses potential risks that are poorly understood. Microbial communities in stream sediments form the base of the food chain and may serve as sentinels for changes in stream health. Iron-reducing organisms have been shown to play a role in the biodegradation of a wide range of organic compounds, and so to evaluate their response to UOG wastewater, we enriched anaerobic microbial communities from sediments collected upstream (background) and downstream (impacted) of an UOG wastewater injection disposal facility in the presence of hydraulic fracturing fluid (HFF) additives: guar gum, ethylene glycol, and two biocides, 2,2-dibromo-3-nitrilopropionamide (DBNPA) and bronopol (C3H6BrNO4). Iron reduction was significantly inhibited early in the incubations with the addition of biocides, whereas amendment with guar gum and ethylene glycol stimulated iron reduction relative to levels in the unamended controls. Changes in the microbial community structure were observed across all treatments, indicating the potential for even small amounts of UOG wastewater components to influence natural microbial processes. The microbial community structure differed between enrichments with background and impacted sediments, suggesting that impacted sediments may have been preconditioned by exposure to wastewater. These experiments demonstrated the potential for biocides to significantly decrease iron reduction rates immediately following a spill and demonstrated how microbial communities previously exposed to UOG wastewater may be more resilient to additional spills.

  15. A Longitudinal Assessment of Structural and Chemical Alterations in Mixed Martial Arts Fighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Andrew R; Ling, Josef M; Dodd, Andrew B; Gasparovic, Charles; Klimaj, Stefan D; Meier, Timothy B

    2015-11-15

    Growing evidence suggests that temporally proximal acute concussions and repetitive subconcussive head injuries may lead to long-term neurological deficits. However, the underlying mechanisms of injury and their relative time-scales are not well documented in human injury models. The current study therefore investigated whether biomarkers of brain chemistry (magnetic resonance [MR] spectroscopy: N-acetylaspartate [NAA], combined glutamate and glutamine [Glx], total creatine [Cre], choline compounds [Cho], and myo-inositol [mI]) and structure (cortical thickness, white matter [WM]/subcortical volume) differed between mixed martial artists (MMA; n = 13) and matched healthy controls (HC) without a history of contact sport participation (HC; n = 14). A subset of participants (MMA = 9; HC = 10) returned for follow-up visits, with MMA (n = 3) with clinician-documented acute concussions also scanned serially. As expected, MMA self-reported a higher incidence of previous concussions and significantly more cognitive symptoms during prior concussion recovery. Fighters also exhibited reduced memory and processing speed relative to controls on neuropsychological testing coupled with cortical thinning in the left posterior cingulate gyrus and right occipital cortex at baseline assessment. Over a 1-year follow-up period, MMA experienced a significant decrease in both WM volume and NAA concentration, as well as relative thinning in the left middle and superior frontal gyri. These longitudinal changes did not correlate with self-reported metrics of injury (i.e., fight diary). In contrast, HC did not exhibit significant longitudinal changes over a 4-month follow-up period (p > 0.05). Collectively, current results provide preliminary evidence of progressive changes in brain chemistry and structure over a relatively short time period in individuals with high exposure to repetitive head hits. These findings require replication in independent samples.

  16. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  17. Environmental Determinants of Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2017-07-07

    Many features of the environment have been found to exert an important influence on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, progression, and severity. Changes in the environment because of migration to different geographic locations, modifications in lifestyle choices, and shifts in social policies and cultural practices alter CVD risk, even in the absence of genetic changes. Nevertheless, the cumulative impact of the environment on CVD risk has been difficult to assess and the mechanisms by which some environment factors influence CVD remain obscure. Human environments are complex, and their natural, social, and personal domains are highly variable because of diversity in human ecosystems, evolutionary histories, social structures, and individual choices. Accumulating evidence supports the notion that ecological features such as the diurnal cycles of light and day, sunlight exposure, seasons, and geographic characteristics of the natural environment such as altitude, latitude, and greenspaces are important determinants of cardiovascular health and CVD risk. In highly developed societies, the influence of the natural environment is moderated by the physical characteristics of the social environments such as the built environment and pollution, as well as by socioeconomic status and social networks. These attributes of the social environment shape lifestyle choices that significantly modify CVD risk. An understanding of how different domains of the environment, individually and collectively, affect CVD risk could lead to a better appraisal of CVD and aid in the development of new preventive and therapeutic strategies to limit the increasingly high global burden of heart disease and stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Structural and functional alterations of two multidomain oxidoreductases induced by guanidine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Ming; Zhou, Yu-Ling; Li, Hong-Tao; Zhang, De-Ling; Chen, Jie; Liang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The unfolding and refolding of two multidomain oxidoreductases, bovine liver catalase and flavoprotein bovine milk xanthine oxidase (XO), have been analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and activity measurements. Two intermediates, a partially folded active dimer disassembled from the native tetramer and a partially folded inactivated monomer, are found to exist in the conformational changes of catalase induced by guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl). Similarly, two intermediates, an active, compacted intermediate bound by flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) partially and an inactive flexible intermediate with FAD completely dissociated, exist in the conformational changes of XO induced by GdnHCl. The activity regains completely and an enhancement in activity compared with the native catalase or native XO is observed by dilution of catalase or XO incubated with GdnHCl at concentrations not >0.5 or 1.8 M into the refolding buffer, but the yield of reactivation for catalase or XO is zero when the concentration of GdnHCl is >1.5 or 3.0 M. The addition of FAD provides a remarkable protection against the inactivation of XO by GdnHCl under mild denaturing conditions, and the conformational change of XO is irreversible after FAD has been removed in the presence of a strong denaturing agent. These findings provide impetus for exploring the influences of cofactors such as FAD on the structure-function relationship of xanthine oxidoreductases.

  19. Altered structural correlates of impulsivity in adolescents with internet gaming disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin eDu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggested that internet gaming disorder (IGD was associated with impulsivity and structural abnormalities in brain gray matter. However, no morphometric study has examined the association between gray matter and impulsivity in IGD individuals. In this study, 25 adolescents with IGD and 27 healthy controls (HCs were recruited, and the relationship between Barratt impulsiveness scale-11 (BIS score and gray matter volume (GMV was investigated with the voxel-based morphometric (VBM correlation analysis. Then, the intergroup differences in correlation between BIS score and GMV were tested across all gray matter voxels. Our results showed that the correlations between BIS score and GMV of the right dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, the bilateral insula and the orbitofrontal cortex, the right amygdala and the left fusiform gyrus decreased in the IGD group compared to the HCs. Region-of-interest (ROI analysis revealed that GMV in all these clusters showed significant positive correlations with BIS score in the HCs, while no significant correlation was found in the IGD group. Our findings demonstrated that dysfunction of these brain areas involved in the behavior inhibition, attention and emotion regulation might contribute to impulse control problems in IGD adolescents.

  20. Ablation of mouse adult neurogenesis alters olfactory bulb structure and olfactory fear conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Valley

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis replenishes olfactory bulb (OB interneurons throughout the life of most mammals, yet during this constant fl ux it remains unclear how the OB maintains a constant structure and function. In the mouse OB, we investigated the dynamics of turnover and its impact on olfactory function by ablating adult neurogenesis with an x-ray lesion to the subventricular zone (SVZ. Regardless of the magnitude of the lesion to the SVZ, we found no change in the survival of young adult born granule cells (GCs born after the lesion, and a gradual decrease in the population of GCs born before the lesion. After a lesion producing a 96% reduction of incoming adult born GCs to the OB, we found a diminished behavioral fear response to conditioned odor cues but not to audio cues. Interestingly, despite this behavioral defi cit and gradual anatomical changes, we found no electrophysiological changes in the GC population assayed in vivo through dendro-dendritic synaptic plasticity and odor-evoked local fi eld potential oscillations. These data indicate that turnover in the granule cell layer is generally decoupled from the rate of adult neurogenesis, and that OB adult neurogenesis plays a role in a wide behavioral system extending beyond the OB.

  1. Triclocarban Influences Antibiotic Resistance and Alters Anaerobic Digester Microbial Community Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Daniel E; Zitomer, Daniel H; Hristova, Krassimira R; Kappell, Anthony D; McNamara, Patrick J

    2016-01-05

    Triclocarban (TCC) is one of the most abundant organic micropollutants detected in biosolids. Lab-scale anaerobic digesters were amended with TCC at concentrations ranging from the background concentration of seed biosolids (30 mg/kg) to toxic concentrations of 850 mg/kg to determine the effect on methane production, relative abundance of antibiotic resistance genes, and microbial community structure. Additionally, the TCC addition rate was varied to determine the impacts of acclimation time. At environmentally relevant TCC concentrations (max detect = 440 mg/kg), digesters maintained function. Digesters receiving 450 mg/kg of TCC maintained function under gradual TCC addition, but volatile fatty acid concentrations increased, pH decreased, and methane production ceased when immediately fed this concentration. The concentrations of the mexB gene (encoding for a multidrug efflux pump) were higher with all concentrations of TCC compared to a control, but higher TCC concentrations did not correlate with increased mexB abundance. The relative abundance of the gene tet(L) was greater in the digesters that no longer produced methane, and no effect on the relative abundance of the class 1 integron integrase encoding gene (intI1) was observed. Illumina sequencing revealed substantial community shifts in digesters that functionally failed from increased levels of TCC. More subtle, yet significant, community shifts were observed in digesters amended with TCC levels that did not inhibit function. This research demonstrates that TCC can select for a multidrug resistance encoding gene in mixed community anaerobic environments, and this selection occurs at concentrations (30 mg/kg) that can be found in full-scale anaerobic digesters (U.S. median concentration = 22 mg/kg, mean = 39 mg/kg).

  2. Machine learning based analysis of cardiovascular images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, JM

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), including coronary artery disease (CAD) and congenital heart disease (CHD) are the global leading cause of death. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow non-invasive imaging of cardiovascular structures. This thesis presents machine

  3. Cardiovascular radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanAman, M.; Mueller, C.F.

    1985-01-01

    Soon after Roentgen documented the uses of x-rays in 1895, fluoroscopic and film evaluation of the heart began. Even today the chest roentgenogram remains one of the first and most frequently used studies for the evaluation of the normal and abnormal heart and great vessels. This chapter gives an overview of plain film evaluation of the cardiovascular system and follow up with comments on the newer imaging modalities of computed tomography, and digital subtraction angiography, in the cardiovascular disease workup. The authors present an evaluation of plain films of the chest, which remains their most cost effective, available, simple, and reliable initial screening tool in the evaluation of cardiovascular disease

  4. Biochar affects soil organic matter cycling and microbial functions but does not alter microbial community structure in a paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Wang, Jingyuan; Dippold, Michaela; Gao, Yang; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-06-15

    The application of biochar (BC) in conjunction with mineral fertilizers is one of the most promising management practices recommended to improve soil quality. However, the interactive mechanisms of BC and mineral fertilizer addition affecting microbial communities and functions associated with soil organic matter (SOM) cycling are poorly understood. We investigated the SOM in physical and chemical fractions, microbial community structure (using phospholipid fatty acid analysis, PLFA) and functions (by analyzing enzymes involved in C and N cycling and Biolog) in a 6-year field experiment with BC and NPK amendment. BC application increased total soil C and particulate organic C for 47.4-50.4% and 63.7-74.6%, respectively. The effects of BC on the microbial community and C-cycling enzymes were dependent on fertilization. Addition of BC alone did not change the microbial community compared with the control, but altered the microbial community structure in conjunction with NPK fertilization. SOM fractions accounted for 55% of the variance in the PLFA-related microbial community structure. The particulate organic N explained the largest variation in the microbial community structure. Microbial metabolic activity strongly increased after BC addition, particularly the utilization of amino acids and amines due to an increase in the activity of proteolytic (l-leucine aminopeptidase) enzymes. These results indicate that microorganisms start to mine N from the SOM to compensate for high C:N ratios after BC application, which consequently accelerate cycling of stable N. Concluding, BC in combination with NPK fertilizer application strongly affected microbial community composition and functions, which consequently influenced SOM cycling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Association between structural and functional brain alterations in drug-free patients with schizophrenia: a multimodal meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Zhang, Wenjing; Yao, Li; Xiao, Yuan; Liu, Lu; Liu, Jieke; Li, Siyi; Tao, Bo; Shah, Chandan; Gong, Qiyong; Sweeney, John A; Lui, Su

    2018-03-01

    Neuroimaging studies have shown both structural and functional abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia. Recently, studies have begun to explore the association between structural and functional grey matter abnormalities. By conducting a meta-analysis on morphometric and functional imaging studies of grey matter alterations in drug-free patients, the present study aims to examine the degree of overlap between brain regions with anatomic and functional changes in patients with schizophrenia. We performed a systematic search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library to identify relevant publications. A multimodal analysis was then conducted using Seed-based d Mapping software. Exploratory analyses included jackknife, subgroup and meta-regression analyses. We included 15 structural MRI studies comprising 486 drug-free patients and 485 healthy controls, and 16 functional MRI studies comprising 403 drug-free patients and 428 controls in our meta-analysis. Drug-free patients were examined to reduce pharmacological effects on the imaging data. Multimodal analysis showed considerable overlap between anatomic and functional changes, mainly in frontotemporal regions, bilateral medial posterior cingulate/paracingulate gyrus, bilateral insula, basal ganglia and left cerebellum. There were also brain regions showing only anatomic changes in the right superior frontal gyrus, left supramarginal gyrus, right lingual gyrus and functional alternations involving the right angular gyrus. The methodological aspects, patient characteristics and clinical variables of the included studies were heterogeneous, and we cannot exclude medication effects. The present study showed overlapping anatomic and functional brain abnormalities mainly in the default mode (DMN) and auditory networks (AN) in drug-free patients with schizophrenia. However, the pattern of changes differed in these networks. Decreased grey matter was associated with decreased activation within the DMN

  6. Structural alterations in lateral prefrontal, parietal and posterior midline regions of men with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckart, Cindy; Stoppel, Christian; Kaufmann, Jörn; Tempelmann, Claus; Hinrichs, Hermann; Elbert, Thomas; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

    2011-05-01

    So far, the neural network associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been suggested to mainly involve the amygdala, hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex. However, increasing evidence indicates that cortical regions extending beyond this network might also be implicated in the pathophysiology of PTSD. We aimed to investigate PTSD-related structural alterations in some of these regions. We enrolled highly traumatized refugees with and without (traumatized controls) PTSD and nontraumatized controls in the study. To increase the validity of our results, we combined an automatic cortical parcellation technique and voxel-based morphometry. In all, 39 refugees (20 with and 19 without PTSD) and 13 controls participated in the study. Participants were middle-aged men who were free of psychoactive substances and consumed little to no alcohol. Patients with PTSD (and to a lesser extent traumatized controls) showed reduced volumes in the right inferior parietal cortex, the left rostral middle frontal cortex, the bilateral lateral orbitofrontal cortex and the bilateral isthmus of the cingulate. An influence of cumulative traumatic stress on the isthmus of the cingulate and the lateral orbitofrontal cortex indicated that, at least in these regions, structural alterations might be associated with repeated stress experiences. Voxel-based morphometry analyses produced largely consistent results, but because of a poorer signal-to-noise ratio, conventional statistics did not reach significance. Although we controlled for several important confounding variables (e.g., sex, alcohol abuse) with our particular sample, this might limit the generalizibility of our data. Moreover, high comorbidity of PTSD and major depression hinders a definite separation of these conditions in our findings. Finally, the results concerning the lateral orbito frontal cortex should be interpreted with caution, as magnetic resonance imaging acquisition in this region is affected by a general

  7. The impact of an anti-gravity treadmill (AlterG) training on walking capacity and corticospinal tract structure in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Sh; Marzbani, H; Raminfard, S; Birgani, P M; Rasooli, A H; Mirbagheri, M M

    2017-07-01

    We studied the effects of an anti-gravity treadmill (AlterG) training on walking capacity and corticospinal tract structure in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). AlterG can help CP children walk on the treadmill by reducing their weights up to 80% and maintain their balance during locomotion. AlterG training thus has the potential to improve walking capacity permanently as it can provide systematic and intense locomotor training for sufficiently long period of time and produce brain neuroplasticity. AlterG training was given for 45 minutes, three times a week for two months. The neuroplasticity of corticospinal tract was evaluated using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). The fractional Anisotropy (FA) feature was extracted to quantify structural changes of the corticospinal tract. Walking capacity was evaluated using popular clinical measurements of gait; i.e., walking speed, mobility and balance. The evaluations were done before and after training. Our results revealed that AlterG training resulted in an increase in average FA value of the corticospinal tract following the training. The outcome measures of clinical assessments of gait presented enhanced walking capacity of the CP subjects. Our findings indicated that the improved walking capacity was concurrent with the enhancement of the corticospinal tract structure. The clinical implication is that AlterG training may be considered as a therapeutic tool for permanent gait improvement in CP children.

  8. Cardiovascular genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wung, Shu-Fen; Hickey, Kathleen T; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y; Gallek, Matthew J

    2013-03-01

    This article provides an update on cardiovascular genomics using three clinically relevant exemplars, including myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, and sudden cardiac death (SCD). ORGANIZATIONAL CONSTRUCT: Recent advances in cardiovascular genomic research, testing, and clinical implications are presented. Genomic nurse experts reviewed and summarized recent salient literature to provide updates on three selected cardiovascular genomic conditions. Research is ongoing to discover comprehensive genetic markers contributing to many common forms of cardiovascular disease (CVD), including MI and stroke. However, genomic technologies are increasingly being used clinically, particularly in patients with long QT syndrome (LQTS) or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) who are at risk for SCD. Currently, there are no clinically recommended genetic tests for many common forms of CVD even though direct-to-consumer genetic tests are being marketed to healthcare providers and the general public. On the other hand, genetic testing for patients with certain single gene conditions, including channelopathies (e.g., LQTS) and cardiomyopathies (e.g., HCM), is recommended clinically. Nurses play a pivotal role in cardiogenetics and are actively engaged in direct clinical care of patients and families with a wide variety of heritable conditions. It is important for nurses to understand current development of cardiovascular genomics and be prepared to translate the new genomic knowledge into practice. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  9. Heart-Brain Axis: Effects of Neurologic Injury on Cardiovascular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahsili-Fahadan, Pouya; Geocadin, Romergryko G

    2017-02-03

    A complex interaction exists between the nervous and cardiovascular systems. A large network of cortical and subcortical brain regions control cardiovascular function via the sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow. A dysfunction in one system may lead to changes in the function of the other. The effects of cardiovascular disease on the nervous system have been widely studied; however, our understanding of the effects of neurological disorders on the cardiovascular system has only expanded in the past 2 decades. Various pathologies of the nervous system can lead to a wide range of alterations in function and structure of the cardiovascular system ranging from transient and benign electrographic changes to myocardial injury, cardiomyopathy, and even cardiac death. In this article, we first review the anatomy and physiology of the central and autonomic nervous systems in regard to control of the cardiovascular function. The effects of neurological injury on cardiac function and structure will be summarized, and finally, we review neurological disorders commonly associated with cardiovascular manifestations. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. A histological study of the effect of exogenous melatonin on gentamicin induced structural alterations of proximal tubules in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapić, Dina; Mornjaković, Zakira; Ćosović, Esad; Šahinović, Maida

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the reactive changes of rat proximal tubules caused by gentamicin and the effect of relatively low doses of melatonin. 48 adult male Wistar rats were distributed into six groups of equal size which all received one of the following daily intraperitoneal injections: vehicle (5% ethanol in Ringer solution) during 11 days (C); gentamicin (80 mg/kg) during 8 days (G), two groups which concomitantly received gentamicin (80 mg/kg) during 8 days and melatonin in two different test doses (5 or 20 mg/kg) during 11 days (GM1, GM2) and two groups treated only with melatonin in two different doses (5 or 20 mg/kg) during 11 days (M1, M2). Histological analysis included qualitative and semi-quantitative light microscopy analysis of proximal tubules. Exogenous melatonin had no significant effect on the microstructure, independently of dosis. The changes of proximal tubules microstructure induced by gentamicin were expressed in the form of granulovacuolar degeneration, necrosis and desquamation. The grade of proximal tubular changes was smaller in animals who besides gentamicin received melatonin. Melatonin has a dose dependent protective effect on the structural alterations of proximal tubules of the kidney induced by gentamicin.

  11. Time-Dependent Alterations of MMPs, TIMPs and Tendon Structure in Human Achilles Tendons after Acute Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkwitz, Susann; Schmock, Aysha; Kurtoglu, Alper; Tsitsilonis, Serafeim; Manegold, Sebastian; Wildemann, Britt; Klatte-Schulz, Franka

    2017-10-20

    A balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) is required to maintain tendon homeostasis. Variation in this balance over time might impact on the success of tendon healing. This study aimed to analyze structural changes and the expression profile of MMPs and TIMPs in human Achilles tendons at different time-points after rupture. Biopsies from 37 patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture were taken at surgery and grouped according to time after rupture: early (2-4 days), middle (5-6 days), and late (≥7 days), and intact Achilles tendons served as control. The histological score increased from the early to the late time-point after rupture, indicating the progression towards a more degenerative status. In comparison to intact tendons, qRT-PCR analysis revealed a significantly increased expression of MMP-1, -2, -13, TIMP-1, COL1A1, and COL3A1 in ruptured tendons, whereas TIMP-3 decreased. Comparing the changes over time post rupture, the expression of MMP-9, -13, and COL1A1 significantly increased, whereas MMP-3 and -10 expression decreased. TIMP expression was not significantly altered over time. MMP staining by immunohistochemistry was positive in the ruptured tendons exemplarily analyzed from early and late time-points. The study demonstrates a pivotal contribution of all investigated MMPs and TIMP-1, but a minor role of TIMP-2, -3, and -4, in the early human tendon healing process.

  12. Low concentrations, potential ecological consequences: Synthetic estrogens alter life-history and demographic structures of aquatic invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, María Sol; Hallgren, Per; Balseiro, Esteban; Hansson, Lars-Anders

    2013-01-01

    Contraceptive drugs are nowadays found in aquatic environments around the globe. Particularly, 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE 2 ) may act even at low concentrations, such as those recorded in natural ecosystems. We evaluated the physiological effects of EE 2 on cyclopoids and calanoids, common copepods in both marine and freshwater communities. We used three EE 2 concentrations and assessed its impact on activity of different physiological endpoints: Acetylcholinesterase (neurotransmission), Glutathione S-transferase (detoxifying system), and Caspase-3 (apoptosis). While EE 2 exerts, distinctive effect on detoxifying and apoptotic systems, no effect on AChE was observed at environmental doses. Our results show that EE 2 exposure affects differently copepod physiology endpoints, altering moulting process, adult recruitment in calanoids and calanoid to cyclopoid ratio. The ecological consequences of this underlying physiological process may affect since life history to population and community structures, and this represent a new aspects of this xenobiotic in natural systems. Highlights: •We evaluated physiological effects of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE 2 ) on copepods. •We measured the EE 2 effect on neurotransmission, detoxifying system and apoptosis. •EE 2 exert distinctive effect on detoxifying and apoptotic systems. •EE 2 affects differently calanoids and cyclopoids moulting and adult recruitment. •Physiological impact in invertebrates' communities is a novel aspect of EE 2 effects. -- Anthropogenic estrogens modify the physiological functioning of aquatic invertebrates

  13. Enhanced Bio-hydrogen Production from Protein Wastewater by Altering Protein Structure and Amino Acids Acidification Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Naidong; Chen, Yinguang; Chen, Aihui; Feng, Leiyu

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced bio-hydrogen production from protein wastewater by altering protein structure and amino acids acidification type via pH control was investigated. The hydrogen production reached 205.2 mL/g-protein when protein wastewater was pretreated at pH 12 and then fermented at pH 10. The mechanism studies showed that pH 12 pretreatment significantly enhanced protein bio-hydrolysis during the subsequent fermentation stage as it caused the unfolding of protein, damaged the protein hydrogen bonding networks, and destroyed the disulfide bridges, which increased the susceptibility of protein to protease. Moreover, pH 10 fermentation produced more acetic but less propionic acid during the anaerobic fermentation of amino acids, which was consistent with the theory of fermentation type affecting hydrogen production. Further analyses of the critical enzymes, genes, and microorganisms indicated that the activity and abundance of hydrogen producing bacteria in the pH 10 fermentation reactor were greater than those in the control. PMID:24495932

  14. Mercury alters the bacterial community structure and diversity in soil even at concentrations lower than the guideline values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub, Khandaker Rayhan; Subashchandrabose, Suresh Ramraj; Krishnan, Kannan; Naidu, Ravi; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of inorganic mercury (Hg) on bacterial community and diversity in different soils. Three soils-neutral, alkaline and acidic-were spiked with six different concentrations of Hg ranging from 0 to 200 mg kg -1 and aged for 90 days. At the end of the ageing period, 18 samples from three different soils were investigated for bacterial community structure and soil physicochemical properties. Illumina MiSeq-based 16s ribosomal RNA (rRNA) amplicon sequencing revealed the alteration in the bacterial community between un-spiked control soils and Hg-spiked soils. Among the bacterial groups, Actinobacteria (22.65%) were the most abundant phyla in all samples followed by Proteobacteria (21.95%), Bacteroidetes (4.15%), Firmicutes (2.9%) and Acidobacteria (2.04%). However, the largest group showing increased abundance with higher Hg doses was the unclassified group (45.86%), followed by Proteobacteria. Mercury had a considerable negative impact on key soil functional bacteria such as ammonium oxidizers and nitrifiers. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated that among the measured soil properties, Hg had a major influence on bacterial community structure. Furthermore, nonlinear regression analysis confirmed that Hg significantly decreased soil bacterial alpha diversity in lower organic carbon containing neutral and alkaline soils, whereas in acidic soil with higher organic carbon there was no significant correlation. EC 20 values obtained by a nonlinear regression analysis indicated that Hg significantly decreased soil bacterial diversity in concentrations lower than several guideline values.

  15. Solution-active structural alterations in liganded hemoglobins C (beta6 Glu --> Lys) and S (beta6 Glu --> Val).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, R E; Juszczak, L J; Fataliev, N A; Friedman, J M; Nagel, R L

    1999-05-14

    Based upon existing crystallographic evidence, HbS, HbC, and HbA have essentially the same molecular structure. However, important areas of the molecule are not well defined crystallographically (e.g. the N-terminal nonhelical portion of the alpha and beta chains), and conformational constraints differ in solution and in the crystalline state. Over the years, our laboratory and others have provided evidence of conformational changes in HbS and, more recently, in HbC. We now present data based upon allosteric perturbation monitored by front-face fluorescence, ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and oxygen equilibrium studies that confirm and significantly expand previous findings suggesting solution-active structural differences in liganded forms of HbS and HbC distal to the site of mutation and involving the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate binding pocket. The liganded forms of these hemoglobins are of significant interest because HbC crystallizes in the erythrocyte in the oxy form, and oxy HbS exhibits increased mechanical precipitability and a high propensity to oxidize. Specific findings are as follows: 1) differences in the intrinsic fluorescence indicate that the Trp microenvironments are more hydrophobic for HbS > HbC > HbA, 2) ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy detects alterations in Tyr hydrogen bonding, in Trp hydrophobicity at the alpha1beta2 interface (beta37), and in the A-helix (alpha14/beta15) of both chains, 3) displacement by inositol hexaphosphate of the Hb-bound 8-hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonate (the fluorescent 2,3-diphosphoglycerate analog) follows the order HbA > HbS > HbC, and 4) oxygen equilibria measurements indicate a differential allosteric effect by inositol hexaphosphate for HbC approximately HbS > HbA.

  16. Cardiovascular Disease and Thyroid Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Jens; Selmer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid function has a profound effect on the heart, and both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates are increased in hyperthyroidism. New-onset atrial fibrillation carries a prolonged risk for the development of hyperthyroidism, suggesting altered availability of thyroid hormones at the ce......Thyroid function has a profound effect on the heart, and both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates are increased in hyperthyroidism. New-onset atrial fibrillation carries a prolonged risk for the development of hyperthyroidism, suggesting altered availability of thyroid hormones...... at the cellular level. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is associated with increased left ventricular mass of the heart, which reverts after obtaining euthyroidism. Mortality and risk of major cardiovascular events are increased. Subclinical hypothyroidism is also associated with subtle changes in the heart, e.g. its...

  17. Cardiovascular KATPchannels and advanced aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua-Qian; Subbotina, Ekaterina; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Coetzee, William A

    2016-01-01

    With advanced aging, there is a decline in innate cardiovascular function. This decline is not general in nature. Instead, specific changes occur that impact the basic cardiovascular function, which include alterations in biochemical pathways and ion channel function. This review focuses on a particular ion channel that couple the latter two processes, namely the K ATP channel, which opening is promoted by alterations in intracellular energy metabolism. We show that the intrinsic properties of the K ATP channel changes with advanced aging and argue that the channel can be further modulated by biochemical changes. The importance is widespread, given the ubiquitous nature of the K ATP channel in the cardiovascular system where it can regulate processes as diverse as cardiac function, blood flow and protection mechanisms against superimposed stress, such as cardiac ischemia. We highlight questions that remain to be answered before the K ATP channel can be considered as a viable target for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Chronic inflammation and cardiovascular risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    process linking cardiovascular risk factors for atherosclerosis and its complications to an altered arterial ... others are also associated with enhanced atherosclerosis. There are many reports of the relationship ... scale prospective cohort studies have shown that CRP predicts incident myocardial infarction, stroke and ...

  19. ANALYSIS OF THE INCIDENCE AND STRUCTURE OF THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM DISEASES IN THE FAR NORTH MIGRANTS OVER THE PERIOD OF READAPTATION TO THE NEW CLIMATIC CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Anatolyevich Yaskevich

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study. To study the frequency and structure of cardiovascular diseases of the Far North migrants within the period of readaptation to the new climatic conditions. Materials and methods. 145 migrants with stages II–III of arterial hypertension (AH coming from the Far North arrived in the southern regions of central Siberia for permanent residence. The survey included questionnaires, clinical, instrumental, and functional and laboratory research methods. Results. After moving to central Siberia, the hypertensive crisis is more common in people who lived in the Far North for 30 years or more. An increase in the hypertensive crisis frequency was observed in men, rather than women, whereas the stroke incidence in female migrants gets higher, but remains unchanged in male migrants. An increase in the incidence of diseases that complicate the hypertension progression was detected in the migrants during the period following the migration. An increase in the incidence of angina attacks and strokes as well as a trend towards an increase in the incidence of myocardial infarction and heart failure after moving to central Siberia is caused by an increase in the level of neurotic disorders associated with social and economic factors. Conclusion. The identified patterns should be taken into account in the construction of prevention and rehabilitation programs for the Far North migrants along with an obligatory assessment of the adaptive and readaptive capabilities of the organism. Both the follow-up plan and the list of the required measures should be made individually, while taking into account the identified cardiovascular diseases, concomitant pathology and risk factors. Should the migrant be diagnosed with any cardiovascular diseases, they need to consult a cardiologist with the purpose of correcting both medicated and medication-free therapy for the readaptation period.

  20. Natural acidification changes the timing and rate of succession, alters community structure, and increases homogeneity in marine biofouling communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Norah E M; Milazzo, Marco; Rastrick, Samuel P S; Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Therriault, Thomas W; Harley, Christopher D G

    2018-01-01

    Ocean acidification may have far-reaching consequences for marine community and ecosystem dynamics, but its full impacts remain poorly understood due to the difficulty of manipulating pCO 2 at the ecosystem level to mimic realistic fluctuations that occur on a number of different timescales. It is especially unclear how quickly communities at various stages of development respond to intermediate-scale pCO 2 change and, if high pCO 2 is relieved mid-succession, whether past acidification effects persist, are reversed by alleviation of pCO 2 stress, or are worsened by departures from prior high pCO 2 conditions to which organisms had acclimatized. Here, we used reciprocal transplant experiments along a shallow water volcanic pCO 2 gradient to assess the importance of the timing and duration of high pCO 2 exposure (i.e., discrete events at different stages of successional development vs. continuous exposure) on patterns of colonization and succession in a benthic fouling community. We show that succession at the acidified site was initially delayed (less community change by 8 weeks) but then caught up over the next 4 weeks. These changes in succession led to homogenization of communities maintained in or transplanted to acidified conditions, and altered community structure in ways that reflected both short- and longer-term acidification history. These community shifts are likely a result of interspecific variability in response to increased pCO 2 and changes in species interactions. High pCO 2 altered biofilm development, allowing serpulids to do best at the acidified site by the end of the experiment, although early (pretransplant) negative effects of pCO 2 on recruitment of these worms were still detectable. The ascidians Diplosoma sp. and Botryllus sp. settled later and were more tolerant to acidification. Overall, transient and persistent acidification-driven changes in the biofouling community, via both past and more recent exposure, could have important

  1. Structural Alterations of Segmented Macular Inner Layers in Aquaporin4-Antibody-Positive Optic Neuritis Patients in a Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxia Peng

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyse the structural injury of the peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (pRNFL and segmented macular layers in optic neuritis (ON in aquaporin4-antibody (AQP4-Ab seropositivity(AQP4-Ab-positiveON patients and in AQP4-Ab seronegativity (AQP4-Ab-negative ON patients in order to evaluate their correlations with the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and the value of the early diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica (NMO.This is a retrospective, cross-sectional and control observational study.In total, 213 ON patients (291 eyes and 50 healthy controls (HC (100 eyes were recruited in this study. According to a serum AQP4-Ab assay, 98 ON patients (132 eyes were grouped as AQP4-Ab-positive ON and 115 ON patients (159 eyes were grouped as AQP4-Ab-negative ON cohorts. All subjects underwent scanning with spectralis optical coherence tomography (OCT and BCVA tests. pRNFL and segmented macular layer measurements were analysed.The pRNFL thickness in AQP4-Ab-positive ON eyes showed a more serious loss during 0-2 months (-27.61μm versus -14.47 μm and ≥6 months (-57.91μm versus -47.19μm when compared with AQP4-Ab-negative ON eyes. AQP4-Ab-positive ON preferentially damaged the nasal lateral pRNFL. The alterations in the macular ganglion cell layer plus the inner plexiform layer (GCIP in AQP4-Ab-positive ON eyes were similar to those in AQP4-Ab-negative ON eyes. AQP4-Ab-positive ON eyes had entirely different injury patterns in the inner nuclear layer (INL compared with AQP4-Ab-negative ON eyes during the first 6 months after the initial ON attack. These differences were as follows: the INL volume of AQP4-Ab-positive ON eyes had a gradual growing trend compared with AQP4-Ab-negative ON eyes, and it increased rapidly during 0-2 months, reached its peak during 2-4 months, and then decreased gradually. The pRNFL and GCIP in AQP4-Ab-positive ON eyes had positive correlations with BCVA. When the pRNFL thickness decreased to 95%CI (50.77

  2. Prevalence of non-cardiovascular findings on CT angiography in children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Archana [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); St. Christopher' s Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hellinger, Jeffrey C. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); New York Cardiovascular Institute at Lenox Hill Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Servaes, Sabah; Keller, Marc S. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Schwartz, Mathew C. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Levine Children' s Hospital, Sanger Heart and Vascular Institute, Charlotte, NC (United States); Epelman, Monica [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nemours Children' s Health System/Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging/Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2017-03-15

    congenital heart disease who undergo CT angiography. Based upon our study population, if a child with congenital heart disease has a CT angiography, five out of six will have non-cardiovascular findings, while nearly three out of four (73.7%; 221 / 300) will have significant non-cardiovascular findings. Close attention to the non-cardiovascular structures in children with congenital heart disease presenting for a CT angiography is recommended as in nearly 40% of these children, findings were unexpected and directly altered patient care. (orig.)

  3. Prevalence of non-cardiovascular findings on CT angiography in children with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Archana; Hellinger, Jeffrey C.; Servaes, Sabah; Keller, Marc S.; Schwartz, Mathew C.; Epelman, Monica

    2017-01-01

    congenital heart disease who undergo CT angiography. Based upon our study population, if a child with congenital heart disease has a CT angiography, five out of six will have non-cardiovascular findings, while nearly three out of four (73.7%; 221 / 300) will have significant non-cardiovascular findings. Close attention to the non-cardiovascular structures in children with congenital heart disease presenting for a CT angiography is recommended as in nearly 40% of these children, findings were unexpected and directly altered patient care. (orig.)

  4. Incorporating freeze-dried strawberry powder into a high-fat meal does not alter postprandial vascular function or blood markers of cardiovascular disease risk: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Chesney K; Skulas-Ray, Ann C; Gaugler, Trent L; Lambert, Joshua D; Proctor, David N; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2017-02-01

    Postprandial dysmetabolism-an exaggerated spike in triglycerides, glucose, and insulin-increases cardiovascular disease risk by inducing oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Polyphenol-rich foods may blunt these effects when they are incorporated into a high-fat, calorie-dense meal. Strawberries are a rich source of polyphenols, but there is little research on their postprandial effects. This study was designed to investigate the effect of adding 40 g freeze-dried strawberry powder (∼1 lb. or 0.45 kg fresh strawberries) to a high-fat (50 g total fat) meal on postprandial vascular function, as well as triglyceride, glucose, and insulin responses. Healthy, overweight or obese [mean ± SEM body mass index (in kg/m 2 ): 31 ± 0.5] adults (mean ± SEM age: 28 ± 2 y; 17 men and 13 women) consumed a control meal and a strawberry meal in a randomized crossover design. Testing sessions were separated by ≥1 wk for men and ∼1 mo for women to control for hormonal variations. Blood samples were obtained before the meal and 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h after the meal. Central blood pressure and arterial stiffness indexes were measured at baseline and 2 and 4 h postmeal with the use of pulse waveform analysis. There were no significant differences between the strawberry and control meals for any outcomes. Consumption of either meal significantly decreased the augmentation index at 2 and 4 h (P < 0.002) and significantly increased triglycerides, insulin, and glucose at all time points (P < 0.001) relative to baseline. The strawberry intervention did not alter vascular function or attenuate postprandial metabolic derangements in triglycerides, glucose, or insulin relative to the control meal. Additional research is needed to clarify whether strawberries or other polyphenol-rich interventions improve postprandial responses, and future studies should take into account the acute meal-induced improvements in measures of vascular function. This trial was registered

  5. Invited review: aging and the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Alberto U; Radaelli, Alberto; Centola, Marco

    2003-12-01

    Aging is associated with complex and diversified changes of cardiovascular structure and function. The heart becomes slightly hypertrophic and hyporesponsive to sympathetic (but not parasympathetic) stimuli, so that the exercise-induced increases in heart rate and myocardial contractility are blunted in older hearts. The aorta and major elastic arteries become elongated and stiffer, with increased pulse wave velocity, evidence of endothelial dysfunction, and biochemical patterns resembling early atherosclerosis. The arterial baroreflex is sizably altered in aging, but different components are differentially affected: there is a definite impairment of arterial baroreceptor control of the heart but much better preserved baroreceptor control of peripheral vascular resistance. Alterations at the afferent, central neural, efferent, and effector organ portions of the reflex arch have been claimed to account for age-related baroreflex changes, but no conclusive evidence is available on this mechanistic aspect. Reflexes arising from cardiopulmonary vagal afferents are also blunted in aged individuals. The cardiovascular and reflex changes brought about by aging may have significant implications for circulatory homeostasis in health and disease.

  6. Cardiovascular disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    risk factors. These associations involve obesity and. 37 may be modified by improving fitness . Sedentary lifestyle with its associated risk is increasing becoming rampant in Africa due to rural to urban migration. Injury to endothelium causes endothelial dysfunction. Cardiovascular disease: A Global Epidemic extending into.

  7. Alteraciones estructurales de la glándula tiroidea tras la radioterapia Structural alterations of thyroid gland after radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caridad Verdecia Cañizares

    2009-03-01

    present paper was to report cased detected in our study of structural anomalies of thyroid gland in patients underwent radiotherapy for treatment of malignant head and neck tumors. METHODS: A cross-sectional and descriptive study was carried out to determine prevalence of structural alterations of thyroid gland in 43 patients survival of head-neck tumors underwent radiotherapy admitted in "William Soler" and "Juan Manual Márquez" Teaching Hospitals during 10 years (1990 to 2000. RESULTS: More frequent structural alteration of thyroid gland includes glandular fibrosis (18,5% followed by thyroid carcinoma, and of simple cysts of that gland (11,1% respectively. There were 2 cases of differential carcinoma of thyroid gland (7, 4%, and one of adeno-follicular mixed injury (3, 7%. Fine-needle aspirate cytology allows detection of most of these injuries and also the intra-parenchymatous guided-echography of this gland. Treatment of injuries founded was surgical and we performed a total thyroidectomy in two patients presenting with differential carcinoma of thyroid gland, subtotal thyroidectomy in t here patients with cysts of that gland, and thyroid adenomas. In cases of glandular fibrosis there was a concomitant thyroid hypofunction, thus, we administered substitute treatment using Levothyroxine. CONCLUSIONS: Fine-needle aspiration cytology by means of echography of thyroid gland allows diagnosing of structural alterations no detected in physical examination. More irradiated malignant pathology was non-Hodgkin lymphomas. More doses of irradiation, more is thyroid pathology.

  8. HIV and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 652 HIV and Cardiovascular Disease HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE WHY SHOULD PEOPLE WITH HIV CARE ABOUT CVD? ... OF CVD? WHAT ABOUT CHANGING MEDICATIONS? HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes a group of problems ...

  9. Therapeutic effects of an anti-gravity locomotor training (AlterG) on postural balance and cerebellum structure in children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasooli, A H; Birgani, P M; Azizi, Sh; Shahrokhi, A; Mirbagheri, M M

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated the therapeutic effects of anti-gravity locomotor treadmill (AlterG) training on postural stability in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) and spasticity, particularly in the lower extremity. AlterG can facilitate walking by reducing the weight of CP children by up to 80%; it can also help subjects maintain an appropriate posture during the locomotor AlterG training. Thus, we hypothesized that AlterG training, for a sufficient period of time, has a potential to produce cerebellum neuroplasticity, and consequently result in an effective permanent postural stability. AlterG training was given for 45 minutes, three times a week for two months. Postural balance was evaluated using posturography. The parameters of the Romberg based posturography were extracted to quantify the Center of Balance (CoP). The neuroplasticity of Cerebellum was evaluated using a Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). The evaluations were done pre- and post-training. The Fractional Anisotropy (FA) feature was used for quantifying structural changes in the cerebellum. The results showed that AlterG training resulted in an increase in average FA value of the cerebellum white matter following the training. The results of the posturography evaluations showed a consistent improvement in postural stability. These results were consistent in all subjects. Our findings indicated that the improvement in the posture was accompanied with the enhancement of the cerebellum white matter structure. The clinical implication is that AlterG training can be considered a therapeutic tool for an effective and permanent improvement of postural stability in CP children.

  10. [Assessment of control of cardiovascular risk factors in obese posmenopausal women after monitoring a structured dietary education and exercise program. (SÍSIFO Program)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Soto, Z M; Montoro García, S; Leal Hernández, M; Abellán Alemán, J

    2016-01-01

    Evaluate the influence of a specific program of physical exercise on cardiovascular risk, quality of life and eating habits of menopausal women. Prospective, intervention study previous-after without control group for three months. 66 menopausal women were included. The intervention consisted of a structured diet and exercise program. Biochemical, anthropometric, dietary and life quality parameters were determined before and three months after surgery. After the intervention a decrease in weight (4.4±2,3kg) and BMI (1.83±0.84kg/m(2)) (pcardiovascular risk by the Framingham tables decreases by 3% postoperatively (pcardiovascular risk of the women studied. It also improves the quality of life and dietary habits. Copyright © 2016 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Cardiovascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulen, R.L.; Grosh, J.

    1984-01-01

    Invasive cardiovascular diagnostic procedures involve a finite risk and therefore can be recommended only when the benefit appears to exceed the risk by a substantial margin. The risk/benefit ratio varies not only with the procedure concerned but with the status of the vascular system, concomitant diseases, and the risks of both the suspected illness and its treatment. The risks inherent in the procedures per se are detailed in the sections to follow

  12. Cardiovascular manifestations of subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethuraman Manikandan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH is one of the devastating conditions, especially the aneurysmal bleed which has high mortality as well as morbidity. The mortality and morbidity caused by SAH have been recognised to be caused by both neurological and systemic causes. The alterations in systemic and other organ damage could cause death in up to 40% of SAH patients. Among the systemic manifestations, cardiovascular and respiratory complications increase hospitalisation and worsen the outcome. The main pathophysiological mechanism is the increased sympathetic activation causing myocardial necrosis. Various cardiovascular manifestations range from electrocardiogram changes to myocardial ischaemia, cardiac failure and arrhythmias. This review deals with the cardiac manifestations in SAH patients.

  13. Importance of doping, dopant distribution, and defects on electronic band structure alteration of metal oxide nanoparticles: Implications for reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Navid B.; Milliron, Delia J.; Aich, Nirupam; Katz, Lynn E.; Liljestrand, Howard M.; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are considered to have the potency to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the key mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity. However, the nanotoxicology literature demonstrates a lack of consensus on the dominant toxicity mechanism(s) for a particular MONP. Moreover, recent literature has studied the correlation between band structure of pristine MONPs to their ability to introduce ROS and thus has downplayed the ROS-mediated toxicological relevance of a number of such materials. On the other hand, material science can control the band structure of these materials to engineer their electronic and optical properties and thereby is constantly modulating the pristine electronic structure. Since band structure is the fundamental material property that controls ROS-producing ability, band tuning via introduction of dopants and defects needs careful consideration in toxicity assessments. This commentary critically evaluates the existing material science and nanotoxicity literature and identifies the gap in our understanding of the role of important crystal structure features (i.e., dopants and defects) on MONPs' electronic structure alteration as well as their ROS-generation capability. Furthermore, this commentary provides suggestions on characterization techniques to evaluate dopants and defects on the crystal structure and identifies research needs for advanced theoretical predictions of their electronic band structures and ROS-generation abilities. Correlation of electronic band structure and ROS will not only aid in better mechanistic assessment of nanotoxicity but will be impactful in designing and developing ROS-based applications ranging from water disinfection to next-generation antibiotics and even cancer therapeutics. - Highlights: • Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) • Band structure of pristine MONPs is different than those with dopants/defects • Dopants/defects modulate

  14. Importance of doping, dopant distribution, and defects on electronic band structure alteration of metal oxide nanoparticles: Implications for reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, Navid B., E-mail: navid.saleh@utexas.edu [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Milliron, Delia J. [McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Aich, Nirupam [Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, 14260 (United States); Katz, Lynn E.; Liljestrand, Howard M.; Kirisits, Mary Jo [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are considered to have the potency to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the key mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity. However, the nanotoxicology literature demonstrates a lack of consensus on the dominant toxicity mechanism(s) for a particular MONP. Moreover, recent literature has studied the correlation between band structure of pristine MONPs to their ability to introduce ROS and thus has downplayed the ROS-mediated toxicological relevance of a number of such materials. On the other hand, material science can control the band structure of these materials to engineer their electronic and optical properties and thereby is constantly modulating the pristine electronic structure. Since band structure is the fundamental material property that controls ROS-producing ability, band tuning via introduction of dopants and defects needs careful consideration in toxicity assessments. This commentary critically evaluates the existing material science and nanotoxicity literature and identifies the gap in our understanding of the role of important crystal structure features (i.e., dopants and defects) on MONPs' electronic structure alteration as well as their ROS-generation capability. Furthermore, this commentary provides suggestions on characterization techniques to evaluate dopants and defects on the crystal structure and identifies research needs for advanced theoretical predictions of their electronic band structures and ROS-generation abilities. Correlation of electronic band structure and ROS will not only aid in better mechanistic assessment of nanotoxicity but will be impactful in designing and developing ROS-based applications ranging from water disinfection to next-generation antibiotics and even cancer therapeutics. - Highlights: • Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) • Band structure of pristine MONPs is different than those with dopants/defects • Dopants/defects modulate

  15. Dorsal raphe nucleus of brain in the rats flown in space inflight and postflight alteration of structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, I.

    The structure of brain dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) was studied in the rats flown in space aboard Space Shuttle "Columbia" (STS-58, SLS-2 program) and dissected on day 13 of the mission ("inflight" rats) and in 5-6 hours after finishing 14-day flight ("postflight" rats). The brain of "inflight" rats were excised after decapitation, sectioned sagitally halves of brain were fixed by immersion in 2,5 % glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer pH 7.3 at 4°C and kept in the flight at 4°C. After landing the brain frontal 0.5 mm sections from DRN area were osmificated and embedded in araldite at NASA ARC. The brains of "postflight": and control rats were underwent to the same procedure. Electronmicroscopical analysis, computer morphometry and glial cell count were performed at Moscow. In DRN neuropil of "inflight" rats the most part of axo-dendritic synapses were surrounded by glia cell processes and had decreased electron density of pre- and postsynaptic membrane and pronounced diminution of synaptic vesicle amount while dendrites were characterized by decrease in matrix electron density and microtubule quantity that in total indicates the decline of afferent flow reaching DRN neurons in microgravity. In DRN neurons of "inflight" rats all mitochondria were characterized by evenly increased dimensions, decreased matrix electron density, small amount of short and far- between located cristae and enlarged intermembrane and intercristae spaces, that in total points out low level of coupling of oxidation to phosphorilation, decrease in energy supply of neuron. Amount of ribosome in cytoplasm was significantly decreased indicating lower lever of biosynthetic processes. The last is supported by diminished dimensions of neuronal body, nucleus and nucleolus (place of r RNA synthesis), cross section area of that were reduced in DRN neurons of "inflight" rats by 18.8 % (p functional activity of DRN - main serotoniner gic center of brain and in combination with the data (Krasnov et

  16. Altered structure and function of adipose tissue in long-lived mice with growth hormone-related mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Justin; McFadden, Samuel; Bartke, Andrzej

    2017-04-03

    A major focus of biogerontology is elucidating the role(s) of the endocrine system in aging and the accumulation of age-related diseases. Endocrine control of mammalian longevity was first reported in Ames dwarf (Prop1 df ) mice, which are long-lived due to a recessive Prop1 loss-of-function mutation resulting in deficiency of growth hormone (GH), thyroid-stimulating hormone, and prolactin. Following this report, several other GH-related mutants with altered longevity have been described including long-lived Snell dwarf and growth hormone receptor knockout mice, and short-lived GH overexpressing transgenic mice. One of the emerging areas of interest in these mutant mice is the role of adipose tissue in their altered healthspan and lifespan. Here, we provide an overview of the alterations in body composition of GH-related mutants, as well as the altered thermogenic potential of their brown adipose tissue and the altered cellular senescence and adipokine production of their white adipose tissue.

  17. Triacylglycerol structure and interesterification of palmitic and stearic acid-rich fats: an overview and implications for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Sarah E E

    2009-06-01

    The position of fatty acids in the TAG molecule (sn-1, sn-2 and sn-3) determines the physical properties of the fat, which affects its absorption, metabolism and distribution into tissues, which may have implications for the risk of CHD. The TAG structure of fats can be manipulated by the process of interesterification, which is of increasing commercial importance, as it can be used to change the physical characteristics of a fat without the generation of trans-fatty acids. Interesterified fats rich in long-chain SFA are commercially important, but few studies have investigated their health effects. Evidence from animal and human infant studies suggests that TAG structure and interesterification affect digestibility, atherogenicity and fasting lipid levels, with fats containing palmitic and stearic acid in the sn-2 position being better digested and considered to be more atherogenic. However, chronic studies in human adults suggest that TAG structure has no effect on digestibility or fasting lipids. The postprandial effects of fats with differing TAG structure are better characterised but the evidence is inconclusive; it is probable that differences in the physical characteristics of fats resulting from interesterification and changes in TAG structure are key determinants of the level of postprandial lipaemia, rather than the position of fatty acids in the TAG. The present review gives an overview of TAG structure and interesterified palmitic and stearic acid-rich fats, their physical properties and their acute and chronic effects in human adults in relation to CHD.

  18. Interaction of a common painkiller piroxicam and copper-piroxicam with chromatin causes structural alterations accompanied by modulation at the epigenomic/genomic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sathi; Sanyal, Sulagna; Chakraborty, Payal; Das, Chandrima; Sarkar, Munna

    2017-08-01

    NSAIDs are the most common class of painkillers and anti-inflammatory agents. They also show other functions like chemoprevention and chemosuppression for which they act at the protein but not at the genome level since they are mostly anions at physiological pH, which prohibit their approach to the poly-anionic DNA. Complexing the drugs with bioactive metal obliterate their negative charge and allow them to bind to the DNA, thereby, opening the possibility of genome level interaction. To test this hypothesis, we present the interaction of a traditional NSAID, Piroxicam and its copper complex with core histone and chromatin. Spectroscopy, DLS, and SEM studies were applied to see the effect of the interaction on the structure of histone/chromatin. This was coupled with MTT assay, immunoblot analysis, confocal microscopy, micro array analysis and qRT-PCR. The interaction of Piroxicam and its copper complex with histone/chromatin results in structural alterations. Such structural alterations can have different biological manifestations, but to test our hypothesis, we have focused only on the accompanied modulations at the epigenomic/genomic level. The complex, showed alteration of key epigenetic signatures implicated in transcription in the global context, although Piroxicam caused no significant changes. We have correlated such alterations caused by the complex with the changes in global gene expression and validated the candidate gene expression alterations. Our results provide the proof of concept that DNA binding ability of the copper complexes of a traditional NSAID, opens up the possibility of modulations at the epigenomic/genomic level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dermatan Sulfate Epimerase 1-Deficient Mice Have Reduced Content and Changed Distribution of Iduronic Acids in Dermatan Sulfate and an Altered Collagen Structure in Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarana, M.; Kalamajski, S.; Kongsgaard, M.

    2009-01-01

    Dermatan sulfate epimerase 1 (DS-epi1) and DS-epi2 convert glucuronic acid to iduronic acid in chondroitin/dermatan sulfate biosynthesis. Here we report on the generation of DS-epi1-null mice and the resulting alterations in the chondroitin/dermatan polysaccharide chains. The numbers of long blocks...... of adjacent iduronic acids are greatly decreased in skin decorin and biglycan chondroitin/dermatan sulfate, along with a parallel decrease in iduronic-2-O-sulfated-galactosamine-4-O-sulfated structures. Both iduronic acid blocks and iduronic acids surrounded by glucuronic acids are also decreased in versican......-derived chains. DS-epi1-deficient mice are smaller than their wild-type littermates but otherwise have no gross macroscopic alterations. The lack of DS-epi1 affects the chondroitin/dermatan sulfate in many proteoglycans, and the consequences for skin collagen structure were initially analyzed. We found...

  20. Recent findings in cardiovascular physiology with space travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, Richard L

    2009-10-01

    The cardiovascular system undergoes major changes in stress with space flight primarily related to the elimination of the head-to-foot gravitational force. A major observation has been that the central venous pressure is not elevated early in space flight yet stroke volume is increased at least early in flight. Recent observations demonstrate that heart rate remains lower during the normal daily activities of space flight compared to Earth-based conditions. Structural and functional adaptations occur in the vascular system that could result in impaired response with demands of physical exertion and return to Earth. Cardiac muscle mass is reduced after flight and contractile function may be altered. Regular and specific countermeasures are essential to maintain cardiovascular health during long-duration space flight.

  1. Throughfall-mediated alterations to soil microbial community structure in a forest plot of homogenous soil texture, litter, and plant species composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stan, John; Rosier, Carl; Moore, Leslie; Gay, Trent; Reichard, James; Wu, Tiehang; Kan, Jinjun

    2015-04-01

    Identifying spatiotemporal influences on soil microbial community (SMC) structure is critical to our understanding of patterns in biogeochemical cycling and related ecological services (e.g., plant community structure, water quality, response to environmental change). Since forest canopy structure alters the spatiotemporal patterning of precipitation water and solute supplies to soils (via "throughfall"), is it possible that changes in SMC structure could arise from modifications in canopy elements? Our study investigates this question by monitoring throughfall water and dissolved ion supply to soils beneath a continuum of canopy structure: from large gaps (0% cover), to bare Quercus virginiana Mill. (southern live oak) canopy (~50-70%), to heavy Tillandsia usneoides L. (Spanish moss) canopy (>90% cover). Throughfall water supply diminished with increasing canopy cover, yet increased washoff/leaching of Na+, Cl-, PO43-, and SO42- from the canopy to the soils. Presence of T. usneoides diminished throughfall NO3-, but enhanced NH4+, concentrations supplied to subcanopy soils. The mineral soil horizon (0-10 cm) sampled in triplicate from locations receiving throughfall water and solutes from canopy gaps, bare canopy, and T. usneoides-laden canopy significantly differed in soil chemistry parameters (pH, Ca2+, Mg2+, CEC). Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturant Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) banding patterns beneath similar canopy covers (experiencing similar throughfall dynamics) also produced high similarities per ANalyses Of SIMilarity (ANO-SIM), and clustered together when analyzed by Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS). These results suggest that modifications of forest canopy structures are capable of affecting mineral-soil horizon SMC structure via throughfall when canopies' biomass distribution is highly heterogeneous. As SMC structure, in many instances, relates to functional diversity, we suggest that future research seek to identify functional

  2. Apolipoprotein E: from cardiovascular disease to neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahley, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E was initially described as a lipid transport protein and major ligand for low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors with a role in cholesterol metabolism and cardiovascular disease. It has since emerged as a major risk factor (causative gene) for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Detailed understanding of the structural features of the three isoforms (apoE2, apoE3, and apoE4), which differ by only a single amino acid interchange, has elucidated their unique functions. ApoE2 and apoE4 increase the risk for heart disease: apoE2 increases atherogenic lipoprotein levels (it binds poorly to LDL receptors), and apoE4 increases LDL levels (it binds preferentially to triglyceride-rich, very low density lipoproteins, leading to downregulation of LDL receptors). ApoE4 also increases the risk for neurodegenerative diseases, decreases their age of onset, or alters their progression. ApoE4 likely causes neurodegeneration secondary to its abnormal structure, caused by an interaction between its carboxyl- and amino-terminal domains, called domain interaction. When neurons are stressed or injured, they synthesize apoE to redistribute cholesterol for neuronal repair or remodeling. However, because of its altered structure, neuronal apoE4 undergoes neuron-specific proteolysis, generating neurotoxic fragments (12-29 kDa) that escape the secretory pathway and cause mitochondrial dysfunction and cytoskeletal alterations, including tau phosphorylation. ApoE4-associated pathology can be prevented by small-molecule structure correctors that block domain interaction by converting apoE4 to a molecule that resembles apoE3 both structurally and functionally. Structure correctors are a potential therapeutic approach to reduce apoE4 pathology in both cardiovascular and neurological disorders.

  3. Obesity and cardiovascular risk in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Raj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The global prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents has increased substantially over the past several decades. These trends are also visible in developing economies like India. Childhood obesity impacts all the major organ systems of the body and is well known to result in significant morbidity and mortality. Obesity in childhood and adolescence is associated with established risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and accelerated atherosclerotic processes, including elevated blood pressure (BP, atherogenic dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, type II diabetes mellitus, cardiac structural and functional changes and obstructive sleep apnea. Probable mechanisms of obesity-related hypertension include insulin resistance, sodium retention, increased sympathetic nervous system activity, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and altered vascular function. Adiposity promotes cardiovascular risk clustering during childhood and adolescence. Insulin resistance has a strong association with childhood obesity. A variety of proinflammatory mediators that are associated with cardiometabolic dysfunction are also known to be influenced by obesity levels. Obesity in early life promotes atherosclerotic disease in vascular structures such as the aorta and the coronary arteries. Childhood and adolescent adiposity has strong influences on the structure and function of the heart, predominantly of the left ventricle. Obesity compromises pulmonary function and increases the risk of sleep-disordered breathing and obstructive sleep apnea. Neglecting childhood and adolescent obesity will compromise the cardiovascular health of the pediatric population and is likely to result in a serious public health crisis in future.

  4. Are there structural alterations in the enamel organ of offspring of rats with alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus?

    OpenAIRE

    Silva-Sousa,Yara Teresinha Corrêa; Peres,Luiz Cesar; Foss,Milton César

    2003-01-01

    Enamel hypoplasia is the most common developmental defect of human teeth that may be seen in deciduous teeth of babies born to diabetic women. In the present experimental study, we analyzed the enamel organ of the mandibular incisors of the offspring of rats with alloxan-induced diabetes. By light microscopy, no alterations could be found in the enamel organ of rats born to diabetic mothers compared to normal ones, except in one case. In contrast, significant differences were detected with co...

  5. Cardiovascular group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  6. Acute Cardiovascular Care Association Position Paper on Intensive Cardiovascular Care Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnefoy-Cudraz, Eric; Bueno, Hector; Casella, Gianni

    2018-01-01

    , the recommended management structure, the optimal number of staff, the need for specially trained cardiologists and cardiovascular nurses, the desired equipment and architecture, and the interaction with other departments in the hospital and other intensive cardiovascular care units in the region....../area. This update emphasises cardiologist training, referring to the recently updated Acute Cardiovascular Care Association core curriculum on acute cardiovascular care. The training of nurses in acute cardiovascular care is additionally addressed. Intensive cardiovascular care unit expertise is not limited......Acute cardiovascular care has progressed considerably since the last position paper was published 10 years ago. It is now a well-defined, complex field with demanding multidisciplinary teamworking. The Acute Cardiovascular Care Association has provided this update of the 2005 position paper...

  7. Assessment of the structural brain network reveals altered connectivity in children with unilateral cerebral palsy due to periventricular white matter lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannek, Kerstin; Boyd, Roslyn N; Fiori, Simona; Guzzetta, Andrea; Rose, Stephen E

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a term to describe the spectrum of disorders of impaired motor and sensory function caused by a brain lesion occurring early during development. Diffusion MRI and tractography have been shown to be useful in the study of white matter (WM) microstructure in tracts likely to be impacted by the static brain lesion. The purpose of this study was to identify WM pathways with altered connectivity in children with unilateral CP caused by periventricular white matter lesions using a whole-brain connectivity approach. Data of 50 children with unilateral CP caused by periventricular white matter lesions (5-17 years; manual ability classification system [MACS] I = 25/II = 25) and 17 children with typical development (CTD; 7-16 years) were analysed. Structural and High Angular Resolution Diffusion weighted Images (HARDI; 64 directions, b = 3000 s/mm(2)) were acquired at 3 T. Connectomes were calculated using whole-brain probabilistic tractography in combination with structural parcellation of the cortex and subcortical structures. Connections with altered fractional anisotropy (FA) in children with unilateral CP compared to CTD were identified using network-based statistics (NBS). The relationship between FA and performance of the impaired hand in bimanual tasks (Assisting Hand Assessment-AHA) was assessed in connections that showed significant differences in FA compared to CTD. FA was reduced in children with unilateral CP compared to CTD. Seven pathways, including the corticospinal, thalamocortical, and fronto-parietal association pathways were identified simultaneously in children with left and right unilateral CP. There was a positive relationship between performance of the impaired hand in bimanual tasks and FA within the cortico-spinal and thalamo-cortical pathways (r(2) = 0.16-0.44; p < 0.05). This study shows that network-based analysis of structural connectivity can identify alterations in FA in unilateral CP, and that these

  8. Biomarkers for cardiovascular risk in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canas, Jose A; Sweeten, Shawn; Balagopal, Prabhakaran Babu

    2013-03-01

    The magnitude of lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has radically increased along with the high prevalence of obesity in children. The spotlight is now on dysfunctional adiposity as a precursor for the development of premature CVD. As full-blown CVD is not present in childhood, there is a critical need for surrogate markers to best assess, predict, and treat the children who are vulnerable to developing CVD. Accumulation of excess fat mass can be conceived as a derangement in the balance between energy intake and expenditure. This appears to provoke various structural and metabolic alterations leading to adipocyte dysfunction, with important cardiovascular health consequences. Subclinical inflammation, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction appear to play important roles early in the clinical course of obesity. Associations between biomarkers and noninvasive measures of early atherosclerosis in children continue to emerge and several biomarkers appear to be promising. At present, there are no explicit data to recommend any of these biomarkers as a routine clinical marker of CVD in children. More work is needed to validate these biomarkers and to improve understanding of their role in CVD risk prediction in the pediatric population.

  9. Cardiovascular syncope: diagnostic approach and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsheshet, A; Goldenberg, I

    2011-06-01

    Cardiovascular syncope, defined as a transient loss of consciousness resulting from a global cerebral hypoperfusion characterized by rapid onset and spontaneous rapid recovery, comprises events due to bradyarrhythmias, tachyarrhythmias, and structural cardiovascular disease. The evaluation of cardiovascular syncope must be careful and thorough as this type of syncope is associated with increased subsequent morbidity and mortality. In this review we provide current data regarding specific causes of cardiovascular syncope, diagnostic approach, risk stratification, and management of patients who experience a syncope event when a cardiovascular disorder is suspected to be a precipitating factor for the syncope event. Multiple risk stratifications studies were carried out to identify patients at high risk for cardiovascular syncope; we provide several prominent examples of such risk stratifications, with special focus on the congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) as an example of an arrhythmogenic disorder associated with syncope and sudden cardiac death in young individuals without structural heart disease.

  10. Envejecimiento del sistema cardiovascular Cardiovascular system aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M Ocampo

    2005-08-01

    decrease of chronotropism, inotropism and lusitropism, mediated by beta-adrenergic stimuli. At a vascular level, there is an increment of rigidity in the arterial walls with increase in the velocity of the pulse wave, endothelial dysfunction and decrease of vasodilation mediated by beta-adrenergic stimuli. During rest the cardiovascular system is able to develop efficient accommodative mechanisms, but in stressful situations such as exercise, the changes associated to aging become evident, due to the diminishment in the capacity to obtain the maximal heart rate, the increase in the post-load and the decrease of the intrinsic contractility. Because of this, the elderly must maximize the Frank-Starling mechanism in order to maintain cardiac output. Structural and functional changes associated to cardiovascular aging become evident and must be known by the elderly health-care staff.

  11. Structural alterations in a component of cytochrome c oxidase and molecular evolution of pathogenic Neisseria in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Aspholm

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Three closely related bacterial species within the genus Neisseria are of importance to human disease and health. Neisseria meningitidis is a major cause of meningitis, while Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea and Neisseria lactamica is a common, harmless commensal of children. Comparative genomics have yet to yield clear insights into which factors dictate the unique host-parasite relationships exhibited by each since, as a group, they display remarkable conservation at the levels of nucleotide sequence, gene content and synteny. Here, we discovered two rare alterations in the gene encoding the CcoP protein component of cytochrome cbb(3 oxidase that are phylogenetically informative. One is a single nucleotide polymorphism resulting in CcoP truncation that acts as a molecular signature for the species N. meningitidis. We go on to show that the ancestral ccoP gene arose by a unique gene duplication and fusion event and is specifically and completely distributed within species of the genus Neisseria. Surprisingly, we found that strains engineered to express either of the two CcoP forms conditionally differed in their capacity to support nitrite-dependent, microaerobic growth mediated by NirK, a nitrite reductase. Thus, we propose that changes in CcoP domain architecture and ensuing alterations in function are key traits in successive, adaptive radiations within these metapopulations. These findings provide a dramatic example of how rare changes in core metabolic proteins can be connected to significant macroevolutionary shifts. They also show how evolutionary change at the molecular level can be linked to metabolic innovation and its reversal as well as demonstrating how genotype can be used to infer alterations of the fitness landscape within a single host.

  12. Opportunity, Geologic and Structural Context of Aqueous Alteration in Noachian Outcrops, Marathon Valley and Rim and Endeavour Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumpler, L. S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Jolliff, B. L.; Farrand, W. H.; Fox, V.; Golombek, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    In its 12th year of exploration and 1600 sols since arrival at the rim of the 22 km-diameter Noachian Endeavour impact crater, Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity traversed from the summit of the western rim segment "Cape Tribulation" to "Marathon Valley", a shallow trough dissecting the rim and the site of strong orbital detection of smectites. In situ analysis of the exposures within Marathon Valley is establishing some of the geologic and geochemical controls on the aqueous alteration responsible for smectite detection known to occur in crater rims throughout Noachian terrains of Mars.

  13. The Aging Cardiovascular System: Understanding It at the Cellular and Clinical Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneni, Francesco; Diaz Cañestro, Candela; Libby, Peter; Lüscher, Thomas F; Camici, Giovanni G

    2017-04-18

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) presents a great burden for elderly patients, their caregivers, and health systems. Structural and functional alterations of vessels accumulate throughout life, culminating in increased risk of developing CVD. The growing elderly population worldwide highlights the need to understand how aging promotes CVD in order to develop new strategies to confront this challenge. This review provides examples of some major unresolved clinical problems encountered in daily cardiovascular practice as we care for elderly patients. Next, the authors summarize the current understanding of the mechanisms implicated in cardiovascular aging, and the potential for targeting novel pathways implicated in endothelial dysfunction, mitochondrial oxidative stress, chromatin remodeling, and genomic instability. Lastly, the authors consider critical aspects of vascular repair, including autologous transplantation of bone marrow-derived stem cells in elderly patients. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cardiac Development and Transcription Factors: Insulin Signalling, Insulin Resistance, and Intrauterine Nutritional Programming of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindsamy, Annelene; Naidoo, Strinivasen

    2018-01-01

    Programming with an insult or stimulus during critical developmental life stages shapes metabolic disease through divergent mechanisms. Cardiovascular disease increasingly contributes to global morbidity and mortality, and the heart as an insulin-sensitive organ may become insulin resistant, which manifests as micro- and/or macrovascular complications due to diabetic complications. Cardiogenesis is a sequential process during which the heart develops into a mature organ and is regulated by several cardiac-specific transcription factors. Disrupted cardiac insulin signalling contributes to cardiac insulin resistance. Intrauterine under- or overnutrition alters offspring cardiac structure and function, notably cardiac hypertrophy, systolic and diastolic dysfunction, and hypertension that precede the onset of cardiovascular disease. Optimal intrauterine nutrition and oxygen saturation are required for normal cardiac development in offspring and the maintenance of their cardiovascular physiology. PMID:29484207

  15. Thyroid disease and the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid hormones, specifically triiodothyronine (T3), have significant effects on the heart and cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, subclinical thyroid disease, and low T3 syndrome each cause cardiac and cardiovascular abnormalities through both genomic and nongenomic effects on cardiac myocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. In compromised health, such as occurs in heart disease, alterations in thyroid hormone metabolism may further impair cardiac and cardiovascular function. Diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease may benefit from including analysis of thyroid hormone status, including serum total T3 levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of exercise on cardiovascular risk markers in Mexican school-aged children: comparison between two structured group routines Efecto del ejercicio sobre marcadores de riesgo cardiovascular en escolares mexicanos: comparación entre dos rutinas grupales

    OpenAIRE

    Margie Balas-Nakash; Alejandra Benítez-Arciniega; Otilia Perichart-Perera; Roxana Valdés-Ramos; Felipe Vadillo-Ortega

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To assess the effects of two groups of exercise routines on cardiovascular disease risk markers. Material and Methods. An intervention study was conducted with 319 Mexican school-aged children in which routines were implemented Monday through Friday for 12 weeks. Routine A was the reference group, with 20 min of less intense activity and routine B was the new group with 40 min of aerobic exercises. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, fat mass percentage (FM%), systolic and ...

  17. DNA methylation changes separate allergic patients from healthy controls and may reflect altered CD4+ T-cell population structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colm E Nestor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered DNA methylation patterns in CD4(+ T-cells indicate the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in inflammatory diseases. However, the identification of these alterations is complicated by the heterogeneity of most inflammatory diseases. Seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR is an optimal disease model for the study of DNA methylation because of its well-defined phenotype and etiology. We generated genome-wide DNA methylation (N(patients = 8, N(controls = 8 and gene expression (N(patients = 9, Ncontrols = 10 profiles of CD4(+ T-cells from SAR patients and healthy controls using Illumina's HumanMethylation450 and HT-12 microarrays, respectively. DNA methylation profiles clearly and robustly distinguished SAR patients from controls, during and outside the pollen season. In agreement with previously published studies, gene expression profiles of the same samples failed to separate patients and controls. Separation by methylation (N(patients = 12, N(controls = 12, but not by gene expression (N(patients = 21, N(controls = 21 was also observed in an in vitro model system in which purified PBMCs from patients and healthy controls were challenged with allergen. We observed changes in the proportions of memory T-cell populations between patients (N(patients = 35 and controls (N(controls = 12, which could explain the observed difference in DNA methylation. Our data highlight the potential of epigenomics in the stratification of immune disease and represents the first successful molecular classification of SAR using CD4(+ T cells.

  18. Adolescent Risk Behaviours and Mealtime Routines: Does Family Meal Frequency Alter the Association between Family Structure and Risk Behaviour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Kate A.; Kirby, Joanna; Currie, Candace

    2012-01-01

    Family structure is associated with a range of adolescent risk behaviours, with those living in both parent families generally faring best. This study describes the association between family structure and adolescent risk behaviours and assesses the role of the family meal. Data from the 2006 Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children survey were…

  19. Amino acid duplication in the coiled-coil structure of collagen XVII alters its maturation and trimerization causing mild junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Jasmin K; Hofmann, Silke C; Leppert, Juna; Has, Cristina; Franzke, Claus-Werner

    2017-02-01

    The function and stability of collagens depend on the accurate triple helix formation of three distinct polypeptide chains. Disruption of this triple-helical structure can result in connective-tissue disorders. Triple helix formation is thought to depend on three-stranded coiled-coil oligomerization sites within non-collagenous domains. However, only little is known about the physiological relevance of these coiled-coil structures. Transmembrane collagen XVII, also known as 180 kDa bullous pemphigoid antigen provides mechanical stability through the anchorage of epithelial cells to the basement membrane. Mutations in the collagen XVII gene, COL17A1, cause junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), characterized by chronic trauma-induced skin blistering. Here we exploited a novel naturally occurring COL17A1 mutation, leading to an in-frame lysine duplication within the coiled-coil structure of the juxtamembranous NC16A domain of collagen XVII, which resulted in a mild phenotype of JEB due to reduced membrane-anchored collagen XVII molecules. This mutation causes structural changes in the mutant molecule and interferes with its maturation. The destabilized coiled-coil structure of the mutant collagen XVII unmasks a furin cleavage site that results in excessive and non-physiological ectodomain shedding during its maturation. Furthermore, it decreases its triple-helical stability due to defective coiled-coil oligomerization, which makes it highly susceptible to proteolytic degradation. As a consequence of altered maturation and decreased stability of collagen XVII trimers, reduced collagen XVII is incorporated into the cell membrane, resulting in compromised dermal-epidermal adhesion. Taken together, using this genetic model, we provide the first proof that alteration of the coiled-coil structure destabilizes oligomerization and impairs physiological shedding of collagen XVII in vivo. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  20. Pantethine, a derivative of vitamin B5, favorably alters total, LDL and non-HDL cholesterol in low to moderate cardiovascular risk subjects eligible for statin therapy: a triple-blinded placebo and diet-controlled investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Malkanthi; Rumberger, John A; Azumano, Isao; Napolitano, Joseph J; Citrolo, Danielle; Kamiya, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    High serum concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. The efficacy of pantethine treatment on cardiovascular risk markers was investigated in a randomized, triple-blinded, placebo-controlled study, in a low to moderate cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk North American population eligible for statin therapy, using the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) guidelines. A total of 32 subjects were randomized to pantethine (600 mg/day from weeks 1 to 8 and 900 mg/day from weeks 9 to 16) or placebo. Compared with placebo, the participants on pantethine showed a significant decrease in total cholesterol at 16 weeks (P=0.040) and LDL-C at 8 and 16 weeks (P=0.020 and P=0.006, respectively), and decreasing trends in non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at week 8 and week 12 (P=0.102 and P=0.145, respectively) that reached significance by week 16 (P=0.042). An 11% decrease in LDL-C from baseline was seen in participants on pantethine, at weeks 4, 8, 12, and 16, while participants on placebo showed a 3% increase at week 16. This decrease was significant between groups at weeks 8 (P=0.027) and 16 (P=0.010). The homocysteine levels for both groups did not change significantly from baseline to week 16. Coenzyme Q10 significantly increased from baseline to week 4 and remained elevated until week 16, in both the pantethine and placebo groups. After 16 weeks, the participants on placebo did not show significant improvement in any CVD risk end points. This study confirms that pantethine lowers cardiovascular risk markers in low to moderate CVD risk participants eligible for statins according to NCEP guidelines.

  1. Pantethine, a derivative of vitamin B5, favorably alters total, LDL and non-HDL cholesterol in low to moderate cardiovascular risk subjects eligible for statin therapy: a triple-blinded placebo and diet-controlled investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Malkanthi Evans,1 John A Rumberger,2 Isao Azumano,3 Joseph J Napolitano,4 Danielle Citrolo,5 Toshikazu Kamiya5 1KGK Synergize Inc, London, ON, Canada; 2The Princeton Longevity Center, Princeton, NJ, USA; 3Daiichi Fine Chemical Co, Ltd, Toyama, Japan; 4Independent Consultant, Allentown, PA, USA; 5Kyowa Hakko USA, New York, NY, USA Abstract: High serum concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. The efficacy of pantethine treatment on cardiovascular risk markers was investigated in a randomized, triple-blinded, placebo-controlled study, in a low to moderate cardiovascular disease (CVD risk North American population eligible for statin therapy, using the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP guidelines. A total of 32 subjects were randomized to pantethine (600 mg/day from weeks 1 to 8 and 900 mg/day from weeks 9 to16 or placebo. Compared with placebo, the participants on pantethine showed a significant decrease in total cholesterol at 16 weeks (P=0.040 and LDL-C at 8 and 16 weeks (P=0.020 and P=0.006, respectively, and decreasing trends in non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at week 8 and week 12 (P=0.102 and P=0.145, respectively that reached significance by week 16 (P=0.042. An 11% decrease in LDL-C from baseline was seen in participants on pantethine, at weeks 4, 8, 12, and 16, while participants on placebo showed a 3% increase at week 16. This decrease was significant between groups at weeks 8 (P=0.027 and 16 (P=0.010. The homocysteine levels for both groups did not change significantly from baseline to week 16. Coenzyme Q10 significantly increased from baseline to week 4 and remained elevated until week 16, in both the pantethine and placebo groups. After 16 weeks, the participants on placebo did not show significant improvement in any CVD risk end points. This study confirms that pantethine lowers cardiovascular risk markers in low to moderate CVD risk participants

  2. The structural alteration and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins in the presence of calcium: Importance of lens calcium homeostasis in development of diabetic cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZM, Sara Zafaranchi; Khoshaman, Kazem; Masoudi, Raheleh; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Yousefi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    The imbalance of the calcium homeostasis in the lenticular tissues of diabetic patients is an important risk factor for development of cataract diseases. In the current study, the impact of elevated levels of calcium ions were investigated on structure and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins using gel electrophoresis and spectroscopic assessments. The glycated proteins indicated significant resistance against calcium-induced structural insults and aggregation. While, glycated crystallins revealed an increased conformational stability; a slight instability was observed for these proteins upon interaction with calcium ions. Also, in the presence of calcium, the proteolytic pattern of native crystallins was altered and that of glycated protein counterparts remained almost unchanged. According to results of this study it is suggested that the structural alteration of lens crystallins upon glycation may significantly reduce their calcium buffering capacity in eye lenses. Therefore, under chronic hyperglycemia accumulation of this cataractogenic metal ion in the lenticular tissues may subsequently culminate in activation of different pathogenic pathways, leading to development of lens opacity and cataract diseases.

  3. Aging in the Cardiovascular System: Lessons from Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamczyk, Magda R; del Campo, Lara; Andrés, Vicente

    2018-02-10

    Aging, the main risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), is becoming progressively more prevalent in our societies. A better understanding of how aging promotes CVD is therefore urgently needed to develop new strategies to reduce disease burden. Atherosclerosis and heart failure contribute significantly to age-associated CVD-related morbimortality. CVD and aging are both accelerated in patients suffering from Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a rare genetic disorder caused by the prelamin A mutant progerin. Progerin causes extensive atherosclerosis and cardiac electrophysiological alterations that invariably lead to premature aging and death. This review summarizes the main structural and functional alterations to the cardiovascular system during physiological and premature aging and discusses the mechanisms underlying exaggerated CVD and aging induced by prelamin A and progerin. Because both proteins are expressed in normally aging non-HGPS individuals, and most hallmarks of normal aging occur in progeria, research on HGPS can identify mechanisms underlying physiological aging.

  4. Heterologous expression ofa histone-like protein from Streptococcus intermedius in Escherichia coli alters the nucleoid structure and inhibits the growth of E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dali; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Murakami, Keiji; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Kayama, Shizuo; Taniguchi, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Akitake; Ono, Tsuneko; Matsuo, Takashi; Miyake, Yoichiro

    2008-11-01

    Escherichia coli failed to survive after transformation with a Streptococcus intermedius histone-like protein gene (Si-hlp) and its promoter-harbored plasmid. The promoter function of Si-hlp in E. coli was determined using enhanced green fluorescence protein (egfp) gene as a reporter. The inhibitory effect of Si-HLP on E. coli viability was verified by a tetracycline-inducible gene expression system. Further study suggested that Si-HLP may alter the bacterial nucleoid structure, leading to the growth inhibition of E. coli.

  5. Importance of doping, dopant distribution, and defects on electronic band structure alteration of metal oxide nanoparticles: Implications for reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Navid B; Milliron, Delia J; Aich, Nirupam; Katz, Lynn E; Liljestrand, Howard M; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2016-10-15

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are considered to have the potency to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), one of the key mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity. However, the nanotoxicology literature demonstrates a lack of consensus on the dominant toxicity mechanism(s) for a particular MONP. Moreover, recent literature has studied the correlation between band structure of pristine MONPs to their ability to introduce ROS and thus has downplayed the ROS-mediated toxicological relevance of a number of such materials. On the other hand, material science can control the band structure of these materials to engineer their electronic and optical properties and thereby is constantly modulating the pristine electronic structure. Since band structure is the fundamental material property that controls ROS-producing ability, band tuning via introduction of dopants and defects needs careful consideration in toxicity assessments. This commentary critically evaluates the existing material science and nanotoxicity literature and identifies the gap in our understanding of the role of important crystal structure features (i.e., dopants and defects) on MONPs' electronic structure alteration as well as their ROS-generation capability. Furthermore, this commentary provides suggestions on characterization techniques to evaluate dopants and defects on the crystal structure and identifies research needs for advanced theoretical predictions of their electronic band structures and ROS-generation abilities. Correlation of electronic band structure and ROS will not only aid in better mechanistic assessment of nanotoxicity but will be impactful in designing and developing ROS-based applications ranging from water disinfection to next-generation antibiotics and even cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Longitudinal assessment of right ventricular structure and function by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthur, Ashita; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Connelly, Kim A; Dhir, Vinita; Chan, Kelvin K W; Haq, Rashida; Kirpalani, Anish; Barfett, Joseph J; Jimenez-Juan, Laura; Karur, Gauri R; Deva, Djeven P; Yan, Andrew T

    2017-04-10

    There are limited data on the effects of trastuzumab on the right ventricle (RV). Therefore, we sought to evaluate the temporal changes in right ventricular (RV) structure and function as measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), and their relationship with left ventricular (LV) structure and function in breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab. Prospective, longitudinal, observational study involving 41 women with HER2+ breast cancer who underwent serial CMR at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months after initiation of trastuzumab. A single blinded observer measured RV parameters on de-identified CMRs in a random order. Linear mixed models were used to investigate temporal changes in RV parameters. Of the 41 women (age 52 ± 11 years), only one patient experienced trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity. Compared to baseline, there were small but significant increases in the RV end-diastolic volume at 6 months (p = 0.002) and RV end-systolic volume at 6 and 12 months (p < 0.001 for both), but not at 18 months (p = 0.82 and 0.13 respectively). RV ejection fraction (RVEF), when compared to baseline (58.3%, 95% CI 57.1-59.5%), showed corresponding decreases at 6 months (53.9%, 95% CI 52.5-55.4%, p < 0.001) and 12 months (55%, 95% CI 53.8-56.2%, p < 0.001) that recovered at 18 months (56.6%, 95% CI 55.1-58.0%, p = 0.08). Although the temporal pattern of changes in LVEF and RVEF were similar, there was no significant correlation between RVEF and LVEF at baseline (r = 0.29, p = 0.07) or between their changes at 6 months (r = 0.24, p = 0.17). In patients receiving trastuzumab without overt cardiotoxicity, there is a subtle but significant deleterious effect on RV structure and function that recover at 18 months, which can be detected by CMR. Furthermore, monitoring of LVEF alone may not be sufficient in detecting early RV injury. These novel findings provide further support for CMR in monitoring early

  7. The effect of exercise on cardiovascular risk markers in Mexican school-aged children: comparison between two structured group routines Efecto del ejercicio sobre marcadores de riesgo cardiovascular en escolares mexicanos: comparación entre dos rutinas grupales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margie Balas-Nakash

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the effects of two groups of exercise routines on cardiovascular disease risk markers. Material and Methods. An intervention study was conducted with 319 Mexican school-aged children in which routines were implemented Monday through Friday for 12 weeks. Routine A was the reference group, with 20 min of less intense activity and routine B was the new group with 40 min of aerobic exercises. Body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, fat mass percentage (FM%, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, lipids, lipoproteins, glucose and insulin were measured before and after the intervention. Results. Routine A had an effect on diastolic pressure, while routine B had an effect on BMI, FM%, blood pressure and triglycerides. Routine B had a greater effect on blood pressure than routine A. The prevalence of obesity, high blood pressure and hypertriglyceridemia decreased in both groups. Conclusion. Aerobic exercise is an effective health promotion strategy to reduce some cardiovascular disease risk markers.Objetivo. Evaluar el efecto de dos rutinas grupales de ejercicio sobre marcadores de riesgo cardiovascular. Material y métodos. Intervención en 319 escolares mexicanos. Las rutinas fueron implementadas por 12 semanas (rutina A (referencia: 20 min con ejercicios menos intensos vs rutina B (nueva: 40 min con ejercicios aeróbicos. Se midieron al inicio y al final el índice de masa corporal (IMC, masa grasa (%MG, presión arterial sistólica y diastólica, lípidos, lipoproteínas, glucosa e insulina. Resultados. La rutina A tuvo efecto sobre la presión diastólica; la B tuvo efecto sobre el IMC, %MG, presión arterial y triglicéridos. La rutina B tuvo mayores efectos en la presión arterial que la rutina A. Las prevalencias de obesidad, hipertensión arterial e hipertrigliceridemia disminuyeron en ambos grupos. Conclusiones. El ejercicio aeróbico es una estrategia de promoción exitosa para reducir algunos marcadores de riesgo

  8. Alterations in archaeological bones thermally treated: structure and morphology; Alteraciones en huesos arqueologicos termicamente tratados: estructura y morfologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pijoan, C.M.; Mansilla, J.; Leboreiro, I. [Direccion de Antropologia Fisica, INAH, Gandhi s/n, Polanco, 11560 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Lara, V.H. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-lztapalapa, Michoacan esquina La Purisima, Apdo.Postal 55-534, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Bosch, P. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Archaeological bones found close to Mexico city (Tlatelcomila) have been characterized by X-ray Diffraction, Small Angle X-ray Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy. These techniques, which are not conventionally used in archaeological research, provided useful information. The boiled bones were clearly distinguished from grilled bones. The degree of deterioration of the bone structure was quantified through parameters such as gyration radius or fractal dimension. The morphology followed the structural modifications and changes resulting from thermic exposure. (Author) 23 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  9. A chemometric analysis of ligand-induced changes in intrinsic fluorescence of folate binding protein indicates a link between altered conformational structure and physico-chemical characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Susanne W; Holm, Jan; Hansen, Steen Ingemann

    2009-01-01

    Ligand binding alters the conformational structure and physico-chemical characteristics of bovine folate binding protein (FBP). For the purpose of achieving further information we analyzed ligand (folate and methotrexate)-induced changes in the fluorescence landscape of FBP. Fluorescence excitation...... of folate accords fairly well with the disappearance of strongly hydrophobic tryptophan residues from the solvent-exposed surface of FBP. The PARAFAC has thus proven useful to establish a hitherto unexplained link between parallel changes in conformational structure and physico-chemical characteristics...... of FBP induced by folate binding. Parameters for ligand binding derived from PARAFAC analysis of the fluorescence data were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those obtained from binding of radiofolate to FBP. Herein, methotrexate exhibited a higher affinity for FBP than in competition...

  10. Alterations in emotion generation and regulation neurocircuitry in depression and eating disorders: A comparative review of structural and functional neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donofry, Shannon D; Roecklein, Kathryn A; Wildes, Jennifer E; Miller, Megan A; Erickson, Kirk I

    2016-09-01

    Major depression and eating disorders (EDs) are highly co-morbid and may share liability. Impaired emotion regulation may represent a common etiological or maintaining mechanism. Research has demonstrated that depressed individuals and individuals with EDs exhibit impaired emotion regulation, with these impairments being associated with changes in brain structure and function. The goal of this review was to evaluate findings from neuroimaging studies of depression and EDs to determine whether there are overlapping alterations in the brain regions known to be involved in emotion regulation, evidence of which would aid in the diagnosis and treatment of these conditions. Our review of the literature suggests that depression and EDs exhibit common structural and functional alterations in brain regions involved in emotion regulation, including the amygdala, ventral striatum and nucleus accumbens, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. We present preliminary support for a shared etiological mechanism. Future studies should consider manipulating emotion regulation in a sample of individuals with depression and EDs to better characterize abnormalities in these brain circuits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Alterations in collagen structure in hypermobility and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes detected by Raman spectroscopy in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Carina K.; Gniadecka, Monika; Ullman, Susanne; Halberg, Poul; Kobayasi, Takasi; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2000-11-01

    Patients with hypermobility syndrome (HS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) were investigated by means of in vivo near- infrared Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy. HS is a benign and common condition (up to 5 percent of the population of the Western World). EDS is a rare, inherited connective tissue disease characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and other, occasionally serious, organ changes. EDS and HS may be related disorders. We investigated 13 patients with HS, 8 patients with EDS, and 24 healthy volunteers by means of in vivo Raman spectroscopy. The patients were classified according to Beighton and Holzberg et al. No difference in age between the three groups was found (HS 41 (33-49), EDS 36 (25-47), controls 37 (31-42); mean, 95% confidence intervals, respectively). Spectral differences were found in the intensity of the amide-III bands around 1245 and 1270 cm-1 in HS and EDS compared with healthy skin (Kruskal-Wallis, p equals 0,02 for intensity ratios (I1245/I1270) between the investigated groups). To elucidate the character of the alterations in the amide-III bands a curve fitting procedure was applied. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopy may aid in the diagnosis of HS and EDS. Moreover the technique may be useful for analyzing the molecular changes occurring in these syndromes.

  12. Chronic alterations in growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I signaling lead to changes in mouse tendon structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R H; Clausen, N M; Schjerling, P

    2014-01-01

    RNA expression (targets: GAPDH, RPLP0, IGF-IEa, IGF-IR, COL1A1, COL3A1, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, versican, scleraxis, tenascin C, fibronectin, fibromodulin, decorin) in the Achilles tendon, and the mRNA expression was also measured in calf muscle (same targets as tendon plus IGF-IEb, IGF-IEc). We found that GHR......The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) axis is an important stimulator of collagen synthesis in connective tissue, but the effect of chronically altered GH/IGF-I levels on connective tissue of the muscle-tendon unit is not known. We studied three groups of mice; 1) giant......-/- mice had significantly lower collagen fibril volume fraction in Achilles tendon, as well as decreased mRNA expression of IGF-I isoforms and collagen types I and III in muscle compared to CTRL. In contrast, the mRNA expression of IGF-I isoforms and collagens in bGH mice was generally high in both tendon...

  13. Climate change alters the structure of arctic marine food webs due to poleward shifts of boreal generalists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortsch, Susanne; Primicerio, Raul; Fossheim, Maria; Dolgov, Andrey V.; Aschan, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Climate-driven poleward shifts, leading to changes in species composition and relative abundances, have been recently documented in the Arctic. Among the fastest moving species are boreal generalist fish which are expected to affect arctic marine food web structure and ecosystem functioning substantially. Here, we address structural changes at the food web level induced by poleward shifts via topological network analysis of highly resolved boreal and arctic food webs of the Barents Sea. We detected considerable differences in structural properties and link configuration between the boreal and the arctic food webs, the latter being more modular and less connected. We found that a main characteristic of the boreal fish moving poleward into the arctic region of the Barents Sea is high generalism, a property that increases connectance and reduces modularity in the arctic marine food web. Our results reveal that habitats form natural boundaries for food web modules, and that generalists play an important functional role in coupling pelagic and benthic modules. We posit that these habitat couplers have the potential to promote the transfer of energy and matter between habitats, but also the spread of pertubations, thereby changing arctic marine food web structure considerably with implications for ecosystem dynamics and functioning. PMID:26336179

  14. DNA-repair protein hHR23a alters its protein structure upon binding proteasomal subunit S5a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Kylie J.; Lech, Patrycja J.; Goh, Amanda M.; Wang, Qinghua; Howley, Peter M.

    2003-01-01

    The Rad23 family of proteins, including the human homologs hHR23a and hHR23b, stimulates nucleotide excision repair and has been shown to provide a novel link between proteasome-mediated protein degradation and DNA repair. In this work, we illustrate how the proteasomal subunit S5a regulates hHR23a protein structure. By using NMR spectroscopy, we have elucidated the structure and dynamic properties of the 40-kDa hHR23a protein and show it to contain four structured domains connected by flexible linker regions. In addition, we reveal that these domains interact in an intramolecular fashion, and by using residual dipolar coupling data in combination with chemical shift perturbation analysis, we present the hHR23a structure. By itself, hHR23a adopts a closed conformation defined by the interaction of an N-terminal ubiquitin-like domain with two ubiquitin-associated domains. Interestingly, binding of the proteasomal subunit S5a disrupts the hHR23a interdomain interactions and thereby causes it to adopt an opened conformation. PMID:14557549

  15. Climate change alters the structure of arctic marine food webs due to poleward shifts of boreal generalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortsch, Susanne; Primicerio, Raul; Fossheim, Maria; Dolgov, Andrey V; Aschan, Michaela

    2015-09-07

    Climate-driven poleward shifts, leading to changes in species composition and relative abundances, have been recently documented in the Arctic. Among the fastest moving species are boreal generalist fish which are expected to affect arctic marine food web structure and ecosystem functioning substantially. Here, we address structural changes at the food web level induced by poleward shifts via topological network analysis of highly resolved boreal and arctic food webs of the Barents Sea. We detected considerable differences in structural properties and link configuration between the boreal and the arctic food webs, the latter being more modular and less connected. We found that a main characteristic of the boreal fish moving poleward into the arctic region of the Barents Sea is high generalism, a property that increases connectance and reduces modularity in the arctic marine food web. Our results reveal that habitats form natural boundaries for food web modules, and that generalists play an important functional role in coupling pelagic and benthic modules. We posit that these habitat couplers have the potential to promote the transfer of energy and matter between habitats, but also the spread of pertubations, thereby changing arctic marine food web structure considerably with implications for ecosystem dynamics and functioning. © 2015 The Authors.

  16. Disconnect between alcohol-induced alterations in chromatin structure and gene transcription in a mouse embryonic stem cell model of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey, Kylee J; Wang, Haiqing; Bedi, Yudhishtar S; Skiles, William M; Chang, Richard Cheng-An; Golding, Michael C

    2017-05-01

    Alterations to chromatin structure induced by environmental insults have become an attractive explanation for the persistence of exposure effects into subsequent life stages. However, a growing body of work examining the epigenetic impact that alcohol and other drugs of abuse exert consistently notes a disconnection between induced changes in chromatin structure and patterns of gene transcription. Thus, an important question is whether perturbations in the 'histone code' induced by prenatal exposures to alcohol implicitly subvert gene expression, or whether the hierarchy of cellular signaling networks driving development is such that they retain control over the transcriptional program. To address this question, we examined the impact of ethanol exposure in mouse embryonic stem cells cultured under 2i conditions, where the transcriptional program is rigidly enforced through the use of small molecule inhibitors. We find that ethanol-induced changes in post-translational histone modifications are dose-dependent, unique to the chromatin modification under investigation, and that the extent and direction of the change differ between the period of exposure and the recovery phase. Similar to in vivo models, we find post-translational modifications affecting histone 3 lysine 9 are the most profoundly impacted, with the signature of exposure persisting long after alcohol has been removed. These changes in chromatin structure associate with dose-dependent alterations in the levels of transcripts encoding Dnmt1, Uhrf1, Tet1, Tet2, Tet3, and Polycomb complex members Eed and Ezh2. However, in this model, ethanol-induced changes to the chromatin template do not consistently associate with changes in gene transcription, impede the process of differentiation, or affect the acquisition of monoallelic patterns of expression for the imprinted gene Igf2R. These findings question the inferred universal relevance of epigenetic changes induced by drugs of abuse and suggest that changes

  17. Discriminating the drivers of edge effects on nest predation: forest edges reduce capture rates of ship rats (Rattus rattus), a globally invasive nest predator, by altering vegetation structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffell, Jay; Didham, Raphael K; Barrett, Paul; Gorman, Nic; Pike, Rhonda; Hickey-Elliott, Andrée; Sievwright, Karin; Armstrong, Doug P

    2014-01-01

    Forest edges can strongly affect avian nest success by altering nest predation rates, but this relationship is inconsistent and context dependent. There is a need for researchers to improve the predictability of edge effects on nest predation rates by examining the mechanisms driving their occurrence and variability. In this study, we examined how the capture rates of ship rats, an invasive nest predator responsible for avian declines globally, varied with distance from the forest edge within forest fragments in a pastoral landscape in New Zealand. We hypothesised that forest edges would affect capture rates by altering vegetation structure within fragments, and that the strength of edge effects would depend on whether fragments were grazed by livestock. We measured vegetation structure and rat capture rates at 488 locations ranging from 0-212 m from the forest edge in 15 forest fragments, seven of which were grazed. Contrary to the vast majority of previous studies of edge effects on nest predation, ship rat capture rates increased with increasing distance from the forest edge. For grazed fragments, capture rates were estimated to be 78% lower at the forest edge than 118 m into the forest interior (the farthest distance for grazed fragments). This relationship was similar for ungrazed fragments, with capture rates estimated to be 51% lower at the forest edge than 118 m into the forest interior. A subsequent path analysis suggested that these 'reverse' edge effects were largely or entirely mediated by changes in vegetation structure, implying that edge effects on ship rats can be predicted from the response of vegetation structure to forest edges. We suggest the occurrence, strength, and direction of edge effects on nest predation rates may depend on edge-driven changes in local habitat when the dominant predator is primarily restricted to forest patches.

  18. Cingulo-insular structural alterations associated with psychogenic symptoms, childhood abuse and PTSD in functional neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, David L; Matin, Nassim; Barsky, Arthur; Costumero-Ramos, Victor; Makaretz, Sara J; Young, Sigrid S; Sepulcre, Jorge; LaFrance, W Curt; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2017-06-01

    Adverse early-life events are predisposing factors for functional neurological disorder (FND) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cingulo-insular regions are implicated in the biology of both conditions and are sites of stress-mediated neuroplasticity. We hypothesised that functional neurological symptoms and the magnitude of childhood abuse would be associated with overlapping anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insular volumetric reductions, and that FND and PTSD symptoms would map onto distinct cingulo-insular areas. This within-group voxel-based morphometry study probes volumetric associations with self-report measures of functional neurological symptoms, adverse life events and PTSD symptoms in 23 mixed-gender FND patients. Separate secondary analyses were also performed in the subset of 18 women with FND to account for gender-specific effects. Across the entire cohort, there were no statistically significant volumetric associations with self-report measures of functional neurological symptom severity or childhood abuse. In women with FND, however, parallel inverse associations were observed between left anterior insular volume and functional neurological symptoms as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 and the Screening for Somatoform Symptoms Conversion Disorder subscale. Similar inverse relationships were also appreciated between childhood abuse burden and left anterior insular volume. Across all subjects, PTSD symptom severity was inversely associated with dorsal ACC volume, and the magnitude of lifetime adverse events was inversely associated with left hippocampal volume. This study reveals distinct cingulo-insular alterations for FND and PTSD symptoms and may advance our understanding of FND. Potential biological convergence between stress-related neuroplasticity, functional neurological symptoms and reduced insular volume was identified. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017

  19. Athermal alterations in the structure in the canalicular membrane and ATPase activity induced by thermal levels of microwave radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelan, A.M.; Neubauer, C.F.; Timm, R.; Neirenberg, J.; Lange, D.G.

    1994-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were exposed 30 min/day for 4 days to thermogenic levels (rectal temperature increase of 2.2 degrees C) of microwave radiation [2.45 GHz, 80 mW/cm 2 , continuous-wave mode (CW)] or to a radiant heat source resulting in an equivalent increase in body temperature of 2.2 degrees C. On the fifth day the animals were sacrificed and their livers removed. The canalicular membranes were isolated and evaluated for adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity, total fatty acid composition and membrane fluidity characteristics. Mg ++ -ATPase activity (V max ) decreased by 48.5% in the group exposed to microwave radiation, with no significant change in the group exposed to radiant heat. The decrease in Mg ++ -ATPase was partially compensated by a concomitant increase in Na + /K + -ATPase activity (170% increase in V max over control) in animals exposed to microwave radiation, while no change occurred in the group exposed to radiant heat. This alteration in ATPase activity in the group exposed to microwave radiation is associated with a large decrease in the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids. Conversely, the group exposed to radiant heat had an increase in the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids. The most dramatic changes were found in the levels of arachidonic acid. Finally, the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin label technique used to measure the fluidity of the canalicular membranes of the animals in the three groups (sham, microwave radiation and radiant heat) indicated that the results were different in the three groups, reflecting the changes found in their fatty acid composition. The physiological response to open-quotes equivalentclose quotes thermal loads in rats is expressed differently for different types of energy sources. Possible mechanisms producing these divergent thermogenic responses are discussed. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  20. 3-Deoxyglucosone: a potential glycating agent accountable for structural alteration in H3 histone protein through generation of different AGEs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalaluddin M Ashraf

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs are heterogeneous group of compounds, known to be implicated in diabetic complications. One of the consequences of the Maillard reaction is attributed to the production of reactive intermediate products such as α-oxoaldehydes. 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG, an α-oxoaldehyde has been found to be involved in accelerating vascular damage during diabetes. In the present study, calf thymus histone H3 was treated with 3-deoxyglucosone to investigate the generation of AGEs (Nε-carboxymethyllysine, pentosidine, by examining the degree of side chain modifications and formation of different intermediates and employing various physicochemical techniques. The results clearly indicate the formation of AGEs and structural changes upon glycation of H3 by 3-deoxyglucosone, which may hamper the normal functioning of H3 histone, that may compromise the veracity of chromatin structures and function in secondary complications of diabetes.

  1. Accelerated cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the mouse heart using self-gated parallel imaging strategies does not compromise accuracy of structural and functional measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörries Carola

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-gated dynamic cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR enables non-invasive visualization of the heart and accurate assessment of cardiac function in mouse models of human disease. However, self-gated CMR requires the acquisition of large datasets to ensure accurate and artifact-free reconstruction of cardiac cines and is therefore hampered by long acquisition times putting high demands on the physiological stability of the animal. For this reason, we evaluated the feasibility of accelerating the data collection using the parallel imaging technique SENSE with respect to both anatomical definition and cardiac function quantification. Results Findings obtained from accelerated data sets were compared to fully sampled reference data. Our results revealed only minor differences in image quality of short- and long-axis cardiac cines: small anatomical structures (papillary muscles and the aortic valve and left-ventricular (LV remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI were accurately detected even for 3-fold accelerated data acquisition using a four-element phased array coil. Quantitative analysis of LV cardiac function (end-diastolic volume (EDV, end-systolic volume (ESV, stroke volume (SV, ejection fraction (EF and LV mass in healthy and infarcted animals revealed no substantial deviations from reference (fully sampled data for all investigated acceleration factors with deviations ranging from 2% to 6% in healthy animals and from 2% to 8% in infarcted mice for the highest acceleration factor of 3.0. CNR calculations performed between LV myocardial wall and LV cavity revealed a maximum CNR decrease of 50% for the 3-fold accelerated data acquisition when compared to the fully-sampled acquisition. Conclusions We have demonstrated the feasibility of accelerated self-gated retrospective CMR in mice using the parallel imaging technique SENSE. The proposed method led to considerably reduced acquisition times, while preserving high

  2. Altered structural and effective connectivity in anorexia and bulimia nervosa in circuits that regulate energy and reward homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, G K W; Shott, M E; Riederer, J; Pryor, T L

    2016-11-01

    Anorexia and bulimia nervosa are severe eating disorders that share many behaviors. Structural and functional brain circuits could provide biological links that those disorders have in common. We recruited 77 young adult women, 26 healthy controls, 26 women with anorexia and 25 women with bulimia nervosa. Probabilistic tractography was used to map white matter connectivity strength across taste and food intake regulating brain circuits. An independent multisample greedy equivalence search algorithm tested effective connectivity between those regions during sucrose tasting. Anorexia and bulimia nervosa had greater structural connectivity in pathways between insula, orbitofrontal cortex and ventral striatum, but lower connectivity from orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala to the hypothalamus (Pbulimia nervosa effective connectivity was directed from anterior cingulate via ventral striatum to the hypothalamus. Across all groups, sweetness perception was predicted by connectivity strength in pathways connecting to the middle orbitofrontal cortex. This study provides evidence that white matter structural as well as effective connectivity within the energy-homeostasis and food reward-regulating circuitry is fundamentally different in anorexia and bulimia nervosa compared with that in controls. In eating disorders, anterior cingulate cognitive-emotional top down control could affect food reward and eating drive, override hypothalamic inputs to the ventral striatum and enable prolonged food restriction.

  3. STRUCTURAL AND CONNECTOMIC NEUROIMAGING FOR THE PERSONALIZED STUDY OF LONGITUDINAL ALTERATIONS IN CORTICAL SHAPE, THICKNESS AND CONNECTIVITY AFTER TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, A.; Goh, S.-Y. M.; Torgerson, C. M.; Vespa, P. M.; Van Horn, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    The integration of longitudinal brain structure analysis with neurointensive care strategies continues to be a substantial difficulty facing the traumatic brain injury (TBI) research community. For patient-tailored case analysis, it remains challenging to establish how lesion profile modulates longitudinal changes in cortical structure and connectivity, as well as how these changes lead to behavioral, cognitive and neural dysfunction. Additionally, despite the clinical potential of morphometric and connectomic studies, few analytic tools are available for their study in TBI. Here we review the state of the art in structural and connectomic neuroimaging for the study of TBI and illustrate a set of recently-developed, patient-tailored approaches for the study of TBI-related brain atrophy and alterations in morphometry as well as inter-regional connectivity. The ability of such techniques to quantify how injury modulates longitudinal changes in cortical shape, structure and circuitry is highlighted. Quantitative approaches such as these can be used to assess and monitor the clinical condition and evolution of TBI victims, and can have substantial translational impact, especially when used in conjunction with measures of neuropsychological function. PMID:24844173

  4. Edentulation alters material properties of cortical bone in the human craniofacial skeleton: functional implications for craniofacial structure in primate evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechow, Paul C.; Wang, Qian; Peterson, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal adaptations to reduced function are an important source of skeletal variation and may be indicative of environmental pressures that lead to evolutionary changes. Humans serve as a model animal to investigate the effects of loss of craniofacial function through edentulation. In the human maxilla, it is known that edentulation leads to significant changes in skeletal structure such as residual ridge resorption and loss of cortical thickness. However, little is known about changes in bone tissue structure and material properties, which are also important for understanding skeletal mechanics but are often ignored. The aims of this study were to determine cortical material properties in edentulous crania and to evaluate differences with dentate crania and thus examine the effects of loss of function on craniofacial structure. Cortical bone samples from fifteen edentulous human skulls were measured for thickness and density. Elastic properties and directions of maximum stiffness were determined by using ultrasonic techniques. These data were compared to those from dentate crania reported in a previous investigation. Cortical bone from all regions of the facial skeleton of edentulous individuals is thinner than in dentate skulls. Elastic and shear moduli, and density are similar or greater in the zygoma and cranial vault of edentulous individuals, while these properties are less in the maxilla. Most cortical bone, especially in edentulous maxillae, has reduced directional orientation. The loss of significant occlusal loads following edentulation may contribute to the change in material properties and the loss of orientation over time during the normal process of bone remodeling. These results suggest that area-specific cortical microstructural changes accompany bone resorption following edentulation. They also suggest that functional forces are important for maintaining bone mass throughout the craniofacial skeleton, even in areas such as the browridges, which

  5. Are changes in the phytoplankton community structure altering the flux of CO2 in regions of the North Atlantic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostle, C.; Landschutzer, P.; Johnson, M.; Schuster, U.; Watson, A. J.; Edwards, M.; Robinson, C.

    2016-02-01

    The North Atlantic Ocean is a globally important sink of carbon dioxide (CO2). However, the strength of the sink varies temporally and regionally. This study uses a neural network method to map the surface ocean pCO2 (partial pressure of CO2) and flux of CO2from the atmosphere to the ocean alongside measurements of plankton abundance collected from the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) survey to determine the relationship between regional changes in phytoplankton community structure and regional differences in carbon flux. Despite increasing sea surface temperatures, the Grand Banks of Newfoundland show a decrease in sea surface pCO2 of -2 µatm yr-1 from 1993 to 2011. The carbon flux in the North Sea is variable over the same period. This is in contrast to most of the open ocean within the North Atlantic, where increases in sea surface pCO2 follow the trend of increasing CO2 in the atmosphere, i.e. the flux or sink remains constant. The increasing CO2 sink in the Grand Banks of Newfoundland and the variable sink in the North Sea correlate with changes in phytoplankton community composition. This study investigates the biogeochemical and oceanographic mechanisms potentially linking increasing sea surface temperature, changes in phytoplankton community structure and the changing carbon sink in these two important regions of the Atlantic Ocean. The use of volunteer ships to concurrently collect these datasets demonstrates the potential to investigate relationships between plankton community structure and carbon flux in a cost-effective way. These results not only have implications for plankton-dynamic biogeochemical models, but also likely influence carbon export, as different phytoplankton communities have different carbon export efficiencies. Extending and maintaining such datasets is critical to improving our understanding of and monitoring carbon cycling in the surface ocean and improving climate model accuracy.

  6. Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk in Collegiate Football Players and Nonathletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrosielski, Devon A.; Rosenbaum, Daryl; Wooster, Benjamin M.; Merrill, Michael; Swanson, John; Moore, J. Brian; Brubaker, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    Collegiate American football players may be at risk for cardiovascular disease. Objective: To compare cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiovascular structure and function parameters of football players, stratified by position, to a group of sedentary, nonathletes. Participants: Twenty-six collegiate football players and 13 nonathletes…

  7. Bamboo thickets alter the demographic structure of Euterpe edulis population: A keystone, threatened palm species of the Atlantic forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Débora Cristina; Rodrigues, Ricardo Ribeiro; Pizo, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of bamboos can strongly affect forest structure by interfering plant regeneration and reducing local biodiversity. Considering that bamboos exert a negative influence on the plant community, our main goal was to investigate how this influence manifests at the population level. We compared the demographic structure of the threatened palm Euterpe edulis between bamboo and non-bamboo dominated patches within the Atlantic forest. In the study site, the native bamboo Guadua tagoara has created a marked patchiness and heterogeneity in the vegetation. Plots were set up randomly in bamboo and non-bamboo patches and the heights of all E. edulis individuals were measured. Data from canopy openness and litter depth were collected for both patches. Greater number of E. edulis was recorded in bamboo patches. However, frequency distribution of the height classes differed between patches revealing a predominance of seedling and sapling I classes in bamboo patches, in comparison to a more evenly distribution of height classes in non-bamboo patches. The canopy in bamboo patches was more open and the litter depth was thicker. Our analyses evidenced G. tagoara is functioning as a demographic bottleneck of natural population of E. edulis by arresting its later stages of regeneration and in high densities that bamboos may limit recruitment of this palm species.

  8. Structural brain alterations in bipolar disorder II: a combined voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Elisa; Rossi-Espagnet, Maria Camilla; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Comparelli, Anna; Del Casale, Antonio; Carducci, Filippo; Romano, Andrea; Manfredi, Giovanni; Tatarelli, Roberto; Bozzao, Alessandro; Girardi, Paolo

    2013-09-05

    Brain structural changes have been described in bipolar disorder (BP), but usually studies focused on both I and II subtypes indiscriminately and investigated changes in either brain volume or white matter (WM) integrity. We used combined voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis to track changes in the grey matter (GM) and WM in the brains of patients affected by BPII, as compared to healthy controls. Using VBM and DTI, we scanned 20 DSM-IV-TR BPII patients in their euthymic phase and 21 healthy, age- and gender-matched volunteers with no psychiatric history. VBM showed decreases in GM of BPII patients, compared to controls, which were diffuse in nature and most prominent in the right middle frontal gyrus and in the right superior temporal gurus. DTI showed significant and widespread FA reduction in BPII patients in all major WM tracts, including cortico-cortical association tracts. The small sample size limits the generalisability of our findings. Reduced GM volumes and WM integrity changes in BPII patients are not prominent like those previously reported in bipolar disorder type-I and involve cortical structures and their related association tracts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Altered hippocampal arteriole structure and function in a rat model of preeclampsia: Potential role in impaired seizure-induced hyperemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Abbie C; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the effect of experimental preeclampsia on hyperemia during seizure in the hippocampus and vascular function and structure of hippocampal arterioles using Sprague Dawley rats (n = 14/group) that were nonpregnant, pregnant (d20), or had experimental preeclampsia (induced by a high cholesterol diet d7-20). Hyperemia was measured via hydrogen clearance basally and during pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure (40-130 mg/kg i.v.). Reactivity of isolated and pressurized hippocampal arterioles to KCl, nitric oxide synthase inhibition with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside were investigated. Capillary density was quantified via immunohistochemistry. Cerebral blood flow increased during seizure vs. baseline in pregnant (118 ± 14 vs. 87 ± 9 mL/100 g/min; p  0.05), suggesting impaired seizure-induced hyperemia in preeclampsia. Hippocampal arterioles from preeclamptic rats had less basal tone, and dilated less to 15 mM KCl (9 ± 8%) vs. pregnant (61 ± 27%) and nonpregnant rats (20 ± 11%). L-NAME had no effect on hippocampal arterioles in any group, but dilation to sodium nitroprusside was similar. Structurally, hippocampal arterioles from preeclamptic rats underwent inward hypotrophic remodeling and capillary rarefaction. Impaired seizure-induced hyperemia, vascular dysfunction, and limited vasodilatory reserve of hippocampal arterioles could potentiate hippocampal injury in preeclampsia especially during eclampsia.

  10. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  11. Reach-scale stream restoration in agricultural streams of southern Minnesota alters structural and functional responses of macroinvertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolph, Christine L.; Eggert, Susan L.; Magner, Joe; Ferrington, Leonard C.; Vondracek, Bruce C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that stream restoration at the reach scale may not increase stream biodiversity, raising concerns about the utility of this conservation practice. We examined whether reach-scale restoration in disturbed agricultural streams was associated with changes in macroinvertebrate community structure (total macroinvertebrate taxon richness, total macroinvertebrate density, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera [EPT] taxon richness, % abundance of EPT taxa) or secondary production (macroinvertebrate biomass over time). We collected macroinvertebrate samples over the course of 1 y from restored and unrestored reaches of 3 streams in southern Minnesota and used generalized least-square (GLS) models to assess whether measures of community structure were related to reach type, stream site, or sampling month. After accounting for effects of stream site and time, we found no significant difference in total taxon richness or % abundance of EPT taxa between restored and unrestored reaches. However, the number of EPT taxa and macroinvertebrate density were significantly higher in restored than in unrestored reaches. We compared secondary production estimates among study reaches based on 95th-percentile confidence intervals generated via bootstrapping. In each study stream, secondary production was significantly (2–3×) higher in the restored than in the unrestored reach. Higher productivity in the restored reaches was largely a result of the disproportionate success of a few dominant, tolerant taxa. Our findings suggest that reach-scale restoration may have ecological effects that are not detected by measures of total taxon richness alone.

  12. Metabolic and Cardiovascular Effects of Ghrelin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfredi Tesauro

    2010-01-01

    Ghrelin receptors have been detected in the hypothalamus and the pituitary, but also in the cardiovascular system, where ghrelin exerts beneficial hemodynamic activities. Ghrelin administration acutely improves endothelial dysfunction by increasing nitric oxide bioavailability and normalizes the altered balance between endothelin-1 and nitric oxide within the vasculature of patients with metabolic syndrome. Other cardiovascular effects of ghrelin include improvement of left ventricular contractility and cardiac output, as well as reduction of arterial pressure and systemic vascular resistance. In addition, antinflammatory and antiapoptotic actions of ghrelin have been reported both in vivo and in vitro. This review summarizes the most recent findings on the metabolic and cardiovascular effects of ghrelin through GH-dependent and -independent mechanisms and the possible role of ghrelin as a therapeutic molecule for treating cardiovascular diseases.

  13. A hypertension-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation introduces an m1G37 modification into tRNAMet, altering its structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mi; Xue, Ling; Chen, Yaru; Li, Haiying; He, Qiufen; Wang, Bibin; Meng, Feilong; Wang, Meng; Guan, Min-Xin

    2018-01-26

    Defective nucleotide modifications of mitochondrial tRNAs have been associated with several human diseases, but their pathophysiology remains poorly understood. In this report, we investigated the pathogenic molecular mechanism underlying a hypertension-associated 4435A→G mutation in mitochondrial tRNA Met The m.4435A→G mutation affected a highly conserved adenosine at position 37, 3' adjacent to the tRNA's anticodon, which is important for the fidelity of codon recognition and stabilization. We hypothesized that the m.4435A→G mutation introduced an m 1 G37 modification of tRNA Met , altering its structure and function. Primer extension and methylation activity assays indeed confirmed that the m.4435A→G mutation created a tRNA methyltransferase 5 (TRMT5)-catalyzed m 1 G37 modification of tRNA Met We found that this mutation altered the tRNA Met structure, indicated by an increased melting temperature and electrophoretic mobility of the mutated tRNA compared with the wildtype molecule. We demonstrated that cybrid cell lines carrying the m.4435A→G mutation exhibited significantly decreased efficiency in aminoacylation and steady-state levels of tRNA Met , as compared with those of control cybrids. The aberrant tRNA Met metabolism resulted in variable decreases in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded polypeptides in the mutant cybrids. Furthermore, we found that the m.4435A→G mutation caused respiratory deficiency, markedly diminished mitochondrial ATP levels and membrane potential, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species in mutant cybrids. These results demonstrated that an aberrant m 1 G37 modification of mitochondrial tRNA Met affected the structure and function of its tRNA and consequently altered mitochondrial function. Our findings provide critical insights into the pathophysiology of maternally inherited hypertension, which is manifested by the deficient tRNA nucleotide modification. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and

  14. Sex differences in cardiovascular ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Allison A; Cheng, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Despite recent progress in identifying and narrowing the gaps in cardiovascular outcomes between men and women, general understanding of how and why cardiovascular disease presentations differ between the sexes remains limited. Sex-specific patterns of cardiac and vascular ageing play an important role and, in fact, begin very early in life. Differences between the sexes in patterns of age-related cardiac remodelling are associated with the relatively greater prevalence in women than in men of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Similarly, sex variation in how vascular structure and function change with ageing contributes to differences between men and women in how coronary artery disease manifests typically or atypically over the adult life course. Both hormonal and non-hormonal factors underlie sex differences in cardiovascular ageing and the development of age-related disease. The midlife withdrawal of endogenous oestrogen appears to augment the age-related increase in cardiovascular risk seen in postmenopausal compared with premenopausal women. However, when compared with intrinsic biological differences between men and women that are present throughout life, this menopausal transition may not be as substantial an actor in determining cardiovascular outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Ab initio van der waals interactions in simulations of water alter structure from mainly tetrahedral to high-density-like

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelhøj, Andreas; Kelkkanen, Kari André; Wikfeldt, K Thor

    2011-01-01

    The structure of liquid water at ambient conditions is studied in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations in the NVE ensemble using van der Waals (vdW) density-functional theory, i.e., using the new exchange-correlation functionals optPBE-vdW and vdW-DF2, where the latter has softer nonlocal...... protocol could cause the deviation. An O-O PCF consisting of a linear combination of 70% from vdW-DF2 and 30% from low-density liquid water, as extrapolated from experiments, reproduces near-quantitatively the experimental O-O PCF for ambient water. This suggests the possibility that the new functionals...... shows some resemblance with experiment for high-density water ( Soper , A. K. and Ricci , M. A. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2000 , 84 , 2881 ), but not directly with experiment for ambient water. Considering the accuracy of the new functionals for interaction energies, we investigate whether the simulation...

  16. Altering F-Actin Structure of C17.2 Cells using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magers, Jay; Gillette, Nathan L. D.; Rotkin, Slava V.; Jedlicka, Sabrina; Pirbhai, Massooma; Lehigh Univesity Collaboration; Susquehanna University Collaboration

    Advancements in nanotechnology have become fundamental to the delivery of drugs to treat various diseases. One such advancement is that of carbon nanotubes and their possible implications on drug delivery. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have great potential in the biomedical field as a means to deliver materials such as drugs and genes into the human body due to their size and chemistry. However, the effects of the nanotubes on cells they interact with are still unknown. Previous studies have shown that a low dosage of SWCNTs can affect differentiation of C17.2 neural stem cells. In this experiment, we investigate how the tubes affect the structure of the cells. Specifically, we determined the impact on the cell by examining the actin filament length, protrusions along the edge of the cells, and actin distribution. Presenter/Author 1.

  17. T cell receptor sequencing of early-stage breast cancer tumors identifies altered clonal structure of the T cell repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, John F; Wheeler, Amanda J; Chan, Natalie H; Hanft, Violet R; Dirbas, Frederick M; Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Quake, Stephen R

    2017-11-28

    Tumor-infiltrating T cells play an important role in many cancers, and can improve prognosis and yield therapeutic targets. We characterized T cells infiltrating both breast cancer tumors and the surrounding normal breast tissue to identify T cells specific to each, as well as their abundance in peripheral blood. Using immune profiling of the T cell beta-chain repertoire in 16 patients with early-stage breast cancer, we show that the clonal structure of the tumor is significantly different from adjacent breast tissue, with the tumor containing ∼2.5-fold greater density of T cells and higher clonality compared with normal breast. The clonal structure of T cells in blood and normal breast is more similar than between blood and tumor, and could be used to distinguish tumor from normal breast tissue in 14 of 16 patients. Many T cell sequences overlap between tissue and blood from the same patient, including ∼50% of T cells between tumor and normal breast. Both tumor and normal breast contain high-abundance "enriched" sequences that are absent or of low abundance in the other tissue. Many of these T cells are either not detected or detected with very low frequency in the blood, suggesting the existence of separate compartments of T cells in both tumor and normal breast. Enriched T cell sequences are typically unique to each patient, but a subset is shared between many different patients. We show that many of these are commonly generated sequences, and thus unlikely to play an important role in the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  18. Altering the Structure of Carbohydrate Storage Granules in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 through Branching-Enzyme Truncations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welkie, David G.; Lee, Byung-Hoo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Carbohydrate storage is an important element of metabolism in cyanobacteria and in the chloroplasts of plants. Understanding how to manipulate the metabolism and storage of carbohydrate is also an important factor toward harnessing cyanobacteria for energy production. While most cyanobacteria produce glycogen, some have been found to accumulate polysaccharides in the form of water-insoluble α-glucan similar to amylopectin. Notably, this alternative form, termed “semi-amylopectin,” forms in cyanobacterial species harboring three branching-enzyme (BE) homologs, designated BE1, BE2, and BE3. In this study, mutagenesis of the branching genes found in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 was performed in order to characterize their possible impact on polysaccharide storage granule morphology. N-terminal truncations were made to the native BE gene of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. In addition, one of the two native debranching enzyme genes was replaced with a heterologous debranching enzyme gene from a semi-amylopectin-forming strain. Growth and glycogen content of mutant strains did not significantly differ from those of the wild type, and ultrastructure analysis revealed only slight changes to granule morphology. However, analysis of chain length distribution by anion-exchange chromatography revealed modest changes to the branched-chain length profile. The resulting glycogen shared structure characteristics similar to that of granules isolated from semi-amylopectin-producing strains. IMPORTANCE This study is the first to investigate the impact of branching-enzyme truncations on the structure of storage carbohydrates in cyanobacteria. The results of this study are an important contribution toward understanding the relationship between the enzymatic repertoire of a cyanobacterial species and the morphology of its storage carbohydrates. PMID:26668264

  19. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study Reveals Local Brain Structural Alterations associated With Ambient Fine Particles in older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Casanova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5: PM with aerodynamic diameters <2.5µm has been linked with cognitive deficits in older adults. Using fine-grained voxel-wise analyses, we examined whether PM2.5 exposure also affects brain structure.Methods: Brain MRI data were obtained from 1,365 women (aged 71-89 in the Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study and local brain volumes were estimated using RAVENS (regional analysis of volumes in normalized space. Based on geocoded residential locations and air monitoring data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, we employed a spatiotemporal model to estimate long-term (3-year average exposure to ambient PM2.5 preceding MRI scans. Voxel-wise linear regression models were fit separately to gray matter (GM and white matter (WM maps to analyze associations between brain structure and PM2.5 exposure, with adjustment for potential confounders. Results: Increased PM2.5 exposure was associated with smaller volumes in both cortical GM and subcortical WM areas. For GM, associations were clustered in the bilateral superior, middle, and medial frontal gyri. For WM, the largest clusters were in the frontal lobe, with smaller clusters in the temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes. No statistically significant associations were observed between PM2.5 exposure and hippocampal volumes. Conclusions: Long-term PM2.5 exposures may accelerate loss of both GM and WM in older women. While our previous work linked WM decreased volumes to PM2.5 air pollution, this is the first neuroimaging study reporting associations between air pollution exposure and smaller volumes of cortical GM. Our data support the hypothesized synaptic neurotoxicity of airborne particles.

  20. Cardiovascular involvement in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Lewis, Suzanne K; Biviano, Angelo B; Iyer, Vivek; Garan, Hasan; Green, Peter H

    2017-08-26

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune response to ingestion of gluten protein, which is found in wheat, rye, and barley grains, and results in both small intestinal manifestations, including villous atrophy, as well as systemic manifestations. The main treatment for the disease is a gluten-free diet (GFD), which typically results in the restoration of the small intestinal villi, and restoration of other affected organ systems, to their normal functioning. In an increasing number of recently published studies, there has been great interest in the occurrence of alterations in the cardiovascular system in untreated CD. Herein, published studies in which CD and cardiovascular terms appear in the title of the study were reviewed. The publications were categorized into one of several types: (1) articles (including cohort and case-control studies); (2) reviews and meta-analyses; (3) case studies (one to three patient reports); (4) letters; (5) editorials; and (6) abstracts (used when no full-length work had been published). The studies were subdivided as either heart or vascular studies, and were further characterized by the particular condition that was evident in conjunction with CD. Publication information was determined using the Google Scholar search tool. For each publication, its type and year of publication were tabulated. Salient information from each article was then compiled. It was determined that there has been a sharp increase in the number of CD - cardiovascular studies since 2000. Most of the publications are either of the type "article" or "case study". The largest number of documents published concerned CD in conjunction with cardiomyopathy (33 studies), and there have also been substantial numbers of studies published on CD and thrombosis (27), cardiovascular risk (17), atherosclerosis (13), stroke (12), arterial function (11), and ischemic heart disease (11). Based on the published research, it can be concluded that many types of cardiovascular issues

  1. Cocoa, blood pressure, and cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Claudio; Desideri, Giovambattista; Ferri, Livia; Proietti, Ilenia; Di Agostino, Stefania; Martella, Letizia; Mai, Francesca; Di Giosia, Paolo; Grassi, Davide

    2015-11-18

    High blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular events worldwide. Clinical and epidemiological studies suggest that cocoa-rich products reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. According to this, cocoa has a high content in polyphenols, especially flavanols. Flavanols have been described to exert favorable effects on endothelium-derived vasodilation via the stimulation of nitric oxide-synthase, the increased availability of l-arginine, and the decreased degradation of NO. Cocoa may also have a beneficial effect by protecting against oxidative stress alterations and via decreased platelet aggregation, decreased lipid oxidation, and insulin resistance. These effects are associated with a decrease of blood pressure and a favorable trend toward a reduction in cardiovascular events and strokes. Previous meta-analyses have shown that cocoa-rich foods may reduce blood pressure. Long-term trials investigating the effect of cocoa products are needed to determine whether or not blood pressure is reduced on a chronic basis by daily ingestion of cocoa. Furthermore, long-term trials investigating the effect of cocoa on clinical outcomes are also needed to assess whether cocoa has an effect on cardiovascular events. A 3 mmHg systolic blood pressure reduction has been estimated to decrease the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. This paper summarizes new findings concerning cocoa effects on blood pressure and cardiovascular health, focusing on putative mechanisms of action and "nutraceutical " viewpoints.

  2. Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Cardiovascular Remodeling Is Reversed by Normoxia in a Mouse Model of Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Grattoni, Anabel L; Alvarez-Buvé, Roger; Torres, Marta; Farré, Ramon; Montserrat, Josep M; Dalmases, Mireia; Almendros, Isaac; Barbé, Ferran; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) is the principal injurious factor involved in the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with OSA. The gold standard for treatment is CPAP, which eliminates IH and appears to reduce cardiovascular risk. There is no experimental evidence on the reversibility of cardiovascular remodeling after IH withdrawal. The objective of the present study is to assess the reversibility of early cardiovascular structural remodeling induced by IH after resumption of normoxic breathing in a novel recovery animal model mimicking OSA treatment. We investigated cardiovascular remodeling in C57BL/6 mice exposed to IH for 6 weeks vs the normoxia group and its spontaneous recovery after 6 subsequent weeks under normoxia. Aortic expansive remodeling was induced by IH, with intima-media thickening and without lumen perimeter changes. Elastic fiber network disorganization, fragmentation, and estrangement between the end points of disrupted fibers were increased by IH. Extracellular matrix turnover was altered, as visualized by collagen and mucoid interlaminar accumulation. Furthermore, left ventricular perivascular fibrosis was increased by IH, whereas cardiomyocytes size was unaffected. These cardiovascular remodeling events induced by IH were normalized after recovery in normoxia, mimicking CPAP treatment. The early structural cardiovascular remodeling induced by IH was normalized after IH removal, revealing a novel recovery model for studying the effects of OSA treatment. Our findings suggest the clinical relevance of early detection and effective treatment of OSA in patients to prevent the natural course of cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Long-term carbon exclusion alters soil microbial function but not community structure across forests of contrasting productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, S. C.; Dove, N. C.; Stark, J.

    2017-12-01

    While it is well-documented that distinct heterotrophic microbial communities emerge under different conditions of carbon (C) availability, the response of soil microbial communities and their function to long-term conditions of C exclusion in situ has yet to be investigated. We evaluated the role of C in controlling soil microbial communities and function by experimentally excluding plant C inputs for nine years at four forest sites along a productivity gradient in Oregon, USA. Carbon exclusion treatments were implemented by root trenching to a depth of 30 cm using 25-cm diameter steel pipe, and minimizing aboveground inputs as plant litter by covering the pipe with a 1-mm mesh screen. After nine years, we measured rates of gross and net nitrogen (N) transformations and microbial respiration in situ in the upper 15-cm of mineral soil in both C excluded plots and undisturbed control soils. We measured the soil total C and N concentration and potential extracellular enzyme activities. We used phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis to determine potential changes in the microbial community structure. Nine years of C exclusion reduced soil total C by about 20%, except at the highest productivity site where no statistically significant change was observed. Although PLFA community structure and microbial C were unchanged, microbial respiration was reduced by 15-45% at all sites. Similarly, specific extracellular enzyme activities for all enzymes increased at these sites with C exclusion, suggesting that the microbial communities were substrate-limited. Although gross N mineralization decreased under C exclusion, decreases in gross N immobilization were greater, resulting in increased net N mineralization rates in all but the lowest productivity site. Furthermore, C exclusion only increased net nitrification in the highest productivity site. Although these field-based results are largely consistent with previous laboratory studies indicating a strong coupling between C

  4. Cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prejbisz, A.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Eisenhofer, G.; Januszewicz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical expression of phaeochromocytoma may involve numerous cardiovascular manifestations, but usually presents as sustained or paroxysmal hypertension associated with other signs and symptoms of catecholamine excess. Most of the life-threatening cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma,

  5. Understanding cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000759.htm Understanding cardiovascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... lead to heart attack or stroke. Types of Cardiovascular Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common ...

  6. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 29,2018 The following statistics ... clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent of ...

  7. Exposure of tropoelastin to peroxynitrous acid gives high yields of nitrated tyrosine residues, di-tyrosine cross-links and altered protein structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degendorfer, Georg; Chuang, Christine Yu-Nung; Mariotti, Michele

    2018-01-01

    Elastin is an abundant extracellular matrix protein in elastic tissues, including the lungs, skin and arteries, and comprises 30–57% of the aorta by dry mass. The monomeric precursor, tropoelastin (TE), undergoes complex processing during elastogenesis to form mature elastic fibres. Peroxynitrous......-damaged extracellular matrix implicated in lesion rupture. We demonstrate that TE is highly sensitive to ONOOH, with this resulting in extensive dimerization, fragmentation and nitration of Tyr residues to give 3-nitrotyrosine (3-nitroTyr). This occurs with equimolar or greater levels of oxidant and increases in a dose...... with lipid deposits. These data suggest that exposure of TE to ONOOH gives marked chemical and structural changes to TE and altered matrix assembly, and that such damage accumulates in human arterial tissue during the development of atherosclerosis....

  8. Structural alteration of industry of region as pre-condition of steady development of national economy (on the example of the Dnepropetrovsk area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Vlasiuk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An economic analysis is conducted in the production sphere of the Dnepropetrovsk area in a period development and in the process of transformation production to the sector of the national economic system. In particular, an analysis of the actual state of socio ­economic development of the Dnipropetrovsk region in the late XX century and its current state in order to find trends change attributes of manifestation and impact on living standards . The analysis of individual industries Dnipropetrovsk region. It is shown that the basis of the regional industry ­ metallurgy. Comparative analysis of the sectoral structure of industrial production Dnipropetrovsk Oblast major types of products that characterize its economy in 1997 and 2012. This analysis revealed the changes in the structural transformation of the regional industry . The basic indicators of socio­ economic development of the Dnipropetrovsk region. In particular , it was found that the dynamics of socio ­economic development of the region by major figures exceeded the average values in Ukraine , and the main results of 2011 was a steady growth in key sectors of the Dnipropetrovsk region. Were clarified problems of the region’s economy and its future prospects . The factors of forming of regional economic policy and principles of structural alteration of industry are considered.

  9. Structural and molecular alterations of primary afferent fibres in the spinal dorsal horn in vincristine-induced neuropathy in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Karine; Rivals, Isabelle; M'Dahoma, Saïd; Dubacq, Sophie; Pezet, Sophie; Calvino, Bernard

    2013-11-01

    Vincristine is one of the most common anti-cancer drug therapies administered for the treatment of many types of cancer. Its dose-limiting side effect is the emergence of peripheral neuropathy, resulting in chronic neuropathic pain in many patients. This study sought to understand the mechanisms underlying the development of neuropathic pain by vincristine-induced neurotoxicity. We focused on signs of functional changes and revealed that deep layers of the spinal cord (III-IV) experience increased neuronal activity both in the absence of peripheral stimulation and, as a result of tactile mechanical stimulations. These laminae and superficial laminae I-II were also subject to structural changes as evidenced by an increase in immunoreactivity of Piccolo, a marker of active presynaptic elements. Further investigations performed, using DNA microarray technology, describe a large number of genes differentially expressed in dorsal root ganglions and in the spinal dorsal horn after vincristine treatment. Our study describes an important list of genes differentially regulated by vincristine treatment that will be useful for future studies and brings forward evidence for molecular and anatomical modifications of large diameter sensory neurons terminating in deep dorsal horn laminae, which could participate in the development of tactile allodynia.

  10. Persistent expression of activated notch in the developing hypothalamus affects survival of pituitary progenitors and alters pituitary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujla, Paven K; Bogdanovic, Vedran; Naratadam, George T; Raetzman, Lori T

    2015-08-01

    As the pituitary gland develops, signals from the hypothalamus are necessary for pituitary induction and expansion. Little is known about the control of cues that regulate early signaling between the two structures. Ligands and receptors of the Notch signaling pathway are found in both the hypothalamus and Rathke's pouch. The downstream Notch effector gene Hes1 is required for proper pituitary formation; however, these effects could be due to the action of Hes1 in the hypothalamus, Rathke's pouch, or both. To determine the contribution of hypothalamic Notch signaling to pituitary organogenesis, we used mice with loss and gain of Notch function within the developing hypothalamus. We demonstrate that loss of Notch signaling by conditional deletion of Rbpj in the hypothalamus does not affect expression of Hes1 within the posterior hypothalamus or expression of Hes5. In contrast, expression of activated Notch within the hypothalamus results in ectopic Hes5 expression and increased Hes1 expression, which is sufficient to disrupt pituitary development and postnatal expansion. Taken together, our results indicate that Rbpj-dependent Notch signaling within the developing hypothalamus is not necessary for pituitary development, but persistent Notch signaling and ectopic Hes5 expression in hypothalamic progenitors affects pituitary induction and expansion. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Local structures of mesoporous bioactive glasses and their surface alterations in vitro: inferences from solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawidjaja, Philips N.; Mathew, Renny; Lo, Andy Y. H.; Izquierdo-Barba, Isabel; García, Ana; Arcos, Daniel; Mattias Edén, María Vallet-Regí

    2012-01-01

    We review the benefits of using 29Si and 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for probing the local structures of both bulk and surface portions of mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBGs) of the CaO–SiO2−(P2O5) system. These mesoporous materials exhibit an ordered pore arrangement, and are promising candidates for improved bone and tooth implants. We discuss experimental MAS NMR results from three MBGs displaying different Ca, Si and P contents: the 29Si NMR spectra were recorded either directly by employing radio-frequency pulses to 29Si, or by magnetization transfers from neighbouring protons using cross polarization, thereby providing quantitative information about the silicate speciation present in the pore wall and at the MBG surface, respectively. The surface modifications were monitored for the three MBGs during their immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF) for intervals between 30 min and one week. The results were formulated as a reaction sequence describing the interconversions between the distinct silicate species. We generally observed a depletion of Ca2+ ions at the MBG surface, and a minor condensation of the silicate-surface network over one week of SBF soaking. PMID:22349247

  12. Water-limiting conditions alter the structure and biofilm-forming ability of bacterial multispecies communities in the alfalfa rhizosphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Bogino

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities that adhere to biotic or abiotic surfaces and are enclosed in a protective matrix of extracellular compounds. An important advantage of the biofilm lifestyle for soil bacteria (rhizobacteria is protection against water deprivation (desiccation or osmotic effect. The rhizosphere is a crucial microhabitat for ecological, interactive, and agricultural production processes. The composition and functions of bacterial biofilms in soil microniches are poorly understood. We studied multibacterial communities established as biofilm-like structures in the rhizosphere of Medicago sativa (alfalfa exposed to 3 experimental conditions of water limitation. The whole biofilm-forming ability (WBFA for rhizospheric communities exposed to desiccation was higher than that of communities exposed to saline or nonstressful conditions. A culture-dependent ribotyping analysis indicated that communities exposed to desiccation or saline conditions were more diverse than those under the nonstressful condition. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of selected strains showed that the rhizospheric communities consisted primarily of members of the Actinobacteria and α- and γ-Proteobacteria, regardless of the water-limiting condition. Our findings contribute to improved understanding of the effects of environmental stress factors on plant-bacteria interaction processes and have potential application to agricultural management practices.

  13. Erythritol and Lufenuron Detrimentally Alter Age Structure of Wild Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Populations in Blueberry and Blackberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, B J; Marshall, D A; Smith, B J; Stringer, S J; Werle, C T; Magee, D J; Adamczyk, J J

    2017-04-01

    We report on the efficacy of 0.5 M (61,000 ppm) erythritol (E) in Truvia Baking Blend, 10 ppm lufenuron (L), and their combination (LE) to reduce egg and larval densities of wild populations of Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) infesting fields of rabbiteye blueberries (Vaccinium virgatum) and blackberries (Rubus sp.). Formulations included the active ingredients (lufenuron, erythritol, or both), sugar (in control and erythritol treatments), and Dawn hand-soap applied to plants with pressurized 3-gallon garden spray tanks. The three chemical treatments (E, L, and LE) had no effect on D. suzukii ovipositing in blackberry and blueberry fruit, but they did reduce larval infestation by 75%, particularly densities of first and second instars. Erythritol and lufenuron were equally efficacious compounds as a D. suzukii ovicide and larvicide, but they did not display additive or synergistic activity. Extremely high larval mortality in control fruits show an age structure heavily skewed toward egg output. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by a US Government employee and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Active sites of the cytochrome p450cam (CYP101) F87W and F87A mutants. Evidence for significant structural reorganization without alteration of catalytic regiospecificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, S F; Graham-Lorence, S; Peterson, J A; Ortiz de Montellano, P R

    1993-01-05

    Ferricyanide oxidation of the aryl-iron complexes formed by the reaction of cytochrome P450 enzymes with arylhydrazines causes in situ migration of the aryl group from the iron to the porphyrin nitrogen atoms. The regiochemistry of this migration, defined by the ratio of the four possible N-arylprotoporphyrin IX isomers, provides a method for mapping the topologies of cytochrome P450 active sites. The method has been validated by using it to examine the active site of cytochrome P450cam (CYP101), for which a crystal structure is available. In agreement with the crystal structure, reaction with phenylhydrazine gives a 5:25:70 ratio of the NA:NC:ND (subscript indicates pyrrole ring) N-phenylprotoporphyrin IX isomers. Naphthylhydrazine, however, yields exclusively the NC regioisomer and 4-(phenyl)phenylhydrazine the NA:NC:ND isomers in a 14:40:46 ratio. These isomer ratio differences are readily explained by topological differences between the upper and lower reaches of the active site. Having validated the aryl-iron shift as a topological probe, we used it to investigate the structural changes caused by mutation of Phe-87, a residue that provides the ceiling over pyrrole ring D in the crystal structure of cytochrome P450cam. Mutation of Phe-87 to a tryptophan causes no detectable change in the regiochemistry of camphor hydroxylation and only minor changes in the N-aryl isomer ratios. However, mutation of Phe-87 to an alanine, which was expected to open up the region above pyrrole ring D, severely decreased the proportion of the ND in favor of the NA isomer. Less rather than more space is therefore available over pyrrole ring D in the F87A mutant despite the fact that the regiochemistry of camphor hydroxylation remains unchanged. These results provide evidence for significant structural reorganization in the upper regions of the substrate binding site without alteration of the camphor hydroxylation regiospecificity in the F87A mutant.

  15. Structural brain alterations associated with schizophrenia preceded by conduct disorder: a common and distinct subtype of schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Boris; Leygraf, Norbert; Müller, Bernhard W; Scherbaum, Norbert; Forsting, Michael; Wiltfang, Jens; Gizewski, Elke R; Hodgins, Sheilagh

    2013-09-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) prior to age 15 is a precursor of schizophrenia in a minority of cases and is associated with violent behavior through adulthood, after taking account of substance misuse. The present study used structural magnetic imaging to examine gray matter (GM) volumes among 27 men with schizophrenia preceded by CD (SZ+CD), 23 men with schizophrenia but without CD (SZ-CD), 27 men with CD only (CD), and 25 healthy (H) men. The groups with schizophrenia were similar in terms of age of onset and duration of illness, levels of psychotic symptoms, and medication. The 2 groups with CD were similar as to number of CD symptoms, lifelong aggressive behavior, and number of criminal convictions. Men with SZ+CD, relative to those with SZ-CD, displayed (1) increased GM volumes in the hypothalamus, the left putamen, the right cuneus/precuneus, and the right inferior parietal cortex after controlling for age, alcohol, and drug misuse and (2) decreased GM volumes in the inferior frontal region. Men with SZ+CD (relative to the SZ-CD group) and CD (relative to the H group) displayed increased GM volumes of the hypothalamus and the inferior and superior parietal lobes, which were not associated with substance misuse. Aggressive behavior, both prior to age 15 and lifetime tendency, was positively correlated with the GM volume of the hypothalamus. Thus, among males, SZ+CD represents a distinct subtype of schizophrenia. Although differences in behavior emerge in childhood and remain stable through adulthood, further research is needed to determine whether the differences in GM volumes result from abnormal neural development distinct from that of other males developing schizophrenia.

  16. Two and three dimensional characterization of Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus induced structural alterations in Cucurbita pepo L. plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellnig, Günther; Pöckl, Michael Herbert; Möstl, Stefan; Zechmann, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Infection of plants by Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus (ZYMV) induces severe ultrastructural changes. The aim of this study was to investigate ultrastructural changes during ZYMV-infection in Cucurbita pepo L. plants on the two and three dimensional (2D and 3D) level and to correlate these changes with the spread of ZYMV throughout the plant by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and image analysis. This study revealed that after inoculation of the cotyledons ZYMV moved into roots [3 days post inoculation (dpi)], then moved upwards into the stem and apical meristem (5 dpi), then into the first true leaf (7 dpi) and could finally be found in all plant parts (9 dpi). ZYMV-infected cells contained viral inclusion bodies in the form of cylindrical inclusions (CIs). These CIs occurred in four different forms throughout the cytosol of roots and leaves: scrolls and pinwheels when cut transversely and long tubular structures and bundles of filaments when cut longitudinally. 3D reconstruction of ZYMV-infected cells containing scrolls revealed that they form long tubes throughout the cytosol. The majority has a preferred orientation and an average length and width of 3 μm and 120 nm, respectively. Image analysis revealed an increased size of cells and vacuoles (107% and 447%, respectively) in younger ZYMV-infected leaves leading to a similar ratio of cytoplasm to vacuole (about 1:1) in older and younger ZYMV-infected leaves which indicates advanced cell growth in younger tissues. The collected data advances the current knowledge about ZYMV-induced ultrastructural changes in Cucurbita pepo. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Independence of protein kinase C-delta activity from activation loop phosphorylation: structural basis and altered functions in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Belkina, Natalya V; Graham, Caroline; Shaw, Stephen

    2006-04-28

    Activation loop phosphorylation plays critical regulatory roles for many kinases. Unlike other protein kinase Cs (PKC), PKC-delta does not require phosphorylation of its activation loop (Thr-507) for in vitro activity. We investigated the structural basis for this unusual capacity and its relevance to PKC-delta function in intact cells. Mutational analysis demonstrated that activity without Thr-507 phosphorylation depends on 20 residues N-terminal to the kinase domain and a pair of phenylalanines (Phe-500/Phe-527) unique to PKC-delta in/near the activation loop. Molecular modeling demonstrated that these elements stabilize the activation loop by forming a hydrophobic chain of interactions from the C-lobe to activation loop to N-terminal (helical) extension. In cells PKC-delta mediates both apoptosis and transcription regulation. We found that the T507A mutant of the PKC-delta kinase domain resembled the corresponding wild type in mediating apoptosis in transfected HEK293T cells. But the T507A mutant was completely defective in AP-1 and NF-kappaB reporter assays. A novel assay in which the kinase domain of PKC-delta and its substrate (a fusion protein of PKC substrate peptide with green fluorescent protein) were co-targeted to lipid rafts revealed a major substrate-selective defect of the T507A mutant in phosphorylating the substrate in cells. In vitro analysis showed strong product inhibition on the T507A mutant with particular substrates whose characteristics suggest it contributes to the substrate selective defect of the PKC-delta T507A mutant in cells. Thus, activation loop phosphorylation of PKC-delta may regulate its function in cells in a novel way.

  18. Overexpression of the OsERF71 Transcription Factor Alters Rice Root Structure and Drought Resistance1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Geupil; Jeong, Jin Seo; Kim, Youn Shic; Ha, Sun-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Plant responses to drought stress require the regulation of transcriptional networks via drought-responsive transcription factors, which mediate a range of morphological and physiological changes. AP2/ERF transcription factors are known to act as key regulators of drought resistance transcriptional networks; however, little is known about the associated molecular mechanisms that give rise to specific morphological and physiological adaptations. In this study, we functionally characterized the rice (Oryza sativa) drought-responsive AP2/ERF transcription factor OsERF71, which is expressed predominantly in the root meristem, pericycle, and endodermis. Overexpression of OsERF71, either throughout the entire plant or specifically in roots, resulted in a drought resistance phenotype at the vegetative growth stage, indicating that overexpression in roots was sufficient to confer drought resistance. The root-specific overexpression was more effective in conferring drought resistance at the reproductive stage, such that grain yield was increased by 23% to 42% over wild-type plants or whole-body overexpressing transgenic lines under drought conditions. OsERF71 overexpression in roots elevated the expression levels of genes related to cell wall loosening and lignin biosynthetic genes, which correlated with changes in root structure, the formation of enlarged aerenchyma, and high lignification levels. Furthermore, OsERF71 was found to directly bind to the promoter of OsCINNAMOYL-COENZYME A REDUCTASE1, a key gene in lignin biosynthesis. These results indicate that the OsERF71-mediated drought resistance pathway recruits factors involved in cell wall modification to enable root morphological adaptations, thereby providing a mechanism for enhancing drought resistance. PMID:27382137

  19. Conventional tillage decreases the abundance and biomass of earthworms and alters their community structure in a global meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, María Jesús I; Schmidt, Olaf

    2017-10-01

    The adoption of less intensive soil cultivation practices is expected to increase earthworm populations and their contributions to ecosystem functioning. However, conflicting results have been reported on the effects of tillage intensity on earthworm populations, attributed in narrative reviews to site-dependent differences in soil properties, climatic conditions and agronomic operations (e.g. fertilization, residue management and chemical crop protection). We present a quantitative review based on a global meta-analysis, using paired observations from 165 publications performed over 65 years (1950-2016) across 40 countries on five continents, to elucidate this long-standing unresolved issue. Results showed that disturbing the soil less (e.g. no-tillage and conservation agriculture [CA]) significantly increased earthworm abundance (mean increase of 137% and 127%, respectively) and biomass (196% and 101%, respectively) compared to when the soil is inverted by conventional ploughing. Earthworm population responses were more pronounced when the soil had been under reduced tillage (RT) for a long time (>10 years), in warm temperate zones with fine-textured soils, and in soils with higher clay contents (>35%) and low pH (earthworm population responses to RT. Additional meta-analyses confirmed that epigeic and, more importantly, the bigger-sized anecic earthworms were the most sensitive ecological groups to conventional tillage. In particular, the deep burrower Lumbricus terrestris exhibited the strongest positive response to RT, increasing in abundance by 124% more than the overall mean of all 13 species analysed individually. The restoration of these two important ecological groups of earthworms and their burrowing, feeding and casting activities under various forms of RT will ensure the provision of ecosystem functions such as soil structure maintenance and nutrient cycling by "nature's plough." © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Suppression of the phytoene synthase gene (EgcrtB) alters carotenoid content and intracellular structure of Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shota; Soshino, Mika; Takaichi, Shinichi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Nagata, Noriko; Asahina, Masashi; Shinomura, Tomoko

    2017-07-17

    susceptibility of cells to light stress. Our results indicate that suppression of EgcrtB causes a significant decrease in carotenoid and chlorophyll content in E. gracilis accompanied by changes in intracellular structures, suggesting that Dtx (de-epoxidized form of diadinoxanthin cycle pigments) contributes to photoprotection of this alga during the long-term acclimation to light-induced stress.

  1. Role of Adipokines in Atherosclerosis: Interferences with Cardiovascular Complications in Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; Gómez, Rodolfo; López, Verónica; Pino, Jesús; González, Antonio; Lago, Francisca; Gómez-Reino, Juan J.; Gualillo, Oreste

    2012-01-01

    Patients with rheumatic diseases have an increased risk of mortality by cardiovascular events. In fact, several rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis are associated with a higher prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Although traditional cardiovascular risk factors have been involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases in rheumatic patients, these alterations do not completely explain the enhanced cardiovascular risk in this population. Obesity and its pathologic alteration of fat mass and dysfunction, due to an altered pattern of secretion of proinflammatory adipokines, could be one of the links between cardiovascular and rheumatic diseases. Indeed, the incidence of CVDs is augmented in obese individuals with rheumatic disorders. Thus, in this paper we explore in detail the relationships among adipokines, rheumatic diseases, and cardiovascular complications by giving to the reader a holistic vision and several suggestions for future perspectives and potential clinical implications. PMID:22910888

  2. Primary hyperparathyroidism and the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Thomas J; O'Flynn, Anne Marie; McDermott, John H; Kearney, Peter

    2006-11-18

    The role of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) in heart disease is still somewhat uncertain in many respects. Patients with PHPT seem to have an increase in mortality and this seems mainly due to an overrepresentation of cardiovascular death. PHPT is reported to be associated with hypertension, disturbances in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, cardiac arrhythmias as well as structural and functional alterations in the vascular wall. There is an increased prevalence of cardiac structural abnormalities such as LVH and functional properties of the heart may be affected by the hyperparathyroid condition as well. We report the case of a 65-year-old woman with no cardiac risk factors apart from her age and type 2 diabetes who presented in cardiogenic shock. Extensive evaluation for the aetiology of the cardiomyopathy revealed solely a diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism. Cardiac manifestations of primary hyperparathyroidism have been reported before but to our knowledge this is the first description of severe left ventricular function secondary to PHPT. We believe that this atypical presentation of primary hyperparathyroidism causing left ventricular cardiomyopathy warrants further attention, and that a diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism should always be considered in patients with systolic as well as diastolic left ventricular dysfunction, and no other obvious cause.

  3. Shatter cone and microscopic shock-alteration evidence for a post-Paleoproterozoic terrestrial impact structure near Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fackelman, Siobhan P.; Morrow, Jared R.; Koeberl, Christian; McElvain, Thornton H.

    2008-06-01

    Field mapping, morphologic description, and petrographic analysis of recently discovered shatter cones within Paleoproterozoic crystalline rocks exposed over an area > 5 km 2, located ˜ 8 km northeast of Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, give robust evidence of a previously unrecognized terrestrial impact structure. Herein, we provisionally name this the "Santa Fe impact structure". The shatter cones are composed of nested sub-conical, curviplanar, and flat joint surfaces bearing abundant curved and bifurcating striations that strongly resemble the multiply striated joint surfaces (MSJS) documented from shatter cones at Vredefort dome. The cones occur as a penetrative feature in intrusive igneous and supracrustal metamorphic rocks, are unusually large (up to 2 m long and 0.5 m wide at the base), display upward-pointing apices, and have subvertical, northeastward-plunging axes that crosscut regional host-rock fabrics. Key characteristics of superficially similar, but non-shock-generated conical and striated features are inconsistent with the properties of the Santa Fe cones. In thin section, sub-millimeter-scale, dark, semi-opaque to isotropic veneers on cone surfaces and veinlets within cone interiors closely resemble previously described shock-induced melt features. Microscopic grain alteration, restricted generally to within 1 mm of the cone surfaces, includes random fractures, fluid micro-inclusions, sericite replacement in feldspar, rare kink bands in mica, optical mosaicism, and decorated planar fractures (PFs) and planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz. The PFs and PDFs are dominated by a basal (0001) crystallographic orientation, which indicate a peak shock pressure of ˜ 5-10 GPa that is consistent with shatter cone formation. Regional structural and exhumation models, together with anomalous breccia units that overlie and crosscut the shatter cone-bearing rocks, may provide additional age constraints for the impact event. The observed shatter cone outcrop

  4. Cardiovascular Disease, Mitochondria, and Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrated that mitochondria play an important role in the cardiovascular system and mutations of mitochondrial DNA affect coronary artery disease, resulting in hypertension, atherosclerosis, and cardiomyopathy. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has been used for thousands of years to treat cardiovascular disease, but it is not yet clear how TCM affects mitochondrial function. By reviewing the interactions between the cardiovascular system, mitochondrial DNA, and TCM, we show that cardiovascular disease is negatively affected by mutations in mitochondrial DNA and that TCM can be used to treat cardiovascular disease by regulating the structure and function of mitochondria via increases in mitochondrial electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, modulation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, and decreases in mitochondrial ROS. However further research is still required to identify the mechanism by which TCM affects CVD and modifies mitochondrial DNA.

  5. Aquaporins in Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Lu; Wang, Di; Shi, Yundi; Li, Xuejun

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that some aquaporins (AQPs ), including AQP1, AQP4, AQP7 and AQP9, are expressed in endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and heart of cardiovascular system. These AQPs are involved in the cardiovascular function and in pathological process of related diseases, such as cerebral ischemia , congestion heart failure , hypertension and angiogenesis. Therefore, it is important to understand the accurate association between AQPs and cardiovascular system, which may provide novel approaches to prevent and treat related diseases. Here we will discuss the expression and physiological function of AQPs in cardiovascular system and summarize recent researches on AQPs related cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Dietary echium oil increases long-chain n-3 PUFAs, including docosapentaenoic acid, in blood fractions and alters biochemical markers for cardiovascular disease independently of age, sex, and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnt, Katrin; Fuhrmann, Claudia; Köhler, Melanie; Kiehntopf, Michael; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    Dietary supplementation with echium oil (EO) containing stearidonic acid (SDA) is a plant-based strategy to improve long-chain (LC) n-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status in humans. We investigated the effect of EO on LC n-3 PUFA accumulation in blood and biochemical markers with respect to age, sex, and metabolic syndrome. This double-blind, parallel-arm, randomized controlled study started with a 2-wk run-in period, during which participants (n = 80) were administered 17 g/d run-in oil. Normal-weight individuals from 2 age groups (20-35 and 49-69 y) were allotted to EO or fish oil (FO; control) groups. During the 8-wk intervention, participants were administered either 17 g/d EO (2 g SDA; n = 59) or FO [1.9 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA); n = 19]. Overweight individuals with metabolic syndrome (n = 19) were recruited for EO treatment only. During the 10-wk study, the participants followed a dietary n-3 PUFA restriction, e.g., no fish. After the 8-wk EO treatment, increases in the LC n-3 metabolites EPA (168% and 79%) and docosapentaenoic acid [DPA (68% and 39%)] were observed, whereas docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) decreased (-5% and -23%) in plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, respectively. Compared with FO, the efficacy of EO to increase EPA and DPA in blood was significantly lower (∼25% and ∼50%, respectively). A higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with lower relative and net increases in EPA and DPA. Compared with baseline, EO significantly reduced serum cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, oxidized LDL, and triglyceride (TG), but also HDL cholesterol, regardless of age and BMI. In the FO group, only TG decreased. Overall, daily intake of 15-20 g EO increased EPA and DPA in blood but had no influence on DHA. EO lowered cardiovascular risk markers, e.g., serum TG, which is particularly relevant for individuals with metabolic syndrome. Natural EO could be a noteworthy source of n-3 PUFA in human nutrition.

  7. Photochemical Reaction Altered Cardiac Toxicity of Diesel Exhaust Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Epidemiological studies have indicated an association between urban air pollution exposure and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present study was designed to evaluate the cardiac effects of inhaled diesel exhaust and compared with photochemically altered d...

  8. Maximal exercise capacity is related to cardiovascular structure in patients with longstanding hypertension. A LIFE substudy. Losartan Intervention For Endpoint-Reduction in Hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M H; Wachtell, K; Hermann, K L

    2001-01-01

    the predicted maximal workload. This impaired exercise capacity was associated with lower common carotid distensibility and lower oxygen reserve. The latter was independently related to LV hypertrophy, low systemic vascular compliance and peripheral vascular remodeling, suggesting that cardiovascular......BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular hypertrophy and remodeling in patients with never-treated hypertension has been associated with impaired exercise capacity, but whether this relationship remains in patients with longstanding hypertension and target organ damage is less elucidated. METHODS: In 43...... unmedicated patients with essential hypertension and electrocardiographic left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, we measured maximal workload and oxygen reserve by bicycle test, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (BP), LV mass index by magnetic resonance imaging (LVMI(MRI), n = 31), LVMI(echo) and systemic vascular...

  9. Structural Connectivity Alterations Along the Alzheimer’s Disease Continuum: Reproducibility Across Two Independent Samples and Correlation with Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β and Tau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucholka, Alan; Grau-Rivera, Oriol; Falcon, Carles; Rami, Lorena; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Lladó, Albert; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Molinuevo, José Luis

    2018-01-01

    Background: Gray matter changes associated with the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have been thoroughly studied. However, alterations in white matter tracts have received less attention, particularly during early or preclinical stages of the disease. Objective: To identify the structural connectivity changes across the AD continuum. Methods: We performed probabilistic tractography in a total of 183 subjects on two independent samples that include control (n = 68) and preclinical AD individuals (n = 28), patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to AD (n = 44), and AD patients (n = 43). We compared the connectivity between groups, and with CSF Aβ42 and tau biomarkers. Results: We observed disconnections in preclinical individuals, mainly located in the temporal lobe. This pattern of disconnection spread to the parietal and frontal lobes at the MCI stage and involved almost all the brain in AD. These findings were not driven by gray matter atrophy. Discussion: Using tractography, we were able to identify white matter changes between subsequent disease stages and, notably, also in preclinical AD. Therefore, this method may be useful for detecting early and specific brain structural changes during preclinical AD stage. PMID:29376852

  10. The factor structure of the Turkish version of the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) in patients with diabetes and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Brzoska Patrick; Yilmaz-Aslan Yüce; Sultanoglu Eda; Sultanoglu Bülent; Razum Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) has been used extensively in the study of illness perceptions across different populations. Only few confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) studies of the questionnaire are available. This study examines the construct and discriminant validity of the Turkish IPQ-R in patients with diabetes and cardiovascular disease focusing on the hypothesized seven dimensions of personal controllability, treatment controllability, timeline...

  11. Age-related left ventricular remodeling and associated risk for cardiovascular outcomes: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Susan; Fernandes, Verônica R S; Bluemke, David A; McClelland, Robyn L; Kronmal, Richard A; Lima, João A C

    2009-05-01

    Age-related alterations of left ventricular (LV) structure and function that may predispose to cardiovascular events are not well understood. We used cardiac MRI to examine age-related differences in LV structure and function in 5004 participants without overt cardiovascular disease when enrolled in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis; 1099 participants received additional strain analyses by MRI tagging. We also assessed the relation of age-associated remodeling with cardiovascular outcomes using Cox proportional hazard models adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors. Although LV mass decreased with age (-0.3 g per year), the mass-to-volume ratio markedly increased (+5 mg/mL per year, Pfall in stroke volume (-0.4 mL per year, P or =65 years; hazard ratio, 1.68 [CI 0.77 to 3.68]) individuals with the highest compared to lowest mass-to-volume ratio quintile (P(interaction)=0.013). Age is associated with a phenotype of LV remodeling marked by increased mass-to-volume ratio and accompanied by systolic as well as diastolic myocardial dysfunction that is not reflected by preserved ejection fraction. This pattern of ventricular remodeling confers significant cardiovascular risk, particularly when present earlier in life.

  12. Centrosome structure and function is altered by chloral hydrate and diazepam during the first reproductive cell cycles in sea urchin eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, H.; Chakrabarti, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper explores the mode of action of the tranquillizers chloral hydrate and diazepam during fertilization and mitosis of the first reproductive cell cycles in sea urchin eggs. Most striking effects of these drugs are the alteration of centrosomal material and the abnormal microtubule configurations during exposure and after recovery from the drugs. This finding is utilized to study the mechanisms of centrosome compaction and decompaction and the dynamic configurational changes of centrosomal material and its interactions with microtubules. When 0.1% chloral hydrate or 350-750 microM diazepam is applied at specific phases during the first cell cycle of sea urchin eggs, expanded centrosomal material compacts at distinct regions and super-compacts into dense spheres while microtubules disassemble. When eggs are treated before pronuclear fusion, centrosomal material aggregates around each of the two pronuclei while microtubules disappear. Upon recovery, atypical asters oftentimes with multiple foci are formed from centrosomal material surrounding the pronuclei which indicates that the drugs have affected centrosomal material and prevent it from functioning normally. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence studies with antibodies that routinely stain centrosomes in sea urchin eggs (4D2; and Ah-6) depict centrosomal material that is altered when compared to control cells. This centrosomal material is not able to reform normal microtubule patterns upon recovery but will form multiple asters around the two pronuclei. When cells are treated with 0.1% chloral hydrate or 350-750 microM diazepam during mitosis, the bipolar centrosomal material becomes compacted and aggregates into multiple dense spheres while spindle and polar microtubules disassemble. With increased incubation time, the smaller dense centrosome particles aggregate into bigger and fewer spheres. Upon recovery, unusual irregular microtubule configurations are formed from centrosomes that have lost their

  13. Multiplexed quantitative high content screening reveals that cigarette smoke condensate induces changes in cell structure and function through alterations in cell signaling pathways in human bronchial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, Charleata A.; Hamm, Jonathan T.

    2009-01-01

    Human bronchial cells are one of the first cell types exposed to environmental toxins. Toxins often activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and protein kinase C (PKC). We evaluated the hypothesis that cigarette smoke condensate (CSC), the particulate fraction of cigarette smoke, activates PKC-α and NF-κB, and concomitantly disrupts the F-actin cytoskeleton, induces apoptosis and alters cell function in BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Compared to controls, exposure of BEAS-2B cells to doses of 30 μg/ml CSC significantly activated PKC-α, while CSC doses above 20 μg/ml CSC significantly activated NF-κB. As NF-κB was activated, cell number decreased. CSC treatment of BEAS-2B cells induced a decrease in cell size and an increase in cell surface extensions including filopodia and lamellipodia. CSC treatment of BEAS-2B cells induced F-actin rearrangement such that stress fibers were no longer prominent at the cell periphery and throughout the cells, but relocalized to perinuclear regions. Concurrently, CSC induced an increase in the focal adhesion protein vinculin at the cell periphery. CSC doses above 30 μg/ml induced a significant increase in apoptosis in BEAS-2B cells evidenced by an increase in activated caspase 3, an increase in mitochondrial mass and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. As caspase 3 increased, cell number decreased. CSC doses above 30 μg/ml also induced significant concurrent changes in cell function including decreased cell spreading and motility. CSC initiates a signaling cascade in human bronchial epithelial cells involving PKC-α, NF-κB and caspase 3, and consequently decreases cell spreading and motility. These CSC-induced alterations in cell structure likely prevent cells from performing their normal function thereby contributing to smoke-induced diseases.

  14. Temperature increases from 55 to 75 C in a two-phase biogas reactor result in fundamental alterations within the bacterial and archaeal community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rademacher, Antje [Leibniz-Institut fuer Agrartechnik Potsdam-Bornim e.V. (ATB), Potsdam (Germany). Abt. Bioverfahrenstechnik; Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Technischen Umweltschutz; Nolte, Christine; Schoenberg, Mandy; Klocke, Michael [Leibniz-Institut fuer Agrartechnik Potsdam-Bornim e.V. (ATB), Potsdam (Germany). Abt. Bioverfahrenstechnik

    2012-10-15

    Agricultural biogas plants were operated in most cases below their optimal performance. An increase in the fermentation temperature and a spatial separation of hydrolysis/acetogenesis and methanogenesis are known strategies in improving and stabilizing biogas production. In this study, the dynamic variability of the bacterial and archaeal community was monitored within a two-phase leach bed biogas reactor supplied with rye silage and straw during a stepwise temperature increase from 55 to 75 C within the leach bed reactor (LBR), using TRFLP analyses. To identify the terminal restriction fragments that were obtained, bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene libraries were constructed. Above 65 C, the bacterial community structure changed from being Clostridiales-dominated toward being dominated by members of the Bacteroidales, Clostridiales, and Thermotogales orders. Simultaneously, several changes occurred, including a decrease in the total cell count, degradation rate, and biogas yield along with alterations in the intermediate production. A bioaugmentation with compost at 70 C led to slight improvements in the reactor performance; these did not persist at 75 C. However, the archaeal community within the downstream anaerobic filter reactor (AF), operated constantly at 55 C, altered by the temperature increase in the LBR. At an LBR temperature of 55 C, members of the Methanobacteriales order were prevalent in the AF, whereas at higher LBR temperatures Methanosarcinales prevailed. Altogether, the best performance of this two-phase reactor was achieved at an LBR temperature of below 65 C, which indicates that this temperature range has a favorable effect on the microbial community responsible for the production of biogas. (orig.)

  15. Western-style diet, with and without chronic androgen treatment, alters the number, structure, and function of small antral follicles in ovaries of young adult monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Cecily V; Xu, Fuhua; Xu, Jing; Ting, Alison Y; Galbreath, Etienne; McGee, Whitney K; Zelinski, Mary B; Hennebold, Jon D; Cameron, Judy L; Stouffer, Richard L

    2016-04-01

    in fats and sugars in the presence and absence of chronically elevated T alters the structure and function of SAFs within primate ovaries. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Beat to beat variability in cardiovascular variables: noise or music?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, M. L.; Berger, R. D.; Saul, J. P.; Smith, J. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Cardiovascular variables such as heart rate, arterial blood pressure, stroke volume and the shape of electrocardiographic complexes all fluctuate on a beat to beat basis. These fluctuations have traditionally been ignored or, at best, treated as noise to be averaged out. The variability in cardiovascular signals reflects the homeodynamic interplay between perturbations to cardiovascular function and the dynamic response of the cardiovascular regulatory systems. Modern signal processing techniques provide a means of analyzing beat to beat fluctuations in cardiovascular signals, so as to permit a quantitative, noninvasive or minimally invasive method of assessing closed loop hemodynamic regulation and cardiac electrical stability. This method promises to provide a new approach to the clinical diagnosis and management of alterations in cardiovascular regulation and stability.

  17. High serotonin levels during brain development alter the structural input-output connectivity of neural networks in the rat somatosensory layer IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie eMiceli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic regulation of serotonin (5-HT concentration is critical for normal topographical organization and development of thalamocortical (TC afferent circuits. Down-regulation of the serotonin transporter (SERT and the consequent impaired reuptake of 5-HT at the synapse, results in a reduced terminal branching of developing TC afferents within the primary somatosensory cortex (S1. Despite the presence of multiple genetic models, the effect of high extracellular 5-HT levels on the structure and function of developing intracortical neural networks is far from being understood. Here, using juvenile SERT knockout (SERT-/- rats we investigated, in vitro, the effect of increased 5-HT levels on the structural organization of (i the thalamocortical projections of the ventroposteromedial thalamic nucleus towards S1, (ii the general barrel-field pattern and (iii the electrophysiological and morphological properties of the excitatory cell population in layer IV of S1 (spiny stellate and pyramidal cells. Our results confirmed previous findings that high levels of 5-HT during development lead to a reduction of the topographical precision of TCA projections towards the barrel cortex. Also, the barrel pattern was altered but not abolished in SERT-/- rats. In layer IV, both excitatory spiny stellate and pyramidal cells showed a significantly reduced intracolumnar organization of their axonal projections. In addition, the layer IV spiny stellate cells gave rise to a prominent projection towards the infragranular layer Vb. Our findings point to a structural and functional reorganization, of TCAs, as well as early stage intracortical microcircuitry, following the disruption of 5-HT reuptake during critical developmental periods. The increased projection pattern of the layer IV neurons suggests that the intracortical network changes are not limited to the main entry layer IV but may also affect the subsequent stages of the canonical circuits of the barrel

  18. Structural and functional alterations in the prefrontal cortex after post-weaning social isolation: relationship with species-typical and deviant aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, Laszlo; Toth, Mate; Sipos, Eszter; Bruzsik, Biborka; Tulogdi, Aron; Bendahan, Samuel; Sandi, Carmen; Haller, Jozsef

    2017-05-01

    Although the inhibitory control of aggression by the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is the cornerstone of current theories of aggression control, a number of human and laboratory studies showed that the execution of aggression increases PFC activity; moreover, enhanced activation was observed in aggression-related psychopathologies and laboratory models of abnormal aggression. Here, we investigated these apparently contradictory findings in the post-weaning social isolation paradigm (PWSI), an established laboratory model of abnormal aggression. When studied in the resident-intruder test as adults, rats submitted to PWSI showed increased attack counts, increased share of bites directed towards vulnerable body parts of opponents (head, throat, and belly) and reduced social signaling of attacks. These deviations from species-typical behavioral characteristics were associated with a specific reduction in the thickness of the right medial PFC (mPFC), a bilateral decrease in dendritic and glial density, and reduced vascularization on the right-hand side of the mPFC. Thus, the early stressor interfered with mPFC development. Despite these structural deficits, aggressive encounters enhanced the activation of the mPFC in PWSI rats as compared to controls. A voxel-like functional analysis revealed that overactivation was restricted to a circumscribed sub-region, which contributed to the activation of hypothalamic centers involved in the initiation of biting attacks as shown by structural equation modeling. These findings demonstrate that structural alterations and functional hyperactivity can coexist in the mPFC of rats exposed to early stressors, and suggest that the role of the mPFC in aggression control is more complex than suggested by the inhibitory control theory.

  19. Angiotensin (1-7) ameliorates the structural and biochemical alterations of ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in rats via activation of ACE-2/Mas receptor axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuohashish, Hatem M; Ahmed, Mohammed M; Sabry, Dina; Khattab, Mahmoud M; Al-Rejaie, Salim S

    2017-05-23

    The local and systemic renin angiotensin system (RAS) influences the skeletal system micro-structure and metabolism. Studies suggested angiotensin 1-7 (Ang(1-7)) as the beneficial RAS molecule via Mas receptor activation. This study examines the function of Ang(1-7) in bone micro-architecture and metabolism in an ovariectomized (OVX) rodent model of osteoporosis. OVX rats showed structural and bone metabolic degeneration in parallel with suppressed expressions of the angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2)/Ang(1-7)/Mas components. The infusion of Ang(1-7) markedly alleviated the altered bone metabolism and significantly enhanced both trabecular (metaphyseal) and cortical (metaphyseal-diaphyseal) morphometry. Urinary and bones minerals were also improved in OVX rats by Ang(1-7). The infusion of the heptapeptide enhanced ACE-2/Mas receptor expressions, while down-regulated AngII, ACE, and AngII type-1 receptor (AT1R) in OVX animals. Moreover, Ang(1-7) markedly improved osteoprotegerin (OPG) and lowered receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expressions. The defensive properties of Ang(1-7) on bone metabolism, structure and minerals were considerably eradicated after blockage of Mas receptor with A-779. Ang(1-7)-induced up-regulated ACE-2/Ang(1-7)/Mas cascade and OPG expressions were abolished and the expressions of ACE/AngII/AT1R and RANKL were provoked by A-779. These findings shows for the first time the novel valuable therapeutic role of Ang(1-7) on bone health and metabolism through the ACE-2/Mas cascade.

  20. Neural, Endocrine and Local Mechanisms in the Effects of Environmental Stressors on the Cardiovascular Response to Blood Loss

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schadt, James C

    2006-01-01

    .... Although, blood loss surely alters and compromises the highly integrated cardiovascular and respiratory control of oxygen delivery and removal of carbon dioxide, there is little if any published...

  1. Cardiovascular risk factors and collateral artery formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, D; Pasterkamp, G; Hoefer, I E

    2009-12-01

    Arterial lumen narrowing and vascular occlusion is the actual cause of morbidity and mortality in atherosclerotic disease. Collateral artery formation (arteriogenesis) refers to an active remodelling of non-functional vascular anastomoses to functional collateral arteries, capable to bypass the site of obstruction and preserve the tissue that is jeopardized by ischaemia. Hemodynamic forces such as shear stress and wall stress play a pivotal role in collateral artery formation, accompanied by the expression of various cytokines and invasion of circulating leucocytes. Arteriogenesis hence represents an important compensatory mechanism for atherosclerotic vessel occlusion. As arteriogenesis mostly occurs when lumen narrowing by atherosclerotic plaques takes place, presence of cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia and diabetes) is highly likely. Risk factors for atherosclerotic disease affect collateral artery growth directly and indirectly by altering hemodynamic forces or influencing cellular function and proliferation. Adequate collateralization varies significantly among atherosclerotic patients, some profit from the presence of extensive collateral networks, whereas others do not. Cardiovascular risk factors could increase the risk of adverse cardiovascular events in certain patients because of the reduced protection through an alternative vascular network. Likewise, drugs primarily thought to control cardiovascular risk factors might contribute or counteract collateral artery growth. This review summarizes current knowledge on the influence of cardiovascular risk factors and the effects of cardiovascular medication on the development of collateral vessels in experimental and clinical studies.

  2. Differences in fungal and bacterial physiology alter soil carbon and nitrogen cycling: synthesizing effects of microbial community structure using the Fungi and Bacteria (FAB) model. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, C.; Hawkes, C. V.; Waring, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    community structure can alter biogeochemical predictions substantially, particularly when key functional groups are considered. The FAB model helps to move us towards this goal and generates community structure predictions that can be empirically validated.

  3. Beneficial effect of low ethanol intake on the cardiovascular system: possible biochemical mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudesh Vasdev

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Sudesh Vasdev1, Vicki Gill1, Pawan K Singal21Discipline of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada; 2Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Manitoba, Faculty of Medicine, Winnipeg, Manitoba, CanadaAbstract: Low ethanol intake is known to have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular disease. In cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance leads to altered glucose and lipid metabolism resulting in an increased production of aldehydes, including methylglyoxal. Aldehydes react non-enzymatically with sulfhydryl and amino groups of proteins forming advanced glycation end products (AGEs, altering protein structure and function. These alterations cause endothelial dysfunction with increased cytosolic free calcium, peripheral vascular resistance, and blood pressure. AGEs produce atherogenic effects including oxidative stress, platelet adhesion, inflammation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and modification of lipoproteins. Low ethanol intake attenuates hypertension and atherosclerosis but the mechanism of this effect is not clear. Ethanol at low concentrations is metabolized by low Km alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase, both reactions resulting in the production of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH. This creates a reductive environment, decreasing oxidative stress and secondary production of aldehydes through lipid peroxidation. NADH may also increase the tissue levels of the antioxidants cysteine and glutathione, which bind aldehydes and stimulate methylglyoxal catabolism. Low ethanol improves insulin resistance, increases high-density lipoprotein and stimulates activity of the antioxidant enzyme, paraoxonase. In conclusion, we suggest that chronic low ethanol intake confers its beneficial effect mainly through its ability to increase antioxidant capacity and lower AGEs.Keywords: low ethanol, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, biochemical

  4. Beneficial effect of low ethanol intake on the cardiovascular system: possible biochemical mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudesh Vasdev

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Sudesh Vasdev1, Vicki Gill1, Pawan K Singal21Discipline of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada; 2Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Manitoba, Faculty of Medicine, Winnipeg, Manitoba, CanadaAbstract: Low ethanol intake is known to have a beneficial effect on cardiovascular disease. In cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance leads to altered glucose and lipid metabolism resulting in an increased production of aldehydes, including methylglyoxal. Aldehydes react non-enzymatically with sulfhydryl and amino groups of proteins forming advanced glycation end products (AGEs, altering protein structure and function. These alterations cause endothelial dysfunction with increased cytosolic free calcium, peripheral vascular resistance, and blood pressure. AGEs produce atherogenic effects including oxidative stress, platelet adhesion, inflammation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and modification of lipoproteins. Low ethanol intake attenuates hypertension and atherosclerosis but the mechanism of this effect is not clear. Ethanol at low concentrations is metabolized by low Km alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase, both reactions resulting in the production of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH. This creates a reductive environment, decreasing oxidative stress and secondary production of aldehydes through lipid peroxidation. NADH may also increase the tissue levels of the antioxidants cysteine and glutathione, which bind aldehydes and stimulate methylglyoxal catabolism. Low ethanol improves insulin resistance, increases high-density lipoprotein and stimulates activity of the antioxidant enzyme, paraoxonase. In conclusion, we suggest that chronic low ethanol intake confers its beneficial effect mainly through its ability to increase antioxidant capacity and lower AGEs.Keywords: low ethanol, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, biochemical

  5. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.M.

    1984-11-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  6. MENOPAUSE AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Anichkov

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A role of menopause as a cardiovascular risk factor is reviewed. Menopause influence on the cardiovascular system may be mediated by body fat re-allocation, metabolic, hemodynamic and pro-inflammatory changes. Besides, estrogen deprivation has a direct effect on the arterial wall. Lifestyle modification, lipid-lowering and antihypertensive treatment should be considered for cardiovascular risk reduction in postmenopausal women.

  7. Adrenomedullin and cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Hoi Kin; Cheung, Tommy Tsang; Cheung, Bernard M Y

    2012-01-01

    Summary The cardiovascular system is regulated by the autonomic nervous system, the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, nitric oxide (NO) and other factors including neuropeptides. Research in neurohumoral factors has led to the development of many cardiovascular drugs. Adrenomedullin (ADM), initially isolated from the adrenal gland, has diverse physiological and pathophysiological functions in the cardiovascular system. It is produced in many organs and tissues including the vasculature. A...

  8. Cardiovascular molecular MR imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, H. J.; van der Meer, R. W.; de Roos, A.; Bax, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular molecular imaging is a rapidly evolving field of research, aiming to image and quantify molecular and cellular targets in vivo. MR imaging has some inherent properties that make it very suitable for cardiovascular molecular imaging. Until now, only a limited number of studies have been published on cardiovascular molecular imaging using MR imaging. Review In the current review, MR techniques that have already shown potential are discussed. Metabolic MR imaging can ...

  9. Research in cardiovascular care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Deaton, Christi; Fitzsimmons, Donna

    2014-01-01

    with the increasing opportunities and challenges in multidisciplinary research, the Science Committee of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professionals (CCNAP) recognised the need for a position statement to guide researchers, policymakers and funding bodies to contribute to the advancement...... of the body of knowledge that is needed to further improve cardiovascular care. In this paper, knowledge gaps in current research related to cardiovascular patient care are identified, upcoming challenges are explored and recommendations for future research are given....

  10. Chronic Stress Induces Structural Alterations in Splenic Lymphoid Tissue That Are Associated with Changes in Corticosterone Levels in Wistar-Kyoto Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Hernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder patients present chronic stress and decreased immunity. The Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY is a strain in which the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is overactivated. To determine whether chronic stress induces changes in corticosterone levels and splenic lymphoid tissue, 9-week-old male rats were subject to restraint stress (3 h daily, chemical stress (hydrocortisone treatment, 50 mg/Kg weight, mixed stress (restraint plus hydrocortisone, or control treatment (without stress for 1, 4, and 7 weeks. The serum corticosterone levels by RIA and spleens morphology were analyzed. Corticosterone levels as did the structure, size of the follicles and morphology of the parenchyma (increase in red pulp in the spleen, varied depending on time and type of stressor. These changes indicate that chronic stress alters the immune response in the spleen in WKY rats by inducing morphological changes, explaining in part the impaired immunity that develops in organisms that are exposed to chronic stress.

  11. Structural characterization of S100A15 reveals a novel zinc coordination site among S100 proteins and altered surface chemistry with functional implications for receptor binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Jill I

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S100 proteins are a family of small, EF-hand containing calcium-binding signaling proteins that are implicated in many cancers. While the majority of human S100 proteins share 25-65% sequence similarity, S100A7 and its recently identified paralog, S100A15, display 93% sequence identity. Intriguingly, however, S100A7 and S100A15 serve distinct roles in inflammatory skin disease; S100A7 signals through the receptor for advanced glycation products (RAGE in a zinc-dependent manner, while S100A15 signals through a yet unidentified G-protein coupled receptor in a zinc-independent manner. Of the seven divergent residues that differentiate S100A7 and S100A15, four cluster in a zinc-binding region and the remaining three localize to a predicted receptor-binding surface. Results To investigate the structural and functional consequences of these divergent clusters, we report the X-ray crystal structures of S100A15 and S100A7D24G, a hybrid variant where the zinc ligand Asp24 of S100A7 has been substituted with the glycine of S100A15, to 1.7 Å and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. Remarkably, despite replacement of the Asp ligand, zinc binding is retained at the S100A15 dimer interface with distorted tetrahedral geometry and a chloride ion serving as an exogenous fourth ligand. Zinc binding was confirmed using anomalous difference maps and solution binding studies that revealed similar affinities of zinc for S100A15 and S100A7. Additionally, the predicted receptor-binding surface on S100A7 is substantially more basic in S100A15 without incurring structural rearrangement. Conclusions Here we demonstrate that S100A15 retains the ability to coordinate zinc through incorporation of an exogenous ligand resulting in a unique zinc-binding site among S100 proteins. The altered surface chemistry between S100A7 and S100A15 that localizes to the predicted receptor binding site is likely responsible for the differential recognition of distinct

  12. Road work on memory lane--functional and structural alterations to the learning and memory circuit in adults born very preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvan, Piergiorgio; Froudist Walsh, Seán; Allin, Matthew P G; Walshe, Muriel; Murray, Robin M; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; McGuire, Philip K; Williams, Steven C R; Nosarti, Chiara

    2014-11-15

    Very preterm (VPT) birth is considered a risk factor not only for neurological impairment, but also for reduced function in several cognitive domains in childhood and later in life. Individuals who were born VPT are more likely to demonstrate learning and memory difficulties compared to term-born controls. These problems contribute to more VPT-born children repeating grades and underachieving in school. This, in turn, affects their prospects in adult life. Here we aimed to 1) study how the VPT-born adult brain functionally recruited specific areas during learning, i.e. encoding and recall across four repeated blocks of verbal stimuli, and to investigate how these patterns of activation differed from term-born subjects; and 2) probe the microstructural differences of white-matter tracts connecting these areas to other parts of the learning and memory network. To investigate these functional-structural relationships we analyzed functional and diffusion-weighted MRI. Functional-MRI and a verbal paired associate learning (VPAL) task were used to extract Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) activity in 21 VPT-born adults (learning in key structures of the learning and memory network, including anterior cingulate and caudate body during encoding and thalamus/parahippocampal gyrus during cued recall. Altered activation in thalamus/parahippocampal gyrus may be explained by reduced connections between these areas and the hippocampus, which may be a direct consequence of neonatal hypoxic/ischemic injury. These results could reflect the effect of adaptive plastic processes associated with high-order cognitive functions, at least when the cognitive load remains relatively low, as ex-preterm young adults displayed unimpaired performance in completing the verbal paired associate learning task. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. GWAS-identified risk variants for major depressive disorder: Preliminary support for an association with late-life depressive symptoms and brain structural alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joanne; Artero, Sylvaine; Carrière, Isabelle; Maller, Jerome J; Meslin, Chantal; Ritchie, Karen; Ancelin, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    A number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have investigated risk factors for major depressive disorder (MDD), however there has been little attempt to replicate these findings in population-based studies of depressive symptoms. Variants within three genes, BICC1, PCLO and GRM7 were selected for replication in our study based on the following criteria: they were identified in a prior MDD GWAS study; a subsequent study found evidence that they influenced depression risk; and there is a solid biological basis for a role in depression. We firstly investigated whether these variants were associated with depressive symptoms in our population-based cohort of 929 elderly (238 with clinical depressive symptoms and 691 controls), and secondly to investigate associations with structural brain alterations. A number of nominally significant associations were identified, but none reached Bonferroni-corrected significance levels. Common SNPs in BICC1 and PCLO were associated with a 50% and 30% decreased risk of depression, respectively. PCLO rs2522833 was also associated with the volume of grey matter (p=1.6×10(-3)), and to a lesser extent with hippocampal volume and white matter lesions. Among depressed individuals rs9870680 (GRM7) was associated with the volume of grey and white matter (p=10(-4) and 8.3×10(-3), respectively). Our results provide some support for the involvement of BICC1 and PCLO in late-life depressive disorders and preliminary evidence that these genetic variants may also influence brain structural volumes. However effect sizes remain modest and associations did not reach corrected significance levels. Further large imaging studies are needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural characterization of a mixed-linkage glucan deficient mutant reveals alteration in cellulose microfibril orientation in rice coleoptile mesophyll cell walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Michelle Smith-Moritz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE F6 (CslF6 gene was previously shown to mediate the biosynthesis of mixed-linkage glucan (MLG, a cell wall polysaccharide that is hypothesized to be a tightly associated with cellulose and also have a role in cell expansion in the primary cell wall of young seedlings in grass species. We have recently shown that loss-of-function cslf6 rice mutants do not accumulate MLG in most vegetative tissues. Despite the absence of a structurally important polymer, MLG, these mutants are unexpectedly viable and only show a moderate growth compromise compared to wild type. Therefore these mutants are ideal biological systems to test the current grass cell wall model. In order to gain a better understanding of the role of MLG in the primary wall, we performed in-depth compositional and structural analyses of the cell walls of three day-old rice seedlings using various biochemical and novel microspectroscopic approaches. We found that cellulose content as well as matrix polysaccharide composition was not significantly altered in the MLG deficient mutant. However, we observed a significant change in cellulose microfibril bundle organization in mesophyll cell walls of the cslf6 mutant. Using synchrotron source Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared Spectromicroscopy for high-resolution imaging, we determined that the bonds associated with cellulose and arabinoxylan, another major component of the primary cell was of grasses, were in a lower energy configuration compared to wild type, suggesting a slightly weaker primary wall in MLG deficient mesophyll cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MLG may influence cellulose deposition in mesophyll cell walls without significantly affecting anisotropic growth thus challenging MLG importance in cell wall expansion.

  15. Defining population structure and genetic signatures of decline in the giant garter snake (Thamnophis gigas): implications for conserving threatened species within highly altered landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Dustin A.; Halstead, Brian J.; Casazza, Michael L.; Hansen, Eric C.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Vandergast, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic habitat fragmentation can disrupt the ability of species to disperse across landscapes, which can alter the levels and distribution of genetic diversity within populations and negatively impact long-term viability. The giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) is a state and federally threatened species that historically occurred in the wetland habitats of California’s Great Central Valley. Despite the loss of 93 % of historic wetlands throughout the Central Valley, giant gartersnakes continue to persist in relatively small, isolated patches of highly modified agricultural wetlands. Gathering information regarding genetic diversity and effective population size represents an essential component for conservation management programs aimed at this species. Previous mitochondrial sequence studies have revealed historical patterns of differentiation, yet little is known about contemporary population structure and diversity. On the basis of 15 microsatellite loci, we estimate population structure and compare indices of genetic diversity among populations spanning seven drainage basins within the Central Valley. We sought to understand how habitat loss may have affected genetic differentiation, genetic diversity and effective population size, and what these patterns suggest in terms of management and restoration actions. We recovered five genetic clusters that were consistent with regional drainage basins, although three northern basins within the Sacramento Valley formed a single genetic cluster. Our results show that northern drainage basin populations have higher connectivity than among central and southern basins populations, and that greater differentiation exists among the more geographically isolated populations in the central and southern portion of the species’ range. Genetic diversity measures among basins were significantly different, and were generally lower in southern basin populations. Levels of inbreeding and evidence of population

  16. Alteration in DNA structure, molecular responses and Na+ -K+ -ATPase activities in the gill of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus, 1758) in response to sub-lethal verapamil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajima, Malachy N O; Pandey, Pramod K; Kumar, Kundan; Poojary, Nalini

    2018-01-01

    The ecotoxicological consequences of residues from pharmaceutical drugs on aquatic biota have necessitated the development of sensitive and reliable techniques to assess the impact of these xenobiotics on aquatic organisms. This study investigated the alteration in DNA structure, molecular responses and the activities of Na + -K + -ATPase and antioxidant enzymes in the gill of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, exposed to long-term effects at the concentrations (0.14, 0.28 and 0.57mgL -1 ) of verapamil in static renewal system for 15, 30, 45 and 60 days. Evaluation of DNA structure, using single cell gel electrophoresis, revealed certain degree of DNA damages in the gill in a time and concentration-dependent relationship. Transcription of mRNA of superoxide dismutase (sod), catalase (cat) and heat shock protein (hsp70) genes in the gill of the fish showed the genes were up-regulated. Na + -K + -ATPase activity was inhibited in a concentration and time dependent manner. The indices of oxidative stress biomarkers (lipid peroxidation and carbonyl protein) as well as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase were elevated in the treated fish in comparison to the control. Further, the level of reduced glutathione and catalase activity were inhibited at 0.28mgL -1 after day 30. Long-term exposure to sub-lethal concentration of verapamil can cause DNA damages, molecular effects and oxidative stress in O. niloticus. The biomarkers analysed can be used as early warning signals in environmental biomonitoring and assessment of drug contamination in aquatic ecosystem. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-07

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Diastolic dysfunction, cardiovascular aging, and the anesthesiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, David; Dudley, Michael; Groban, Leanne

    2009-09-01

    As the number of persons aged 65 years and older continues to increase, the anesthesiologist will more frequently encounter this demographic. Cardiovascular changes that occur in this patient population present difficult anesthetic challenges and place these patients at high risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality. The anesthesiologist should be knowledgeable about these age-related cardiovascular changes, the pathophysiology underlying them, and the appropriate perioperative management. Whether presenting for cardiac or general surgery, the anesthesiologist must identify patients with altered physiology as a result of aging or diastolic dysfunction and be prepared to modify the care plan accordingly. With a directed preoperative assessment that focuses on certain aspects of the cardiovascular system, and the assistance of powerful echocardiographic tools such as tissue Doppler, this can be achieved.

  19. Effect of mercury vapour exposure on urinary excretion of calcium, zinc and copper: relationship to alterations in functional and structural integrity of the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, Ibrahim A M; Gadallah, Mohsen; Shafik, Ahmed; Shouman, Ahmed E

    2002-09-01

    The kidney has a remarkable capacity to concentrate mercury (Hg) and as such is a primary target organ when exposure to Hg occurs, and it is also an organ for Hg excretion. The present work aims to investigate the effect of occupational Hg vapour exposure on the urinary excretion of calcium (Ca), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu), and the possible association of this excretion to work duration as well as renal alterations. 83 non-smoker participants (36 referents, age: 35.6 +/- 9.5 years; 27 Hg vapour-exposed workers with or = 11 years work duration, age: 39.50 +/- 8.50 years) were included in the present study. Urinary levels of microalbumin (U-Malb) and retinol-binding protein (U-RBP) as well as cytosolic glutathione S-transferase activity (U-GST) were measured to assess the glomerular and proximal tubular reabsorption functions as well as structural integrity of proximal tubules; respectively. In addition, blood Hg (B-Hg), serum levels of Hg (S-Hg) and Ca (S-Ca), and urinary levels of Hg (U-Hg), Ca (U-Ca), Zn (U-Zn), Cu (U-Cu) and creatinine (U-cr) were estimated. In comparison to referents, all investigated parameters showed significant increase (except S-Ca and U-Zn/U-Cu ratio that significantly decreased among the workers as one group, S-Ca and U-Zn/U-Cu ratio that significantly and nonsignificantly decreased; respectively among workers with or = 11 years work duration). In addition, B-Hg was nonsignificantly increased and S-Ca was significantly decreased; also, both U-Hg and U-Zn/U-Cu were nonsignificantly decreased among workers with > or = 11 years work duration in comparison to those with < or = 10 years work duration. Also, each of U-Hg, U-Ca, U-Zn and U-Cu was related to one another, while each of U-Ca, U-Zn and U-Cu was related to each of U-Malb, U-RBP and U-GST (except U-Zn was not related to U-GST). Hg vapour exposure leads to renal alterations which may parallel the change in proteinuria and enzymuria as well as the increased loss in urine of each of Ca, Zn

  20. How Confinement-Induced Structures Alter the Contribution of Hydrodynamic and Short-Ranged Repulsion Forces to the Viscosity of Colloidal Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Ramaswamy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Confined systems ranging from the atomic to the granular are ubiquitous in nature. Experiments and simulations of such atomic and granular systems have shown a complex relationship between the microstructural arrangements under confinement, the short-ranged particle stresses, and flow fields. Understanding the same correlation between structure and rheology in the colloidal regime is important due to the significance of such suspensions in industrial applications. Moreover, colloidal suspensions exhibit a wide range of structures under confinement that could considerably modify such force balances and the resulting viscosity. Here, we use a combination of experiments and simulations to elucidate how confinement-induced structures alter the relative contributions of hydrodynamic and short-range repulsive forces to produce up to a tenfold change in the viscosity. In the experiments we use a custom-built confocal rheoscope to image the particle configurations of a colloidal suspension while simultaneously measuring its stress response. We find that as the gap decreases below 15 particle diameters, the viscosity first decreases from its bulk value, shows fluctuations with the gap, and then sharply increases for gaps below 3 particle diameters. These trends in the viscosity are shown to strongly correlate with the suspension microstructure. Further, we compare our experimental results to those from two different simulations techniques, which enables us to determine the relative contributions of hydrodynamic and short-range repulsive stresses to the suspension rheology. The first method uses the lubrication approximation to find the hydrodynamic stress and includes a short-range repulsive force between the particles while the second is a Stokesian dynamics simulation that calculates the full hydrodynamic stress in the suspension. We find that the decrease in the viscosity at moderate confinements has a significant contribution from both the

  1. Cardiovascular risk calculation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    James A. Ker

    2014-08-20

    Aug 20, 2014 ... Introduction. Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of global mortality and morbidity. Atherosclerosis is the main underlying cause in the majority of cardiovascular disease events. Traditional independent risk factors for car diovascular disease include age, abnormal lipid levels, elevated blood ...

  2. Leptin: a cardiovascular perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review Article: Leptin: a cardiovascular perspective. 72. 2012 Volume 17 No 2. JEMDSA. Introduction. Within the realms of noncommunicable disease development in South Africa, obesity is a disease that causes concern. This especially holds true for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Disheartened.

  3. Lifestyle in Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.O. Younge (John)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Globally, the burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is still increasing. However, in recent decades, better treatment modalities have led to less cardiovascular related deaths. After years of research, we now generally accept that lifestyle factors are the most

  4. Caffeine exposure alters cardiac gene expression in embryonic cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiefan; Mei, Wenbin; Barbazuk, William B.; Rivkees, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that in utero caffeine treatment at embryonic day (E) 8.5 alters DNA methylation patterns, gene expression, and cardiac function in adult mice. To provide insight into the mechanisms, we examined cardiac gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in cardiomyocytes shortly after exposure to physiologically relevant doses of caffeine. In HL-1 and primary embryonic cardiomyocytes, caffeine treatment for 48 h significantly altered the expression of cardiac structural genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b, Tnni3), hormonal genes (Anp and BnP), cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2c, Mef2d, Nfatc1), and microRNAs (miRNAs; miR208a, miR208b, miR499). In addition, expressions of these genes were significantly altered in embryonic hearts exposed to in utero caffeine. For in utero experiments, pregnant CD-1 dams were treated with 20–60 mg/kg of caffeine, which resulted in maternal circulation levels of 37.3–65.3 μM 2 h after treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on embryonic ventricles treated with vehicle or 20 mg/kg of caffeine daily from E6.5-9.5. Differential expression (DE) analysis revealed that 124 genes and 849 transcripts were significantly altered, and differential exon usage (DEU) analysis identified 597 exons that were changed in response to prenatal caffeine exposure. Among the DE genes identified by RNA sequencing were several cardiac structural genes and genes that control DNA methylation and histone modification. Pathway analysis revealed that pathways related to cardiovascular development and diseases were significantly affected by caffeine. In addition, global cardiac DNA methylation was reduced in caffeine-treated cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that caffeine exposure alters gene expression and DNA methylation in embryonic cardiomyocytes. PMID:25354728

  5. Caffeine exposure alters cardiac gene expression in embryonic cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiefan; Mei, Wenbin; Barbazuk, William B; Rivkees, Scott A; Wendler, Christopher C

    2014-12-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that in utero caffeine treatment at embryonic day (E) 8.5 alters DNA methylation patterns, gene expression, and cardiac function in adult mice. To provide insight into the mechanisms, we examined cardiac gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in cardiomyocytes shortly after exposure to physiologically relevant doses of caffeine. In HL-1 and primary embryonic cardiomyocytes, caffeine treatment for 48 h significantly altered the expression of cardiac structural genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b, Tnni3), hormonal genes (Anp and BnP), cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2c, Mef2d, Nfatc1), and microRNAs (miRNAs; miR208a, miR208b, miR499). In addition, expressions of these genes were significantly altered in embryonic hearts exposed to in utero caffeine. For in utero experiments, pregnant CD-1 dams were treated with 20-60 mg/kg of caffeine, which resulted in maternal circulation levels of 37.3-65.3 μM 2 h after treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on embryonic ventricles treated with vehicle or 20 mg/kg of caffeine daily from E6.5-9.5. Differential expression (DE) analysis revealed that 124 genes and 849 transcripts were significantly altered, and differential exon usage (DEU) analysis identified 597 exons that were changed in response to prenatal caffeine exposure. Among the DE genes identified by RNA sequencing were several cardiac structural genes and genes that control DNA methylation and histone modification. Pathway analysis revealed that pathways related to cardiovascular development and diseases were significantly affected by caffeine. In addition, global cardiac DNA methylation was reduced in caffeine-treated cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that caffeine exposure alters gene expression and DNA methylation in embryonic cardiomyocytes. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Maximal exercise capacity is related to cardiovascular structure in patients with longstanding hypertension. A LIFE substudy. Losartan Intervention For Endpoint-Reduction in Hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M H; Wachtell, K; Hermann, K L

    2001-01-01

    unmedicated patients with essential hypertension and electrocardiographic left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, we measured maximal workload and oxygen reserve by bicycle test, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (BP), LV mass index by magnetic resonance imaging (LVMI(MRI), n = 31), LVMI(echo) and systemic vascular......). In multiple regression analyses, lower oxygen reserve was related to higher LVMI(MRI) (beta = -0.44), lower systemic vascular compliance (beta = -0.36), and higher MFVR (beta = -0.52) (adjusted R2 = 0.53, P hypertension and target organ damage cannot achieve......BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular hypertrophy and remodeling in patients with never-treated hypertension has been associated with impaired exercise capacity, but whether this relationship remains in patients with longstanding hypertension and target organ damage is less elucidated. METHODS: In 43...

  7. Maximal exercise capacity is related to cardiovascular structure in patients with longstanding hypertension. A LIFE substudy. Losartan Intervention For Endpoint-Reduction in Hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M H; Wachtell, K; Hermann, K L

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular hypertrophy and remodeling in patients with never-treated hypertension has been associated with impaired exercise capacity, but whether this relationship remains in patients with longstanding hypertension and target organ damage is less elucidated. METHODS: In 43...... unmedicated patients with essential hypertension and electrocardiographic left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, we measured maximal workload and oxygen reserve by bicycle test, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (BP), LV mass index by magnetic resonance imaging (LVMI(MRI), n = 31), LVMI(echo) and systemic vascular...... compliance by echocardiography, minimal forearm vascular resistance (MFVR) by plethysmography, and intima media thickness and distensibility in the common carotid arteries by ultrasound. RESULTS: The patients did not achieve the maximal workload as predicted by age, gender and body composition (146...

  8. Triglycerides and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Varbo, Anette

    2014-01-01

    cholesterol might not cause cardiovascular disease as originally thought has now generated renewed interest in raised concentrations of triglycerides. This renewed interest has also been driven by epidemiological and genetic evidence supporting raised triglycerides, remnant cholesterol, or triglyceride......-rich lipoproteins as an additional cause of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Triglycerides can be measured in the non-fasting or fasting states, with concentrations of 2-10 mmol/L conferring increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and concentrations greater than 10 mmol/L conferring increased risk...... of acute pancreatitis and possibly cardiovascular disease. Although randomised trials showing cardiovascular benefit of triglyceride reduction are scarce, new triglyceride-lowering drugs are being developed, and large-scale trials have been initiated that will hopefully provide conclusive evidence...

  9. The factor structure of the Turkish version of the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R in patients with diabetes and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzoska Patrick

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R has been used extensively in the study of illness perceptions across different populations. Only few confirmatory factor analytic (CFA studies of the questionnaire are available. This study examines the construct and discriminant validity of the Turkish IPQ-R in patients with diabetes and cardiovascular disease focusing on the hypothesized seven dimensions of personal controllability, treatment controllability, timeline acute/chronic, timeline cyclical, coherence, consequences and emotional representations. Methods 302 patients (60.6% women with a medically confirmed diagnosis of diabetes or cardiovascular disease and a mean age of 53.9 years were recruited from out-patient clinics in Turkey and surveyed by means of standardized interviews. Direct maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis was conducted. Results Several areas of ill-fit were identified in the original measurement model of the IPQ-R. Four items (items 17, 19, 20, and 31 were deleted because of poor factor loadings. Also, two error covariances (between items 33 and 34 and between items 7 and 8 were added and item 6 respecified to obtain a good model fit. The modified 34-item model showed good reliability and discriminant validity. Conclusion In accordance with studies on other language adaptations of the questionnaire, we identified certain items of the IPQ-R as potential sources of poor model fit. Their inclusion should be reconsidered in future applications of the questionnaire and researchers should examine whether our reduced set of items is stable across different populations. Our modified 34-item model showed a good reliability and discriminant validity and hence could be a valuable instrument in the assessment of illness perceptions in the Turkish health care setting, provided that the model is confirmed in subsequent research.

  10. The factor structure of the Turkish version of the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) in patients with diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzoska, Patrick; Yilmaz-Aslan, Yüce; Sultanoglu, Eda; Sultanoglu, Bülent; Razum, Oliver

    2012-10-09

    The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) has been used extensively in the study of illness perceptions across different populations. Only few confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) studies of the questionnaire are available. This study examines the construct and discriminant validity of the Turkish IPQ-R in patients with diabetes and cardiovascular disease focusing on the hypothesized seven dimensions of personal controllability, treatment controllability, timeline acute/chronic, timeline cyclical, coherence, consequences and emotional representations. 302 patients (60.6% women) with a medically confirmed diagnosis of diabetes or cardiovascular disease and a mean age of 53.9 years were recruited from out-patient clinics in Turkey and surveyed by means of standardized interviews. Direct maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis was conducted. Several areas of ill-fit were identified in the original measurement model of the IPQ-R. Four items (items 17, 19, 20, and 31) were deleted because of poor factor loadings. Also, two error covariances (between items 33 and 34 and between items 7 and 8) were added and item 6 respecified to obtain a good model fit. The modified 34-item model showed good reliability and discriminant validity. In accordance with studies on other language adaptations of the questionnaire, we identified certain items of the IPQ-R as potential sources of poor model fit. Their inclusion should be reconsidered in future applications of the questionnaire and researchers should examine whether our reduced set of items is stable across different populations. Our modified 34-item model showed a good reliability and discriminant validity and hence could be a valuable instrument in the assessment of illness perceptions in the Turkish health care setting, provided that the model is confirmed in subsequent research.

  11. Microglia in the mouse retina alter the structure and function of retinal pigmented epithelial cells: a potential cellular interaction relevant to AMD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Ma

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of legal blindness in the elderly in the industrialized word. While the immune system in the retina is likely to be important in AMD pathogenesis, the cell biology underlying the disease is incompletely understood. Clinical and basic science studies have implicated alterations in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE layer as a locus of early change. Also, retinal microglia, the resident immune cells of the retina, have been observed to translocate from their normal position in the inner retina to accumulate in the subretinal space close to the RPE layer in AMD eyes and in animal models of AMD.In this study, we examined the effects of retinal microglia on RPE cells using 1 an in vitro model where activated retinal microglia are co-cultured with primary RPE cells, and 2 an in vivo mouse model where retinal microglia are transplanted into the subretinal space. We found that retinal microglia induced in RPE cells 1 changes in RPE structure and distribution, 2 increased expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory, chemotactic, and pro-angiogenic molecules, and 3 increased extent of in vivo choroidal neovascularization in the subretinal space.These findings share similarities with important pathological features found in AMD and suggest the relevance of microglia-RPE interactions in AMD pathogenesis. We speculate that the migration of retinal microglia into the subretinal space in early stages of the disease induces significant changes in RPE cells that perpetuate further microglial accumulation, increase inflammation in the outer retina, and fosters an environment conducive for the formation of neovascular changes responsible for much of vision loss in advanced AMD.

  12. Hyperactivity of the Arabidopsis cryptochrome (cry1) L407F mutant is caused by a structural alteration close to the cry1 ATP-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Christian; Niemann, Nils; Hennig, Lars; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Batschauer, Alfred

    2017-08-04

    Plant cryptochromes (cry) act as UV-A/blue light receptors. The prototype, Arabidopsis thaliana cry1, regulates several light responses during the life cycle, including de-etiolation, and is also involved in regulating flowering time. The cry1 photocycle is initiated by light absorption by its FAD chromophore, which is most likely fully oxidized (FAD ox ) in the dark state and photoreduced to the neutral flavin semiquinone (FADH°) in its lit state. Cryptochromes lack the DNA-repair activity of the closely related DNA photolyases, but they retain the ability to bind nucleotides such as ATP. The previously characterized L407F mutant allele of Arabidopsis cry1 is biologically hyperactive and seems to mimic the ATP-bound state of cry1, but the reason for this phenotypic change is unclear. Here, we show that cry1 L407F can still bind ATP, has less pronounced photoreduction and formation of FADH° than wild-type cry1, and has a dark reversion rate 1.7 times lower than that of the wild type. The hyperactivity of cry1 L407F is not related to a higher FADH° occupancy of the photoreceptor but is caused by a structural alteration close to the ATP-binding site. Moreover, we show that ATP binds to cry1 in both the dark and the lit states. This binding was not affected by cry1's C-terminal extension, which is important for signal transduction. Finally, we show that a recently discovered chemical inhibitor of cry1, 3-bromo-7-nitroindazole, competes for ATP binding and thereby diminishes FADH° formation, which demonstrates that both processes are important for cry1 function. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Exposure of tropoelastin to peroxynitrous acid gives high yields of nitrated tyrosine residues, di-tyrosine cross-links and altered protein structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degendorfer, Georg; Chuang, Christine Y; Mariotti, Michele; Hammer, Astrid; Hoefler, Gerald; Hägglund, Per; Malle, Ernst; Wise, Steven G; Davies, Michael J

    2018-02-01

    Elastin is an abundant extracellular matrix protein in elastic tissues, including the lungs, skin and arteries, and comprises 30-57% of the aorta by dry mass. The monomeric precursor, tropoelastin (TE), undergoes complex processing during elastogenesis to form mature elastic fibres. Peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH), a potent oxidising and nitrating agent, is formed in vivo from superoxide and nitric oxide radicals. Considerable evidence supports ONOOH formation in the inflamed artery wall, and a role for this species in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions, with ONOOH-damaged extracellular matrix implicated in lesion rupture. We demonstrate that TE is highly sensitive to ONOOH, with this resulting in extensive dimerization, fragmentation and nitration of Tyr residues to give 3-nitrotyrosine (3-nitroTyr). This occurs with equimolar or greater levels of oxidant and increases in a dose-dependent manner. Quantification of Tyr loss and 3-nitroTyr formation indicates extensive Tyr modification with up to two modified Tyr per protein molecule, and up to 8% conversion of initial ONOOH to 3-nitroTyr. These effects were modulated by bicarbonate, an alternative target for ONOOH. Inter- and intra-protein di-tyrosine cross-links have been characterized by mass spectrometry. Examination of human atherosclerotic lesions shows colocalization of 3-nitroTyr with elastin epitopes, consistent with TE or elastin modification in vivo, and also an association of 3-nitroTyr containing proteins and elastin with lipid deposits. These data suggest that exposure of TE to ONOOH gives marked chemical and structural changes to TE and altered matrix assembly, and that such damage accumulates in human arterial tissue during the development of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of exercise on cardiovascular dysfunctions induced by cigarette smoking

    OpenAIRE

    Khaled, A.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Smoking is known to adversely affect many organs and systems in human, where the cardiovascular system is one of the important targets. However, the exact mechanisms by which cigarette smoke alters myocardial and endothelial cells function and induces cardiovascular pathology are not clear. There are no reports especially with nitric oxide (NO), uric acid and hemodynamics after acute exercise in smokers up to date. This study is designed to investigate the role of oxidative stress, N...

  15. Structural and Mechanistic Basis for Extended-Spectrum Drug-Resistance Mutations in Altering the Specificity of TEM, CTX-M, and KPC β-lactamases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Palzkill

    2018-02-01

    ceftazidime. Although structural data are limited, extended-spectrum mutations in KPC may act by mediating new, direct interactions with substrate and/or altering conformations of the active site. In many cases, mutations that expand the substrate profile of these enzymes simultaneously decrease the thermodynamic stability. This leads to the emergence of additional global suppressor mutations that help correct the stability defects leading to increased protein expression and increased antibiotic resistance.

  16. Cardiovascular adaptations to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Nyberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic exercise training leads to cardiovascular changes that markedly increase aerobic power and lead to improved endurance performance. The functionally most important adaptation is the improvement in maximal cardiac output which is the result of an enlargement in cardiac dimension, improved...... arteries is reduced, a factor contributing to increased arterial compliance. Endurance training may also induce alterations in the vasodilator capacity, although such adaptations are more pronounced in individuals with reduced vascular function. The microvascular net increases in size within the muscle...... allowing for an improved capacity for oxygen extraction by the muscle through a greater area for diffusion, a shorter diffusion distance, and a longer mean transit time for the erythrocyte to pass through the smallest blood vessels. The present article addresses the effect of endurance training on systemic...

  17. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and treated wastewater on water relations and leaf structure alterations of Viburnum tinus L. plants during both saline and recovery periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Bellot, María José; Nortes, Pedro Antonio; Ortuño, María Fernanda; Romero, Cristina; Fernández-García, Nieves; Sánchez-Blanco, María Jesús

    2015-09-01

    Nowadays, irrigation with low quality water is becoming an alternative to satisfy the needs of crops. However, some plant species have to deal with high salinity of reclaimed water, by adapting their physiological behaviour during both saline and recovery periods and developing morphological changes in their leaves. The application of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) could also be a suitable option to mitigate the negative effects of this kind of water, although the effectiveness of plant-AMF association is influenced by many factors. In this work, during forty weeks, the combined effect of Glomus iranicum var. tenuihypharum and two types of water: control, C, EC<0.9 dS m(-1) and reclaimed water, RW (with EC: 4 dS m(-1) during a first saline period and EC: 6 dS m(-1) during a second saline period) was evaluated for laurustinus plants (Viburnum tinus L.) transplanted in soil. This was followed by a recovery period of eight weeks, when all the plants were irrigated in the control irrigation conditions. Seasonal and daily changes in stem water potential (Ψstem), stomatal conductance (gs), photosynthesis (Pn) and leaf internal CO2 concentration (Ci) of laurustinus plants were evaluated. Leaf structure alterations, nutrient imbalance, height and leaf hydraulic conductivity (Kleaf) were also determined. Due to the high difficulty of absorbing water from the soil, RW plants showed a high volumetric water content (θv) in soil. The stem water potential and the stomatal conductance (gs) values were reduced in RW plants throughout the second saline period. These decreases were also found during the day. Leaf Ca(2+)/Na(+) and K(+)/Na(+) ratios diminished in RW plants respect to the C plants due to the Na(+) accumulation, although height and chlorophyll content values did not show statistical differences. Leaves from RW plants showed a significantly thicker mesophyll than Control leaves as a consequence of high EC. The area of palisade parenchyma (PP) increased while the

  18. Introduction: Cardiovascular physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Niels; Kurths, Jürgen; Ditto, William; Bauernschmitt, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The number of patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases increases unproportionally high with the increase of the human population and aging, leading to very high expenses in the public health system. Therefore, the challenge of cardiovascular physics is to develop high-sophisticated methods which are able to, on the one hand, supplement and replace expensive medical devices and, on the other hand, improve the medical diagnostics with decreasing the patient's risk. Cardiovascular physics-which interconnects medicine, physics, biology, engineering, and mathematics-is based on interdisciplinary collaboration of specialists from the above scientific fields and attempts to gain deeper insights into pathophysiology and treatment options. This paper summarizes advances in cardiovascular physics with emphasis on a workshop held in Bad Honnef, Germany, in May 2005. The meeting attracted an interdisciplinary audience and led to a number of papers covering the main research fields of cardiovascular physics, including data analysis, modeling, and medical application. The variety of problems addressed by this issue underlines the complexity of the cardiovascular system. It could be demonstrated in this Focus Issue, that data analyses and modeling methods from cardiovascular physics have the ability to lead to significant improvements in different medical fields. Consequently, this Focus Issue of Chaos is a status report that may invite all interested readers to join the community and find competent discussion and cooperation partners.

  19. Caffeine and cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Duncan; Rodricks, Joseph V; Mariano, Gregory F; Chowdhury, Farah

    2017-10-01

    This report evaluates the scientific literature on caffeine with respect to potential cardiovascular outcomes, specifically relative risks of total cardiovascular disease (CVD), coronary heart disease (CHD) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI), effects on arrhythmia, heart failure, sudden cardiac arrest, stroke, blood pressure, hypertension, and other biomarkers of effect, including heart rate, cerebral blood flow, cardiac output, plasma homocysteine levels, serum cholesterol levels, electrocardiogram (EKG) parameters, heart rate variability, endothelial/platelet function and plasma/urine catecholamine levels. Caffeine intake has been associated with a range of reversible and transient physiological effects broadly and cardiovascular effects specifically. This report attempts to understand where the delineations exist in caffeine intake and corresponding cardiovascular effects among various subpopulations. The available literature suggests that cardiovascular effects experienced by caffeine consumers at levels up to 600 mg/day are in most cases mild, transient, and reversible, with no lasting adverse effect. The point at which caffeine intake may cause harm to the cardiovascular system is not readily identifiable in part because data on the effects of daily intakes greater than 600 mg is limited. However, the evidence considered within this review suggests that typical moderate caffeine intake is not associated with increased risks of total cardiovascular disease; arrhythmia; heart failure; blood pressure changes among regular coffee drinkers; or hypertension in baseline populations. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Evaluation of cardiovascular risk in HIV positive patients in a specialized center at Santiago, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazcano, Camila; Millacura, Juan C; Saavedra, Felipe; Cortés, Claudia P

    2016-06-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has changed the course of HIV epidemic, as consequence, the patients present the same medical conditions than the rest ofthe population, including cardiovascular diseases. To describe the evolution of cardiovascular risk of HIV positive patients attending to a HIV/AIDS integral clinical center. Clinical charts were reviewed, looking for cardiovascular risk markers. Our findings showed a deficient evaluation of the cardiovascular basal risks at first medical control and patients had important metabolic alterations despite hypolipidemic treatment. Given the higher cardiovascular risk of this population, increasing the effort on diagnosis and treatment of HIV patients is required.

  1. [Cancer and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, Carlos; Valdivielso, Pedro; González-Alegre, María Teresa; García-Iglesias, María Francisca; Estirado, Eva; Mostaza, José M

    2015-01-01

    Survivors of cancer have a shorter survival in the long term partly due to the increase in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Some chemotherapy drugs, thoracic and cranial radiotherapy and above all the transplantation of hematopoietic cells are associated with an increase in the incidence of cardiovascular events compared with general population. Some of these treatments favor the development of a metabolic syndrome that could be the intermediary between these treatments and the development of CVD. It is recommended for cancer survivors to promote healthy lifestyles and the strict control of cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Cardiovascular comorbiditiy in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurcharan Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The chronic inflammatory nature of psoriasis is also thought to predispose patients to other diseases with an inflammatory component, the most notable being cardiovascular and metabolic (cardiometabolite disorders. This concept is supported by studies showing that psoriasis is associated with cardiovascular risk factors like diabetes, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking and diseases including MI. Given the increased prevalence of cardiovascular co morbidities in patients, dermatologists treating psoriasis need to approach the disease as a potentially multisystem disorder and must alert these patients to the potentially negative effects of their disease.

  3. Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis include cardiac dysfunction and abnormalities in the central, splanchnic and peripheral circulation, and haemodynamic changes caused by humoral and nervous dysregulation. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy implies systolic and diastolic dysfunction and electrophysi......Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis include cardiac dysfunction and abnormalities in the central, splanchnic and peripheral circulation, and haemodynamic changes caused by humoral and nervous dysregulation. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy implies systolic and diastolic dysfunction....... The clinical significance of cardiovascular complications and cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is an important topic for future research, and the initiation of new randomised studies of potential treatments for these complications is needed....

  4. Cardiovascular involvement in myositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise P

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to provide an update on cardiovascular involvement in idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM). Studies from the past 18 months are identified and reviewed. Finally, the clinical impact of these findings is discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiological...... on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging suggests that CMR should be considered as a potentially viable diagnostic tool to evaluate the possibility of silent myocardial inflammation in IIM with normal routine noninvasive evaluation. SUMMARY: Updated literature on cardiovascular involvement in IIM has...... identified an increased risk for subclinical and clinical cardiovascular disease in these rare inflammatory muscle diseases....

  5. Crowdfunding for cardiovascular research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krittanawong, Chayakrit; Zhang, HongJu Janet; Aydar, Mehmet; Wang, Zhen; Sun, Tao

    2018-01-01

    The competition for public cardiovascular research grants has recently increased. Independent researchers are facing increasing competition for public research grant support and ultimately may need to seek alternative funding sources. Crowdfunding, a financing method of raising funds online by pooling together small donations from the online community to support a specific initiative, seems to have significant potential. However, the feasibility of crowdfunding for cardiovascular research remains unknown. Here, we performed exploratory data analysis of the feasibility of online crowdfunding in cardiovascular research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Coarctation induces alterations in basement membranes in the cardiovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipke, D W; McCarthy, K J; Elton, T S

    1993-01-01

    A coarctation hypertensive rat model was used to examine the effects of elevated blood pressure on basement membrane component synthesis by cardiac myocytes and aorta using immunohistochemistry and Northern blot analysis. Carotid arterial pressure increased immediately on coarctation, and left...... with regard to protein and tissue type affected as well as intensity of the changes. However, changes in mRNA levels (but not protein deposition) for perlecan and type IV collagen were also observed in aortas from hypertensive rats compared with controls. Increases in steady-state mRNA levels for all basement...

  7. Age alters the cardiovascular response to direct passive heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minson, C. T.; Wladkowski, S. L.; Cardell, A. F.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Kenney, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    During direct passive heating in young men, a dramatic increase in skin blood flow is achieved by a rise in cardiac output (Qc) and redistribution of flow from the splanchnic and renal vascular beds. To examine the effect of age on these responses, seven young (Y; 23 +/- 1 yr) and seven older (O; 70 +/- 3 yr) men were passively heated with water-perfused suits to their individual limit of thermal tolerance. Measurements included heart rate (HR), Qc (by acetylene rebreathing), central venous pressure (via peripherally inserted central catheter), blood pressures (by brachial auscultation), skin blood flow (from increases in forearm blood flow by venous occlusion plethysmography), splanchnic blood flow (by indocyanine green clearance), renal blood flow (by p-aminohippurate clearance), and esophageal and mean skin temperatures. Qc was significantly lower in the older than in the young men (11.1 +/- 0.7 and 7.4 +/- 0.2 l/min in Y and O, respectively, at the limit of thermal tolerance; P response (62 +/- 3 and 75 +/- 4% maximal HR in Y and O, respectively, P responses, the older men had a significantly lower increase in total blood flow directed to the skin.

  8. Coarctation induces alterations in basement membranes in the cardiovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipke, D W; McCarthy, K J; Elton, T S

    1993-01-01

    A coarctation hypertensive rat model was used to examine the effects of elevated blood pressure on basement membrane component synthesis by cardiac myocytes and aorta using immunohistochemistry and Northern blot analysis. Carotid arterial pressure increased immediately on coarctation, and left ve...

  9. Age alters the cardiovascular response to direct passive heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minson, C. T.; Wladkowski, S. L.; Cardell, A. F.; Pawelczyk, J. A.; Kenney, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    During direct passive heating in young men, a dramatic increase in skin blood flow is achieved by a rise in cardiac output (Qc) and redistribution of flow from the splanchnic and renal vascular beds. To examine the effect of age on these responses, seven young (Y; 23 +/- 1 yr) and seven older (O; 70 +/- 3 yr) men were passively heated with water-perfused suits to their individual limit of thermal tolerance. Measurements included heart rate (HR), Qc (by acetylene rebreathing), central venous pressure (via peripherally inserted central catheter), blood pressures (by brachial auscultation), skin blood flow (from increases in forearm blood flow by venous occlusion plethysmography), splanchnic blood flow (by indocyanine green clearance), renal blood flow (by p-aminohippurate clearance), and esophageal and mean skin temperatures. Qc was significantly lower in the older than in the young men (11.1 +/- 0.7 and 7.4 +/- 0.2 l/min in Y and O, respectively, at the limit of thermal tolerance; P < 0. 05), despite similar increases in esophageal and mean skin temperatures and time to reach the limit of thermal tolerance. A lower stroke volume (99 +/- 7 and 68 +/- 4 ml/beat in Y and O, respectively, P < 0.05), most likely due to an attenuated increase in inotropic function during heating, was the primary factor for the lower Qc observed in the older men. Increases in HR were similar in the young and older men; however, when expressed as a percentage of maximal HR, the older men relied on a greater proportion of their chronotropic reserve to obtain the same HR response (62 +/- 3 and 75 +/- 4% maximal HR in Y and O, respectively, P < 0.05). Furthermore, the older men redistributed less blood flow from the combined splanchnic and renal circulations at the limit of thermal tolerance (960 +/- 80 and 720 +/- 100 ml/min in Y and O, respectively, P < 0. 05). As a result of these combined attenuated responses, the older men had a significantly lower increase in total blood flow directed to the skin.

  10. Ceruloplasmin and cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, P. L.; Mazumder, B.; Ehrenwald, E.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.

    2000-01-01

    Transition metal ion-mediated oxidation is a commonly used model system for studies of the chemical, structural, and functional modifications of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The physiological relevance of studies using free metal ions is unclear and has led to an exploration of free metal ion-independent mechanisms of oxidation. We and others have investigated the role of human ceruloplasmin (Cp) in oxidative processes because it the principal copper-containing protein in serum. There is an abundance of epidemiological data that suggests that serum Cp may be an important risk factor predicting myocardial infarction and cardiovascular disease. Biochemical studies have shown that Cp is a potent catalyst of LDL oxidation in vitro. The pro-oxidant activity of Cp requires an intact structure, and a single copper atom at the surface of the protein, near His(426), is required for LDL oxidation. Under conditions where inhibitory protein (such as albumin) is present, LDL oxidation by Cp is optimal in the presence of superoxide, which reduces the surface copper atom of Cp. Cultured vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells also oxidize LDL in the presence of Cp. Superoxide release by these cells is a critical factor regulating the rate of oxidation. Cultured monocytic cells, when activated by zymosan, can oxidize LDL, but these cells are unique in their secretion of Cp. Inhibitor studies using Cp-specific antibodies and antisense oligonucleotides show that Cp is a major contributor to LDL oxidation by these cells. The role of Cp in lipoprotein oxidation and atherosclerotic lesion progression in vivo has not been directly assessed and is an important area for future studies.

  11. Oral health and cardiovascular care: Perceptions of people with cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Paula; Everett, Bronwyn; Salamonson, Yenna; Ajwani, Shilpi; Bhole, Sameer; Bishop, Joshua; Lintern, Karen; Nolan, Samantha; Rajaratnam, Rohan; Redfern, Julie; Sheehan, Maria; Skarligos, Fiona; Spencer, Lissa; Srinivas, Ravi; George, Ajesh

    2017-01-01

    Main objective The aim of this study was to explore the perception of patients with cardiovascular disease towards oral health and the potential for cardiac care clinicians to promote oral health. Method A needs assessment was undertaken with twelve patients with cardiovascular disease attending cardiac rehabilitation between 2015 and 2016, in three metropolitan hospitals in Sydney, Australia. These patients participated in face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data was analysed using them...

  12. Effects of an eight-week supervised, structured lifestyle modification programme on anthropometric, metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in severely obese adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crowe, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Lifestyle modification is fundamental to obesity treatment, but few studies have described the effects of structured lifestyle programmes specifically in bariatric patients. We sought to describe changes in anthropometric and metabolic characteristics in a cohort of bariatric patients after participation in a nurse-led, structured lifestyle programme.

  13. Nutritional Omega-3 Deficiency Alters Glucocorticoid Receptor-Signaling Pathway and Neuronal Morphology in Regionally Distinct Brain Structures Associated with Emotional Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Larrieu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive evidence suggests that long term dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs deficiency results in altered emotional behaviour. We have recently demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs deficiency induces emotional alterations through abnormal corticosterone secretion which leads to altered dendritic arborisation in the prefrontal cortex (PFC. Here we show that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis feedback inhibition was not compromised in n-3 deficient mice. Rather, glucocorticoid receptor (GR signaling pathway was inactivated in the PFC but not in the hippocampus of n-3 deficient mice. Consequently, only dendritic arborisation in PFC was affected by dietary n-3 PUFAs deficiency. In addition, occlusion experiment with GR blockade altered GR signaling in the PFC of control mice, with no further alterations in n-3 deficient mice. In conclusion, n-3 PUFAs deficiency compromised PFC, leading to dendritic atrophy, but did not change hippocampal GR function and dendritic arborisation. We argue that this GR sensitivity contributes to n-3 PUFAs deficiency-related emotional behaviour deficits.

  14. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it ordered? As a test to evaluate lipid metabolism or cardiovascular risk, APOE genotyping is ordered when someone has: Significantly elevated cholesterol and triglyceride levels that do not respond to dietary and ...

  15. Violence and Cardiovascular Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suglia, Shakira F.; Sapra, Katherine J.; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2014-01-01

    Context Violence, experienced in either childhood or adulthood, has been associated with physical health outcomes including cardiovascular disease. However, the consistency of the existing literature has not been evaluated. Evidence acquisition In 2013, the authors conducted a PubMed and Web of Science review of peer reviewed articles published prior to August 2013 on the relation between violence exposure, experienced in either childhood or adulthood, and cardiovascular outcomes. To meet inclusion criteria, articles had to present estimates for the relation between violence exposure and cardiovascular outcomes (hypertension, blood pressure, stroke, coronary disease, or myocardial infarction) adjusted for demographic factors. Articles focusing on violence from TV, video games, natural disasters, terrorism, or war were excluded. Evidence synthesis The initial search yielded 2,273 articles; after removing duplicates and applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 30 articles were selected for review. A consistent positive relation was noted on the association between violence experienced during childhood and cardiovascular outcomes in adulthood (i.e., hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction). Associations across genders with varying types of violence exposure were also noted. By contrast, findings were mixed on the relation between adult violence exposure and cardiovascular outcome. Conclusions Despite varying definitions of violence exposure and cardiovascular endpoints, a consistent relation exists between childhood violence exposure, largely assessed retrospectively, and cardiovascular endpoints. Findings are mixed for the adult violence–cardiovascular health relation. The cross-sectional nature of most adult studies and the reliance of self-reported outcomes can potentially be attributed to the lack of findings among adult violence exposure studies. PMID:25599905

  16. Plasma norepinephrine is an independent predictor of adverse cerebral and cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetic patients without structural heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yufu, Kunio; Okada, Norihiro; Ebata, Yuki; Murozono, Yukichi; Shinohara, Tetsuji; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Takahashi, Naohiko

    2014-09-01

    Resting plasma norepinephrine (NE) level was reportedly related to high mortality in patients with heart failure. The current study investigated whether resting NE could predict long-term major adverse cerebral and cardiovascular events (MACCEs) in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients without heart disease. We evaluated resting NE in 95 patients with type 2 diabetes who did not have severe complications. Based on the ROC curves, high NE was defined as ≥333pg/ml. Accurate follow-up information during a mean of 3.6±1.9 years was obtained in 27 high NE patients (13 female, mean age 64±12 years) and 68 low NE patients (29 female, 60±12 years). The Kaplan-Meier curves revealed that MACCE-free ratio was significantly lower in the high NE patients than in the low NE patients (log-rank 10.3, p=0.0013). Cox proportional hazards regression analysis revealed that female gender (hazard ratio 7.75), low baroreflex sensitivity (hazard ratio 6.66), and high NE (hazard ratio 5.40) were independently associated with the incidence of MACCE. Our results suggest that resting NE is comparably useful to identify the high-risk patients for MACCE to baroreflex sensitivity in type 2 diabetic patients. The results also suggest that pathogenic sympathetic activation leading to MACCE may be identified by the assessment of resting NE, more easily and less expensively compared to cardiac iodine 123 metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy in this population. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Applications of 3D printing in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Mitsouras, Dimitris; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Liu, Peter P; Chatzizisis, Y