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  1. Normal pressure hydrocephalus: did publications alter management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneste, J; van Acker, R

    1990-07-01

    Forty six Dutch neurologists and neurosurgeons were interviewed to evaluate the clinical value of research articles on normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). From this survey it appears that most clinicians still limit investigations to psychometry, CSF-tap test(s), and cisternography. The main reasons for not using other techniques were: their invasiveness, technical complexity, poor availability, lack of time and doubt on their additional predictive value. There is an obvious discrepancy between the quantity of publications on NPH and their impact and their ability to assist clinicians in selecting potential NPH patients for a shunt.

  2. Altered islet morphology but normal islet secretory function in vitro in a mouse model with microvascular alterations in the pancreas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Kostromina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our previous studies have shown that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 signaling is important for the development of pancreatic microvasculature via its regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A. Pancreas-specific STAT3-KO mice exhibit glucose intolerance and impaired insulin secretion in vivo, along with microvascular alterations in the pancreas. However, the specific role of STAT3 signaling in the regulation of pancreatic islet development and function is not entirely understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the role of STAT3 signaling in the formation and maintenance of pancreatic islets, we studied pancreas-specific STAT3-KO mice. Histological analysis showed that STAT3 deficiency affected pancreatic islet morphology. We found an increased proportion of small-sized islets and a reduced fraction of medium-sized islets, indicating abnormal islet development in STAT3-KO mice. Interestingly, the islet area relative to the whole pancreas area in transgenic and control mice was not significantly different. Immunohistochemical analysis on pancreatic cryosections revealed abnormalities in islet architecture in STAT3-KO mice: the pattern of peripheral distribution of glucagon-positive α-cells was altered. At the same time, islets belonging to different size categories isolated from STAT3-KO mice exhibited normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in perifusion experiments in vitro when compared to control mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that STAT3 signaling in the pancreas is required for normal islet formation and/or maintenance. Altered islet size distribution in the KO mice does not result in an impaired islet secretory function in vitro. Therefore, our current study supports that the glucose intolerance and in vivo insulin secretion defect in pancreas-specific STAT3-KO mice is due to altered microvasculature in the pancreas, and not intrinsic beta-cell function.

  3. Structural alterations of the retinal microcirculation in the "prehypertensive" high- normal blood pressure state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Guido; Buzzi, Silvia; Dell'Oro, Raffaella; Mineo, Claudia; Dimitriadis, Kyriakos; Seravalle, Gino; Lonati, Laura; Cuspidi, Cesare

    2013-01-01

    The high-normal blood pressure (also known as prehypertension) is a clinical condition characterized by an increased cardiovascular risk as well as by the presence of target organ damage. This include an increased left ventricular mass, an endothelial dysfunction and an early renal functional and structural damage. Whether this is the case also for alterations of retinal vessels network, which are frequently detectable in established hypertension, is still largey undefined. The present paper, after discussing the main characteristics of the high-normal blood pressure state, will review the different approaches used throughout the years for assessing retinal microcirculatory network. Data collected by our group in subjects with high normal blood pressure will be also discussed, showing that arterial venular ratio values are reduced in this individuals with high-normal blood pressure and more so in established hypertension. These data indicate that retinal microvascular alterations 1) are of early appearance in the clinical course of hypertension and 2) are of frequent detection in the high-normal blood pressure state. The possible hemodynamic and non-hemodynamic mechanisms resposible for these structural alteations of the retinal microcirculation will be also discussed.

  4. Analysis of spatial heterogeneity in normal epithelium and preneoplastic alterations in mouse prostate tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkonen, Mira; Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Kartasalo, Kimmo; Nykter, Matti; Visakorpi, Tapio; Latonen, Leena

    2017-01-01

    Cancer involves histological changes in tissue, which is of primary importance in pathological diagnosis and research. Automated histological analysis requires ability to computationally separate pathological alterations from normal tissue with all its variables. On the other hand, understanding connections between genetic alterations and histological attributes requires development of enhanced analysis methods suitable also for small sample sizes. Here, we set out to develop computational methods for early detection and distinction of prostate cancer-related pathological alterations. We use analysis of features from HE stained histological images of normal mouse prostate epithelium, distinguishing the descriptors for variability between ventral, lateral, and dorsal lobes. In addition, we use two common prostate cancer models, Hi-Myc and Pten+/− mice, to build a feature-based machine learning model separating the early pathological lesions provoked by these genetic alterations. This work offers a set of computational methods for separation of early neoplastic lesions in the prostates of model mice, and provides proof-of-principle for linking specific tumor genotypes to quantitative histological characteristics. The results obtained show that separation between different spatial locations within the organ, as well as classification between histologies linked to different genetic backgrounds, can be performed with very high specificity and sensitivity. PMID:28317907

  5. Microsatellite alterations in phenotypically normal esophageal squamous epithelium and metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Chun Cai; Di Liu; Kai-Hua Liu; Hai-Ping Zhang; Shan Zhong; Ning-Sao Xia

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the microsatellite alterations in phenotypically normal esophageal squamous epithelium and metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence.METHODS: Forty-one specimens were obtained from esophageal cancer (EC) patients. Histopathological assessment identified 23 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and 18 adenocarcinomas (ADC), including only 8 ADC with Barrett esophageal columnar epithelium (metaplasia) and dysplasia adjacent to ADC. Paraffinembedded normal squamous epithelium, Barrett esophageal columnar epithelium (metaplasia), dysplasia and esophageal tumor tissues were dissected from the surrounding tissues under microscopic guidance. DNA was extracted using proteinase K digestion buffer, and DNA was diluted at 1:100, 1:1000, 1:5000, 1:10000 and 1:50000, respectively. Seven microsatellite markers (D2S123, D3S1616, D3S1300, D5S346, D17S787, D18S58 and BATRII loci) were used in this study. Un-dilution and dilution polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were performed, and microsatellite analysis was carried out.RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found in microsatellite instability (MSI) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of un-diluted DNA between SCC and ADC. The levels of MSI and LOH were high in the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence of diluted DNA. The more the diluted DNA was, the higher the rates of MSI and LOH were at the above 7 loci, especially at D3S1616, D5S346, D2S123, D3S1300 and D18S58 loci.CONCLUSION: The sequence of metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma is associated with microsatellite alterations, including MSI and LOH. The MSI and LOH may be the early genetic events during esophageal carcinogenesis, and genetic alterations at the D3S1616, D5S346 and D3S123 loci may play a role in the progress of microsatellite alterations.

  6. Alteration of brain viscoelasticity after shunt treatment in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freimann, Florian Baptist; Sprung, Christian [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Neurosurgical Department, Berlin (Germany); Streitberger, Kaspar-Josche; Klatt, Dieter; Sack, Ingolf [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Campus Charite Mitte, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Lin, Kui; McLaughlin, Joyce [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Mathematics Department, Troy, NY (United States); Braun, Juergen [Charite - University Medicine Campus Benjamin Franklin, Institute of Medical Informatics, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) represents a chronic neurological disorder with increasing incidence. The symptoms of NPH may be relieved by surgically implanting a ventriculoperitoneal shunt to drain excess cerebrospinal fluid. However, the pathogenesis of NPH is not yet fully elucidated, and the clinical response of shunt treatment is hard to predict. According to current theories of NPH, altered mechanical properties of brain tissue seem to play an important role. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a unique method for measuring in vivo brain mechanics. In this study cerebral MRE was applied to test the viscoelastic properties of the brain in 20 patients with primary (N = 14) and secondary (N = 6) NPH prior and after (91 {+-} 16 days) shunt placement. Viscoelastic parameters were derived from the complex modulus according to the rheological springpot model. This model provided two independent parameters {mu} and {alpha}, related to the inherent rigidity and topology of the mechanical network of brain tissue. The viscoelastic parameters {mu} and {alpha} were found to be decreased with -25% and -10%, respectively, compared to age-matched controls (P < 0.001). Interestingly, {alpha} increased after shunt placement (P < 0.001) to almost normal values whereas {mu} remained symptomatically low. The results indicate the fundamental role of altered viscoelastic properties of brain tissue during disease progression and tissue repair in NPH. Clinical improvement in NPH is associated with an increasing complexity of the mechanical network whose inherent strength, however, remains degraded. (orig.)

  7. Chronic insulin treatment of diabetes does not fully normalize alterations in the retinal transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball Scot R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a leading cause of blindness in working age adults. Approximately 95% of patients with Type 1 diabetes develop some degree of retinopathy within 25 years of diagnosis despite normalization of blood glucose by insulin therapy. The goal of this study was to identify molecular changes in the rodent retina induced by diabetes that are not normalized by insulin replacement and restoration of euglycemia. Methods The retina transcriptome (22,523 genes and transcript variants was examined after three months of streptozotocin-induced diabetes in male Sprague Dawley rats with and without insulin replacement for the later one and a half months of diabetes. Selected gene expression changes were confirmed by qPCR, and also examined in independent control and diabetic rats at a one month time-point. Results Transcriptomic alterations in response to diabetes (1376 probes were clustered according to insulin responsiveness. More than half (57% of diabetes-induced mRNA changes (789 probes observed at three months were fully normalized to control levels with insulin therapy, while 37% of probes (514 were only partially normalized. A small set of genes (5%, 65 probes was significantly dysregulated in the insulin-treated diabetic rats. qPCR confirmation of findings and examination of a one month time point allowed genes to be further categorized as prevented or rescued with insulin therapy. A subset of genes (Ccr5, Jak3, Litaf was confirmed at the level of protein expression, with protein levels recapitulating changes in mRNA expression. Conclusions These results provide the first genome-wide examination of the effects of insulin therapy on retinal gene expression changes with diabetes. While insulin clearly normalizes the majority of genes dysregulated in response to diabetes, a number of genes related to inflammatory processes, microvascular integrity, and neuronal function are still altered in expression in

  8. Characterizing structural association alterations within brain networks in normal aging using Gaussian Bayesian networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yan; Chen, Kewei; Wu, Xia; Zhang, Jiacai; Li, Ke; Jin, Zhen; Yao, Li

    2014-01-01

    Recent multivariate neuroimaging studies have revealed aging-related alterations in brain structural networks. However, the sensory/motor networks such as the auditory, visual and motor networks, have obtained much less attention in normal aging research. In this study, we used Gaussian Bayesian networks (BN), an approach investigating possible inter-regional directed relationship, to characterize aging effects on structural associations between core brain regions within each of these structural sensory/motor networks using volumetric MRI data. We then further examined the discriminability of BN models for the young (N = 109; mean age =22.73 years, range 20-28) and old (N = 82; mean age =74.37 years, range 60-90) groups. The results of the BN modeling demonstrated that structural associations exist between two homotopic brain regions from the left and right hemispheres in each of the three networks. In particular, compared with the young group, the old group had significant connection reductions in each of the three networks and lesser connection numbers in the visual network. Moreover, it was found that the aging-related BN models could distinguish the young and old individuals with 90.05, 73.82, and 88.48% accuracy for the auditory, visual, and motor networks, respectively. Our findings suggest that BN models can be used to investigate the normal aging process with reliable statistical power. Moreover, these differences in structural inter-regional interactions may help elucidate the neuronal mechanism of anatomical changes in normal aging.

  9. Alteration of serum haptoglobin concentration in normal parturition and dystocia affected cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. Aziz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the alteration in serum haptoglobin (Hp concentration in dystocia affected cows in comparison to those having normal parturition. Thirty cows included in this study, seventeen with normal parturition and thirteen with difficult parturition (dystocia. Blood samples, from cows that having normal parturition, were collected every three days during the last two weeks of gestation, at calving, 3, 7, and 10 days postpartum. Blood samples from dystocia affected cows were collected at calving, 3, 7, and 10 days postpartum. Serum Hp concentration was determined using ELISA. The results gradual increase of Hp concentration prepartum from 190±70 mg/L at the 10th day before calving to 250±30 and 260±100 mg/L at 7th and 3rd day prepartum, respectively. At day of parturition, Hp concentration increased to 300±140 mg/L, to reach 330±150 mg/L at 3rd day postpartum. Hp concentration at 7th and 10th day postpartum declined to 230±90 and 220±160 mg/L, respectively. Serum Hp of dystocia affected cows was 360±240 mg/L at calving. At 3rd day postpartum, Hp increased to 660±220 mg/L. At 7th and 10th days postpartum, Hp concentration declined to 510±300 and 400±110 mg/L, respectively. No variation in Hp was observed between the cows giving twins and those giving single calve. There was no significant effect of dystocia causes on serum Hp at calving and at 3rd day postpartum. It be concluded that normal calving and dystocia elevated the serum Hp concentration, and insufficient dilatation of birth canal was the most effective cause of dystocia. Also comparison of serum Hp concentration at 3rd and 7th day postpartum can be used as an indicator for the development of complications.

  10. Expression of functions by normal sheep alveolar macrophages and their alteration by interaction with Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niang, M; Rosenbusch, R F; Lopez-Virella, J; Kaeberle, M L

    1997-10-31

    Normal sheep alveolar macrophages collected by bronchial lavage were exposed to live or heat-killed Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae organisms, and their capability to ingest Staphylococcus aureus and to elicit antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against sensitized chicken red blood cells was tested. Controls consisted of non-infected macrophages in M199 medium. In addition, the effect of M. ovipneumoniae on expression of surface molecules on these sheep alveolar macrophages was determined. The percentage of S. aureus ingested by nontreated sheep alveolar macrophages was significantly higher than that of infected macrophages. Live mycoplasmas were more effective in suppressing the ingestion of S. aureus by these macrophages than killed mycoplasmas. Both live and killed mycoplasmas suppressed the cytolytic effect of the sheep alveolar macrophages to a similar degree. About 78% and 45% of the normal sheep alveolar macrophages had IgG and complement receptors, respectively. Infection of these macrophages with M. ovipneumoniae decreased significantly the expression of IgG receptors but had no effects on complement receptors. There were substantial increases in the expression of both MHC class I and class II by the mycoplasma-induced macrophages as compared with unstimulated macrophages. Live mycoplasmas were more effective in inducing expression of both classes than killed mycoplasmas. The results, taken together, suggest that M. ovipneumoniae induced alterations in macrophage activities and this may be a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of respiratory disease induced by the organism.

  11. Absorption spectra and light penetration depth of normal and pathologically altered human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barun, V. V.; Ivanov, A. P.; Volotovskaya, A. V.; Ulashchik, V. S.

    2007-05-01

    A three-layered skin model (stratum corneum, epidermis, and dermis) and engineering formulas for radiative transfer theory are used to study absorption spectra and light penetration depths of normal and pathologically altered skin. The formulas include small-angle and asymptotic approximations and a layer-addition method. These characteristics are calculated for wavelengths used for low-intensity laser therapy. We examined several pathologies such as vitiligo, edema, erythematosus lupus, and subcutaneous wound, for which the bulk concentrations of melanin and blood vessels or tissue structure (for subcutaneous wound) change compared with normal skin. The penetration depth spectrum is very similar to the inverted blood absorption spectrum. In other words, the depth is minimal at blood absorption maxima. The calculated absorption spectra enable the power and irradiation wavelength providing the required light effect to be selected. Relationships between the penetration depth and the diffuse reflectance coefficient of skin (unambiguously expressed through the absorption coefficient) are analyzed at different wavelengths. This makes it possible to find relationships between the light fields inside and outside the tissue.

  12. Determination of oxidation state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czapla-Masztafiak, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland); Lis, G.J.; Gajda, M.; Jasek, E. [Department of Histology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kopernika 7, 31-034 Kraków (Poland); Czubek, U. [Department of Coronary Disease, Jagiellonian University Medical College, John Paul II Hospital, Prądnicka 80, 31-202 Kraków (Poland); Bolechała, F. [Department of Forensic Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Grzegórzecka 16, 31-531 Kraków (Poland); Borca, C. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kwiatek, W.M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    In order to investigate changes in chemical state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves X-ray absorption spectroscopy was applied. Since Fe is suspected to play detrimental role in aortic valve stenosis pathogenesis the oxidation state of this element has been determined. The experimental material consisted of 10 μm sections of valves excised during routine surgery and from autopsies. The experiment was performed at the MicroXAS beamline of the SLS synchrotron facility in Villigen (Switzerland). The Fe K-edge XANES spectra obtained from tissue samples were carefully analyzed and compared with the spectra of reference compounds containing iron in various chemical structures. The analysis of absorption edge position and shape of the spectra revealed that both chemical forms of iron are presented in valve tissue but Fe{sup 3+} is the predominant form. Small shift of the absorption edge toward higher energy in the spectra from stenotic valve samples indicates higher content of the Fe{sup 3+} form in pathological tissue. Such a phenomenon suggests the role of Fenton reaction and reactive oxygen species in the etiology of aortic valve stenosis. The comparison of pre-edge regions of XANES spectra for control and stenotic valve tissue confirmed no differences in local symmetry or spin state of iron in analyzed samples.

  13. Soybean isoflavones alter parvalbumin in hippocampus of mid-aged normal female, ovariectomized female, and normal male rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In Koo HWANG; Moo Ho WON; Yoon-bok LEE; Ki-yeon YOO; Tae-cheon KANG; Soon Sung LIM; Sang Moo KIM; Heon-soo SOHN; Woo-jung KIM; Hyun Kyung SHIN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the long-term effect of soybean isoflavones on changes in parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactivity in the hippocampus in normal female, ovariectomized (OVX) female and normal male rats. Methods: Ten-month-old rats were assigned to one of 9 groups (n=7 in each group) based on body weight using arandomized complete-block design. The groups were: control diet-treated females,OVX females, and males; 0.3 g/kg isoflavone-treated females, OVX females, and males; and 1.2 g/kg isoflavone-treated females, OVX females, and males. The PV immunostaining was conducted by using the standard avidin-biotin complex method. Results: PV immunoreactivity and the number of PV-immunoreactive neurons in all the groups after isoflavone treatment were significantly changed in the hippocampal CA1 region and in the dentate gyrus, but not in the hippocampal CA2/3 region. PV immunoreactivity and the number of PV-immunoreactive neurons in the control diet OVX females were similar to those in the control diet, and were greater than those in the control diet normal females. PV immunoreactivity and the number of PV-immunoreactive neurons in all the isoflavone-treated groups decreased dose-dependently after isoflavone treatment. Conclusion: Long-term administration of isoflavones may induce a reduction of PV in interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 region and in the dentate gyrus. The reduction of PV in these regions suggests that the long-term administration of isoflavones may cause a change in calcium homeostasis in the hippocampal CA1 region and in the dentate gyrus.

  14. Neurotrophic ACTH4-9 analogue therapy normalizes electroencephalographic alterations in chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckers, H J; van Dokkum, R P; Verhaagen, J; van Luijtelaar, E L; Coenen, A M; Lopes da Silva, F H; Gispen, W H

    1998-12-01

    Chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (CEAE) is an established experimental model for multiple sclerosis (MS). The demyelinating lesions in the white matter of the central nervous system observed in CEAE and in MS are accompanied by various neurophysiological alterations. Among the best defined electrophysiological abnormalities are the changes in event-related potentials, in particular evoked potentials involving the spinal cord, i.e. motor and sensory evoked potentials. Less familiar are the changes observed in the electroencephalogram of CEAE-affected animals, which are also encountered in the human equivalent, MS. In the present experiment we evaluated the therapeutic value of a neurotrophic peptide treatment [H-Met(O2)-Glu-His-Phe-D-Lys-Phe-OH, an ACTH4-9 analogue] and its effect on the delayed flash visual evoked potentials (VEP) and power spectra of the electroencephalogram, during a 17-week follow-up of CEAE. CEAE animals treated with the neurotrophic peptide were protected against the development of neurological symptoms during the course of the demyelinating syndrome. VEPs of animals suffering from CEAE showed a delay of the latencies of the late components which was significantly counteracted by peptide treatment. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the VEP afterdischarge recorded from CEAE animals was significantly increased during the course of CEAE and correlated closely with the progression of the myelinopathy. Furthermore, CEAE animals showed an increase of electroencephalogram (EEG) beta activity of up to 500% as compared with the age-matched control group. This increase in beta power mainly consisted of a prevailing 20-21 Hz peak, a frequency that normally is not dominant in control EEG recordings of the rat during passive wakefulness. All these electrophysiological phenomena were absent in ACTH4-9 analogue-treated animals. The present findings underscore the potential importance of a neurotrophic peptide treatment in the pharmacotherapy of

  15. Altered blood-brain barrier permeability in rats with prehepatic portal hypertension turns to normal when portal pressure is lowered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francisco Eizayaga; Camila Scorticati; Juan P Prestifilippo; Salvador Romay; Maria A Fernandez; José L Castro; Abraham Lemberg; Juan C Perazzo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the blood-brain barrier integrity in prehepatic portal hypertensive rats induced by partial portal vein ligation, at 14 and 40 d after ligation when portal pressure is spontaneously normalized.METHODS: Adult male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: Group Ⅰ: Sham14d, sham operated; Group Ⅱ: PH14d, portal vein stenosis; (both groups were used 14 days after surgery); Group Ⅲ: Sham40d, Sham operated and Group Ⅳ: PH40d Portal vein stenosis (Groups Ⅱ and Ⅳ used 40 d after surgery). Plasma ammonia,plasma and cerebrospinal fluid protein and liver enzymes concentrations were determined. Trypan and Evans blue dyes, systemically injected, were investigated in hippocampus to study blood-brain barrier integrity. Portal pressure was periodically recorded.RESULTS: Forty days after stricture, portal pressure was normalized, plasma ammonia was moderately high,and both dyes were absent in central nervous system parenchyma. All other parameters were reestablished.When portal pressure was normalized and ammonia level was lowered, but not normal, the altered integrity of blood-brain barrier becomes reestablished.CONCLUSION: The impairment of blood-brain barrier and subsequent normalization could be a mechanism involved in hepatic encephalopathy reversibility. Hemodynamic changes and ammonia could trigger blood-brain barrier alterations and its reestablishment.

  16. Detecting altered postural control after cerebral concussion in athletes with normal postural stability

    OpenAIRE

    Cavanaugh, J; Guskiewicz, K.; Giuliani, C.; Marshall, S.; Mercer, V; Stergiou, N.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine if approximate entropy (ApEn), a regularity statistic from non-linear dynamics, could detect changes in postural control during quiet standing in athletes with normal postural stability after cerebral concussion.

  17. Neurotrophic ACTH4-9 analogue therapy normalizes electroencephalographic alterations in chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Duckers, H.J.; Dokkum, R.P. van; Verhaagen, J.; Luijtelaar, E.L.; Coenen, A.M.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    Chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (CEAE) is an established experimental model for multiple sclerosis (MS). The demyelinating lesions in the white matter of the central nervous system observed in CEAE and in MS are accompanied by various neurophysiological alterations. Among the best de

  18. Neurotrophic ACTH4-9 analogue therapy normalizes electroencephalographic alterations in chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gispen, W. H.; Duckers, H.J.; van Dokkum, R.P.; Verhaagen, J; Luijtelaar, E.L.; Coenen, A.M.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    Chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (CEAE) is an established experimental model for multiple sclerosis (MS). The demyelinating lesions in the white matter of the central nervous system observed in CEAE and in MS are accompanied by various neurophysiological alterations. Among the best defined electrophysiological abnormalities are the changes in event-related potentials, in particular evoked potentials involving the spinal cord, i.e. motor and sensory evoked potentials. Less famil...

  19. Epigenetic alterations of the SERPINE1 gene in oral squamous cell carcinomas and normal oral mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Shan; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Krogdahl, Annelise

    2010-01-01

    cells in oral carcinomas by immunohistochemistry, we found that PAI-1 was expressed in 18 of the 20 patients, mainly by cancer cells. Two showed PAI-1 positive stromal cells surrounding the tumor areas and five showed PAI-1 positive cells in tumor-adjacent normal epithelium. By real-time RT-PCR analysis...

  20. Is temporal summation of pain and spinal nociception altered during normal aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouf, Rafik; Piché, Mathieu; Rainville, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    This study examines the effect of normal aging on temporal summation (TS) of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (RIII). Two groups of healthy volunteers, young and elderly, received transcutaneous electrical stimulation applied to the right sural nerve to assess pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (RIII-reflex). Stimulus intensity was adjusted individually to 120% of RIII-reflex threshold, and shocks were delivered as a single stimulus or as a series of 5 stimuli to assess TS at 5 different frequencies (0.17, 0.33, 0.66, 1, and 2 Hz). This study shows that robust TS of pain and RIII-reflex is observable in individuals aged between 18 and 75 years and indicates that these effects are comparable between young and older individuals. These results contrast with some previous findings and imply that at least some pain regulatory processes, including TS, may not be affected by normal aging, although this may vary depending on the method.

  1. Neuronal networks and mediators of cortical neurovascular coupling responses in normal and altered brain states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecrux, C; Hamel, E

    2016-10-05

    Brain imaging techniques that use vascular signals to map changes in neuronal activity, such as blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, rely on the spatial and temporal coupling between changes in neurophysiology and haemodynamics, known as 'neurovascular coupling (NVC)'. Accordingly, NVC responses, mapped by changes in brain haemodynamics, have been validated for different stimuli under physiological conditions. In the cerebral cortex, the networks of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons generating the changes in neural activity and the key mediators that signal to the vascular unit have been identified for some incoming afferent pathways. The neural circuits recruited by whisker glutamatergic-, basal forebrain cholinergic- or locus coeruleus noradrenergic pathway stimulation were found to be highly specific and discriminative, particularly when comparing the two modulatory systems to the sensory response. However, it is largely unknown whether or not NVC is still reliable when brain states are altered or in disease conditions. This lack of knowledge is surprising since brain imaging is broadly used in humans and, ultimately, in conditions that deviate from baseline brain function. Using the whisker-to-barrel pathway as a model of NVC, we can interrogate the reliability of NVC under enhanced cholinergic or noradrenergic modulation of cortical circuits that alters brain states.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'.

  2. Alterations in acid-base homeostasis during water immersion in normal man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, M.; Schneider, N. S.; Vaamonde, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of water immersion on renal bicarbonate and acid excretion were assessed in 10 normal male subjects. Immersion resulted in a highly significant progressive increase in the rate of sodium and bicarbonate excretion, and in urine pH. Immersion was also associated with a significant increase in urine P-CO2; this increase presupposes a maintained rate of hydrogen secretion in the distal tubular segment. The rapidity of onset of the bicarbonaturia (2 hrs of immersion) and the concomitant increase in urinary P-CO2 suggest that enhanced bicarbonate excretion of immersion cannot be completely accounted for by immersion-induced suppression of aldosterone, and that the natriuresis and bicarbonaturia of immersion is mediated in part by an increased proximal rejection of sodium and bicarbonate.

  3. Identification of genes with altered expression in medullary breast cancer vs. ductal breast cancer and normal breast epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Benoit, Vivian; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2006-01-01

    to both immunological and endogenous cellular factors, although little is known about the distinct biology of MCB that may contribute to the improved outcome of MCB patients. To identify candidate genes, we performed gene array expression analysis of cell lines of MCB, ductal breast cancer and normal......Medullary breast cancer (MCB) is a morphologically and biologically distinct subtype that, despite cytologically highly malignant characteristics, has a favorable prognosis compared to the more common infiltrating ductal breast carcinoma. MCB metastasizes less frequently, which has been attributed......) gene families, Vav1, monoglyceride lipase and NADP+-dependent malic enzyme, exhibited altered expression in MCB vs. ductal breast cancer, and the differences for some of these genes were confirmed on an extended panel of cell lines by quantitative PCR. Immunohistochemical analysis further established...

  4. Identification of genes with altered expression in medullary breast cancer vs. ductal breast cancer and normal breast epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Benoit, Vivian M; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke;

    2006-01-01

    Medullary breast cancer (MCB) is a morphologically and biologically distinct subtype that, despite cytologically highly malignant characteristics, has a favorable prognosis compared to the more common infiltrating ductal breast carcinoma. MCB metastasizes less frequently, which has been attributed...... to both immunological and endogenous cellular factors, although little is known about the distinct biology of MCB that may contribute to the improved outcome of MCB patients. To identify candidate genes, we performed gene array expression analysis of cell lines of MCB, ductal breast cancer and normal......) gene families, Vav1, monoglyceride lipase and NADP+-dependent malic enzyme, exhibited altered expression in MCB vs. ductal breast cancer, and the differences for some of these genes were confirmed on an extended panel of cell lines by quantitative PCR. Immunohistochemical analysis further established...

  5. Impact of streptozotocin on altering normal glucose homeostasis during insulin testing in diabetic rats compared to normoglycemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinna NA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nidal A Qinna,1 Adnan A Badwan2 1Department of Pharmacology and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of Petra, 2Research and Innovation Centre, The Jordanian Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Co. Plc. (JPM, Amman, Jordan Abstract: Streptozotocin (STZ is currently the most used diabetogenic agent in testing insulin and new antidiabetic drugs in animals. Due to the toxic and disruptive nature of STZ on organs, apart from pancreas, involved in preserving the body’s normal glucose homeostasis, this study aims to reassess the action of STZ in inducing different glucose response states in diabetic rats while testing insulin. Diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats induced with STZ were classified according to their initial blood glucose levels into stages. The effect of randomizing rats in such a manner was investigated for the severity of interrupting normal liver, pancreas, and kidney functions. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic actions of subcutaneously injected insulin in diabetic and nondiabetic rats were compared. Interruption of glucose homeostasis by STZ was challenged by single and repeated administrations of injected insulin and oral glucose to diabetic rats. In diabetic rats with high glucose (451–750 mg/dL, noticeable changes were seen in the liver and kidney functions compared to rats with lower basal glucose levels. Increased serum levels of recombinant human insulin were clearly indicated by a significant increase in the calculated maximum serum concentration and area under the concentration–time curve. Reversion of serum glucose levels to normal levels pre- and postinsulin and oral glucose administrations to STZ diabetic rats were found to be variable. In conclusion, diabetic animals were more responsive to insulin than nondiabetic animals. STZ was capable of inducing different levels of normal glucose homeostasis disruption in rats. Both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic actions of insulin were

  6. Evidence for normal letter-sound integration, but altered language pathways in a case of recovered Landau-Kleffner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullens, Pim; Pullens, Will; Blau, Vera; Sorger, Bettina; Jansma, Bernadette M; Goebel, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Landau-Kleffner Syndrome (LKS) is a rare form of acquired aphasia in children, characterized by epileptic discharges, which occur mostly during sleep. After normal speech and language development, aphasia develops between the ages of 3-7 years in a period ranging from days to months. The epileptic discharges usually disappear after reaching adulthood, but language outcomes are usually poor if no treatment focused on restoration of (non-) verbal communication is given. Patients often appear deaf-mute, but sign language, as part of the treatment, may lead to recovery of communication. The neural mechanisms underlying poor language outcomes in LKS are not yet understood. In this detailed functional MRI study of a recovered LKS patient - that is, a patient no longer suffering from epileptic discharges, audiovisual multi-sensory processing was investigated, since LKS patients are often proficient in reading, but not in speech perception. In the recovered LKS patient a large difference in the neural activation to auditory stimuli was found in the left versus the right auditory cortex, which cannot be attributed to hearing loss. Compared to healthy proficient readers investigated earlier with the same fMRI experiment, the patient demonstrated normal letter-sound integration in the superior temporal gyrus as demonstrated by the multi-sensory interaction index, indicating intact STG function. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) based fiber tracking in the LKS patient showed fibers originating from Heschl's gyrus that seem to be left-right inverted with respect to HG fiber pattern described in the literature for healthy controls. In the patient, in both hemispheres we found arcuate fibers projecting from (homologues of) Broca's to Wernicke's areas, and a lack of fibers from arcuate left inferior parietal and sylvian areas reported in healthy subjects. We observed short arcuate segments in the right hemisphere. Although speculative, our results suggest intact temporal lobe

  7. Willingness to wait and altered encoding of time-discounted reward in the orbitofrontal cortex with normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Matthew R; Bryden, Daniel W; Cerri, Domenic H; Haney, Zachary R; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2012-04-18

    Normal aging has been associated with cognitive changes, including shifts in responding for time-discounted rewards. The orbitofrontal cortex, an area previously associated with aging-related cognitive changes, is critical for normal discounting. Previously we have shown in a choice task that rats prefer immediate over delayed reward and that neural representations of delayed reward in orbitofrontal cortex were attenuated, whereas immediate reward elicited strong responses. Changes in choice performance were correlated with changes in firing rate in orbitofrontal neurons, suggesting that these reward representations were critical to the rats' ability to wait for reward. Here we asked whether age-dependent changes in discounting behavior were related to changes in the representation of delayed reward in the orbitofrontal cortex. Young (3-6 months) and aged (22-26 months) rats were trained on the same discounting paradigm used previously. We found that aged rats showed less sensitivity to increasing delay preceding reward delivery, shifting behavior away from the delayed reward more slowly than younger rats. This sensitivity was specific to delay, since choice performance did not differ between the two groups when delay was held constant and reward size varied. Aged rats exhibited a corresponding increase in the prevalence of neurons that fired more strongly for delayed reward. Again this change was specific to delay; there was no change in encoding of different-sized rewards. These results suggest that natural aging results in altered representations of reward in orbitofrontal cortex. These changes may relate to the increased ability to delay gratification and reduced impulsivity associated with aging.

  8. Sleep apnea predicts distinct alterations in glucose homeostasis and biomarkers in obese adults with normal and impaired glucose metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Nathan R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Notwithstanding previous studies supporting independent associations between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and prevalence of diabetes, the underlying pathogenesis of impaired glucose regulation in OSA remains unclear. We explored mechanisms linking OSA with prediabetes/diabetes and associated biomarker profiles. We hypothesized that OSA is associated with distinct alterations in glucose homeostasis and biomarker profiles in subjects with normal (NGM and impaired glucose metabolism (IGM. Methods Forty-five severely obese adults (36 women without certain comorbidities/medications underwent anthropometric measurements, polysomnography, and blood tests. We measured fasting serum glucose, insulin, selected cytokines, and calculated homeostasis model assessment estimates of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS and pancreatic beta-cell function (HOMA-B. Results Both increases in apnea-hypopnea index (AHI and the presence of prediabetes/diabetes were associated with reductions in HOMA-IS in the entire cohort even after adjustment for sex, race, age, and BMI (P = 0.003. In subjects with NGM (n = 30, OSA severity was associated with significantly increased HOMA-B (a trend towards decreased HOMA-IS independent of sex and adiposity. OSA-related oxyhemoglobin desaturations correlated with TNF-α (r=-0.76; P = 0.001 in women with NGM and with IL-6 (rho=-0.55; P = 0.035 in women with IGM (n = 15 matched individually for age, adiposity, and AHI. Conclusions OSA is independently associated with altered glucose homeostasis and increased basal beta-cell function in severely obese adults with NGM. The findings suggest that moderate to severe OSA imposes an excessive functional demand on pancreatic beta-cells, which may lead to their exhaustion and impaired secretory capacity over time. The two distinct biomarker profiles linking sleep apnea with NGM and IGM via TNF-α and IL-6 have been discerned in our study to suggest that sleep apnea and particularly

  9. Exposure to (12)C particles alters the normal dynamics of brain monoamine metabolism and behaviour in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Oleg V; Belokopytova, Ksenia V; Bazyan, Ara S; Kudrin, Vladimir S; Narkevich, Viktor B; Ivanov, Aleksandr A; Severiukhin, Yury S; Timoshenko, Gennady N; Krasavin, Eugene A

    2016-09-01

    Planning of the deep-space exploration missions raises a number of questions on the radiation protection of astronauts. One of the medical concerns is associated with exposure of a crew to highly energetic particles of galactic cosmic rays. Among many other health disorders, irradiation with these particles has a substantial impact on the central nervous system (CNS). Although radiation damage to CNS has been addressed extensively during the last years, the mechanisms underlying observed impairments remain mostly unknown. The present study reveals neurochemical and behavioural alterations induced in rats by 1Gy of 500MeV/u (12)C particles with a relatively moderate linear energy transfer (10.6keV/μm). It is found that exposure to carbon ions leads to significant modification of the normal monoamine metabolism dynamics as well as the locomotor, exploratory, and anxiety-like behaviours during a two-month period. The obtained results indicate an abnormal redistribution of monoamines and their metabolites in different brain regions after exposure. The most pronounced impairments are detected in the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and hypothalamus that illustrate the sensitivity of these brain regions to densely ionizing radiations. It is also shown that exposure to (12)C particles enhances the anxiety in animals and accelerates the age-related reduction in their exploratory capability. The observed monoamine metabolism pattern may indicate the presence of certain compensatory mechanisms being induced in response to irradiation and capable of partial restoration of monoaminergic systems' functions. Overall, these findings support a possibility of CNS damage by space-born particles of a relatively moderate linear energy transfer.

  10. Computer treatment of the contents of some elements in the normal and pathologically altered human colon mucosa tissues obtained by INAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draskovic, R.J.; Bozanic, M.; Bozanic, V.; Bohus, T. (Institut za Nuklearne Nauke Boris Kidric, Belgrade (Yugoslavia))

    1984-11-01

    Distribution of some elements (Cr, Fe, Co, Sb, Sc and Zn) in normal and pathologically altered human colon mucosa tissues were investigated by INAA. The following tissues were analyzed: normal colon mucosa, colitis chronica, colitis ulcerosa, adenoma tubulare and adenocarcinoma (diagnoses were previously confirmed clinically and histopathologically). The values of contents of the elements in these tissues (Csub(x) in nkg/g) are treated by specific computer functional programs. Regression functions of these parameters were found for the altered tissues in comparison to the normal, as well as specific functional correlations of the Csub(x)/Csub(y) relations for pairs of investigated elements. The functions which characterize these relations for the investigated colon mucosa tissue were also determined.

  11. Analysis of activin/TGFB-signaling modulators within the normal and dysfunctional adult human testis reveals evidence of altered signaling capacity in a subset of seminomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Vinali L; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; McLachlan, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Activin is a pleiotropic growth factor belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFB) superfamily of signaling molecules. Regulated activin signaling is known to influence several steps in rodent male gamete differentiation. TGFB ligand isoforms, TGFB1-B3, also influence germ cell survival...... cancer patients and from normal men subjected to gonadotropin suppression with androgen-based contraceptives. Our findings identify distinct differences between normal and gonadotropin-deprived human testis in the expression and cellular localization of activin/TGFB-signaling modulators. The presence...... may be affected by spermatogenic disruption and altered hormone levels in the testis....

  12. Management of familial Mediterranean fever by colchicine does not normalize the altered profile of microbial long chain fatty acids in the human metabolome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanna eKtsoyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In our previous works we established that in an autoinflammatory condition, familial Mediterranean fever, the gut microbial diversity is specifically restructured, which also results in the altered profiles of microbial long chain fatty acids (LCFAs present in the systemic metabolome. The mainstream management of the disease is based on oral administration of colchicine to suppress clinical signs and extend remission periods and our aim was to determine whether this therapy normalizes the microbial LCFA profiles in the metabolome as well. Unexpectedly, the treatment does not normalize these profiles. Moreover, it results in the formation of new distinct microbial LCFA clusters, which are well separated from the corresponding values in healthy controls and FMF patients without the therapy. We hypothesize that the therapy alters the proinflammatory network specific for the disease, with the concomitant changes in gut microbiota and the corresponding microbial LCFAs in the metabolome.

  13. Passage from normal mucosa to adenoma and colon cancer: alteration of normal sCD30 mechanisms regulating TH1/TH2 cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contasta, Ida; Berghella, Anna Maria; Pellegrini, Patrizia; Adorno, Domenico

    2003-08-01

    The pathogenesis of cancer is currently under intensive investigation to identify reliable prognostic indices for the early detection of disease. Adenomas have been identified as precursors of colorectal cancer and tumor establishment, and disease progression has been found to reflect a malfunction of the immune system. On the basis of the role of the CD30 molecule in the regulation of TH1/TH2 functions and our previous results, strongly suggesting the validity of serum TH1/TH2 cytokines in the study of tumor progression, we studied network interaction between the production of soluble (s) CD30/sBCl2 in whole blood culture [in basic conditions and after PHA, LPS, and anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) stimulation] and levels of TH1/TH2 cytokines (IL2, IFN gamma, IL12, IL4, IL5, IL10). Peripheral blood from a group of healthy subjects, as well as from patients with adenoma and colorectal cancer was used. Our objective was to gain a better insight into the role of the CD30 molecule in the passage from normal mucosa to adenoma and tumor and identify specific disease markers. Our results suggest that the decrease in CD30 expression and the abnormal increase in Bcl2 expression, observed in the peripheral cells of both adenoma and tumor groups determine an imbalance between TH1/TH2 functions. Consequently, changes in sCD30/sBcl2 culture production and TH1/TH2 cytokine serum levels may be reliable markers for tumor progression. In fact, our overall data show that a decrease of sCD30 levels in basic and PHA conditions and an increase of IFN gamma, IL4, IL5, and IL12 serum levels and sBcl2 in all activation condition are indicative of the passage from normal mucosa to adenoma; whilst a decrease of sBcl2 level in basic, LPS and anti-CD3 conditions and of IL2, IFN gamma serum levels, together with an increase of IL5 are indicative of the passage from adenoma to tumor.

  14. Virtual endoscopy of the nasopharynx in the evaluation of its normal anatomy and alterations due to lymphoid hyperplasia: preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandolfo, Ignazio; Mazziotti, Silvio; Ascenti, Giorgio; Vinci, Sergio; Salamone, Ignazio; Colletti, Giovanni; Blandino, Alfredo [University of Messina, Department of Radiological Sciences, Messina (Italy)

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of virtual endoscopy in establishing the anatomic appearance of nasopharynx, both normal and affected by lymphoid hyperplasia. Thirty-seven patients affected by chronic rhinosinusal and otomastoid pathology, all studied by rhinoscopy, were examined with multislice computed tomography (CT) and virtual endoscopy of the nasopharynx. Rhinoscopy showed a completely normal nasopharynx in 15 cases and a variable grade of lymphoid hypertrophy in 22 patients. A general agreement was observed between traditional and virtual endoscopy findings in both subgroups. The tasca of Luschka was detected in 13/15 of normal subjects and only in 3/22 patients. The Rosenmuller fossae appeared deeper in normal subjects and their symmetry could be considered an important criterion of normality. In all cases, a good evaluation of the tubaric ostium was obtained. Differentiation between hyperplasic lymphoid tissue and neoplasms is possible only in lymphoid hyperplasia characterized by median crest-like swelling with a narrow base. In most cases, differential diagnosis cannot be based only on morphological criteria of virtual endoscopy, but it should be evaluated considering the overall CT findings and clinical presentation. (orig.)

  15. Reduction of oxidative stress during recovery accelerates normalization of primary cilia length that is altered after ischemic injury in murine kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jee In; Kim, Jinu; Jang, Hee-Seong; Noh, Mi Ra; Lipschutz, Joshua H; Park, Kwon Moo

    2013-05-15

    The primary cilium is a microtubule-based nonmotile organelle that extends from the surface of cells, including renal tubular cells. Here, we investigated the alteration of primary cilium length during epithelial cell injury and repair, following ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) insult, and the role of reactive oxygen species in this alteration. Thirty minutes of bilateral renal ischemia induced severe renal tubular cell damage and an increase of plasma creatinine (PCr) concentration. Between 8 and 16 days following the ischemia, the increased PCr returned to normal range, although without complete histological restoration. Compared with the primary cilium length in normal kidney tubule cells, the length was shortened 4 h and 1 day following ischemia, increased over normal 8 days after ischemia, and then returned to near normal 16 days following ischemia. In the urine of I/R-subjected mice, acetylated tubulin was detected. The cilium length of proliferating cells was shorter than that in nonproliferating cells. Mature cells had shorter cilia than differentiating cells. Treatment with Mn(III) tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin (MnTMPyP), an antioxidant, during the recovery of damaged kidneys accelerated normalization of cilia length concomitant with a decrease of oxidative stress and morphological recovery in the kidney. In the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, H(2)O(2) treatment caused released ciliary fragment into medium, and MnTMPyP inhibited the deciliation. The ERK inhibitor U0126 inhibited elongation of cilia in normal and MDCK cells recovering from H(2)O(2) stress. Taken together, our results suggest that primary cilia length reflects cell proliferation and the length of primary cilium is regulated, at least, in part, by reactive oxygen species through ERK.

  16. Breaking up prolonged sitting does not alter postprandial glycemia in young, normal-weight men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rasmus Kopp; Andersen, J B; Vinther, A S;

    2016-01-01

    A randomized, controlled, cross-over study was used to investigate the effects of breaking up prolonged sitting with low intensity physical activity on postprandial blood glucose concentrations in healthy, young, normal-weight adults. 14 men (n=6) and women (n=8) were assigned to 2.5 h of prolonged...

  17. Cardiac-Specific Disruption of GH Receptor Alters Glucose Homeostasis While Maintaining Normal Cardiac Performance in Adult Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Adam; Liu, Xingbo; Sim, Don; Benner, Chance M; Duran-Ortiz, Silvana; Qian, Yanrong; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Kim, Jason K; Kopchick, John J

    2016-05-01

    GH is considered necessary for the proper development and maintenance of several tissues, including the heart. Studies conducted in both GH receptor null and bovine GH transgenic mice have demonstrated specific cardiac structural and functional changes. In each of these mouse lines, however, GH-induced signaling is altered systemically, being decreased in GH receptor null mice and increased in bovine GH transgenic mice. Therefore, to clarify the direct effects GH has on cardiac tissue, we developed a tamoxifen-inducible, cardiac-specific GHR disrupted (iC-GHRKO) mouse line. Cardiac GH receptor was disrupted in 4-month-old iC-GHRKO mice to avoid developmental effects due to perinatal GHR gene disruption. Surprisingly, iC-GHRKO mice showed no difference vs controls in baseline or postdobutamine stress test echocardiography measurements, nor did iC-GHRKO mice show differences in longitudinal systolic blood pressure measurements. Interestingly, iC-GHRKO mice had decreased fat mass and improved insulin sensitivity at 6.5 months of age. By 12.5 months of age, however, iC-GHRKO mice no longer had significant decreases in fat mass and had developed glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Furthermore, investigation via immunoblot analysis demonstrated that iC-GHRKO mice had appreciably decreased insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation, specifically in heart and liver, but not in epididymal white adipose tissue. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in circulating IGF-1 levels in 12.5-month-old iC-GHRKO mice. These data indicate that whereas the disruption of cardiomyocyte GH-induced signaling in adult mice does not affect cardiac function, it does play a role in systemic glucose homeostasis, in part through modulation of circulating IGF-1.

  18. Aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with normal and altered glycated hemoglobin levels in two regions in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Pimentel Moreno

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the aerobic bacterial microbiota of the conjunctiva in diabetic patients with regard to the management of diabetes, assessed using glycated hemoglobin levels. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using conjunctival smears of diabetic patients from both sexes and with different ages, residing in two different Brazilian cities (Sorocaba and Rio Branco. A control group of non-diabetic patients was also included. The diabetic patients were considered to have controlled diabetes when their glycated hemoglobin level was ≤7% and blood glucose level was ≤126 mg/dL. Patients with non-controlled diabetes were those with glycated hemoglobin levels >7% and blood glucose levels >126 mg/dL. The samples obtained were inoculated in Brain-Heart Infusion broth and in culture media for aerobic bacteria (blood and chocolate agars; bacterial growth was evaluated in a microbiology laboratory. Results: A total of 120 eyes of 120 patients were included in the present study. The percentage of cultures in which bacterial growth was observed was greater in diabetic patients, although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.103. There was a greater trend toward bacterial growth in the conjunctiva of diabetic patients with altered fasting blood glucose. There was no difference in the frequency of bacterial growth on the conjunctiva between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. In Sorocaba, conjunctival bacterial growth was similar to that observed in Rio Branco. The microorganism most frequently detected in the present study was Staphylococcus epidermidis, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Escherichia coli. Conclusion: There was no difference between diabetic patients with normal or altered glycated hemoglobin levels. The microorganisms found were similar to those found in studies investigating the conjunctival bacterial flora of diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  19. Meal pattern alterations associated with intermittent fasting for weight loss are normalized after high-fat diet re-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthardt, Juliet D; Bello, Nicholas T

    2017-03-03

    Alternate day, intermittent fasting (IMF) can be an effective weight loss strategy. However, the effects of IMF on eating behaviors are not well characterized. We investigated the acute and residual effects of IMF for weight loss on meal patterns in adult obese male C57BL/6 mice. After 8weeks of ad libitum high-fat diet to induce diet-induced obesity (DIO), mice were either continued on ad libitum high-fat diet (HFD) or placed on one of 5 diet strategies for weight loss: IMF of high-fat diet (IMF-HFD), pair-fed to IMF-HFD group (PF-HFD), ad libitum low-fat diet (LFD), IMF of low-fat diet (IMF-LFD), or pair-fed to IMF-LFD group (PF-LFD). After the 4-week diet period, all groups were refed the high-fat diet for 6weeks. By the end of the diet period, all 5 groups had lost weight compared with HFD group, but after 6weeks of HFD re-feeding all groups had similar body weights. On (Day 2) of the diet period, IMF-HFD had greater first meal size and faster eating rate compared with HFD. Also, first meal duration was greater in LFD and IMF-LFD compared with HFD. At the end of the diet period (Day 28), the intermittent fasting groups (IMF-HFD and IMF-LFD) had greater first meal sizes and faster first meal eating rate compared with their respective ad libitum fed groups on similar diets (HFD and LFD). Also, average meal duration was longer on Day 28 in the low-fat diet groups (LFD and IMF-LFD) compared with high-fat diet groups (HFD and IMF-HFD). After 6weeks of HFD re-feeding (Day 70), there were no differences in meal patterns in groups that had previously experienced intermittent fasting compared with ad libitum fed groups. These findings suggest that meal patterns are only transiently altered during alternate day intermittent fasting for weight loss in obese male mice.

  20. Recombinant human erythropoietin treatment of chronic renal failure patients normalizes altered phenotype and proliferation of CD4-positive T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisowska, Katarzyna A; Debska-Slizien, Alicja; Radzka, Monika; Witkowski, Jacek M; Rutkowski, Boleslaw; Bryl, Ewa

    2010-03-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) receive recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) for the correction of anemia. However, rhEPO also has an immunomodulatory effect. Detailed changes of phenotype and function of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in CRF patients receiving rhEPO have not been reported yet; their study may bring insight into understanding of this immunomodulatory action of rhEPO. Two groups of CRF patients were included into the study: those treated; and those not receiving rhEPO. The expression of activation markers on CD4(+) lymphocytes was measured with flow cytometry, both ex vivo and in vitro. The kinetics of CD4(+) T lymphocytes proliferation was calculated using a dividing cells tracing method and numerical approach. Significantly higher percentages of CD4(+)CD95(+), CD4(+)HLA-DR(+) cells, and lower percentages of CD4(+)CD69(+) and CD4(+)CD28(+) cells were observed in both rhEPO-treated and untreated patients when compared with healthy controls. Changes in the proportions of CD4(+)CD28(+) and CD4(+)HLA-DR(+) subpopulations were dependent on the type of rhEPO, being more pronounced for rhEPObeta. CD4(+) lymphocytes from untreated patients exhibited decreased expression of CD28 and CD69 after stimulation in vitro, whereas the expression of these antigens on lymphocytes of rhEPO-treated patients was similar to that observed in healthy controls. Fewer CD4(+)CD28(+) T lymphocytes of untreated patients proliferated in vitro; these cells had longer G0-->G1 time, which negatively correlated with surface expression of CD28. Our study confirms that rhEPO treatment normalizes activation parameters of CD4(+) T lymphocytes and their proliferative capacity, which could explain earlier described immunomodulatory effects of rhEPO in patients suffering from CRF.

  1. Structural and Histochemical Alterations in the Aortic Valves of Elderly Patients: A Comparative Study of Aortic Stenosis, Aortic Regurgitation, and Normal Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the pathogenesis of aortic stenosis (AS) and regurgitation (AR) by comparing differences in mechanical and biochemical alterations. We applied scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) to measure the speed of sound (SOS) through valves to estimate the elasticity and monitor sensitivity to protease treatment, as the SOS is correlated with the stiffness of materials, which is reduced after digestion by proteases. The fibrosa of both the AS and AR groups were stiffer than the fibrosa of the normal group. The AR group displayed significantly stiffer fibrosa than the AS group, with the exception of calcified areas. The AS group showed significantly decreased SOS values following protease digestion, whereas the AR showed little reduction. The AS group presented type III collagen in the fibrosa and the ventricularis. In the AR group, both type I collagen and type III collagen coexisted in the fibrosa and the ventricularis. Upon immunostaining for advanced glycation end-products, the AS group showed sparse, weak staining, whereas the AR group presented a strong, band-like positive reaction in the fibrosa. In conclusion, tissue remodelling associated with damage and repair is associated with AS pathogenesis, whereas static chemical alterations with slow collagen turnover induce AR. PMID:27747234

  2. Differential gene expression between squamous cell carcinoma of esophageus and its normal epithelium;altered pattern of mal,akr1c2,and rab11a expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sakineh Kazemi-Noureini; Sergio Colonna-Romano; Abed-Ali Ziaee; Mohammad-Ali Malboobi; Mansour Yazdanbod; Parviz Setayeshgar; Bruno Maresca

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To identify the altered gene expression patterns in squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus (ESCC) in relation to adjacent normal esophageal epithelium.METHODS: Total RNA was extracted using SV total RNA isolation kit from snap frozen tissues of ESCC samples and normal esophageal epithelium far from the tumor. Radiolabeled cDNA were synthesized from equal quantities of total RNAs of tumor and normal tissues using combinations of 24 arbitrary 13-mer primers and three different anchoring oligo-dT primers and separated on sequencing gels. cDNA with considerable different amounts of signals in tumor and normal tissue were reamplified and cloned.Using southern blot, the clones of each band were controlled for false positive results caused by probable heterogeneity of cDNA population with the same size. Clones that confirmed differential expression by slot blot selected for sequencing and northern analysis. Corresponding full-length gene sequences was predicted using human genome project data, related transcripts were translated and used for various protein/motif searches to speculate their probable functions.RESULTS: The 97 genes showed different levels of cDNA in tumor and normal tissues of esophagus. The expression of mai gene was remarkably down regulated in all 10surveyed tumor tissues. Akr1c2, a member of the aldoketo reductase 1C family, which is involved in metabolism of sex hormones and xenobiotics, was up-regulated in 8out of 10 inspected ESCC samples. Rab11a, RPL7, and RPL28 showed moderate levels of differential expression.Many other cDNAs remained to further studies.CONCLUSION: The mai gene which is switched-off in all ESCC samples can be considered as a tumor suppressor gene that more studies in its regulation may lead to valuable explanations in ESCC development. Akr1c2 which is upregulated in ESCC probably plays an important role in tumor development of esophagus and may be proposed as a potential molecular target in ESCC treatments. Differential

  3. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (Gnrhr) gene knock out: Normal growth and development of sensory, motor and spatial orientation behavior but altered metabolism in neonatal and prepubertal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Ellen R; Sherwood, Nancy M

    2017-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is important in the control of reproduction, but its actions in non-reproductive processes are less well known. In this study we examined the effect of disrupting the GnRH receptor in mice to determine if growth, metabolism or behaviors that are not associated with reproduction were affected. To minimize the effects of other hormones such as FSH, LH and sex steroids, the neonatal-prepubertal period of 2 to 28 days of age was selected. The study shows that regardless of sex or phenotype in the Gnrhr gene knockout line, there was no significant difference in the daily development of motor control, sensory detection or spatial orientation among the wildtype, heterozygous or null mice. This included a series of behavioral tests for touch, vision, hearing, spatial orientation, locomotory behavior and muscle strength. Neither the daily body weight nor the final weight on day 28 of the kidney, liver and thymus relative to body weight varied significantly in any group. However by day 28, metabolic changes in the GnRH null females compared with wildtype females showed a significant reduction in inguinal fat pad weight normalized to body weight; this was accompanied by an increase in glucose compared with wildtype females shown by Student-Newman-Keuls Multiple Comparison test and Student's unpaired t tests. Our studies show that the GnRH-GnRHR system is not essential for growth or motor/sensory/orientation behavior during the first month of life prior to puberty onset. The lack of the GnRH-GnRHR axis, however, did affect females resulting in reduced subcutaneous inguinal fat pad weight and increased glucose with possible insulin resistance; the loss of the normal rise of estradiol at postnatal days 15-28 may account for the altered metabolism in the prepubertal female pups.

  4. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (Gnrhr) gene knock out: Normal growth and development of sensory, motor and spatial orientation behavior but altered metabolism in neonatal and prepubertal mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Ellen R.; Sherwood, Nancy M.

    2017-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is important in the control of reproduction, but its actions in non-reproductive processes are less well known. In this study we examined the effect of disrupting the GnRH receptor in mice to determine if growth, metabolism or behaviors that are not associated with reproduction were affected. To minimize the effects of other hormones such as FSH, LH and sex steroids, the neonatal-prepubertal period of 2 to 28 days of age was selected. The study shows that regardless of sex or phenotype in the Gnrhr gene knockout line, there was no significant difference in the daily development of motor control, sensory detection or spatial orientation among the wildtype, heterozygous or null mice. This included a series of behavioral tests for touch, vision, hearing, spatial orientation, locomotory behavior and muscle strength. Neither the daily body weight nor the final weight on day 28 of the kidney, liver and thymus relative to body weight varied significantly in any group. However by day 28, metabolic changes in the GnRH null females compared with wildtype females showed a significant reduction in inguinal fat pad weight normalized to body weight; this was accompanied by an increase in glucose compared with wildtype females shown by Student-Newman-Keuls Multiple Comparison test and Student's unpaired t tests. Our studies show that the GnRH-GnRHR system is not essential for growth or motor/sensory/orientation behavior during the first month of life prior to puberty onset. The lack of the GnRH-GnRHR axis, however, did affect females resulting in reduced subcutaneous inguinal fat pad weight and increased glucose with possible insulin resistance; the loss of the normal rise of estradiol at postnatal days 15–28 may account for the altered metabolism in the prepubertal female pups. PMID:28346489

  5. Overexpression of CONSTANS homologs CO1 and CO2 fails to alter normal reproductive onset and fall bud set in woody perennial poplar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Yu Hsu

    Full Text Available CONSTANS (CO is an important flowering-time gene in the photoperiodic flowering pathway of annual Arabidopsis thaliana in which overexpression of CO induces early flowering, whereas mutations in CO cause delayed flowering. The closest homologs of CO in woody perennial poplar (Populus spp. are CO1 and CO2. A previous report showed that the CO2/FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (FT1 regulon controls the onset of reproduction in poplar, similar to what is seen with the CO/FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT regulon in Arabidopsis. The CO2/FT1 regulon was also reported to control fall bud set. Our long-term field observations show that overexpression of CO1 and CO2 individually or together did not alter normal reproductive onset, spring bud break, or fall dormancy in poplar, but did result in smaller trees when compared with controls. Transcripts of CO1 and CO2 were normally most abundant in the growing season and rhythmic within a day, peaking at dawn. Our manipulative experiments did not provide evidence for transcriptional regulation being affected by photoperiod, light intensity, temperature, or water stress when transcripts of CO1 and CO2 were consistently measured in the morning. A genetic network analysis using overexpressing trees, microarrays, and computation demonstrated that a majority of functionally known genes downstream of CO1 and CO2 are associated with metabolic processes, which could explain their effect on tree size. In conclusion, the function of CO1 and CO2 in poplar does not appear to overlap with that of CO from Arabidopsis, nor do our data support the involvement of CO1 and CO2 in spring bud break or fall bud set.

  6. Alterations in expression of Cat-315 epitope of perineuronal nets during normal ageing, and its modulation by an open-channel NMDA receptor blocker, memantine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Jun; Ohgomori, Tomohiro; Jinno, Shozo

    2017-03-08

    The perineuronal net (PNN), a specialized aggregate of the extracellular matrix, is involved in neuroprotection against oxidative stress, which is now recognized as a major contributor to age-related decline in brain functions. In this study, we investigated the age-related molecular changes of PNNs using monoclonal antibody Cat-315, which recognizes human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) glycan on aggrecan-based PNNs. Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of Cat-315 epitope in the hippocampus were higher in middle-aged (MA, 12-month-old) mice than in young adult (YA, 2-month-old) mice. Although there were no differences in the expression levels of Cat-315 epitope between old age (OA, 20-month-old) and MA mice, Cat-315 immunoreactivity was also detected in astrocytes of OA mice. To focus on Cat-315 epitope in PNNs, we used YA and MA mice in the following experiments. Optical disector analysis showed that there were no differences in the numbers of Cat-315-positive (Cat-315(+) ) PNNs between YA and MA mice. Fluorescence intensity analysis indicated that Cat-315 immunoreactivity in PNNs increased with age in the dorsal hippocampus, which is mainly involved in cognitive functions. Administration of an open-channel blocker of NMDA receptor, memantine, reduced the expression levels of Cat-315 epitope in the hippocampus. Furthermore, the numbers of glutamatergic and GABAergic terminals colocalized with Cat-315 epitope around parvalbumin-positive neurons were decreased by memantine. These findings provide novel insight into the involvement of PNNs in normal brain ageing, and suggest that memantine may counteract the age-related alterations in expression levels of Cat-315 epitope via regulation of its subcellular localization. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Common chromosomal fragile sites (CFS) may be involved in normal and traumatic cognitive stress memory consolidation and altered nervous system immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, G S

    2010-05-01

    Previous reports of specific patterns of increased fragility at common chromosomal fragile sites (CFS) found in association with certain neurobehavioural disorders did not attract attention at the time due to a shift towards molecular approaches to delineate neuropsychiatric disorder candidate genes. Links with miRNA, altered methylation and the origin of copy number variation indicate that CFS region characteristics may be part of chromatinomic mechanisms that are increasingly linked with neuroplasticity and memory. Current reports of large-scale double-stranded DNA breaks in differentiating neurons and evidence of ongoing DNA demethylation of specific gene promoters in adult hippocampus may shed new light on the dynamic epigenetic changes that are increasingly appreciated as contributing to long-term memory consolidation. The expression of immune recombination activating genes in key stress-induced memory regions suggests the adoption by the brain of this ancient pattern recognition and memory system to establish a structural basis for long-term memory through controlled chromosomal breakage at highly specific genomic regions. It is furthermore considered that these mechanisms for management of epigenetic information related to stress memory could be linked, in some instances, with the transfer of the somatically acquired information to the germline. Here, rearranged sequences can be subjected to further selection and possible eventual retrotranscription to become part of the more stable coding machinery if proven to be crucial for survival and reproduction. While linkage of cognitive memory with stress and fear circuitry and memory establishment through structural DNA modification is proposed as a normal process, inappropriate activation of immune-like genomic rearrangement processes through traumatic stress memory may have the potential to lead to undesirable activation of neuro-inflammatory processes. These theories could have a significant impact on the

  8. 1,25(OH2D3 alters growth plate maturation and bone architecture in young rats with normal renal function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Idelevich

    Full Text Available Whereas detrimental effects of vitamin D deficiency are known over century, the effects of vitamin D receptor activation by 1,25(OH(2D(3, the principal hormonal form of vitamin D, on the growing bone and its growth plate are less clear. Currently, 1,25(OH(2D(3 is used in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease and mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD and is strongly associated with growth retardation. Here, we investigate the effect of 1,25(OH(2D(3 treatment on bone development in normal young rats, unrelated to renal insufficiency. Young rats received daily i.p. injections of 1 µg/kg 1,25(OH(2D(3 for one week, or intermittent 3 µg/kg 1,25(OH(2D(3 for one month. Histological analysis revealed narrower tibial growth plates, predominantly in the hypertrophic zone of 1,25(OH(2D(3-treated animals in both experimental protocols. This phenotype was supported by narrower distribution of aggrecan, collagens II and X mRNA, shown by in situ hybridization. Concomitant with altered chondrocyte maturation, 1,25(OH(2D(3 increased chondrocyte proliferation and apoptosis in terminal hypertrophic cells. In vitro treatment of the chondrocytic cell line ATDC5 with 1,25(OH(2D(3 lowered differentiation and increased proliferation dose and time-dependently. Micro-CT analysis of femurs from 1-week 1,25(OH(2D(3-treated group revealed reduced cortical thickness, elevated cortical porosity, and higher trabecular number and thickness. 1-month administration resulted in a similar cortical phenotype but without effect on trabecular bone. Evaluation of fluorochrome binding with confocal microscopy revealed inhibiting effects of 1,25(OH(2D(3 on intracortical bone formation. This study shows negative effects of 1,25(OH(2D(3 on growth plate and bone which may contribute to the exacerbation of MBD in the CKD pediatric patients.

  9. 1,25(OH)2D3 alters growth plate maturation and bone architecture in young rats with normal renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idelevich, Anna; Kerschnitzki, Michael; Shahar, Ron; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat

    2011-01-01

    Whereas detrimental effects of vitamin D deficiency are known over century, the effects of vitamin D receptor activation by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), the principal hormonal form of vitamin D, on the growing bone and its growth plate are less clear. Currently, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) is used in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease and mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) and is strongly associated with growth retardation. Here, we investigate the effect of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) treatment on bone development in normal young rats, unrelated to renal insufficiency. Young rats received daily i.p. injections of 1 µg/kg 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) for one week, or intermittent 3 µg/kg 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) for one month. Histological analysis revealed narrower tibial growth plates, predominantly in the hypertrophic zone of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-treated animals in both experimental protocols. This phenotype was supported by narrower distribution of aggrecan, collagens II and X mRNA, shown by in situ hybridization. Concomitant with altered chondrocyte maturation, 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) increased chondrocyte proliferation and apoptosis in terminal hypertrophic cells. In vitro treatment of the chondrocytic cell line ATDC5 with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) lowered differentiation and increased proliferation dose and time-dependently. Micro-CT analysis of femurs from 1-week 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-treated group revealed reduced cortical thickness, elevated cortical porosity, and higher trabecular number and thickness. 1-month administration resulted in a similar cortical phenotype but without effect on trabecular bone. Evaluation of fluorochrome binding with confocal microscopy revealed inhibiting effects of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) on intracortical bone formation. This study shows negative effects of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) on growth plate and bone which may contribute to the exacerbation of MBD in the CKD pediatric patients.

  10. Cholecystectomy in patients with normal gallbladder function did not alter characteristics in duodenal motility which was not correlated to size of bile acid pool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P V; Mortensen, J; Oster-Jørgensen, E;

    1999-01-01

    Nine gallstone patients with normal gallbladder function as assessed by hepatobiliary scintigraphy were included. Fasting and postprandial duodenal motility were studied before and one month after an uncomplicated laparoscopic cholecystectomy. An ambulatory continuous pressure recording was obtai......Nine gallstone patients with normal gallbladder function as assessed by hepatobiliary scintigraphy were included. Fasting and postprandial duodenal motility were studied before and one month after an uncomplicated laparoscopic cholecystectomy. An ambulatory continuous pressure recording...

  11. Brief Report: Alterations in Cerebral Blood Flow as Assessed by PET/CT in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder with Normal IQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Marco; Manouilenko, Irina; Stone-Elander, Sharon; Odh, Richard; Salmaso, Dario; Hatherly, Robert; Brolin, Fredrik; Jacobsson, Hans; Larsson, Stig A.; Bejerot, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Specific biological markers for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have not yet been established. Functional studies have shown abnormalities in the anatomo-functional connectivity of the limbic-striatal "social" brain. This study aimed to investigate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) at rest. Thirteen patients with ASD of normal intelligence and…

  12. Alterations in vitamin D signaling pathway in gastric cancer progression: a study of vitamin D receptor expression in human normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yanghui; Da, Mingxu; Zhang, Yongbin; Peng, Lingzhi; Yao, Jibin; Duan, Yaoxing

    2015-01-01

    Amount of studies in cells and animal models have proved vitamin D has multifarious antitumor effects. However, epidemiological studies showed inconsistent result on gastric cancer. The antitumor role is mainly mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Our hypothesis is that VDR may be abnormally (poorly) expressed in gastric cancer tissue. Present study is aimed at discovering and analyzing VDR expression in a series of human gastric tissues, including normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissue, and correlated VDR to the clinicopathological parameters of gastric cancer patients. VDR expression was detected by immunohistochemistry. The χ(2) test was used to analyze the VDR expression as well as the relationship between VDR and the clinicopathological factors of gastric cancer patients. Compared with normal (82.61%) and premalignant tissues (73.64%), VDR was lower expressed in cancer tissues (57.61%), with a statistically significant difference (P = 0.001). Among cancer tissues, VDR was higher expressed in well and moderate differentiated tissues contrasted with tissues with poor differentiation, and higher expressed in small tumors (gastric tissues. VDR expression has been on the decline from the premalignant stage, finally low expressed in gastric cancer tissues, especial in poorly differentiated tissues. VDR could be a potential prognostic factor for patients with gastric cancer.

  13. The efficacy of foot orthoses on alteration to center of pressure displacement in subjects with flat and normal feet: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboutorabi, Atefe; Arazpour, Mokhtar; Hutchins, Stephen William; Curran, Sarah; Maleki, Maryam

    2014-04-29

    Abstract Purpose: The aim of this review was to evaluate and compare the effect of foot orthoses on center of pressure (CoP) displacement in healthy patients and those with flat foot. Method: The search strategy was based on the Population Intervention Comparison Outcome (PICO) method. A search was performed in PubMed, Science Direct, Google scholar and ISI web of knowledge databases by using selected keywords. Seventeen articles were selected for final evaluation. The procedure was followed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) method. Result: The results of the literature review demonstrated that there is lack of evidence to show that FOs improve CoP displacement in subjects with flat foot. Conclusion: There is no consistent evidence to prove the efficacy of FOs on altering CoP displacement in healthy subjects but in those with flat foot, FOs decreased CoP excursion. Implications for Rehabilitation Foot orthoses (FOs) have become an integral part of the treatment of injuries of the foot, ankle, and lower extremity. Assessment of FOs effect on the COP displacement can help to provide a better understanding of the body's compensatory mechanisms and their therapeutic effects. There is no consistent evidence to prove the efficacy of FOs on CoP displacement in healthy subjects but in flat foot subjects foot orthoses decreased CoP excursion has been demonstrated.

  14. Viable and morphologically normal boar spermatozoa alter the expression of heat-shock protein genes in oviductal epithelial cells during co-culture in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeste, Marc; Holt, William V; Bonet, Sergi; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E; Lloyd, Rhiannon E

    2014-09-01

    The principal aim of this study was to determine if boar spermatozoa influence the expression of four selected chaperone and heat-shock protein (HSP) genes-namely clusterin (CLU), HSP90AA1, HSPA5, and HSPA8-in oviductal epithelial cells (OECs) during in vitro co-culture. All corresponding proteins of these genes were previously identified in a sperm-interacting, 70-kDa soluble fraction derived from apical plasma membranes of OECs. The present study also sought to determine whether or not: (i) spermatozoa must directly bind to OEC for an effect on gene expression to be elicited and (ii) reproductive and nonreproductive epithelial cell types (LLC-PK1, pig kidney) respond equivalently, in terms of alterations in chaperone and HSP gene expression, during co-culture with sperm. Spermatozoa induced a significant upregulation (P sperm-binding index and on the viability and morphological quality of the bound sperm population. In conclusion, the upregulation of HSP genes caused by direct contact between spermatozoa and OECs, rather than nonreproductive epithelial cells, suggests HSPs could play an integral role in the modulation of sperm function in the oviductal reservoir.

  15. Alterations of diffusion tensor MRI parameters in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease compared with normal brains: possible diagnostic use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chin-Song; Weng, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Wey-Yil [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Division of Movement Disorders,Department of Neurology, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Neuroscience Research Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Linkou (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taoyuan County (China); Cheng, Jur-Shan [Chang Gung University, Clinical Informatics and Medical Statistics Research Center,College of Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Wai, Yau-Yau [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Keelung (China); Chen, Yao-Liang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Linkou (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Keelung (China); Wang, Jiun-Jie [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Neuroscience Research Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Linkou (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taoyuan County (China); Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Medical Imaging Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Taoyuan (China)

    2016-11-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of diffusion tensor imaging in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We examined a total of 126 PD patients (68 males/58 females, mean age: 62.0 ±7.6 years) and 91 healthy controls (43 males/48 females, mean age: 59.8 ±7.2 years). Images were acquired on a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner. The Camino software was used to normalize and parcellate diffusion-weighted images into 90 cerebral regions based on the automatic anatomical labelling template. The minimum, median, and maximum values of the mean/radial/axial diffusivity/fractional anisotropy were determined. The diagnostic performance was assessed by receiver operating characteristic analysis. The associations of imaging parameters with disease severity were tested using Pearson's correlation coefficients after adjustment for disease duration. Compared with healthy controls, PD patients showed increased diffusivity in multiple cortical regions that extended beyond the basal ganglia. An area under curve of 85 % was identified for the maximum values of mean diffusivity in the ipsilateral middle temporal gyrus. The most significant intergroup difference was 26.8 % for the ipsilateral inferior parietal gyrus. The measurement of water diffusion from the parcellated cortex may be clinically useful for the assessment of PD patients. (orig.)

  16. The Ups and Downs of the Posteromedial Cortex: Age- and Amyloid-Related Functional Alterations of the Encoding/Retrieval Flip in Cognitively Normal Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannini, Patrizia; Hedden, Trey; Huijbers, Willem; Ward, Andrew; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Neural networks supporting memory function decline with increasing age. Accumulation of amyloid-β, a histopathological finding in Alzheimer's disease, is a likely contributor. Posteromedial cortices (PMCs) are particularly vulnerable to early amyloid pathology and play a role in both encoding and retrieval processes. The extent to which aging and amyloid influence the ability to modulate activity between these processes within the PMC was investigated by combining positron emission tomography-amyloid imaging with functional magnetic resonance imaging in cognitively normal older and young adults. Young subjects exhibited a marked decrease in activity during encoding and an increase during retrieval (also known as encoding/retrieval “flip”). Impaired ability to modulate activity was associated with increasing age, greater amyloid burden, and worse memory performance. In contrast, the hippocampus showed increased activity during both encoding and retrieval, which was not related to these variables. These findings support a specific link between amyloid pathology and neural dysfunction in PMC and elucidate the underpinnings of age-related memory dysfunction. PMID:22586140

  17. Senescence-Associated Molecular and Epigenetic Alterations in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Cultures from Amniotic Fluid of Normal and Fetus-Affected Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jūratė Savickienė

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human amniotic-fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AF-MSCs are interesting for their multilineage differentiation potential and wide range of therapeutic applications due to the ease of culture expansion. However, MSCs undergo replicative senescence. So far, the molecular mechanisms that underlie fetal diseases and cell senescence are still poorly understood. Here, we analyzed senescence-associated morphologic, molecular, and epigenetic characteristics during propagation of MSCs derived from AF of normal and fetus-affected pregnancy. AF-MSCs cultures from both cell sources displayed quite similar morphology and expression of specific cell surface (CD44, CD90, and CD105 and stemness (Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Rex1 markers but had interindividual variability in proliferation capability and time to reach senescence. Within passages 4 and 8, senescent cultures exhibited typical morphological features, senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, increased levels of p16, and decreased levels of miR-17 and miR-21 but showed differential expression of p21, p53, and ATM dependently on the onset of cell senescence. These differences correlated with changes in the level of chromatin modifiers (DNMT1 and HDAC1 and polycomb group proteins (EZH2, SUZ12, and BMI1 paralleling with changes in the expression of repressive histone marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 and stemness markers (Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Rex1. Therefore epigenetic factors are important for AF-MSCs senescence process that may be related with individuality of donor or a fetus malignancy status.

  18. Time course of lithium-induced alterations in renal and endocrine function in normal and Brattleboro rats with hypothalamic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balment, R J; Jones, I C; Henderson, I W

    1977-04-01

    1. A lithium chloride (1.1 g/kg) supplemented diet was given to Long Evans (LE) and Brattleboro (DI) rats to investigate its actions in the presence (LE) and absence (DI) of vasopressin. 2. During the first 24 h, Li-supplemented LE rats displayed an initial water deficit (drinking less than renal output), increased plasma antidiuretic (ADH) titres and slightly increased plasma renin activities (PRA) and plasma osmolarities. Such changes were qualitatively similar to those seen in rats fed a normal diet, but deprived of water for 24 hours. After 12 days, the Li-supplemented rats had elevated plasma ADH titres, but reduced pituitary oxytocic and antidiuretic activities. 3. The urinary losses of Na, K and Cl exceeded dietary intakes in LE rats on the introduction of the Li-supplement, and the urinary osmolarity fell by 50%. Electrolyte balances were gradually re-established, although drinking and urine production increased in parallel to reach twice the control values by day 12 of the supplement. 4. Aldosterone and corticosterone secretory rates and their peripheral plasma concentrations were unchanged both after 24 h and 28 days of the Li-supplement. 5. Li elicited no water deficit or saluresis in DI rats, and although the polyuria and polydipsia were exacerbated, urinary osmolarity did not change over the 12 day observation period. 6. Li increased Ca excretion in both rat types; after 12 days the PRA of DI but not LE animals were increased. 7. It is concluded that the overall renal actions of Li are tempered by vasopressin rather than adrenocorticosteroids.

  19. Senescence-Associated Molecular and Epigenetic Alterations in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Cultures from Amniotic Fluid of Normal and Fetus-Affected Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savickienė, Jūratė; Baronaitė, Sandra; Zentelytė, Aistė; Treigytė, Gražina

    2016-01-01

    Human amniotic-fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AF-MSCs) are interesting for their multilineage differentiation potential and wide range of therapeutic applications due to the ease of culture expansion. However, MSCs undergo replicative senescence. So far, the molecular mechanisms that underlie fetal diseases and cell senescence are still poorly understood. Here, we analyzed senescence-associated morphologic, molecular, and epigenetic characteristics during propagation of MSCs derived from AF of normal and fetus-affected pregnancy. AF-MSCs cultures from both cell sources displayed quite similar morphology and expression of specific cell surface (CD44, CD90, and CD105) and stemness (Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Rex1) markers but had interindividual variability in proliferation capability and time to reach senescence. Within passages 4 and 8, senescent cultures exhibited typical morphological features, senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, increased levels of p16, and decreased levels of miR-17 and miR-21 but showed differential expression of p21, p53, and ATM dependently on the onset of cell senescence. These differences correlated with changes in the level of chromatin modifiers (DNMT1 and HDAC1) and polycomb group proteins (EZH2, SUZ12, and BMI1) paralleling with changes in the expression of repressive histone marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3) and stemness markers (Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Rex1). Therefore epigenetic factors are important for AF-MSCs senescence process that may be related with individuality of donor or a fetus malignancy status. PMID:27803714

  20. Normal cognitive aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Caroline N; Natelson Love, Marissa C; Triebel, Kristen L

    2013-11-01

    Even those who do not experience dementia or mild cognitive impairment may experience subtle cognitive changes associated with aging. Normal cognitive changes can affect an older adult's everyday function and quality of life, and a better understanding of this process may help clinicians distinguish normal from disease states. This article describes the neurocognitive changes observed in normal aging, followed by a description of the structural and functional alterations seen in aging brains. Practical implications of normal cognitive aging are then discussed, followed by a discussion of what is known about factors that may mitigate age-associated cognitive decline.

  1. Clarifying Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Confusion exists among database textbooks as to the goal of normalization as well as to which normal form a designer should aspire. This article discusses such discrepancies with the intention of simplifying normalization for both teacher and student. This author's industry and classroom experiences indicate such simplification yields quicker…

  2. Birkhoff normalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, H.; Hoveijn, I.; Lunter, G.; Vegter, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Birkhoff normal form procedure is a widely used tool for approximating a Hamiltonian systems by a simpler one. This chapter starts out with an introduction to Hamiltonian mechanics, followed by an explanation of the Birkhoff normal form procedure. Finally we discuss several algorithms for comput

  3. [Spasmodic torticollis, substantiating Manto syndrome, of possible toxic aethiology, with alterations of brainstem acoustic evoked potentials (BAEPs). Treatment with L-5-hydroxytryptophan. Follow up of 18 months, during which high degree resolution of symptoms and normalization of BAEPs took place].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disertori, B; Ducati, A; Piazza, M

    1982-01-01

    A case of very severe spasmodic torticollis observed for 18 months is presented and discussed. Head was so rotated that permitted only backward seeing and compressed brachial plexus between scaleni muscles with sensory, motor and trophic troubles in the hand. A toxic aethiology from parathion is likely. Brainstem Acoustic Evoked Potentials (BAEPs) showed in the beginning abnormal responses, especially as refers to waves originating in the mesencephalon. Therapy with L-5-hydroxytryptophan subdued neurological symptoms; a parallel normalization of BAEPs recording was observed. The Authors propose to call this syndrome (spasmodic torticollis with thoracic outlet syndrome) after the mythical diviner Manto, which Dante Alighieri refers to in his "Divina Commedia" (Inferno, XX, 55 e segg.).

  4. Short-chain fatty acid-supplemented total parenteral nutrition alters intestinal structure, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) mRNA and protein, and proglucagon mRNA abundance in normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappenden, K A; Drozdowski, L A; Thomson, A B; McBurney, M I

    1998-07-01

    Intestinal adaptation is a complex physiologic process that is not completely understood. Intravenous short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) enhance intestinal adaptation after 80% enterectomy in rats. The purpose of this study was to examine rapid responses to SCFA-supplemented total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in the normal small intestine. After jugular catheterization, 31 Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing 258 +/- 3 g) were randomly assigned to receive standard TPN or an isoenergetic, isonitrogenous TPN solution supplemented with SCFAs (TPN+SCFA). Intestinal samples were obtained after 24 or 72 h of nutrient infusion. TPN+SCFA for 24 h increased (P SCFA for 72 h increased (P SCFA infusion and returned to levels seen with control TPN by 72 h. Glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) mRNA was significantly higher (P SCFA groups at both time points when compared with control TPN groups. Ileal GLUT2 protein abundance in the 72-h TPN+SCFA group was significantly higher (P SCFA than after 24 h, whereas the 24- and 72-h TPN groups did not differ. In summary, SCFAs led to rapid changes in ileal proglucagon and glucose transporter expression in rats receiving TPN and provide insights into therapeutic management of individuals with short bowel syndrome or intestinal malabsorption syndromes.

  5. The Aging Prostate Is Never "Normal"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlomm, Thorsten; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We argue against the recently published statement that tumor-specific molecular alterations found in "normal" prostate tissue from cancer patients challenge focal therapy approaches that only target a visible cancer lesion and not the adjacent molecular field.......We argue against the recently published statement that tumor-specific molecular alterations found in "normal" prostate tissue from cancer patients challenge focal therapy approaches that only target a visible cancer lesion and not the adjacent molecular field....

  6. Chlorophyllin significantly reduces benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct formation and alters cytochrome P450 1A1 and 1B1 expression and EROD activity in normal human mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshava, Channa; Divi, Rao L; Einem, Tracey L; Richardson, Diana L; Leonard, Sarah L; Keshava, Nagalakshmi; Poirier, Miriam C; Weston, Ainsley

    2009-03-01

    We hypothesized that chlorophyllin (CHLN) would reduce benzo[a]pyrene-DNA (BP-DNA) adduct levels. Using normal human mammary epithelial cells (NHMECs) exposed to 4 microM BP for 24 hr in the presence or absence of 5 microM CHLN, we measured BP-DNA adducts by chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA). The protocol included the following experimental groups: BP alone, BP given simultaneously with CHLN (BP+CHLN) for 24 hr, CHLN given for 24 hr followed by BP for 24 hr (preCHLN, postBP), and CHLN given for 48 hr with BP added for the last 24 hr (preCHLN, postBP+CHLN). Incubation with CHLN decreased BPdG levels in all groups, with 87% inhibition in the preCHLN, postBP+CHLN group. To examine metabolic mechanisms, we monitored expression by Affymetrix microarray (U133A), and found BP-induced up-regulation of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression, as well as up-regulation of groups of interferon-inducible, inflammation and signal transduction genes. Incubation of cells with CHLN and BP in any combination decreased expression of many of these genes. Using reverse transcription real time PCR (RT-PCR) the maximal inhibition of BP-induced gene expression, >85% for CYP1A1 and >70% for CYP1B1, was observed in the preCHLN, postBP+CHLN group. To explore the relationship between transcription and enzyme activity, the ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay was used to measure the combined CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 activities. BP exposure caused the EROD levels to double, when compared with the unexposed controls. The CHLN-exposed groups all showed EROD levels similar to the unexposed controls. Therefore, the addition of CHLN to BP-exposed cells reduced BPdG formation and CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression, but EROD activity was not significantly reduced.

  7. Detección de isoenzimas sintasas de óxido nítrico (NOS en membrana sinovial de articulaciones metacarpofalángicas equinas normales y con daño macroscópico Detection of nitric oxide synthase isoenzymes (NOS in normal and alterated synovial membrane from equine metacarpophalangeal joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Galleguillos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Se determinó la presencia de isoformas de sintasa del óxido nítrico (NOS en membrana sinovial de articulación metacarpofalángica equina. Se consideró un grupo normal NN (n=13 sin daño observable en las estructuras articulares; grupo NA (n = 8 con la membrana sinovial congestiva; grupo AN (n=10 con el cartílago dañado y membrana sinovial normal; AA (n = 8 con el cartílago y membrana sinovial alterados. La detección de las isoformas de NOS se realizó mediante “Western Blot” utilizando anticuerpos monoclonales. La quimioluminiscencia generada fue medida y expresada en unidades densitométricas relativas (UDR que corresponde a la razón entre los pixeles de cada muestra y de un patrón interno. La NOS I de 145 kDa se encontró en todas las muestras analizadas. La NOS III de 140 kDa se detectó sólo en un porcentaje de las muestras (NN = 77%; NA = 63%; AN = 30%; AA = 100% y no se encontró una diferencia significativa entre los grupos. No se detectó la NOS II en ninguna de las muestras analizadas. Se concluye que la NOS I y NOS III son constitutivas de la membrana sinovial, mientras que la NOS II no se detecta, posiblemente debido a que no existe una inflamación aguda en los grupos analizados.We studied the presence of NOS isoforms in synovial membrane from equine metacarpophalangeal joint. This was considered a normal joint group NN (n = 13 when there was not any visual damage of joint structures. The damaged groups were classified as follows: NA (n = 8 with congestive synovial membrane without cartilage damage; AN (n = 10 cartilage damage and normal synovial membrane and AA (n = 8 those with cartilage damage and congestive synovial membrane. Damaged cartilage showed erosions and multiple wear lines. Detection of NOS isoforms was performed by western blot using monoclonal antibodies. The generated chemiluminescence was measured and expressed in densitometric relative units (DRU that represent the rate between the pixels of each

  8. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... local chapter Join our online community Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) Normal pressure hydrocephalus is a brain disorder ... Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Normal pressure hydrocephalus occurs when excess cerebrospinal fluid ...

  9. Normal and pathologically altered oculomotoric muscles in CT picture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvicala, V.; Balakova, H. (Karlova Univ., Prague (Czechoslovakia). Fakulta Vseobecneho Lekarstvi)

    1984-03-01

    Computerized tomography reliably visualizes oculomotoric muscles, particularly in coronary projection. 21 patients were examined where computerized tomography of the orbit showed disorders of oculomotoric muscles. Thyreoprivic ophthalmopathy (8 patients) was manifest by non-symmetric irregular thickening of muscles, whose density was unhomogeneously higher. In acromegaly (3 patients) the thickening of the muscles was less, affecting all muscles to a similar degree. Inflammatory and tumorous processes always affected only one oculomotoric muscle.

  10. Normalization: A Preprocessing Stage

    OpenAIRE

    Patro, S. Gopal Krishna; Sahu, Kishore Kumar

    2015-01-01

    As we know that the normalization is a pre-processing stage of any type problem statement. Especially normalization takes important role in the field of soft computing, cloud computing etc. for manipulation of data like scale down or scale up the range of data before it becomes used for further stage. There are so many normalization techniques are there namely Min-Max normalization, Z-score normalization and Decimal scaling normalization. So by referring these normalization techniques we are ...

  11. Scapular and rotator cuff muscle activity during arm elevation: a review of normal function and alterations with shoulder impingement Atividade dos músculos escapulares e do manguito rotator durante a elevação do braço: uma revisão da função normal e das alterações na síndrome do impacto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Phadke

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this manuscript is to review current knowledge of how muscle activation and force production contribute to shoulder kinematics in healthy subjects and persons with shoulder impingement. RESULTS: The middle and lower serratus anterior muscles produce scapular upward rotation, posterior tilting, and external rotation. Upper trapezius produces clavicular elevation and retraction. The middle trapezius is primarily a medial stabilizer of the scapula. The lower trapezius assists in medial stabilization and upward rotation of the scapula. The pectoralis minor is aligned to resist normal rotations of the scapula during arm elevation. The rotator cuff is critical to stabilization and prevention of excess superior translation of the humeral head, as well as production of glenohumeral external rotation during arm elevation. Alterations in activation amplitude or timing have been identified across various investigations of subjects with shoulder impingement as compared to healthy controls. These include decreased activation of the middle or lower serratus anterior and rotator cuff, delayed activation of middle and lower trapezius, and increased activation of the upper trapezius and middle deltoid in impingement subjects. In addition, subjects with a short resting length of the pectoralis minor exhibit altered scapular kinematic patterns similar to those found in persons with shoulder impingement. CONCLUSION: These normal muscle functional capabilities and alterations in patient populations should be considered when planning exercise approaches for the rehabilitation of these patients.OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste manuscrito é revisar o conhecimento atual sobre como a ativação muscular e a produção de força contribuem para a cinemática do ombro em indivíduos saudáveis e em pessoas com síndrome do impacto. RESULTADOS: As porções média e inferior do músculo serrátil anterior produzem rotação para cima, inclina

  12. Differential Inequalities, Normality and Quasi-Normality

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xiaojun; Pang, Xuecheng

    2011-01-01

    We prove that if D is a domain in C, alpha>1 and c>0, then the family F of functions meromorphic in D such that |f'(z)|/(1+|f(z)|^alpha)>c for every z in D is normalin D. For alpha=1, the same assumptions imply quasi-normality but not necessarily normality.

  13. Alterações histológicas e imunoistoquímicas em pâncreas de ratos normais e diabéticos tratados com Syzygium cumini Histological and immunohistochemical alterations in the pancreas of normal and diabetic rats treated with Syzygium cumini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deila Rosely Carneiro Schossler

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito da administração oral do extrato da casca de Syzygium cumini sobre o pâncreas de ratos normais e diabéticos. Os animais foram divididos em grupo controle (C, controle tratado (CT, diabético controle (DC e diabético tratado (DT. Os tratados receberam dose diária de 1g kg-1 de peso vivo, durante 30 dias. Os animais foram submetidos à eutanásia e o pâncreas retirado para análise histológica e imunoistoquímica para insulina. Neste estudo observou-se uma diminuição (PThis study verified the effect of Syzygium cumini bark extract on the pancreas of normal and diabetic rats. The animals were allocated into four groups, control (C, treated control (TC, diabetic control (DC and treated diabetic (TD. An aqueous extract from Syzygium cumini bark, was given by gavage in a daily dose of 1g kg-1 of body weight. After a thirty day period, the animals were euthanized and the pancreas taken to imunno-histochemical analysis. A significant decrease in the number and size of islets, citoarchitectural alterations, as well as a severe decrease in the number of positive cells in diabetic animals (p<0.0001 was observed. However, was noticed a no significant difference neither between DC and DT nor C and CT groups. These results indicate that the Syzygium cumini bark extract does not affect significantly the number, size and citoarchitecture of islets, and, it also does not lead to an increase in beta cell number in animals treated with the plant extract.

  14. [Altered states of consciousness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, E P

    2005-01-01

    The review of modern ideas concerning the altered states of consciousness is presented in this article. Various methods of entry into the altered states of consciousness are looked over. It is shown that the altered states of consciousness are insufficiently known, but important aspects of human being existence. The role of investigation of the altered states of consciousness for the creation of integrative scientific conception base is discussed.

  15. Normalization in econometrics

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, James D.; Daniel F. Waggoner; Zha, Tao

    2004-01-01

    The issue of normalization arises whenever two different values for a vector of unknown parameters imply the identical economic model. A normalization does not just imply a rule for selecting which point, among equivalent ones, to call the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE). It also governs the topography of the set of points that go into a small-sample confidence interval associated with that MLE. A poor normalization can lead to multimodal distributions, disjoint confidence intervals, and v...

  16. Normalizers of Irreducible Subfactors

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Roger R; Wiggins, Alan D

    2007-01-01

    We consider normalizers of an irreducible inclusion $N\\subseteq M$ of $\\mathrm{II}_1$ factors. In the infinite index setting an inclusion $uNu^*\\subseteq N$ can be strict, forcing us to also investigate the semigroup of one-sided normalizers. We relate these normalizers of $N$ in $M$ to projections in the basic construction and show that every trace one projection in the relative commutant $N'\\cap $ is of the form $u^*e_Nu$ for some unitary $u\\in M$ with $uNu^*\\subseteq N$. This enables us to identify the normalizers and the algebras they generate in several situations. In particular each normalizer of a tensor product of irreducible subfactors is a tensor product of normalizers modulo a unitary. We also examine normalizers of irreducible subfactors arising from subgroup--group inclusions $H\\subseteq G$. Here the normalizers are the normalizing group elements modulo a unitary from $L(H)$. We are also able to identify the finite trace $L(H)$-bimodules in $\\ell^2(G)$ as double cosets which are also finite union...

  17. Shared values and normality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-hua; PANG Xue-cheng

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between the normality and the shared values for a meromorphic function on the unit disc △.Based on Marty's normality criterion and through a detailed analysis of the meromorphic functions,it is shown that if for every f∈F,f and f(k) share a and b on △ and the zeros of f(z)-a are of multiplicity k≥3,then F is normal on △,where F is a family of meromorphic functions on the unit disc △,and a and b are distinct values.

  18. Normality in analytical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Steve

    2013-12-01

    Although C.G. Jung's interest in normality wavered throughout his career, it was one of the areas he identified in later life as worthy of further research. He began his career using a definition of normality which would have been the target of Foucault's criticism, had Foucault chosen to review Jung's work. However, Jung then evolved his thinking to a standpoint that was more aligned to Foucault's own. Thereafter, the post Jungian concept of normality has remained relatively undeveloped by comparison with psychoanalysis and mainstream psychology. Jung's disjecta membra on the subject suggest that, in contemporary analytical psychology, too much focus is placed on the process of individuation to the neglect of applications that consider collective processes. Also, there is potential for useful research and development into the nature of conflict between individuals and societies, and how normal people typically develop in relation to the spectrum between individuation and collectivity.

  19. Normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrocephalus - occult; Hydrocephalus - idiopathic; Hydrocephalus - adult; Hydrocephalus - communicating; Dementia - hydrocephalus; NPH ... Ferri FF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. In: Ferri FF, ed. ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 648. Rosenberg GA. Brain edema and disorders ...

  20. Normal Functioning Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  1. Monitoring the normal body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Nina Konstantin; Holm, Lotte; Baarts, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : An extensive body of literature is concerned with obese people, risk, and weight management. However, little is known about weight management among people not belonging to the extreme BMI categories. Management of weight among normal-weight and moderately overweight individuals...... provides us with knowledge about how to prevent future overweight or obesity. This paper investigates body size ideals and monitoring practices among normal-weight and moderately overweight people. Methods : The study is based on in-depth interviews combined with observations. 24 participants were...... recruited by strategic sampling based on self-reported BMI 18.5-29.9 kg/m2 and socio-demographic factors. Inductive analysis was conducted. Results : Normal-weight and moderately overweight people have clear ideals for their body size. Despite being normal weight or close to this, they construct a variety...

  2. Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is a potentially reversible neurodegenerative disease commonly characterized by a triad of dementia, gait, and urinary disturbance. Advancements in diagnosis and treatment have aided in properly identifying and improving symptoms in patients. However, a large proportion of iNPH patients remain either undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Using PubMed search engine of keywords “normal pressure hydrocephalus,” “diagnosis,” “shunt treatment,” “biomarkers,” ...

  3. Ratios of Normal Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Marsaglia

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This article extends and amplifies on results from a paper of over forty years ago. It provides software for evaluating the density and distribution functions of the ratio z/w for any two jointly normal variates z,w, and provides details on methods for transforming a general ratio z/w into a standard form, (a+x/(b+y , with x and y independent standard normal and a, b non-negative constants. It discusses handling general ratios when, in theory, none of the moments exist yet practical considerations suggest there should be approximations whose adequacy can be verified by means of the included software. These approximations show that many of the ratios of normal variates encountered in practice can themselves be taken as normally distributed. A practical rule is developed: If a < 2.256 and 4 < b then the ratio (a+x/(b+y is itself approximately normally distributed with mean μ = a/(1.01b − .2713 and variance 2 = (a2 + 1/(b2 + .108b − 3.795 − μ2.

  4. Ratios of Normal Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Marsaglia

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This article extends and amplifies on results from a paper of over forty years ago. It provides software for evaluating the density and distribution functions of the ratio z/w for any two jointly normal variates z,w, and provides details on methods for transforming a general ratio z/w into a standard form, (a+x/(b+y , with x and y independent standard normal and a, b non-negative constants. It discusses handling general ratios when, in theory, none of the moments exist yet practical considerations suggest there should be approximations whose adequacy can be verified by means of the included software. These approximations show that many of the ratios of normal variates encountered in practice can themselves be taken as normally distributed. A practical rule is developed: If a < 2.256 and 4 < b then the ratio (a+x/(b+y is itself approximately normally distributed with mean μ = a/(1.01b - .2713 and variance σ2 = (a2 + 1/(b2 + .108b - 3.795 μ2.

  5. Normalized Information Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Vitanyi, Paul M B; Cilibrasi, Rudi L; Li, Ming

    2008-01-01

    The normalized information distance is a universal distance measure for objects of all kinds. It is based on Kolmogorov complexity and thus uncomputable, but there are ways to utilize it. First, compression algorithms can be used to approximate the Kolmogorov complexity if the objects have a string representation. Second, for names and abstract concepts, page count statistics from the World Wide Web can be used. These practical realizations of the normalized information distance can then be applied to machine learning tasks, expecially clustering, to perform feature-free and parameter-free data mining. This chapter discusses the theoretical foundations of the normalized information distance and both practical realizations. It presents numerous examples of successful real-world applications based on these distance measures, ranging from bioinformatics to music clustering to machine translation.

  6. Normalization of satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hongsuk H.; Elman, Gregory C.

    1990-01-01

    Sets of Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery taken over the Washington, DC metropolitan area during the months of November, March and May were converted into a form of ground reflectance imagery. This conversion was accomplished by adjusting the incident sunlight and view angles and by applying a pixel-by-pixel correction for atmospheric effects. Seasonal color changes of the area can be better observed when such normalization is applied to space imagery taken in time series. In normalized imagery, the grey scale depicts variations in surface reflectance and tonal signature of multi-band color imagery can be directly interpreted for quantitative information of the target.

  7. Epigenetic Alterations in Muscular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Lanzuolo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms, acting via chromatin organization, fix in time and space different transcriptional programs and contribute to the quality, stability, and heritability of cell-specific transcription programs. In the last years, great advances have been made in our understanding of mechanisms by which this occurs in normal subjects. However, only a small part of the complete picture has been revealed. Abnormal gene expression patterns are often implicated in the development of different diseases, and thus epigenetic studies from patients promise to fill an important lack of knowledge, deciphering aberrant molecular mechanisms at the basis of pathogenesis and diseases progression. The identification of epigenetic modifications that could be used as targets for therapeutic interventions could be particularly timely in the light of pharmacologically reversion of pathological perturbations, avoiding changes in DNA sequences. Here I discuss the available information on epigenetic mechanisms that, altered in neuromuscular disorders, could contribute to the progression of the disease.

  8. Genetic alterations in pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Roland M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer of the exocrine pancreas represents the fifth leading cause of cancer death in the Western population with an average survival after diagnosis of 3 to 6 months and a five-year survival rate under 5%. Our understanding of the molecular carcinogenesis has improved in the last few years due to the development of novel molecular biological techniques. Pancreatic cancer is a multi-stage process resulting from the accumulation of genetic changes in the somatic DNA of normal cells. In this article we describe major genetic alterations of pancreatic cancer, mutations in the proto-oncogene K-RAS and the tumor suppressors INK4A, TP53 and DPC4/SMAD4. The accumulation of these genetic changes leads to a profound disturbance in cell cycle regulation and continuous growth. The knowledge of the underlying molecular mechanisms will offer new therapeutic and diagnostic options and hopefully improve the outcome of this aggressive disease.

  9. Normality in Analytical Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Myers

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although C.G. Jung’s interest in normality wavered throughout his career, it was one of the areas he identified in later life as worthy of further research. He began his career using a definition of normality which would have been the target of Foucault’s criticism, had Foucault chosen to review Jung’s work. However, Jung then evolved his thinking to a standpoint that was more aligned to Foucault’s own. Thereafter, the post Jungian concept of normality has remained relatively undeveloped by comparison with psychoanalysis and mainstream psychology. Jung’s disjecta membra on the subject suggest that, in contemporary analytical psychology, too much focus is placed on the process of individuation to the neglect of applications that consider collective processes. Also, there is potential for useful research and development into the nature of conflict between individuals and societies, and how normal people typically develop in relation to the spectrum between individuation and collectivity.

  10. Back to Normal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Xinjiang officials speed up the investigation of July 5 riot suspects and restore social order Life in Urumqi has gone back to normal one month after the July 5 riot that killed nearly 200 people in the capital city of China’s northwestern

  11. Normalized information distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitányi, P.M.B.; Balbach, F.J.; Cilibrasi, R.L.; Li, M.; Emmert-Streib, F.; Dehmer, M.

    2009-01-01

    The normalized information distance is a universal distance measure for objects of all kinds. It is based on Kolmogorov complexity and thus uncomputable, but there are ways to utilize it. First, compression algorithms can be used to approximate the Kolmogorov complexity if the objects have a string

  12. Normalized information distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitányi, P.M.B.; Balbach, F.J.; Cilibrasi, R.L.; Li, M.

    2008-01-01

    The normalized information distance is a universal distance measure for objects of all kinds. It is based on Kolmogorov complexity and thus uncomputable, but there are ways to utilize it. First, compression algorithms can be used to approximate the Kolmogorov complexity if the objects have a string

  13. Quantitative synaptic alterations in human brain during normal aging and in patients with Alzheimer disease%正常增龄及阿尔茨海默病患者脑组织中突触密度改变的定量观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许丹; 胡亚卓; 桂秋萍; 朱明伟; 张红红; 王鲁宁

    2005-01-01

    果:纳入分析脑标本共34例,全部进入分析结果.①光镜下可见突触素免疫反应阳性物质呈大小不等的颗粒,弥散分布于脑皮质、壳核及海马灰质神经毡内,神经细胞、胶质细胞胞体内及血管穿行部位和白质无阳性表达.额叶皮质Ⅱ,Ⅲ层较其他各层密度高,枕叶皮质Ⅳ层密度较其他各层高.②正常老年脑额叶、枕叶、壳核及海马CA3区突触素吸光度与年龄呈负相关(r=-0.688,-0 592,-0458,-0619,P=0.000,0.001,0.014,0.000).③阿尔茨海默病患者海马CA3区突触素吸光度低于正常>75岁病例(0.031 3±0.003 0,0.040 7±0.005 3,Z=-2.997,P=0.001).结论:①脑老化过程中额叶、枕叶及脑海马CA3区与壳核突触密度随年龄增加而下降,尤其是脑额叶、枕叶及脑海马CA3区的这种变化与年龄的相关性更为显著.②阿尔茨海默病患者突触密度较正常增龄病例有所降低,其认知功能减退可能与突触脱失有关.③尸检取材操作均在死亡后8~72 h完成,甲醛固定时间均在6周以上,避免了对突触素稳定性数据的影响.%BACKGROUND: Synaptic density, a key index of structure and function of brain tissues, is related to cognitive function. Synaptic loss occurs during human brain aging and in Alzheimer disease (AD), inducing the changes of synaptic density.OBJECTIVE: To observe quantitative synaptic alterations in human brain and changes of synaptic density in different parts during normal aging so as to compare them with those of AD patients.DESIGN: Sampling survey.SETTING: Senile Neurological Department of General Hospital of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: Pathological data were selected from General Hospital of Chinese PLA from June 1996 to December 2002. Inclusion criteria: had no major nervous system diseases and neuropathological changes. Brain tissues of 28 corpses in normal aging group, 23 males and 5 females aged 23-100 years with an average of (65±22.8) years, were obtained at autopsy.All corpses were divided into

  14. Normality concerning shared values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Let F be a family of meromorphic functions in a plane domain D, and a and b be finite non-zero complex values such that a/b ∈ N \\ {1}. If for every f ∈ F, f(z) = a =■ f (z) = a and f (z) = b =■ f (z) = b, then F is normal. We also construct a non-normal family F of meromorphic functions in the unit disk Δ = {|z| < 1} such that for every f ∈ F, f(z) = m + 1  f (z) = m + 1 and f (z) = 1  f (z) = 1 in Δ, where m is a given positive integer. This answers Problem 5.1 in the works of Gu, Pang and Fang.

  15. Normality concerning shared values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG JianMing

    2009-01-01

    Let F be a family of meromorphic functions in a plane domain D,and a and b be finite non-zero complex values such that a/b ∈ N \\ {1}.If for every f ∈ F,f(z)=a=>(z) = a and f'(z)=b=>f"(z)=b,then F is normal.We also construct a non-normal family F of meromorphic functions in the unit disk △= {|z|<1} such that for every f ∈F,f(z) =m+1f'(z) = m+1and f'(z)=1 f"(z) = 1 in △ A,where m is a given positive integer.This answers Problem 5.1 in the works of Gu,Pang and Fang.

  16. Monitoring the normal body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Nina Konstantin; Holm, Lotte; Baarts, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : An extensive body of literature is concerned with obese people, risk, and weight management. However, little is known about weight management among people not belonging to the extreme BMI categories. Management of weight among normal-weight and moderately overweight individuals...... provides us with knowledge about how to prevent future overweight or obesity. This paper investigates body size ideals and monitoring practices among normal-weight and moderately overweight people. Methods : The study is based on in-depth interviews combined with observations. 24 participants were...... of practices for monitoring their bodies based on different kinds of calculations of weight and body size, observations of body shape, and measurements of bodily firmness. Biometric measurements are familiar to them as are health authorities' recommendations. Despite not belonging to an extreme BMI category...

  17. Normal Order: Combinatorial Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, A I; Blasiak, P; Horzela, A; Penson, K A; Solomon, Allan I.; Duchamp, Gerard; Blasiak, Pawel; Horzela, Andrzej; Penson, Karol A.

    2004-01-01

    A conventional context for supersymmetric problems arises when we consider systems containing both boson and fermion operators. In this note we consider the normal ordering problem for a string of such operators. In the general case, upon which we touch briefly, this problem leads to combinatorial numbers, the so-called Rook numbers. Since we assume that the two species, bosons and fermions, commute, we subsequently restrict ourselves to consideration of a single species, single-mode boson monomials. This problem leads to elegant generalisations of well-known combinatorial numbers, specifically Bell and Stirling numbers. We explicitly give the generating functions for some classes of these numbers. In this note we concentrate on the combinatorial graph approach, showing how some important classical results of graph theory lead to transparent representations of the combinatorial numbers associated with the boson normal ordering problem.

  18. Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant R. Nassar BS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH is a potentially reversible neurodegenerative disease commonly characterized by a triad of dementia, gait, and urinary disturbance. Advancements in diagnosis and treatment have aided in properly identifying and improving symptoms in patients. However, a large proportion of iNPH patients remain either undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Using PubMed search engine of keywords “normal pressure hydrocephalus,” “diagnosis,” “shunt treatment,” “biomarkers,” “gait disturbances,” “cognitive function,” “neuropsychology,” “imaging,” and “pathogenesis,” articles were obtained for this review. The majority of the articles were retrieved from the past 10 years. The purpose of this review article is to aid general practitioners in further understanding current findings on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of iNPH.

  19. Neuroethics beyond Normal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, John R; Giordano, James

    2016-01-01

    An integrated and principled neuroethics offers ethical guidelines able to transcend conventional and medical reliance on normality standards. Elsewhere we have proposed four principles for wise guidance on human transformations. Principles like these are already urgently needed, as bio- and cyberenhancements are rapidly emerging. Context matters. Neither "treatments" nor "enhancements" are objectively identifiable apart from performance expectations, social contexts, and civic orders. Lessons learned from disability studies about enablement and inclusion suggest a fresh way to categorize modifications to the body and its performance. The term "enhancement" should be broken apart to permit recognition of enablements and augmentations, and kinds of radical augmentation for specialized performance. Augmentations affecting the self, self-worth, and self-identity of persons require heightened ethical scrutiny. Reversibility becomes the core problem, not the easy answer, as augmented persons may not cooperate with either decommissioning or displacement into unaccommodating societies. We conclude by indicating how our four principles of self-creativity, nonobsolescence, empowerment, and citizenship establish a neuroethics beyond normal that is better prepared for a future in which humans and their societies are going so far beyond normal.

  20. Alterations in physiology and anatomy during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eng Kien; Tan, Eng Loy

    2013-12-01

    Pregnant women undergo profound anatomical and physiological changes so that they can cope with the increased physical and metabolic demands of their pregnancies. The cardiovascular, respiratory, haematological, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine systems all undergo important physiological alterations and adaptations needed to allow development of the fetus and to allow the mother and fetus to survive the demands of childbirth. Such alterations in anatomy and physiology may cause difficulties in interpreting signs, symptoms, and biochemical investigations, making the clinical assessment of a pregnant woman inevitably confusing but challenging. Understanding these changes is important for every practicing obstetrician, as the pathological deviations from the normal physiological alterations may not be clear-cut until an adverse outcome has resulted. Only with a sound knowledge of the physiology and anatomy changes can the care of an obstetric parturient be safely optimized for a better maternal and fetal outcome.

  1. Music and Alterity Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Martí

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of alterity constitutes an important issue in anthropological research and, therefore, in the study of musical practices, as well. Without it, we could hardly understand other kinds of music situated in different spaces and time from the observer. In order to effectively approach these musical practices, we have to develop strategies to help us reduce as much as possible that which distorts the vision of the other. However, beyond the strictly epistemological and methodological issues, the study of music cannot ignore the ethical question related to the manner in which Western thought has understood and treated the other: through a hierarchical and stereotypical type of thinking based on the condition of otherness. Throughout the article, different alterity procedures are presented and discussed, such as synecdochization, exoticization, undervaluation, overvaluation, misunderstanding and exclusion. Taking these different alterity strategies into account may help us to better understand how the musical other is constructed, used and ultimately instrumentalized.

  2. Attention Alters Perceived Attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Störmer, Viola S; Alvarez, George A

    2016-04-01

    Can attention alter the impression of a face? Previous studies showed that attention modulates the appearance of lower-level visual features. For instance, attention can make a simple stimulus appear to have higher contrast than it actually does. We tested whether attention can also alter the perception of a higher-order property-namely, facial attractiveness. We asked participants to judge the relative attractiveness of two faces after summoning their attention to one of the faces using a briefly presented visual cue. Across trials, participants judged the attended face to be more attractive than the same face when it was unattended. This effect was not due to decision or response biases, but rather was due to changes in perceptual processing of the faces. These results show that attention alters perceived facial attractiveness, and broadly demonstrate that attention can influence higher-level perception and may affect people's initial impressions of one another.

  3. Revisiting the Process of Normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zener, Rita Schaefer

    1999-01-01

    Defines normalization and deviations in child development. Discusses the three different levels in the normalization process. Asserts that guiding the process of normalization should drive the practice of Montessori education. Concludes that whenever there are brief episodes of normalization, the true nature of the child shows itself. (JS)

  4. Normal transmitting boundary conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖振鹏

    1996-01-01

    The multi-transmitting formula (MTF) governed by a single artificial speed is analytically developed into a generalized MTF governed by a few artificial speeds to improve its capacity in simultaneous simulation of several one-way waves propagating at different speeds.The generalized MTF is then discretized and further generalized using the space extrapolation to improve its accuracies in numerical simulation of transient waves at large angles of incidence.The above two successive generalizitions of MTF based on the notion of normal transmission lead to a compact formula of local non-reflecting boundary condition.The formula not only provides a general representation of the major schemes of existing local boundary conditions but can be used to generate new schemes,which combine advantages of different schemes.

  5. Evaluating the Normal Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Marsaglia

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a little table-free C function that evaluates the normal distribution with absolute error less than 8 x 10 -16 . A small extension provides relative error near the limit available in double precision: 14 to 16 digits, the limits determined mainly by the computer's ability to evaluate exp(-t for large t. Results are compared with those provided by calls to erf or erfc functions, the best of which compare favorably, others do not, and all appear to be much more complicated than need be to get either absolute accuracy less than 10-15 or relative accuracy to the exp(-limited 14 to 16 digits. Also provided: A short history of the error function erf and its intended use, as well as, in the "browse files" attachment, various erf or erfc versions used for comparison.

  6. Ressourcenorientierte Diagnostik im Alter

    OpenAIRE

    Forstmeier, Simon; Maercker, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Trotz der im Alter zunehmenden körperlichen, kognitiven und sozialen Verlusten bleibt das subjektive Wohlbefinden relativ stabil. Dies weist auf die vielen Ressourcen älterer Menschen hin. Dieser Artikel stellt für die klinische Ressourcendiagnostik relevante Verfahren vor und erläutert die zugrunde liegenden Konzepte. Berücksichtigt werden Aktivitäten und Erlebnisse als Ressourcen, emotionale Ressourcen (positiver Affekt, Lebenszufriedenheit, Selbstwerterleben, Lebensqualität), motivationale...

  7. AXIAL SKELETAL AND HOX EXPRESSION DOMAIN ALTERATIONS INDUCED BY RETINOIC ACID, VALPROIC ACID AND BROMOXYNIL DURING MURINE DEVELOPMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT Retinoic acid (RA) alters the developmental fate of the axial skeletal anlage. "Anteriorizations" or "posteriorizations", the assumption of characteristics of embryonic areas normally anterior or posterior to the affected tissues, are correlated with altered emb...

  8. Normal labour: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, D

    2000-02-01

    Midwives practice within the normal childbirth paradigm. It is argued that midwives failure to define normality has allowed increasing technicalization and medicalization of the normal physiological process of birth because doctors so closely define abnormality. A concept analysis model is used to clarify what is meant by the term 'normal labour'; the emphasis being on understanding what normal labour is as it applies to midwifery practice today. This analysis highlights the importance of movement and the sequential nature of normal labour, and reveals how this is implicit within the other uses of both the words normal and labour. The final definition of normal labour offered is intended to be complimentary to existing medical determinants of progress of normal labour, because as the body of the text stresses, medical knowledge is fundamentally enmeshed in midwifery care.

  9. Network community structure alterations in adult schizophrenia: identification and localization of alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman-Sinkoff, Dov B; Barch, Deanna M

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of literature suggests functional connectivity alterations in schizophrenia. While findings have been mixed, evidence points towards a complex pattern of hyper-connectivity and hypo-connectivity. This altered connectivity can be represented and analyzed using the mathematical frameworks provided by graph and information theory to represent functional connectivity data as graphs comprised of nodes and edges linking the nodes. One analytic technique in this framework is the determination and analysis of network community structure, which is the grouping of nodes into linked communities or modules. This data-driven technique finds a best-fit structure such that nodes in a given community have greater connectivity with nodes in their community than with nodes in other communities. These community structure representations have been found to recapitulate known neural-systems in healthy individuals, have been used to identify novel functional systems, and have identified and localized community structure alterations in a childhood onset schizophrenia cohort. In the present study, we sought to determine whether community structure alterations were present in an adult onset schizophrenia cohort while stringently controlling for sources of imaging artifacts. Group level average graphs in healthy controls and individuals with schizophrenia exhibited visually similar network community structures and high amounts of normalized mutual information (NMI). However, testing of individual subject community structures identified small but significant alterations in community structure with alterations being driven by changes in node community membership in the somatosensory, auditory, default mode, salience, and subcortical networks.

  10. Raman spectroscopic study of a genetically altered kidney cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Joel; Garcia, Francisco; Centeno, Silvia P.; Joshi, N. V.

    2008-02-01

    A Raman spectroscopic investigation of a genetically altered Human Embryonic Kidney Cell (HEK293) along with a pathologically normal cell has been carried out by a conventional method. The genetic alteration was carried out with a standard protocol by using a Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP). Raman spectra show that there are dramatic differences between the spectrum obtained from a genetically altered cell and that obtained from a pathologically normal cell. The former shows three broad bands; meanwhile the latter shows several sharp peaks corresponding to the ring vibrational modes of Phen, GFP and DNA. The present analysis provides an indication that the force field near Phen located at 64, 65 and 66 was altered during the genetic transformation. The Raman spectrum could be a direct experimental evidence for substantial modifications triggered due to the expression of specific genes.

  11. Combinatorial Maps with Normalized Knot

    CERN Document Server

    Zeps, Dainis

    2010-01-01

    We consider combinatorial maps with fixed combinatorial knot numbered with augmenting numeration called normalized knot. We show that knot's normalization doesn't affect combinatorial map what concerns its generality. Knot's normalization leads to more concise numeration of corners in maps, e.g., odd or even corners allow easy to follow distinguished cycles in map caused by the fixation of the knot. Knot's normalization may be applied to edge structuring knot too. If both are normalized then one is fully and other partially normalized mutually.

  12. Institutionalizing Normal: Rethinking Composition's Precedence in Normal Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinnell, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Composition historians have recently worked to recover histories of composition in normal schools. This essay argues, however, that historians have inadvertently misconstrued the role of normal schools in American education by inaccurately comparing rhetorical education in normal schools to rhetorical education in colleges and universities.…

  13. Normal and pathological altruism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, B J; Rosof, L S

    2001-01-01

    The psychoanalytic literature on altruism is sparse, although much has been written on this topic from a sociobiological perspective. Freud (1917) first described the concept in "Libido Theory and Narcissism." In 1946 Anna Freud coined the term "altruistic surrender" to describe the psychodynamics of altruistic behavior in a group of inhibited individuals who were neurotically driven to do good for others. The usefulness and clinical applicability of this formulation, in conjunction with the frequent coexistence of masochism and altruism, encouraged psychoanalysts to regard all forms of altruism as having masochistic underpinnings. Since then, there has been a conflation of the two concepts in much of the analytic literature. This paper reexamines the psychoanalytic understanding of altruism and proposes an expansion of the concept to include a normal form. Five types of altruism are described: protoaltruism, generative altruism, conflicted altruism, pseudoaltruism, and psychotic altruism. Protoaltruism has biological roots and can be observed in animals. In humans, protoaltruism includes maternal and paternal nurturing and protectiveness. Generative altruism is the nonconflictual pleasure in fostering the success and/or welfare of another. Conflicted altruism is generative altruism that is drawn into conflict, but in which the pleasure and satisfaction of another (a proxy) is actually enjoyed. Pseudoaltruism originates in conflict and serves as a defensive cloak for underlying sadomasochism. Psychotic altruism is defined as the sometimes bizarre forms of caretaking behavior and associated self-denial seen in psychotic individuals, and often based on delusion. We consider Anna Freud's altruistic surrender to combine features of both conflict-laden altruism and pseudoaltruism. Two clinical illustrations are discussed.

  14. Surface normals and barycentric coordinates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullineux Glen

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The normal to a triangular parametric surface is investigated where the parameters used are barycentric coordinates. Formulae for the normal are obtained for non-rational and rational surfaces.

  15. Altered Sensory Feedbacks in Pianist's Dystonia: the altered auditory feedback paradigm and the glove effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Pei-Hsin Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study investigates the effect of altered auditory feedback (AAF in musician's dystonia (MD and discusses whether altered auditory feedback can be considered as a sensory trick in MD. Furthermore, the effect of AAF is compared with altered tactile feedback, which can serve as a sensory trick in several other forms of focal dystonia. Methods: The method is based on scale analysis (Jabusch et al. 2004. Experiment 1 employs synchronization paradigm: 12 MD patients and 25 healthy pianists had to repeatedly play C-major scales in synchrony with a metronome on a MIDI-piano with 3 auditory feedback conditions: 1. normal feedback; 2. no feedback; 3. constant delayed feedback. Experiment 2 employs synchronization-continuation paradigm: 12 MD patients and 12 healthy pianists had to repeatedly play C-major scales in two phases: first in synchrony with a metronome, secondly continue the established tempo without the metronome. There are 4 experimental conditions, among them 3 are the same altered auditory feedback as in Experiment 1 and 1 is related to altered tactile sensory input. The coefficient of variation of inter-onset intervals of the key depressions was calculated to evaluate fine motor control. Results: In both experiments, the healthy controls and the patients behaved very similarly. There is no difference in the regularity of playing between the two groups under any condition, and neither did AAF nor did altered tactile feedback have a beneficial effect on patients’ fine motor control. Conclusions: The results of the two experiments suggest that in the context of our experimental designs, AAF and altered tactile feedback play a minor role in motor coordination in patients with musicians' dystonia. We propose that altered auditory and tactile feedback do not serve as effective sensory tricks and may not temporarily reduce the symptoms of patients suffering from MD in this experimental context.

  16. Selective Induced Altered Coccidians to Immunize and Prevent Enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Microbiomic flora in digestive tract is pivotal to the state of our health and disease. Antibiotics affect GI, control composition of microbiome, and shift equilibrium from health into disease status. Coccidiosis causes gastrointestinal inflammation. Antibiotic additives contaminate animal products and enter food chain, consumed by humans with possible allergic, antibiotic resistance and enigmatic side effects. Purposed study induced nonpathogenic, immunogenic organisms to protect against disease and abolish antibiotics' use in food animals and side effects in man. Diverse species of Coccidia were used as model. Immature organisms were treated with serial purification procedure prior to developmental stages to obtain altered strains. Chicks received oral gavage immunized with serial low doses of normal or altered organisms or sham treatment and were challenged with high infective normal organisms to compare pathogenicity and immunogenicity. Mature induced altered forms of E. tenella and E. necatrix lacked developmental stage of “sporocysts” and contained free sporozoites. In contrast, E. maxima progressed to normal forms or did not mature at all. Animals that received altered forms were considerably protected with higher weight gain and antibody titers against challenge infection compared to those that received normal organisms (p < 0.05). This is the first report to induce selected protective altered organisms for possible preventive measures to minimize antibiotic use in food animals. PMID:27721824

  17. Effects of water immersion on plasma catecholamines in normal humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, M.; Johnson, G.; Denunzio, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in order to determine whether water immersion to the neck (NI) alters plasma catecholamines in normal humans. Eight normal subjects were studied during a seated control study (C) and during 4 hr of NI, and the levels of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) as determined by radioenzymatic assay were measured hourly. Results show that despite the induction of a marked natriuresis and diuresis indicating significant central hypervolemia, NI failed to alter plasma NE or E levels compared with those of either C or the corresponding prestudy 1.5 hr. In addition, the diuresis and natriuresis was found to vary independently of NE. These results indicate that the response of the sympathetic nervous system to acute volume alteration may differ from the reported response to chronic volume expansion.

  18. Short proofs of strong normalization

    OpenAIRE

    Wojdyga, Aleksander

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents simple, syntactic strong normalization proofs for the simply-typed lambda-calculus and the polymorphic lambda-calculus (system F) with the full set of logical connectives, and all the permutative reductions. The normalization proofs use translations of terms and types to systems, for which strong normalization property is known.

  19. Landscape of Genomic Alterations in Cervical Carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is responsible for 10–15% of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide1,2. The etiological role of infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses (HPV) in cervical carcinomas is well established3. Previous studies have implicated somatic mutations in PIK3CA, PTEN, TP53, STK11 and KRAS4–7 as well as several copy number alterations in the pathogenesis of cervical carcinomas8,9. Here, we report whole exome sequencing analysis of 115 cervical carcinoma-normal paired samples, tran...

  20. MICROSATELLITE ALTERATION AND ITS CHARACTERISTICS IN COLORECTAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To determine the role of microsatellite alterations incarcinogenesis of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Methods: Alterations of 10 microsatellite loci from 5 different chromosomes were detected in 92 colorectal cancers and their paired normal mucosa by PCR, denatured polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. Associations of microsatellite alterations with clinopathologic parameters were statistically clarified.Results: Alterations of microsatellite were classified into microsatellite instability type I, type II and loss of heterozygosity (LOH). The carcinoma with ≥30% loci microsatellite alterations was defined as replication error(RER) positive tumors. Of 92 cases, 14 were RER+. Microsatellite alterations of P53(1) and D18S363 loci (64.29% ) was most commonly identified in the RER+ tumors. RER+ were more commonly seen in poorly differentiated carcinomas and tended to occur in mucoid carcinomas. The type of microsatellite alterations varied in different histological types of CRC. Conclusions: Microsatellite alteration is a common molecular event in CRC. Different microsatellite loci showed various biologic significance. P53(1) and D18S363 should be essentially detected loci that can show the RER status of tumors.

  1. Music alters visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Jolij

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual perception is not a passive process: in order to efficiently process visual input, the brain actively uses previous knowledge (e.g., memory and expectations about what the world should look like. However, perception is not only influenced by previous knowledge. Especially the perception of emotional stimuli is influenced by the emotional state of the observer. In other words, how we perceive the world does not only depend on what we know of the world, but also by how we feel. In this study, we further investigated the relation between mood and perception. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We let observers do a difficult stimulus detection task, in which they had to detect schematic happy and sad faces embedded in noise. Mood was manipulated by means of music. We found that observers were more accurate in detecting faces congruent with their mood, corroborating earlier research. However, in trials in which no actual face was presented, observers made a significant number of false alarms. The content of these false alarms, or illusory percepts, was strongly influenced by the observers' mood. CONCLUSIONS: As illusory percepts are believed to reflect the content of internal representations that are employed by the brain during top-down processing of visual input, we conclude that top-down modulation of visual processing is not purely predictive in nature: mood, in this case manipulated by music, may also directly alter the way we perceive the world.

  2. Genetic Alterations in Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bralten, Linda B. C.; French, Pim J., E-mail: p.french@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Neurology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Dr Molewaterplein 50, 3000 CA, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-03-07

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumor and have a dismal prognosis. Understanding the genetic alterations that drive glioma formation and progression may help improve patient prognosis by identification of novel treatment targets. Recently, two major studies have performed in-depth mutation analysis of glioblastomas (the most common and aggressive subtype of glioma). This systematic approach revealed three major pathways that are affected in glioblastomas: The receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway, the TP53 pathway and the pRB pathway. Apart from frequent mutations in the IDH1/2 gene, much less is known about the causal genetic changes of grade II and III (anaplastic) gliomas. Exceptions include TP53 mutations and fusion genes involving the BRAF gene in astrocytic and pilocytic glioma subtypes, respectively. In this review, we provide an update on all common events involved in the initiation and/or progression across the different subtypes of glioma and provide future directions for research into the genetic changes.

  3. Landscape of Genomic Alterations in Cervical Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Lichtenstein, Lee; Freeman, Samuel S.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Imaz-Rosshandler, Ivan; Pugh, Trevor J.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Ambrogio, Lauren; Cibulskis, Kristian; Bertelsen, Bjørn; Romero-Cordoba, Sandra; Treviño, Victor; Vazquez-Santillan, Karla; Guadarrama, Alberto Salido; Wright, Alexi A.; Rosenberg, Mara W.; Duke, Fujiko; Kaplan, Bethany; Wang, Rui; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Walline, Heather M.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Stewart, Chip; Carter, Scott L.; McKenna, Aaron; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Iram P.; Espinosa-Castilla, Magali; Woie, Kathrine; Bjorge, Line; Wik, Elisabeth; Halle, Mari K.; Hoivik, Erling A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Gabiño, Nayeli Belem; Gómez-Macías, Gabriela Sofia; Valdez-Chapa, Lezmes D.; Garza-Rodríguez, María Lourdes; Maytorena, German; Vazquez, Jorge; Rodea, Carlos; Cravioto, Adrian; Cortes, Maria L.; Greulich, Heidi; Crum, Christopher P.; Neuberg, Donna S.; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Escareno, Claudia Rangel; Akslen, Lars A.; Carey, Thomas E.; Vintermyr, Olav K.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A.; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Getz, Gad; Salvesen, Helga B.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is responsible for 10–15% of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide1,2. The etiological role of infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses (HPV) in cervical carcinomas is well established3. Previous studies have implicated somatic mutations in PIK3CA, PTEN, TP53, STK11 and KRAS4–7 as well as several copy number alterations in the pathogenesis of cervical carcinomas8,9. Here, we report whole exome sequencing analysis of 115 cervical carcinoma-normal paired samples, transcriptome sequencing of 79 cases and whole genome sequencing of 14 tumor-normal pairs. Novel somatic mutations in 79 primary squamous cell carcinomas include recurrent E322K substitutions in the MAPK1 gene (8%), inactivating mutations in the HLA-B gene (9%), and mutations in EP300 (16%), FBXW7 (15%), NFE2L2 (4%) TP53 (5%) and ERBB2 (6%). We also observed somatic ELF3 (13%) and CBFB (8%) mutations in 24 adenocarcinomas. Squamous cell carcinomas had higher frequencies of somatic mutations in the Tp*C dinucleotide context than adenocarcinomas. Gene expression levels at HPV integration sites were significantly higher in tumors with HPV integration compared with expression of the same genes in tumors without viral integration at the same site. These data demonstrate several recurrent genomic alterations in cervical carcinomas that suggest novel strategies to combat this disease. PMID:24390348

  4. Plasma sialic acid alterations in neoplastic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, C; Dixit, M; Kumar, S S; Reddy, H; Semenya, K A; Hardy, R E

    1987-01-01

    The several types of neoplastic transformations are accompanied by alterations in the composition of cell glycoproteins, which are major structural components of cell surfaces. One such observed alteration is in the level of sialic acid on the cell surface. In the present investigation, plasma sialic acid levels were measured in normal volunteers and neoplastic patients using thiobarbituric acid spectrophotometric methods. The mean plasma sialic acid level from 124 normal volunteers was 3.0 mumol/ml. The mean for 20 non-malignant patients was 3.2 mumol/ml. Such observed mean values of sialic acid were 3.7 mumol/ml in 64 breast cancer patients, 5.1 mumol/ml in 22 lung cancer patients, 4.1 mumol/ml in 20 colon patients, and 5.0 mumol/ml in 26 patients having ovarian, cervix, pancreas, prostate, thyroid, uterine, squamous cell, esophageal and endometrial cancers. Serial determinations of plasma sialic acid in 15 patients correlated well with the progression and regression of disease. These results indicate that plasma sialic acid levels are elevated over control levels in the different types of cancer patients studied. Assay of plasma sialic acid is not sensitive enough to be used for screening, but could be used as a prognostic determinant in a variety of neoplastic conditions.

  5. Surfaces parametrised by the normals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    the origin to the tangent plane and the surface is simply considered as the envelope of its family of tangent planes. Suppose we are given points and normals and we want a C^k-surface interpolating these data. The data gives the value and gradients of the support function at certain points (the given normals...

  6. Normal family of quasimeromorphic mappings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Daochun(孙道椿); YANG; Lo(杨乐)

    2003-01-01

    The more general quasimeromorphic mappings are studied with the geometric method. The necessary and sufficient conditions for the normality of the family of quasimeromorphic mappings are discussed. We proved two inequalities on the covering surface and obtained some normal criteria on quasimeromorphic mappings with them. Obviously, these criteria hold for meromorphic functions.

  7. Normal BGG solutions and polynomials

    CERN Document Server

    Cap, A; Hammerl, M

    2012-01-01

    First BGG operators are a large class of overdetermined linear differential operators intrinsically associated to a parabolic geometry on a manifold. The corresponding equations include those controlling infinitesimal automorphisms, higher symmetries, and many other widely studied PDE of geometric origin. The machinery of BGG sequences also singles out a subclass of solutions called normal solutions. These correspond to parallel tractor fields and hence to (certain) holonomy reductions of the canonical normal Cartan connection. Using the normal Cartan connection, we define a special class of local frames for any natural vector bundle associated to a parabolic geometry. We then prove that the coefficient functions of any normal solution of a first BGG operator with respect to such a frame are polynomials in the normal coordinates of the parabolic geometry. A bound on the degree of these polynomials in terms of representation theory data is derived. For geometries locally isomorphic to the homogeneous model of ...

  8. Tumor vessel normalization after aerobic exercise enhances chemotherapeutic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadler, Keri L; Thomas, Nicholas J; Galie, Peter A; Bhang, Dong Ha; Roby, Kerry C; Addai, Prince; Till, Jacob E; Sturgeon, Kathleen; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Chen, Christopher S; Ryeom, Sandra

    2016-10-04

    Targeted therapies aimed at tumor vasculature are utilized in combination with chemotherapy to improve drug delivery and efficacy after tumor vascular normalization. Tumor vessels are highly disorganized with disrupted blood flow impeding drug delivery to cancer cells. Although pharmacologic anti-angiogenic therapy can remodel and normalize tumor vessels, there is a limited window of efficacy and these drugs are associated with severe side effects necessitating alternatives for vascular normalization. Recently, moderate aerobic exercise has been shown to induce vascular normalization in mouse models. Here, we provide a mechanistic explanation for the tumor vascular normalization induced by exercise. Shear stress, the mechanical stimuli exerted on endothelial cells by blood flow, modulates vascular integrity. Increasing vascular shear stress through aerobic exercise can alter and remodel blood vessels in normal tissues. Our data in mouse models indicate that activation of calcineurin-NFAT-TSP1 signaling in endothelial cells plays a critical role in exercise-induced shear stress mediated tumor vessel remodeling. We show that moderate aerobic exercise with chemotherapy caused a significantly greater decrease in tumor growth than chemotherapy alone through improved chemotherapy delivery after tumor vascular normalization. Our work suggests that the vascular normalizing effects of aerobic exercise can be an effective chemotherapy adjuvant.

  9. Normal families of meromorphic functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Chao-wei; WANG Yong-jun

    2007-01-01

    A normal theorem concerning meromorphic functions sharing values was proved with the method of Zalcman-Pang.The theorem is as follows.If for each f in F,all zeros of f-a have multiplicity at least k(k≥2),f and its k-th derivative function share a,and if f=b whenever its k-th denvative equal b,then F is normal in D.This theorem improved the result of Chen and Fang[Chen HH,Fang ML,Shared values and normal families of meromorphic functions,Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications,2001,260:124-1 32].

  10. Normality Criteria of Meromorphic Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qiong; Yuan Wen-jun; Chen Wei; Tian Hong-gen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider normality criteria for a family of meromorphic functions concerning shared values. Let F be a family of meromorphic functions defined in a domain D, m, n, k and d be four positive integers satisfying m≥n+2 and d≥ k+1m−n−1 , and a(̸=0), b be two finite constants. Suppose that every f ∈F has all its zeros and poles of multiplicity at least k and d, respectively. If (fn)(k)−afm and (gn)(k)−agm share the value b for every pair of functions (f, g) of F, then F is normal in D. Our results improve the related theorems of Schwick (Schwick W. Normality criteria for families of meromorphic function. J. Anal. Math., 1989, 52:241–289), Li and Gu (Li Y T, Gu Y X. On normal families of meromorphic functions. J. Math. Anal. Appl., 2009, 354: 421–425).

  11. Fedosov supermanifolds: II. Normal coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Geyer, B; Geyer, Bodo; Lavrov, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The study of recently introduced Fedosov supermanifolds is continued. Using normal coordinates, properties of even and odd symplectic supermanifolds endowed with a symmetric connection respecting given sympletic structure are studied.

  12. Presenting Thin Media Models Affects Women's Choice of Diet or Normal Snacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahe, Barbara; Krause, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Our study explored the influence of thin- versus normal-size media models and of self-reported restrained eating behavior on women's observed snacking behavior. Fifty female undergraduates saw a set of advertisements for beauty products showing either thin or computer-altered normal-size female models, allegedly as part of a study on effective…

  13. Low normal thyroid function as a determinant of increased large very low density lipoprotein particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tienhoven-Wind, Lynnda; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Low-normal thyroid function may relate to increases in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, but effects on lipoprotein subfractions are largely unknown. Associations of alterations in lipoprotein metabolism and functionality with low-normal thyroid function could be more pronounced in T

  14. Immoral, deviant, or just normal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary research often relates driving under the influence (DUI) to alcohol addiction and young drunk drivers, in particular, to social deviance. Based on qualitative interviews with 25 convicted drunk drivers, this article studies the relationship between drinking and DUI. The article focus...... themselves and their relationship between drinking and DUI as normal. The article thus concludes that while some drunk drivers view themselves in line with popular conceptions of DUI, others distance themselves from these associations so as to present themselves as normal....

  15. Is normal science good science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianna Kępińska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available “Normal science” is a concept introduced by Thomas Kuhn in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (1962. In Kuhn’s view, normal science means “puzzle solving”, solving problems within the paradigm—framework most successful in solving current major scientific problems—rather than producing major novelties. This paper examines Kuhnian and Popperian accounts of normal science and their criticisms to assess if normal science is good. The advantage of normal science according to Kuhn was “psychological”: subjective satisfaction from successful “puzzle solving”. Popper argues for an “intellectual” science, one that consistently refutes conjectures (hypotheses and offers new ideas rather than focus on personal advantages. His account is criticized as too impersonal and idealistic. Feyerabend’s perspective seems more balanced; he argues for a community that would introduce new ideas, defend old ones, and enable scientists to develop in line with their subjective preferences. The paper concludes that normal science has no one clear-cut set of criteria encompassing its meaning and enabling clear assessment.

  16. Genetic alteration in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoo Chul; Kang, Tae Woong; Lee, Jin Oh [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Cancer of stomach, colon and liver are a group of the most common cancer in Korea. However, results with current therapeutic modalities are still unsatisfactory. The intensive efforts have been made to understand basic pathogenesis and to find better therapeutic tools for the treatment of this miserable disease. We studied the alteration of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in hepatocellular carcinoma in Korea. We found that alteration of Rb gene, APC were 33 %, 13 % respectively. But alterations of oncogenes such as myc, ras and mdm2 were rarely found. Our results suggests that HBV may act as oncogenic role in hepatocarcinogenesis instead of oncogenes. 6 figs, 2 tabs. (Author).

  17. Epigenetic alterations in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In-Seon CHOI; Tsung-Teh WU

    2005-01-01

    Gastric cancer is believed to result in part from the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations leading to oncogene overexpression and tumor suppressor loss. Epigenetic alterations as a distinct and crucial mechanism to silence a variety of methylated tissue-specific and imprinted genes, have been extensively studied in gastric carcinoma and play important roles in gastric carcinogenesis. This review will briefly discuss the basic aspects of DNA methylation and CpG island methylation, in particular the epigenetic alterations of certain critical genes implicated in gastric carcinogenesis and its relevance of clinical implications.

  18. Groupoid normalizers of tensor products

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Junsheng; White, Stuart A; Wiggins, Alan D

    2008-01-01

    We consider an inclusion $B\\subseteq M$ of finite von Neumann algebras satisfying $B'\\cap M\\subseteq B$. A partial isometry $v\\in M$ is called a groupoid normalizer if $vBv^*, v^*Bv\\subseteq B$. Given two such inclusions $B_i\\subseteq M_i$, $i=1,2$, we find approximations to the groupoid normalizers of $B_1 \\vnotimes B_2$ in $M_1\\vnotimes M_2$, from which we deduce that the von Neumann algebra generated by the groupoid normalizers of the tensor product is equal to the tensor product of the von Neumann algebras generated by the groupoid normalizers. Examples are given to show that this can fail without the hypothesis $B_i'\\cap M_i\\subseteq B_i$, $i=1,2$. We also prove a parallel result where the groupoid normalizers are replaced by the intertwiners, those partial isometries $v\\in M$ satisfying $vBv^*\\subseteq B$ and $v^*v, vv^*\\in B$.

  19. Normal probability plots with confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantarangsi, Wanpen; Liu, Wei; Bretz, Frank; Kiatsupaibul, Seksan; Hayter, Anthony J; Wan, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Normal probability plots are widely used as a statistical tool for assessing whether an observed simple random sample is drawn from a normally distributed population. The users, however, have to judge subjectively, if no objective rule is provided, whether the plotted points fall close to a straight line. In this paper, we focus on how a normal probability plot can be augmented by intervals for all the points so that, if the population distribution is normal, then all the points should fall into the corresponding intervals simultaneously with probability 1-α. These simultaneous 1-α probability intervals provide therefore an objective mean to judge whether the plotted points fall close to the straight line: the plotted points fall close to the straight line if and only if all the points fall into the corresponding intervals. The powers of several normal probability plot based (graphical) tests and the most popular nongraphical Anderson-Darling and Shapiro-Wilk tests are compared by simulation. Based on this comparison, recommendations are given in Section 3 on which graphical tests should be used in what circumstances. An example is provided to illustrate the methods.

  20. Microstructural, densitometric and metabolic variations in bones from rats with normal or altered skeletal states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew N Luu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High resolution μCT, and combined μPET/CT have emerged as non-invasive techniques to enhance or even replace dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA as the current preferred approach for fragility fracture risk assessment. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of µPET/CT imaging to differentiate changes in rat bone tissue density and microstructure induced by metabolic bone diseases more accurately than current available methods. METHODS: Thirty three rats were divided into three groups of control, ovariectomy and vitamin-D deficiency. At the conclusion of the study, animals were subjected to glucose ((18FDG and sodium fluoride (Na(18F PET/CT scanning. Then, specimens were subjected to µCT imaging and tensile mechanical testing. RESULTS: Compared to control, those allocated to ovariectomy and vitamin D deficiency groups showed 4% and 22% (significant increase in (18FDG uptake values, respectively. DXA-based bone mineral density was higher in the vitamin D deficiency group when compared to the other groups (cortical bone, yet μCT-based apparent and mineral density results were not different between groups. DXA-based bone mineral density was lower in the ovariectomy group when compared to the other groups (cancellous bone; yet μCT-based mineral density results were not different between groups, and the μCT-based apparent density results were lower in the ovariectomy group compared to the other groups. CONCLUSION: PET and micro-CT provide an accurate three-dimensional measurement of the changes in bone tissue mineral density, as well as microstructure for cortical and cancellous bone and metabolic activity. As osteomalacia is characterized by impaired bone mineralization, the use of densitometric analyses may lead to misinterpretation of the condition as osteoporosis. In contrast, µCT alone and in combination with the PET component certainly provides an accurate three-dimensional measurement of the changes in both bone tissue mineral density, as well as microstructure for cortical and cancellous bone and metabolic activity.

  1. Normal Skin Microbiota is Altered in Pre-clinical Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ring, Hans Christian; Bay, Lene; Kallenbach, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    therefore hypothesized that clinically unaffected HS skin would also have an increased presence of biofilm compared with that of healthy controls. We conducted a case-control study, investigating the morphology of the axillary skin microbiota. Peptide nucleic acid – fluorescence in situ hybridization probes...... were used in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Significant differences were found in both distribution and quantity of the cutaneous microbiota in clinically non-affected axillary skin of patients with HS compared with healthy controls. Surprisingly, we detected fewer bacteria...... and less biofilm in patients with HS. The reduced microbiota in patients with HS may play an important role in the early course of the disease....

  2. Normal Skin Microbiota is Altered in Pre-clinical Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Hans Christian; Bay, Lene; Kallenbach, Klaus; Miller, Iben M; Prens, Errol; Saunte, Ditte M; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2017-02-08

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease defined by recurrent nodules, tunnels (sinus tracts) and scarring involving the intertriginous regions. The clinical course of HS is compatible with a biofilm-driven disease, and biofilm has been described in lesional HS skin. We therefore hypothesized that clinically unaffected HS skin would also have an increased presence of biofilm compared with that of healthy controls. We conducted a case-control study, investigating the morphology of the axillary skin microbiota. Peptide nucleic acid - fluorescence in situ hybridization probes were used in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Significant differences were found in both distribution and quantity of the cutaneous microbiota in clinically non-affected axillary skin of patients with HS compared with healthy controls. Surprisingly, we detected fewer bacteria and less biofilm in patients with HS. The reduced microbiota in patients with HS may play an important role in the early course of the disease.

  3. Special Features in Regulating Respiration Under Normal Conditions and Conditions of Altered Gas Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-25

    brain are made reference to I1 P. Pavlov’s article about ’alimentary center* (1910-1911) forgetting to mention that, first, in this article I. P...can for some time be impulse source. As a means of switching on afferent impulses we [23] resorted to blockade of adreno-choline and serotonin -rIrt-*ve...respiratory center can be reduced, by introducing into blood stream, or better yet, into spinal artery, no."drenaline, adrenaline, serotonin , DOC

  4. Glomerular hemodynamic alterations during acute hyperinsulinemia in normal and diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, B. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Thies, R. S.; Collins, R. C.; Blantz, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of insulin dependent diabetes invariably requires exogenous insulin to control blood glucose. Insulin treatment, independent of other factors associated with insulin dependent diabetes, may induce changes that affect glomerular function. Due to exogenous delivery of insulin in insulin dependent diabetes entering systemic circulation prior to the portal vein, plasma levels of insulin are often in excess of that observed in non-diabetics. The specific effects of hyperinsulinemia on glomerular hemodynamics have not been previously examined. Micropuncture studies were performed in control (non-diabetic), untreated diabetic and insulin-treated diabetic rats 7 to 10 days after administration of 65 mg/kg body weight streptozotocin. After the first period micropuncture measurements were obtained, 5 U of regular insulin (Humulin-R) was infused i.v., and glucose clamped at euglycemic values (80 to 120 mg/dl). Blood glucose concentration in non-diabetic controls was 99 +/- 6 mg/dl. In control rats, insulin infusion and glucose clamp increased nephron filtration rate due to decreases in both afferent and efferent arteriolar resistance (afferent greater than efferent) resulting in increased plasma flow and increased glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient. However, insulin infusion and glucose clamp produced the opposite effect in both untreated and insulin-treated diabetic rats with afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction resulting in decreases in plasma flow, glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient and nephron filtration rate. Thromboxane A2 (TX) synthetase inhibition partially decreased the vasoconstrictive response due to acute insulin infusion in diabetic rats preventing the decrease in nephron filtration rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  5. Moderate dietary salt restriction does not alter insulin resistance or serum lipids in normal men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, A; Braatvedt, G; Holdaway, I

    1996-04-01

    Dietary salt restriction lowers blood pressure and has been advocated as a population-based strategy to reduce the cardiovascular morbidity associated with hypertension. However, the effect of lowering salt intake on metabolic vascular risk factors such as insulin resistance and levels of atherogenic lipids and fasting insulin is uncertain. We have studied the short-term effect of moderate dietary salt restriction on insulin resistance and serum lipids in 34 nonobese (body mass index [mean +/- SD] 23.4 +/- 1.8 kg/m2), normotensive young white men. Subjects were maintained on a low salt diet ( fashion, each subject also received 120 mmol of sodium chloride per day during one of the study weeks, and a matching placebo during the other. Insulin resistance, serum insulin, lipids, and blood pressure were measured in the fasting state at the end of each study week. Urinary sodium excretion (185 +/- 46 v 52 +/- 25 mmol/day, P < .001), serum sodium (141.2 +/- 1.2 v 140.1 +/- 1.3 mmol/L, P < .001) and body weight (75.4 +/- 9.1 v 75.0 +/- 9.3 kg, P < .05) were higher during the high salt than the low salt period. Serum creatinine was higher during the low salt period (100 +/- 8 v 90 +/- 9 mumols/L, P < .01). There was no difference in blood pressure, insulin resistance, serum insulin, C-peptide, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol or its subfractions, triglycerides, apolipoprotein A1, or apolipoprotein B between the high salt and low salt periods. We conclude that short-term, moderate dietary salt restriction does not adversely affect insulin sensitivity or levels of atherogenic lipids in normotensive nonobese men.

  6. 3j Symbols: To Normalize or Not to Normalize?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veenendaal, Michel

    2011-01-01

    The systematic use of alternative normalization constants for 3j symbols can lead to a more natural expression of quantities, such as vector products and spherical tensor operators. The redefined coupling constants directly equate tensor products to the inner and outer products without any additional square roots. The approach is extended to…

  7. Conductivity Modulation in a gated Normal-CDW-Normal configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Saumya; Lake, Roger

    There is considerable interest in switching by exploiting a voltage controlled phase transition, and one such phase is the charge density wave phase that occurs in a number of quasi one dimensional and two dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides. Voltage controlled switching of the charge density wave transition in 1T-TaS2 has recently been demonstrated. We consider a transistor geometry with normal metal contacts and a channel of CDW material. The interaction is modeled with a negative U Hubbard term. Normal-CDW-temperature-U phase diagrams show the regime of the CDW in the ideal lattice. The wavelength of the CDW in the transistor channel is determined by both the conditions of Fermi surface nesting and also the condition of commensurability with the channel length between the two normal leads. Moving the Fermi level of the channel first results in phase boundaries within the CDW as the conditions of commensurability and Fermi surface nesting become incompatible. Moving the Fermi level from half filling by few tens of meV causes a collapsing of the CDW gap and an effective CDW-normal transition, leaving vestiges of the CDW in the channel. The transition is accompanied by one to two orders of magnitude increase in the conductivity. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant No. 1124733 and the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) Nanoelectronic Research Initiative as a part of the Nanoelectronics for 2020 and Beyond (NEB-2020) program.

  8. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0523 TITLE: Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: George Tsokos, M.D. CONTRACTING...Activation Alters Platelet Function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0523 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) George Tsokos, M.D...a decreased level of disease. Further studies will expand upon these observations better outlining the function of platelets in the injury associated

  9. Mechanical stratigraphy and normal faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrill, David A.; Morris, Alan P.; McGinnis, Ronald N.; Smart, Kevin J.; Wigginton, Sarah S.; Hill, Nicola J.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stratigraphy encompasses the mechanical properties, thicknesses, and interface properties of rock units. Although mechanical stratigraphy often relates directly to lithostratigraphy, lithologic description alone does not adequately describe mechanical behavior. Analyses of normal faults with displacements of millimeters to 10's of kilometers in mechanically layered rocks reveal that mechanical stratigraphy influences nucleation, failure mode, fault geometry, displacement gradient, displacement distribution, fault core and damage zone characteristics, and fault zone deformation processes. The relationship between normal faulting and mechanical stratigraphy can be used either to predict structural style using knowledge of mechanical stratigraphy, or conversely to interpret mechanical stratigraphy based on characterization of the structural style. This review paper explores a range of mechanical stratigraphic controls on normal faulting illustrated by natural and modeled examples.

  10. The construction of normal expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quitzau, Maj-Britt; Røpke, Inge

    2008-01-01

    The gradual upward changes of standards in normal everyday life have significant environmental implications, and it is therefore important to study how these changes come about. The intention of the article is to analyze the social construction of normal expectations through a case study. The case...... concerns the present boom in bathroom renovations in Denmark, which offers an excellent opportunity to study the interplay between a wide variety of consumption drivers and social changes pointing toward long-term changes of normal expectations regarding bathroom standards. The study is problemoriented...... and transdisciplinary and draws on a wide range of sociological, anthropological, and economic theories. The empirical basis comprises a combination of statistics, a review of magazine and media coverage, visits to exhibitions, and qualitative interviews. A variety of consumption drivers are identified. Among...

  11. Glaucoma de pressão normal Normal tension glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Maynart Tavares

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available O glaucoma de pressão normal é neuropatia óptica caracterizada por diminuição da camada de fibras nervosas da retina, aumento da relação escavação/disco e defeito de campo visual, porém sem evidência de aumento da pressão intra-ocular. Os pacientes com glaucoma de pressão normal constituem um grupo heterogêneo em que várias condições sistêmicas podem ser encontradas e apresentam sinais clínicos oculares somente facilmente identificados nos estágios muito avançados da doença. E seu tratamento apresenta desafios maiores do que os existentes no tratamento dos glaucomas hipertensivos. O presente texto propõe uma revisão da patogênese e do diagnóstico diferencial, discutindo os aspectos vasculares, reumáticos, neurológicos e genéticos que devem ser investigados, assim como do tratamento dessa doença. Os autores pesquisaram os bancos de dados do PubMed (MEDLINE, LILACS e Cochrane Library (CENTRAL.Normal tension glaucoma is an optic neuropathy in which the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness is reduced, the optic nerve is pathologically excavated, and the visual field is disturbed, although intraocular pressure is classified as normal. Patients with normal tension glaucoma are a heterogeneous group in which many systemic pathologic conditions may be present, and presenting ocular clinical signs that are difficult to be identified in the early stages of the disease. Treatment is more challenging than in hypertensive glaucomas. The authors sought to review the pathophysiology and differential diagnosis of this condition assessing vascular, rheumatic, neurological and genetic aspects that should be studied, as well as its treatment. The sources of references are PubMed (MEDLINE, LILACS and Cochrane Library (CENTRAL databases.

  12. Saccadic Alterations in Severe Developmental Dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Pensiero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is not sure if persons with dyslexia have ocular motor deficits in addition to their deficits in rapid visual information processing. A 15-year-old boy afflicted by severe dyslexia was submitted to saccadic eye movement recording. Neurological and ophthalmic examinations were normal apart from the presence of an esophoria for near and slightly longer latencies of pattern visual evoked potentials. Subclinical saccadic alterations were present, which could be at the basis of the reading pathology: (1 low velocities (and larger durations of the adducting saccades of the left eye with undershooting and long-lasting postsaccadic onward drift, typical of the internuclear ophthalmoplegia; (2 saccades interrupted in mid-flight and fixation instability, which are present in cases of brainstem premotor disturbances.

  13. Culture adaptation alters transcriptional hierarchies among single human embryonic stem cells reflecting altered patterns of differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Paul J; Au-Young, Janice K; Dadi, SriVidya; Keys, David N; Harrison, Neil J; Jones, Mark; Soneji, Shamit; Enver, Tariq; Sherlock, Jon K; Andrews, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    We have used single cell transcriptome analysis to re-examine the substates of early passage, karyotypically Normal, and late passage, karyotypically Abnormal ('Culture Adapted') human embryonic stem cells characterized by differential expression of the cell surface marker antigen, SSEA3. The results confirmed that culture adaptation is associated with alterations to the dynamics of the SSEA3(+) and SSEA3(-) substates of these cells, with SSEA3(-) Adapted cells remaining within the stem cell compartment whereas the SSEA3(-) Normal cells appear to have differentiated. However, the single cell data reveal that these substates are characterized by further heterogeneity that changes on culture adaptation. Notably the Adapted population includes cells with a transcriptome substate suggestive of a shift to a more naïve-like phenotype in contrast to the cells of the Normal population. Further, a subset of the Normal SSEA3(+) cells expresses genes typical of endoderm differentiation, despite also expressing the undifferentiated stem cell genes, POU5F1 (OCT4) and NANOG, whereas such apparently lineage-primed cells are absent from the Adapted population. These results suggest that the selective growth advantage gained by genetically variant, culture adapted human embryonic stem cells may derive in part from a changed substate structure that influences their propensity for differentiation.

  14. Spytkirtlernes normale struktur og funktion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dynesen, Anja Weirsøe; Jensen, Siri Beier; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

    2011-01-01

    Spytkirtlernes normale struktur og funktion Makroskopisk inddeles spytkirtlerne efter deres størrelse, hvor glandulae (gll.) parotideae, gll. submandibulares og gll. sublinguales er de store parrede spytkirtler, mens de små spytkirtler er lokaliserede submukøst i kinder, læber og ganen. Mikroskop......Spytkirtlernes normale struktur og funktion Makroskopisk inddeles spytkirtlerne efter deres størrelse, hvor glandulae (gll.) parotideae, gll. submandibulares og gll. sublinguales er de store parrede spytkirtler, mens de små spytkirtler er lokaliserede submukøst i kinder, læber og ganen...

  15. [Hepatic alterations in patients with dengue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larreal, Yraima; Valero, Nereida; Estévez, Jesús; Reyes, Ivette; Maldonado, Mery; Espina, Luz Marina; Arias, Julia; Meleán, Eddy; Añez, German; Atencio, Ricardo

    2005-06-01

    Clinical features of Dengue are very variable due to multiple alterations induced by the virus in the organism. Increased levels of transaminases similar to those produced by the Hepatitis virus have been reported in patients with Dengue from hiperendemic zones in Asia. The objectives of this study were to determine alterations in the liver tests in patients with Dengue and to relate them to the disease, clinically and serologically. Clinical history, hemathological tests serum transaminases (ALT y AST) and bilirubin assays were performed in 62 patients with clinical and serological diagnosis of Dengue. According to clinical features 38.7% of the patients with classical (CD) and hemorrhagic (DHF) forms of Dengue reffered abdominal pain and 2 patients with DHF had ictericia and hepatomegaly. Laboratory test findings showed leucopenia in 72.5% in both forms of Dengue and of patients with DHF severe thrombocytopenia (< 50.000 platelets x mm3), long PT and PPT in 70.9%, 23.0% and 42.3%, respectively. Transaminase values five fold higher than the normal values (p < 0.005) were observed in 36.8% and 74.4% of patients with CD and DHF respectively; AST was predominant in both groups. Our results suggest liver damage during the course of Dengue. A differential diagnosis has to be done between the hepatic involvement of Dengue cases and others viral diseases with hepatic disfunctions.

  16. Radiation induces acute alterations in neuronal function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Wu

    Full Text Available Every year, nearly 200,000 patients undergo radiation for brain tumors. For both patients and caregivers the most distressing adverse effect is impaired cognition. Efforts to protect against this debilitating effect have suffered from inadequate understanding of the cellular mechanisms of radiation damage. In the past it was accepted that radiation-induced normal tissue injury resulted from a progressive reduction in the survival of clonogenic cells. Moreover, because radiation-induced brain dysfunction is believed to evolve over months to years, most studies have focused on late changes in brain parenchyma. However, clinically, acute changes in cognition are also observed. Because neurons are fully differentiated post-mitotic cells, little information exists on the acute effects of radiation on synaptic function. The purpose of our study was to assess the potential acute effects of radiation on neuronal function utilizing ex vivo hippocampal brain slices. The cellular localization and functional status of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors was identified by immunoblotting. Electrophysiological recordings were obtained both for populations of neuronal cells and individual neurons. In the dentate gyrus region of isolated ex vivo slices, radiation led to early decreases in tyrosine phosphorylation and removal of excitatory N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs from the cell surface while simultaneously increasing the surface expression of inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA(ARs. These alterations in cellular localization corresponded with altered synaptic responses and inhibition of long-term potentiation. The non-competitive NMDAR antagonist memantine blocked these radiation-induced alterations in cellular distribution. These findings demonstrate acute effects of radiation on neuronal cells within isolated brain slices and open new avenues for study.

  17. Learning arm/hand coordination with an altered visual input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftime Nielsen, Simona Denisia; Dosen, Strahinja; Popović, Mirjana B; Popović, Dejan B

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this study was to test a novel tool for the analysis of motor coordination with an altered visual input. The altered visual input was created using special glasses that presented the view as recorded by a video camera placed at various positions around the subject. The camera was positioned at a frontal (F), lateral (L), or top (T) position with respect to the subject. We studied the differences between the arm-end (wrist) trajectories while grasping an object between altered vision (F, L, and T conditions) and normal vision (N) in ten subjects. The outcome measures from the analysis were the trajectory errors, the movement parameters, and the time of execution. We found substantial trajectory errors and an increased execution time at the baseline of the study. We also found that trajectory errors decreased in all conditions after three days of practice with the altered vision in the F condition only for 20 minutes per day, suggesting that recalibration of the visual systems occurred relatively quickly. These results indicate that this recalibration occurs via movement training in an altered condition. The results also suggest that recalibration is more difficult to achieve for altered vision in the F and L conditions compared to the T condition. This study has direct implications on the design of new rehabilitation systems.

  18. Length Normalization in XML Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamps, Jaap; Rijke, Maarten de; Sigurbjörnsson, Börkur

    2005-01-01

    The full paper appeared as: J. Kamps, M. de Rijke, and B. Sigurbj¨ornsson, “Length Normalization in XML Retrieval,” In: Proceedings 27th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference (SIGIR 2004), pages 80-87, 2004.

  19. Normal Families and Shared Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue-qin; LEI Chun-lin

    2015-01-01

    Let k be a positive integer, let h be a holomorphic function in a domain D, h 6≡0 and let F be a family of nonvanishing meromorphic functions in D. If each pair of functions f and g in F , f (k) and g(k) share h in D, then F is normal in D.

  20. Complete normal ordering 1: Foundations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ellis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new prescription for quantising scalar field theories (in generic spacetime dimension and background perturbatively around a true minimum of the full quantum effective action, which is to ‘complete normal order’ the bare action of interest. When the true vacuum of the theory is located at zero field value, the key property of this prescription is the automatic cancellation, to any finite order in perturbation theory, of all tadpole and, more generally, all ‘cephalopod’ Feynman diagrams. The latter are connected diagrams that can be disconnected into two pieces by cutting one internal vertex, with either one or both pieces free from external lines. In addition, this procedure of ‘complete normal ordering’ (which is an extension of the standard field theory definition of normal ordering reduces by a substantial factor the number of Feynman diagrams to be calculated at any given loop order. We illustrate explicitly the complete normal ordering procedure and the cancellation of cephalopod diagrams in scalar field theories with non-derivative interactions, and by using a point splitting ‘trick’ we extend this result to theories with derivative interactions, such as those appearing as non-linear σ-models in the world-sheet formulation of string theory. We focus here on theories with trivial vacua, generalising the discussion to non-trivial vacua in a follow-up paper.

  1. Complete normal ordering 1: Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Skliros, Dimitri P.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new prescription for quantising scalar field theories (in generic spacetime dimension and background) perturbatively around a true minimum of the full quantum effective action, which is to 'complete normal order' the bare action of interest. When the true vacuum of the theory is located at zero field value, the key property of this prescription is the automatic cancellation, to any finite order in perturbation theory, of all tadpole and, more generally, all 'cephalopod' Feynman diagrams. The latter are connected diagrams that can be disconnected into two pieces by cutting one internal vertex, with either one or both pieces free from external lines. In addition, this procedure of 'complete normal ordering' (which is an extension of the standard field theory definition of normal ordering) reduces by a substantial factor the number of Feynman diagrams to be calculated at any given loop order. We illustrate explicitly the complete normal ordering procedure and the cancellation of cephalopod diagrams in scalar field theories with non-derivative interactions, and by using a point splitting 'trick' we extend this result to theories with derivative interactions, such as those appearing as non-linear σ-models in the world-sheet formulation of string theory. We focus here on theories with trivial vacua, generalising the discussion to non-trivial vacua in a follow-up paper.

  2. Selections, Extensions and Collectionwise Normality

    CERN Document Server

    Gutev, Valentin

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that the classical Michael's selection theorem for l.s.c. mappings with a collectionwise normal domain can be reduced only to compact-valued mappings modulo the Dowker's extension theorem for such spaces. The technique developed to achieve this result is applied to construct selections for set-valued mappings whose point images are in completely metrizable absolute retracts.

  3. Is My Child's Appetite Normal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child’s appetite changes. Children do not grow as fast in their preschool years. That is why your child may have a smaller appetite now. That is normal. If he or she is not hungry or does not finish a meal, relax. Take the food away. Your child probably is eating enough if ...

  4. Oral mucosal alterations among the institutionalized elderly in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Conceição Ferreira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the prevalence of oral mucosal alterations and associated factors among the institutionalized elderly in Brazil. Data were collected through a structured questionnaire, a review of their medical records and an intra-oral examination. A sample of 335 individuals over 60 years of age was randomly selected. In total, 646 alterations were diagnosed; 59.1% were variations of the normal oral mucosa. The most frequent variation consisted of sublingual varicosities (51.6%. Denture stomatitis (15.2% and denture hyperplasia (12.8% were the most frequent lesions. Elderly patients who wore dentures had a significantly higher prevalence of oral mucosal lesions (p = 0.00 than those that didn't wear dentures. There was a high prevalence of variations of the normal oral mucosa and of mucosal lesions, especially denture-induced lesions, among the institutionalized elderly.

  5. [Neurocutaneous syndrome with hair alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Martínez, F

    1997-09-01

    There are multiple neurocutaneous syndromes that may show hair alterations such as the interglabellar peak or 'widow's peak', which is an alteration of the hair implantation, in addition to the genohypotrichosis, hypertrichosis and hair shaft dysplasias. In this chapter we will focus on the latter. Out of the unspecific hair shaft dysplasias the only ones showing neurological alterations are trichorrhexis invaginata, observed in the syndrome of Netherton. Among the specific dysplasias we would like to point out monilethrix, and very especially the moniliform hair syndrome, the trichorrhexis nodosa, the pili torti and trichotiodystrophy. The latter is actually a group of syndromes which associates a series of diverse symptoms that have in common hair brittleness, fertility problems and physical and mental retardation, and they constitute the basic syndrome know as 'BIDS syndrome.

  6. A relaxed mutant with an altered ribosomal protein L11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J; Watson, R J; Friesen, J D

    1976-02-27

    Relaxed mutants of Escherichia coli have been isolated which have an altered electrophoretic mobility of ribosomal protein L11. It can be shown that reversion to stringency in one of these mutants occurs simultaneously with a reversion of L11 protein to tis normal mobility. The L11 structural gene, rplK, maping near rif, is carried by the bacteriophage lambdacI857S7drifd18, and is most likely identical with relC.

  7. Normal Galaxies in the Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Helou, G

    2000-01-01

    This review addresses what can be learned from infrared observations about galaxies powered predominantly by star formation. Infrared techniques mostly probe the interstellar medium of galaxies, yielding physical and chemical information on the medium out of which stars form, which is in turn affected by those stars. Methods traditionally used in the study of such normal galaxies at wavelengths longer than 3 microns are described, and major questions currently pursued in the field are outlined. The most prominent results from the IRAS survey are reviewed. Contributions by ISO in the field of broad-band photometry are then presented, followed by ISO results in spectrospcopy. Normal galaxy studies not directly concerned with the ISM are quickly reviewed. The outlook and challenges in pursuing the interpretation of infrared data on the ISM are discussed.

  8. Studying Normal, Everyday Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daren C. Brabham

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Social media research has tended to focus on stand-out cases and has made use of big data methods to make claims about human experience and sociality. This commentary urges researchers to consider the everyday, normal experiences of most social media users, to consider the place of social media in a broader social context, and to consider marrying big data approaches with interviews and surveys of users.

  9. Normal Functions Concerning Shared Values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XIAO-JING

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss normal functions concerning shared values. We obtain the follow result. Let F be a family of meromorphic functions in the unit disc △, and a be a nonzero finite complex number. If for any f ∈ F, the zeros of f are of multiplicity, f and f' share a, then there exists a positive number M such that for any f ∈ F, (1 -|z|~2)(|f'(z)|)/(1+|f(z)|~2)≤ M.

  10. The normal posterior atlantoaxial relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelock, J.E. (Rochester General Hospital, NY (USA)); Schuster, J.A. (Rochester Univ. Medical Center, NY (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The relationship of the posterior aspects of the atlas and the axis were studied in 100 normal adult volunteers. The ratio of the height of the atlantal spinolaminar line to the atlantoaxial interspinous distance was found to be remarkably constant and was less than 2.0 in all men and women. This ratio should prove helpful in detecting hyperflexion injuries isolated to the atlantoaxial level. (orig.).

  11. Blood ferrokinetics in normal man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosain, F; Marsaglia, G; Finch, C A

    1967-01-01

    The clearance of radioiron from plasma and its appearance in circulating erythrocytes in normal subjects are studied. The importance of correcting for plasma iron fluctuations and for mean body hematocrit is illustrated. The data are analyzed by probability theory to determine relationships between intravascular and extravascular iron. Two refluxes are described, one of about 7 particles of every 100 leaving the plasma, and the second of about 23. The return times of these are about 5 hours and 8 days, respectively.

  12. Revealing alteration of membrane structures during ischema using impedance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Gheorghiu

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Alterations of membrane structure and function are essential characteristics of cells undergoing ischemia. Noninvasive monitoring of tissue alterations during ischemia and the estimation of the reversibility domain (corresponding to organ capability to fully recover its functions after shifting back to normal blood perfusion are important for biomedical applications allowing better time management during surgical interventions, especially in organ transplantation. Due to it’s capability to reveal inhomogeneities, as well as it’s noninvasive character, impedance spectroscopy was used for continuous monitoring of the progression of excised tissue samples during ischemia. We have developed a fast, noninvasive, automated method for quantitative analysis of impedance spectra of tissue samples, capable of revealing, through characteristic parameters (dispersion amplitudes, time constants and distribution parameters membrane based microscopic processes like the closure ofgap-junctions (a characteristic of the early alterations of ischemic tissues in the reversibility phase. Microscopic and equivalent circuit modeling was used to probe the effect of closure of cell connections and of changes in electrical properties of cell constituents on impedance spectra. We have developed a normalizing procedure emphasizing the pattern of ischemic alterations and enabling the comparison of different data sets.

  13. Promoter Methylation Precedes Chromosomal Alterations in Colorectal Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Derks

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancers are characterized by genetic and epigenetic alterations. This study aimed to explore the timing of promoter methylation and relationship with mutations and chromosomal alterations in colorectal carcinogenesis. Methods: In a series of 47 nonprogressed adenomas, 41 progressed adenomas (malignant polyps, 38 colorectal carcinomas and 18 paired normal tissues, we evaluated promoter methylation status of hMLH1, O6MGMT, APC, p14ARF, p16INK4A, RASSF1A, GATA-4, GATA-5, and CHFR using methylation-specific PCR. Mutation status of TP53, APC and KRAS were studied by p53 immunohistochemistry and sequencing of the APC and KRAS mutation cluster regions. Chromosomal alterations were evaluated by comparative genomic hybridization. Results: Our data demonstrate that nonprogressed adenomas, progressed adenomas and carcinomas show similar frequencies of promoter methylation for the majority of the genes. Normal tissues showed significantly lower frequencies of promoter methylation of APC, p16INK4A, GATA-4, and GATA-5 (P-values: 0.02, 0.02, 1.1×10−5 and 0.008 respectively. P53 immunopositivity and chromosomal abnormalities occur predominantly in carcinomas (P values: 1.1×10−5 and 4.1×10−10. Conclusions: Since promoter methylation was already present in nonprogressed adenomas without chromosomal alterations, we conclude that promoter methylation can be regarded as an early event preceding TP53 mutation and chromosomal abnormalities in colorectal cancer development.

  14. Normalization of Gravitational Acceleration Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Randy A.; Brown, Aaron J.; Adamo, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Unlike the uniform density spherical shell approximations of Newton, the con- sequence of spaceflight in the real universe is that gravitational fields are sensitive to the nonsphericity of their generating central bodies. The gravitational potential of a nonspherical central body is typically resolved using spherical harmonic approximations. However, attempting to directly calculate the spherical harmonic approximations results in at least two singularities which must be removed in order to generalize the method and solve for any possible orbit, including polar orbits. Three unique algorithms have been developed to eliminate these singularities by Samuel Pines [1], Bill Lear [2], and Robert Gottlieb [3]. This paper documents the methodical normalization of two1 of the three known formulations for singularity-free gravitational acceleration (namely, the Lear [2] and Gottlieb [3] algorithms) and formulates a general method for defining normalization parameters used to generate normalized Legendre Polynomials and ALFs for any algorithm. A treatment of the conventional formulation of the gravitational potential and acceleration is also provided, in addition to a brief overview of the philosophical differences between the three known singularity-free algorithms.

  15. Normal fault earthquakes or graviquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doglioni, C.; Carminati, E.; Petricca, P.; Riguzzi, F.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquakes are dissipation of energy throughout elastic waves. Canonically is the elastic energy accumulated during the interseismic period. However, in crustal extensional settings, gravity is the main energy source for hangingwall fault collapsing. Gravitational potential is about 100 times larger than the observed magnitude, far more than enough to explain the earthquake. Therefore, normal faults have a different mechanism of energy accumulation and dissipation (graviquakes) with respect to other tectonic settings (strike-slip and contractional), where elastic energy allows motion even against gravity. The bigger the involved volume, the larger is their magnitude. The steeper the normal fault, the larger is the vertical displacement and the larger is the seismic energy released. Normal faults activate preferentially at about 60° but they can be shallower in low friction rocks. In low static friction rocks, the fault may partly creep dissipating gravitational energy without releasing great amount of seismic energy. The maximum volume involved by graviquakes is smaller than the other tectonic settings, being the activated fault at most about three times the hypocentre depth, explaining their higher b-value and the lower magnitude of the largest recorded events. Having different phenomenology, graviquakes show peculiar precursors. PMID:26169163

  16. [Dynamic posturography in normal subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salami, A; Guglielmetti, G; Bindi, G F; Dellepiane, M

    1990-01-01

    The relative lack of data on the dynamic posturography led us to start a study in order to give our contributions to the standardization of M1, M2, M3, response parameters in normal subjects. Our research was carried out on 35 normal subjects aged 21 to 50. All of them were standing in Romberg's position on a Tönnies model board in a normally lit and ventilated room. We performed two tests: the first one open-eyed staring at no point, the second, 5 minutes later, closed-eyed. The EMG signals were obtained by surface electrodes on triceps sural and front tibial muscles. The EMG recording was determined by a "tilt" movement of the board at a steady speed of 50 per sec. and 4 wide. We use a XT 286 IBM computer with "T POST" software for checking and testing the data. Our results showed a significant variation in the value of the duration parameter in open-eyed and closed-eyed tests. Latency and area values were inferior to those obtained by other authors, except for Diener and Dichgans (3) whose results differ in latency value only.

  17. "Ser diferente é normal?"/"Being different: is it normal?"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Veras

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A pergunta título deste trabalho retoma o slogan “Ser diferente é normal”, que é parte da campanha criada para uma organização não-governamental que atende portadores de Síndrome de Down. O objetivo é a inclusão social da pessoa com deficiência e o primeiro passo foi propor a inclusão de um grupo de diferentes no grupo dito normal. No vídeo de lançamento da campanha, o diferente, identificado como normal, é mostrado por meio de exemplos – um negro com cabelo black-power, um skin-head, um corpo tatuado, um corpo feminino halterofílico, uma família hippie, uma garota com síndrome de Down. A visão da adolescente dançando reduz, de certo modo, o efeito imaginário que vai além da síndrome, uma vez que apenas o corpo com seus olhinhos puxados se destacam, e não se interrogam questões cognitivas. Minha proposta é refletir sobre o estatuto paradoxal do exemplo, tal como é trabalhado nesse vídeo: se, por definição, um exemplo mostra de fato seu pertencimento a uma classe, pode-se concluir que é exatamente por ser exemplar que ele se encontra fora dela, no exato momento em que a exibe e define. The question in the title of this paper refers to the slogan "ser diferente é normal" ("It´s normal to be different", which is part of a campaign created for a NGO that supports people with Down syndrome. The objective of the campaign is to promote the social inclusion of individuals with Down syndrome, and the first step was to propose the inclusion of a group of "differents" in the so-called normal group. The film launching the campaign shows the different identified as normal by means of examples: a black man exhibiting blackpower haircut, a skin-head, a tattooed body, an over-athletic female body, a hippie family and a girl with Down syndrome. The vision of the dancing teenager lessens the imaginary effect that surpasses the syndrome, since only her body and her little oriental eyes stand out and no cognitive issues are

  18. Non-normal Hasemann Boundary Value Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We will discuss the non-normal Hasemann boundary value problem:we may find these results are coincided with those of normal Hasemann boundary value problem and non normal Riemann boundary value problem.

  19. Normalization of markers for dopamine innervation in striatum of MPTP-lesioned miniature pigs with intrastriatal grafts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cumming, P; Danielsen, E H; Vafaee, M

    2001-01-01

    , both pre-synaptic markers of dopamine fibres were normal in striatum. Dopamine depletion or grafting were without effect on the cerebral perfusion rate, measured with [15O]-water, did not alter the rate of oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) in brain, and did not alter the binding potential of tracers......, this apparent immunological response did not preclude the re-establishment of normal [18F]fluorodopa and [11C]NS 2214 uptake in the allografted striatum. Udgivelsesdato: 2001-May...

  20. WEIERSTRASS REPRESENTATION FOR SURFACES WITH PRESCRIBED NORMAL GAUSS MAP AND GAUSS CURVATURE IN H3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI SHUGUO

    2004-01-01

    The author obtains a Weierstrass representation for surfaces with prescribed normal Gauss map and Gauss curvature in H3. A differential equation about the hyperbolic Gauss map is also obtained, which characterizes the relation among the hyperbolic Gauss map, the normal Gauss map and Gauss curvature. The author discusses the harmonicity of the normal Gauss map and the hyperbolic Gauss map from surface with constant Gauss curvature in H3 to S2 with certain altered conformal metric.Finally, the author considers the surface whose normal Gauss map is conformal and derives a completely nonlinear differential equation of second order which graph must satisfy.

  1. Alternative normalization methods demonstrate widespread cortical hypometabolism in untreated de novo Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berti, Valentina; Polito, C; Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    , recent studies suggested that conventional data normalization procedures may not always be valid, and demonstrated that alternative normalization strategies better allow detection of low magnitude changes. We hypothesized that these alternative normalization procedures would disclose more widespread...... metabolic alterations in de novo PD. METHODS: [18F]FDG PET scans of 26 untreated de novo PD patients (Hoehn & Yahr stage I-II) and 21 age-matched controls were compared using voxel-based analysis. Normalization was performed using gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) reference regions and Yakushev...... normalization. RESULTS: Compared to GM normalization, WM and Yakushev normalization procedures disclosed much larger cortical regions of relative hypometabolism in the PD group with extensive involvement of frontal and parieto-temporal-occipital cortices, and several subcortical structures. Furthermore...

  2. Art as Alterity in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    In education, art has often been perceived as entertainment and decoration and is the first subject to go when there are budget cuts or test-score pressures. Drawing on Emmanuel Lévinas's idea of the primacy of radical alterity that breaks the totality of our being, enables self-transformation and ethics, and ensures community as a totality…

  3. Modelling glass alteration in an altered argillaceous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bildstein, O.; Trotignon, L.; Pozo, C.; Jullien, M.

    2007-05-01

    The long term behaviour of materials such as glass, steel and clay has been investigated in the context of deep geological disposal of radioactive wastes. The interactions between vitrified wastes, canister corrosion products (CPs) and clay are studied using a modified version of the reaction-transport code Crunch, especially looking at pH changes and possible cementation at the interface with the clayey materials. These perturbations may indeed affect the lifetime of glass matrix in deep repositories, e.g., high pH enhances the rate of glass alteration. This work focuses on the argillite of Bure. The calculations were performed at 323 K with a glass alteration rate switching from a high initial rate to a residual rate according to the sorption capacity of CPs. The time at which this sorption capacity is saturated is crucial to the system in terms of wastes package lifetime. The results show that the glass alteration imposes a high pH value at the interface with CPs and clay: up to a value of 9.2, compared to 7.3 which is the initial pH value in the argillite. Experimental data show that the rate of glass alteration is much higher in such pH conditions. For a R7T7-type glass, the rate is about five times higher at pH 9 than at pH 7. This pH perturbation migrates through the clayey domain as a result of the migration of mobile elements such as boron and sodium, and despite the existence of strong pH buffers in the argillite. The cementation of porosity at the interface between glass and clay is predicted by the model due to the massive precipitation of iron corrosion products and glass alteration products. At this point of the evolution of the system, the pH starts to decrease and the alteration rate of the glass could be significantly reduced. This porosity clogging effect is difficult to confirm by experiments especially since existing data on short term experiments tend to show a pervasive precipitation of silica in the domain instead of a localized precipitation

  4. Foveal phase retardation changes associated with normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanNasdale, Dean A; Elsner, Ann E; Hobbs, Timothy; Burns, Stephen A

    2011-11-01

    This study quantified normal age-related changes to the photoreceptor axons in the central macula using the birefringent properties of the Henle fiber layer. A scanning laser polarimeter was used to acquire 15° × 15° macular images in 120 clinically normal subjects, ranging in age from the third decade to the eighth. Raw image data of the macular cross were used to compute phase retardation maps associated with Henle fiber layer. Annular regions of interest ranging from 0.25° to 3° eccentricity and centered on the fovea were used to generate intensity profiles from the phase retardation data, which were then analyzed using sine curve fitting and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). The amplitude of a 2f sine curve was used as a measure of macular phase retardation magnitude. For FFT analysis, the 2f amplitude, as well as the 4f, were normalized by the remaining FFT components. The amplitude component of the 2f curve fit and the normalized 2f FFT component decreased as a function of age, while the eccentricity of the maximum value for the normalized 2f FFT component increased. The phase retardation changes in the central macula indicate structural alterations in the cone photoreceptor axons near the fovea as a function of age. These changes result in either fewer cone photoreceptors in the central macula, or a change in the orientation of their axons. This large sample size demonstrates systematic changes to the central cone photoreceptor morphology using scanning laser polarimetry.

  5. Multispectral histogram normalization contrast enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soha, J. M.; Schwartz, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    A multispectral histogram normalization or decorrelation enhancement which achieves effective color composites by removing interband correlation is described. The enhancement procedure employs either linear or nonlinear transformations to equalize principal component variances. An additional rotation to any set of orthogonal coordinates is thus possible, while full histogram utilization is maintained by avoiding the reintroduction of correlation. For the three-dimensional case, the enhancement procedure may be implemented with a lookup table. An application of the enhancement to Landsat multispectral scanning imagery is presented.

  6. Normal pediatric postmortem CT appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Willemijn M.; Bosboom, Dennis G.H.; Koopmanschap, Desiree H.J.L.M. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nievelstein, Rutger A.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Nikkels, Peter G.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rijn, Rick R. van [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-04-01

    Postmortem radiology is a rapidly developing specialty that is increasingly used as an adjunct to or substitute for conventional autopsy. The goal is to find patterns of disease and possibly the cause of death. Postmortem CT images bring to light processes of decomposition most radiologists are unfamiliar with. These postmortem changes, such as the formation of gas and edema, should not be mistaken for pathological processes that occur in living persons. In this review we discuss the normal postmortem thoraco-abdominal changes and how these appear on CT images, as well as how to differentiate these findings from those of pathological processes. (orig.)

  7. Normal language in abnormal brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piattelli-Palmarini, Massimo

    2017-02-27

    There is little doubt that, in the adult, specific brain lesions cause specific language deficits. Yet, brain localizations of linguistic functions are made problematic by several reported cases of normal language in spite of major brain anomalies, mostly, but not exclusively, occurring early in life. The signal cases are hydrocephaly, spina bifida and hemispherectomy. These cases are discussed and possible solutions are suggested: namely a vast redundancy of neurons and/or the role of microtubules as neuron-internal processors and key factors in signaling and guiding the growth and reconfiguration of the brain.

  8. Blood Ferrokinetics in Normal Man*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosain, Fazle; Marsaglia, George; Finch, Clement A.

    1967-01-01

    The clearance of radioiron from plasma and its appearance in circulating erythrocytes in normal subjects are studied. The importance of correcting for plasma iron fluctuations and for mean body hematocrit is illustrated. The data are analyzed by probability theory to determine relationships between intravascular and extravascular iron. Two refluxes are described, one of about 7 particles of every 100 leaving the plasma, and the second of about 23. The return times of these are about 5 hours and 8 days, respectively. Images PMID:6018746

  9. The genetic alteration of retinoblastoma gene in esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Il; Shim, Yung Mok; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Retinoblastoma(RB) gene is the prototype of tumor suppressor gene and it`s alteration have been frequently observed in a large number of human tumors. To investigate the role of RB in esophageal cancer, we studied 36 esophageal cancer tissues with Southern blot analysis to detect gross LOH and PCR-SSCP method to find minute LOH and mutation, if any. In the cases with abnormalities, the nucleotide sequence analysis was performed. Allelic loss of chromosome 13q14 occurred in 20 out of 32 informative cases (62.5%) by Southern analysis. Furthermore, PCR-LOH added three positive cases. Mobility shift by PCR-SSCP was observed in one case at exon 22, which showed 1 bp deletion in codon 771 of RB gene resulting in frame shift mutation. Besides, nine PCR-band alteration in tumor tissue compared with normal tissue were observed in exon 14 and 22, but mutation was not found on sequencing analysis suggesting the epigenetic alteration in tumor tissue. Analysis of the clinical data did not show any difference depending upon RB alteration. However, the total incidence of RB gene may play an important role in the development of esophageal cancer. The main genetic alteration of RB gene was deletion detected by Southern blot and one bp deletion leading to frame shift was also observed. 8 figs, 5 tabs. (Author).

  10. Altered matrix mineralization in a case of a sclerosing osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstaetter, Jochen G; Roschger, Andreas; Puchner, Stephan E; Dominkus, Martin; Sulzbacher, Irene; Windhager, Reinhard; Klaushofer, Klaus; Roschger, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about the tumor matrix mineralization of highly sclerotic osteosarcoma. We used quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI) to determine the Bone mineralization density distribution (BMDD) of a highly sclerosing osteosarcoma of the proximal tibia as well as adjacent normal bone of a 10-year-old girl following chemotherapy according to the EURAMOS-1 protocol. Data were compared to recently published normative reference data for young individuals. Backscattered electron imaging of the tumor region revealed a dense accumulation of mineralized tumor bone matrix (up to 90% of the medullar space). The BMDD was shifted tremendously towards higher matrix mineralization (CaMean +18.5%, CaPeak +22.5%, CaHigh +100 fold) compared to normal bone. Additionally the BMDD became much wider, indicating a higher heterogeneity in mineralization (CaWidth +40%). In contrast to lamellar bone, which mineralizes via a mineralization front, the mineralization of the tumor matrix starts by randomly distributed spots of mineral clusters fusing together to a highly mineralized non-lamellar bone matrix. We also found an altered BMDD of the patient's normal bone when compared with the reference BMDD of young individuals. In conclusion this high radiodensity region of the sclerosing sarcoma is not only due to the high amount of tumor matrix but also to its high mineralization density. Chemotherapy may lead to altered matrix mineralization of normal bone due to suppression of bone turnover. The mechanism of matrix mineralization in a sclerosing osteosarcoma warrants further studies.

  11. Update on normal tension glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotiranjan Mallick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal tension glaucoma (NTG is labelled when typical glaucomatous disc changes, visual field defects and open anterior chamber angles are associated with intraocular pressure (IOP constantly below 21 mmHg. Chronic low vascular perfusion, Raynaud's phenomenon, migraine, nocturnal systemic hypotension and over-treated systemic hypertension are the main causes of normal tension glaucoma. Goldmann applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, slit lamp biomicroscopy, optical coherence tomography and visual field analysis are the main tools of investigation for the diagnosis of NTG. Management follows the same principles of treatment for other chronic glaucomas: To reduce IOP by a substantial amount, sufficient to prevent disabling visual loss. Treatment is generally aimed to lower IOP by 30% from pre-existing levels to 12-14 mmHg. Betaxolol, brimonidine, prostaglandin analogues, trabeculectomy (in refractory cases, systemic calcium channel blockers (such as nifedipine and 24-hour monitoring of blood pressure are considered in the management of NTG. The present review summarises risk factors, causes, pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of NTG.

  12. Glaucoma alters the circadian timing system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Drouyer

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a widespread ocular disease and major cause of blindness characterized by progressive, irreversible damage of the optic nerve. Although the degenerative loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC and visual deficits associated with glaucoma have been extensively studied, we hypothesize that glaucoma will also lead to alteration of the circadian timing system. Circadian and non-visual responses to light are mediated by a specialized subset of melanopsin expressing RGCs that provide photic input to mammalian endogenous clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. In order to explore the molecular, anatomical and functional consequences of glaucoma we used a rodent model of chronic ocular hypertension, a primary causal factor of the pathology. Quantitative analysis of retinal projections using sensitive anterograde tracing demonstrates a significant reduction (approximately 50-70% of RGC axon terminals in all visual and non-visual structures and notably in the SCN. The capacity of glaucomatous rats to entrain to light was challenged by exposure to successive shifts of the light dark (LD cycle associated with step-wise decreases in light intensity. Although glaucomatous rats are able to entrain their locomotor activity to the LD cycle at all light levels, they require more time to re-adjust to a shifted LD cycle and show significantly greater variability in activity onsets in comparison with normal rats. Quantitative PCR reveals the novel finding that melanopsin as well as rod and cone opsin mRNAs are significantly reduced in glaucomatous retinas. Our findings demonstrate that glaucoma impacts on all these aspects of the circadian timing system. In light of these results, the classical view of glaucoma as pathology unique to the visual system should be extended to include anatomical and functional alterations of the circadian timing system.

  13. Genetic alterations and epigenetic changes in hepatocarcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Stella Hoyos Giraldo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Normal">Hepatocarcinogenesis as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is associated with background of chronic liver disease usually in association with cirrhosis, marked hepatic fibrosis, hepatitis B virus (HBV and/or hepatitis virus (HCV infection, chronic inflammation, Aflatoxin B1(AFB1 exposure, chronic alcoholism, metabolic disorder of the liver and necroinflamatory liver disease. Hepatocarcinogenesis involve two mechanisms, genetic alterations (with changes in the cell's DNA sequence and epigenetic changes (without changes in the cell's DNA sequence, but changes in the pattern of gene expression that can persist through one or more generations (somatic sense. Hepatocarcinogenesis is associated with activation of oncogenes and decreased expression of tumor suppressor genes (TSG; include those involved in cell cycle control, apoptosis, DNA repair, immortalization and angiogenesis. AFB1 is metabolized in the liver into a potent carcinogen, aflatoxin 8, 9-epoxide, which is detoxified by epoxide hydrolase (EPHX and glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1.

    Normal">A failure of detoxification processes can allow to mutagenic metabolite to bind to DNA and inducing P53 mutation. Genetic polymorphism of EPHX and GSTM1 can make individuals more susceptible to AFB1. Epigenetic inactivation of GSTP1 by promoter hypermethylation plays a role in the development of HCC because, it leads that electrophilic metabolite increase DNA damage and mutations. HBV DNA integration into the host chromosomal DNA of hepatocytes has been detected in HBV-related HCC.

    Normal">DNA tumor viruses cause cancer mainly by interfering with cell cycle controls, and activating the cell's replication machinery by blocking the action of key TSG. HBx protein is a

  14. [Factors that alter taste perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffeis, E R; Silva-Netto, C R

    1990-01-01

    Dysfunction of taste perception is a significant problem for many individuals. Taste anomalies may affect health not only by directly affecting liquid and solid food intake, but also by creating a state of depression due to the loss of an important source of pleasure. Many factors alter taste perception, such as lesions of the oral mucosa, cigarette smoking, radiation, chemotherapy, renal disease, hepatitis, leprosy, hormones, nutrition, use of dentures, medications, and aging. Gum or ice chewing may temporarily help loss of taste. Patients should be encouraged to chew their food thoroughly, alternating the sides of the mouth, or alternating different foods. Unfortunately, in many cases there is no cure for this alteration, and patience is then the only possibility.

  15. Frequency combs and platicons in optical microresonators with normal GVD

    CERN Document Server

    Lobanov, V E; Kippenberg, T J; Gorodetsky, M L

    2015-01-01

    We predict the existence of a novel type of the flat-top dissipative solitonic pulses, "platicons", in microresonators with normal group velocity dispersion (GVD). We propose methods to generate these platicons from cw pump. Their duration may be altered significantly by tuning the pump frequency. The transformation of a discrete energy spectrum of dark solitons of the Lugiato-Lefever equation into a quasicontinuous spectrum of platicons is demonstrated. Generation of similar structures is also possible with bi-harmonic, phase/amplitude modulated pump or via laser injection locking.

  16. Frequency combs and platicons in optical microresonators with normal GVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, V E; Lihachev, G; Kippenberg, T J; Gorodetsky, M L

    2015-03-23

    We predict the existence of a novel type of the flat-top dissipative solitonic pulses, "platicons", in microresonators with normal group velocity dispersion (GVD). We propose methods to generate these platicons from cw pump. Their duration may be altered significantly by tuning the pump frequency. The transformation of a discrete energy spectrum of dark solitons of the Lugiato-Lefever equation into a quasicontinuous spectrum of platicons is demonstrated. Generation of similar structures is also possible with bi-harmonic, phase/amplitude modulated pump or via laser injection locking.

  17. Is My Penis Normal? (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Is My Penis Normal? KidsHealth > For Teens > Is My Penis Normal? A A A en español ¿Es normal ... any guy who's ever worried about whether his penis is a normal size. There's a fairly wide ...

  18. Normal Orthodox Semigroups with Inverse Transversals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUFeng-lin

    2003-01-01

    A normal orthodox semigroup is an orthodox semigroup whose idempotent elements form a normal band.We deal with congruces on a normal orthodox semigroup with an iverse transversal .A structure theorem for such semigroup is obtained.Munn(1966)gave a fundamental inverse semigroup Following Munn's idea ,we give a fundamental normal orthodox semigroup with an inverse transversal.

  19. Fantastic alterities and The Sandman

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the ways in which the comics medium enhances our understanding of literary models of the Fantastic. It examines the presence and depiction of multiple worlds in Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman, with specific reference to the role of the comics medium and its denial of mimesis when creating such alterities. \\ud \\ud It initially uses literature review to establish a contemporary working model of the Fantastic, taking as its basis the framework devised by Tzvetan Todorov, and inc...

  20. Buccal alterations in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negrato Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Long standing hyperglycaemia besides damaging the kidneys, eyes, nerves, blood vessels, heart, can also impair the function of the salivary glands leading to a reduction in the salivary flow. When salivary flow decreases, as a consequence of an acute hyperglycaemia, many buccal or oral alterations can occur such as: a increased concentration of mucin and glucose; b impaired production and/or action of many antimicrobial factors; c absence of a metalloprotein called gustin, that contains zinc and is responsible for the constant maturation of taste papillae; d bad taste; e oral candidiasis f increased cells exfoliation after contact, because of poor lubrication; g increased proliferation of pathogenic microorganisms; h coated tongue; i halitosis; and many others may occur as a consequence of chronic hyperglycaemia: a tongue alterations, generally a burning mouth; b periodontal disease; c white spots due to demineralization in the teeth; d caries; e delayed healing of wounds; f greater tendency to infections; g lichen planus; h mucosa ulcerations. Buccal alterations found in diabetic patients, although not specific of this disease, have its incidence and progression increased when an inadequate glycaemic control is present.

  1. Oral alterations among chemical dependents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Vanessa COLODEL

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has been daily observed a significant increase ofchemical dependent individuals, as well as the lack of depth on thisissue in the dentistry area. Nevertheless many times the dentalclinicians are the first professionals to diagnose possible alterations,which appear due to the consumption of tobacco, alcohol and other illicit drugs. Objectives: To make a literature review of oral alterations and to identify them on a specific group of persons, which are addicted to different types of drugs. Material and methods: The clinical history of the selected individuals was added to the answers of a questionnaire,comprising the data of the present research. Results: Besides other minor soft tissue alterations, a high prevalence of caries and periodontal diseases were found in the studied population. Conclusion: It was concluded that the role of the dental clinician is very important to the health rehabilitation of drug addicts, individuals with physical and mental disorders that need specific oral care, which sometimes is neglected.

  2. IIH with normal CSF pressures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soh Youn Suh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a condition of raised intracranial pressure (ICP in the absence of space occupying lesions. ICP is usually measured by lumbar puncture and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure above 250 mm H 2 O is one of the diagnostic criteria of IIH. Recently, we have encountered two patients who complained of headaches and exhibited disc swelling without an increased ICP. We prescribed acetazolamide and followed both patients frequently; because of the definite disc swelling with IIH related symptoms. Symptoms and signs resolved in both patients after they started taking acetazolamide. It is generally known that an elevated ICP, as measured by lumbar puncture, is the most important diagnostic sign of IIH. However, these cases caution even when CSF pressure is within the normal range, that suspicion should be raised when a patient has papilledema with related symptoms, since untreated papilledema may cause progressive and irreversible visual loss.

  3. Normal origamis of Mumford curves

    CERN Document Server

    Kremer, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    An origami (also known as square-tiled surface) is a Riemann surface covering a torus with at most one branch point. Lifting two generators of the fundamental group of the punctured torus decomposes the surface into finitely many unit squares. By varying the complex structure of the torus one obtains easily accessible examples of Teichm\\"uller curves in the moduli space of Riemann surfaces. The p-adic analogues of Riemann surfaces are Mumford curves. A p-adic origami is defined as a covering of Mumford curves with at most one branch point, where the bottom curve has genus one. A classification of all normal non-trivial p-adic origamis is presented and used to calculate some invariants. These can be used to describe p-adic origamis in terms of glueing squares.

  4. Appearance normalization of histology slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicory, Jared; Couture, Heather D; Thomas, Nancy E; Borland, David; Marron, J S; Woosley, John; Niethammer, Marc

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a method for automatic color and intensity normalization of digitized histology slides stained with two different agents. In comparison to previous approaches, prior information on the stain vectors is used in the plane estimation process, resulting in improved stability of the estimates. Due to the prevalence of hematoxylin and eosin staining for histology slides, the proposed method has significant practical utility. In particular, it can be used as a first step to standardize appearance across slides and is effective at countering effects due to differing stain amounts and protocols and counteracting slide fading. The approach is validated against non-prior plane-fitting using synthetic experiments and 13 real datasets. Results of application of the method to adjustment of faded slides are given, and the effectiveness of the method in aiding statistical classification is shown.

  5. Chapter 1: Direct Normal Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myer, Daryl R.

    2016-04-15

    This chapter addresses the quantitative and qualitative aspects of the solar resource, the direct solar radiation. It discusses the total or integrated broadband direct beam extraterrestrial radiation (ETR). This total integrated irradiance is comprised of photons of electromagnetic radiation. The chapter also discusses the impact of the atmosphere and its effect upon the direct normal irradiance (DNI) beam radiation. The gases and particulates present in the atmosphere traversed by the direct beam reflect, absorb, and scatter differing spectral regions and proportions of the direct beam, and act as a variable filter. Knowledge of the available broadband DNI beam radiation resource data is essential in designing a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) system. Spectral variations in the DNI beam radiation affect the performance of a CPV system depending on the solar cell technology used. The chapter describes propagation and scattering processes of circumsolar radiation (CSR), which includes the Mie scattering from large particles.

  6. Normalized Compression Distance of Multiples

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Andrew R

    2012-01-01

    Normalized compression distance (NCD) is a parameter-free similarity measure based on compression. The NCD between pairs of objects is not sufficient for all applications. We propose an NCD of finite multisets (multiples) of objacts that is metric and is better for many applications. Previously, attempts to obtain such an NCD failed. We use the theoretical notion of Kolmogorov complexity that for practical purposes is approximated from above by the length of the compressed version of the file involved, using a real-world compression program. We applied the new NCD for multiples to retinal progenitor cell questions that were earlier treated with the pairwise NCD. Here we get significantly better results. We also applied the NCD for multiples to synthetic time sequence data. The preliminary results are as good as nearest neighbor Euclidean classifier.

  7. Radioprotection of normal tissue cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Patrick; Wenz, Frederik; Herskind, Carsten [Heidelberg University, Department of Radiation Oncology Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Improvements of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and systemic therapy have resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity is still dose limiting. Several strategies have been pursued with the goal to develop substances which may prevent or reduce damage to normal tissue. Drugs applied before radiotherapy are called radioprotectors; those given after radiotherapy to reduce long-term effects are radiomitigators. Despite more than 50 years of research, until now only two substances, amifostine and palifermin, have overcome all obstacles of clinical approval and are applied during radiotherapy of head and neck cancer or total body irradiation, respectively. However, better understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response has allowed the development of several highly promising drugs functioning as scavengers of reactive oxygen species or targeting specific molecules involved in regulation of cell death pathways or cell cycle arrest. The present review describes the major targets for radioprotectors or radiomitigators currently tested in clinical trials. (orig.) [German] Verbesserungen in der Radiotherapie in Kombination mit Chirurgie und Chemotherapie fuehrten zu erhoehten Ueberlebensraten von Tumorpatienten. Trotzdem sind Strahlenfolgen am Normalgewebe weiterhin dosislimitierend. Verschiedene Ansaetze wurden verfolgt, um Substanzen zu entwickeln, die Normalgewebstoxizitaeten verhindern oder verringern. Medikamente, die vor der Radiotherapie verabreicht werden, heissen Radioprotektoren, solche die danach gegeben werden, um langfristige Effekte zu reduzieren, Radiomitigatoren. Trotz mehr als 50 Jahre Forschung ueberwanden nur zwei Substanzen, Amifostin und Palifermin, alle Huerden der klinischen Pruefung und sind fuer die Anwendung waehrend der Radiotherapie von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren bzw. bei Ganzkoerperbestrahlung zugelassen. Jedoch erlaubte das bessere Verstaendnis der Signalwege

  8. Multivariate normal-Laplace distribution and processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanichukattu Korakutty Jose

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The normal-Laplace distribution is considered and its properties are discussed. A multivariate normal-Laplace distribution is introduced and its properties are studied. First order autoregressive processes with these stationary marginal distributions are developed and studied. A generalized multivariate normal-Laplace distribution is introduced. Multivariate geometric normal-Laplace distribution and multivariate geometric generalized normal-Laplace distributions are introduced and their properties are studied. Estimation of parameters and some applications are also discussed.

  9. Association of basal forebrain volumes and cognition in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, D; Grothe, M; Fischer, F U; Heinsen, H; Kilimann, I; Teipel, S; Fellgiebel, A

    2014-01-01

    The basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS) is known to undergo moderate neurodegenerative alterations during normal aging and severe atrophy in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been suggested that functional and structural alterations of the BFCS mediate cognitive performance in normal aging and AD. But, it is still unclear to what extend age-associated cognitive decline can be related to BFCS in normal aging. We analyzed the relationship between BFCS volume and cognition using MRI and a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery in a cohort of 43 healthy elderly subjects spanning the age range from 60 to 85 years. Most notably, we found significant associations between general intelligence and BFCS volumes, specifically within areas corresponding to posterior nuclei of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (Ch4p) and the nucleus subputaminalis (NSP). Associations between specific cognitive domains and BFCS volumes were less pronounced. Supplementary analyses demonstrated that especially the volume of NSP but also the volume of Ch4p was related to the volume of widespread temporal, frontal, and parietal gray and white matter regions. Volumes of these gray and white matter regions were also related to general intelligence. Higher volumes of Ch4p and NSP may enhance the effectiveness of acetylcholine supply in related gray and white matter regions underlying general intelligence and hence explain the observed association between the volume of Ch4p as well as NSP and general intelligence. Since general intelligence is known to attenuate the degree of age-associated cognitive decline and the risk of developing late-onset AD, the BFCS might, besides the specific contribution to the pathophysiology in AD, constitute a mechanism of brain resilience in normal aging.

  10. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  11. Altered Glutathione Redox State in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey K. Yao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered antioxidant status has been reported in schizophrenia. The glutathione (GSH redox system is important for reducing oxidative stress. GSH, a radical scavenger, is converted to oxidized glutathione (GSSG through glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and converted back to GSH by glutathione reductase (GR. Measurements of GSH, GSSG and its related enzymatic reactions are thus important for evaluating the redox and antioxidant status. In the present study, levels of GSH, GSSG, GPx and GR were assessed in the caudate region of postmortem brains from schizophrenic patients and control subjects (with and without other psychiatric disorders. Significantly lower levels of GSH, GPx, and GR were found in schizophrenic group than in control groups without any psychiatric disorders. Concomitantly, a decreased GSH:GSSG ratio was also found in schizophrenic group. Moreover, both GSSG and GR levels were significantly and inversely correlated to age of schizophrenic patients, but not control subjects. No significant differences were found in any GSH redox measures between control subjects and individuals with other types of psychiatric disorders. There were, however, positive correlations between GSH and GPx, GSH and GR, as well as GPx and GR levels in control subjects without psychiatric disorders. These positive correlations suggest a dynamic state is kept in check during the redox coupling under normal conditions. By contrast, lack of such correlations in schizophrenia point to a disturbance of redox coupling mechanisms in the antioxidant defense system, possibly resulting from a decreased level of GSH as well as age-related decreases of GSSG and GR activities.

  12. Eye Motility Alterations in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Migliorini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We evaluated a sample of individuals with retinitis pigmentosa (RP with the aim of assessing the presence or absence of ocular motility (OM disorders. Materials and Methods. We included 23 out of the 25 individuals from the sample (9 females and 14 males with an average visual acuity of 6/10. Results. The cover test about the vertical deviation in near distance showed an r/l in 3.45% and an l/r in 6.9%. The assessment of OM showed that 39.1% of the sample had a severe hyperfunction of the IO of the right eye and a severe hyperfunction (34.5% of the SO of the left eye; 21.8% had a moderate hypofunction of right SO with a moderate percentage of hypofunction of 17.5% for the SO of the left eye; 30.5%, however, showed a serious hypofunction of the SR of both eyes; 21.7% of the sample showed a hyperfunction in both eyes of the IR. Conclusion. This alteration, however, is not attributable to either a high refractive defect (medium-low myopia: −1 diopter ±3 SD or to a severely impaired binocular vision (visual acuity, motor fusion, and stereopsis are normal or within a range of values commonly accepted. Therefore, the disorders of OM lead to a genetic origin.

  13. Eye Motility Alterations in Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Raffaele; Comberiati, Anna Maria; Galeoto, Giovanni; Fratipietro, Manuela; Arrico, Loredana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated a sample of individuals with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with the aim of assessing the presence or absence of ocular motility (OM) disorders. Materials and Methods. We included 23 out of the 25 individuals from the sample (9 females and 14 males) with an average visual acuity of 6/10. Results. The cover test about the vertical deviation in near distance showed an r/l in 3.45% and an l/r in 6.9%. The assessment of OM showed that 39.1% of the sample had a severe hyperfunction of the IO of the right eye and a severe hyperfunction (34.5%) of the SO of the left eye; 21.8% had a moderate hypofunction of right SO with a moderate percentage of hypofunction of 17.5% for the SO of the left eye; 30.5%, however, showed a serious hypofunction of the SR of both eyes; 21.7% of the sample showed a hyperfunction in both eyes of the IR. Conclusion. This alteration, however, is not attributable to either a high refractive defect (medium-low myopia: -1 diopter ±3 SD) or to a severely impaired binocular vision (visual acuity, motor fusion, and stereopsis are normal or within a range of values commonly accepted). Therefore, the disorders of OM lead to a genetic origin.

  14. Alteration of in vivo cellulose ribbon assembly by carboxymethylcellulose and other cellulose derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    In vivo cellulose ribbon assembly by the Gram-negative bacterium Acetobacter xylinum can be altered by incubation in carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), a negatively charged water-soluble cellulose derivative, and also by incubation in a variety of neutral, water-soluble cellulose derivatives. In the presence of all of these substituted celluloses, normal fasciation of microfibril bundles to form the typical twisting ribbon is prevented. Alteration of ribbon assembly is most extensive in the presen...

  15. Normalization of emotion control scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojatoolah Tahmasebian

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotion control skill teaches the individuals how to identify their emotions and how to express and control them in various situations. The aim of this study was to normalize and measure the internal and external validity and reliability of emotion control test. Methods: This standardization study was carried out on a statistical society, including all pupils, students, teachers, nurses and university professors in Kermanshah in 2012, using Williams’ emotion control scale. The subjects included 1,500 (810 females and 690 males people who were selected by stratified random sampling. Williams (1997 emotion control scale, was used to collect the required data. Emotional Control Scale is a tool for measuring the degree of control people have over their emotions. This scale has four subscales, including anger, depressed mood, anxiety and positive affect. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS software using correlation and Cronbach's alpha tests. Results: The results of internal consistency of the questionnaire reported by Cronbach's alpha indicated an acceptable internal consistency for emotional control scale, and the correlation between the subscales of the test and between the items of the questionnaire was significant at 0.01 confidence level. Conclusion: The validity of emotion control scale among the pupils, students, teachers, nurses and teachers in Iran has an acceptable range, and the test itemswere correlated with each other, thereby making them appropriate for measuring emotion control.

  16. Simulations of Normal Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bottema, R

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented of numerical simulations of normal isolated late type spiral galaxies. Specifically the galaxy NGC 628 is used as a template. The method employs a TREESPH code including stellar particles, gas particles, cooling and heating of the gas, star formation according to a Jeans criterion, and Supernova feedback. A regular spiral disc can be generated as an equilibrium situation of two opposing actions. On the one hand cooling and dissipation of the gas, on the other hand gas heating by the FUV field of young stars and SN mechanical forcing. The disc exhibits small and medium scale spiral structure of which the multiplicity increases as a function of radius. The theory of swing amplification can explain, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the emerging spiral structure. In addition, swing amplification predicts that the existence of a grand design m=2 spiral is only possible if the disc is massive. The simulations show that the galaxy is then unstable to bar formation. A general criterion is ...

  17. Memory abilities during normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrosky-Solis, F; Jaime, R M; Ardila, A

    1998-02-01

    One hundred and five normal subjects from 20 to 89 years old, and with a minimum of six years of formal education were selected. Subjects were divided into seven age ranges, with 15 subjects in each group. The following tests were individually administered: (1) Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS) (Wechsler, 1945); (2) Serial Verbal Learning (Ardila, Rosselli & Puente, 1994; Ardila & Ostrosky, 1991); (3) The Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure (ROCF) (Osterrieth, 1944) (copy, immediate, and delayed reproduction); (4) Corsi's blocks (Milner, 1971) (forwards and backwards); and (5) Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (Wilson, Cockburn, & Baddeley, 1985). This last test may be considered as a functional or ecological memory test. All test scores declined across ages between 4.1% and 76.6%. In all the tests, excepting Digits, standard deviations increased with age. It was observed that the youngest subjects could retain about three-fourths of the information presented, whereas the oldest retained around one-third of this information. About half of the test significantly correlated with the Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test. A factor analysis revealed four different factors accounting for 63.3% of the variance. A single nonverbal memory factor accounted for over 40% of the variance.

  18. The hemodynamic effects of rebaudioside A in healthy adults with normal and low-normal blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, K C; Curry, L L; Carakostas, M C; Tarka, S M; Reeves, M S; Farmer, M V; McKenney, J M; Toth, P D; Schwartz, S L; Lubin, B C; Dicklin, M R; Boileau, A C; Bisognano, J D

    2008-07-01

    Rebaudioside A and stevioside are steviol glycosides extracted from the plant Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni and are used in several countries as food and beverage sweeteners. This randomized, double-blind trial evaluated the hemodynamic effects of 4weeks consumption of 1000mg/day rebaudioside A vs. placebo in 100 individuals with normal and low-normal systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Subjects were predominantly female (76%, rebaudioside A and 82%, placebo) with a mean age of approximately 41 (range 18-73) years. At baseline, mean resting, seated SBP/DBP was 110.0/70.3mmHg and 110.7/71.2mmHg for the rebaudioside A and placebo groups, respectively. Compared with placebo, rebaudioside A did not significantly alter resting, seated SBP, DBP, mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) or 24-h ambulatory blood pressures responses. These results indicate that consumption of as much as 1000mg/day of rebaudioside A produced no clinically important changes in blood pressure in healthy adults with normal and low-normal blood pressure.

  19. Magneto-optical characteristics of human sperms: normal and deformed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhnini, Lama; Dairi, Maheen; Manaa, Hacene

    2008-08-01

    In this study we report on magnetic orientation of human sperms. Samples were taken from 17 donors. Normal human sperms became oriented with their long axis perpendicular to the magnetic field (1 T maximum). Total orientation was achieved with magnetic field of about 1 T, while for abnormal sperms the magnetic behavior was different. The dependence of the measured degree of orientation on the intensity of the magnetic field was in good agreement with the theoretical equation for the magnetic orientation of diamagnetic substances. As a result of a numerical analysis based on the equation, the anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibility of normal sperm was found to be Delta(chi) = 8 x 10(-20) J/T(2). The degree of orientation was influenced by the alterations in the shape of the head, body or the tail. It has been suggested that the DNA in the sperm head retain the strong magnetic anisotropy to counterbalance the magnetic anisotropy retained by flagellum microtubules. Recent studies demonstrated a well-defined nuclear architecture in human sperm nucleus, where the head morphology has significant correlation with sperm chromatin structure assay SCSA. Then, as the methods to evaluate SCSA can be difficult and expensive our simple magnetic orientation technique can be an alternative to diagnose alteration in DNA.

  20. Pesticide Exposures May Alter Mouth Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_162249.html Pesticide Exposures May Alter Mouth Bacteria Study of Washington farm workers finds alterations persist ... News) -- Pesticide exposure may change the makeup of bacteria in the mouths of farm workers, a new ...

  1. Altered erythropoiesis and iron metabolism in carriers of thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Jacqueline S; Cominal, Juçara G; Silva-Pinto, Ana Cristina; Olbina, Gordana; Ginzburg, Yelena Z; Nandi, Vijay; Westerman, Mark; Rivella, Stefano; de Souza, Ana Maria

    2015-06-01

    The thalassemia syndromes (α- and β-thalassemia) are the most common and frequent disorders associated with ineffective erythropoiesis. Imbalance of α- or β-globin chain production results in impaired red blood cell synthesis, anemia, and more erythroid progenitors in the blood stream. While patients affected by these disorders show definitive altered parameters related to erythropoiesis, the relationship between the degree of anemia, altered erythropoiesis, and dysfunctional iron metabolism has not been investigated in both α-thalassemia carriers (ATC) and β-thalassemia carriers (BTC). Here, we demonstrate that ATC have a significantly reduced hepcidin and increased soluble transferrin receptor levels but relatively normal hematological findings. In contrast, BTC have several hematological parameters significantly different from controls, including increased soluble transferrin receptor and erythropoietin levels. These changes in both groups suggest an altered balance between erythropoiesis and iron metabolism. The index sTfR/log ferritin and (hepcidin/ferritin)/sTfR are, respectively, increased and reduced relative to controls, proportional to the severity of each thalassemia group. In conclusion, we showed in this study, for the first time in the literature, that thalassemia carriers have altered iron metabolism and erythropoiesis.

  2. DIFFERENTIAL HISTOMORPHOMETRIC CHANGES IN NORMAL AND INFLAMED GINGIVAL EPITHELIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaskovic Stankovic Sanja

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and aim: In recent decades, many factors such as smoking, unhealthy diet as well as high alcohol intake were marked as risk factors that can lead to increased incidence of malignant alterations, gingivitis, periodontal disease and other oral epithelium pathological changes. Having in mind that in the group of non-malignant and non-dental oral pathology gingivitis and periodontal disease are the most common oral mucosa alterations aim of our research was to investigate histomorphometric characteristics of healthy and altered oral and gingival epithelium. Material and methods: Tissue samples of 24 oral and gingival mucosa specimens were collected. Samples were fixed in 10% buffered paraformaldehyde, routinely processed and embedded in paraffin blocks. From each block sections 5 micrometer thin were made and standard H/E staining as well as immunocytochemical detection of Ki-67 proliferation marker and CD79a lymphocyte marker were performed. Measurements and image analysis was performed with Image Pro Plus software (Media Cybernetics, USA and Axiovision (Ziess, USA. Results: We showed that inflamed gingival epithelium is increasing its thickness in proportion to the severity of adjacent inflammation. Furthermore, mitotic index is rising (up to 132% in the same manner as well as basal lamina length (up to 70% when normal and inflamed gingiva is compared. Architecture of epithelial ridges is changed from straightforward to mesh-like. Conclusion: Assessment of the free gingival epithelium thickness is directly related to the severity of the inflammation process i

  3. A kernel version of multivariate alteration detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack

    2013-01-01

    Based on the established methods kernel canonical correlation analysis and multivariate alteration detection we introduce a kernel version of multivariate alteration detection. A case study with SPOT HRV data shows that the kMAD variates focus on extreme change observations.......Based on the established methods kernel canonical correlation analysis and multivariate alteration detection we introduce a kernel version of multivariate alteration detection. A case study with SPOT HRV data shows that the kMAD variates focus on extreme change observations....

  4. Altered functional connectivity of prefrontal cortex in chronic heroin abusers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinbao Qi; Xianming Fu; Ruobing Qian; Chaoshi Niu; Xiangpin Wei

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated alterations in the resting-state functional connectivity of the pre-frontal cortex in chronic heroin abusers using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We found that, compared with normal controls, in heroin abusers the left prefrontal cortex showed decreased functional connectivity with the left hippocampus, right anterior cingulate, left middle frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus and right precuneus. However, the right prefrontal cortex showed decreased functional connectivity with the left orbital frontal cortex and the left middle frontal gyrus in chronic heroin abusers. These alterations of resting-state functional connectivity in the prefrontal cortices of heroin abusers suggest that their frontal executive neural network may be impaired, and that this may contribute to their continued heroin abuse and relapse after withdrawal.

  5. Metabolic alterations in cancer cells and therapeutic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naima Hammoudi; Kausar Begam Riaz Ahmed; Celia Garcia-Prieto; Peng Huang

    2011-01-01

    Cancer metabolism has emerged as an important area of research in recent years. Elucidation of the metabolic differences between cancer and normal cells and the underlying mechanisms will not only advance our understanding of fundamental cancer cell biology but also provide an important basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies and novel compounds to selectively eliminate cancer cells by targeting their unique metabolism. This article reviews several important metabolic alterations in cancer cells, with an emphasis on increased aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) and glutamine addiction, and discusses the mechanisms that may contribute to such metabolic changes. In addition, metabolic alterations in cancer stem cells, mitochondrial metabolism and its influence on drug sensitivity, and potential therapeutic strategies and agents that target cancer metabolism are also discussed.

  6. Altered Transendothelial Transport of Hormones as a Contributor to Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanyoung Yoon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The vascular endothelium is a dynamic structure responsible for the separation and regulated movement of biological material between circulation and interstitial fluid. Hormones and nutrients can move across the endothelium either via a transcellular or paracellular route. Transcellular endothelial transport is well understood and broadly acknowledged to play an important role in the normal and abnormal physiology of endothelial function. However, less is known about the role of the paracellular route. Although the concept of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes is now widely accepted, we suggest that alterations in paracellular transport should be studied in greater detail and incorporated into this model. In this review we provide an overview of endothelial paracellular permeability and discuss its potential importance in contributing to the development of diabetes and associated complications. Accordingly, we also contend that if better understood, altered endothelial paracellular permeability could be considered as a potential therapeutic target for diabetes.

  7. Normal anatomy of the skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustrin, E S; Robertson, R L; Tilak, S

    1994-08-01

    CT and MR imaging increasingly are being used for the evaluation of the skull base. New innovative techniques have revolutionized radiologic understanding of normal skull base anatomy. Thus, normal anatomic relationships with radiographic correlation are vital for accurate pathologic assessment.

  8. Normal birth weight piglets with impaired preweaning growth utilize alternative metabolic pathways in the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study was designed to determine if normal weight pigs that grow poorly during the pre-weaning period have altered hepatic metabolism, as reported for intrauterine growth retarded pigs. Eight pairs of average birth weight pigs (1.57 +/- 0.05 kg) were identified that diverged in weight by...

  9. Automatic Radiometric Normalization of Multitemporal Satellite Imagery with the Iteratively Re-weighted MAD Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, Morton John; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2008-01-01

    A recently proposed method for automatic radiometric normalization of multi- and hyper-spectral imagery based on the invariance property of the Multivariate Alteration Detection (MAD) transformation and orthogonal linear regression is extended by using an iterative re-weighting scheme involving no...

  10. Euler Characteristic and Quadrilaterals of Normal Surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tejas Kalelkar

    2008-05-01

    Let be a compact 3-manifold with a triangulation . We give an inequality relating the Euler characteristic of a surface normally embedded in with the number of normal quadrilaterals in . This gives a relation between a topological invariant of the surface and a quantity derived from its combinatorial description. Secondly, we obtain an inequality relating the number of normal triangles and normal quadrilaterals of , that depends on the maximum number of tetrahedrons that share a vertex in .

  11. 18 CFR 154.305 - Tax normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax normalization. 154... Changes § 154.305 Tax normalization. (a) Applicability. An interstate pipeline must compute the income tax component of its cost-of-service by using tax normalization for all transactions. (b) Definitions. (1)...

  12. Calcium signaling in plant cells in altered gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, E. L.

    2003-10-01

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration in altered gravity (microgravity and clinostating) evidence that Ca 2+ signaling can play a fundamental role in biological effects of microgravity. Calcium as a second messenger is known to play a crucial role in stimulus - response coupling for many plant cellular signaling pathways. Its messenger functions are realized by transient changes in the cytosolic ion concentration induced by a variety of internal and external stimuli such as light, hormones, temperature, anoxia, salinity, and gravity. Although the first data on the changes in the calcium balance in plant cells under the influence of altered gravity have appeared in 80 th, a review highlighting the performed research and the possible significance of such Ca 2+ changes in the structural and metabolic rearrangements of plant cells in altered gravity is still lacking. In this paper, an attempt was made to summarize the available experimental results and to consider some hypotheses in this field of research. It is proposed to distinguish between cell gravisensing and cell graviperception; the former is related to cell structure and metabolism stability in the gravitational field and their changes in microgravity (cells not specialized to gravity perception), the latter is related to active use of a gravitational stimulus by cells presumebly specialized to gravity perception for realization of normal space orientation, growth, and vital activity (gravitropism, gravitaxis) in plants. The main experimental data concerning both redistribution of free Ca 2+ ions in plant cell organelles and the cell wall, and an increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration under the influence of altered gravity are presented. Based on the gravitational decompensation hypothesis, the consequence of events occurring in gravisensing cells not specialized to gravity perception under altered gravity are considered in the following order: changes in the cytoplasmic membrane surface

  13. Medical humanities and medical alterity in fiction and in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Brian

    2015-01-01

    A widely accepted component of any answer to the question 'What is it to do good medical ethics?' is the commitment to benefit people's health, in principlist terminology, 'beneficence'. This paper addresses deliberate maleficence and the cultural otherness with which it is associated, focusing on the activities of the serial killer Dr Harold Shipman. It finds an uncanny 'fit' between the normal operation of healthcare services and this sort of alterity which has attracted little attention from bioethicists but has been addressed by novelists. To the extent that the medical humanities offers useful insights into hard moral problems, its capacities rest on taking account of both the fictional and the real.

  14. Window to 'Clovis's' Altered Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a rock outcrop dubbed 'Clovis.' The rock was discovered to be softer than other rocks studied so far at Gusev Crater after the rover easily ground a hole (center) into it with its rock abrasion tool. An analysis of the interior of the hole with the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer found higher concentrations of sulfur, bromine and chlorine compared to basaltic, or volcanic, rocks at Gusev. This might indicate that Clovis was chemically altered, and that fluids once flowed through the rock depositing these elements. Spirit's solar panels can be seen in the foreground. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera on sol 205 (July 31, 2004).

  15. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  16. Self-alteration in HRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamazaki, Ryuji; Nørskov, Marco

    Humanlike androids are being developed with the ambition to be immersed into our daily life and meet us on an equal level in social interaction. The possibilities and limitations of these types of robots can potentially change societies and Human-Robot Interaction might affect the very way in which...... the ways in which our subjectivity can be innerly transformed, decentred, in other words, self-altered. In our trials so far, we have been investigating the potential of teleoperated androids, which are embodied telecommunication media with humanlike appearances. By conducting pilot studies in Japan...... and Denmark, we examine how Telenoid, a new type of teleoperated android robot designed as a minimalistic human, affect people in the real world. We introduce Telenoid to real-world as the fields of elderly care and child education by focusing on the social aspects of the android robot that might facilitate...

  17. Genetic alterations in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif; Lena Karapanagiotou; Kostas Syrigos

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is devastating for patients and their relatives as the incidence rate is approximately the same as mortality rate. Only a small percentage, which ranges from 0.4% to 4% of patients who have been given this diagnosis, will be alive at five years. At the time of diagnosis, 80% of pancreatic cancer patients have unresectable or metastatic disease.Moreover, the therapeutic alternatives offered by chemotherapy or radiotherapy are few, if not zero. For all these reasons, there is an imperative need of analyzing and understanding the primitive lesions that lead to invasive pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Molecular pathology of these lesions is the key of our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of this cancer and will probably help us in earlier diagnosis and better therapeutic results. This review focuses on medical research on pancreatic cancer models and the underlying genetic alterations.

  18. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on Incidence of Altered Sensation of Mandibular Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Shu; Wu, Shih-Yun; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Lai, Yu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Altered sensation (including paresthesia, dysesthesia and hypoesthesia) after mandibular implant surgery may indicate transient or permanent injury of the inferior alveolar nerve and the mental branch, and considerably lower patients’ satisfaction about the therapy. Previous studies have shown a great degree of variability on the incidence of altered sensation. We here reported the incidence of altered sensation after mandibular implant surgery based on a meta-analysis of 26 articles published between 1990.1.1 and 2016.1.1. Study quality and risk of bias was assessed and the studies with a lower score were excluded in the meta-analysis. Data synthesis was performed using the logistic-normal random-effect model. The meta-analyses revealed that the short-term (10 days after implant placement) and long-term (1 year after implant placement) incidence was 13% (95% CI, 6%-25%) and 3% (95% CI, 1%-7%), respectively. (2) For the patients who initially reported altered sensation, 80% (95% CI, 52%-94%) of them would return to normal sensation within 6 months after surgery, and 91% (95% CI, 78%-96%) of them would return to normal sensation one year after surgery. We concluded that dentist-patient communication about the risk of altered sensation is critical to treatment planning, since the short-term incidence of altered sensation is substantial (13%). When a patient reports altered sensation, regular assessment for 6 months would help tracing the changes of symptoms. In terms of long-term follow-up (1 year after surgery), the incidence is much lower (3%) and most patients (91%) would return to normal sensation. PMID:27100832

  19. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozeren Aydin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM. Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative

  20. Alteration of Mancos Shale by synthetic hydrofracturing fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruichak, J. N.; Ilgen, A.; Wang, Y.; Griego, J.; Rodriguez, M.

    2015-12-01

    Shale gas produced through hydrofracturing has changed the energy perspective in the United States. Shale gas extraction is complicated by the fast decline in wellbore production, to mitigate which re-stimulation and drilling new wells are required. Our goal is to conduct laboratory experiments that examine methane transport from low-permeability matrices to fracture networks induced by hydraulic fracturing. In particular, we address whether mineralogical alteration of shale by hydrofracturing fluids has an effect on matrix-to-fracture methane transport. We performed a set of laboratory experiments addressing the alteration of Mancos shale by synthetic hydrofracturing fluid at hydrothermal conditions (90 °C). Both powdered shale and shale chips were investigated. Solid characterization was done using bulk and micro-X-ray diffraction (XRD, μXRD), and micro-X-ray Fluorescence mapping (µXRF). Analysis of the aqueous samples was done using ion chromatography (IC) for major anions and cations and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) - for trace metals. Our results indicate that calcium, barium, strontium , magnesium, manganese, silica, sodium, chloride and sulfate were released from Mancos shale after reaction with hydrofracturing fluid. Altered zones on shale surface after 2 months of reaction are thin - likely, within a few microns. The XRD patterns normalized to the 100% peak for quartz indicate that the dolomite, calcite, biotite, and kaolinite peaks decrease in intensity relative to the quartz peaks with increased alteration time, indicative of the partial dissolution of these minerals. Understanding mineralogical composition of an altered layer of Mancos shale will provide insight whether methane transport through these zones will be affected compared to the unaltered material. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the

  1. Algal toxins alter copepod feeding behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiarong Hong

    Full Text Available Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod's feeding appendages-a "sampling beating" that has short durations (<100 ms and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration "grazing beating" that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod's grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod's feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods.

  2. Alterations of the Thioredoxin System by Hyperoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipple, Trent E.; Welty, Stephen E.; Nelin, Leif D.; Hansen, Jason M.; Rogers, Lynette K.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) contribute to alveolar simplification seen in animal models of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and VEGF expression is redox regulated by thioredoxin (Trx)-1 in other diseases. The present studies tested the hypothesis that exposure to 85% O2 negatively impacts the Trx1 system and VEGF expression in the lungs of newborn mice. There was no effect of fraction of inspired oxygen on lung Trx1 or Trx reductase-1 protein levels; however, lung Trx1 protein was predominantly oxidized in the lungs of newborn mice exposed to 85% O2 by 24 hours of exposure. In room air (RA), lung Trx interacting protein (Txnip) levels decreased developmentally through Day 7 (1.0 ± 0.06 [Day 1] vs. 0.49 ± 0.10 [Day 3] vs. 0.29 ± 0.03 [Day 7]; P < 0.01), whereas VEGF expression increased (1.25 ± 0.16 [Day 1] vs. 4.35 ± 1.51 [Day 3] vs. 13.23 ± 0.37 [Day 7]; P < 0.01). Newborn mice exposed to 85% O2 had no developmental decrease in Txnip protein levels and a delayed increase in VEGF protein levels. Lung Txnip and VEGF protein levels were different than in corresponding RA controls at Day 3, before the detection of lung morphologic abnormalities in our model. Txnip and VEGF protein levels were inversely correlated in both the RA and hyperoxia-exposed groups (n = 18; R = −0.66; P = 0.003). In conclusion, oxidation of Trx1 and sustained Txnip expression in the lungs of newborn mice exposed to 85% oxygen is likely to severely attenuate normal Trx1 function. The inverse correlation of Txnip with VEGF expression suggests that decreased Trx1 function contributes to the observed lung developmental abnormalities. PMID:19244202

  3. Genomic alterations detected by comparative genomic hybridization in ovarian endometriomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C. Veiga-Castelli

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a complex and multifactorial disease. Chromosomal imbalance screening in endometriotic tissue can be used to detect hot-spot regions in the search for a possible genetic marker for endometriosis. The objective of the present study was to detect chromosomal imbalances by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH in ectopic tissue samples from ovarian endometriomas and eutopic tissue from the same patients. We evaluated 10 ovarian endometriotic tissues and 10 eutopic endometrial tissues by metaphase CGH. CGH was prepared with normal and test DNA enzymatically digested, ligated to adaptors and amplified by PCR. A second PCR was performed for DNA labeling. Equal amounts of both normal and test-labeled DNA were hybridized in human normal metaphases. The Isis FISH Imaging System V 5.0 software was used for chromosome analysis. In both eutopic and ectopic groups, 4/10 samples presented chromosomal alterations, mainly chromosomal gains. CGH identified 11q12.3-q13.1, 17p11.1-p12, 17q25.3-qter, and 19p as critical regions. Genomic imbalances in 11q, 17p, 17q, and 19p were detected in normal eutopic and/or ectopic endometrium from women with ovarian endometriosis. These regions contain genes such as POLR2G, MXRA7 and UBA52 involved in biological processes that may lead to the establishment and maintenance of endometriotic implants. This genomic imbalance may affect genes in which dysregulation impacts both eutopic and ectopic endometrium.

  4. Hindlimb unloading alters ligament healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Paolo P.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Dwyer, Kelley W.; Turner, Joanne; Vailas, Arthur C.; Vanderby, Ray Jr

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading inhibits healing in fibrous connective tissue such as ligament. Male rats were assigned to 3- and 7-wk treatment groups with three subgroups each: sham control, ambulatory healing, and hindlimb-suspended healing. Ambulatory and suspended animals underwent surgical rupture of their medial collateral ligaments, whereas sham surgeries were performed on control animals. After 3 or 7 wk, mechanical and/or morphological properties were measured in ligament, muscle, and bone. During mechanical testing, most suspended ligaments failed in the scar region, indicating the greatest impairment was to ligament and not to bone-ligament insertion. Ligament testing revealed significant reductions in maximum force, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and low-load properties in suspended animals. In addition, femoral mineral density, femoral strength, gastrocnemius mass, and tibialis anterior mass were significantly reduced. Microscopy revealed abnormal scar formation and cell distribution in suspended ligaments with extracellular matrix discontinuities and voids between misaligned, but well-formed, collagen fiber bundles. Hence, stress levels from ambulation appear unnecessary for formation of fiber bundles yet required for collagen to form structurally competent continuous fibers. Results support our hypothesis that hindlimb unloading impairs healing of fibrous connective tissue. In addition, this study provides compelling morphological evidence explaining the altered structure-function relationship in load-deprived healing connective tissue.

  5. Epigenetic Alterations in Parathyroid Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdelli, Chiara; Corbetta, Sabrina

    2017-01-01

    Parathyroid cancers (PCas) are rare malignancies representing approximately 0.005% of all cancers. PCas are a rare cause of primary hyperparathyroidism, which is the third most common endocrine disease, mainly related to parathyroid benign tumors. About 90% of PCas are hormonally active hypersecreting parathormone (PTH); consequently patients present with complications of severe hypercalcemia. Pre-operative diagnosis is often difficult due to clinical features shared with benign parathyroid lesions. Surgery provides the current best chance of cure, though persistent or recurrent disease occurs in about 50% of patients with PCas. Somatic inactivating mutations of CDC73/HRPT2 gene, encoding parafibromin, are the most frequent genetic anomalies occurring in PCas. Recently, the aberrant DNA methylation signature and microRNA expression profile have been identified in PCas, providing evidence that parathyroid malignancies are distinct entities from parathyroid benign lesions, showing an epigenetic signature resembling some embryonic aspects. The present paper reviews data about epigenetic alterations in PCas, up to now limited to DNA methylation, chromatin regulators and microRNA profile. PMID:28157158

  6. Pulmonary alterations in cocaine users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Terra Filho

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Brazilian researchers have recently recognized a marked increase in the number of people using abusable drugs and the consequences of this habit. It has become a major public health problem in a potentially productive segment of the general population. In the last few years, several medical articles have given special emphasis to pulmonary complications related to cocaine use. This review is based on this information and experience acquired with groups of cocaine users. OBJECTIVE: To present to physicians the pulmonary aspects of cocaine use and warn about the various effects this drug has on the respiratory system, stressing those related to long-term use. DESIGN: Narrative review. METHOD: Pulmonary complications are described. These may include infections (Staphylococcus aureus, pulmonary tuberculosis, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome/aids, etc., aspiration pneumonia, lung abscess, empyema, septic embolism, non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, barotrauma, pulmonary granulomatosis, bronchiolitis obliterans and organizing pneumonia, pneumonitis and interstitial fibrosis, pneumonitis hypersensitivity, lung infiltrates and eosinophilia in individuals with bronchial hyperreactivity, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, vasculitis, pulmonary infarction, pulmonary hypertension and alterations in gas exchange. It is concluded that physicians should give special attention to the various pulmonary and clinical manifestations related to cocaine use, particularly in young patients.

  7. Confirmed viral meningitis with normal CSF findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Naghum; Desjobert, Edouard; Lumley, Janine; Webster, Daniel; Jacobs, Michael

    2014-07-17

    An 18-year-old woman presented with a progressively worsening headache, photophobia feverishness and vomiting. Three weeks previously she had returned to the UK from a trip to Peru. At presentation, she had clinical signs of meningism. On admission, blood tests showed a mild lymphopenia, with a normal C reactive protein and white cell count. Chest X-ray and CT of the head were normal. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) microscopy was normal. CSF protein and glucose were in the normal range. MRI of the head and cerebral angiography were also normal. Subsequent molecular testing of CSF detected enterovirus RNA by reverse transcriptase PCR. The patient's clinical syndrome correlated with her virological diagnosis and no other cause of her symptoms was found. Her symptoms were self-limiting and improved with supportive management. This case illustrates an important example of viral central nervous system infection presenting clinically as meningitis but with normal CSF microscopy.

  8. Altered Frequency Distribution in the Electroencephalogram is Correlated to the Analgesic Effect of Remifentanil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Carina; Malver, Lasse P; Kurita, Geana P;

    2015-01-01

    distributions were extracted by a continuous wavelet transform and normalized into delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma bands. Alterations relative to pre-treatment responses were calculated for all channels and used as input to the MVPA. Compared to placebo, remifentanil increased the delta band and decreased...

  9. Pseudo--Normals for Signed Distance Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanæs, Henrik; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    2003-01-01

    undertake showing that the angle weighted pseudo--normal has an important property, namely that it allows us to discriminate between points that are inside and points that are outside the mesh. This result is used for proposing a simple and efficient algorithm for computing the signed distance field from...... a mesh. Moreover, our result is an additional argument for the angle weighted pseudo--normals being the natural extension of the face normals....

  10. Multidimensional dynamical systems accepting the normal shift

    CERN Document Server

    Boldin, A Y

    1994-01-01

    The dynamical systems of the form \\ddot\\bold r=\\bold F (\\bold r,\\dot\\bold r) in \\Bbb R^n accepting the normal shift are considered. The concept of weak normality for them is introduced. The partial differential equations for the force field \\bold F(\\bold r,\\dot\\bold r) of the dynamical systems with weak and complete normality are derived.

  11. Rural Electric Network Alteration Spurs Cable Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>Most aluminum cable enterprises in Yunnan and Zhejiang focus their production capacity on overhead cables needed in rural electric network alteration. During the 12th Five-Year Plan period, China launched the rural electric network alteration & upgrade project. As of the middle of 2011, the budget of the central government for the rural electric network alteration & upgrade project planned by the National Development and Reform Commission has reached up to RMB 64.96 billion.

  12. Moments of q-Normal and conditional q-Normal distributions

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We calculate moments and moment generating functions of two distributions: the so called $q-$Normal and the so called conditional $q-$Normal distributions. These distributions generalize both Normal ($q=1),$ Wigner ($% q=0,$ $q-$Normal) and Kesten-McKay ($q=0,$ conditional $q-$Normal) distributions. As a by product we get asymptotic properties of some expansions in modified Bessel functions.

  13. Short communication: Alteration of priors for random effects in Gaussian linear mixed model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenplas, Jérémie; Christensen, Ole Fredslund; Gengler, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    , multiple-trait predictions of lactation yields, and Bayesian approaches integrating external information into genetic evaluations) need to alter both the mean and (co)variance of the prior distributions and, to our knowledge, most software packages available in the animal breeding community do not permit......Linear mixed models, for which the prior multivariate normal distributions of random effects are assumed to have a mean equal to 0, are commonly used in animal breeding. However, some statistical analyses (e.g., the consideration of a population under selection into a genomic scheme breeding...... such alterations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to propose a method to alter both the mean and (co)variance of the prior multivariate normal distributions of random effects of linear mixed models while using currently available software packages. The proposed method was tested on simulated examples with 3...

  14. Altered mental status and endocrine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Elizabeth; Abraham, Michael K

    2014-05-01

    Although the altered mental status is a common presentation in the emergency department, altered mental status caused by endocrine emergencies is rare. The altered patient could have an endocrine cause that can quickly improve with appropriate diagnosis and interventions. When dealing with limited information and an obtunded patient, it is important to have a broad differential diagnosis, pick up on the physical examination findings, and evaluate laboratory abnormalities that could suggest an underlying endocrine emergency. This article outlines the findings and provides a description of altered patients with endocrine emergencies to facilitate the diagnosis and treatment in the emergency department.

  15. Altered Esophageal Mucosal Structure in Patients with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Sánchez, María Inés; Nachman, Fabio D.; Fuxman, Claudia; Iantorno, Guido; Hwang, Hui Jer; Ditaranto, Andrés; Costa, Florencia; Longarini, Gabriela; Wang, Xuan Yu; Huang, Xianxi; Vázquez, Horacio; Moreno, María L.; Niveloni, Sonia; Bercik, Premysl; Smecuol, Edgardo; Mazure, Roberto; Bilder, Claudio; Mauriño, Eduardo C.; Verdu, Elena F.; Bai, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Reflux symptoms (RS) are common in patients with celiac disease (CD), a chronic enteropathy that affects primarily the small intestine. We evaluated mucosal integrity and motility of the lower esophagus as mechanisms contributing to RS generation in patients with CD. Methods. We enrolled newly diagnosed CD patients with and without RS, nonceliac patients with classical reflux disease (GERD), and controls (without RS). Endoscopic biopsies from the distal esophagus were assessed for dilated intercellular space (DIS) by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Tight junction (TJ) mRNA proteins expression for zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-2 and claudin-3 (CLDN-2; CLDN-3) was determined using qRT-PCR. Results. DIS scores were higher in patients with active CD than in controls, but similar to GERD patients. The altered DIS was found even in CD patients without RS and normalized after one year of a gluten-free diet. CD patients with and without RS had lower expression of ZO-1 than controls. The expression of CLDN-2 and CLDN-3 was similar in CD and GERD patients. Conclusions. Our study shows that patients with active CD have altered esophageal mucosal integrity, independently of the presence of RS. The altered expression of ZO-1 may underlie loss of TJ integrity in the esophageal mucosa and may contribute to RS generation. PMID:27446827

  16. Hypoglycemic effect of Gymnema sylvestre (retz.,) R.Br leaf in normal and alloxan induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathya, S; Kokilavani, R; Gurusamy, K

    2008-10-01

    The water extract of Gymnema sylvestre R.Br leaf was tested for hypoglycemic activity in normal and alloxan induced diabetic rats. Grated amount (2ml/kg) of the water extract of Gymnema sylvestre leaf was given to both normal and alloxan induced diabetic rats. A significant reduction of glucose concentration was noticed in normal rats, blood glucose level was significantly reduced in diabetic rats. Protein level is also decreased in diabetic rats. Urea, uric acid and creatinine levels were increased in diabetic condition. After the herbal treatment the levels were altered near to normal level.

  17. Altered DNA methylation in leukocytes with trisomy 21.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi Kerkel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The primary abnormality in Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21, is well known; but how this chromosomal gain produces the complex DS phenotype, including immune system defects, is not well understood. We profiled DNA methylation in total peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL and T-lymphocytes from adults with DS and normal controls and found gene-specific abnormalities of CpG methylation in DS, with many of the differentially methylated genes having known or predicted roles in lymphocyte development and function. Validation of the microarray data by bisulfite sequencing and methylation-sensitive Pyrosequencing (MS-Pyroseq confirmed strong differences in methylation (p<0.0001 for each of 8 genes tested: TMEM131, TCF7, CD3Z/CD247, SH3BP2, EIF4E, PLD6, SUMO3, and CPT1B, in DS versus control PBL. In addition, we validated differential methylation of NOD2/CARD15 by bisulfite sequencing in DS versus control T-cells. The differentially methylated genes were found on various autosomes, with no enrichment on chromosome 21. Differences in methylation were generally stable in a given individual, remained significant after adjusting for age, and were not due to altered cell counts. Some but not all of the differentially methylated genes showed different mean mRNA expression in DS versus control PBL; and the altered expression of 5 of these genes, TMEM131, TCF7, CD3Z, NOD2, and NPDC1, was recapitulated by exposing normal lymphocytes to the demethylating drug 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine (5aza-dC plus mitogens. We conclude that altered gene-specific DNA methylation is a recurrent and functionally relevant downstream response to trisomy 21 in human cells.

  18. Stem cells in normal mammary gland and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Yin, Xin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Jun

    2010-04-01

    The mammary gland is a structurally dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic alterations with age, menstrual cycle, and reproductive status. Mammary gland stem cells, the minor cell population within the mature organ, are thought to have multiple functions in regulating mammary gland development, tissue maintenance, major growth, and structural remodeling. In addition, accumulative evidence suggests that breast cancers are initiated and maintained by a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell features (called cancer stem cells). A variety of methods have been developed to identify and characterize mammary stem cells, and several signal transduction pathways have been identified to be essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of mammary gland stem cells. Understanding the origin of breast cancer stem cells, their relationship to breast cancer development, and the differences between normal and cancer stem cells may lead to novel approaches to breast cancer diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  19. EGFR-inhibitors, radiotherapy and normal tissue toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    will be explained with references to the current knowledge of the biology of skin toxicity. Treatment options for acute side-effects in skin and mucosa after bio-radiotherapy is rarely causal. A few attempts have been done; some of them aiming to rephosphorylate the EGFreceptor in the skin with vitamin K3. The talk......EGFR-inhibitors have been used in several clinical settings during the last decade and side-effects related to normal tissues like the skin, mucosa and kidney has been well described. However, when EGFR-inhibitors are combined with radiotherapy, then different skin and mucosa toxicity profiles can...... will discuss the available data from these studies. Across several tumour sites and for different EGFR-inhibitors, a correlation between skin toxicity and tumour response has also been documented. The reason for this correlation is not obvious but probably related to genetic alterations or certain genetic...

  20. http://programminghistorian.org/lessons/normalizing-data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Turkel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The list that we created in the From HTML to a List of Words (2 needs some normalizing before it can be used further. We are going to do this by applying additional string methods, as well as by using regular expressions. Once normalized, we will be able to more easily analyze our data.

  1. Representations of reductive normal algebraic monoids

    OpenAIRE

    Doty, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The rational representation theory of a reductive normal algebraic monoid (with one-dimensional center) forms a highest weight category, in the sense of Cline, Parshall, and Scott. This is a fundamental fact about the representation theory of reductive normal algebraic monoids. We survey how this result was obtained, and treat some natural examples coming from classical groups.

  2. Morphological evaluation of normal human corneal epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlers, Niels; Heegaard, Steffen; Hjortdal, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    of corneas from 100 consecutively selected paraffin-embedded eyes were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS). All specimens were evaluated by light microscopy. The eyes were enucleated from patients with choroidal melanoma. Corneas were considered to be normal. RESULTS: Ninety of 100....... The high number of pathological observations suggests that 'normal' eyes harbour and potentially accumulate considerable pathology....

  3. On the Computation of Noether Normalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱烨; 张江峰

    2004-01-01

    This paper considered the Noether normalization of a finitely generated algebra over an algebraically closed field. It gives a necessary and sufficient condition as well as an algorithm for the identification of those algebraically independent variables, then uses these elements to construct the Noether normalization of this algebra.

  4. A Skew-Normal Mixture Regression Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Lin, Tsung-I

    2014-01-01

    A challenge associated with traditional mixture regression models (MRMs), which rest on the assumption of normally distributed errors, is determining the number of unobserved groups. Specifically, even slight deviations from normality can lead to the detection of spurious classes. The current work aims to (a) examine how sensitive the commonly…

  5. Combinatorial Solutions to Normal Ordering of Bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Blasiak, P; Horzela, A; Penson, K A; Solomon, A I

    2005-01-01

    We present a combinatorial method of constructing solutions to the normal ordering of boson operators. Generalizations of standard combinatorial notions - the Stirling and Bell numbers, Bell polynomials and Dobinski relations - lead to calculational tools which allow to find explicitly normally ordered forms for a large class of operator functions.

  6. Product of normal edge transitive Cayley graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Assari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available For two normal edge transitive Cayley graphs on two groups H and K whichhave no common direct factor and gcd(|H|/|H'|, |Z(K| = 1 = gcd(|K=K′|,|Z(H|,we consider four standard product of them and proved that only tensor product ofthem can be normal edge transitive.

  7. More on (,-Normal Operators in Hilbert Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoul Eskandari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We study some properties of (,-normal operators and we present various inequalities between the operator norm and the numerical radius of (,-normal operators on Banach algebra ℬ(ℋ of all bounded linear operators ∶ℋ→ℋ, where ℋ is Hilbert space.

  8. Construction of \\mu-normal sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Madritsch, Manfred G.; Mance, Bill

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper we extend Champernowne's construction of normal numbers to provide sequences which are generic for a given invariant probability measure, which need not be the maximal one. We present a construction together with estimates and examples for normal numbers with respect to L\\"uroth series expansion, continued fractions expansion or $\\beta$-expansion.

  9. Normal Form for Families of Hamiltonian Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Guo WANG

    2007-01-01

    We consider perturbations of integrable Hamiltonian systems in the neighborhood of normally parabolic invariant tori. Using the techniques of KAM-theory we prove that there exists a canonical transformation that puts the Hamiltonian in normal form up to a remainder of weighted order 2d+1. And some dynamical consequences are obtained.

  10. Study of palmar dermatoglyphics in vitiligo and normal individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azra Mubeen Karnul

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Vitiligo is a common idiopathic & hereditary disease characterized by one or more patches of de-pigmented skin due to degeneration or disappearance of cutaneous melanocytes. Variations in dermatoglyphic pattern are noted in many genetic & hereditary disorders. Altered dermatoglyphics pattern is well established as a diagnostic aid in such disorders. Early diagnosis is also possible. Therefore this Study was conducted to analyse dermatoglyphic patterns in Vitiligo cases & their deviations from normal individuals & to find out any existence of specific dermatoglyphic pattern in Vitiligo cases. Method: Study conducted across 100 Vitiligo cases and 100 normal individuals. Finger tips and palmar prints were studied. Result: Finger tips pattern of Vitiligo males showed increased loop patterns on 2nd, 3rd & 4th finger tips of both hands. There is an overall highly significant diminution in whorl pattern in hands of males. Arch pattern is shown in all finger tips of female cases exceedingly .The main line formula evidenced in Vitiligo cases is 7 6 5’ & while as reference sample 11 9 7 in both sexes. Distal displacement of axial triradius is increased significantly in left hands of female cases. ATD angle is reduced significantly in male vitiligo cases. Classical distribution formula for palmar pattern frequency is altered as the pattern frequency is increased in hypothenar & ID2 of right hands of vitiligo males while as hypothenar & ID1 in right hands of vitiligo females. Conclusion: Deviations in dermatoglyphic pattern might be a marker for individual diagnosis of vitiligo & a simple & inexpensive means to determine the disease which have hereditary background & can be employed as a method for screening Vitiligo.

  11. Serum Copper and Plasma Protein Status in Normal Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nushrat Noor, Nasim Jahan, Nayma Sultana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Gradual alteration of serum copper and some plasma protein levels may occur with advancement of pregnancy, which is associated with increased maternal and infant morbidity and mortality.Objective: To observe serum copper and plasma protein levels in normal pregnant women of different trimesters in order to find out their nutritional status.Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in the Department of Physiology, Sir Salimullah Medical College (SSMC, Dhaka, between 1st January 2010 and December 2010. Ninety normal pregnant women of different trimesters with age 20-30 years were included in the study group. They were selected from Out Patient Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, SSMC. Age matched 30 non-pregnant women were taken as control. Serum copper level was measured by Spectrophotometric method, serum total protein and albumin levels were estimated by standard method. Statistical analysis was done by one way ANOVA, Bonferroni and Pearson’s correlation coefficient test as applicable.Results: Serum Cu levels were significantly higher in all trimesters of pregnant women compared to control. Again, this value was significantly higher in 3rd trimester than that of in 1st and 2nd trimester and also in 2nd trimester than that of in 1st trimester. In addition, mean serum total protein level was significantly lower in 3rd trimester than control but no statistically significant difference was observed among different trimesters. Again, mean serum albumin level was significantly lower in 2nd and 3rd trimester than 1st trimester and control. In addition, serum Cu concentration showed significant positive correlation with different trimesters of gestation.Conclusion: This study reveals that hypercupremia along with hypoproteinemia occur in pregnant women from 1st to 3rd trimester of gestation. This gradual alteration of micro and macronutrients become more profound with advancement of pregnancy.

  12. Normalizing the causality between time series

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, X San

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a rigorous yet concise formula has been derived to evaluate the information flow, and hence the causality in a quantitative sense, between time series. To assess the importance of a resulting causality, it needs to be normalized. The normalization is achieved through distinguishing three types of fundamental mechanisms that govern the marginal entropy change of the flow recipient. A normalized or relative flow measures its importance relative to other mechanisms. In analyzing realistic series, both absolute and relative information flows need to be taken into account, since the normalizers for a pair of reverse flows belong to two different entropy balances; it is quite normal that two identical flows may differ a lot in relative importance in their respective balances. We have reproduced these results with several autoregressive models. We have also shown applications to a climate change problem and a financial analysis problem. For the former, reconfirmed is the role of the Indian Ocean Dipole as ...

  13. Normalization strategy of microarray gene expression data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To discuss strategies and methods of normalization on how to deal with and analyze data for different chips with the combination of statistics, mathematics and bioinformatics in order to find significant difference genes. Methods: With Excel and SPSS software, high or low density chips were analyzed through total intensity normalization (TIN) and locally weighted linear regression normalization (LWLRN). Results: These methods effectively reduced systemic errors and made data more comparable and reliable. Conclusion: These methods can search the genes of significant difference, although normalization methods are being developed and need to be improved further. Great breakthrough will be obtained in microarray data normalization analysis and transformation with the development of non-linear technology, software and hardware of computer.

  14. A study of cardiovascular autonomic function in normal pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumana Panja

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was designed to evaluate the physiological responses to noninvasive cardiovascular autonomic function tests in normal pregnancy and compare them with non- pregnant controls. Materials and Methods: The study population comprised of 90 apparently healthy, pregnant women divided equally into three groups based on their period of gestation and 30 otherwise healthy, non-pregnant women as controls. The standard autonomic function tests based on cardiovascular reflexes, including heart rate response tests and blood pressure response tests were performed. Result: It was observed that variability of mean between and within all the population groups and controls was significantly different. Multiple comparison analysis revealed a significantly lower Deep Breathing Difference in pregnant subjects, significant difference in Valsalva Ratio in third trimester group, a significantly lower Postural Tachycardia Index only during last trimester and a significantly higher fall in systolic blood pressure on standing only during 1st trimester. A significantly lower alteration in diastolic blood pressure during isometric handgrip in later trimesters and a significant increase in overall cardiovascular autonomic score between and within all groups were also observed. Conclusion: The observations serve to corroborate that the cardiovascular indices in pregnant women are significantly altered in comparison to non-pregnant women, thus highlighting the importance of cardiovascular monitoring during pregnancy. The study also helped to reaffirm the efficacy of simple cardiovascular reflex tests in research on pregnancy physiology.

  15. The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田允; 黄继云; 王锐; 陶蓉蓉; 卢应梅; 廖美华; 陆楠楠; 李静; 芦博; 韩峰

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impaired social interaction and communication. However, the role of synaptic dysfunction during development of autism remains unclear. In the present study, we address the alterations of biochemical signaling in hippocampal network following induction of the autism in experimental animals. Here, the an- imal disease model and DNA array being used to investigate the differences in transcriptome or- ganization between autistic and normal brain by gene co--expression network analysis.

  16. Tributyltin exposure alters cytokine levels in mouse serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Shanieek; Pellom, Samuel T; Shanker, Anil; Whalen, Margaret M

    2016-11-01

    Tributyltin (TBT), a toxic environmental contaminant, has been widely utilized for various industrial, agricultural and household purposes. Its usage has led to a global contamination and its bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms and terrestrial mammals. Previous studies suggest that TBT has debilitating effects on the overall immune function of animals, rendering them more vulnerable to diseases. TBT (at concentrations that have been detected in human blood) alters secretion of inflammatory cytokines from human lymphocytes ex vivo. Thus, it is important to determine if specified levels of TBT can alter levels of cytokines in an in vivo system. Mice were exposed to biologically relevant concentrations of TBT (200, 100 or 25 nM final concentrations). The quantitative determination of interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL2, IL5, IL7, IL12βp40, IL13, IL15, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP), MIP2 and regulated on activation normal T-cell-expressed and secreted (RANTES) was performed in mouse sera by MAGPIX analysis and Western blot. Results indicated alterations (both decreases and increases) in several cytokines. The pro-inflammatory cytokines IFNγ, TNFα, IL-1β, IL-2, IL5, IL12βp40 and IL-15 were altered as were the chemokines MIP-1 and RANTES and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-13. Increases in IFNγ and TNFα were seen in the serum of mice exposed to TBT for less than 24 h. Levels of IL1β, IL-12 βp40, IL-5 and IL-15 were also modulated in mouse serum, depending on the specific experiment and exposure level. IL-2 was consistently decreased in mouse serum when animals were exposed to TBT. There were also TBT-induced increases in MIP-1β, RANTES and IL-13. These results from human and murine samples clearly suggest that TBT exposures modulate the secretion inflammatory cytokines.

  17. Altered States of Consciousness and Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ben Morgan; And Others

    This document contains the reports of research at a symposium on "Altered States of Consciousness and Alcohol." The participants primarily agreed that alcohol induces an altered state of consciousness similar to other drugs, but that this phenomenon has not been explicitly stated due to the current interest in newer and more novel drugs. The…

  18. Metabolomic analysis of urine samples by UHPLC-QTOF-MS: Impact of normalization strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnebin, Yoric; Tonoli, David; Lescuyer, Pierre; Ponte, Belen; de Seigneux, Sophie; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Schappler, Julie; Boccard, Julien; Rudaz, Serge

    2017-02-22

    Among the various biological matrices used in metabolomics, urine is a biofluid of major interest because of its non-invasive collection and its availability in large quantities. However, significant sources of variability in urine metabolomics based on UHPLC-MS are related to the analytical drift and variation of the sample concentration, thus requiring normalization. A sequential normalization strategy was developed to remove these detrimental effects, including: (i) pre-acquisition sample normalization by individual dilution factors to narrow the concentration range and to standardize the analytical conditions, (ii) post-acquisition data normalization by quality control-based robust LOESS signal correction (QC-RLSC) to correct for potential analytical drift, and (iii) post-acquisition data normalization by MS total useful signal (MSTUS) or probabilistic quotient normalization (PQN) to prevent the impact of concentration variability. This generic strategy was performed with urine samples from healthy individuals and was further implemented in the context of a clinical study to detect alterations in urine metabolomic profiles due to kidney failure. In the case of kidney failure, the relation between creatinine/osmolality and the sample concentration is modified, and relying only on these measurements for normalization could be highly detrimental. The sequential normalization strategy was demonstrated to significantly improve patient stratification by decreasing the unwanted variability and thus enhancing data quality.

  19. Alteration in buccal mucosal cells due to the effect of tobacco and alcohol by assessing the silver-stained nucleolar organiser regions and micronuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Jindal

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Tobacco and alcohol consumption produce alteration in apparently normal buccal mucosal cells, which may cumulatively lead to carcinomatous changes. Result of these changes may be used as educational tool in cessation of habits.

  20. Alterations of plasma nitric oxide, vascular endothelial growth factor, and soluble form of its receptor (sFlt-1 after resistance exercise: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parivash Shekarchizadeh Esfahanni

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Resistance training does not alter plasma angiogenic factors (NO, VEGF, and sFlt-1, at least in normal rats. More studies are needed to show the effect of resistance training on angiogenesis process.

  1. Genome-wide quantification of rare somatic mutations in normal human tissues using massively parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Margaret L; Kinde, Isaac; Tomasetti, Cristian; McMahon, K Wyatt; Rosenquist, Thomas A; Grollman, Arthur P; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Papadopoulos, Nickolas

    2016-08-30

    We present the bottleneck sequencing system (BotSeqS), a next-generation sequencing method that simultaneously quantifies rare somatic point mutations across the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. BotSeqS combines molecular barcoding with a simple dilution step immediately before library amplification. We use BotSeqS to show age- and tissue-dependent accumulations of rare mutations and demonstrate that somatic mutational burden in normal human tissues can vary by several orders of magnitude, depending on biologic and environmental factors. We further show major differences between the mutational patterns of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes in normal tissues. Lastly, the mutation spectra of normal tissues were different from each other, but similar to those of the cancers that arose in them. This technology can provide insights into the number and nature of genetic alterations in normal tissues and can be used to address a variety of fundamental questions about the genomes of diseased tissues.

  2. 14 CFR 26.45 - Holders of type certificates-Alterations and repairs to alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Holders of type certificates-Alterations... AIRPLANES Aging Airplane Safety-Damage Tolerance Data for Repairs and Alterations § 26.45 Holders of type... alteration data developed by the holder of a type certificate, the holder must— (1) Review...

  3. Brain responses to altered auditory feedback during musical keyboard production: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfordresher, Peter Q; Mantell, James T; Brown, Steven; Zivadinov, Robert; Cox, Jennifer L

    2014-03-27

    Alterations of auditory feedback during piano performance can be profoundly disruptive. Furthermore, different alterations can yield different types of disruptive effects. Whereas alterations of feedback synchrony disrupt performed timing, alterations of feedback pitch contents can disrupt accuracy. The current research tested whether these behavioral dissociations correlate with differences in brain activity. Twenty pianists performed simple piano keyboard melodies while being scanned in a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. In different conditions they experienced normal auditory feedback, altered auditory feedback (asynchronous delays or altered pitches), or control conditions that excluded movement or sound. Behavioral results replicated past findings. Neuroimaging data suggested that asynchronous delays led to increased activity in Broca's area and its right homologue, whereas disruptive alterations of pitch elevated activations in the cerebellum, area Spt, inferior parietal lobule, and the anterior cingulate cortex. Both disruptive conditions increased activations in the supplementary motor area. These results provide the first evidence of neural responses associated with perception/action mismatch during keyboard production.

  4. The effective degeneracy of protein normal modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyuntae; Song, Guang

    2016-05-12

    Normal modes are frequently computed and used to portray protein dynamics and interpret protein conformational changes. In this work, we investigate the nature of normal modes and find that the normal modes of proteins, especially those at the low frequency range (0-600 cm(-1)), are highly susceptible to degeneracy. Two or more modes are degenerate if they have the same frequency and consequently any orthogonal transformation of them also is a valid representation of the mode subspace. Thus, degenerate modes can no longer characterize unique directions of motions as regular modes do. Though the normal modes of proteins are usually of different frequencies, the difference in frequency between neighboring modes is so small that, under even slight structural uncertainty that unavoidably exists in structure determination, it can easily vanish and as a result, a mode becomes effectively degenerate with its neighboring modes. This can be easily observed in that some modes seem to disappear and their matching modes cannot be found when the structure used to compute the modes is modified only slightly. We term this degeneracy the effective degeneracy of normal modes. This work is built upon our recent discovery that the vibrational spectrum of globular proteins is universal. The high density of modes observed in the vibrational frequency spectra of proteins renders their normal modes highly susceptible to degeneracy, under even the smallest structural uncertainty. Indeed, we find the degree of degeneracy of modes is proportional to the density of modes in the vibrational spectrum. This means that for modes at the same frequency, degeneracy is more severe for larger proteins. Degeneracy exists also in the modes of coarse-grained models, but to a much lesser extent than those of all-atom models. In closing, we discuss the implications of the effective degeneracy of normal modes: how it may significantly affect the ways in which normal modes are used in various normal modes

  5. The venous manifestations of pulse wave encephalopathy: windkessel dysfunction in normal aging and senile dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, Grant A. [Locked Bag 1, Newcastle Region Mail Center, Department of Medical Imaging, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle (Australia); Levi, Christopher R.; Wang, Yang; Lovett, Elizabeth C. [Hunter Medical Research Institute, Clinical Neurosciences Program, Newcastle (Australia); Schofield, Peter [James Fletcher Hospital, Neuropsychiatry Unit, Newcastle (Australia)

    2008-06-15

    Cerebral arterial, venous and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsations are closely coupled and this produces pulsation dampening or the windkessel effect. Normal pressure hydrocephalus is a manifestation of the breakdown of this windkessel effect with altered CSF and venous pulsations being noted. The aim of this study was to show that dysfunction of the windkessel mechanism is also a component of normal aging and senile dementia. The study group comprised 24 patients classified as either early senile dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT) or vascular dementia (VaD). The patients with dementia were compared with 12 age-matched non-cognitively impaired subjects, and 12 normal young individuals were compared with the normal aging group. MRI flow quantification was used to measure the nonpulsatile and pulsatile components of blood flow as well as the pulsation at the tentorial incisura. With normal aging blood flow decreased but arterial pulsations increased in volume by 49% (P = 0.003). The CSF vented via the tentorial incisura does not change significantly with age and therefore increased venous pulsation is necessary. In patients with VaD the arterial pulse volume was higher by 24% and the straight sinus pulsation was higher by 57% than in normal aging subjects (P = 0.05 and P = 0.03, respectively). In patients with SDAT the total venous pulsation volumes were similar to those in normal aging subjects but there was less basal sinus pulsation. Normal aging, SDAT and VaD are associated with alterations in venous pulsation due to a breakdown of the windkessel effect. (orig.)

  6. Normal radiographic findings. 4. act. ed.; Roentgennormalbefunde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, T.B. [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Dillingen (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    This book can serve the reader in three ways: First, it presents normal findings for all radiographic techniques including KM. Important data which are criteria of normal findings are indicated directly in the pictures and are also explained in full text and in summary form. Secondly, it teaches the systematics of interpreting a picture - how to look at it, what structures to regard in what order, and for what to look in particular. Checklists are presented in each case. Thirdly, findings are formulated in accordance with the image analysis procedure. All criteria of normal findings are defined in these formulations, which make them an important didactic element. (orig.)

  7. On normality of the Wijsman topology

    CERN Document Server

    Holá, Lubica

    2011-01-01

    Let $(X,\\rho)$ be a metric space and $(CL(X),W_\\rho)$ be the hyperspace of all nonempty closed subsets of $X$ equipped with the Wijsman topology. The Wijsman topology is one of the most important classical hyperspace topologies. We give a partial answer to a question posed in \\cite{maio} whether the normality of $(CL(X),W_\\rho)$ is equivalent to its metrizability. If $(X,\\rho)$ is a linear metric space, then $(CL(X),W_\\rho)$ is normal if and only if $(CL(X),W_\\rho)$ is metrizable. Some further results concerning normality of the Wijsman topology on $CL(X)$ are also proved.

  8. Normal families related to shared sets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LV Feng-jiao; LI Jiang-tao

    2008-01-01

    We studied the normality criterion for families of meromorphic functions related to shared sets. Let F be a family of meromorphic functions on the unit disc (, a and b be distinct non-zero values, S={a,b}, and k be a positive integer. If for every f∈F, i) the zeros of f(z) have a multiplicity of at least k+1, and ii) , then F is normal on (. At the same time, the corresponding results of normal function are also proved.

  9. The lambda sigma calculus and strong normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack-Nielsen, Anders; Schürmann, Carsten

    Explicit substitution calculi can be classified into several dis- tinct categories depending on whether they are confluent, meta-confluent, strong normalization preserving, strongly normalizing, simulating, fully compositional, and/or local. In this paper we present a variant of the λσ-calculus......, which satisfies all seven conditions. In particular, we show how to circumvent Mellies counter-example to strong normalization by a slight restriction of the congruence rules. The calculus is implemented as the core data structure of the Celf logical framework. All meta-theoretic aspects of this work...

  10. Nonlinear dynamics exploration through normal forms

    CERN Document Server

    Kahn, Peter B

    2014-01-01

    Geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students, this exposition covers the method of normal forms and its application to ordinary differential equations through perturbation analysis. In addition to its emphasis on the freedom inherent in the normal form expansion, the text features numerous examples of equations, the kind of which are encountered in many areas of science and engineering. The treatment begins with an introduction to the basic concepts underlying the normal forms. Coverage then shifts to an investigation of systems with one degree of freedom that model oscillations

  11. Gene expression profiles in liver cancer and normal liver tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian Xin Liu; Hong Chi Jiang; An Long Zhu; Jin Zhou; Xiu Qin Wang; Min Wu

    2000-01-01

    AIM To describe a liver cancer = specific gene expression profile and to identify genes that showed alteredexpression between liver cancer tissues and their adjacent nearly normal tissues.METHODS The cDNA probes which were labeled with a-32P dATP were synthesized from total RNA ofliver cancer and adjacent normal tissues and hybridized separately to two identical Atlas human cancer eDNAexpression array membranes containing 588 known genes.RESULTS Autoradiographic results were analyzed by specific Atlas ImageTM (version 1. 0) software.Among the 588 genes analyzed, 18 genes were found up-regulated in cancer, including TFDP2, Aktl, E2F-3etc, and 25 genes were down-regulated in cancer, including TDGF1, BAK, LAR, etc. Expression levels ofgenes that associated with the regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, cell-cellinteraction, invasion regulators and eytokines altered mostly.CONCLUSION The result obtained from Atlas microarray provides a comprehensive liver cancer-specificexpression profile. The results can lead to the identification of liver cancer-specific biomarkers and may behelpful in early diagnosis and dentifiction of target genes for designing rational therapeutic strategies.

  12. Nucleophosmin mutations in childhood acute myelogenous leukemia with normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Dell'Oro, Maria Grazia; Mecucci, Cristina; Giarin, Emanuela; Masetti, Riccardo; Rossi, Vincenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Martelli, Massimo F; Basso, Giuseppe; Pession, Andrea; Biondi, Andrea; Falini, Brunangelo

    2005-08-15

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein involved in leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations, and it regulates the alternate reading frame (ARF)-p53 tumor-suppressor pathway. Recently, it has been demonstrated that mutations of the NPM1 gene alter the protein at its C-terminal, causing its cytoplasmic localization. Cytoplasmic NPM was detected in 35% of adult patients with primary non-French-American-British (FAB) classification M3 acute myeloid leukemia (AML), associated mainly with normal karyotype. We evaluated the prevalence of the NPM1 gene mutation in non-M3 childhood AML patients enrolled in the ongoing Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP-AML02) protocol in Italy. NPM1 mutations were found in 7 (6.5%) of 107 successfully analyzed patients. NPM1-mutated patients carried a normal karyotype (7/26, 27.1%) and were older in age. Thus, the NPM1 mutation is a frequent abnormality in AML patients without known genetic marker; the mutation may represent a new target to monitor minimal residual disease in AML and a potential candidate for alternative and targeted treatments.

  13. Contribution of altered signal transduction associated to glutamate receptors in brain to the neurological alterations of hepatic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vicente Felipo

    2006-01-01

    Patients with liver disease may present hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome covering a wide range of neurological alterations,including cognitive and motor disturbances. HE reduces the quality of life of the patients and is associated with poor prognosis. In the worse cases HE may lead to coma or death.The mechanisms leading to HE which are not well known are being studied using animal models. The neurological alterations in HE are a consequence of impaired cerebral function mainly due to alterations in neurotransmission. We review here some studies indicating that alterations in neurotransmission associated to different types of glutamate receptors are responsible for some of the cognitive and motor alterations present in HE.These studies show that the function of the signal transduction pathway glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP associated to the NMDA type of glutamate receptors is impaired in brain in vivo in HE animal models as well as in brain of patients died of HE. Activation of NMDA receptors in brain activates this pathway and increases cGMP. In animal models of HE this increase in cGMP induced by activation of NMDA receptors is reduced,which is responsible for the impairment in learning ability in these animal models. Increasing cGMP by pharmacological means restores learning ability in rats with HE and may be a new therapeutic approach to improve cognitive function in patients with HE.However, it is necessary to previously assess the possible secondary effects.Patients with HE may present psychomotor slowing,hypokinesia and bradykinesia. Animal models of HE also show hypolocomotion. It has been shown in rats with HE that hypolocomotion is due to excessive activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in substantia nigra pars reticulata. Blocking mGluR1 in this brain area normalizes motor activity in the rats, suggesting that a similar treatment for patients with HE could be useful to treat psychomotor slowing and

  14. Genetic alterations in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magić Zvonko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although the patients with diagnosed B-NHL are classified into the same disease stage on the basis of clinical, histopathological, and immunological parameters, they respond significantly different to the applied treatment. This points out the possibility that within the same group of lymphoma there are different diseases at molecular level. For that reason many studies deal with the detection of gene alterations in lymphomas to provide a better framework for diagnosis and treatment of these hematological malignancies. Aim. To define genetic alterations in the B-NHL with highest possibilities for diagnostic purposes and molecular detection of MRD. Methods. Formalin fixed and paraffin embedded lymph node tissues from 45 patients were examined by different PCR techniques for the presence of IgH and TCR γ gene rearrangement; K-ras and H-ras mutations; c-myc amplification and bcl-2 translocation. There were 34 cases of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (B-NHL, 5 cases of T-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (T-NHL and 6 cases of chronic lymphadenitis (CL. The mononuclear cell fraction of the peripheral blood of 12 patients with B-NHL was analyzed for the presence of monoclonality at the time of diagnosis and in 3 to 6 months time intervals after an autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Results. The monoclonality of B-lymphocytes, as evidenced by DNA fragment length homogeneity, was detected in 88 % (30/34 of B-NHL, but never in CL, T-NHL, or in normal PBL. Bcl-2 translocation was detected in 7/31 (22.6% B-NHL specimens, c-myc amplification 9/31 (29%, all were more than doubled, K-ras mutations in 1/31 (3.23% and H-ras mutations in 2/31 (6.45% of the examined B-NHL samples. In the case of LC and normal PBL, however, these gene alterations were not detected. All the patients (12 with B-NHL had dominant clone of B-lymphocyte in the peripheral blood at the time of diagnosis while only in 2 of 12 patients MRD was detected 3 or 6 months after

  15. Sampling exactly from the normal distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Karney, Charles F F

    2013-01-01

    An algorithm for sampling exactly from the normal distribution is given. The algorithm reads some number of uniformly distributed random digits in a given base and generates an initial portion of the representation of a normal deviate in the same base. Thereafter, uniform random digits are copied directly into the representation of the normal deviate. Thus, in constrast to existing methods, it is possible to generate normal deviates exactly rounded to any precision with a mean cost that scales linearly in the precision. The method performs no arbitrary precision arithmetic, calls no transcendental functions, and, indeed, uses no floating point arithmetic whatsoever; it uses only simple integer operations. The algorithm is inspired by von Neumann's algorithm for sampling from the exponential distribution; an improvement to von Neumann's algorithm is also given.

  16. [Normal and abnormal meningeal enhancement: MRI features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietemann, J L; Correia Bernardo, R; Bogorin, A; Abu Eid, M; Koob, M; Nogueira, Th; Vargas, M I; Fakhoury, W; Zöllner, G

    2005-11-01

    The authors describe normal imaging of the meninges and meningeal spaces and MR (magnetic resonance) imaging findings in tumoral and nontumoral diseases. Dural or/and pial enhancement may be related to tumoral, infectious or granulomatous diseases.

  17. Relative Radiometric Normalization of Multitemporal images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Castillo Sanz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A correct radiometric normalization between both images is fundamental for change detection. MAD method and its IR-MAD extension in an implementation on multisprectral aerial images is described in this paper

  18. Developmental pragmatics in normal and abnormal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bara, B G; Bosco, F M; Bucciarelli, M

    1999-07-01

    We propose a critical review of current theories of developmental pragmatics. The underlying assumption is that such a theory ought to account for both normal and abnormal development. From a clinical point of view, we are concerned with the effects of brain damage on the emergence of pragmatic competence. In particular, the paper deals with direct speech acts, indirect speech acts, irony, and deceit in children with head injury, closed head injury, hydrocephalus, focal brain damage, and autism. Since no single theory covers systematically the emergence of pragmatic capacity in normal children, it is not surprising that we have not found a systematic account of deficits in the communicative performance of brain injured children. In our view, the challenge for a pragmatic theory is the determination of the normal developmental pattern within which different pragmatic phenomena may find a precise role. Such a framework of normal behavior would then permit the systematic study of abnormal pragmatic development.

  19. The method of minimal normal forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mane, S.R.; Weng, W.T.

    1992-12-31

    Normal form methods for solving nonlinear differential equations are reviewed and the comparative merits of three methods are evaluated. The concept of the minimal normal form is explained and is shown to be superior to other choices. The method is then extended to apply to the evaluation of discrete maps of an accelerator or storage ring. Such an extension, as suggested in this paper, is more suited for accelerator-based applications than a formulation utilizing continuous differential equations. A computer code has been generated to systematically implement various normal form formulations for maps in two-dimensional phase space. Specific examples of quadratic and cubic nonlinear fields were used and solved by the method developed. The minimal normal form method shown here gives good results using relatively low order expansions.

  20. The method of minimal normal forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mane, S.R.; Weng, W.T.

    1992-01-01

    Normal form methods for solving nonlinear differential equations are reviewed and the comparative merits of three methods are evaluated. The concept of the minimal normal form is explained and is shown to be superior to other choices. The method is then extended to apply to the evaluation of discrete maps of an accelerator or storage ring. Such an extension, as suggested in this paper, is more suited for accelerator-based applications than a formulation utilizing continuous differential equations. A computer code has been generated to systematically implement various normal form formulations for maps in two-dimensional phase space. Specific examples of quadratic and cubic nonlinear fields were used and solved by the method developed. The minimal normal form method shown here gives good results using relatively low order expansions.

  1. Ultrasound, normal placenta - Braxton Hicks (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... performed at 17 weeks gestation. It shows the placenta during a normal (Braxton Hicks) contraction. Throughout the ... contracts to facilitate better blood flow through the placenta and the fetus. In this ultrasound, the placenta ...

  2. Mental Health: What's Normal, What's Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Adult health Understanding what's considered normal mental health can be tricky. See how feelings, thoughts and behaviors determine mental health and how to recognize if you or a ...

  3. Comparison of nuclear matrix proteins between gastric cancer and normal gastric tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin-Xian Zhang; Yi Ding; Zhuo Li; Xiao-Ping Le; Wei Zhang; Ling Sun; Hui-Rong Shi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the alteration of nuclear matrix proteins (NMPs) in gastric cancer.METHODS: The NMPs extracted from 22 cases of gastric cancer and normal gastric tissues were investigated by SDS-PAGE technique and the data were analyzed using Genetools analysis software.RESULTS: Compared with normal gastric tissue, the expression of 30 ku and 28 ku NMPs in gastric cancer decreased significantly (P=0.002, P=0.001, P<0.05). No significant difference was found in the expression of the two NMPs between the various differentiated grades (P=0.947, P=0.356) and clinical stages of gastric cancer (P=0.920, P=0.243, P>0.05).CONCLUSION: The results suggested that the alteration of NMPs in gastric cancer occurred at the early stage of gastric cancer development.

  4. High-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals metabolic effects of normal brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Janna L; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Swerdlow, Russell H; Choi, In-Young; Lee, Phil; Brooks, William M

    2014-07-01

    Altered brain metabolism is likely to be an important contributor to normal cognitive decline and brain pathology in elderly individuals. To characterize the metabolic changes associated with normal brain aging, we used high-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo to quantify 20 neurochemicals in the hippocampus and sensorimotor cortex of young adult and aged rats. We found significant differences in the neurochemical profile of the aged brain when compared with younger adults, including lower aspartate, ascorbate, glutamate, and macromolecules, and higher glucose, myo-inositol, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, total choline, and glutamine. These neurochemical biomarkers point to specific cellular mechanisms that are altered in brain aging, such as bioenergetics, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell membrane turnover, and endogenous neuroprotection. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be a valuable translational approach for studying mechanisms of brain aging and pathology, and for investigating treatments to preserve or enhance cognitive function in aging.

  5. Normal cardiac function in mice with supraphysiological cardiac creatine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacruz, Lucia; Hernandez, Alejandro; Nienaber, Jeffrey; Mishra, Rajashree; Pinilla, Miguel; Burchette, James; Mao, Lan; Rockman, Howard A; Jacobs, Danny O

    2014-02-01

    Creatine and phosphocreatine levels are decreased in heart failure, and reductions in myocellular phosphocreatine levels predict the severity of the disease and portend adverse outcomes. Previous studies of transgenic mouse models with increased creatine content higher than two times baseline showed the development of heart failure and shortened lifespan. Given phosphocreatine's role in buffering ATP content, we tested the hypothesis whether elevated cardiac creatine content would alter cardiac function under normal physiological conditions. Here, we report the creation of transgenic mice that overexpress the human creatine transporter (CrT) in cardiac muscle under the control of the α-myosin heavy chain promoter. Cardiac transgene expression was quantified by qRT-PCR, and human CrT protein expression was documented on Western blots and immunohistochemistry using a specific anti-CrT antibody. High-energy phosphate metabolites and cardiac function were measured in transgenic animals and compared with age-matched, wild-type controls. Adult transgenic animals showed increases of 5.7- and 4.7-fold in the content of creatine and free ADP, respectively. Phosphocreatine and ATP levels were two times as high in young transgenic animals but declined to control levels by the time the animals reached 8 wk of age. Transgenic mice appeared to be healthy and had normal life spans. Cardiac morphometry, conscious echocardiography, and pressure-volume loop studies demonstrated mild hypertrophy but normal function. Based on our characterization of the human CrT protein expression, creatine and phosphocreatine content, and cardiac morphometry and function, these transgenic mice provide an in vivo model for examining the therapeutic value of elevated creatine content for cardiac pathologies.

  6. Right thoracic curvature in the normal spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda Keigo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trunk asymmetry and vertebral rotation, at times observed in the normal spine, resemble the characteristics of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Right thoracic curvature has also been reported in the normal spine. If it is determined that the features of right thoracic side curvature in the normal spine are the same as those observed in AIS, these findings might provide a basis for elucidating the etiology of this condition. For this reason, we investigated right thoracic curvature in the normal spine. Methods For normal spinal measurements, 1,200 patients who underwent a posteroanterior chest radiographs were evaluated. These consisted of 400 children (ages 4-9, 400 adolescents (ages 10-19 and 400 adults (ages 20-29, with each group comprised of both genders. The exclusion criteria were obvious chest and spinal diseases. As side curvature is minimal in normal spines and the range at which curvature is measured is difficult to ascertain, first the typical curvature range in scoliosis patients was determined and then the Cobb angle in normal spines was measured using the same range as the scoliosis curve, from T5 to T12. Right thoracic curvature was given a positive value. The curve pattern was organized in each collective three groups: neutral (from -1 degree to 1 degree, right (> +1 degree, and left ( Results In child group, Cobb angle in left was 120, in neutral was 125 and in right was 155. In adolescent group, Cobb angle in left was 70, in neutral was 114 and in right was 216. In adult group, Cobb angle in left was 46, in neutral was 102 and in right was 252. The curvature pattern shifts to the right side in the adolescent group (p Conclusions Based on standing chest radiographic measurements, a right thoracic curvature was observed in normal spines after adolescence.

  7. Progeria, rapamycin and normal aging: recent breakthrough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2011-01-01

    A recent discovery that rapamycin suppresses a pro-senescent phenotype in progeric cells not only suggests a non-toxic therapy for progeria but also implies its similarity with normal aging. For one, rapamycin is also known to suppress aging of regular human cells. Here I discuss four potential scenarios, comparing progeria with both normal and accelerated aging. This reveals further indications of rapamycin both for accelerated aging in obese and for progeria. PMID:21743107

  8. Progeria, rapamycin and normal aging: recent breakthrough

    OpenAIRE

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2011-01-01

    A recent discovery that rapamycin suppresses a pro-senescent phenotype in progeric cells not only suggests a non-toxic therapy for progeria but also implies its similarity with normal aging. For one, rapamycin is also known to suppress aging of regular human cells. Here I discuss four potential scenarios, comparing progeria with both normal and accelerated aging. This reveals further indications of rapamycin both for accelerated aging in obese and for progeria.

  9. Progeria, rapamycin and normal aging: recent breakthrough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2011-07-01

    A recent discovery that rapamycin suppresses a pro-senescent phenotype in progeric cells not only suggests a non-toxic therapy for progeria but also implies its similarity with normal aging. For one, rapamycin is also known to suppress aging of regular human cells. Here I discuss four potential scenarios, comparing progeria with both normal and accelerated aging. This reveals further indications of rapamycin both for accelerated aging in obese and for progeria.

  10. Normal form analysis of the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, J.A.

    1994-07-01

    A systematic analysis effort is under way to calculate and model the effects of present and future upgrades to the Tevatron. As a first step, using normal form theory, amplitude-dependent tuneshifts for current Tevatron collider operating conditions were calculated. The normal form algorithm was implemented within the frame work of the object-oriented accelerator physics class libraries BEAMLINE and MXYZPTLK under development at Fermilab.

  11. Trauma-related dissociation and altered states of consciousness: a call for clinical, treatment, and neuroscience research

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this commentary is to describe trauma-related dissociation and altered states of consciousness in the context of a four-dimensional model that has recently been proposed (Frewen & Lanius, 2015). This model categorizes symptoms of trauma-related psychopathology into (1) those that occur within normal waking consciousness and (2) those that are dissociative and are associated with trauma-related altered states of consciousness (TRASC) along four dimensions: (1) time; (2) ...

  12. The olfactory neuron AWC promotes avoidance of normally palatable food following chronic dietary restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Olofsson, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Changes in metabolic state alter foraging behavior and food preference in animals. Here, I show that normally attractive food becomes repulsive to Caenorhabditis elegans if animals are chronically undernourished as a result of alimentary tract defects. This behavioral plasticity is achieved in two ways: increased food leaving and induction of aversive behavior towards food. A particularly strong food avoider is defective in the chitin synthase that makes the pharyngeal lining. Food avoidance ...

  13. The effect of short-term glucagon infusion on kidney function in normal man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Noer, J; Kehlet, H

    1977-01-01

    Kidney function was studied in six normal males before and during a 2 h glucagon (10 ng/kg/min) infusion. The following variables were determined during each 20 min clearance period; glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal plasma-flow (RPF) , filtration fraction (FF), urinary albumin and beta2...... not significantly changed. We suggest that glucagon may contribute to the reversible kidney function alterations typically found in poorly regulated juvenile diabetes, a state with relative or absolute hyperglucagonaemia....

  14. Histological analysis of the distribution pattern of glandular tissue in normal inferior nasal turbinates

    OpenAIRE

    Millas, Ieda; Liquidato, Bianca Maria; Dolci,José Eduardo Lutaif; Fregnani, José Humberto Tavares Guerreiro; Macéa,José Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Nasal turbinates play an important role in nasal physiology. These functions include the important function of particle filtration by the mucocilliary system. Many nasal mucosal diseases, such as rhinitis and rhinosinusitis, are directly related with structural alterations of the mucosal lining of the turbinates. AIM: To study the distribution pattern of the glandular epithelium of the lamina propria in the normal lower nasal turbinate mucosa of the anterior, medium and posterior portions. MA...

  15. Cortical Thinning in Network-Associated Regions in Cognitively Normal and Below-Normal Range Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnock, Farena; Parlar, Melissa; Hawco, Colin; Hanford, Lindsay; Hall, Geoffrey B.

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed whether cortical thickness across the brain and regionally in terms of the default mode, salience, and central executive networks differentiates schizophrenia patients and healthy controls with normal range or below-normal range cognitive performance. Cognitive normality was defined using the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) composite score (T = 50 ± 10) and structural magnetic resonance imaging was used to generate cortical thickness data. Whole brain analysis revealed that cognitively normal range controls (n = 39) had greater cortical thickness than both cognitively normal (n = 17) and below-normal range (n = 49) patients. Cognitively normal controls also demonstrated greater thickness than patients in regions associated with the default mode and salience, but not central executive networks. No differences on any thickness measure were found between cognitively normal range and below-normal range controls (n = 24) or between cognitively normal and below-normal range patients. In addition, structural covariance between network regions was high and similar across subgroups. Positive and negative symptom severity did not correlate with thickness values. Cortical thinning across the brain and regionally in relation to the default and salience networks may index shared aspects of the psychotic psychopathology that defines schizophrenia with no relation to cognitive impairment.

  16. Cortical Thinning in Network-Associated Regions in Cognitively Normal and Below-Normal Range Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Walter Heinrichs

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed whether cortical thickness across the brain and regionally in terms of the default mode, salience, and central executive networks differentiates schizophrenia patients and healthy controls with normal range or below-normal range cognitive performance. Cognitive normality was defined using the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB composite score (T=50 ± 10 and structural magnetic resonance imaging was used to generate cortical thickness data. Whole brain analysis revealed that cognitively normal range controls (n=39 had greater cortical thickness than both cognitively normal (n=17 and below-normal range (n=49 patients. Cognitively normal controls also demonstrated greater thickness than patients in regions associated with the default mode and salience, but not central executive networks. No differences on any thickness measure were found between cognitively normal range and below-normal range controls (n=24 or between cognitively normal and below-normal range patients. In addition, structural covariance between network regions was high and similar across subgroups. Positive and negative symptom severity did not correlate with thickness values. Cortical thinning across the brain and regionally in relation to the default and salience networks may index shared aspects of the psychotic psychopathology that defines schizophrenia with no relation to cognitive impairment.

  17. "Electromyographic pattern of masticatory muscles in altered dentition" Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H D Adhikari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The aim of this study is to show that a change in occlusal contacting pattern of tooth has definite influence over the behavior of orofacial musculature, resulting deleterious effect on it. Keeping this in view, the electromyographic (EMG activity of temporalis and masseter muscles in rest position of mandible, maximum clenching and chewing, was studied in total 24 subjects--14 subjects with normal occlusion and rest 10 with normal occlusion and one tooth carious which was prepared to receive an inlay with high point. This high point or occlusal interference was introduced intentionally to have a change in occlusion or "altered dentition". The subjects were all male medical volunteers with average age group of 20 years. A particular variety of chewing substance - chewing gum was used in this study. No EMG activity was detected in the rest position of mandible. In maximum clenching, balanced type of activity was seen bilaterally in normal occlusion.Whereas in changed occlusion, an unbalanced type of muscle activity was seen in temporalis muscle during maximum clenching. There was an overall decrease in activity in both the muscles during maximum clenching and during chewing. This decrease in activity was statistically significant in most of the times. A non-specific pattern of muscle activity resembling spasm in skeletal muscle -- a state of "hyperactivity" was also found during chewing in presence of occlusal interference. This spasm-like activity may cause pain in the muscles of masticatory apparatus. All these abnormal types of behavior of muscle were abolished after removal of high point and establishing the previous normal occlusion. It is therefore, for the clinicians to understand the importance of establishing occlusal equilibrium in day to day practice.

  18. Radiolytic Alteration of Biosignatures on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, R. C.

    2016-05-01

    When exposed to ionizing radiation, a complex distribution of redox states and reactive intermediates form in both perchlorate and nitrate salts. These reactive species then act to alter the forms of organic biosignatures preserved on Mars.

  19. Evaluation of Cytological Alterations of Oral Mucosa in Smokers and Waterpipe Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Khafri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Oral mucosal epithelia of smokers and waterpipe users are more susceptible to malignant alterations. The aim of this study was morphometric evaluation of the effects of using waterpipe on normal oral mucosa.Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study, cytologic smear samples from the following three different areas: buccal mucosa, lateral surface of the tongue, and floor of the mouth (right were taken from 40 smokers, 40 waterpipe users, and 40 normal individuals. They were then stained using Papanicolaou staining technique. Quantitative cytologic alterations such as nuclear and cytoplasmic size, nuclear-cytoplasmic (N/C ratio, Feret ratio (FR, percent of karriorhexis, vacuolization of cytoplasm, two or multilobed nuclei, inflammation, and candida were evaluated. Quantitative evaluation was performed using MoticPlus 2 software, and 50 cells in each slide were studied. Practitioners were matched with age and sex in three groups.Results: An increase in nuclear size, the N/C ratio, and F.R, while a decrease in cytoplasm size were observed in lateral surface of the tongue, buccal mucosa and floor of the mouth of smokers, waterpipe users and normal individuals, respectively(p≤0.001. No statistically significant differences were observed in percent of karriorhexis, vacuolization of cytoplasm, and two or multilobed nuclei in oral mucosa of smokers, waterpipe users (p=0.8, and normal individuals (p=0.9 in buccal mucosa,tongue, and mouth floor areas. However, the percentage of inflammation and candida in smokers (p<0.001 and waterpipe users (p=0.002 were higher than normal.individualsConclusion: Smoking and using waterpipe are effective in creating some quantitative cytometric alterations in oral mucosa; however, smoking shows greater effect in the cytometric alterations than using waterpipe. Role of cytology in screening and detection of oral mucosa malignancies in smokers and waterpipe users needs further studies.

  20. [Incidence of normal hearing in acoustic neuroma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Donato, G; Russo, A; Taibah, A; Saleh, E; Sanna, M

    1995-04-01

    Unilateral or asymetrical sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus and instability classically represent the main symptoms for the suspected diagnosis of acoustic neurinoma. In literature there are very few studies which refer about acoustic neurinoma in patients with normal hearing. In this article we report the results of a retrospective analysis of 155 acoustic neurinoma cases with normal hearing managed in our center in the last 7 years. These patients are classified in two groups: 1) with normal hearing at the time of diagnosis and 2) with at least a mild sensorineural hearing loss. Of this 155 cases, 21 (13.5%) had normal pure tone audiogram. An important characteristic of these patients, in comparison with the group with normal hearing, is the younger age. Tinnitus, instability, sudden hearing loss with complete recovery and vertigo are the most common symptoms. The mean pure tone threshold is 14.7 dB, speech audiometry is positive in very few cases, while a large number of cases show false negative. ABR are positive in 90.5% of cases, and demonstrate its high sensitivity for retrococlear pathology. The mean tumor size shows significant differences between the group with normal hearing and this with hearing loss. We believe that the presence of this symptoms in a young patient should necessitate complete neurotologic examination and in the patients with normal hearing a high level of suspicion represents the first step for early diagnosis of small tumors; the next step is the through evaluation of patient with pure tone audiogram, ABR, and imaging studies, preferably MRI with gadolinium, as this permits the diagnosis of small intracanalicular tumor. Thus, in cases of small tumors with good hearing we feel that will be possible to adopt hearing conservation surgical approach like FCM and retrosigmoid approach in more cases.

  1. Natal Host Plants Can Alter Herbivore Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Huipeng; Evan L. Preisser; Su, Qi; Jiao, Xiaoguo; Xie, Wen; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Zhang, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    Interspecific competition between herbivores is widely recognized as an important determinant of community structure. Although researchers have identified a number of factors capable of altering competitive interactions, few studies have addressed the influence of neighboring plant species. If adaptation to/ epigenetic effects of an herbivore’s natal host plant alter its performance on other host plants, then interspecific herbivore interactions may play out differently in heterogeneous and h...

  2. Sleep deprivation alters choice strategy without altering uncertainty or loss aversion preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullette-Gillman, O'Dhaniel A; Kurnianingsih, Yoanna A; Liu, Jean C J

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation alters decision making; however, it is unclear what specific cognitive processes are modified to drive altered choices. In this manuscript, we examined how one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) alters economic decision making. We specifically examined changes in uncertainty preferences dissociably from changes in the strategy with which participants engage with presented choice information. With high test-retest reliability, we show that TSD does not alter uncertainty preferences or loss aversion. Rather, TSD alters the information the participants rely upon to make their choices. Utilizing a choice strategy metric which contrasts the influence of maximizing and satisficing information on choice behavior, we find that TSD alters the relative reliance on maximizing information and satisficing information, in the gains domain. This alteration is the result of participants both decreasing their reliance on cognitively-complex maximizing information and a concomitant increase in the use of readily-available satisficing information. TSD did not result in a decrease in overall information use in either domain. These results show that sleep deprivation alters decision making by altering the informational strategies that participants employ, without altering their preferences.

  3. Sleep Deprivation Alters Choice Strategy Without Altering Uncertainty or Loss Aversion Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Dhaniel A Mullette-Gillman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sleep deprivation alters decision making; however, it is unclear what specific cognitive processes are modified to drive altered choices. In this manuscript, we examined how one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD alters economic decision making. We specifically examined changes in uncertainty preferences dissociably from changes in the strategy with which participants engage with presented choice information. With high test-retest reliability, we show that TSD does not alter uncertainty preferences or loss aversion. Rather, TSD alters the information the participants rely upon to make their choices. Utilizing a choice strategy metric which contrasts the influence of maximizing and satisficing information on choice behavior, we find that TSD alters the relative reliance on maximizing information and satisficing information, in the gains domain. This alteration is the result of participants both decreasing their reliance on cognitively-complex maximizing information and a concomitant increase in the use of readily-available satisficing information. TSD did not result in a decrease in overall information use in either domain. These results show that sleep deprivation alters decision making by altering the informational strategies that participants employ, without altering their preferences.

  4. Comparative alteration in atherogenic indices and hypocholesteremic effect of palm oil and palm oil mill effluent in normal albino rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ajiboye, John A.; Erukainure, Ochuko L; Lawal, Babatunde A.; Nwachukwu, Viola A.; Tugbobo-Amisu, Adesewa O.; Okafor, Ebelechukwu N.

    2015-01-01

    The comparative hypocholesteremic effect of feeding palm oil and palm oil mill effluent (POME) was investigated in male albino rats. Diets were prepared and designed to contain 50% of energy as carbohydrate, 35% as fat, and 15% as protein. Groups of six rats were each fed one of these diets, while a group was fed pelletized mouse chow which served as the control. Feeding on palm oil and POME led to a significant increase (p 

  5. Comparative alteration in atherogenic indices and hypocholesteremic effect of palm oil and palm oil mill effluent in normal albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiboye, John A; Erukainure, Ochuko L; Lawal, Babatunde A; Nwachukwu, Viola A; Tugbobo-Amisu, Adesewa O; Okafor, Ebelechukwu N

    2015-09-01

    The comparative hypocholesteremic effect of feeding palm oil and palm oil mill effluent (POME) was investigated in male albino rats. Diets were prepared and designed to contain 50% of energy as carbohydrate, 35% as fat, and 15% as protein. Groups of six rats were each fed one of these diets, while a group was fed pelletized mouse chow which served as the control. Feeding on palm oil and POME led to a significant increase (p < 0.05) in serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, and vLDL. Feeding on POME led to significant increase (p < 0.05) in cholesterol, triglyceride and LDL levels in brain tissues. Increased hepatic LDL level was also observed in POME fed rats. Except for hepatic triglyceride and tissues HDL level, a rather reduced level of the studied lipids was observed in the serum and tissues of palm oil fed rats compared to POME. These results indicate the protective potentials of palm oil against cardiovascular disease, as well as hyperlipidemia that characterize obesity and hypertension; as compared to its effluent.

  6. Comparative alteration in atherogenic indices and hypocholesteremic effect of palm oil and palm oil mill effluent in normal albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Ajiboye

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The comparative hypocholesteremic effect of feeding palm oil and palm oil mill effluent (POME was investigated in male albino rats. Diets were prepared and designed to contain 50% of energy as carbohydrate, 35% as fat, and 15% as protein. Groups of six rats were each fed one of these diets, while a group was fed pelletized mouse chow which served as the control. Feeding on palm oil and POME led to a significant increase (p < 0.05 in serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, and vLDL. Feeding on POME led to significant increase (p < 0.05 in cholesterol, triglyceride and LDL levels in brain tissues. Increased hepatic LDL level was also observed in POME fed rats. Except for hepatic triglyceride and tissues HDL level, a rather reduced level of the studied lipids was observed in the serum and tissues of palm oil fed rats compared to POME. These results indicate the protective potentials of palm oil against cardiovascular disease, as well as hyperlipidemia that characterize obesity and hypertension; as compared to its effluent.

  7. The Use of Normal Colon Cell Culture to Assess Toxicities and Cancer Molecular Pathway Alterations Induced by Disinfection Byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent Epidemiological studies have linked the consumption of disinfected surface waters to an increased risk of colorectal cancer (Bove, GE, Jr et al., Int. J. Health Geogr., 6:18, 2007). Approximately 600 disinfection byproducts (DBP) have been identified. Because it would be...

  8. Altered balance in the autonomic nervous system in schizophrenic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B M; Mehlsen, J; Behnke, K

    1988-01-01

    .05). Heart-rate response to inspiration was greater in non-medicated schizophrenics compared to normal subjects (P less than 0.05), whereas no difference was found between medicated and non-medicated schizophrenics. The results show that the balance in the autonomic nervous system is altered in schizophrenic...... patients with a hyperexcitability in both the sympathetic and the parasympathetic division. Our study has thus indicated a dysfunction in the autonomic nervous system per se and the previous interpretations of attentional orienting responses in schizophrenia is questioned. Medication with neuroleptics......The aim of the present study was to evaluate the autonomic nervous function in schizophrenic patients. Twenty-eight patients (29 +/- 6 years) diagnosed as schizophrenics and in stable medication were included, together with ten schizophrenic patients (25 +/- 5 years) who were unmedicated. Eleven...

  9. 28 CFR 36.402 - Alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... not limited to, remodeling, renovation, rehabilitation, reconstruction, historic restoration, changes... configuration of walls and full-height partitions. Normal maintenance, reroofing, painting or...

  10. [Normal aging of frontal lobe functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calso, Cristina; Besnard, Jérémy; Allain, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Normal aging in individuals is often associated with morphological, metabolic and cognitive changes, which particularly concern the cerebral frontal regions. Starting from the "frontal lobe hypothesis of cognitive aging" (West, 1996), the present review is based on the neuroanatomical model developed by Stuss (2008), introducing four categories of frontal lobe functions: executive control, behavioural and emotional self-regulation and decision-making, energization and meta-cognitive functions. The selected studies only address the changes of one at least of these functions. The results suggest a deterioration of several cognitive frontal abilities in normal aging: flexibility, inhibition, planning, verbal fluency, implicit decision-making, second-order and affective theory of mind. Normal aging seems also to be characterised by a general reduction in processing speed observed during neuropsychological assessment (Salthouse, 1996). Nevertheless many cognitive functions remain preserved such as automatic or non-conscious inhibition, specific capacities of flexibility and first-order theory of mind. Therefore normal aging doesn't seem to be associated with a global cognitive decline but rather with a selective change in some frontal systems, conclusion which should be taken into account for designing caring programs in normal aging.

  11. Statistical normalization techniques for magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell T. Shinohara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While computed tomography and other imaging techniques are measured in absolute units with physical meaning, magnetic resonance images are expressed in arbitrary units that are difficult to interpret and differ between study visits and subjects. Much work in the image processing literature on intensity normalization has focused on histogram matching and other histogram mapping techniques, with little emphasis on normalizing images to have biologically interpretable units. Furthermore, there are no formalized principles or goals for the crucial comparability of image intensities within and across subjects. To address this, we propose a set of criteria necessary for the normalization of images. We further propose simple and robust biologically motivated normalization techniques for multisequence brain imaging that have the same interpretation across acquisitions and satisfy the proposed criteria. We compare the performance of different normalization methods in thousands of images of patients with Alzheimer's disease, hundreds of patients with multiple sclerosis, and hundreds of healthy subjects obtained in several different studies at dozens of imaging centers.

  12. Ultrastructural Alterations of Myelinated Fibers and Oligodendrocytes in the Prefrontal Cortex in Schizophrenia: A Postmortem Morphometric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya A. Uranova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is believed to result from altered neuronal connectivity and impaired myelination. However, there are few direct evidence for myelin abnormalities in schizophrenia. We performed electron microscopic study of myelinated fibers and oligodendrocytes and morphometric study of myelinated fibers in the prefrontal cortex in gray and white matters in schizophrenia and normal controls. Six types of abnormal fibers and ultrastructural alterations of oligodendrocytes were found in schizophrenia. No significant group differences in area density of myelinated fibers were found. Frequency of pathological fibers was increased significantly in gray matter in young and elderly schizophrenia patients and in patients with predominantly positive symptoms. In contrast, in white matter, frequency of altered fibers was increased significantly in elderly patients, in patients with predominantly negative symptoms, and correlated with illness duration. Progressive alterations of myelinated fibers in white matter might be followed by alterations of myelinated fibers in gray matter in schizophrenia.

  13. Morning anaerobic performance is not altered by vigilance impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Lericollais

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the role played by vigilance on the anaerobic performance recorded during a Wingate test performed at the bathyphase (nadir of the circadian rhythmicity. Twenty active male participants performed a 60-s Wingate test at 6 a.m. during 3 test sessions in counter-balanced order the day after either (i a normal reference night, (ii a total sleep deprivation night, or (iii a total sleep deprivation night associated with an extended simulated driving task from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. During this task, the number of inappropriate line crossings (ILCs was used to control and quantify the effective decrease in the level of vigilance. The main findings show that (i vigilance of each participant was significantly altered (i.e., a drastic and progressive increase in ILCs is shown during the 7.5 hours of driving by the sleep deprivation night associated with an extended driving task; (ii the subjective evaluation of vigilance performed by self-rated scale revealed an increased impairment of the vigilance level between the normal reference night, the total sleep deprivation night and the total sleep deprivation night associated with an extended driving task; and (iii the morning following this last condition, during the Wingate test, the recorded cycling biomechanical parameters (peak power, mean power and fatigue index values, power decrease, and cycling kinetic and kinematic patterns were not significantly different from the two other conditions. Consequently, these results show that anaerobic performances recorded during a Wingate test performed at the bathyphase of the circadian rhythmicity are not altered by a drastic impairment in vigilance. These findings seem to indicate that vigilance is probably not a factor that contributes to circadian variations in anaerobic performance.

  14. Postnatal morphine administration alters hippocampal development in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traudt, Christopher M; Tkac, Ivan; Ennis, Kathleen M; Sutton, Leah M; Mammel, Daniel M; Rao, Raghavendra

    2012-01-01

    Morphine is frequently used as an analgesic and sedative in preterm infants. Adult rats exposed to morphine have an altered hippocampal neurochemical profile and decreased neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. To evaluate whether neonatal rats are similarly affected, rat pups were injected twice daily with 2 mg/kg morphine or normal saline from postnatal days 3 to 7. On postnatal day 8, the hippocampal neurochemical profile was determined using in vivo (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The mRNA and protein concentrations of specific analytes were measured in hippocampus, and cell division in dentate gyrus was assessed using bromodeoxyuridine. The concentrations of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), taurine, and myo-insotol were decreased, whereas concentrations of glutathione, phosphoethanolamine, and choline-containing compounds were increased in morphine-exposed rats relative to control rats. Morphine decreased glutamic acid decarboxylase enzyme levels and myelin basic protein mRNA expression in the hippocampus. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling in the dentate gyrus was decreased by 60-70% in morphine-exposed rats. These results suggest that recurrent morphine administration during brain development alters hippocampal structure.

  15. The inflammatory response to vaccination is altered in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Yousfi, Mimoun; Mercier, Sabine; Breuillé, Denis; Denis, Philippe; Papet, Isabelle; Mirand, Philippe Patureau; Obled, Christiane

    2005-08-01

    To further explore whether immune function and acute phase response are altered during ageing, the response to a mild inflammatory stress (DT-Polio-Typhim vaccination) was studied in elderly and young subjects. Cytokine production (IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10) by whole blood cultures, circulating cytokines and acute phase proteins were analysed before and 2 days after vaccination. Prior to vaccination, only IFN-gamma production was lower in the elderly than in the young subjects due to a lower mononuclear cell number. In the same time, although in the normal range, several acute phase proteins were greater in elderly than in young subjects, suggesting a low-grade inflammatory state in the elderly. After vaccination, IFN-gamma production remained lower in the elderly than in the young, supporting an altered cell-mediated immunity with advancing age. TNF-alpha production was unaffected by either ageing or vaccination. IL-6 production was stimulated by vaccination in young subjects but not significantly in the elderly. IL-10 production was inhibited by vaccination in the elderly but not in the young. Acute phase proteins were less increased in elderly than in young subjects. Taken together, these results support a general lack of inflammatory response in the elderly exposed to an immune challenge and suggest that immune deficiency may concern both Th1 and Th2 responses. However, the interpretation must respect the limitation of small subjects number.

  16. Altered thermoregulatory responses to clonidine in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, J. M.; Banyasz, T.; Kovacs, T.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of streptozotocin (STZ) treatment on alpha 2-adrenoceptor regulation of body temperature were studied by monitoring the response of colonic temperature to administration of clonidine. 2. A dose-dependent fall in colonic temperature occurred in control rats given clonidine challenge (0.05-2.0 mg kg-1, s.c.); this response was inhibited by prior administration of either yohimbine or idazoxan (2 mg kg-1, s.c.) but not by the peripherally-acting alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist L-659,066 (10 mg kg-1, s.c.). 3. In rats treated with STZ (65 mg kg-1, i.v.) administration of clonidine elicited a dose-independent hyperthermia (circa 1 degree C.); this effect was unaltered by prior administration of yohimbine or idazoxan. 4. Naloxone (5 mg kg-1, s.c.) elicited a small fall in temperature (< 1 degree C.) in both control and STZ-treated rats; naloxone pretreatment did not alter the temperature response to clonidine in either group. 5. Nicotinic acid (10 mg kg-1, s.c.) caused a similar small elevation in temperature in both groups. 6. Administration of replacement insulin to STZ-treated rats maintained weight gain and low blood glucose while the thermoregulatory response to clonidine slowly reverted to normal. 7. These results show that altered central temperature control is an element of the generalised abnormality of alpha 2-receptor function induced by STZ. PMID:8851514

  17. Alterations in gastric mucin synthesis by Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James C, Byrd; Robert S, Bresalier

    2000-01-01

    AIM To determine the role of Helicobacter pylori in altering gastric mucin synthesis and define how thprocess relates to H. pylori-related diseases.METHODS Analyses of human gastric tissues using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridizatiodocument the role of H. pylori in altering the composition and distribution of gastric mucins.RESULTS These data indicate a decrease in the product of the MUC5 (MUC5AC) gene and aberraexpression of MUC6 in the surface epithelium of H. pylori-infected patients. A normal pattern was restorby H. pylori eradication. Inhibition of mucin synthesis including MUC5AC and MUCl mucins by H. pvlohas been established in vitro using biochemical and Western blot analyses. This effect is not due to inhibitiof glycosylation, but results from inhibition of synthesis of mucin core structures. In vitro experiments usiinhibitors of mucin synthesis indicate that cell surface mucins decrease adhesion of H. pylori to gastepithelial cells.CONCLUSION Inhibition of mucin synthesis by H. pylori in vivo can disrupt the protective mucous layand facilitate bacterial adhesion, which may lead to increased inflammation in thc gastric epithelium.

  18. Ketogenic diet alters dopaminergic activity in the mouse cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, William H; Adams, Ryan E; Wyss, Livia S

    2014-06-13

    The present study was conducted to determine if the ketogenic diet altered basal levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in mice. The catecholamines dopamine (DA) and norephinephrine (NE) and the indolamine serotonin (5HT) were quantified postmortem in six different brain regions of adult mice fed a ketogenic diet for 3 weeks. The dopamine metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) and the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5HIAA) were also measured. Tissue punches were collected bilaterally from the motor cortex, somatosensory cortex, nucleus accumbens, anterior caudate-putamen, posterior caudate-putamen and the midbrain. Dopaminergic activity, as measured by the dopamine metabolites to dopamine content ratio - ([DOPAC]+[HVA])/[DA] - was significantly increased in the motor and somatosensory cortex regions of mice fed the ketogenic diet when compared to those same areas in brains of mice fed a normal diet. These results indicate that the ketogenic diet alters the activity of the meso-cortical dopaminergic system, which may contribute to the diet's therapeutic effect in reducing epileptic seizure activity.

  19. Sustainability and the anthropogenic alteration of evolutionary processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cairns, Jr.

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Persuasive evidence indicates that Earth is now experiencing a major biotic crisis. Even if humankind ceases severe stress on natural systems, the crisis will probably disrupt the basic evolutionary processes that characterized the period preceding the agricultural and industrial revolutions.Proliferation of drug and pesticide resistant species and opportunistic species that thrive in human-dominated ecosystems will become increasingly common. The effect on humankind of altering basic evolutionary processes is uncertain because the understanding of these processes is not robust. The probable result will not be an environment as favorable to humans as the one that has existed for most of human history. Humans probably have altered the environment since Homo sapiens first appeared. However, only in the last two centuries has the degree and rate of change reached levels now considered by many people to be ‘normal’, even though the record shows they are not.Greatly improved technology has facilitated increased exploitation of natural resources to unsustainablelevels. This exploitation, in turn, has led to exponential human population growth, which has depleted natural capital (living systems and the services they provide. Economic globalization has ensured that ecosystems far distant from consumers can be and are profitably exploited. Economicgrowth has become a universal mantra that is coupled with a conviction that such growth can continue indefinitely on a finite planet. A major paradigm shift is essential if sustainable use of the planet is to become a reality.

  20. Alteration of cortical excitability in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhalla, Alaa; de Andrade, Daniel Ciampi; Baudic, Sophie; Perrot, Serge; Bouhassira, Didier

    2010-06-01

    We assessed cortical excitability and intracortical modulation systematically, by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex, in patients with fibromyalgia. In total 46 female patients with fibromyalgia and 21 normal female subjects, matched for age, were included in this study. TMS was applied to the hand motor area of both hemispheres and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded for the first interosseous muscle of the contralateral hand. Single-pulse stimulation was used for measurements of the rest motor threshold (RMT) and suprathreshold MEP. Paired-pulse stimulation was used to assess short intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF). Putative correlations were sought between changes in electrophysiological parameters and major clinical features of fibromyalgia, such as pain, fatigue, anxiety, depression and catastrophizing. The RMT on both sides was significantly increased in patients with fibromyalgia and suprathreshold MEP was significantly decreased bilaterally. However, these alterations, suggesting a global decrease in corticospinal excitability, were not correlated with clinical features. Patients with fibromyalgia also had lower ICF and SICI on both sides, than controls, these lower values being correlated with fatigue, catastrophizing and depression. These neurophysiological alterations were not linked to medication, as similar changes were observed in patients with or without psychotropic treatment. In conclusion, fibromyalgia is associated with deficits in intracortical modulation involving both GABAergic and glutamatergic mechanisms, possibly related to certain aspects of the pathophysiology of this chronic pain syndrome. Our data add to the growing body of evidence for objective and quantifiable changes in brain function in fibromyalgia.

  1. A normalization model of multisensory integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Tomokazu; Angelaki, Dora E; DeAngelis, Gregory C

    2011-06-01

    Responses of neurons that integrate multiple sensory inputs are traditionally characterized in terms of a set of empirical principles. However, a simple computational framework that accounts for these empirical features of multisensory integration has not been established. We propose that divisive normalization, acting at the stage of multisensory integration, can account for many of the empirical principles of multisensory integration shown by single neurons, such as the principle of inverse effectiveness and the spatial principle. This model, which uses a simple functional operation (normalization) for which there is considerable experimental support, also accounts for the recent observation that the mathematical rule by which multisensory neurons combine their inputs changes with cue reliability. The normalization model, which makes a strong testable prediction regarding cross-modal suppression, may therefore provide a simple unifying computational account of the important features of multisensory integration by neurons.

  2. Neuroinflammation in the normal aging hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, R M; Kitt, M M; Watkins, L R; Maier, S F

    2015-11-19

    A consequence of normal aging is a greater susceptibility to memory impairments following an immune challenge such as infection, surgery, or traumatic brain injury. The neuroinflammatory response, produced by these challenges results in increased and prolonged production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the otherwise healthy aged brain. Here we discuss the mechanisms by which long-lasting elevations in pro-inflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus produce memory impairments. Sensitized microglia are a primary source of this exaggerated neuroinflammatory response and appear to be a hallmark of the normal aging brain. We review the current understanding of the causes and effects of normal aging-induced microglial sensitization, including dysregulations of the neuroendocrine system, potentiation of neuroinflammatory responses following an immune challenge, and the impairment of memories. We end with a discussion of therapeutic approaches to prevent these deleterious effects.

  3. Porosity Governs Normal Stresses in Polymer Gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cagny, Henri C G; Vos, Bart E; Vahabi, Mahsa; Kurniawan, Nicholas A; Doi, Masao; Koenderink, Gijsje H; MacKintosh, F C; Bonn, Daniel

    2016-11-18

    When sheared, most elastic solids including metals, rubbers, and polymer gels dilate perpendicularly to the shear plane. This behavior, known as the Poynting effect, is characterized by a positive normal stress. Surprisingly, fibrous biopolymer gels exhibit a negative normal stress under shear. Here we show that this anomalous behavior originates from the open-network structure of biopolymer gels. Using fibrin networks with a controllable pore size as a model system, we show that the normal-stress response to an applied shear is positive at short times, but decreases to negative values with a characteristic time scale set by pore size. Using a two-fluid model, we develop a quantitative theory that unifies the opposite behaviors encountered in synthetic and biopolymer gels.

  4. Masturbation, sexuality, and adaptation: normalization in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Theodore

    2008-03-01

    During adolescence the central masturbation fantasy that is formulated during childhood takes its final form and paradoxically must now be directed outward for appropriate object finding and pair matching in the service of procreative aims. This is a step in adaptation that requires a further developmental landmark that I have called normalization. The path toward airing these private fantasies is facilitated by chumship relationships as a step toward further exposure to the social surround. Hartmann's structuring application of adaptation within psychoanalysis is used as a framework for understanding the process that simultaneously serves intrapsychic and social demands and permits goals that follow evolutionary principles. Variations in the normalization process from masturbatory isolation to a variety of forms of sexual socialization are examined in sociological data concerning current adolescent sexual behavior and in case examples that indicate some routes to normalized experience and practice.

  5. How Different are Normal and Barred Spirals?

    CERN Document Server

    Bergh, Sidney van den

    2011-01-01

    No significant color differences are found between normal and barred spirals over the range of Hubble stages a - ab - b - bc. Furthermore, no significant difference is seen between the luminosity distributions of normal and barred galaxies over the same range of Hubble stages. However, SBc galaxies are found to be systematically fainter than Sc galaxies at 99% confidence. The observation that normal and barred spirals with Hubble stages a - ab - b - bc have indistinguishable intrinsic colors hints at the possibility that the bars in such spiral galaxies might be ephemeral structures. Finally, it is pointed out that lenticular galaxies of types S0 and SB0 are systematically fainter than are other early-type galaxies, suggesting that such galaxies are situated on evolutionary tracks that differ systematically from those of galaxies that lie along the E - Sa - Sb -Sc and E - SBa - SBb - SBc sequences.

  6. MR imaging of normal hip anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Connie Y; Huang, Ambrose J

    2013-02-01

    Understanding normal anatomy of the hip is important for diagnosing its pathology. MR arthrography is more sensitive for the detection of intra-articular pathology than noncontrast MR imaging. Important elements of the osseous structures on MR imaging include the alignment and the marrow. Acetabular ossicles may be present. Normal variations involving the cartilage include the supra-acetabular fossa and the stellate lesion. Important muscles of the hip are the sartorius, rectus femoris, iliopsoas, gluteus minimus and medius, adductors, and hamstrings. The iliofemoral, ischiofemoral, and pubofemoral ligaments represent thickenings of the joint capsule that reinforce and stabilize the hip joint. Normal variations in the labrum include labral sulcus and absent labrum. The largest nerves in the hip and thigh are the sciatic nerve, the femoral nerve, and the obturator nerve.

  7. Altered distribution of hippocampal interneurons in the murine Down Syndrome model Ts65Dn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-González, Samuel; Ballestín, Raúl; López-Hidalgo, Rosa; Gilabert-Juan, Javier; Blasco-Ibáñez, José Miguel; Crespo, Carlos; Nácher, Juan; Varea, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Down Syndrome, with an incidence of one in 800 live births, is the most common genetic alteration producing intellectual disability. We have used the Ts65Dn model, that mimics some of the alterations observed in Down Syndrome. This genetic alteration induces an imbalance between excitation and inhibition that has been suggested as responsible for the cognitive impairment present in this syndrome. The hippocampus has a crucial role in memory processing and is an important area to analyze this imbalance. In this report we have analysed, in the hippocampus of Ts65Dn mice, the expression of synaptic markers: synaptophysin, vesicular glutamate transporter-1 and isoform 67 of the glutamic acid decarboxylase; and of different subtypes of inhibitory neurons (Calbindin D-28k, parvalbumin, calretinin, NPY, CCK, VIP and somatostatin). We have observed alterations in the inhibitory neuropil in the hippocampus of Ts65Dn mice. There was an excess of inhibitory puncta and a reduction of the excitatory ones. In agreement with this observation, we have observed an increase in the number of inhibitory neurons in CA1 and CA3, mainly interneurons expressing calbindin, calretinin, NPY and VIP, whereas parvalbumin cell numbers were not affected. These alterations in the number of interneurons, but especially the alterations in the proportion of the different types, may influence the normal function of inhibitory circuits and underlie the cognitive deficits observed in DS.

  8. Altered orbitofrontal sulcogyral patterns in adult males with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiromi; Nakamura, Motoaki; Ohno, Taisei; Itahashi, Takashi; Tanaka, Eizaburo; Ohta, Haruhisa; Yamada, Takashi; Kanai, Chieko; Iwanami, Akira; Kato, Nobumasa; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro

    2014-04-01

    Functions of the orbitofrontal cortex include diverse social, cognitive and affective processes, many of which are abnormal in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Recently, altered orbitofrontal sulcogyral patterns have been revealed in several psychiatric conditions, such as schizophrenia, indicating a possibility that altered orbitofrontal sulcogyral morphology reflects abnormal neurodevelopment. However, the presence of sulcal alterations in ASD remains unexplored. Using structural magnetic resonance imaging, subtypes of the 'H-shaped' sulcus (Type I, II and III, in order of frequency), posterior orbital sulcus (POS) and intermediate orbital sulcus were identified in each hemisphere of adult males with ASD (n = 51) and matched normal controls (n = 55) based on the study by Chiavaras and Petrides. ASD showed a significantly altered distribution of H-shaped sulcal subtypes in both hemispheres, with a significant increase of Type III. A significant alteration in the distribution of sulcal subtypes was also identified in the right hemisphere POS of ASD. Categorical regression analysis revealed that Type I and II expressions predicted a reduced total Autism-Spectrum Quotient score. Furthermore, Type I expression was associated with a reduced 'attention to detail' subscale score. The results demonstrate that altered sulcogyral morphology can be a marker for abnormal neurodevelopment leading to the increased risk of developing autism.

  9. Metabolomics data normalization with EigenMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya V Karpievitch

    Full Text Available Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry has become one of the analytical platforms of choice for metabolomics studies. However, LC-MS metabolomics data can suffer from the effects of various systematic biases. These include batch effects, day-to-day variations in instrument performance, signal intensity loss due to time-dependent effects of the LC column performance, accumulation of contaminants in the MS ion source and MS sensitivity among others. In this study we aimed to test a singular value decomposition-based method, called EigenMS, for normalization of metabolomics data. We analyzed a clinical human dataset where LC-MS serum metabolomics data and physiological measurements were collected from thirty nine healthy subjects and forty with type 2 diabetes and applied EigenMS to detect and correct for any systematic bias. EigenMS works in several stages. First, EigenMS preserves the treatment group differences in the metabolomics data by estimating treatment effects with an ANOVA model (multiple fixed effects can be estimated. Singular value decomposition of the residuals matrix is then used to determine bias trends in the data. The number of bias trends is then estimated via a permutation test and the effects of the bias trends are eliminated. EigenMS removed bias of unknown complexity from the LC-MS metabolomics data, allowing for increased sensitivity in differential analysis. Moreover, normalized samples better correlated with both other normalized samples and corresponding physiological data, such as blood glucose level, glycated haemoglobin, exercise central augmentation pressure normalized to heart rate of 75, and total cholesterol. We were able to report 2578 discriminatory metabolite peaks in the normalized data (p<0.05 as compared to only 1840 metabolite signals in the raw data. Our results support the use of singular value decomposition-based normalization for metabolomics data.

  10. Cognitive plasticity in normal and pathological aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío; Botella, Juan; Zamarrón, María Dolores; Molina, María Ángeles; Cabras, Emilia; Schettini, Rocío; Tárraga, Lluis

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of the present study is to examine to what extent age and cognitive impairment contribute to learning performance (cognitive plasticity, cognitive modifiability, or learning potential). To address this question, participants coming from four studies (Longitudinal Study of Active Aging, age range, 55-75 years, N = 458; Longitudinal Study in the very old [90+], age range, 90-102, N = 188, and Cognitive Plasticity within the Course of Cognitive Impairment, 97 "Normal", 57 mild cognitive impairment [MCI], and 98 Alzheimer's disease [AD] patients) were examined through a measure of verbal learning (developed from Rey). The results show that all age, MCI, and AD groups learned across the five learning trials of that test, but significant differences were found due to age, pathology, and education. The effects of pathology (MCI and AD) can be expressed in a metric of "years of normal decline by age"; specifically, being MCI means suffering an impairment in performance that is equivalent to the decline of a normal individual during 15 years, whereas the impact of AD is equivalent to 22.7 years. Likewise, the improvement associated with about 5 years of education is equivalent to about 1 year less of normal aging. Also, the two pathological groups significantly differed from "normal" groups in the delayed trial of the test. The most dramatic difference is that between the "normal" group and the AD patients, which shows relatively poorer performance for the AD group in the delayed trial than in the first learning trial. The potential role of this unique effect for quick detection purposes of AD is assessed (in the 75-89 years age range, sensitivity and specificity equal 0.813 and 0.917, respectively).

  11. New approach for anti-normally and normally ordering bosonic-operator functions in quantum optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shi-Min; Zhang, Yun-Hai; Xu, Xing-Lei; Li, Hong-Qi; Wang, Ji-Suo

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we provide a new kind of operator formula for anti-normally and normally ordering bosonic-operator functions in quantum optics, which can help us arrange a bosonic-operator function f(λQ̂ + νP̂) in its anti-normal and normal ordering conveniently. Furthermore, mutual transformation formulas between anti-normal ordering and normal ordering, which have good universality, are derived too. Based on these operator formulas, some new differential relations and some useful mathematical integral formulas are easily derived without really performing these integrations. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2015AM025) and the Natural Science Foundation of Heze University, China (Grant No. XY14PY02).

  12. Magnetic normal modes in nano-particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimsditch, M. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: grimsditch@anl.gov; Giovannini, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Via del Paradiso 12, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Montoncello, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Via del Paradiso 12, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Nizzoli, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Via del Paradiso 12, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Leaf, G. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Kaper, H. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Karpeev, D. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2004-12-31

    We have recently developed two methods to calculate the magnetic normal modes of a magnetic nano-particle. One of the methods is based on a conventional micromagnetic approach in which the time evolution of the magnetization of each cell is monitored. After filtering in frequency domain, the magnetic normal modes can be reconstructed. The second method is based on solving the same micromagneitc system in a dynamical matrix formulation. The results of the two methods, applied to a rectangular parallelepiped of Fe, will be presented and compared.

  13. Evaluation of CT-based SUV normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriese, Joke; Beels, Laurence; Maes, Alex; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Pottel, Hans

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine patients’ lean body mass (LBM) and lean tissue (LT) mass using a computed tomography (CT)-based method, and to compare standardized uptake value (SUV) normalized by these parameters to conventionally normalized SUVs. Head-to-toe positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examinations were retrospectively retrieved and semi-automatically segmented into tissue types based on thresholding of CT Hounsfield units (HU). The following HU ranges were used for determination of CT-estimated LBM and LT (LBMCT and LTCT):  -180 to  -7 for adipose tissue (AT), -6 to 142 for LT, and 143 to 3010 for bone tissue (BT). Formula-estimated LBMs were calculated using formulas of James (1976 Research on Obesity: a Report of the DHSS/MRC Group (London: HMSO)) and Janmahasatian et al (2005 Clin. Pharmacokinet. 44 1051-65), and body surface area (BSA) was calculated using the DuBois formula (Dubois and Dubois 1989 Nutrition 5 303-11). The CT segmentation method was validated by comparing total patient body weight (BW) to CT-estimated BW (BWCT). LBMCT was compared to formula-based estimates (LBMJames and LBMJanma). SUVs in two healthy reference tissues, liver and mediastinum, were normalized for the aforementioned parameters and compared to each other in terms of variability and dependence on normalization factors and BW. Comparison of actual BW to BWCT shows a non-significant difference of 0.8 kg. LBMJames estimates are significantly higher than LBMJanma with differences of 4.7 kg for female and 1.0 kg for male patients. Formula-based LBM estimates do not significantly differ from LBMCT, neither for men nor for women. The coefficient of variation (CV) of SUV normalized for LBMJames (SUVLBM-James) (12.3%) was significantly reduced in liver compared to SUVBW (15.4%). All SUV variances in mediastinum were significantly reduced (CVs were 11.1-12.2%) compared to SUVBW (15.5%), except SUVBSA (15.2%). Only SUVBW and SUVLBM-James show

  14. Nonapproximablity of the Normalized Information Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Terwijn, Sebastiaan A; Vitanyi, Paul M B

    2009-01-01

    Normalized information distance (NID) uses the theoretical notion of Kolmogorov complexity, which for practical purposes is approximated by the length of the compressed version of the file involved, using a real-world compression program. This practical application is called `normalized compression distance' and it is trivially computable. It is a parameter-free similarity measure based on compression, and is used in pattern recognition, data mining, phylogeny, clustering, and classification. The complexity properties of its theoretical precursor, the NID, have been open. We show that the NID is neither upper semicomputable nor lower semicomputable up to any reasonable precision.

  15. Normalized Information Distance is Not Semicomputable

    CERN Document Server

    Terwijn, Sebastiaan A; Vitanyi, Paul M B

    2010-01-01

    Normalized information distance (NID) uses the theoretical notion of Kolmogorov complexity, which for practical purposes is approximated by the length of the compressed version of the file involved, using a real-world compression program. This practical application is called 'normalized compression distance' and it is trivially computable. It is a parameter-free similarity measure based on compression, and is used in pattern recognition, data mining, phylogeny, clustering, and classification. The complexity properties of its theoretical precursor, the NID, have been open. We show that the NID is neither upper semicomputable nor lower semicomputable.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid space alterations in melancholic depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Via

    Full Text Available Melancholic depression is a biologically homogeneous clinical entity in which structural brain alterations have been described. Interestingly, reports of structural alterations in melancholia include volume increases in Cerebro-Spinal Fluid (CSF spaces. However, there are no previous reports of CSF volume alterations using automated whole-brain voxel-wise approaches, as tissue classification algorithms have been traditionally regarded as less reliable for CSF segmentation. Here we aimed to assess CSF volumetric alterations in melancholic depression and their clinical correlates by means of a novel segmentation algorithm ('new segment', as implemented in the software Statistical Parametric Mapping-SPM8, incorporating specific features that may improve CSF segmentation. A three-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI was obtained from seventy patients with melancholic depression and forty healthy control subjects. Although imaging data were pre-processed with the 'new segment' algorithm, in order to obtain a comparison with previous segmentation approaches, tissue segmentation was also performed with the 'unified segmentation' approach. Melancholic patients showed a CSF volume increase in the region of the left Sylvian fissure, and a CSF volume decrease in the subarachnoid spaces surrounding medial and lateral parietal cortices. Furthermore, CSF increases in the left Sylvian fissure were negatively correlated with the reduction percentage of depressive symptoms at discharge. None of these results were replicated with the 'unified segmentation' approach. By contrast, between-group differences in the left Sylvian fissure were replicated with a non-automated quantification of the CSF content of this region. Left Sylvian fissure alterations reported here are in agreement with previous findings from non-automated CSF assessments, and also with other reports of gray and white matter insular alterations in depressive samples using automated approaches

  17. Normalization of Illumina Infinium whole-genome SNP data improves copy number estimates and allelic intensity ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliusson Gunnar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Illumina Infinium whole genome genotyping (WGG arrays are increasingly being applied in cancer genomics to study gene copy number alterations and allele-specific aberrations such as loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH. Methods developed for normalization of WGG arrays have mostly focused on diploid, normal samples. However, for cancer samples genomic aberrations may confound normalization and data interpretation. Therefore, we examined the effects of the conventionally used normalization method for Illumina Infinium arrays when applied to cancer samples. Results We demonstrate an asymmetry in the detection of the two alleles for each SNP, which deleteriously influences both allelic proportions and copy number estimates. The asymmetry is caused by a remaining bias between the two dyes used in the Infinium II assay after using the normalization method in Illumina's proprietary software (BeadStudio. We propose a quantile normalization strategy for correction of this dye bias. We tested the normalization strategy using 535 individual hybridizations from 10 data sets from the analysis of cancer genomes and normal blood samples generated on Illumina Infinium II 300 k version 1 and 2, 370 k and 550 k BeadChips. We show that the proposed normalization strategy successfully removes asymmetry in estimates of both allelic proportions and copy numbers. Additionally, the normalization strategy reduces the technical variation for copy number estimates while retaining the response to copy number alterations. Conclusion The proposed normalization strategy represents a valuable tool that improves the quality of data obtained from Illumina Infinium arrays, in particular when used for LOH and copy number variation studies.

  18. Free fatty acids normalize a rosiglitazone-induced visfatin release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Dominik G; Mittermayer, Friedrich; Schaller, Georg; Artwohl, Michaela; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina M; Prager, Gerhard; Roden, Michael; Wolzt, Michael

    2006-11-01

    The detrimental effect of elevated free fatty acids (FFAs) on insulin sensitivity can be improved by thiazolidinediones (TZDs) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is unknown whether this salutary action of TZD is associated with altered release of the insulin-mimetic adipocytokine visfatin. In this study, we investigated whether visfatin concentrations are altered by FFA and TZD treatment. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study 16 healthy volunteers received an infusion of triglycerides/heparin to increase plasma FFA after 3 wk of treatment with rosiglitazone (8 mg/day, n = 8) or placebo (n = 8), and circulating plasma visfatin was measured. As a corollary, human adipocytes were incubated with synthetic fatty acids and rosiglitazone to assess visfatin release in vitro. The results were that rosiglitazone treatment increased systemic plasma visfatin concentrations from 0.6 +/- 0.1 to 1.7 +/- 0.2 ng/ml (P < 0.01). Lipid infusion caused a marked elevation of plasma FFA but had no effect on circulating visfatin in controls. In contrast, elevated visfatin concentrations in subjects receiving rosiglitazone were normalized by lipid infusion. In isolated adipocytes, visfatin was released into supernatant medium by acute addition and long-term treatment of rosiglitazone. This secretion was blocked by synthetic fatty acids and by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or Akt. In conclusion, release of the insulin-mimetic visfatin may represent a major mechanism of metabolic TZD action. The presence of FFA antagonizes this action, which may have implications for visfatin bioactivity.

  19. A novel SNP analysis method to detect copy number alterations with an unbiased reference signal directly from tumor samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaFramboise William A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic instability in cancer leads to abnormal genome copy number alterations (CNA as a mechanism underlying tumorigenesis. Using microarrays and other technologies, tumor CNA are detected by comparing tumor sample CN to normal reference sample CN. While advances in microarray technology have improved detection of copy number alterations, the increase in the number of measured signals, noise from array probes, variations in signal-to-noise ratio across batches and disparity across laboratories leads to significant limitations for the accurate identification of CNA regions when comparing tumor and normal samples. Methods To address these limitations, we designed a novel "Virtual Normal" algorithm (VN, which allowed for construction of an unbiased reference signal directly from test samples within an experiment using any publicly available normal reference set as a baseline thus eliminating the need for an in-lab normal reference set. Results The algorithm was tested using an optimal, paired tumor/normal data set as well as previously uncharacterized pediatric malignant gliomas for which a normal reference set was not available. Using Affymetrix 250K Sty microarrays, we demonstrated improved signal-to-noise ratio and detected significant copy number alterations using the VN algorithm that were validated by independent PCR analysis of the target CNA regions. Conclusions We developed and validated an algorithm to provide a virtual normal reference signal directly from tumor samples and minimize noise in the derivation of the raw CN signal. The algorithm reduces the variability of assays performed across different reagent and array batches, methods of sample preservation, multiple personnel, and among different laboratories. This approach may be valuable when matched normal samples are unavailable or the paired normal specimens have been subjected to variations in methods of preservation.

  20. ASSESSMENT AND COMPARISION OF CERVICAL JOINT POSITION SENSE IN SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC NECK PAIN vs NORMALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberoi Mugdha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The abundance of mechanoreceptors in the cervical spine and their central and reflex afferent connections to the vestibular, visual and postural control system suggests that the cervical proprioceptive information provides important somatosensory information influencing postural stability, head orientation and eye movement control. Disturbances to the afferent input from the cervical region is thought to underlie symptoms of dizziness, unsteadiness, visual disturbances and signs of altered postural stability, cervical proprioception and head and eye movement control in people with chronic neck pain. This study aimed to assess and compare cervical joint position sense in subjects with chronic neck pain vs normals. Methods: Total 60 subjects, divided into two groups chronic neck pain group (n=30 (12 males and 18 females with mean age of 40.7 years and control group (n=30 with age and gender matched normal individuals were assessed for baseline data and demographic variables. Head repositioning accuracy test was used to assess cervical joint position sense in degrees. Results: The difference in the head repositioning error values were found to be extremely significant (p<0.0001 for all the neck movements for subjects with chronic neck pain as compared to normals. Conclusion: Cervical joint position sense in subjects with chronic neck pain is found to be altered as compared to age and gender matched normals.

  1. Mutations that alter the transport function of the LamB protein in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Wandersman, C; Schwartz, M

    1982-01-01

    Some Escherichia coli K-12 lamB mutants, those producing reduced amounts of LamB protein (one-tenth the wild type amount), grow normally on dextrins but transport maltose when present at a concentration of 1 microM at about one-tenth the normal rate. lamB Dex- mutants were found as derivatives of these strains. These Dex- mutants are considerably impaired in the transport of maltose at low concentrations (below 10 microM), and they have a structurally altered LamB protein which is impaired in...

  2. The importance of being subtle: small changes in calcium homeostasis control cognitive decline in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toescu, Emil C; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2007-06-01

    Aging is a complex, multifactorial process. One of the features of normal aging of the brain is a decline in cognitive functions and much experimental attention has been devoted to understanding this process. Evidence accumulated in the last decade indicates that such functional changes are not due to gross morphological alterations, but to subtle functional modification of synaptic connectivity and intracellular signalling and metabolism. Such synaptic modifications are compatible with a normal level of activity and allow the maintenance of a certain degree of functional reserve. This is in contrast to the changes in various neurodegenerative diseases, characterized by significant neuronal loss and dramatic and irreversible functional deficit. This whole special issue has been initiated with the intention of focusing on the processes of normal brain aging. In this review, we present data that shows how subtle changes in Ca(2+) homeostasis or in the state of various Ca(2+)-dependent processes or molecules, which occur in aging can have significant functional consequences.

  3. Denotational Aspects of Untyped Normalization by Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filinski, Andrzej; Rohde, Henning Korsholm

    2005-01-01

    We show that the standard normalization-by-evaluation construction for the simply-typed ¿ß¿-calculus has a natural counterpart for the untyped ¿ß-calculus, with the central type-indexed logical relation replaced by a "recursively defined" invariant relation, in the style of Pitts. In fact, the co...

  4. Normal tension glaucoma and Alzheimer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach-Holm, Daniella; Kessing, Svend Vedel; Mogensen, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is associated with increased risk of developing dementia/Alzheimer disease (AD). METHODS: A total of 69 patients with NTG were identified in the case note files in the Glaucoma Clinic, University Hospital of Copenhagen (Rigshospitalet...

  5. Robust glint detection through homography normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dan Witzner; Roholm, Lars; García Ferreiros, Iván

    2014-01-01

    A novel normalization principle for robust glint detection is presented. The method is based on geometric properties of corneal reflections and allows for simple and effective detection of glints even in the presence of several spurious and identically appearing reflections. The method is tested...

  6. Power curve report - with turbulence intensity normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Wagner, Rozenn; Vesth, Allan

    , additional shear and turbulence intensitity filters are applied on the measured data. Secondly, the method for normalization to a given reference turbulence intensity level (as described in Annex M of the draft of IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.2 [3]) is applied. The measurements have been performed using DTU...

  7. Spatial normalization of brain images and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin, J-F; Lebenberg, J; Lefranc, S; Labra, N; Auzias, G; Labit, M; Guevara, M; Mohlberg, H; Roca, P; Guevara, P; Dubois, J; Leroy, F; Dehaene-Lambertz, G; Cachia, A; Dickscheid, T; Coulon, O; Poupon, C; Rivière, D; Amunts, K; Sun, Z Y

    2016-10-01

    The deformable atlas paradigm has been at the core of computational anatomy during the last two decades. Spatial normalization is the variant endowing the atlas with a coordinate system used for voxel-based aggregation of images across subjects and studies. This framework has largely contributed to the success of brain mapping. Brain spatial normalization, however, is still ill-posed because of the complexity of the human brain architecture and the lack of architectural landmarks in standard morphological MRI. Multi-atlas strategies have been developed during the last decade to overcome some difficulties in the context of segmentation. A new generation of registration algorithms embedding architectural features inferred for instance from diffusion or functional MRI is on the verge to improve the architectural value of spatial normalization. A better understanding of the architectural meaning of the cortical folding pattern will lead to use some sulci as complementary constraints. Improving the architectural compliance of spatial normalization may impose to relax the diffeomorphic constraint usually underlying atlas warping. A two-level strategy could be designed: in each region, a dictionary of templates of incompatible folding patterns would be collected and matched in a way or another using rare architectural information, while individual subjects would be aligned using diffeomorphisms to the closest template. Manifold learning could help to aggregate subjects according to their morphology. Connectivity-based strategies could emerge as an alternative to deformation-based alignment leading to match the connectomes of the subjects rather than images.

  8. Accounting for the Benefits of Database Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting J.; Du, Hui; Lehmann, Constance M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a teaching approach to reinforce accounting students' understanding of the concept of database normalization. Unlike a conceptual approach shown in most of the AIS textbooks, this approach involves with calculations and reconciliations with which accounting students are familiar because the methods are frequently used in…

  9. The study of normal psychic life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, A.J.J. van de; Derksen, J.J.L.

    2014-01-01

    In the introduction to his Allgemeine Psychopathologie, published in 1913, Karl Jaspers stated that psychology has little value for the psychopathologist because it focuses on all kinds of interesting matters, but not on normal psychic life. In this article we argue that today, in the year 2013, lit

  10. Dlk1 in normal and abnormal hematopoiesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakajiri, S; O'kelly, J; Yin, D

    2005-01-01

    megakaryocytic differentiation of both CMK megakaryoblasts as well as normal CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells. High serum levels of Dlk1 occurred in RA (4/10) and essential thrombocythemia (2/10) patients. Functional studies showed that forced expression of Dlk1 enhanced proliferation of K562 cells growing in 1...

  11. Auction analysis by normal form game approximation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaisers, Michael; Tuyls, Karl; Thuijsman, Frank; Parsons, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Auctions are pervasive in todaypsilas society and provide a variety of real markets. This article facilitates a strategic choice between a set of available trading strategies by introducing a methodology to approximate heuristic payoff tables by normal form games. An example from the auction domain

  12. Principal normal indicatrices of closed space curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter

    1999-01-01

    A theorem due to J. Weiner, which is also proven by B. Solomon, implies that a principal normal indicatrix of a closed space curve with nonvanishing curvature has integrated geodesic curvature zero and contains no subarc with integrated geodesic curvature pi. We prove that the inverse problem alw...

  13. The variability problem of normal human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjær, Tine

    2012-01-01

    Previous investigations have suggested considerable inter-individual variability in the time course pattern of net joint moments during normal human walking, although the limited sample sizes precluded statistical analyses. The purpose of the present study was to obtain joint moment patterns from...

  14. How Long Is a Normal Labor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildingsson, Ingegerd; Blix, Ellen; Hegaard, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Normal progress of labor is a subject for discussion among professionals. The aim of this study was to assess the duration of labor in women with a planned home birth and spontaneous onset who gave birth at home or in hospital after transfer. METHODS: This is a population-based study o...

  15. SPERMATOZOAL RNA PROFILES OF NORMAL FERTILE MEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Constitutes the Normal Fertile Male?G. Charles Ostermeier1, David J. Dix2, David Miller3, Purvesh Khatri4, and Stephen A. Krawetz1.1Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, & Institute for Scientific Computing, Wa...

  16. Bender Gestalt Performance of Normal Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacks, Patricia; Storandt, Martha

    1982-01-01

    Provides normative data on the Bender Gestalt Test (BGT) with a sample of 334 normal older adults. Showed that these older adults do not perform on the BGT in a manner that can be called brain damaged. Use of the cut-off score developed with younger persons appears appropriate. (Author)

  17. REGULAR RELATIONS AND MONOTONE NORMAL ORDERED SPACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU XIAOQUAN; LIU YINGMING

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the classical theorem of Zareckii about regular relations is generalized and an intrinsic characterization of regularity is obtained. Based on the generalized Zareckii theorem and the intrinsic characterization of regularity, the authors give a characterization of monotone normality of ordered spaces. A new proof of the UrysohnNachbin lemma is presented which is quite different from the classical one.

  18. On the importance of the normalization

    CERN Document Server

    Dvoeglazov, V V

    2000-01-01

    We repeat the known procedure of the derivation of the set of Proca equations. It is shown that it can be written in various forms. The importance of the normalization is point out for the problem of the correct description of spin-1 quantized fields. Finally, the discussion of the so-called Kalb-Ramond field is presented.

  19. Normal pressure hydrocephalus presenting as delusional disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH is caused by aqueductal stenosis resulting in syndrome of gait disturbance, cognitive impairment, and urinary incontinence. Late onset psychosis should be evaluated thoroughly to rule out any organic cause. We present the case of a female patient presenting with delusions, gait disturbances, urinary incontinence in her 50s.

  20. Named entity normalization in user generated content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jijkoun, V.; Khalid, M.A.; Marx, M.; de Rijke, M.

    2008-01-01

    Named entity recognition is important for semantically oriented retrieval tasks, such as question answering, entity retrieval, biomedical retrieval, trend detection, and event and entity tracking. In many of these tasks it is important to be able to accurately normalize the recognized entities, i.e.

  1. Normalized Specifications for Identifying Reusable Software

    OpenAIRE

    Luqi

    1987-01-01

    An approach to retrieving reusable software components by means of module specifications is described. The approach depends on normalizing specifications to reduce the variations in the representation of software concepts. The concept is illustrated in terms of both formal and informal approaches to component specifications.

  2. Automatic Radiometric Normalization of Multitemporal Satellite Imagery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, Morton J.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Schmidt, Michael

    2004-01-01

    with normalization using orthogonal regression. The procedure is applied to Landsat TM images over Nevada, Landsat ETM+ images over Morocco, and SPOT HRV images over Kenya. Results from this new automatic, combined MAD/orthogonal regression method, based on statistical analysis of test pixels not used in the actual...

  3. Topological Transformation during Normal Grain Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaogang LOU; Michael A.Player

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates topological transformation during normal grain growth by carrying out a computer vertex simulation.Results show that topological correlation agrees with the models proposed by Blanc et al. and Weaire. Topological transformation occurs more often on grains with some topological classes instead of equal probability on each boundary. This can be qualitatively explained by topological correlation.

  4. COMS normal operation for Earth Observation mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Min

    2012-09-01

    Communication Ocean Meteorological Satellite (COMS) for the hybrid mission of meteorological observation, ocean monitoring, and telecommunication service was launched onto Geostationary Earth Orbit on June 27, 2010 and it is currently under normal operation service since April 2011. The COMS is located on 128.2° East of the geostationary orbit. In order to perform the three missions, the COMS has 3 separate payloads, the meteorological imager (MI), the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI), and the Ka-band antenna. Each payload is dedicated to one of the three missions, respectively. The MI and GOCI perform the Earth observation mission of meteorological observation and ocean monitoring, respectively. For this Earth observation mission the COMS requires daily mission commands from the satellite control ground station and daily mission is affected by the satellite control activities. For this reason daily mission planning is required. The Earth observation mission operation of COMS is described in aspects of mission operation characteristics and mission planning for the normal operation services of meteorological observation and ocean monitoring. And the first year normal operation results after the In-Orbit-Test (IOT) are investigated through statistical approach to provide the achieved COMS normal operation status for the Earth observation mission.

  5. Normal sleep and its neurophysiological regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.F. Hofman; L.M. Talamini

    2015-01-01

    Normal sleep consists of two states: NREM (light and deep sleep) and REM, alternating in a cyclical pattern. The sleep/wake rhythm is regulated by two processes: the sleep propensity, building up during wake, and the circadian rhythm, imposed by the suprachiasmatic nucleus. The arousal pathways in t

  6. Perturbations of normally solvable nonlinear operators, I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William O. Ray

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available Let X and Y be Banach spaces and let ℱ and be Gateaux differentiable mappings from X to Y In this note we study when the operator ℱ+ is surjective for sufficiently small perturbations of a surjective operator ℱ The methods extend previous results in the area of normal solvability for nonlinear operators.

  7. Quaternion normalization in spacecraft attitude determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, J.; Markley, F. L.; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    1993-01-01

    Attitude determination of spacecraft usually utilizes vector measurements such as Sun, center of Earth, star, and magnetic field direction to update the quaternion which determines the spacecraft orientation with respect to some reference coordinates in the three dimensional space. These measurements are usually processed by an extended Kalman filter (EKF) which yields an estimate of the attitude quaternion. Two EKF versions for quaternion estimation were presented in the literature; namely, the multiplicative EKF (MEKF) and the additive EKF (AEKF). In the multiplicative EKF, it is assumed that the error between the correct quaternion and its a-priori estimate is, by itself, a quaternion that represents the rotation necessary to bring the attitude which corresponds to the a-priori estimate of the quaternion into coincidence with the correct attitude. The EKF basically estimates this quotient quaternion and then the updated quaternion estimate is obtained by the product of the a-priori quaternion estimate and the estimate of the difference quaternion. In the additive EKF, it is assumed that the error between the a-priori quaternion estimate and the correct one is an algebraic difference between two four-tuple elements and thus the EKF is set to estimate this difference. The updated quaternion is then computed by adding the estimate of the difference to the a-priori quaternion estimate. If the quaternion estimate converges to the correct quaternion, then, naturally, the quaternion estimate has unity norm. This fact was utilized in the past to obtain superior filter performance by applying normalization to the filter measurement update of the quaternion. It was observed for the AEKF that when the attitude changed very slowly between measurements, normalization merely resulted in a faster convergence; however, when the attitude changed considerably between measurements, without filter tuning or normalization, the quaternion estimate diverged. However, when the

  8. On almost regularity and π-normality of topological spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad Thabit, Sadeq Ali; Kamarulhaili, Hailiza

    2012-05-01

    π-Normality is a weaker version of normality. It was introduced by Kalantan in 2008. π-Normality lies between normality and almost normality (resp. quasi-normality). The importance of this topological property is that it behaves slightly different from normality and almost normality (quasi-normality). π-Normality is neither a productive nor a hereditary property in general. In this paper, some properties of almost regular spaces are presented. In particular, a few results on almost regular spaces are improved. Some relationships between almost regularity and π-normality are presented. π-Generalized closed sets are used to obtain a characterization and preservation theorems of π-normal spaces. Also, we investigate that an almost regular Lindelöf space (resp. with σ-locally finite base) is not necessarily π-normal by giving two counterexamples. An almost normality of the Rational Sequence topology is proved.

  9. RESISTIN: A HORMONE WHICH INDUCES INSULIN RESISTANCE IS INCREASED IN NORMAL PREGNANCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nien, Jyh Kae; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Romero, Roberto; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Erez, Offer; Gotsch, Francesca; Pineles, Beth L.; Friel, Lara A.; Espinoza, Jimmy; Goncalves, Luis; Santolaya, Joaquin; Gomez, Ricardo; Hong, Joon-Seok; Edwin, Samuel; Soto, Eleazar; Richani, Karina; Mazor, Moshe; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2008-01-01

    Aims Resistin, a newly discovered adipokine, is thought to play a key role in the regulation of insulin resistance. The objectives of this study were to develop a nomogram of maternal plasma concentrations of resistin from 11 weeks of gestation to term and to determine whether resistin concentrations differ between normal and overweight pregnant women. Methods In this cross-sectional study, plasma concentrations of resistin were determined in normal pregnant women of normal body mass index (BMI 18.5–24.9; n=261), overweight pregnant women (BMI ≥25; n=140), and non-pregnant women of normal weight (n=40). Blood samples were collected once from each woman between the first trimester and term. Percentiles for resistin concentration were determined for five pre-specified windows of gestational age. Plasma resistin concentration was determined by immunoassay. Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. Results The median maternal plasma concentration of resistin between 11 to 14 weeks of gestation in women of normal weight was significantly higher than non-pregnant women; The plasma concentration of resistin increased with gestational age. Conclusions Normal pregnant women have a higher median plasma concentration of resistin than non-pregnant women and the concentration of this adipokine increases with advancing gestation. Alterations in the maternal plasma concentration of resistin during pregnancy may contribute to metabolic changes of pregnancy. PMID:17919114

  10. Normalization for triple-target microarray experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magniette Frederic

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most microarray studies are made using labelling with one or two dyes which allows the hybridization of one or two samples on the same slide. In such experiments, the most frequently used dyes are Cy3 and Cy5. Recent improvements in the technology (dye-labelling, scanner and, image analysis allow hybridization up to four samples simultaneously. The two additional dyes are Alexa488 and Alexa494. The triple-target or four-target technology is very promising, since it allows more flexibility in the design of experiments, an increase in the statistical power when comparing gene expressions induced by different conditions and a scaled down number of slides. However, there have been few methods proposed for statistical analysis of such data. Moreover the lowess correction of the global dye effect is available for only two-color experiments, and even if its application can be derived, it does not allow simultaneous correction of the raw data. Results We propose a two-step normalization procedure for triple-target experiments. First the dye bleeding is evaluated and corrected if necessary. Then the signal in each channel is normalized using a generalized lowess procedure to correct a global dye bias. The normalization procedure is validated using triple-self experiments and by comparing the results of triple-target and two-color experiments. Although the focus is on triple-target microarrays, the proposed method can be used to normalize p differently labelled targets co-hybridized on a same array, for any value of p greater than 2. Conclusion The proposed normalization procedure is effective: the technical biases are reduced, the number of false positives is under control in the analysis of differentially expressed genes, and the triple-target experiments are more powerful than the corresponding two-color experiments. There is room for improving the microarray experiments by simultaneously hybridizing more than two samples.

  11. Neutrophil dysfunction after thermal injury: alteration of phagolysosomal acidification in patients with large burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerknes, R; Vindenes, H

    1989-04-01

    The neutrophil phagolysosomal acidification during phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus was examined in six patients with large burns, using a flow cytometric technique allowing the simultaneous measurement of phagocytosis and phagolysosomal pH. The kinetics of neutrophil phagolysosomal acidification were altered during the first 20 days following injury, as the initial alkalinization of the phagolysosomes documented in control neutrophils could not be demonstrated in patient cells. Only at discharge and follow-up were the kinetics of phagolysosomal acidification normal. In addition, measurements of neutrophil maximal phagolysosomal acidification showed a lower pH in patient phagolysosomes than in the controls during the first 5 days of hospitalization. The changes of phagolysosomal acidification did not correlate with the alterations of neutrophil maturity or phagocytic capacity. The results demonstrate alterations of an oxygen-independent microbicidal mechanism in neutrophils from patients with large burns, which may contribute to the reduced capacity of neutrophil intracellular killing following thermal injury.

  12. High-resolution copy number arrays in cancer and the problem of normal genome copy number variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2008-11-01

    High-resolution techniques for analysis of genome copy number (CN) enable the analysis of complex cancer somatic genetics. However, the analysis of these data is difficult, and failure to consider a number of issues in depth may result in false leads or unnecessary rejection of true positives. First, segmental duplications may falsely generate CN breakpoints in aneuploid samples. Second, even when tumor data were each normalized to matching lymphocyte DNA, we still observed copy number polymorphisms masquerading as somatic alterations due to allelic imbalance. We investigated a number of different solutions and determined that evaluating matching normal DNA, or at least using locally derived normal baseline data, were preferable to relying on current online databases because of poor cross-platform compatibility and the likelihood of excluding genuine small somatic alterations.

  13. Spine micromorphology of normal and hyperhydric Mammillaria gracilis Pfeiff. (Cactaceae) shoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peharec, P; Posilović, H; Balen, B; Krsnik-Rasol, M

    2010-07-01

    Artificial conditions of tissue culture affect growth and physiology of crassulacean acid metabolism plants which often results in formation of hyperhydric shoots. In in vitro conditions Mammillaria gracilis Pfeiff. (Cactaceae) growth switches from organized to unorganized way, producing a habituated organogenic callus which simultaneously regenerates morphologically normal as well as altered hyperhydric shoots. In this study, influence of tissue culture conditions on morphology of cactus spines of normal and hyperhydric shoots was investigated. Spines of pot-grown Mammillaria plants and of in vitro regenerated shoots were examined with stereo microscope and scanning electron microscope. The pot-grown plants had 16-17 spines per areole. In vitro grown normal shoots, even though they kept typical shoot morphology, had lower number of spines (11-12) and altered spine morphology. This difference was even more pronounced in spine number (six to seven) and morphology of the hyperhydric shoots. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed remarkable differences in micromorphology of spine surface between pot-grown and in vitro grown shoots. Spines of in vitro grown normal shoots showed numerous long trichomes, which were more elongated on spines of the hyperhydric shoots; the corresponding structures on spine surface of pot-grown plants were noticed only as small protrusions. Scanning electron microscopy morphometric studies showed that the spines of pot-grown plants were significantly longer compared to the spines of shoots grown in tissue culture. Moreover, transverse section shape varies from elliptical in pot-grown plants to circular in normal and hyperhydric shoots grown in vitro. Cluster and correspondence analyses performed on the scanning electron microscope obtained results suggest great variability among spines of pot-grown plants. Spines of in vitro grown normal and hyperhydric shoots showed low level of morphological variation among themselves despite the

  14. A quantitative transcriptome reference map of the normal human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracausi, Maria; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara; Piovesan, Allison; Bruno, Samantha; Strippoli, Pierluigi

    2014-10-01

    We performed an innovative systematic meta-analysis of 60 gene expression profiles of whole normal human brain, to provide a quantitative transcriptome reference map of it, i.e. a reference typical value of expression for each of the 39,250 known, mapped and 26,026 uncharacterized (unmapped) transcripts. To this aim, we used the software named Transcriptome Mapper (TRAM), which is able to generate transcriptome maps based on gene expression data from multiple sources. We also analyzed differential expression by comparing the brain transcriptome with those derived from human foetal brain gene expression, from a pool of human tissues (except the brain) and from the two normal human brain regions cerebellum and cerebral cortex, which are two of the main regions severely affected when cognitive impairment occurs, as happens in the case of trisomy 21. Data were downloaded from microarray databases, processed and analyzed using TRAM software and validated in vitro by assaying gene expression through several magnitude orders by 'real-time' reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The excellent agreement between in silico and experimental data suggested that our transcriptome maps may be a useful quantitative reference benchmark for gene expression studies related to the human brain. Furthermore, our analysis yielded biological insights about those genes which have an intrinsic over-/under-expression in the brain, in addition offering a basis for the regional analysis of gene expression. This could be useful for the study of chromosomal alterations associated to cognitive impairment, such as trisomy 21, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability.

  15. Interpreting force concept inventory scores: Normalized gain and SAT scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J. Steinert

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Preinstruction SAT scores and normalized gains (G on the force concept inventory (FCI were examined for individual students in interactive engagement (IE courses in introductory mechanics at one high school (N=335 and one university (N=292 , and strong, positive correlations were found for both populations ( r=0.57 and r=0.46 , respectively. These correlations are likely due to the importance of cognitive skills and abstract reasoning in learning physics. The larger correlation coefficient for the high school population may be a result of the much shorter time interval between taking the SAT and studying mechanics, because the SAT may provide a more current measure of abilities when high school students begin the study of mechanics than it does for college students, who begin mechanics years after the test is taken. In prior research a strong correlation between FCI G and scores on Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning for students from the same two schools was observed. Our results suggest that, when interpreting class average normalized FCI gains and comparing different classes, it is important to take into account the variation of students’ cognitive skills, as measured either by the SAT or by Lawson’s test. While Lawson’s test is not commonly given to students in most introductory mechanics courses, SAT scores provide a readily available alternative means of taking account of students’ reasoning abilities. Knowing the students’ cognitive level before instruction also allows one to alter instruction or to use an intervention designed to improve students’ cognitive level.

  16. Altered global brain signal in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Genevieve J.; Murray, John D.; Repovs, Grega; Cole, Michael W.; Savic, Aleksandar; Glasser, Matthew F.; Pittenger, Christopher; Krystal, John H.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Glahn, David C.; Anticevic, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia display a complex neurobiology, which has long been associated with distributed brain dysfunction. However, no investigation has tested whether schizophrenia shows alterations in global brain signal (GS), a signal derived from functional MRI and often discarded as a meaningless baseline in many studies. To evaluate GS alterations associated with schizophrenia, we studied two large chronic patient samples (n = 90, n = 71), comparing them to healthy subjects (n = 220) and patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder (n = 73). We identified and replicated increased cortical power and variance in schizophrenia, an effect predictive of symptoms yet obscured by GS removal. Voxel-wise signal variance was also increased in schizophrenia, independent of GS effects. Both findings were absent in bipolar patients, confirming diagnostic specificity. Biologically informed computational modeling of shared and nonshared signal propagation through the brain suggests that these findings may be explained by altered net strength of overall brain connectivity in schizophrenia. PMID:24799682

  17. Alterations of the Erythrocyte Membrane during Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmina Serroukh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythrocytes have been long considered as “dead” cells with transport of oxygen (O2 as their only function. However, the ability of red blood cells (RBCs to modulate the microcirculation is now recognized as an important additional function. This capacity is regulated by a key element in the rheologic process: the RBC membrane. This membrane is a complex unit with multiple interactions between the extracellular and intracellular compartments: blood stream, endothelium, and other blood cells on the one hand, and the intracytoplasmic compartment with possible rapid adaptation of erythrocyte metabolism on the other. In this paper, we review the alterations in the erythrocyte membrane observed in critically ill patients and the influence of these alterations on the microcirculatory abnormalities observed in such patients. An understanding of the mechanisms of RBC rheologic alterations in sepsis and their effects on blood flow and on oxygen transport may be important to help reduce morbidity and mortality from severe sepsis.

  18. Inflammation and immune system alterations in frailty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xu; Li, Huifen; Leng, Sean X

    2011-02-01

    Frailty is an important geriatric syndrome characterized by multisystem dysregulation. Substantial evidence suggests heightened inflammatory state and significant immune system alterations in frailty. A heightened inflammatory state is marked by increases in levels of inflammatory molecules (interleukin 6 and C-reactive protein) and counts of white blood cell and its subpopulations, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of frailty, directly or through its detrimental influence on other physiologic systems. Alterations in the innate immune system include decreased proliferation of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells and upregulated monocytic expression of specific stress-responsive inflammatory pathway genes. In the adaptive immune system, although little information is available about potential B-cell changes, significant alterations have been identified in the T-cell compartment, including increased counts of CD8+, CD8+CD28-, CCR5+T cells, above and beyond age-related senescent immune remodeling.

  19. The role of the DLPFC in inductive reasoning of MCI patients and normal agings: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, YanHui; Liang, PeiPeng; Lu, ShengFu; Li, KunCheng; Zhong, Ning

    2009-08-01

    Previous studies of young people have revealed that the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) plays an important role in inductive reasoning. An fMRI experiment was performed in this study to examine whether the left DLPFC was involved in inductive reasoning of MCI patients and normal aging, and whether the activation pattern of this region was different between MCI patients and normal aging. The fMRI results indicated that MCI patients had no difference from normal aging in behavior performance (reaction time and accuracy) and the activation pattern of DLPFC. However, the BOLD response of the DLPFC region for MCI patients was weaker than that for normal aging, and the functional connectivity between the bilateral DLPFC regions for MCI patients was significantly higher than for normal aging. Taken together, these results indicated that DLPFC plays an important role in inductive reasoning of aging, and the functional abnormity of DLPFC may be an earlier marker of MCI before structural alterations.

  20. Valproate, thalidomide and ethyl alcohol alter the migration of HTR-8/SVneo cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rout Ujjwal K

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Valproate, thalidomide and alcohol (ethanol) exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy is known to cause several developmental disorders. All these teratogens are known to pass the placental barrier and interfere directly with the normal development of the fetus. However, these teratogens also alter the formation and function of the placenta itself which may in turn affect the proper nourishment and development of the fetus. Optimum development of the placenta requi...

  1. Epigenetic alterations of the Wnt signaling pathway in cancer: a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Serman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms play a crucial role in cellular proliferation, migration and differentiation in both normal and neoplastic development. One of the key signaling pathways whose components are altered through the epigenetic mechanisms is the Wnt signaling pathway. In this review, we briefly discuss the key concepts of epigenetics and focus on the recent advances in the Wnt signaling pathway research and its potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  2. Prognostic values of chromosome 18q microsatellite alterations in stage Ⅱ colonic carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic value of chromosome 18q microsatellite alterations (MA) in stage Ⅱ colon cancer. METHODS: One hundred and six patients with sporadic stage Ⅱ colon cancer were enrolled in this study. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor and adjacent normal mucosal tissue samples. MA, including loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI), was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresis and DNA sequencing at 5 micr...

  3. On the transition to the normal phase for superconductors surrounded by normal conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren; Kachmar, Ayman

    2009-01-01

    For a cylindrical superconductor surrounded by a normal material, we discuss transition to the normal phase of stable, locally stable and critical configurations. Associated with those phase transitions, we define critical magnetic fields and we provide a sufficient condition for which those...

  4. 'I just want to be normal': An analysis of discourses of normality among recovering heroin users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettleton, Sarah; Neale, Joanne; Pickering, Lucy

    2013-03-01

    Research that has explored the lives of men and women recovering from heroin addiction has reported that users often claim that they 'just want to be normal'. Working within a Foucauldian tradition, we argue in this article that the notions of 'governmentality' and the 'norm' are especially apposite to understanding the ubiquity of this aspiration. Here we focus not on the formal institutions of governance that encourage individuals to adhere to social, cultural and political norms, but rather seek to explore recovering users' accounts of normality as they are envisaged and expressed. The reported empirical data were generated from interviews with 40 men and women in England at various stages of recovery from heroin use. The analytic focus is upon the accounts of normality articulated during the interviews in order to identify the ways in which being normal is presented by the participants. In keeping with the methodological tradition of discourse analysis we identify six discursive repertoires of 'normality talk' that transcend the accounts. It is concluded that the negotiation of normality is a precarious route for this social group. Articulations of a desire to be normal are replete with tensions; there are expressions of both resistance and resignation. Despite claims by some contemporary social theorists that diversity is the 'new normality', the accepted bounds of 'difference' are limited for those who have been addicted to heroin.

  5. Metabolic Cost, Mechanical Work, and Efficiency during Normal Walking in Obese and Normal-Weight Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang; Chen, Peijie; Zhuang, Jie; Zhang, Yanxin; Walt, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the influence of childhood obesity on energetic cost during normal walking and to determine if obese children choose a walking strategy optimizing their gait pattern. Method: Sixteen obese children with no functional abnormalities were matched by age and gender with 16 normal-weight children. All…

  6. Is Hong Kong experiencing normalization of adolescent drug use? Some reflections on the normalization thesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nicole W T; Cheung, Yuet W

    2006-01-01

    The upsurge of consumption of party drugs among adolescents in recent years in Hong Kong has been part of the global trend of adolescent recreational use of drugs at rave parties, discos and similar party settings. Scholars in Western societies have recently proposed the thesis of "normalization of adolescent drug use" to describe such a trend. The normalization thesis points at three major aspects of the normalization phenomenon, namely, a rapid increase of the prevalence of drug use in young people, the widespread popularity of recreational drug use that is closely linked with the recent arrival of dance club culture, and a receptive attitude towards drug use as a normal part of leisure. This article aims to examine whether the normalization thesis can be applied to analyze the situation of adolescent drug use in Hong Kong. Data are drawn from official statistics and a recent survey conducted in 2002-2004 of drug use of Hong Kong marginal youths (N = 504). The case of Hong Kong only partially supports the thesis. Our findings show that the normalization of drug use among young people has occurred in Hong Kong, but the extent of normalization is smaller than those in Western societies like the United Kingdom. They also suggest that a recognition of possible cultural differences may be complementary to the normalization thesis. Limitations of the study are also noted.

  7. Genetic and epigenetic alterations in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpu, Yannick; Hanoun, Naïma; Lulka, Hubert; Sicard, Flavie; Selves, Janick; Buscail, Louis; Torrisani, Jérôme; Cordelier, Pierre

    2011-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. Despite significant progresses in the last decades, the origin of this cancer remains unclear and no efficient therapy exists. PDAC does not arise de novo: three remarkable different types of pancreatic lesions can evolve towards pancreatic cancer. These precursor lesions include: Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) that are microscopic lesions of the pancreas, Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms (IPMN) and Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms (MCN) that are both macroscopic lesions. However, the cellular origin of these lesions is still a matter of debate. Classically, neoplasm initiation or progression is driven by several genetic and epigenetic alterations. The aim of this review is to assemble the current information on genetic mutations and epigenetic disorders that affect genes during pancreatic carcinogenesis. We will further discuss the interest of the genetic and epigenetic alterations for the diagnosis and prognosis of PDAC. Large genetic alterations (chromosomal deletion/amplification) and single point mutations are well described for carcinogenesis inducers. Mutations classically occur within key regions of the genome. Consequences are various and include activation of mitogenic pathways or silencing of apoptotic processes. Alterations of K-RAS, P16 and DPC4 genes are frequently observed in PDAC samples and have been described to arise gradually during carcinogenesis. DNA methylation is an epigenetic process involved in imprinting and X chromosome inactivation. Alteration of DNA methylation patterns leads to deregulation of gene expression, in the absence of mutation. Both genetic and epigenetic events influence genes and non-coding RNA expression, with dramatic effects on proliferation, survival and invasion. Besides improvement in our fundamental understanding of PDAC development, highlighting the molecular alterations that occur in pancreatic carcinogenesis could

  8. Portrét-Alter ego

    OpenAIRE

    BUČKOVÁ, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    The bachelor work is focused in the topic of alter ego in art, mainly in portrait and self- portrait. This work is diveded in two parts-theory and practical part. In the first part I´m interested in ?alter ego?- where it comes form, history (shamanism), these days ( body modification). In the sekond part I´m interested in person (as a whole unit), psychology and psychoanalysis. In the end of the theory I remember (notice) an author, who works with simile topics. In the practical part I descri...

  9. Public health implications of altered puberty timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golub, Mari S; Collman, Gwen W; Foster, Paul M D

    2008-01-01

    . Altered timing of puberty also has implications for behavioral disorders. For example, an early maturation is associated with a greater incidence of conduct and behavior disorders during adolescence. Finally, altered puberty timing is considered an adverse effect in reproductive toxicity risk assessment...... for chemicals. Recent US legislation has mandated improved chemical testing approaches for protecting children's health and screening for endocrine-disrupting agents, which has led to changes in the US Environmental Protection Agency's risk assessment and toxicity testing guidelines to include puberty......-related assessments and to the validation of pubertal male and female rat assays for endocrine screening....

  10. Alterations of BCCIP, a BRCA2 interacting protein, in astrocytomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlo Adrian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 10q26 has been shown to be associated with the aggressiveness of astrocytic tumors (or astrocytomas, but the responsible gene(s residing in this region has not been fully identified. The BCCIP gene is located at chromosome 10q26. It encodes a BRCA2 and CDKN1A (p21 interacting protein. Previous studies have shown that down-regulation of BCCIP impairs recombinational DNA repair, G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, p53 trans-activation activity, cytokinesis, and chromosome stability, suggesting a potential role of BCCIP in cancer etiology. In this study, we investigated whether BCCIP is altered in astrocytomas. Methods Genomic DNA from 45 cases of grade IV astrocytic tumor (glioblastoma tissues and 12 cases of normal tissues were analyzed by quantitative PCR. The BCCIP protein expression in 96 cases of grade II–IV astrocytic tumors was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC. IHC staining of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP, a marker for astrocytic cells, was used to identify cells of the astrocytic lineage. Results We found that BCCIP protein is expressed in normal cells with positive staining of GFAP. However, BCCIP protein expression was not detectable in ~45% of all astrocytic tumors, and in > 60% in the grade IV glioblastoma. About 45% glioblastoma have significant (p BCCIP gene copy number when compared to normal DNA. Furthermore, the frequency of lacking BCCIP expression is associated with the aggressiveness of astrocytic tumors. Conclusion Our data implicate a role of BCCIP in astrocytic tumorigenesis, and lack of BCCIP may be used as a marker for astrocytomas.

  11. Pregnancy Complicated by Obesity Induces Global Transcript Expression Alterations in Visceral and Subcutaneous Fat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashiri, Asher; Heo, Hye J.; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Mazor, Moshe; Budagov, Temuri; Einstein, Francine H.; Atzmon, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Maternal obesity is a significant risk factor for development of both maternal and fetal metabolic complications. Increase in visceral fat and insulin resistance is a metabolic hallmark of pregnancy, yet little is known how obesity alters adipose cellular function and how this may contribute to pregnancy morbidities. We sought to identify alterations in genome-wide transcription expression in both visceral (omental) and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits in pregnancy complicated by obesity. Visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits were collected from normal weight and obese pregnant women (n=4/group) at time of scheduled uncomplicated cesarean section. A genome-wide expression array (Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 st platform), validated by quantitative real-time PCR, was utilized to establish the gene transcript expression profile in both visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat in normal weight and obese pregnant women. Global alteration in gene expression was identified in pregnancy complicated by obesity. These regions of variations lead to identification of indolethylamine N-methyltransferase (INMT), tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2), and ephrin type-B receptor 6 (EPHB6), not previously associated with fat metabolism during pregnancy. In addition, subcutaneous fat of obese pregnant women demonstrated increased coding protein transcripts associated with apoptosis compared to lean counterparts. Global alteration of gene expression in adipose tissue may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with obesity. PMID:24696292

  12. Pregnancy complicated by obesity induces global transcript expression alterations in visceral and subcutaneous fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashiri, Asher; Heo, Hye J; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Mazor, Moshe; Budagov, Temuri; Einstein, Francine H; Atzmon, Gil

    2014-08-01

    Maternal obesity is a significant risk factor for development of both maternal and fetal metabolic complications. Increase in visceral fat and insulin resistance is a metabolic hallmark of pregnancy, yet not much is known how obesity alters adipose cellular function and how this may contribute to pregnancy morbidities. We sought to identify alterations in genome-wide transcription expression in both visceral (omental) and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits in pregnancy complicated by obesity. Visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits were collected from normal weight and obese pregnant women (n = 4/group) at the time of scheduled uncomplicated cesarean section. A genome-wide expression array (Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 st platform), validated by quantitative real-time PCR, was utilized to establish the gene transcript expression profile in both visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat in normal weight and obese pregnant women. Global alteration in gene expression was identified in pregnancy complicated by obesity. These regions of variations led to identification of indolethylamine N-methyltransferase, tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2, and ephrin type-B receptor 6, not previously associated with fat metabolism during pregnancy. In addition, subcutaneous fat of obese pregnant women demonstrated increased coding protein transcripts associated with apoptosis as compared to lean counterparts. Global alteration of gene expression in adipose tissue may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with obesity.

  13. Prognostic value of DNA alterations on chromosome 17p13.2 for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ubol Chuensumran; Sopit Wongkham; Chawalit Pairojkul; Siri Chauin; Songsak Petmitr

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To characterize and evaluate DNA alterations among intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) patients.METHODS: DNA from tumor and corresponding normal tissues of 52 patients was amplified with 33 arbitrary primers. The DNA fragment that alters most frequently in ICC was cloned, sequenced, and identified by comparison with known nucleotide sequences in the genome database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov). The DNA copy numbers of the allelic alterations in cholangiocarcinoma were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and interpreted as allelic loss or DNA amplification by comparison with the reference gene. Associations between allelic imbalance and clinicopathological parameters of ICC patients were evaluated by x2-test.The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze survival rates.RESULTS: From 33 primers, an altered DNA fragment (518 bp) amplified from BC17 random primer was found frequently in the tumors analyzed and mapped to chromosome 17p13.2. Sixteen of 52 (31%) cases showed DNA amplification, while 7 (13%) showed allelic loss. Interestingly, DNA amplification on chromosome 17p13.2 was associated with a good prognosis, median survival time (wk) of amp vs no amp was 44.14 vs 24.14,P = 0.002; whereas allelic loss of this DNA sequence corresponded with a poor prognosis, median survival time (wk) of loss vs no loss was 18.00 vs 28.71, P =0.019). Moreover, Kaplan-Meier curves comparing the DNA alterations with survival depicted highly significant separation that the median survival time equal to DNA amplification, allelic loss, and normal was 44.14 wk,18.00 wk, and 24.29 wk, respectively (P = 0.005).CONCLUSION: Alterations in the DNA sequence on chromosome 17p13.2 may be involved in cholangiocarcinogenesis, and could be used as a prognostic marker in the treatment of ICC patients.

  14. Normal and varicocele testis in adolescents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Santoro; C. Romeo

    2001-01-01

    The authors reviewed the results of their research on the structure and composition of normal and varicocele seminiferous tubules in adolescents. They give new evidences of normal structure of adolescent testis and demonstrate, for the first time, the ultrastructural and immunohistochemical modifications of the lamina propria and basal lamina in the adolescent varicocele patients, which are similar to those observed in adults, but less severe, and of the adherence junctions in seminiferous tubules. They also report the presence of oxidative stress in adolescents limited to testis and not generalised as in the adults. These data are well correlated to different clinical studies that support the hypothesis of a progressive course of varicocele and the need for surgical treatment in adolescent varicocele patients.

  15. A Proposed Arabic Handwritten Text Normalization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Abu-Ain

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Text normalization is an important technique in document image analysis and recognition. It consists of many preprocessing stages, which include slope correction, text padding, skew correction, and straight the writing line. In this side, text normalization has an important role in many procedures such as text segmentation, feature extraction and characters recognition. In the present article, a new method for text baseline detection, straightening, and slant correction for Arabic handwritten texts is proposed. The method comprises a set of sequential steps: first components segmentation is done followed by components text thinning; then, the direction features of the skeletons are extracted, and the candidate baseline regions are determined. After that, selection of the correct baseline region is done, and finally, the baselines of all components are aligned with the writing line.  The experiments are conducted on IFN/ENIT benchmark Arabic dataset. The results show that the proposed method has a promising and encouraging performance.

  16. Normalizing the causality between time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, X. San

    2015-08-01

    Recently, a rigorous yet concise formula was derived to evaluate information flow, and hence the causality in a quantitative sense, between time series. To assess the importance of a resulting causality, it needs to be normalized. The normalization is achieved through distinguishing a Lyapunov exponent-like, one-dimensional phase-space stretching rate and a noise-to-signal ratio from the rate of information flow in the balance of the marginal entropy evolution of the flow recipient. It is verified with autoregressive models and applied to a real financial analysis problem. An unusually strong one-way causality is identified from IBM (International Business Machines Corporation) to GE (General Electric Company) in their early era, revealing to us an old story, which has almost faded into oblivion, about "Seven Dwarfs" competing with a giant for the mainframe computer market.

  17. The general boson normal ordering problem

    CERN Document Server

    Blasiak, P; Solomon, A I; Blasiak, Pawel; Penson, Karol A.; Solomon, Allan I.

    2003-01-01

    We solve the boson normal ordering problem for F[(a*)^r a^s], with r,s positive integers, where a* and a are boson creation and annihilation operators satisfying [a,a*]=1. That is, we provide exact and explicit expressions for the normal form wherein all a's are to the right. The solution involves integer sequences of numbers which are generalizations of the conventional Bell and Stirling numbers whose values they assume for r=s=1. A comprehensive theory of such generalized combinatorial numbers is given including closed-form expressions (extended Dobinski-type formulas)and generating functions. These last are special expectation values in boson coherent states.

  18. Radiogenomics: predicting clinical normal tissue radiosensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsner, Jan

    2006-01-01

    of subcutaneous fibrosis in breast cancer patients will be presented and discussed in relation to possible future studies in radiogenomics. One important and necessary basis for future studies is the collection of carefully designed clinical studies with the accrual of very large numbers of patients (the ESTRO......Studies on the genetic basis of normal tissue radiosensitivity, or  'radiogenomics', aims at predicting clinical radiosensitivity and optimize treatment from individual genetic profiles. Several studies have now reported links between variations in certain genes related to the biological response...... to radiation injury and risk of normal tissue morbidity in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. However, after these initial association studies including few genes, we are still far from being able to predict clinical radiosensitivity on an individual level. Recent data from our own studies on risk...

  19. Distinguishing hyperhidrosis and normal physiological sweat production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Linnea; Gyldenløve, Mette; Zachariae, Claus

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperhidrosis is a condition in which the production of sweat is abnormally increased. No objective criteria for the diagnosis of hyperhidrosis exist, mainly because reference intervals for normal physiological sweat production at rest are unknown. OBJECTIVE: The main objective...... of this study was to establish reference intervals for normal physiological axillary and palmar sweat production. METHODS: Gravimetric testing was performed in 75 healthy control subjects. Subsequently, these results were compared with findings in a cohort of patients with hyperhidrosis and with the results...... derived from a review of data on hyperhidrosis published between 1980 and 2013. RESULTS: Approximately 90% of the controls had axillary and palmar sweat production rates of below 100 mg/5 min. In all except one of the axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis studies reviewed, average sweat production exceeded...

  20. Doppler echocardiography in normal functioning valve prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, R; Yang, S S; Salvucci, T; DiBlasi, S

    1994-09-01

    Even though there has been some criticism regarding the Doppler evaluation in prosthetic valves because of inter-observer and intra-observer variability, among other factors, and Doppler study has a tendency to have falsely high gradients compared to invasive studies, especially mechanical aortic prostheses, Doppler evaluation can provide reliable hemodynamic information about valve function. This test may be particularly useful if used serially, when baseline values are known. Doppler measurement of gradient and valve area has an expected normal range that is specific for the prosthetic type, size, anatomical position, and chronological age. Clearly, a database involving these aspects is needed to provide a more accurate normal range. This study is intended to provide guidance for echocardiographers.

  1. Study of normal colorectal tissue by FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, P O; Bitar, R A; Yassoyama, K; Martinho, H; Santo, A M E; Bruno, P M; Martin, A A

    2007-03-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy was employed to study normal human colorectal tissues in vitro with the aim of evaluating the spectral differences of the complex colon mucous in order to establish a characteristic Raman spectrum. The samples were collected from 39 patients, providing 144 spectra for the statistical analysis. The results enable one to establish three well-defined spectroscopic groups of non-altered colorectal tissues that were consistently checked by statistical (clustering) and biological (histopathology) analyses: group 1 is represented by samples with the presence of epithelial layer, connective tissue papillae, and smooth muscle tissue; group 2 comprises tissues with epithelial layer and connective tissue papillae; group 3 presented mostly fatty and slack conjunctive tissue. The study reveals the existence of an intrinsic spectral variability for each patient that must be considered when sampling tissues fragments to build a spectral database. This is the first step for future studies and applications of Raman spectroscopy to optical biopsy and diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  2. Study on Surface Engineering of Normalized Steels Subjected To Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hardening

    2004-01-01

    Engineering the surfaces of components to improve the life and performance of parts used in automotive and aerospace engineering is the active area of research. Suitable Thermal/Mechanical/Thermo mechanical surface engineering treatments will produce extensive rearrangement of atoms in metals and alloys and corresponding marked variations in Physical, Chemical and Mechanical properties. Among the more important of these treatments are heat treatment processes such as hardening by Quenching, Induction hardening and Case Carburizing which rely on phase transformations to produce desired changes in mechanical properties. Other processes where phase transformation occur are casting, welding and machining etc. [1] Phase transformation may be homogeneous or heterogeneous. Homogeneous involves rearrangements in the structure of the material taking place simultaneously in all parts of the solid, while the heterogeneous transformation involves structural changes which are more localized. Alternatively they could be called as Isothermal and Nonisothermal transformation. But irrespective of the classification, these transformations alter the structure of the material giving rise to changes in the mechanical and physical properties of the processed material. It is of interest to review some consequences of surface modification in isothermal (Normalizing) and nonisothermal transformations (Machining) of low carbon steels.

  3. Effects of normal aging on visuo-motor plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Carrie A.; Cohen, Helen S.; Kimball, Kay T.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2002-01-01

    Normal aging is associated with declines in neurologic function. Uncompensated visual and vestibular problems may have dire consequences including dangerous falls. Visuo-motor plasticity is a form of behavioral neural plasticity, which is important in the process of adapting to visual or vestibular alteration, including those changes due to pathology, pharmacotherapy, surgery or even entry into microgravity or an underwater environment. To determine the effects of aging on visuo-motor plasticity, we chose the simple and easily measured paradigm of visual-motor rearrangement created by using visual displacement prisms while throwing small balls at a target. Subjects threw balls before, during and after wearing a set of prisms which displace the visual scene by twenty degrees to the right. Data obtained during adaptation were modeled using multilevel modeling techniques for 73 subjects, aged 20 to 80 years. We found no statistically significant difference in measures of visuo-motor plasticity with advancing age. Further studies are underway examining variable practice training as a potential mechanism for enhancing this form of behavioral neural plasticity.

  4. [Normal tension glaucoma or syndrome of chronic ocular ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocanu, Carmen; Olaru, Andrei; Popa, Denissa; Deca, Andreea; Barascu, Doina

    2012-01-01

    Chronic ischemia related to a manifest ophthalmic artery stenosis, determines extremely rare ischemic chronic modifications at the level of the optic nerve, with progressive optic atrophy and visual fun ction alteration. It is presented the case of a 59 years patient, who was hospitalized in Clinic of Ophthalmology, Emergency Clinic Districtual Hospital, for decreased vision of the left eye. Fundus eye examination reveals normal aspect of papilla of the right eye and glaucomatous like modification of the left eye, confirmed by perimetry and OCT exams, which present typical glaucomatous lesions. Doppler examination revealed an enormous thrombus at the level of the left internal carotid, with more than 90% stenosis. In this context the diagnosis was chronic ocular ischemia, atypical form. lschemic ocular syndrome presents polymorphic clinic aspects, the most frequent are the ischemic lesions of posterior pole of the eye: retinal hemorrhages, neovascularization, ischemic edema, red cherry macula, cotton-wool spots. lschemic optic neuropathy is less frequent presented, and pseudo-glaucomatous lesion of optic nerve with papillary excavation is exceptional.

  5. Molecular biology of normal melanocytes and melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandarchi, Bizhan; Jabbari, Cyrus Aleksandre; Vedadi, Ali; Navab, Roya

    2013-08-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies in humans and is responsible for 60-80% of deaths from skin cancers. The 5-year survival of patients with metastatic malignant melanoma is about 14%. Its incidence has been increasing in the white population over the past two decades. The mechanisms leading to malignant transformation of melanocytes and melanocytic lesions are poorly understood. In developing malignant melanoma, there is a complex interaction of environmental and endogenous (genetic) factors, including: dysregulation of cell proliferation, programmed cell death (apoptosis) and cell-to-cell interactions. The understanding of genetic alterations in signalling pathways of primary and metastatic malignant melanoma and their interactions may lead to therapeutics modalities, including targeted therapies, particularly in advanced melanomas that have high mortality rates and are often resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Our knowledge regarding the molecular biology of malignant melanoma has been expanding. Even though several genes involved in melanocyte development may also be associated with melanoma cell development, it is still unclear how a normal melanocyte becomes a melanoma cell. This article reviews the molecular events and recent findings associated with malignant melanoma.

  6. Effect of dioxin on normal and leukemic human hematopoietic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambertenghi-Deliliers, G.; Soligo, D. [Univ. degli Studi, Milan (Italy). Dipt. die Ematologia, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico IRCCS; Fracchiolla, N.S. [Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico IRCCS, Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Ematologia; Servida, F. [Fondazione Matarelli, Milan (Italy); Bertazzi, P.A. [Istituti Clinici di Perfezionamento, Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Medicina del Lavoro

    2004-09-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) arises from chlorination of phenolic substrates or from partial combustion of organic materials in the presence of chlorine sources. TCDD has a large number of biological effects such as long-lasting skin disease, cardiovascular disease, diabete and cancer. TCDD is the prototypical agonist of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a member of the erb-A family that also includes the receptors for steroids, thyroid hormones, peroxisome proliferators and retinoids. When bound to dioxin, the AhR can bind to DNA and alter the expression of some genes including cytokines and growth factors. In this study, we analyzed the effect of escalating doses of TCDD on human CD34{sup +} progenitor cells from the leukapheresis of normal donors stimulated with G-CSF as well as the human myeloid leukemic cell lines HL60 (promyelocytic leukemia) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia). The possible specific modulation of gene expression induced by the TCDD exposure was then tested by means of microarray analyses.

  7. Normal neurodynamic responses of the femoral slump test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Weng-Hang; Shih, Yi-Fen; Lin, Pei-Ling; Chen, Wen-Yin; Ma, Hsiao-Li

    2012-04-01

    Femoral slump test is a neurodynamic testing, which could be used to assess the mechanosensitivity of the femoral component of the nervous system. Although Trainor and Pinnington reported the diagnosis accuracy of the femoral slump test, the neurodynamic responses of the femoral slump test have never been studied. The purposes of this study were to evaluate whether maneuvers that changed the nerve tension altered the responses of the femoral slump test and if these responses were influenced by gender and leg dominance; and to identify the correlations between flexibility and measured hip extension angle. Thirty-two asymptomatic subjects (16 males, 16 females) were recruited. The femoral slump test was performed in trunk slump and neutral positions, and cervical extension was used as the structure differential technique. Hip extension angle and visual analog scale (VAS) of thigh pain was measured during the test. Our results showed the decrease of nerve tension significantly increased hip extension ROM (P  0.05). These findings indicated that femoral slump test resulted in normal neurodynamic responses in individuals free of lower extremity problems, and these responses were independent of the influence of muscle flexibility or gender. Future research should emphasize the use of femoral slump test in patient groups such as low back and anterior knee pain.

  8. DNA sequencing of a cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukaemia genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Timothy J; Mardis, Elaine R; Ding, Li; Fulton, Bob; McLellan, Michael D; Chen, Ken; Dooling, David; Dunford-Shore, Brian H; McGrath, Sean; Hickenbotham, Matthew; Cook, Lisa; Abbott, Rachel; Larson, David E; Koboldt, Dan C; Pohl, Craig; Smith, Scott; Hawkins, Amy; Abbott, Scott; Locke, Devin; Hillier, Ladeana W; Miner, Tracie; Fulton, Lucinda; Magrini, Vincent; Wylie, Todd; Glasscock, Jarret; Conyers, Joshua; Sander, Nathan; Shi, Xiaoqi; Osborne, John R; Minx, Patrick; Gordon, David; Chinwalla, Asif; Zhao, Yu; Ries, Rhonda E; Payton, Jacqueline E; Westervelt, Peter; Tomasson, Michael H; Watson, Mark; Baty, Jack; Ivanovich, Jennifer; Heath, Sharon; Shannon, William D; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Walter, Matthew J; Link, Daniel C; Graubert, Timothy A; DiPersio, John F; Wilson, Richard K

    2008-11-06

    Acute myeloid leukaemia is a highly malignant haematopoietic tumour that affects about 13,000 adults in the United States each year. The treatment of this disease has changed little in the past two decades, because most of the genetic events that initiate the disease remain undiscovered. Whole-genome sequencing is now possible at a reasonable cost and timeframe to use this approach for the unbiased discovery of tumour-specific somatic mutations that alter the protein-coding genes. Here we present the results obtained from sequencing a typical acute myeloid leukaemia genome, and its matched normal counterpart obtained from the same patient's skin. We discovered ten genes with acquired mutations; two were previously described mutations that are thought to contribute to tumour progression, and eight were new mutations present in virtually all tumour cells at presentation and relapse, the function of which is not yet known. Our study establishes whole-genome sequencing as an unbiased method for discovering cancer-initiating mutations in previously unidentified genes that may respond to targeted therapies.

  9. The Effect of Gender on the N1-P2 Auditory Complex while Listening and Speaking with Altered Auditory Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swink, Shannon; Stuart, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The effect of gender on the N1-P2 auditory complex was examined while listening and speaking with altered auditory feedback. Fifteen normal hearing adult males and 15 females participated. N1-P2 components were evoked while listening to self-produced nonaltered and frequency shifted /a/ tokens and during production of /a/ tokens during nonaltered…

  10. Prognostic significance of telomeric repeat length alterations in pathological stage I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, T; Komiya, T; Nitta, T; Takada, Y; Kobayashi, M; Masuda, N; Matui, K; Takada, M; Kikui, M; Yasumitu, T; Ohno, A; Nakagawa, K; Fukuoka, M; Kawase, I

    2000-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the prognostic significance of alteration in telomere length in pathological stage (p-stage) I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Paired cancer and normal lung tissues were obtained from 72 patients with histologically confirmed p-stage I-IIIA NSCLC. Terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length, which indicates telomere length, was measured by Southern blot analysis. Tumor telomerase activity was also assayed by non-radioactive PCR-ELISA in 55 patients. TRF length (mean +/- SD) in normal tissue was 6.2 +/- 1.1 Kb. Therefore, upper and lower limits of normal range in TRF length was set at 8.4 (mean + 2SD) Kb and 4.0 (mean-2SD) Kb, respectively. A tumor showing TRF length over normal range was defined as positive for the alteration. In 72 patients, 25 (34.7%) with alteration in TRF length had significantly shorter survival durations than those of the others. Telomerase activity did not correlate with survival duration. In multivariate analysis, alteration in TRF length (P = 0.0033) was second to p-stage (P = 0.0004) in importance among the various parameters.

  11. The classification of normal screening mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Zoey Z. Y.; Rawashdeh, Mohammad A.; Heard, Robert; Brennan, Patrick C.; Lee, Warwick; Lewis, Sarah J.

    2016-03-01

    Rationale and objectives: To understand how breast screen readers classify the difficulty of normal screening mammograms using common lexicon describing normal appearances. Cases were also assessed on their suitability for a single reader strategy. Materials and Methods: 15 breast readers were asked to interpret a test set of 29 normal screening mammogram cases and classify them by rating the difficulty of the case on a five-point Likert scale, identifying the salient features and assessing their suitability for single reading. Using the False Positive Fractions from a previous study, the 29 cases were classified into 10 "low", 10 "medium" and nine "high" difficulties. Data was analyzed with descriptive statistics. Spearman's correlation was used to test the strength of association between the difficulty of the cases and the readers' recommendation for single reading strategy. Results: The ratings from readers in this study corresponded to the known difficulty level of cases for the 'low' and 'high' difficulty cases. Uniform ductal pattern and density, symmetrical mammographic features and the absence of micro-calcifications were the main reasons associated with 'low' difficulty cases. The 'high' difficulty cases were described as having `dense breasts'. There was a statistically significant negative correlation between the difficulty of the cases and readers' recommendation for single reading (r = -0.475, P = 0.009). Conclusion: The findings demonstrated potential relationships between certain mammographic features and the difficulty for readers to classify mammograms as 'normal'. The standard Australian practice of double reading was deemed more suitable for most cases. There was an inverse moderate association between the difficulty of the cases and the recommendations for single reading.

  12. How dementia differs from normal ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginesi, Laura; Jenkins, Catharine; Keenan, Bernie

    Dementia is a collective name for a set of symptoms that include memory loss, mood changes, confusion and increasing difficulty with everyday tasks. This four-part series provides an overview of dementia and its treatment, from its causes and pathophysiology to diagnosis and the nurse's role in its management. This first article reviews the main forms of dementia and how research is shedding new light on the differences between dementia and normal ageing.

  13. Normalization of oxygen and hydrogen isotope data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, T.B.

    1988-01-01

    To resolve confusion due to expression of isotopic data from different laboratories on non-corresponding scales, oxygen isotope analyses of all substances can be expressed relative to VSMOW or VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on scales normalized such that the ??18O of SLAP is -55.5% relative to VSMOW. H3+ contribution in hydrogen isotope ratio analysis can be easily determined using two gaseous reference samples that differ greatly in deuterium content. ?? 1988.

  14. Perturbative calculation of quasi-normal modes

    CERN Document Server

    Siopsis, G

    2005-01-01

    I discuss a systematic method of analytically calculating the asymptotic form of quasi-normal frequencies. In the case of a four-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole, I expand around the zeroth-order approximation to the wave equation proposed by Motl and Neitzke. In the case of a five-dimensional AdS black hole, I discuss a perturbative solution of the Heun equation. The analytical results are in agreement with the results from numerical analysis.

  15. Normality and shared values concerning differential polynomials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Let F be a family of functions meromorphic in a domain D, let P be a polynomial with either deg P≥3 or deg P = 2 and P having only one distinct zero, and let b be a finite nonzero complex number. If, each pair of functions f and g in F, P (f)f and P (g)g share b in D, then F is normal in D.

  16. Deformed Bosons: Combinatorics of Normal Ordering

    CERN Document Server

    Blasiak, P; Penson, K A; Solomon, A I

    2004-01-01

    We solve the normal ordering problem for (A* A)^n where A* (resp. A) are one mode deformed bosonic creation (resp. annihilation) operators satisfying [A,A*]=[N+1]-[N]. The solution generalizes results known for canonical and q-bosons. It involves combinatorial polynomials in the number operator N for which the generating functions and explicit expressions are found. Simple deformations provide examples of the method.

  17. Online Normalization Algorithm for Engine Turbofan Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-02

    turbofan components. Even to monitor bench test cells we look at vibration monitoring according to load parameters and lots of different other...different as well as for helicopter missions, business jets and event test bench tests. Table 1 – Example of context information and endogenous...specificity of each engine or event the particular way each company and pilot operates its aircrafts. 2. STATISTIC MIXTURE MODEL To solve our normalization

  18. The J/$\\psi$ normal nuclear absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Alessandro, B; Arnaldi, R; Atayan, M; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo, P; Borges, G; Castanier, C; Castor, J; Chaurand, B; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cicalò, C; Comets, M P; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; De Falco, A; De Marco, N; Dellacasa, G; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gerschel, C; Giubellino, P; Golubeva, M B; Grigorian, A A; Grigorian, S; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; kanyan, H; ldzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavicheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenço, C; Cormick, M M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Prino, F; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramello, L; Ramos, S; Riccati, L; Santos, H; Saturnini, P; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sigaudo, M F; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, E; Villatte, L; Willis, N; Wu T

    2005-01-01

    We present a new determination of the ratio of cross-sections (J/psi) /DY as expected for nucleus-nucleus reactions if J/psi would only be normally absorbed by nuclear matter. This anticipated behaviour is based on proton-nucleus data exclusively, and compared, as a function of centrality, with updated S-U results from experiment NA38 and with the most recent Pb-Pb results from experiment NA50.

  19. Principal normal indicatrices of closed space curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    A theorem due to J. Weiner, which also is proven by B. Solomon, implies that a principal normal indicatrix of a closed space curve with non-vanishing curvature has integrated geodesic curvature zero and contains no sub arc with integrated geodesic curvature Pi. We prove that the inverse problem a...... to the negative.Keywords: An inverse to Jacobi's theorem, differential geometry of closed space curves, Frenet ApparatusAMS-classification (1991): 53A04...

  20. Projective Normality of Weyl Group Quotients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Kannan; S K Pattanayak

    2011-02-01

    In this note, we prove that for the standard representation of the Weyl group of a semi-simple algebraic group of type $A_n,B_n,C_n,D_n,F_4$ and $G_2$ over $\\mathbb{C}$, the projective variety $\\mathbb{P}(V^m)/W$ is projectively normal with respect to the descent of $\\mathcal{O}(1)^{\\otimes|W|}$, where $V^m$ denote the direct sum of copies of .

  1. Military Innovation in the New Normal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-13

    use of force during the conduct of war. Unless survival is at stake or an idealistic “ evil incarnate” threat exits, the U.S. demonstrates significant...limits of military power would clearly help alleviate tensions between the policy and strategy mismatches resident in the American way of war...strategies, capabilities, and doctrine resident in the pre-9/11 era that remain sufficient in meeting the emergent demands of the new normal. The

  2. Portable Instrument for Normalized Difference Vegetation Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Han-chang; ZHAO Chun-jiang; XUE Xu-zhang; HAO Xiao-jian

    2004-01-01

    By using four specially designed narrow bandpass filters and photodetectors in the instrument, the incident and reflected radiances of sun light on the vegetation are optically sensed, at the red and near infrared bands, then the normalized difference vegetation index(NDVI) is processed by a microprocessor. Compared with conventional spectrometer measuring method of NDVI, the instrument is easy to be used, compact, light and low-cost.

  3. Particularlies normal microflora of the human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Sklyar

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowdays it marks the constant growth of diseases connected to changes of biological balance between macroorganism and various microbial populations of its organs and systems which formed during evolution. The literary data and experimental data of artors are generalised in this article. They concern structure microflora of human organism, factors influencing process of its formation, meaning normal microflora for functioning organism as a whole, and for systems and organs

  4. Research on Normal Human Plantar Pressure Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xi Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FSR400 pressure sensor, nRF905 wireless transceiver and MSP40 SCM are used to design the insole pressure collection system, LabVIEW is used to make HMI of data acquisition, collecting a certain amount of normal human foot pressure data, statistical analysis of pressure distribution relations about five stages of swing phase during walking, using the grid closeness degree to identify plantar pressure distribution pattern recognition, and the algorithm simulation, experimental results demonstrated this method feasible.

  5. The Normalizer Conjecture in the Alternative Case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edgar G. Goodaire; Yuanlin Li

    2001-01-01

    Let L be a torsion loop for which the integral loop ring ZL is an alternative, but not associative, ring. Let Nu(L) denote the normalizer of L in the unit loop u(ZL). We show that Nu(L) = Z(u)L, where Z(u) is the center ofu(ZL), and use this fact to show that u(ZL) has central height 1, unless L is a hamiltonian 2-loop.

  6. Clock drawing performance in cognitively normal elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Emily J; Santini, Veronica; Blankevoort, Christiaan G; Volkers, Karin M; Barrup, Melissa S; Byerly, Laura; Chaisson, Christine; Jefferson, Angela L; Kaplan, Edith; Green, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

    2008-05-01

    The Clock Drawing Test (CDT) is a common neuropsychological measure sensitive to cognitive changes and functional skills (e.g., driving test performance) among older adults. However, normative data have not been adequately developed. We report the distribution of CDT scores using three common scoring systems [Mendez, M. F., Ala, T., & Underwood, K. L. (1992). Development of scoring criteria for the Clock Drawing Task in Alzheimer's Disease. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 40, 1095-1099; Cahn, D. A., Salmon, D. P., Monsch, A. U., Butters, N., Wiederholt, W. C., & Corey-Bloom, J. (1996). Screening for dementia of the Alzheimer type in the community: The utility of the Clock Drawing Test. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 11(6), 529-539], among 207 cognitively normal elderly. The systems were well correlated, took little time to use, and had high inter-rater reliability. We found statistically significant differences in CDT scores based on age and WRAT-3 Reading score, a marker of education quality. We present means, standard deviations, and t- and z-scores based on these subgroups. We found that "normal" CDT performance includes a wider distribution of scores than previously reported. Our results may serve as useful comparisons for clinicians wishing to know whether their patients perform in the general range of cognitively normal elderly.

  7. Normal and Time-Compressed Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Ulrike; Kollmeier, Birger; Holube, Inga

    2016-01-01

    Short-term and long-term learning effects were investigated for the German Oldenburg sentence test (OLSA) using original and time-compressed fast speech in noise. Normal-hearing and hearing-impaired participants completed six lists of the OLSA in five sessions. Two groups of normal-hearing listeners (24 and 12 listeners) and two groups of hearing-impaired listeners (9 listeners each) performed the test with original or time-compressed speech. In general, original speech resulted in better speech recognition thresholds than time-compressed speech. Thresholds decreased with repetition for both speech materials. Confirming earlier results, the largest improvements were observed within the first measurements of the first session, indicating a rapid initial adaptation phase. The improvements were larger for time-compressed than for original speech. The novel results on long-term learning effects when using the OLSA indicate a longer phase of ongoing learning, especially for time-compressed speech, which seems to be limited by a floor effect. In addition, for normal-hearing participants, no complete transfer of learning benefits from time-compressed to original speech was observed. These effects should be borne in mind when inviting listeners repeatedly, for example, in research settings.

  8. Accelerator Technology: Magnets, Normal and Superconducting

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the the Section '8.1 Magnets, Normal and Superconducting' of the Chapter '8 Accelerator Technology' with the content: 8.1 Magnets, Normal and Superconducting 8.1.1 Introduction 8.1.2 Normal Conducting Magnets 8.1.2.1 Magnetic Design 8.1.2.2 Coils 8.1.2.3 Yoke 8.1.2.4 Costs 8.1.2.5 Undulators, Wigglers, Permanent Magnets 8.1.2.6 Solenoids 8.1.3 Superconducting Magnets 8.1.3.1 Superconducting Materials 8.1.3.2 Superconducting Cables 8.1.3.3 Stability and Margins, Quench and Protection 8.1.3.4 Magnetization, Coupling and AC Loss 8.1.3.5 Magnetic Design of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets 8.1.3.6 Current Leads 8.1.3.7 Mechanics, Insulation, Cooling and Manufacturing Aspects

  9. Incompressibility criteria for spun-normal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dunfield, Nathan M

    2011-01-01

    We give a simple sufficient condition for a spun-normal surface in an ideal triangulation to be incompressible, namely that it is a vertex surface with non-empty boundary which has a quadrilateral in each tetrahedron. While this condition is far from being necessary, it is powerful enough to give two new results: the existence of alternating knots with non-integer boundary slopes, and a proof of the Slope Conjecture for a large class of 2-fusion knots. While the condition and conclusion are purely topological, the proof uses the Culler-Shalen theory of essential surfaces arising from ideal points of the character variety, as reinterpreted by Thurston and Yoshida. The criterion itself comes from the work of Kabaya, which we place into the language of normal surface theory. This allows the criterion to be easily applied, and gives the framework for proving that the surface is incompressible. We also explore which spun-normal surfaces arise from ideal points of the deformation variety. In particular, we give an ...

  10. Ultrasound appearance of the normal Lisfranc ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaicker, Jatin; Zajac, Mercedes; Shergill, Ravi; Choudur, Hema N

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to prospectively evaluate the ultrasound appearance of the normal Lisfranc's ligament in 50 patients (100 ft) with no prior or current ligament injury. Fifty normal asymptomatic patients between the ages of 18 and 80 years were assessed. Three key features were recorded: ultrasound appearance, thickness, and length of the Lisfranc's ligament. Patients excluded from this study included pediatric patients and those with history of injury or symptoms related to the foot. The mean right- and left-sided ligament (RT) thickness were 0.096 (0.021) and 0.104 (0.023), respectively. The mean right- and left-sided ligament RT length was 0.54 (0.11) and 0.57 (0.11), respectively. The appearance of the ligament was similar in all patients with a central thin band of hypoechogenicity lined by hyperechoic lines on either side. Understanding the normal appearance, thickness, and length of the Lisfranc's ligament in a large sample is imperative to diagnose abnormal appearances of this ligament including sprains and tears by ultrasound. Ultrasound, with its easy accessibility, can be used in the emergency department to rapidly exclude injury of the ligament. Increased understanding and awareness of the Lisfranc's ligament on ultrasound can allow for more accurate diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Integrating various resources for gene name normalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuncui Hu

    Full Text Available The recognition and normalization of gene mentions in biomedical literature are crucial steps in biomedical text mining. We present a system for extracting gene names from biomedical literature and normalizing them to gene identifiers in databases. The system consists of four major components: gene name recognition, entity mapping, disambiguation and filtering. The first component is a gene name recognizer based on dictionary matching and semi-supervised learning, which utilizes the co-occurrence information of a large amount of unlabeled MEDLINE abstracts to enhance feature representation of gene named entities. In the stage of entity mapping, we combine the strategies of exact match and approximate match to establish linkage between gene names in the context and the EntrezGene database. For the gene names that map to more than one database identifiers, we develop a disambiguation method based on semantic similarity derived from the Gene Ontology and MEDLINE abstracts. To remove the noise produced in the previous steps, we design a filtering method based on the confidence scores in the dictionary used for NER. The system is able to adjust the trade-off between precision and recall based on the result of filtering. It achieves an F-measure of 83% (precision: 82.5% recall: 83.5% on BioCreative II Gene Normalization (GN dataset, which is comparable to the current state-of-the-art.

  12. Connective tissue alteration in abdominal wall hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, N A; Yadete, D H; Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2011-01-01

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of abdominal wall hernia formation is complex. Optimal treatment of hernias depends on a full understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in their formation. The aim of this study was to review the literature on specific collagen alterations in abdom...

  13. Gold mobility during Palaeoarchaean submarine alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Axel; Pitcairn, Iain; Wilson, Allan

    2017-03-01

    Seafloor alteration provides large amounts of solutes to the hydrosphere. In order to investigate gold mobility during water-rock interaction prior to 3-billion-years ago, low detection limit analysis of Au concentrations was carried out on rocks from marine alteration zones. Stratiform zones recording low-temperature (≤150 °C) seafloor alteration are a characteristic feature of greenstone belts older than 3.0 Ga. Hydrothermal processes were operating on, and immediately below, the seafloor, giving rise to extensive silicification of sub-seafloor volcanic rocks and silicification of seafloor sediments. In order to investigate gold mobility during silicification, unaltered and variably silicified volcanic rocks and associated cherts from Palaeoarchaean greenstone successions (c. 3.4 Ga) of South Africa were analyzed. Results show mobility of gold during silicification of mafic/ultramafic rocks and transfer to the Archaean ocean. Some gold was incorporated into carbonaceous marine sediments overlying the alteration zones. A combination of pervasive silicification, rarity of black shales, and low gold content in komatiites can explain the low mineralization potential of Palaeoarchaean greenstone belts for orogenic gold deposits.

  14. Acting: An Altered State of Consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiffele, Eberhard

    2001-01-01

    Uses notions from the field Psychology of Consciousness, including an explanation of how psychologists define and investigate Altered States of Consciousness (ASCs). Argues that actors routinely enter an ASC. Establishes acting as a way to enter an ASC and discusses why theater artists, educators, and advocates need to be aware of both the dangers…

  15. Psychobiology of Altered States of Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitl, Dieter; Birbaumer, Niels; Gruzelier, John; Jamieson, Graham A.; Kotchoubey, Boris; Kubler, Andrea; Lehmann, Dietrich; Miltner, Wolfgang H. R.; Ott, Ulrich; Sammer, Gebhard; Strauch, Inge; Strehl, Ute; Wackermann, Jiri; Weiss, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The article reviews the current knowledge regarding altered states of consciousness (ASC) (a) occurring spontaneously, (b) evoked by physical and physiological stimulation, (c) induced by psychological means, and (d) caused by diseases. The emphasis is laid on psychological and neurobiological approaches. The phenomenological analysis of the…

  16. Reorientation from Altered States: Please, More Carefully.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    Claims counselors too often appear to forget to reorient clients from altered states of consciousness used in counseling and that failure to reorient can result in unnecessary discomfort for clients. Provides suggestions for when and how to reorient to avoid unwanted, lingering aftereffects. (Author/ABL)

  17. Altered Images: The Camera, Computer, & Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, Mary

    The speech contained in this document originally accompanied a slide presentation on the altered photographic image. The discussion examines the links between photographic tradition and contemporary visual imaging, the current transformation of visual imaging by the computer, and the effects of digital imaging on visual arts. Photography has a…

  18. Diabetic rat testes: morphological and functional alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, G; Catizone, A; Esposito, R; Pisanti, F A; Vietri, M T; Galdieri, M

    2009-12-01

    Reproductive dysfunction is a consequence of diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This study investigated the histological and molecular alterations in the testes of rats injected with streptozotocin at prepuperal (SPI rats) and adult age (SAI rats) to understand whether diabetes affects testicular tissue with different severity depending on the age in which this pathological condition starts. The testes of diabetic animals showed frequent abnormal histology, and seminiferous epithelium cytoarchitecture appeared altered as well as the occludin distribution pattern. The early occurrence of diabetes increased the percentage of animals with high number of damaged tubules. The interstitial compartment of the testes was clearly hypertrophic in several portions of the organs both in SPI and SAI rats. Interestingly, fully developed Leydig cells were present in all the treated animals although abnormally distributed. Besides the above-described damages, we found a similar decrease in plasma testosterone levels both in SPI and SAI rats. Oxidative stress (OS) is involved in the pathogenesis of various diabetic complications, and in our experimental models we found that manganese superoxide dismutase was reduced in diabetic animals. We conclude that in STZ-induced diabetes, the altered spermatogenesis, more severe in SPI animals, is possibly due to the effect of OS on Leydig cell function which could cause the testosterone decrease responsible for the alterations found in the seminiferous epithelium of diabetic animals.

  19. RNA expression profile of calcified bicuspid, tricuspid, and normal human aortic valves by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guauque-Olarte, Sandra; Droit, Arnaud; Tremblay-Marchand, Joël; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitri; Dagenais, Francois; Seidman, Jonathan G; Body, Simon C; Pibarot, Philippe; Mathieu, Patrick; Bossé, Yohan

    2016-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms leading to premature development of aortic valve stenosis (AS) in individuals with a bicuspid aortic valve are unknown. The objective of this study was to identify genes differentially expressed between calcified bicuspid aortic valves (BAVc) and tricuspid valves with (TAVc) and without (TAVn) AS using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We collected 10 human BAVc and nine TAVc from men who underwent primary aortic valve replacement. Eight TAVn were obtained from men who underwent heart transplantation. mRNA levels were measured by RNA-Seq and compared between valve groups. Two genes were upregulated, and none were downregulated in BAVc compared with TAVc, suggesting a similar gene expression response to AS in individuals with bicuspid and tricuspid valves. There were 462 genes upregulated and 282 downregulated in BAVc compared with TAVn. In TAVc compared with TAVn, 329 genes were up- and 170 were downregulated. A total of 273 upregulated and 147 downregulated genes were concordantly altered between BAVc vs. TAVn and TAVc vs. TAVn, which represent 56 and 84% of significant genes in the first and second comparisons, respectively. This indicates that extra genes and pathways were altered in BAVc. Shared pathways between calcified (BAVc and TAVc) and normal (TAVn) aortic valves were also more extensively altered in BAVc. The top pathway enriched for genes differentially expressed in calcified compared with normal valves was fibrosis, which support the remodeling process as a therapeutic target. These findings are relevant to understand the molecular basis of AS in patients with bicuspid and tricuspid valves.

  20. Data-driven intensity normalization of PET group comparison studies is superior to global mean normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Aanerud, Joel; Gjedde, Albert

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Global mean (GM) normalization is one of the most commonly used methods of normalization in PET and SPECT group comparison studies of neurodegenerative disorders. It requires that no between-group GM difference is present, which may be strongly violated in neurodegenerative disorders....... Importantly, such GM differences often elude detection due to the large intrinsic variance in absolute values of cerebral blood flow or glucose consumption. Alternative methods of normalization are needed for this type of data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two types of simulation were performed using CBF images...... from 49 controls. Two homogeneous groups of 20 subjects were sampled repeatedly. In one group, cortical CBF was artificially decreased moderately (simulation I) or slightly (simulation II). The other group served as controls. Ratio normalization was performed using five reference regions: (1) Global...

  1. Aqueous alteration on main-belt asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasier, S.; Lantz, C.; Barucci, M.; Lazzarin, M.

    2014-07-01

    The study of aqueous alteration is particularly important for unraveling the processes occurring during the earliest times in Solar System history, as it can give information both on the thermal processes and on the localization of water sources in the asteroid belt, and for the associated astrobiological implications. The aqueous alteration process produces the low temperature (< 320 K) chemical alteration of materials by liquid water which acts as a solvent and produces materials like phyllosilicates, sulphates, oxides, carbonates, and hydroxides. This means that liquid water was present in the primordial asteroids, produced by the melting of water ice by heating sources, very probably by ^{26}Al decay. Hydrated minerals have been found mainly on Mars surface, on primitive main-belt asteroids (C, G, B, F, and P-type, following the classification scheme by Tholen, 1984) and possibly also on few transneptunian objects. Reflectance spectroscopy of aqueous altered asteroids shows absorption features in the 0.6-0.9 and 2.5-3.5-micron regions, which are diagnostic of, or associated with, hydrated minerals. In this work, we investigate the aqueous alteration process on a large sample of 600 visible spectra of C-complex asteroids available in the literature. We analyzed all these spectra in a similar way to characterize the absorption-band parameters (band center, depth, and width) and spectral slope, and to look for possible correlations between the aqueous alteration process and the asteroids taxonomic classes, orbital elements, heliocentric distances, albedo, and sizes. We find that 4.6 % of P, 7.7 % of F, 9.8 % of B, 50.5 % of C, and 100 % of the G-type asteroids have absorption bands in the visible region due to hydrated silicates. Our analysis shows that the aqueous alteration sequence starts from the P-type objects, practically unaltered, and increases through the P → F → B → C → G asteroids, these last being widely aqueously altered, strengthening thus

  2. Probiotics normalize the gut-brain-microbiota axis in immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carli J; Emge, Jacob R; Berzins, Katrina; Lung, Lydia; Khamishon, Rebecca; Shah, Paarth; Rodrigues, David M; Sousa, Andrew J; Reardon, Colin; Sherman, Philip M; Barrett, Kim E; Gareau, Mélanie G

    2014-10-15

    The gut-brain-microbiota axis is increasingly recognized as an important regulator of intestinal physiology. Exposure to psychological stress causes activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and causes altered intestinal barrier function, intestinal dysbiosis, and behavioral changes. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether the effects of psychological stress on intestinal physiology and behavior, including anxiety and memory, are mediated by the adaptive immune system. Furthermore, we wanted to determine whether treatment with probiotics would normalize these effects. Here we demonstrate that B and T cell-deficient Rag1(-/-) mice displayed altered baseline behaviors, including memory and anxiety, accompanied by an overactive HPA axis, increased intestinal secretory state, dysbiosis, and decreased hippocampal c-Fos expression. Both local (intestinal physiology and microbiota) and central (behavioral and hippocampal c-Fos) changes were normalized by pretreatment with probiotics, indicating an overall benefit on health conferred by changes in the microbiota, independent of lymphocytes. Taken together, these findings indicate a role for adaptive immune cells in maintaining normal intestinal and brain health in mice and show that probiotics can overcome this immune-mediated deficit in the gut-brain-microbiota axis.

  3. Evaluation of Postprandial Total Antioxidant Activity in Normal and Overweight Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Arslan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Postprandial changes acutely alter some mechanisms in body. There are many studies showing blood oxidative status changes after food intake, and supplementation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a standardized meal on serum total antioxidant activity (TAA in normal weight and overweight individuals. Material and Method: Fourteen normal weight and twelve overweight individuals were given a standardized meal in the morning after an overnight fast. Serum TAA, glucose, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations were measured at baseline, 3rd hour, and 6th hour after the meal in both groups.Results: In both normal and overweight groups, the difference between baseline and 3rd hour was significant for TAA. The TAA of the overweight group was also significantly lower than the TAA of the normal weight group at 3rd hour. However, there was no significant correlation between lipid parameters and TAA levels. Discussion: The present study shows that postprandial oxidative damage occurs more prominently in overweight individuals than in normal weight individuals. Postprandial changes acutely induce oxidative stress and impair the natural antioxidant defense mechanism. It should be noted that consuming foods with antioxidants in order to avoid various diseases and complications is useful, particularly in obese subjects.

  4. Changes in topological organization of functional PET brain network with normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiliang; Ke, Lining; Liu, Huafeng; Huang, Wenhua; Hu, Zhenghui

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies about brain network have suggested that normal aging is associated with alterations in coordinated patterns of the large-scale brain functional and structural systems. However, age-related changes in functional networks constructed via positron emission tomography (PET) data are still barely understood. Here, we constructed functional brain networks composed of 90 regions in younger (mean age 36.5 years) and older (mean age 56.3 years) age groups with PET data. 113 younger and 110 older healthy individuals were separately selected for two age groups, from a physical examination database. Corresponding brain functional networks of the two groups were constructed by thresholding average cerebral glucose metabolism correlation matrices of 90 regions and analysed using graph theoretical approaches. Although both groups showed normal small-world architecture in the PET networks, increased clustering and decreased efficiency were found in older subjects, implying a degeneration process that brain system shifts from a small-world network to regular one along with normal aging. Moreover, normal senescence was related to changed nodal centralities predominantly in association and paralimbic cortex regions, e.g. increasing in orbitofrontal cortex (middle) and decreasing in left hippocampus. Additionally, the older networks were about equally as robust to random failures as younger counterpart, but more vulnerable against targeted attacks. Finally, methods in the construction of the PET networks revealed reasonable robustness. Our findings enhanced the understanding about the topological principles of PET networks and changes related to normal aging.

  5. Comparison of the histological morphology between normal skin and scar tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shao-wei; Geng, Zhi-jun; Ma, Kui; Sun, Xiao-yan; Fu, Xiao-bing

    2016-04-01

    Skin wound healing is a complex event, and interrupted wound healing process could lead to scar formation. The aim of this study was to examine the morphological changes of scar tissue. Pathological staining (HE staining, Masson's trichrome staining, methenamine silver staining) was used to evaluate the morphological changes of regenerating epidermis in normal skin and scar tissue, and immunofluorescence staining to detect the expression of collagen IV, a component of basement membrane (BM), and the expression of integrinβ4, a receptor for BM laminins. Additionally, the expression of CK14, CK5, and CK10 was measured to evaluate the proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes in normal skin and scar tissue. The results showed that the structure of the skin was histologically changed in scar tissue. Collagen IV, expressed under the epidermis of normal skin, was reduced distinctly in scar tissue. Integrinβ4, expressed in the basal layer of normal skin, was found absent in the basal layer of scar tissue. Additionally, it was found that keratinocytes in scarring epidermis were more proliferative than in normal skin. These results indicate that during the skin wound healing, altered formation of BM may affect the proliferation of keratinocytes, reepithelial and tissue remodeling, and then result in scar formation. Thus, remodeling BM structure during wound repair may be beneficial for improving healing in cutaneous wounds during clinical practice.

  6. Tissue specific DNA methylation in normal human breast epithelium and in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraham, Ayelet; Cho, Sean Soonweng; Uhlmann, Ronit; Polak, Mia Leonov; Sandbank, Judith; Karni, Tami; Pappo, Itzhak; Halperin, Ruvit; Vaknin, Zvi; Sella, Avishay; Sukumar, Saraswati; Evron, Ella

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a heterogeneous and tissue-specific disease. Thus, the tissue of origin reflects on the natural history of the disease and dictates the therapeutic approach. It is suggested that tissue differentiation, mediated mostly by epigenetic modifications, could guide tissue-specific susceptibility and protective mechanisms against cancer. Here we studied breast specific methylation in purified normal epithelium and its reflection in breast cancers. We established genome wide methylation profiles of various normal epithelial tissues and identified 110 genes that were differentially methylated in normal breast epithelium. A number of these genes also showed methylation alterations in breast cancers. We elaborated on one of them, TRIM29 (ATDC), and showed that its promoter was hypo-methylated in normal breast epithelium and heavily methylated in other normal epithelial tissues. Moreover, in breast carcinomas methylation increased and expression decreased whereas the reverse was noted for multiple other carcinomas. Interestingly, TRIM29 regulation in breast tumors clustered according to the PAM50 classification. Thus, it was repressed in the estrogen receptor positive tumors, particularly in the more proliferative luminal B subtype. This goes in line with previous reports indicating tumor suppressive activity of TRIM29 in estrogen receptor positive luminal breast cells in contrast to oncogenic function in pancreatic and lung cancers. Overall, these findings emphasize the linkage between breast specific epigenetic regulation and tissue specificity of cancer.

  7. Transport through hybrid superconducting/normal nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futterer, David

    2013-01-29

    We mainly investigate transport through interacting quantum dots proximized by superconductors. For this purpose we extend an existing theory to describe transport through proximized quantum dots coupled to normal and superconducting leads. It allows us to study the influence of a strong Coulomb interaction on Andreev currents and Josephson currents. This is a particularly interesting topic because it combines two competing properties: in superconductors Cooper pairs are formed by two electrons which experience an attractive interaction while two electrons located on a quantum dot repel each other due to the Coulomb interaction. It seems at first glance that transport processes involving Cooper pairs should be suppressed because of the two competing interactions. However, it is possible to proximize the dot in nonequilibrium situations. At first, we study a setup composed of a quantum dot coupled to one normal, one ferromagnetic, and one superconducting lead in the limit of an infinitely-large superconducting gap. Within this limit the coupling between dot and superconductor is described exactly by the presented theory. It leads to the formation of Andreev-bound states (ABS) and an additional bias scheme opens in which a pure spin current, i.e. a spin current with a vanishing associated charge current, can be generated. In a second work, starting from the infinite-gap limit, we perform a systematic expansion of the superconducting gap around infinity and investigate Andreev currents and Josephson currents. This allows us to estimate the validity of infinite-gap calculations for real systems in which the superconducting gap is usually a rather small quantity. We find indications that a finite gap renormalizes the ABS and propose a resummation approach to explore the finite-gap ABS. Despite the renormalization effects the modifications of transport by finite gaps are rather small. This result lets us conclude that the infinite-gap calculation is a valuable tool to

  8. Microbial colonization and alteration of basaltic glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Einen

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms have been reported to be associated with the alteration of the glassy margin of seafloor pillow basalts (Thorseth et al., 2001, 2003; Lysnes et al., 2004. The amount of iron and other biological important elements present in basalts and the vast abundance of basaltic glass in the earth's crust, make glass alteration an important process in global element cycling. To gain further insight into microbial communities associated with glass alteration, five microcosm experiments mimicking seafloor conditions were inoculated with seafloor basalt and incubated for one year. Mineral precipitations, microbial attachment to the glass and glass alteration were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and the bacterial community composition was fingerprinted by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE in combination with sequencing. SEM analysis revealed a microbial community with low morphological diversity of mainly biofilm associated and prosthecate microorganisms. Approximately 30 nm thick alteration rims developed on the glass in all microcosms after one year of incubation; this however was also seen in non inoculated controls. Calcium carbonate precipitates showed parallel, columnar and filamentous crystallization habits in the microcosms as well as in the sterile controls. DGGE analysis showed an alteration in bacterial community profiles in the five different microcosms, as a response to the different energy and redox regimes and time. In all microcosms a reduction in number of DGGE bands, in combination with an increase in cell abundance were recorded during the experiment. Sequence analysis showed that the microcosms were dominated by four groups of organisms with phylogenetic affiliation to four taxa: The Rhodospirillaceae, a family containing phototrophic marine organisms, in which some members are capable of heterotrophic growth in darkness and N2 fixation; the family Hyphomicrobiaceae, a group

  9. Hypergravity-induced altered behavior in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Wan, Judy; Marcu, Oana; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2012-07-01

    Microgravity and mechanical stress are important factors of the spaceflight environment, and affect astronaut health and behavior. Structural, functional, and behavioral mechanisms of all cells and organisms are adapted to Earth's gravitational force, 1G, while altered gravity can pose challenges to their adaptability to this new environment. On ground, hypergravity paradigms have been used to predict and complement studies on microgravity. Even small changes that take place at a molecular and genetic level during altered gravity may result in changes in phenotypic behavior. Drosophila provides a robust and simple, yet very reliable model system to understand the complexity of hypergravity-induced altered behavior, due to availability of a plethora of genetic tools. Locomotor behavior is a sensitive parameter that reflects the array of molecular adaptive mechanisms recruited during exposure to altered gravity. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of this behavior in a hypergravity environment could potentially extend our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in microgravity. In our laboratory we are trying to dissect out the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hypergravity-induced oxidative stress, and its potential consequences on behavioral alterations by using Drosophila as a model system. In the present study, we employed pan-neuronal and mushroom body specific knock-down adult flies by using Gal4/UAS system to express inverted repeat transgenes (RNAi) to monitor and quantify the hypergravity-induced behavior in Drosophila. We established that acute hypergravity (3G for 60 min) causes a significant and robust decrease in the locomotor behavior in adult Drosophila, and that this change is dependent on genes related to Parkinson's disease, such as DJ-1α , DJ-1β , and parkin. In addition, we also showed that anatomically the control of this behavior is significantly processed in the mushroom body region of the fly brain. This work links a molecular

  10. Microbial colonization and alteration of basaltic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einen, J.; Kruber, C.; Øvreås, L.; Thorseth, I. H.; Torsvik, T.

    2006-03-01

    Microorganisms have been reported to be associated with the alteration of the glassy margin of seafloor pillow basalts (Thorseth et al., 2001, 2003; Lysnes et al., 2004). The amount of iron and other biological important elements present in basalts and the vast abundance of basaltic glass in the earth's crust, make glass alteration an important process in global element cycling. To gain further insight into microbial communities associated with glass alteration, five microcosm experiments mimicking seafloor conditions were inoculated with seafloor basalt and incubated for one year. Mineral precipitations, microbial attachment to the glass and glass alteration were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the bacterial community composition was fingerprinted by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) in combination with sequencing. SEM analysis revealed a microbial community with low morphological diversity of mainly biofilm associated and prosthecate microorganisms. Approximately 30 nm thick alteration rims developed on the glass in all microcosms after one year of incubation; this however was also seen in non inoculated controls. Calcium carbonate precipitates showed parallel, columnar and filamentous crystallization habits in the microcosms as well as in the sterile controls. DGGE analysis showed an alteration in bacterial community profiles in the five different microcosms, as a response to the different energy and redox regimes and time. In all microcosms a reduction in number of DGGE bands, in combination with an increase in cell abundance were recorded during the experiment. Sequence analysis showed that the microcosms were dominated by four groups of organisms with phylogenetic affiliation to four taxa: The Rhodospirillaceae, a family containing phototrophic marine organisms, in which some members are capable of heterotrophic growth in darkness and N2 fixation; the family Hyphomicrobiaceae, a group of prosthecate oligotrophic

  11. Basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan alterations in a rat model of polycystic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehara, T; Carone, F A; McCarthy, K J;

    1994-01-01

    Alterations in basement membrane components, notably proteoglycans, in a rat model of polycystic kidney disease have been investigated. Rats were fed phenol II (2-amino-4-hydroxyphenyl-5-phenyl thiazole) for 4 days and then changed to normal diet for a 7-day recovery period. Marked dilation...... of distal tubules and collecting ducts was observed by 4 days with phenol II treatment, but the morphology returned to normal after 7 days of subsequent normal diet. Staining of tissue sections with two mouse monoclonal antibodies to a recently described basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan...... membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan core protein related to perlecan did not diminish but rather stained affected tubules intensely, whereas laminin, on the other hand, was apparently diminished in the basement membranes of the cystic tubules. Type IV collagen staining did not change through disease...

  12. Cognitive plasticity in normal and pathological aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío; Botella, Juan; Zamarrón, María Dolores; Molina, María Ángeles; Cabras, Emilia; Schettini, Rocío; Tárraga, Lluis

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of the present study is to examine to what extent age and cognitive impairment contribute to learning performance (cognitive plasticity, cognitive modifiability, or learning potential). To address this question, participants coming from four studies (Longitudinal Study of Active Aging, age range, 55–75 years, N = 458; Longitudinal Study in the very old [90+], age range, 90–102, N = 188, and Cognitive Plasticity within the Course of Cognitive Impairment, 97 “Normal”, 57 mild cognitive impairment [MCI], and 98 Alzheimer’s disease [AD] patients) were examined through a measure of verbal learning (developed from Rey). The results show that all age, MCI, and AD groups learned across the five learning trials of that test, but significant differences were found due to age, pathology, and education. The effects of pathology (MCI and AD) can be expressed in a metric of “years of normal decline by age”; specifically, being MCI means suffering an impairment in performance that is equivalent to the decline of a normal individual during 15 years, whereas the impact of AD is equivalent to 22.7 years. Likewise, the improvement associated with about 5 years of education is equivalent to about 1 year less of normal aging. Also, the two pathological groups significantly differed from “normal” groups in the delayed trial of the test. The most dramatic difference is that between the “normal” group and the AD patients, which shows relatively poorer performance for the AD group in the delayed trial than in the first learning trial. The potential role of this unique effect for quick detection purposes of AD is assessed (in the 75–89 years age range, sensitivity and specificity equal 0.813 and 0.917, respectively). PMID:22291469

  13. Applications of the biuariate normal distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, B.J.

    1980-10-01

    In industry there are many situations involving two variables, e.g., measurement from vendor product testing and customer testing of the same product; high temperature test measurements and ambient temperature measurements on a product. Bivariate methods of analysis should be used to summarize, represent, and interpret data sampled from populations where variable elements yield measures of two characteristics. The application of the bivariate normal distribution in solving certain types of industrial problems involving two variable measurements is examined. Three examples given illustrating its use in developing a product screening procedure, establishing a prediction model, an handling testing and measuring errors.

  14. Computational Aspects of Normal Form Perturbation Expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Diana

    The method of normal forms is used to develop analytic solutions to weakly nonlinear ordinary differential equations about an equilibrium solution of the system. Such equations arise in a broad spectrum of areas where one models vibrations and oscillations of mechanical systems, oscillations and feedback in biological and ecological systems, tracking of particles in an accelerator and long -time planetary motion in astronomy. An approximation to the true solution is sought that is valid for a long time with a prescribed error. It is constructed by means of a near-identity transformation from the original system to a nearby one. The transformation is determined by a perturbation expansion as a power series in a small parameter. The method of normal forms, introduced by Poincare in his Ph.D. thesis, was further expanded by Bruno, Arnold, Kummer and others who have emphasized the nonuniqueness of the transformation. Recently, Kahn and Zarmi (1991) developed the method of minimal normal forms (MNF) which uses the nonuniqueness to terminate the normal form equation in an early order of the expansion. In the past, investigators may have missed exploiting this "freedom" because traditionally calculations were carried only to first or second order and for Hamiltonian systems this nonuniqueness is fixed when one requires that the transformation be canonical. The work presented in this thesis centers on three main aspects: (1) establishing the numerical efficacy of MNF for conservative planar systems (Kahn, Murray and Zarmi (1993)), (2) displaying the computational and conceptual simplicity of MNF for dissipative systems (Murray 1994a)), (3) and demonstrating the utility of computer algebra programs in performing very high-order calculations (Forest and Murray) and in exploring the different dynamical features of a system (Kahn, Murray and Zarmi (1994a and b)). In sections 4-11 we have included many examples in order to illustrate the wide applicability of the method of MNF

  15. A spectral characterization of nonlinear normal modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, G. I.; Mauroy, A.; Renson, L.; Kerschen, G.; Sepulchre, R.

    2016-09-01

    This paper explores the relationship that exists between nonlinear normal modes (NNMs) defined as invariant manifolds in phase space and the spectral expansion of the Koopman operator. Specifically, we demonstrate that NNMs correspond to zero level sets of specific eigenfunctions of the Koopman operator. Thanks to this direct connection, a new, global parametrization of the invariant manifolds is established. Unlike the classical parametrization using a pair of state-space variables, this parametrization remains valid whenever the invariant manifold undergoes folding, which extends the computation of NNMs to regimes of greater energy. The proposed ideas are illustrated using a two-degree-of-freedom system with cubic nonlinearity.

  16. Power flow in normal human voice production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The principal mechanisms of energy utilization in voicing are quantified using a simplified model, in order to better define voice efficiency. A control volume analysis of energy utilization in phonation is presented to identify the energy transfer mechanisms in terms of their function. Conversion of subglottal airstream potential energy into useful work done (vocal fold vibration, flow work, sound radiation), and into heat (sound radiation absorbed by the lungs, glottal jet dissipation) are described. An approximate numerical model is used to compute the contributions of each of these mechanisms, as a function of subglottal pressure, for normal phonation. Acknowledge support of NIH Grant 2R01DC005642-10A1.

  17. Hereditary angioedema with normal C1 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, Konrad

    2013-11-01

    Until recently it was assumed that hereditary angioedema was a disease that results exclusively from a genetic deficiency of the C1 inhibitor. In 2000, families with hereditary angioedema, normal C1 inhibitor activity, and protein in plasma were described. Since then, numerous patients and families with that condition have been reported. Most of the patients were women. In many of the affected women, oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy containing estrogens, and pregnancies triggered the clinical symptoms. In some families mutations in the coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor) gene were detected.

  18. Stathmin 1 in normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Neto, João Agostinho; Saad, Sara Teresinha Olalla; Traina, Fabiola

    2014-12-01

    Stathmin 1 is a microtubule destabilizer that plays an important role in cell cycle progression, segregation of chromosomes, clonogenicity, cell motility and survival. Stathmin 1 overexpression has been reported in malignant hematopoietic cells and Stathmin 1 inhibition reduces the highly proliferative potential of leukemia cell lines. However, during the differentiation of primary hematopoietic cells, Stathmin 1 expression decreases in parallel to decreases in the proliferative potential of early hematopoietic progenitors. The scope of the present review is to survey the current knowledge and highlight future perspectives for Stathmin 1 in normal and malignant hematopoiesis, with regard to the expression, function and clinical implications of this protein.

  19. [Differential diagnosis of juvenile normal pressure glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geidel, K; Wiedemann, P; Unterlauft, J D

    2016-12-05

    The case of a 50-year-old female patient with autosomal dominant optic atrophy is described, which was initially misinterpreted and treated as normal pressure glaucoma. Bilateral partial optic atrophy can be diagnosed by chance with mild manifestation of symptoms and can initially be misinterpreted as glaucoma. Taking a detailed medical history and performing a thorough optic nerve head examination can raise the suspicion of hereditary optic atrophy. The reliable detection of autosomal dominant optic atrophy by genetic investigations should be strived for in such cases.

  20. DYNAMIC BAYESIAN MODEL FOR A TRUNCATED NORMAL

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Nesta tese desenvolvemos um Modelo Dinâmico Bayesiano para a densidade Normal Truncada. A estimação clássica e estática de observações desta densidade foi desenvolvida por A.C. Cohen nas décadas de 1950 e 1960, enquanto R. C. Souza apresentou, em 1978, um modelo dinâmico Bayesiano para esta densidade, no qual utilizava idéias da Teoria de Informação. O presente trabalho estende a formulação dinâmica Bayesiana de West, Harrinson e Migon por tratar de observações...

  1. Stereoselective disposition of flurbiprofen in normal volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Knadler, M P; Brater, D C; Hall, S. D.

    1992-01-01

    1. The concentrations of the R- and S-enantiomers of flurbiprofen and its metabolites were measured in plasma and urine following the oral administration of 50 mg racemic flurbiprofen to six normal volunteers. 2. The AUC and half-life of the R-enantiomer were significantly lower than the corresponding S-enantiomer values reflecting the greater clearance of R-flurbiprofen (20.42 +/- 4.71 vs 16.12 +/- 3.60 ml min-1). 3. Ex vivo protein binding studies indicated that the percent unbound of R-flu...

  2. Measures on coallocation and normal lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack-Kang Chan

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Let ℒ1 and ℒ2 be lattices of subsets of a nonempty set X. Suppose ℒ2 coallocates ℒ1 and ℒ1 is a subset of ℒ2. We show that any ℒ1-regular finitely additive measure on the algebra generated by ℒ1 can be uniquely extended to an ℒ2-regular measure on the algebra generated by ℒ2. The case when ℒ1 is not necessary contained in ℒ2, as well as the measure enlargement problem are considered. Furthermore, some discussions on normal lattices and separation of lattices are also given.

  3. Transmission of light waves through normal shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, S I; Johnson, D K

    1995-11-20

    We seek to characterize light waves transmitted through normal shock waves. The investigation is motivated by the need for a theory to support a shadowgraph experiment for flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle. In this experiment light beams are passed through the nozzle transverse to the direction of the flow in which a shock has formed in the vicinity of the throat. We present a formulation and an approximation that yield calculations of the intensity of transmitted waves. We also present experimental results to support the theory. The patterns predicted by the theory compare well with the patterns observed in experiments.

  4. Exchange rate arrangements: From extreme to "normal"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beker Emilija

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies theoretical and empirical location dispersion of exchange rate arrangements - rigid-intermediate-flexible regimes, in the context of extreme arrangements of a currency board, dollarization and monetary union moderate characteristics of intermediate arrangements (adjustable pegs crawling pegs and target zones and imperative-process "normalization" in the form of a managed or clean floating system. It is established that de iure and de facto classifications generate "fear of floating" and "fear of pegging". The "impossible trinity" under the conditions of capital liberalization and globalization creates a bipolar view or hypothesis of vanishing intermediate exchange rate regimes.

  5. Mental health integration: normalizing team care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss-Brennan, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the impact of integrating mental health into primary health care. Mental Health Integration (MHI) within Intermountain Healthcare has changed the culture of primary health care by standardizing a team-based care process that includes mental health as a normal part of the routine medical encounter. Using a quantitative statistical analysis of qualitative reports (mixed methods study), the study reports on health outcomes associated with MHI for patients and staff. Researchers interviewed 59 patients and 50 staff to evaluate the impact of MHI on depression care. Patients receiving MHI reported an improved relationship with caregivers (P approach to improve outcomes.

  6. Altered choroid plexus gene expression in major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortney Ann Turner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Given the emergent interest in biomarkers for mood disorders, we assessed gene expression in the choroid plexus, the region that produces cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD. Genes that are expressed in the choroid plexus (CP can be secreted into the CSF and may be potential biomarker candidates. Given that we have previously shown that fibroblast growth factor family members are differentially expressed in post-mortem brain of subjects with MDD and the CP is a known source of growth factors in the brain, we posed the question whether growth factor dysregulation would be found in the CP of subjects with MDD. We performed laser capture microscopy of the choroid plexus at the level of the hippocampus in subjects with MDD and psychiatrically normal controls. We then extracted, amplified, labeled and hybridized the cRNA to Illumina BeadChips to assess gene expression. In controls, the most highly abundant known transcript was transthyretin. Moreover, half of the 14 most highly expressed transcripts in controls encode ribosomal proteins. Using BeadStudio software, we identified 169 transcripts differentially expressed (p< 0.05 between control and MDD samples. Using pathway analysis we noted that the top network altered in subjects with MDD included multiple members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ pathway. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR confirmed downregulation of several transcripts that interact with the extracellular matrix in subjects with MDD. These results suggest that there may be an altered cytoskeleton in the choroid plexus in MDD subjects that may lead to a disrupted blood-CSF-brain barrier.

  7. Resting State Brain Entropy Alterations in Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqing Zhou

    Full Text Available Brain entropy (BEN mapping provides a novel approach to characterize brain temporal dynamics, a key feature of human brain. Using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI, reliable and spatially distributed BEN patterns have been identified in normal brain, suggesting a potential use in clinical populations since temporal brain dynamics and entropy may be altered in disease conditions. The purpose of this study was to characterize BEN in multiple sclerosis (MS, a neurodegenerative disease that affects millions of people. Since currently there is no cure for MS, developing treatment or medication that can slow down its progression represents a high research priority, for which validating a brain marker sensitive to disease and the related functional impairments is essential. Because MS can start long time before any measurable symptoms and structural deficits, assessing the dynamic brain activity and correspondingly BEN may provide a critical way to study MS and its progression. Because BEN is new to MS, we aimed to assess BEN alterations in the relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS patients using a patient versus control design, to examine the correlation of BEN to clinical measurements, and to check the correlation of BEN to structural brain measures which have been more often used in MS studies. As compared to controls, RRMS patients showed increased BEN in motor areas, executive control area, spatial coordinating area, and memory system. Increased BEN was related to greater disease severity as measured by the expanded disability status scale (EDSS and greater tissue damage as indicated by the mean diffusivity. Patients also showed decreased BEN in other places, which was associated with less disability or fatigue, indicating a disease-related BEN re-distribution. Our results suggest BEN as a novel and useful tool for characterizing RRMS.

  8. Alterations of proteins in MDCK cells during acute potassium deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerapen, Paleerath; Ausakunpipat, Nardtaya; Chanchaem, Prangwalai; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-06-01

    Chronic K(+) deficiency can cause hypokalemic nephropathy associated with metabolic alkalosis, polyuria, tubular dilatation, and tubulointerstitial injury. However, effects of acute K(+) deficiency on the kidney remained unclear. This study aimed to explore such effects by evaluating changes in levels of proteins in renal tubular cells during acute K(+) deficiency. MDCK cells were cultivated in normal K(+) (NK) (K(+)=5.3 mM), low K(+) (LK) (K(+)=2.5 mM), or K(+) depleted (KD) (K(+)=0 mM) medium for 24 h and then harvested. Cellular proteins were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and visualized by SYPRO Ruby staining (5 gels per group). Spot matching and quantitative intensity analysis revealed a total 48 protein spots that had significantly differential levels among the three groups. Among these, 46 and 30 protein spots had differential levels in KD group compared to NK and LK groups, respectively. Comparison between LK and NK groups revealed only 10 protein spots that were differentially expressed. All of these differentially expressed proteins were successfully identified by Q-TOF MS and/or MS/MS analyses. The altered levels of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), ezrin, lamin A/C, tubulin, chaperonin-containing TCP1 (CCT1), and calpain 1 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Global protein network analysis showed three main functional networks, including 1) cell growth and proliferation, 2) cell morphology, cellular assembly and organization, and 3) protein folding in which the altered proteins were involved. Further investigations on these networks may lead to better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of low K(+)-induced renal injury.

  9. Serum factors from pseudoxanthoma elasticum patients alter elastic fiber formation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Saux, Olivier; Bunda, Severa; VanWart, Christopher M; Douet, Vanessa; Got, Laurence; Martin, Ludovic; Hinek, Aleksander

    2006-07-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a heritable disorder mainly characterized by calcified elastic fibers in cutaneous, ocular, and vascular tissues. PXE is caused by mutations in ABCC6, a gene encoding an ABC transporter predominantly expressed in liver and kidneys. The functional relationship between ABCC6 and elastic fiber calcification is unknown. We speculated that ABCC6 deficiency in PXE patients induces a persistent imbalance in circulating metabolite(s), which may impair the synthetic abilities of normal elastoblasts or specifically alter elastic fiber assembly. Therefore, we compared the deposition of elastic fiber proteins in cultures of fibroblasts derived from PXE and unaffected individuals. PXE fibroblasts cultured with normal human serum expressed and deposited increased amounts of proteins, but structurally normal elastic fibers. Interestingly, normal and PXE fibroblasts as well as normal smooth muscle cells deposited abnormal aggregates of elastic fibers when maintained in the presence of serum from PXE patients. The expression of tropoelastin and other elastic fiber-associated genes was not significantly modulated by the presence of PXE serum. These results indicated that certain metabolites present in PXE sera interfered with the normal assembly of elastic fibers in vitro and suggested that PXE is a primary metabolic disorder with secondary connective tissue manifestations.

  10. Alteration of consciousness in focal epilepsy: the global workspace alteration theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomei, Fabrice; McGonigal, Aileen; Naccache, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Alteration of consciousness (AOC) is an important clinical manifestation of partial seizures that greatly impacts the quality of life of patients with epilepsy. Several theories have been proposed in the last fifty years. An emerging concept in neurology is the global workspace (GW) theory that postulates that access to consciousness (from several sensorial modalities) requires transient coordinated activity from associative cortices, in particular the prefrontal cortex and the posterior parietal associative cortex. Several lines of evidence support the view that partial seizures alter consciousness through disturbance of the GW. In particular, a nonlinear relation has been shown between excess of synchronization in the GW regions and the degree of AOC. Changes in thalamocortical synchrony occurring during the spreading of the ictal activity seem particularly involved in the mechanism of altered consciousness. This link between abnormal synchrony and AOC offers new perspectives in the treatment of the AOC since means of decreasing consciousness alteration in seizures could improve patients' quality of life.

  11. Metabolic alterations in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Piva, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Bimbatti, Davide; Fantinel, Emanuela; Santini, Daniele; Cheng, Liang; Cascinu, Stefano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a metabolic disease, being characterized by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways involved in oxygen sensing (VHL/HIF pathway alterations and the subsequent up-regulation of HIF-responsive genes such as VEGF, PDGF, EGF, and glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4, which justify the RCC reliance on aerobic glycolysis), energy sensing (fumarate hydratase-deficient, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, mutations of HGF/MET pathway resulting in the metabolic Warburg shift marked by RCC increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate shunt, augmented lipogenesis, and reduced AMPK and Krebs cycle activity) and/or nutrient sensing cascade (deregulation of AMPK-TSC1/2-mTOR and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways). We analyzed the key metabolic abnormalities underlying RCC carcinogenesis, highlighting those altered pathways that may represent potential targets for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies.

  12. Postural Stability is Altered by Blood Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, M.; Denise, P.; Guincetre, J. Y.; Normand, H.

    2008-06-01

    Non-vestibular influences as shift in blood volume changed perception of body posture. Then, factors affecting blood shift may alter postural control. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of leg venous contention on postural stability. Twelve subjects were studied on a balance plate for 5 minutes with the eyes closed, in 3 conditions: with no leg venous contention or grade 1 and 3 support stockings. Standard deviation of x and y position was calculated before and after the closure of the eyes. Strong venous contention altered postural stability, after the eyes were closed, during the first 10 s of standing. As support stockings prevent blood shift induced by upright posture, this result is in line with the hypothesis that blood shifts influence the perception of body orientation and postural control among others factors as vision, vestibular inputs... This strong venous contention could induce an increase of fall.

  13. Economic scarcity alters the perception of race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krosch, Amy R; Amodio, David M

    2014-06-24

    When the economy declines, racial minorities are hit the hardest. Although existing explanations for this effect focus on institutional causes, recent psychological findings suggest that scarcity may also alter perceptions of race in ways that exacerbate discrimination. We tested the hypothesis that economic resource scarcity causes decision makers to perceive African Americans as "Blacker" and that this visual distortion elicits disparities in the allocation of resources. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrated that scarcity altered perceptions of race, lowering subjects' psychophysical threshold for seeing a mixed-race face as "Black" as opposed to "White." In studies 3 and 4, scarcity led subjects to visualize African American faces as darker and more "stereotypically Black," compared with a control condition. When presented to naïve subjects, face representations produced under scarcity elicited smaller allocations than control-condition representations. Together, these findings introduce a novel perceptual account for the proliferation of racial disparities under economic scarcity.

  14. Neurobiological alterations in alcohol addiction: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdozain, Amaia M; Callado, Luis F

    2014-01-01

    The exact mechanism by which ethanol exerts its effects on the brain is still unknown. However, nowadays it is well known that ethanol interacts with specific neuronal membrane proteins involved in signal transmission, resulting in changes in neural activity. In this review different neurochemical alterations produced by ethanol are described. Primarily, ethanol interacts with two membrane receptors: GABAA and NMDA ion channel receptors. Ethanol enhances the GABA action and antagonizes glutamate action, therefore acting as a CNS depressant. In addition, ethanol affects most other neurochemical and endocrine systems. In regard to the brain reward system, both dopaminergic and opioid system are affected by this drug. Furthermore, the serotonergic, noradrenergic, corticotropin-releasing factor and cannabinoid systems seem to play an important role in the neurobiology of alcoholism. At last but not least, ethanol can also modulate cytoplasmic components, including the second messengers. We also review briefly the different actual and putative pharmacological treatments for alcoholism, based on the alterations produced by this drug.

  15. Alteration of diaspore by thermal treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨华明; 胡岳华; 杨武国; 敖伟琴; 邱冠周

    2004-01-01

    Diaspore (α-AlOOH) was heated at various temperatures from 300 to 1000 ℃ for 2 h. The alteration of diaspore by thermal treatment was investigated by differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray diffraction. The mechanism of thermal decomposition of diaspore was discussed according to the Coats-Redfern equation. It is found that after thermal treatment at 500 ℃, diaspore is transformed entirely to corundum (α-Al2O3). Combined with the mass loss ratio obtained from the thermogravimetric analysis data, the activation energies for the thermal treatment of diaspore are calculated as Ea=10.4 kJ/mol below 400 ℃ and Eb=47.5 kJ/mol above 400 ℃, respectively, which is directly related to the structural alteration of diaspore during the thermal treatment. The results indicate that the thermal decomposition of diaspore is conducted primarily by means of an interfacial reaction.

  16. Identifying associations between genomic alterations in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Joshy; Gorringe, Kylie L; Smyth, Gordon K; Bowtell, David D L

    2013-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping arrays are a reliable method for identifying somatic copy number alterations in cancer samples. Though this is immensely useful to identify potential driver genes, it is not sufficient to identify genes acting in a concerted manner. In cancer cells, co-amplified genes have been shown to provide synergistic effects, and genomic alterations targeting a pathway have been shown to occur in a mutually exclusive manner. We therefore developed a bioinformatic method for detecting such gene pairs using an integrated analysis of genomic copy number and gene expression data. This approach allowed us to identify a gene pair that is co-amplified and co-expressed in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. This finding provided information about the interaction of specific genetic events that contribute to the development and progression of this disease.

  17. Molecular Alterations in Sporadic Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inês Alvelos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT is a frequent endocrine disorder characterized by an excessive autonomous production and release of parathyroid hormone (PTH by the parathyroid glands. This endocrinopathy may result from the development of a benign lesion (adenoma or hyperplasia or from a carcinoma. Most of the PHPT cases occur sporadically; however, approximately 10% of the patients present a familial form of the disease. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of sporadic PHPT are incompletely understood, even though somatic alterations in MEN1 gene and CCND1 protein overexpression are frequently observed. The MEN1 gene is mutated in about 30% of the parathyroid tumours and the protooncogene CCND1 is implicated in parathyroid neoplasia by rearrangements, leading to an overexpression of CCND1 protein in parathyroid cells. The aim of this work is to briefly update the molecular alterations underlying sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism.

  18. Ocean acidification alters fish-jellyfish symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelkerken, Ivan; Pitt, Kylie A; Rutte, Melchior D; Geertsma, Robbert C

    2016-06-29

    Symbiotic relationships are common in nature, and are important for individual fitness and sustaining species populations. Global change is rapidly altering environmental conditions, but, with the exception of coral-microalgae interactions, we know little of how this will affect symbiotic relationships. We here test how the effects of ocean acidification, from rising anthropogenic CO2 emissions, may alter symbiotic interactions between juvenile fish and their jellyfish hosts. Fishes treated with elevated seawater CO2 concentrations, as forecast for the end of the century on a business-as-usual greenhouse gas emission scenario, were negatively affected in their behaviour. The total time that fish (yellowtail scad) spent close to their jellyfish host in a choice arena where they could see and smell their host was approximately three times shorter under future compared with ambient CO2 conditions. Likewise, the mean number of attempts to associate with jellyfish was almost three times lower in CO2-treated compared with control fish, while only 63% (high CO2) versus 86% (control) of all individuals tested initiated an association at all. By contrast, none of three fish species tested were attracted solely to jellyfish olfactory cues under present-day CO2 conditions, suggesting that the altered fish-jellyfish association is not driven by negative effects of ocean acidification on olfaction. Because shelter is not widely available in the open water column and larvae of many (and often commercially important) pelagic species associate with jellyfish for protection against predators, modification of the fish-jellyfish symbiosis might lead to higher mortality and alter species population dynamics, and potentially have flow-on effects for their fisheries.

  19. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  20. Dendritic spine changes associated with normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickstein, D L; Weaver, C M; Luebke, J I; Hof, P R

    2013-10-22

    Given the rapid rate of population aging and the increased incidence of cognitive decline and neurodegenerative diseases with advanced age, it is important to ascertain the determinants that result in cognitive impairment. It is also important to note that much of the aged population exhibit 'successful' cognitive aging, in which cognitive impairment is minimal. One main goal of normal aging studies is to distinguish the neural changes that occur in unsuccessful (functionally impaired) subjects from those of successful (functionally unimpaired) subjects. In this review, we present some of the structural adaptations that neurons and spines undergo throughout normal aging and discuss their likely contributions to electrophysiological properties and cognition. Structural changes of neurons and dendritic spines during aging, and the functional consequences of such changes, remain poorly understood. Elucidating the structural and functional synaptic age-related changes that lead to cognitive impairment may lead to the development of drug treatments that can restore or protect neural circuits and mediate cognition and successful aging.