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Sample records for alter cellular processes

  1. Cellular hyper-excitability caused by mutations that alter the activation process of voltage-gated sodium channels

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    Mohamed-Yassine eAMAROUCH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav are widely expressed as macro-molecular complexes in both excitable and non-excitable tissues. In excitable tissues, the upstroke of the action potential is the result of the passage of a large and rapid influx of sodium ions through these channels. NaV dysfunction has been associated with an increasingly wide range of neurological, muscular and cardiac disorders. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recently identified sodium channel mutations that are linked to hyper-excitability phenotypes and associated with the alteration of the activation process of voltage gated sodium channels. Indeed, several clinical manifestations that demonstrate an alteration of tissue excitability were recently shown to be strongly associated with the presence of mutations that affect the activation process of the voltage-gated sodium channels. These emerging genotype-phenotype correlations have expanded the clinical spectrum of sodium channelopathies to include disorders which feature a hyper-excitability phenotype that may or may not be associated with a cardiomyopathy. The p.I141V mutation in SCN4A and SCN5A, as well as its homologous p.I136V mutation in SCN9A, are interesting examples of mutations that have been linked to inherited hyperexcitability myotonia, exercise-induced polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias and erythromelalgia, respectively. Regardless of which sodium channel isoform is investigated, the substitution of the isoleucine to valine in the locus 141 induces similar modifications in the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated sodium channels by shifting the voltage-dependence of steady state activation towards more negative potentials.

  2. Cellular mechanisms for altered learning in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, M Matthew; Disterhoft, John F

    2010-01-01

    Getting gray hair is part of the natural progression of aging. People expect it and they can change their hair color, if they choose. People also expect increases in memory lapses and learning difficulties as they get older. However, unlike hair color, there is no magic cure or option to fix learning and memory difficulties, because the cellular mechanisms of learning and aging in all the different types of neurons throughout the brain have yet to be discovered. This review describes our efforts to identify a cellular biomarker in hippocampal pyramidal neurons that has been demonstrated to reliably change with learning and with aging - the postburst afterhyperpolarization. We propose that this biomarker, which plays a critical role in regulating neuronal excitability, can be used as a benchmark for future studies in order to understand and identify the cellular mechanisms of learning and aging in the hippocampus, as well as in other cortical regions.

  3. Cellular mechanisms for altered learning in aging

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, M Matthew; Disterhoft, John F

    2010-01-01

    Getting gray hair is part of the natural progression of aging. People expect it and they can change their hair color, if they choose. People also expect increases in memory lapses and learning difficulties as they get older. However, unlike hair color, there is no magic cure or option to fix learning and memory difficulties, because the cellular mechanisms of learning and aging in all the different types of neurons throughout the brain have yet to be discovered. This review describes our effo...

  4. Efficiency of cellular information processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barato, Andre C; Hartich, David; Seifert, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We show that a rate of conditional Shannon entropy reduction, characterizing the learning of an internal process about an external process, is bounded by the thermodynamic entropy production. This approach allows for the definition of an informational efficiency that can be used to study cellular information processing. We analyze three models of increasing complexity inspired by the Escherichia coli sensory network, where the external process is an external ligand concentration jumping between two values. We start with a simple model for which ATP must be consumed so that a protein inside the cell can learn about the external concentration. With a second model for a single receptor we show that the rate at which the receptor learns about the external environment can be nonzero even without any dissipation inside the cell since chemical work done by the external process compensates for this learning rate. The third model is more complete, also containing adaptation. For this model we show inter alia that a bacterium in an environment that changes at a very slow time-scale is quite inefficient, dissipating much more than it learns. Using the concept of a coarse-grained learning rate, we show for the model with adaptation that while the activity learns about the external signal the option of changing the methylation level increases the concentration range for which the learning rate is substantial. (paper)

  5. Altered composition of bone as triggered by irradiation facilitates the rapid erosion of the matrix by both cellular and physicochemical processes.

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    Danielle E Green

    Full Text Available Radiation rapidly undermines trabecular architecture, a destructive process which proceeds despite a devastated cell population. In addition to the 'biologically orchestrated' resorption of the matrix by osteoclasts, physicochemical processes enabled by a damaged matrix may contribute to the rapid erosion of bone quality. 8w male C57BL/6 mice exposed to 5 Gy of Cs(137 γ-irradiation were compared to age-matched control at 2d, 10d, or 8w following exposure. By 10d, irradiation had led to significant loss of trabecular bone volume fraction. Assessed by reflection-based Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI, chemical composition of the irradiated matrix indicated that mineralization had diminished at 2d by -4.3±4.8%, and at 10d by -5.8±3.2%. These data suggest that irradiation facilitates the dissolution of the matrix through a change in the material itself, a conclusion supported by a 13.7±4.5% increase in the elastic modulus as measured by nanoindentation. The decline in viable cells within the marrow of irradiated mice at 2d implies that the immediate collapse of bone quality and inherent increased risk of fracture is not solely a result of an overly-active biologic process, but one fostered by alterations in the material matrix that predisposes the material to erosion.

  6. Music and Alterity Processes

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    Josep Martí

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of alterity constitutes an important issue in anthropological research and, therefore, in the study of musical practices, as well. Without it, we could hardly understand other kinds of music situated in different spaces and time from the observer. In order to effectively approach these musical practices, we have to develop strategies to help us reduce as much as possible that which distorts the vision of the other. However, beyond the strictly epistemological and methodological issues, the study of music cannot ignore the ethical question related to the manner in which Western thought has understood and treated the other: through a hierarchical and stereotypical type of thinking based on the condition of otherness. Throughout the article, different alterity procedures are presented and discussed, such as synecdochization, exoticization, undervaluation, overvaluation, misunderstanding and exclusion. Taking these different alterity strategies into account may help us to better understand how the musical other is constructed, used and ultimately instrumentalized.

  7. Cellular Transplantation Alters the Disease Progression in Becker's Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok; Paranjape, Amruta; Sane, Hemangi; Bhagawanani, Khushboo; Gokulchandran, Nandini; Badhe, Prerna

    2013-01-01

    Becker's Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) is a dystrophinopathy manifested as progressive muscle degeneration. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells (BMMNCs) have shown some myogenic potential. The paracrine effects of the BMMNCs reduce the inflammation and are thought to reduce muscle degeneration. We treated a 39 year old dental surgeon suffering from BMD. Muscle strength was reduced when measured using modified Medical Research Council's Manual Muscle Testing (mMRC-MMT). Static sitting balance was poor. He was wheelchair dependent for ambulation and moderately independent in Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Functional Independence Measure (FIM) score was 93. Musculoskeletal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI-MSK) showed moderate fatty infiltration in the muscles. Three cellular transplantations were carried out. Clinical assessment and the investigations were repeated. Progressive increase in the muscle strength was noted. Ambulation was independent using push-knee splints and minimal assistance when weary. Static and dynamic balance in sitting and standing improved. FIM score increased from 93 to 105. There was no increase in the degree of fatty infiltration, as seen on the MRI-MSK. The case study provides evidence for the putative benefits of cellular therapy in altering the disease progression in BMD. It also suggests augmented clinical benefits of combination of cellular therapy and rehabilitation.

  8. Cellular automata in image processing and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Sun, Xianfang

    2014-01-01

    The book presents findings, views and ideas on what exact problems of image processing, pattern recognition and generation can be efficiently solved by cellular automata architectures. This volume provides a convenient collection in this area, in which publications are otherwise widely scattered throughout the literature. The topics covered include image compression and resizing; skeletonization, erosion and dilation; convex hull computation, edge detection and segmentation; forgery detection and content based retrieval; and pattern generation. The book advances the theory of image processing, pattern recognition and generation as well as the design of efficient algorithms and hardware for parallel image processing and analysis. It is aimed at computer scientists, software programmers, electronic engineers, mathematicians and physicists, and at everyone who studies or develops cellular automaton algorithms and tools for image processing and analysis, or develops novel architectures and implementations of mass...

  9. Impact of Membrane Phospholipid Alterations in Escherichia coli on Cellular Function and Bacterial Stress Adaptation.

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    Rowlett, Veronica W; Mallampalli, Venkata K P S; Karlstaedt, Anja; Dowhan, William; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Margolin, William; Vitrac, Heidi

    2017-07-01

    Bacteria have evolved multiple strategies to sense and rapidly adapt to challenging and ever-changing environmental conditions. The ability to alter membrane lipid composition, a key component of the cellular envelope, is crucial for bacterial survival and adaptation in response to environmental stress. However, the precise roles played by membrane phospholipids in bacterial physiology and stress adaptation are not fully elucidated. The goal of this study was to define the role of membrane phospholipids in adaptation to stress and maintenance of bacterial cell fitness. By using genetically modified strains in which the membrane phospholipid composition can be systematically manipulated, we show that alterations in major Escherichia coli phospholipids transform these cells globally. We found that alterations in phospholipids impair the cellular envelope structure and function, the ability to form biofilms, and bacterial fitness and cause phospholipid-dependent susceptibility to environmental stresses. This study provides an unprecedented view of the structural, signaling, and metabolic pathways in which bacterial phospholipids participate, allowing the design of new approaches in the investigation of lipid-dependent processes involved in bacterial physiology and adaptation. IMPORTANCE In order to cope with and adapt to a wide range of environmental conditions, bacteria have to sense and quickly respond to fluctuating conditions. In this study, we investigated the effects of systematic and controlled alterations in bacterial phospholipids on cell shape, physiology, and stress adaptation. We provide new evidence that alterations of specific phospholipids in Escherichia coli have detrimental effects on cellular shape, envelope integrity, and cell physiology that impair biofilm formation, cellular envelope remodeling, and adaptability to environmental stresses. These findings hold promise for future antibacterial therapies that target bacterial lipid biosynthesis

  10. Image processing with a cellular nonlinear network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morfu, S.

    2005-01-01

    A cellular nonlinear network (CNN) based on uncoupled nonlinear oscillators is proposed for image processing purposes. It is shown theoretically and numerically that the contrast of an image loaded at the nodes of the CNN is strongly enhanced, even if this one is initially weak. An image inversion can be also obtained without reconfiguration of the network whereas a gray levels extraction can be performed with an additional threshold filtering. Lastly, an electronic implementation of this CNN is presented

  11. EFFECTIVENESS OF CELLULAR INJECTION MOLDING PROCESS

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    Tomasz Garbacz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In a study of cellular injection, molding process uses polyvinylchloride PVC. Polymers modified with introducing blowing agents into them in the Laboratory of the Department of Technologies and Materiase of Technical University of Kosice. For technological reasons, blowing agents have a form of granules. In the experiment, the content of the blowing agent (0–2,0 % by mass fed into the processed polymer was adopted as a variable factor. In the studies presented in the article, the chemical blowing agents occurring in the granulated form with a diameter of 1.2 to 1.4 mm were used. The view of the technological line for cellular injection molding and injection mold cavity with injection moldings are shown in Figure 1. The results of the determination of selected properties of injection molded parts for various polymeric materials, obtained with different content of blowing agents, are shown in Figures 4-7. Microscopic examination of cross-sectional structure of the moldings were obtained using the author's position image analysis of porous structure. Based on analysis of photographs taken (Figures 7, 8, 9 it was found that the coating containing 1.0% of blowing agents is a clearly visible solid outer layer and uniform distribution of pores and their sizes are similar.

  12. Altered Cellular Distribution and Sub-Cellular Sorting of Doppel (Dpl Protein in Human Astrocytoma Cell Lines

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    Elena Sbalchiero

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Doppel, a prion-like protein, is a GPI-membrane anchored protein generally not expressed in the Central Nervous System (CNS of different mammalian species, including human. Nevertheless, in astrocytomas, a particular kind of glial tumors, the doppel encoding gene (PRND is over-expressed and the corresponding protein product (Dpl is ectopically localized in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. In this study we have analysed the sub-cellular localization of Dpl using double-immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy examinations in two astrocytoma-derived human cell lines (IPDDC-A2 and D384-MG. Our results confirmed that Dpl is localized in the cytoplasm of the astrocytoma cells and indicated that it is mostly associated with Lamp-1 and Limp-2 positive lysosomal vesicles and, marginally, to the Golgi apparatus and other cellular organelles. Noticeably, none of the examined tumor cells showed a membrane-Dpl localization. The membrane-associated Dpl expression was restored after the transfection of the astrocytoma cells with mutated Dpl-expression vectors in its glycosylation sites. Additionally, Dpl showed altered expression and traffic using the acidotropic agent ammonium chloride, leading to the accumulation of Dpl in nascent exocytic vesicles. Altogether, these results indicated that in the astrocytic tumor cells Dpl has an altered biosynthetic trafficking, likely derived from abnormal post-translational processes: these modifications do not permit the localization of Dpl in correspondence of the plasma membrane and lead to its intracellular accumulation in the lysosomes. In these proteolytic compartments, the astrocytic tumor cells might provide to the degradation of the excess of a potentially cytotoxic Dpl product.

  13. Altered cellular distribution and sub-cellular sorting of doppel (Dpl) protein in human astrocytoma cell lines.

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    Sbalchiero, Elena; Azzalin, Alberto; Palumbo, Silvia; Barbieri, Giulia; Arias, Agustina; Simonelli, Luca; Ferretti, Luca; Comincini, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Doppel, a prion-like protein, is a GPI-membrane anchored protein generally not expressed in the Central Nervous System (CNS) of different mammalian species, including human. Nevertheless, in astrocytomas, a particular kind of glial tumors, the doppel encoding gene (PRND) is over-expressed and the corresponding protein product (Dpl) is ectopically localized in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. In this study we have analysed the sub-cellular localization of Dpl using double-immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy examinations in two astrocytoma-derived human cell lines (IPDDC-A2 and D384-MG). Our results confirmed that Dpl is localized in the cytoplasm of the astrocytoma cells and indicated that it is mostly associated with Lamp-1 and Limp-2 positive lysosomal vesicles and, marginally, to the Golgi apparatus and other cellular organelles. Noticeably, none of the examined tumor cells showed a membrane-Dpl localization. The membrane-associated Dpl expression was restored after the transfection of the astrocytoma cells with mutated Dpl-expression vectors in its glycosylation sites. Additionally, Dpl showed altered expression and traffic using the acidotropic agent ammonium chloride, leading to the accumulation of Dpl in nascent exocytic vesicles. Altogether, these results indicated that in the astrocytic tumor cells Dpl has an altered biosynthetic trafficking, likely derived from abnormal post-translational processes: these modifications do not permit the localization of Dpl in correspondence of the plasma membrane and lead to its intracellular accumulation in the lysosomes. In these proteolytic compartments, the astrocytic tumor cells might provide to the degradation of the excess of a potentially cytotoxic Dpl product.

  14. Bronchoalveolar lavage as a tool for evaluation of cellular alteration during Aelurostrongylus abstrusus infection in cats

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    Vitor M. Ribeiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL is a procedure that retrieves cells and other elements from the lungs for evaluation, which helps in the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to perform this procedure for cellular analysis of BAL fluid alterations during experimental infection with Aelurostrongylus abstrusus in cats. Fourteen cats were individually inoculated with 800 third stage larvae of A. abstrusus and five non-infected cats lined as a control group. The BAL procedure was performed through the use of an endotracheal tube on the nineteen cats with a mean age of 18 months, on 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 270 days after infection. Absolute cell counts in the infected cats revealed that alveolar macrophages and eosinophils were the predominant cells following infection. This study shows that the technique allows us to retrieve cells and first stage larvae what provides information about the inflammatory process caused by aelurostrongylosis.

  15. Coupled cellular automata for frozen soil processes

    OpenAIRE

    R. M. Nagare; P. Bhattacharya; J. Khanna; R. A. Schincariol

    2015-01-01

    Heat and water movement in variably saturated freezing soils is a strongly coupled phenomenon. The coupling is a result of the effects of sub-zero temperature on soil water potential, heat carried by water moving under pressure gradients, and dependency of soil thermal and hydraulic properties on soil water content. This study presents a one-dimensional cellular automata (direct solving) model to simulate coupled heat and water transport with phase change in variably satura...

  16. Epstein-Barr virus growth/latency III program alters cellular microRNA expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, Jennifer E.; Fewell, Claire; Yin, Qinyan; McBride, Jane; Wang Xia; Lin Zhen

    2008-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with lymphoid and epithelial cancers. Initial EBV infection alters lymphocyte gene expression, inducing cellular proliferation and differentiation as the virus transitions through consecutive latency transcription programs. Cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of signaling pathways and are implicated in carcinogenesis. The extent to which EBV exploits cellular miRNAs is unknown. Using micro-array analysis and quantitative PCR, we demonstrate differential expression of cellular miRNAs in type III versus type I EBV latency including elevated expression of miR-21, miR-23a, miR-24, miR-27a, miR-34a, miR-146a and b, and miR-155. In contrast, miR-28 expression was found to be lower in type III latency. The EBV-mediated regulation of cellular miRNAs may contribute to EBV signaling and associated cancers

  17. Different Candida parapsilosis clinical isolates and lipase deficient strain trigger an altered cellular immune response.

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    Tóth, Renáta; Alonso, Maria F; Bain, Judith M; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Erwig, Lars-Peter; Gácser, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Numerous human diseases can be associated with fungal infections either as potential causative agents or as a result of changed immune status due to a primary disease. Fungal infections caused by Candida species can vary from mild to severe dependent upon the site of infection, length of exposure, and past medical history. Patients with impaired immune status are at increased risk for chronic fungal infections. Recent epidemiologic studies have revealed the increasing incidence of candidiasis caused by non-albicans species such as Candida parapsilosis. Due to its increasing relevance we chose two distinct C. parapsilosis strains, to describe the cellular innate immune response toward this species. In the first section of our study we compared the interaction of CLIB 214 and GA1 cells with murine and human macrophages. Both strains are commonly used to investigate C. parapsilosis virulence properties. CLIB 214 is a rapidly pseudohyphae-forming strain and GA1 is an isolate that mainly exists in a yeast form. Our results showed, that the phagocyte response was similar in terms of overall uptake, however differences were observed in macrophage migration and engulfment of fungal cells. As C. parapsilosis releases extracellular lipases in order to promote host invasion we further investigated the role of these secreted components during the distinct stages of the phagocytic process. Using a secreted lipase deficient mutant strain and the parental strain GA1 individually and simultaneously, we confirmed that fungal secreted lipases influence the fungi's virulence by detecting altered innate cellular responses. In this study we report that two isolates of a single species can trigger markedly distinct host responses and that lipase secretion plays a role on the cellular level of host-pathogen interactions.

  18. Different Candida parapsilosis clinical isolates and lipase deficient strain trigger an altered cellular immune response

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    Renata eToth

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous human diseases can be associated with fungal infections either as potential causative agents or as a result of changed immune status due to a primary disease. Fungal infections caused by Candida species can vary from mild to severe dependent upon the site of infection, length of exposure and past medical history. Patients with impaired immune status are at increased risk for chronic fungal infections. Recent epidemiologic studies have revealed the increasing incidence of candidiasis caused by non-albicans species such as C. parapsilosis. Due to its increasing relevance we chose two distinct C. parapsilosis strains, to describe the cellular innate immune response towards this species. In the first section of our study we compared the interaction of CLIB 214 and GA1 cells with murine and human macrophages. Both strains are commonly used to investigate C. parapsilosis virulence properties. CLIB 214 is a rapidly pseudohyphae-forming strain and GA1 is an isolate that mainly exists in a yeast form. Our results showed, that the phagocyte response was similar in terms of overall uptake, however differences were observed in macrophage migration and engulfment of fungal cells. As C. parapsilosis releases extracellular lipases in order to promote host invasion we further investigated the role of these secreted components during the distinct stages of the phagocytic process. Using a secreted lipase deficient mutant strain and the parental strain GA1 individually and simultaneously, we confirmed that fungal secreted lipases influence the fungi’s virulence by detecting altered innate cellular responses.In this study we report that two isolates of a single species can trigger markedly distinct host responses and that lipase secretion plays a role on the cellular level of host pathogen interactions.

  19. HIV-1 transgenic rats display alterations in immunophenotype and cellular responses associated with aging.

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    Abbondanzo, Susan J; Chang, Sulie L

    2014-01-01

    Advances in anti-retroviral therapy over the last two decades have allowed life expectancy in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus to approach that of the general population. The process of aging in mammalian species, including rats, results in immune response changes, alterations in immunological phenotypes, and ultimately increased susceptibility to many infectious diseases. In order to investigate the immunological pathologies associated with chronic HIV-1 disease, particularly in aging individuals, the HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rat model was utilized. HIV-1Tg rats were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to determine immunological alterations during the aging process. LPS is known to cause an imbalance in cytokine and chemokine release, and provides a method to identify changes in immune responses to bacterial infection in an HIV animal model. An immune profile and accompanying cellular consequences as well as changes in inflammatory cytokine and chemokine release related to age and genotype were assessed in HIV-1Tg rats. The percentage of T cells decreased with age, particularly T cytotoxic cells, whereas T helper cells increased with age. Neutrophils and monocytes increased in HIV-1Tg rats during maturation compared to age-matched F344 control rats. Aging HIV-1Tg rats displayed a significant increase in the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α, along with an increase in the chemokine, KC/GRO, in comparison to age-matched controls. Our data indicate that immunophenotype and immune responses can change during aging in HIV-positive individuals. This information could be important in determining the most beneficial age-dependent therapeutic treatment for HIV patients.

  20. HIV-1 transgenic rats display alterations in immunophenotype and cellular responses associated with aging.

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    Susan J Abbondanzo

    Full Text Available Advances in anti-retroviral therapy over the last two decades have allowed life expectancy in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus to approach that of the general population. The process of aging in mammalian species, including rats, results in immune response changes, alterations in immunological phenotypes, and ultimately increased susceptibility to many infectious diseases. In order to investigate the immunological pathologies associated with chronic HIV-1 disease, particularly in aging individuals, the HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg rat model was utilized. HIV-1Tg rats were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS to determine immunological alterations during the aging process. LPS is known to cause an imbalance in cytokine and chemokine release, and provides a method to identify changes in immune responses to bacterial infection in an HIV animal model. An immune profile and accompanying cellular consequences as well as changes in inflammatory cytokine and chemokine release related to age and genotype were assessed in HIV-1Tg rats. The percentage of T cells decreased with age, particularly T cytotoxic cells, whereas T helper cells increased with age. Neutrophils and monocytes increased in HIV-1Tg rats during maturation compared to age-matched F344 control rats. Aging HIV-1Tg rats displayed a significant increase in the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α, along with an increase in the chemokine, KC/GRO, in comparison to age-matched controls. Our data indicate that immunophenotype and immune responses can change during aging in HIV-positive individuals. This information could be important in determining the most beneficial age-dependent therapeutic treatment for HIV patients.

  1. Alteration of cellular immune responses in the seastar Asterias rubens following dietary exposure to cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coteur, G.; Gillan, D.; Pernet, Ph.; Dubois, Ph.

    2005-01-01

    Several parameters of cellular immunity in seastars fed Cd-contaminated mussels were analyzed. The accumulation of cadmium in the seastars did not alter the concentration of amoebocytes in the coelomic fluid. On the contrary, the immune cells showed a reduced phagocytic activity and an increased production of reactive oxygen species. These effects may lead to an inability of the seastars to cope with bacterial infections and to oxidative damages to self tissue that could threaten the survival of the animals

  2. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium.

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    Walker, Nancy M; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R; Stefanski, Casey D; Strubberg, Ashlee M; Clarke, Lane L

    2016-01-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3 (-))-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3 (-)-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl(-) concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl(-) concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl(-) and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Polymer hydration and stiffness at biointerfaces and related cellular processes.

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    Kerch, Garry

    2018-01-01

    The direct and indirect (by changing mechanical properties) effects of hydration at interfaces on cellular processes and tissue diseases are reviewed. The essential effect of substrate stiffness on cellular processes was demonstrated in the last decade. The combined effect of surface stiffness and hydration at interfaces has garnered much less attention, though hydration and dehydration play important roles in biological processes. This review focuses on the studies that demonstrate how hydration affects biological processes at interfaces. Elevated sodium and dehydration stimulate inflammatory signaling in endothelial cells and promote atherosclerosis. Various types of implant and blood contacting device coatings with varied surface stiffness and hydration have been reported. Effect of hydration on polymer modulus of elasticity and viscoelasticity was discussed taking into account cells adhesion, migration, proliferation, differentiation on surfaces with various degree of hydration. Future directions of research were considered, including the use of nanotechnology to regulate the hydration degree. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Markov Process Inspired Cellular Automata Model of Road Traffic

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fa; Li, Li; Hu, Jianming; Ji, Yan; Yao, Danya; Zhang, Yi; Jin, Xuexiang; Su, Yuelong; Wei, Zheng

    2008-01-01

    To provide a more accurate description of the driving behaviors in vehicle queues, a namely Markov-Gap cellular automata model is proposed in this paper. It views the variation of the gap between two consequent vehicles as a Markov process whose stationary distribution corresponds to the observed distribution of practical gaps. The multiformity of this Markov process provides the model enough flexibility to describe various driving behaviors. Two examples are given to show how to specialize i...

  5. Can bread processing conditions alter glycaemic response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Evelyn; Soong, Yean Yean; Zhou, Weibiao; Henry, Jeyakumar

    2015-04-15

    Bread is a staple food that is traditionally made from wheat flour. This study aimed to compare the starch digestibility of western baked bread and oriental steamed bread. Four types of bread were prepared: western baked bread (WBB) and oriental steamed bread (OSB), modified baked bread (MBB) made with the OSB recipe and WBB processing, and modified steamed bread (MSB) made with the WBB recipe and OSB processing. MBB showed the highest starch digestibility in vitro, followed by WBB, OSB and MSB. A similar trend was observed for glycaemic response in vivo. MBB, WBB, OSB and MSB had a glycaemic index of 75±4, 71±5, 68±5 and 65±4, respectively. Processing differences had a more pronounced effect on starch digestibility in bread, and steamed bread was healthier in terms of glycaemic response. The manipulation of processing conditions could be an innovative route to alter the glycaemic response of carbohydrate-rich foods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cellular Transplantation Alters the Disease Progression in Becker’s Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Becker’s Muscular Dystrophy (BMD is a dystrophinopathy manifested as progressive muscle degeneration. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells (BMMNCs have shown some myogenic potential. The paracrine effects of the BMMNCs reduce the inflammation and are thought to reduce muscle degeneration. We treated a 39 year old dental surgeon suffering from BMD. Muscle strength was reduced when measured using modified Medical Research Council’s Manual Muscle Testing (mMRC-MMT. Static sitting balance was poor. He was wheelchair dependent for ambulation and moderately independent in Activities of Daily Living (ADL. Functional Independence Measure (FIM score was 93. Musculoskeletal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI-MSK showed moderate fatty infiltration in the muscles. Three cellular transplantations were carried out. Clinical assessment and the investigations were repeated. Progressive increase in the muscle strength was noted. Ambulation was independent using push-knee splints and minimal assistance when weary. Static and dynamic balance in sitting and standing improved. FIM score increased from 93 to 105. There was no increase in the degree of fatty infiltration, as seen on the MRI-MSK. The case study provides evidence for the putative benefits of cellular therapy in altering the disease progression in BMD. It also suggests augmented clinical benefits of combination of cellular therapy and rehabilitation.

  7. Plant Abiotic Stress Proteomics: The Major Factors Determining Alterations in Cellular Proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosová, Klára; Vítámvás, Pavel; Urban, Milan O.; Prášil, Ilja T.; Renaut, Jenny

    2018-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS: Major environmental and genetic factors determining stress-related protein abundance are discussed.Major aspects of protein biological function including protein isoforms and PTMs, cellular localization and protein interactions are discussed.Functional diversity of protein isoforms and PTMs is discussed. Abiotic stresses reveal profound impacts on plant proteomes including alterations in protein relative abundance, cellular localization, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications (PTMs), protein interactions with other protein partners, and, finally, protein biological functions. The main aim of the present review is to discuss the major factors determining stress-related protein accumulation and their final biological functions. A dynamics of stress response including stress acclimation to altered ambient conditions and recovery after the stress treatment is discussed. The results of proteomic studies aimed at a comparison of stress response in plant genotypes differing in stress adaptability reveal constitutively enhanced levels of several stress-related proteins (protective proteins, chaperones, ROS scavenging- and detoxification-related enzymes) in the tolerant genotypes with respect to the susceptible ones. Tolerant genotypes can efficiently adjust energy metabolism to enhanced needs during stress acclimation. Stress tolerance vs. stress susceptibility are relative terms which can reflect different stress-coping strategies depending on the given stress treatment. The role of differential protein isoforms and PTMs with respect to their biological functions in different physiological constraints (cellular compartments and interacting partners) is discussed. The importance of protein functional studies following high-throughput proteome analyses is presented in a broader context of plant biology. In summary, the manuscript tries to provide an overview of the major factors which have to be considered when interpreting data from proteomic

  8. Image processing with a cellular nonlinear network [rapid communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfu, S.

    2005-08-01

    A cellular nonlinear network (CNN) based on uncoupled nonlinear oscillators is proposed for image processing purposes. It is shown theoretically and numerically that the contrast of an image loaded at the nodes of the CNN is strongly enhanced, even if this one is initially weak. An image inversion can be also obtained without reconfiguration of the network whereas a gray levels extraction can be performed with an additional threshold filtering. Lastly, an electronic implementation of this CNN is presented.

  9. Misconceptions on ATP thermodynamic role in cellular processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Martins

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence and permanence of misconceptions have negative implications on the learning processes  since it impairs theconstruction of significant learning. Misconceptions correction is a complex task due to the difficulties intheir detection and high resistance to their removal. The mainobjective of the present work was to investigate misconceptions about the thermodynamic role of theATP in cellular processes. Tests were realized with high school (HS, undergraduate (UG and graduate students involved in PhD programs (G. In this survey students answered a 15 item questionnaire dealing with the ATP role as the cellular energy source. The stability of such misconceptionswere verified: one result shows that 68% HS, 92% UG and 91% G students state that the energy from ATP hydrolysis is responsiblefor driving cellular processes. Overall results show that students carry misconceptions on basic thermodynamic concepts such as energy transfer and chemical reactions spontaneity. One source of the prevalence of the discussed misconceptions aretextbooks, where schemes, figures and even text early introducefalse concepts on the ATP role.

  10. Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus (TGEV) Infection Alters the Expression of Cellular MicroRNA Species That Affect Transcription of TGEV Gene 7

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Xiangjun; Zhao, Xiaomin; Huang, Yong; Xiang, Hailing; Zhang, Wenlong; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is a member of Coronaviridae family. TGEV infection has emerged as a major cause of severe gastroenteritis and leads to alterations of many cellular processes. Meanwhile, the pathogenic mechanism of TGEV is still unclear. microRNAs (miRNAs) are a novel class of small non-coding RNAs which are involved in the regulation of numerous biological processes such as viral infection and cell apoptosis. Accumulating data show that miRNAs are involved in the p...

  11. Cellular Neural Network for Real Time Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagliasindi, G.; Arena, P.; Fortuna, L.; Mazzitelli, G.; Murari, A.

    2008-03-01

    Since their introduction in 1988, Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNNs) have found a key role as image processing instruments. Thanks to their structure they are able of processing individual pixels in a parallel way providing fast image processing capabilities that has been applied to a wide range of field among which nuclear fusion. In the last years, indeed, visible and infrared video cameras have become more and more important in tokamak fusion experiments for the twofold aim of understanding the physics and monitoring the safety of the operation. Examining the output of these cameras in real-time can provide significant information for plasma control and safety of the machines. The potentiality of CNNs can be exploited to this aim. To demonstrate the feasibility of the approach, CNN image processing has been applied to several tasks both at the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) and the Joint European Torus (JET).

  12. Cellular Neural Network for Real Time Image Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagliasindi, G.; Arena, P.; Fortuna, L.; Mazzitelli, G.; Murari, A.

    2008-01-01

    Since their introduction in 1988, Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNNs) have found a key role as image processing instruments. Thanks to their structure they are able of processing individual pixels in a parallel way providing fast image processing capabilities that has been applied to a wide range of field among which nuclear fusion. In the last years, indeed, visible and infrared video cameras have become more and more important in tokamak fusion experiments for the twofold aim of understanding the physics and monitoring the safety of the operation. Examining the output of these cameras in real-time can provide significant information for plasma control and safety of the machines. The potentiality of CNNs can be exploited to this aim. To demonstrate the feasibility of the approach, CNN image processing has been applied to several tasks both at the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) and the Joint European Torus (JET)

  13. Influence of geometric nanoparticle rotation on cellular internalization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Yuan, Bing; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2013-09-07

    It is increasingly recognized that the investigation of the rotational motion of geometric nanoparticles in the cellular internalization process is significant to understand certain fundamental cellular activities, such as endocytosis. However, the mechanism of rotation of geometric nanoparticles in the internalization process is still largely unknown. Here, we investigate the rotational dynamics of geometric nanoparticles when they adhere onto or are wrapped by lipid membranes, by using dissipative particle dynamics. A variety of rotational modes of the nanoparticles are observed, which are closely related to the complicated competition in the internalization process. We find that the breaking of geometric symmetry of a nanoparticle is important for the occurrence of particle rotation, while its effect can be changed by the orientation of the nanoparticles and the affinity between the ligands and the receptors. Importantly, it is found by our simulations that the rotational mode even determines the possible perturbation of the geometric nanoparticle to the membrane and the configuration between the nanoparticle and lipid membrane in the internalization process. These results provide a new strategy and also provide pivotal insight for the design of nanoparticles as advanced drug-delivery vectors to cells.

  14. Synthetic Biology: Tools to Design, Build, and Optimize Cellular Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Young

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The general central dogma frames the emergent properties of life, which make biology both necessary and difficult to engineer. In a process engineering paradigm, each biological process stream and process unit is heavily influenced by regulatory interactions and interactions with the surrounding environment. Synthetic biology is developing the tools and methods that will increase control over these interactions, eventually resulting in an integrative synthetic biology that will allow ground-up cellular optimization. In this review, we attempt to contextualize the areas of synthetic biology into three tiers: (1 the process units and associated streams of the central dogma, (2 the intrinsic regulatory mechanisms, and (3 the extrinsic physical and chemical environment. Efforts at each of these three tiers attempt to control cellular systems and take advantage of emerging tools and approaches. Ultimately, it will be possible to integrate these approaches and realize the vision of integrative synthetic biology when cells are completely rewired for biotechnological goals. This review will highlight progress towards this goal as well as areas requiring further research.

  15. Synthetic biology: tools to design, build, and optimize cellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eric; Alper, Hal

    2010-01-01

    The general central dogma frames the emergent properties of life, which make biology both necessary and difficult to engineer. In a process engineering paradigm, each biological process stream and process unit is heavily influenced by regulatory interactions and interactions with the surrounding environment. Synthetic biology is developing the tools and methods that will increase control over these interactions, eventually resulting in an integrative synthetic biology that will allow ground-up cellular optimization. In this review, we attempt to contextualize the areas of synthetic biology into three tiers: (1) the process units and associated streams of the central dogma, (2) the intrinsic regulatory mechanisms, and (3) the extrinsic physical and chemical environment. Efforts at each of these three tiers attempt to control cellular systems and take advantage of emerging tools and approaches. Ultimately, it will be possible to integrate these approaches and realize the vision of integrative synthetic biology when cells are completely rewired for biotechnological goals. This review will highlight progress towards this goal as well as areas requiring further research.

  16. Restriction of Receptor Movement Alters Cellular Response: Physical Force Sensing by EphA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaita, Khalid; Nair, Pradeep M; Petit, Rebecca S; Neve, Richard M; Das, Debopriya; Gray, Joe W; Groves, Jay T

    2009-09-09

    Activation of the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase by ephrin-A1 ligands presented on apposed cell surfaces plays important roles in development and exhibits poorly understood functional alterations in cancer. We reconstituted this intermembrane signaling geometry between live EphA2-expressing human breast cancer cells and supported membranes displaying laterally mobile ephrin-A1. Receptor-ligand binding, clustering, and subsequent lateral transport within this junction were observed. EphA2 transport can be blocked by physical barriers nanofabricated onto the underlying substrate. This physical reorganization of EphA2 alters the cellular response to ephrin-A1, as observed by changes in cytoskeleton morphology and recruitment of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10. Quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand spatial organization across a library of 26 mammary epithelial cell lines reveals characteristic differences that strongly correlate with invasion potential. These observations reveal a mechanism for spatio-mechanical regulation of EphA2 signaling pathways.

  17. Alterations in cellular metabolism modulate CD1d-mediated NKT-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Tonya J; Carey, Gregory B; East, James E; Sun, Wenji; Bollino, Dominique R; Kimball, Amy S; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2016-08-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells play a critical role in the host's innate immune response. CD1d-mediated presentation of glycolipid antigens to NKT cells has been established; however, the mechanisms by which NKT cells recognize infected or cancerous cells remain unclear. 5(')-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of lipogenic pathways. We hypothesized that activation of AMPK during infection and malignancy could alter the repertoire of antigens presented by CD1d and serve as a danger signal to NKT cells. In this study, we examined the effect of alterations in metabolism on CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells and found that an infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus rapidly increased CD1d-mediated antigen presentation. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) enhance T-cell effector functions during infection, therefore antigen presenting cells pretreated with pharmacological agents that inhibit glycolysis, induce HIF and activate AMPK were assessed for their ability to induce NKT-cell responses. Pretreatment with 2-deoxyglucose, cobalt chloride, AICAR and metformin significantly enhanced CD1d-mediated NKT-cell activation. In addition, NKT cells preferentially respond to malignant B cells and B-cell lymphomas express HIF-1α. These data suggest that targeting cellular metabolism may serve as a novel means of inducing innate immune responses. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. A celiac cellular phenotype, with altered LPP sub-cellular distribution, is inducible in controls by the toxic gliadin peptide P31-43.

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    Merlin Nanayakkara

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a frequent inflammatory intestinal disease, with a genetic background, caused by gliadin-containing food. Undigested gliadin peptides P31-43 and P57-68 induce innate and adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses, respectively. Alterations in the cell shape and actin cytoskeleton are present in celiac enterocytes, and gliadin peptides induce actin rearrangements in both the CD mucosa and cell lines. Cell shape is maintained by the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, sites of membrane attachment to the extracellular matrix. The locus of the human Lipoma Preferred Partner (LPP gene was identified as strongly associated with CD using genome-wide association studies (GWAS. The LPP protein plays an important role in focal adhesion architecture and acts as a transcription factor in the nucleus. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that a constitutive alteration of the cell shape and the cytoskeleton, involving LPP, occurs in a cell compartment far from the main inflammation site in CD fibroblasts from skin explants. We analyzed the cell shape, actin organization, focal adhesion number, focal adhesion proteins, LPP sub-cellular distribution and adhesion to fibronectin of fibroblasts obtained from CD patients on a Gluten-Free Diet (GFD and controls, without and with treatment with A-gliadin peptide P31-43. We observed a "CD cellular phenotype" in these fibroblasts, characterized by an altered cell shape and actin organization, increased number of focal adhesions, and altered intracellular LPP protein distribution. The treatment of controls fibroblasts with gliadin peptide P31-43 mimics the CD cellular phenotype regarding the cell shape, adhesion capacity, focal adhesion number and LPP sub-cellular distribution, suggesting a close association between these alterations and CD pathogenesis.

  19. Speeding Up Cellular Neural Network Processing Ability by Embodying Memristors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilotta, E; Pantano, P; Vena, S

    2017-05-01

    Cellular neural networks (CNNs) are an efficient tool for image analysis and pattern recognition. Based on elementary cells connected to neighboring units, they are easy to install in hardware, carrying out massively parallel processes. This brief presents a new model of CNN with memory devices, which enhances further CNN performance. By introducing a memristive element in basic cells, we carry out different experiments, allowing the analysis of the functions traditionally carried out by the standard CNN. Without modifying the templates considered by the scientific literature, this simple variation originates a significant improvement in  ∼ 30 % of performances in pattern recognition and image processing. These progresses were experimentally calculated on the time the system requires to reach a fixed point. Moreover, the different role that each parameter has in the developed method was also analyzed to better understand the complex processing ability of these systems.

  20. Experimental design for dynamics identification of cellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Vu; Rundell, Ann E; Buzzard, Gregery T

    2014-03-01

    We address the problem of using nonlinear models to design experiments to characterize the dynamics of cellular processes by using the approach of the Maximally Informative Next Experiment (MINE), which was introduced in W. Dong et al. (PLoS ONE 3(8):e3105, 2008) and independently in M.M. Donahue et al. (IET Syst. Biol. 4:249-262, 2010). In this approach, existing data is used to define a probability distribution on the parameters; the next measurement point is the one that yields the largest model output variance with this distribution. Building upon this approach, we introduce the Expected Dynamics Estimator (EDE), which is the expected value using this distribution of the output as a function of time. We prove the consistency of this estimator (uniform convergence to true dynamics) even when the chosen experiments cluster in a finite set of points. We extend this proof of consistency to various practical assumptions on noisy data and moderate levels of model mismatch. Through the derivation and proof, we develop a relaxed version of MINE that is more computationally tractable and robust than the original formulation. The results are illustrated with numerical examples on two nonlinear ordinary differential equation models of biomolecular and cellular processes.

  1. Alterations of Cellular Immune Reactions in Crew Members Overwintering in the Antarctic Research Station Concordia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Feuerecker, Matthias; Moreels, Marjan; Crucian, Brian; Kaufmann, Ines; Salam, Alex Paddy; Rybka, Alex; Ulrike, Thieme; Quintens, Roel; Sams, Clarence F.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Background: Concordia Station is located inside Antarctica about 1000km from the coast at an altitude of 3200m (Dome C). Hence, individuals living in this harsh environment are exposed to two major conditions: 1.) hypobaric hypoxia and 2.) confinement and extreme isolation. Both hypoxia and confinement can affect human immunity and health, and are likely to be present during exploration class space missions. This study focused on immune alterations measured by a new global immunity test assay, similar to the phased out delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test. Methods: After informed written consent 14 healthy male subjects were included to the CHOICE-study (Consequences-of-longterm-Confinement-and-Hypobaric-HypOxia-on-Immunity-in-the Antarctic-Concordia-Environment). Data collection occurred during two winter-over periods lasting each one year. During the first campaign 6 healthy male were enrolled followed by a second campaign with 8 healthy males. Blood was drawn monthly and incubated for 48h with various bacterial, viral and fungal antigens followed by an analysis of plasma cytokine levels (TNF-alpha, IL2, IFN-gamma, IL10). As a control, blood was incubated without stimulation ("resting condition"). Goals: The scope of this study was to assess the consequences of hypoxia and confinement on cellular immunity as assessed by a new in vitro DTH-like test. Results: Initial results indicate that under resting conditions the in vitro DTH-like test showed low cytokine levels which remained almost unchanged during the entire observation period. However, cytokine responses to viral, bacterial and fungal antigens were remarkably reduced at the first month after arrival at Concordia when compared to levels measured in Europe prior to departure for Antarctica. With incrementing months of confinement this depressed DTH-like response tended to reverse, and in fact to show an "overshooting" immune reaction after stimulation. Conclusion: The reduced in vitro DTH-like test

  2. Chromite alteration processes within Vourinos ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieco, Giovanni; Merlini, Anna

    2012-09-01

    The renewed interest in chromite ore deposits is directly related to the increase in Cr price ruled by international market trends. Chromite, an accessory mineral in peridotites, is considered to be a petrogenetic indicator because its composition reflects the degree of partial melting that the mantle experienced while producing the chromium spinel-bearing rock (Burkhard in Geochim Cosmochim Acta 57:1297-1306, 1993). However, the understanding of chromite alteration and metamorphic modification is still controversial (e.g. Evans and Frost in Geochim Cosmochim Acta 39:959-972, 1975; Burkhard in Geochim Cosmochim Acta 57:1297-1306, 1993; Oze et al. in Am J Sci 304:67-101, 2004). Metamorphic alteration leads to major changes in chromite chemistry and to the growth of secondary phases such as ferritchromite and chlorite. In this study, we investigate the Vourinos complex chromitites (from the mines of Rizo, Aetoraches, Xerolivado and Potamia) with respect to textural and chemical analyses in order to highlight the most important trend of alteration related to chromite transformation. The present study has been partially funded by the Aliakmon project in collaboration between the Public Power Corporation of Greece and Institute of Geology and Mineral Exploration of Kozani.

  3. Morphine alters the circulating proteolytic profile in mice: functional consequences on cellular migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Nan; Khabbazi, Samira; Nassar, Zeyad D; Gregory, Kye; Vithanage, Tharindu; Anand-Apte, Bela; Cabot, Peter J; Sturgess, David; Shaw, Paul N; Parat, Marie-Odile

    2017-12-01

    Opioids modulate the tumor microenvironment with potential functional consequences for tumor growth and metastasis. We evaluated the effects of morphine administration on the circulating proteolytic profile of tumor-free mice. Serum from morphine-treated (1 or 10 mg/kg, i.p. every 12 h) or saline-treated mice was collected at different time points and tested ex vivo in endothelial, lymphatic endothelial, and breast cancer cell migration assays. Serum from mice that were treated with 10 mg/kg morphine for 3 d displayed reduced chemotactic potential for endothelial and breast cancer cells, and elicited reduced cancer cell invasion through reconstituted basement membrane compared with serum from saline controls. This was associated with decreased circulating matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and increased circulating tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) and TIMP-3/4 as assessed by zymography and reverse zymography. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed morphine-induced alterations in MMP-9 and TIMP expression and identified organs, including the liver and spleen, in which these changes originated. Pharmacologic inhibition of MMP-9 abrogated the difference in chemotactic attraction between serum from saline-treated and morphine-treated mice, which indicated that reduced proteolytic ability mediated the decreased migration toward serum from morphine-treated mice. This novel mechanism may enable morphine administration to promote an environment that is less conducive to tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis.-Xie, N., Khabbazi, S., Nassar, Z. D., Gregory, K., Vithanage, T., Anand-Apte, B., Cabot, P. J., Sturgess, D., Shaw, P. N., Parat, M.-O. Morphine alters the circulating proteolytic profile in mice: functional consequences on cellular migration and invasion. © FASEB.

  4. Downregulation of SREBP inhibits tumor growth and initiation by altering cellular metabolism in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yang-An; Xiong, Xiaopeng; Zaytseva, Yekaterina Y; Napier, Dana L; Vallee, Emma; Li, Austin T; Wang, Chi; Weiss, Heidi L; Evers, B Mark; Gao, Tianyan

    2018-02-15

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) belong to a family of transcription factors that regulate the expression of genes required for the synthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol. Three SREBP isoforms, SREBP1a, SREBP1c, and SREBP2, have been identified in mammalian cells. SREBP1a and SREBP1c are derived from a single gene through the use of alternative transcription start sites. Here we investigated the role of SREBP-mediated lipogenesis in regulating tumor growth and initiation in colon cancer. Knockdown of either SREBP1 or SREBP2 decreased levels of fatty acids as a result of decreased expression of SREBP target genes required for lipid biosynthesis in colon cancer cells. Bioenergetic analysis revealed that silencing SREBP1 or SREBP2 expression reduced the mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, as well as fatty acid oxidation indicating an alteration in cellular metabolism. Consequently, the rate of cell proliferation and the ability of cancer cells to form tumor spheroids in suspension culture were significantly decreased. Similar results were obtained in colon cancer cells in which the proteolytic activation of SREBP was blocked. Importantly, knockdown of either SREBP1 or SREBP2 inhibited xenograft tumor growth in vivo and decreased the expression of genes associated with cancer stem cells. Taken together, our findings establish the molecular basis of SREBP-dependent metabolic regulation and provide a rationale for targeting lipid biosynthesis as a promising approach in colon cancer treatment.

  5. Cellular Signaling Pathway Alterations and Potential Targeted Therapies for Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Giunti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parafollicular C-cell-derived medullary thyroid cancer (MTC comprises 3% to 4% of all thyroid cancers. While cytotoxic treatments have been shown to have limited efficacy, targeted molecular therapies that inhibit rearranged during transfection (RET and other tyrosine kinase receptors that are mainly involved in angiogenesis have shown great promise in the treatment of metastatic or locally advanced MTC. Multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as vandetanib, which is already approved for the treatment of progressive MTC, and cabozantinib have shown distinct advantages with regard to rates of disease response and control. However, these types of tyrosine kinase inhibitor compounds are able to concurrently block several types of targets, which limits the understanding of RET as a specific target. Moreover, important resistances to tyrosine kinase inhibitors can occur, which limit the long-term efficacy of these treatments. Deregulated cellular signaling pathways and genetic alterations in MTC, particularly the activation of the RAS/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR cascades and RET crosstalk signaling, are now emerging as novel and potentially promising therapeutic treatments for aggressive MTC.

  6. Color image processing in a cellular neural-network environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C C; de Gyvez, J P

    1996-01-01

    When low-level hardware simulations of cellular neural networks (CNNs) are very costly for exploring new applications, the use of a behavioral simulator becomes indispensable. This paper presents a software prototype capable of performing image processing applications using CNNs. The software is based on a CNN multilayer structure in which each primary color is assigned to a unique layer. This allows an added flexibility as different processing applications can be performed in parallel. To be able to handle a full range of color tones, two novel color mapping schemes were derived. In the proposed schemes the color information is obtained from the cell's state rather than from its output. This modification is necessary because for many templates CNN has only binary stable outputs from which only either a fully saturated or a black color can be obtained. Additionally, a postprocessor capable of performing pixelwise logical operations among color layers was developed to enhance the results obtained from CNN. Examples in the areas of medical image processing, image restoration, and weather forecasting are provided to demonstrate the robustness of the software and the vast potential of CNN.

  7. Estradiol-induced promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis in medaka: Relationship of foci of cellular alteration to neoplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, J.B.; Hinton, D.E. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In some laboratory and field studies, female fish have higher prevalences of liver tumors than do males. The authors hypothesize gender and site-specific differences in prevalence are due to variable exposures of previously initiated fish to tumor modulating compounds. Estradiol, a growth promoter, increases incidences of hepatic tumors in carcinogen-treated rainbow trout and medaka (Oryzias latipes). Estradiol also increases incidences of hepatic foci of cellular alteration (FCA) in medaka. FCA are found in subadults of tumor-bearing feral populations. Lack of knowledge about the relationship of various phenotypes of FCA to eventual tumors, however, has prevented use of FCA as a biomarker. The authors examined fate and growth of liver FCA using a 2-step, initiation-promotion protocol. Three week old medaka were exposed to 200 ppm diethylnitrosamine (DEN) for 24 hr. and then fed 0.1 ppm 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) continuously through sampling at weeks 4--26. Percent volume of FCA and morphometric characteristics of normal and focal hepatocytes, including numerical density and average hepatocyte volume were quantified using computer-assisted stereology. E2 increased percentage of liver occupied by DEN-initiated amphophilic, basophilic and eosinophilic FCA in both sexes. Focal parameters of young, DEN-initiated and estradiol-treated medaka were not reached until much later in fish given only DEN. Non-focal hepatocytes in estradiol-treated medaka were smaller and more numerous than in DEN-only counterparts. Morphometric analysis is quantitatively tracking the fate of specific phenotypes of FCA to determine their role in progression to cancer.

  8. Comprehensive analysis of temporal alterations in cellular proteome of Bacillus subtilis under curcumin treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panga Jaipal Reddy

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a natural dietary compound with antimicrobial activity against various gram positive and negative bacteria. This study aims to investigate the proteome level alterations in Bacillus subtilis due to curcumin treatment and identification of its molecular/cellular targets to understand the mechanism of action. We have performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis of B. subtilis AH75 strain at different time intervals of curcumin treatment (20, 60 and 120 min after the drug exposure, three replicates to compare the protein expression profiles using two complementary quantitative proteomic techniques, 2D-DIGE and iTRAQ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive longitudinal investigation describing the effect of curcumin treatment on B. subtilis proteome. The proteomics analysis revealed several interesting targets such UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase 1, putative septation protein SpoVG and ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit. Further, in silico pathway analysis using DAVID and KOBAS has revealed modulation of pathways related to the fatty acid metabolism and cell wall synthesis, which are crucial for cell viability. Our findings revealed that curcumin treatment lead to inhibition of the cell wall and fatty acid synthesis in addition to differential expression of many crucial proteins involved in modulation of bacterial metabolism. Findings obtained from proteomics analysis were further validated using 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC assay for respiratory activity, resazurin assay for metabolic activity and membrane integrity assay by potassium and inorganic phosphate leakage measurement. The gene expression analysis of selected cell wall biosynthesis enzymes has strengthened the proteomics findings and indicated the major effect of curcumin on cell division.

  9. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) infection alters the expression of cellular microRNA species that affect transcription of TGEV gene 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiangjun; Zhao, Xiaomin; Huang, Yong; Xiang, Hailing; Zhang, Wenlong; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is a member of Coronaviridae family. TGEV infection has emerged as a major cause of severe gastroenteritis and leads to alterations of many cellular processes. Meanwhile, the pathogenic mechanism of TGEV is still unclear. microRNAs (miRNAs) are a novel class of small non-coding RNAs which are involved in the regulation of numerous biological processes such as viral infection and cell apoptosis. Accumulating data show that miRNAs are involved in the process of coronavirus infection such as replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). However, the link between miRNAs and TGEV infection is unknown. In this study, we performed microRNA microarray assay and predicted targets of altered miRNAs. The results showed TGEV infection caused the change of miRNAs profile. Then we selected miR-4331 for further analysis and subsequently identified cell division cycle-associated protein 7 (CDCA7) as the target of miR-4331. Moreover, miR-4331 showed the ability to inhibit transcription of TGEV gene 7 (a non-structure gene) via directly targeting CDCA7. In conclusion, differentially expressed miR-4331 that is caused by TGEV infection can suppress transcription of TGEV gene 7 via targeting cellular CDCA7. Our key finding is that TGEV selectively manipulates the expression of some cellular miRNAs to regulate its subgenomic transcription.

  10. Triple Bioluminescence Imaging for In Vivo Monitoring of Cellular Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey A Maguire

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence imaging (BLI has shown to be crucial for monitoring in vivo biological processes. So far, only dual bioluminescence imaging using firefly (Fluc and Renilla or Gaussia (Gluc luciferase has been achieved due to the lack of availability of other efficiently expressed luciferases using different substrates. Here, we characterized a codon-optimized luciferase from Vargula hilgendorfii (Vluc as a reporter for mammalian gene expression. We showed that Vluc can be multiplexed with Gluc and Fluc for sequential imaging of three distinct cellular phenomena in the same biological system using vargulin, coelenterazine, and D-luciferin substrates, respectively. We applied this triple imaging system to monitor the effect of soluble tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (sTRAIL delivered using an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV on brain tumors in mice. Vluc imaging showed efficient sTRAIL gene delivery to the brain, while Fluc imaging revealed a robust antiglioma therapy. Further, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation in response to sTRAIL binding to glioma cells death receptors was monitored by Gluc imaging. This work is the first demonstration of trimodal in vivo bioluminescence imaging and will have a broad applicability in many different fields including immunology, oncology, virology, and neuroscience.

  11. Manufacturing processes of cellular concrete products for the construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhratov Мuhammet

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular concrete takes the lead in the world of construction as a structural insulation material used in the construction and reconstruction of buildings and constructions of various purposes. In this artificial stone building material, pores are distributed relatively evenly and occupy from 20 to 90% of the concrete volume, ensuring good thermal qualities, which allows cellular concrete houses to keep warmth well. For production of cellular concrete, Portland cement, “burnt lime”, and fine-pulverized blast furnace slags, with a hardening activator are used as binders. As silica components, quartz sand or “fly ash” obtained by combustion of pulverized fuel in power plants as well as secondary products of different ore dressing treatments are used. The low density and high thermal insulation properties of cellular concrete enables 3 times lighter wall weight than the weight of brick walls and 1.7 times lighter than the walls of ceramsite concrete. Thermal insulation and mechanical properties of cellular concrete make possible to construct of it single-layer protecting structures with the desired thermal resistance. Cellular concrete is divided into aerated concretes and foam concretes, whose physical/mechanical and operational performance is, ceteris paribus, almost identical. By the method of hydrothermal treatment cellular concretes are divided into two groups: concrete of autoclave and non-autoclave curing.

  12. Multilevel Cellular Automata as a Tool for Studying Bioinformatic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogeweg, Paulien

    The signature feature of Cellular Automata is the realization that "simple rules can give rise to complex behavior". In particular how fixed "rock-bottom" simple rules can give rise to multiple levels of organization. Here we describe Multilevel Cellular Automata, in which the microscopic entities (states) and their transition rules themselves are adjusted by the mesoscale patterns that they themselves generate. Thus we study the feedback of higher levels of organization on the lower levels. Such an approach is preeminently important for studying bioinformatic systems. We will here focus on an evolutionary approach to formalize such Multilevel Cellular Automata, and review examples of studies that use them.

  13. Adaptive endoplasmic reticulum stress alters cellular responses to the extracellular milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiting; Neely, Elizabeth; Simmons, Zachary; Connor, James R

    2015-05-01

    The ability to respond to perturbations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function is a critical property for all cells. In the presence of chronic ER stress, the cell must adapt so that cell survival is favored or the stress may promote apoptosis. In some pathological processes, such as neurodengeneration, persistent ER stress can be tolerated for an extended period, but eventually cell death occurs. It is not known how an adaptive response converts from survival into apoptosis. To gain a better understanding of the role of adaptive ER stress in neurodegeneration, in this study, with a neuronal cell line SH-SY5Y and primary motor neuron-glia cell mixed cultures, we induced adaptive ER stress and modified the extracellular environment with physiologically relevant changes that alone did not activate ER stress. Our data demonstrate that an adaptive ER stress favored neuronal cell survival, but when cells were exposed to additional physiological insults the level of ER stress was increased, followed by activation of the caspase pathway. Our results indicate that an adaptive ER stress response could be converted to apoptosis when the external cellular milieu changed, suggesting that the conversion from prosurvival to proapoptotic pathways can be driven by the external milieu. This conversion was due at least partially to an increased level of ER stress. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. BRCA1 haploinsufficiency leads to altered expression of genes involved in cellular proliferation and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet E Feilotter

    Full Text Available The assessment of BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding sequences to identify pathogenic mutations associated with inherited breast/ovarian cancer syndrome has provided a method to identify high-risk individuals, allowing them to seek preventative treatments and strategies. However, the current test is expensive, and cannot differentiate between pathogenic variants and those that may be benign. Focusing only on one of the two BRCA partners, we have developed a biological assay for haploinsufficiency of BRCA1. Using a series of EBV-transformed cell lines, we explored gene expression patterns in cells that were BRCA1 wildtype compared to those that carried (heterozygous BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. We identified a subset of 43 genes whose combined expression pattern is a sensitive predictor of BRCA1 status. The gene set was disproportionately made up of genes involved in cellular differentiation, lending credence to the hypothesis that single copy loss of BRCA1 function may impact differentiation, rendering cells more susceptible to undergoing malignant processes.

  15. Cellular effects of fluorodeoxyglucose: Global changes in the lipidome and alteration in intracellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Torgersen, Maria Lyngaas; Lingelem, Anne Berit Dyve; Klokk, Tove Irene; Lintonen, Tuulia; Simolin, Helena; Ekroos, Kim; Skotland, Tore; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2016-11-29

    2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), labeled with 18F radioisotope, is the most common imaging agent used for positron emission tomography (PET) in oncology. However, little is known about the cellular effects of FDG. Another glucose analogue, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG), has been shown to affect many cellular functions, including intracellular transport and lipid metabolism, and has been found to improve the efficacy of cancer chemotherapeutic agents in vivo. Thus, in the present study, we have investigated cellular effects of FDG with the focus on changes in cellular lipids and intracellular transport. By quantifying more than 200 lipids from 17 different lipid classes in HEp-2 cells and by analyzing glycosphingolipids from MCF-7, HT-29 and HBMEC cells, we have discovered that FDG treatment inhibits glucosylceramide synthesis and thus reduces cellular levels of glycosphingolipids. In addition, in HEp-2 cells the levels and/or species composition of other lipid classes, namely diacylglycerols, phosphatidic acids and phosphatidylinositols, were found to change upon treatment with FDG. Furthermore, we show here that FDG inhibits retrograde Shiga toxin transport and is much more efficient in protecting cells against the toxin than 2DG. In summary, our data reveal novel effects of FDG on cellular transport and glycosphingolipid metabolism, which suggest a potential clinical application of FDG as an adjuvant for cancer chemotherapy.

  16. Image Processing in Tunneling Phase Logic Cellular Nonlinear Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Kiehl, Richard A.; Chua, Leon O.

    Based on a simple circuit model of a tunneling phase logic (TPL) element that is driven by a sinusoidal voltage source and biased by a DC voltage source, we present simulations of operations in cellular nonlinear networks (CNN) that could potentially be used to perform general computations in 2D arrays of simple, locally connected nanoscale devices. Some examples are presented to demonstrate the image computation capability of TPL-CNN. In particular, we use a simple 2D TPL-CNN structure to perform edge detection, image enhancement and image segmentation. Some cellular automata (CA)-like behaviors of our 2D TPL-CNN are also presented.

  17. Multiscale evaluation of cellular adhesion alteration and cytoskeleton remodeling by magnetic bead twisting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabey, Daniel; Pelle, Gabriel; André Dias, Sofia; Bottier, Mathieu; Nguyen, Ngoc-Minh; Filoche, Marcel; Louis, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    Cellular adhesion forces depend on local biological conditions meaning that adhesion characterization must be performed while preserving cellular integrity. We presently postulate that magnetic bead twisting provides an appropriate stress, i.e., basically a clamp, for assessment in living cells of both cellular adhesion and mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton. A global dissociation rate obeying a Bell-type model was used to determine the natural dissociation rate ([Formula: see text]) and a reference stress ([Formula: see text]). These adhesion parameters were determined in parallel to the mechanical properties for a variety of biological conditions in which either adhesion or cytoskeleton was selectively weakened or strengthened by changing successively ligand concentration, actin polymerization level (by treating with cytochalasin D), level of exerted stress (by increasing magnetic torque), and cell environment (by using rigid and soft 3D matrices). On the whole, this multiscale evaluation of the cellular and molecular responses to a controlled stress reveals an evolution which is consistent with stochastic multiple bond theories and with literature results obtained with other molecular techniques. Present results confirm the validity of the proposed bead-twisting approach for its capability to probe cellular and molecular responses in a variety of biological conditions.

  18. A sentinel protein assay for simultaneously quantifying cellular processes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soste, M.; Hrabáková, Rita; Wanka, S.; Melnik, A.; Boersema, P.; Maiolica, A.; Wernas, T.; Tognetti, M.; von Mering, Ch.; Picotti, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 10 (2014), s. 1045-1048 ISSN 1548-7091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : targeted proteomics * selected reaction monitoring * cellular signaling Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 32.072, year: 2014

  19. Electromagnetic Evidence of Altered Visual Processing in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Nicola; Dubischar-Krivec, Anna M.; Poustka, Fritz; Birbaumer, Niels; Bolte, Sven; Braun, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate intact or superior local processing of visual-spatial tasks. We investigated the hypothesis that in a disembedding task, autistic individuals exhibit a more local processing style than controls, which is reflected by altered electromagnetic brain activity in response to embedded stimuli…

  20. Methyl jasmonate deficiency alters cellular metabolome including the aminome of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipoxygenase (LOX) catalyzes oxidation of C-13 atom of C:18 polyunsaturated fatty acids and produces jasmonic acid and other oxylipins that have important biological relevance. However, the role of these important molecules in cellular metabolism is barely understood. We have used a transgenic appro...

  1. Attention alters orientation processing in the human lateral geniculate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Sam; Pratte, Michael S; Tong, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Orientation selectivity is a cornerstone property of vision, commonly believed to emerge in the primary visual cortex. We found that reliable orientation information could be detected even earlier, in the human lateral geniculate nucleus, and that attentional feedback selectively altered these orientation responses. This attentional modulation may allow the visual system to modify incoming feature-specific signals at the earliest possible processing site.

  2. Altered Expression of Plasminogen Activator and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor during Cellular Senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    West, Michael D.; Shay, Jerry W.; Wright, Woodring E.; Linskens, Maarten H.K.

    1996-01-01

    Fibroblast senescence is associated with a loss of proliferative potential and an alteration in extracellular gene expression. Because the expression of extracellular gene products are frequently growth state dependent, we undertook a comparative study of the regulation of the components of the

  3. Altered cellular redox status, sirtuin abundance and clock gene expression in a mouse model of developmentally primed NASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Kimberley D; Szczepankiewicz, Dawid; Sihota, Kiran K; Ravindraanandan, Manoj; Thomas, Hugh; Lillycrop, Karen A; Burdge, Graham C; Hanson, Mark A; Byrne, Christopher D; Cagampang, Felino R

    2016-07-01

    We have previously shown that high fat (HF) feeding during pregnancy primes the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatits (NASH) in the adult offspring. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Since the endogenous molecular clock can regulate hepatic lipid metabolism, we investigated whether exposure to a HF diet during development could alter hepatic clock gene expression and contribute to NASH onset in later life. Female mice were fed either a control (C, 7%kcal fat) or HF (45%kcal fat) diet. Offspring were fed either a C or HF diet resulting in four offspring groups: C/C, C/HF, HF/C and HF/HF. NAFLD progression, cellular redox status, sirtuin expression (Sirt1, Sirt3), and the expression of core clock genes (Clock, Bmal1, Per2, Cry2) and clock-controlled genes involved in lipid metabolism (Rev-Erbα, Rev-Erbβ, RORα, and Srebp1c) were measured in offspring livers. Offspring fed a HF diet developed NAFLD. However HF fed offspring of mothers fed a HF diet developed NASH, coupled with significantly reduced NAD(+)/NADH (pNASH in adulthood, involving altered cellular redox status, reduced sirtuin abundance, and desynchronized clock gene expression. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mobile Phone Service Process Hiccups at Cellular Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgington, Theresa M.

    2010-01-01

    This teaching case documents an actual case of process execution and failure. The case is useful in MIS introductory courses seeking to demonstrate the interdependencies within a business process, and the concept of cascading failure at the process level. This case demonstrates benefits and potential problems with information technology systems,…

  5. Opt2 mediates the exposure of phospholipids during cellular adaptation to altered lipid asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Saori; Obara, Keisuke; Uchibori, Kenya; Kamimura, Akiko; Azumi, Kaoru; Kihara, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane lipid asymmetry is important for various membrane-associated functions and is regulated by membrane proteins termed flippases and floppases. The Rim101 pathway senses altered lipid asymmetry in the yeast plasma membrane. The mutant lem3Δ cells, in which lipid asymmetry is disturbed owing to the inactivation of the plasma membrane flippases, showed a severe growth defect when the Rim101 pathway was impaired. To identify factors involved in the Rim101-pathway-dependent adaptation to altered lipid asymmetry, we performed DNA microarray analysis and found that Opt2 induced by the Rim101 pathway plays an important role in the adaptation to altered lipid asymmetry. Biochemical investigation of Opt2 revealed its localization to the plasma membrane and the Golgi, and provided several lines of evidence for the Opt2-mediated exposure of phospholipids. In addition, Opt2 was found to be required for the maintenance of vacuolar morphology and polarized cell growth. These results suggest that Opt2 is a novel factor involved in cell homeostasis by regulating lipid asymmetry. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R.

    2006-01-01

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML

  7. Metabolomics Reveals that Dietary Xenoestrogens Alter Cellular Metabolism Induced by Palbociclib/Letrozole Combination Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Benedikt; Raffeiner, Philipp; Granados, Ana; Huan, Tao; Fang, Mingliang; Forsberg, Erica M; Benton, H Paul; Goetz, Laura; Johnson, Caroline H; Siuzdak, Gary

    2018-03-15

    Recently, the palbociclib/letrozole combination therapy was granted accelerated US FDA approval for the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. Since the underlying metabolic effects of these drugs are yet unknown, we investigated their synergism at the metabolome level in MCF-7 cells. As xenoestrogens interact with the ER, we additionally aimed at deciphering the impact of the phytoestrogen genistein and the estrogenic mycotoxin zearalenone. A global metabolomics approach was applied to unravel metabolite and pathway modifications. The results clearly showed that the combined effects of palbociclib and letrozole on cellular metabolism were far more pronounced than that of each agent alone and potently influenced by xenoestrogens. This behavior was confirmed in proliferation experiments and functional assays. Specifically, amino acids and central carbon metabolites were attenuated, while higher abundances were observed for fatty acids and most nucleic acid-related metabolites. Interestingly, exposure to model xenoestrogens appeared to counteract these effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hyperglycemia- and hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance causes alterations in cellular bioenergetics and activation of inflammatory signaling in lymphatic muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yang; Fluckey, James D; Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2017-07-01

    Insulin resistance is a well-known risk factor for obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) and associated cardiovascular diseases, but its mechanisms are undefined in the lymphatics. Mesenteric lymphatic vessels from MetSyn or LPS-injected rats exhibited impaired intrinsic contractile activity and associated inflammatory changes. Hence, we hypothesized that insulin resistance in lymphatic muscle cells (LMCs) affects cell bioenergetics and signaling pathways that consequently alter contractility. LMCs were treated with different concentrations of insulin or glucose or both at various time points to determine insulin resistance. Onset of insulin resistance significantly impaired glucose uptake, mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption rates, glycolysis, lactic acid, and ATP production in LMCs. Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia also impaired the PI3K/Akt while enhancing the ERK/p38MAPK/JNK pathways in LMCs. Increased NF-κB nuclear translocation and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 and VCAM-1 levels in insulin-resistant LMCs indicated activation of inflammatory mechanisms. In addition, increased phosphorylation of myosin light chain-20, a key regulator of lymphatic muscle contraction, was observed in insulin-resistant LMCs. Therefore, our data elucidate the mechanisms of insulin resistance in LMCs and provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia promote insulin resistance and impair lymphatic contractile status by reducing glucose uptake, altering cellular metabolic pathways, and activating inflammatory signaling cascades.-Lee, Y., Fluckey, J. D., Chakraborty, S., Muthuchamy, M. Hyperglycemia- and hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance causes alterations in cellular bioenergetics and activation of inflammatory signaling in lymphatic muscle. © FASEB.

  9. Binding of hepatitis B virus to its cellular receptor alters the expression profile of genes of bile acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Nicola; Volz, Tassilo; Bhadra, Oliver D; Kah, Janine; Allweiss, Lena; Giersch, Katja; Bierwolf, Jeanette; Riecken, Kristoffer; Pollok, Jörg M; Lohse, Ansgar W; Fehse, Boris; Petersen, Joerg; Urban, Stephan; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Heeren, Joerg; Dandri, Maura

    2014-11-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been associated with alterations in lipid metabolism. Moreover, the Na+-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), responsible for bile acid (BA) uptake into hepatocytes, was identified as the functional cellular receptor mediating HBV entry. The aim of the study was to determine whether HBV alters the liver metabolic profile by employing HBV-infected and uninfected human liver chimeric mice. Humanized urokinase plasminogen activator/severe combined immunodeficiency mice were used to establish chronic HBV infection. Gene expression profiles were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction using primers specifically recognizing transcripts of either human or murine origin. Liver biopsy samples obtained from HBV-chronic individuals were used to validate changes determined in mice. Besides modest changes in lipid metabolism, HBV-infected mice displayed a significant enhancement of human cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (human [h]CYP7A1; median 12-fold induction; Pmetabolic alterations. Binding of HBV to NTCP limits its function, thus promoting compensatory BA synthesis and cholesterol provision. The intimate link determined between HBV and liver metabolism underlines the importance to exploit further metabolic pathways, as well as possible NTCP-related viral-drug interactions. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  10. Purification of highly active alphavirus replication complexes demonstrates altered fractionation of multiple cellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietilä, Maija K; van Hemert, Martijn J; Ahola, Tero

    2018-01-24

    Positive-strand RNA viruses replicate their genomes in membrane-associated structures; alphaviruses and many other groups induce membrane invaginations called spherules. Here, we established a protocol to purify these membranous replication complexes (RCs) from cells infected with Semliki Forest virus (SFV). We isolated SFV spherules located on the plasma membrane and further purified them using two consecutive density gradients. This revealed that SFV infection strongly modifies cellular membranes. We removed soluble proteins, the Golgi and most of the mitochondria, but plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and late endosome markers enriched in the membrane fraction that contained viral RNA synthesizing activity, replicase proteins and minus- and plus-strand RNA. Electron microscopy revealed that the purified membranes displayed spherule-like structures with a narrow neck. This membrane enrichment was specific to viral replication as such a distribution of membrane markers was only observed after infection. Besides the plasma membrane, SFV infection remodeled the ER, and the co-fractionation of the RC-carrying plasma membrane and ER suggests that SFV may recruit ER proteins or membrane to the site of replication. The purified RCs were highly active in synthesizing both genomic and subgenomic RNA. Detergent solubilization destroyed the replication activity demonstrating that the membrane association of the complex is essential. Most of the newly made RNA was in double-stranded replicative molecules but the purified complexes also produced single-stranded RNA as well as released newly made RNA. This indicates that the purification established here maintained the functionality of RCs and thus enables further structural and functional studies of active RCs. IMPORTANCE Similar to all positive-strand RNA viruses, the arthropod-borne alphaviruses induce membranous genome factories but little is known about the arrangement of viral replicase proteins and the

  11. Simulation of electrochemical processes in cardiac tissue based on cellular automaton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdeev, S A; Bogatov, N M

    2014-01-01

    A new class of cellular automata using special accumulative function for nonuniformity distribution is presented. Usage of this automata type for simulation of excitable media applied to electrochemical processes in human cardiac tissue is shown

  12. Central pain processing is altered in people with Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompra, Nefeli; van Dieën, Jaap H; Coppieters, Michel W

    2016-08-01

    Tendinopathy is often a chronic condition. The mechanisms behind persistent tendon pain are not yet fully understood. It is unknown whether, similar to other persistent pain states, central pain mechanisms contribute to ongoing tendon pain. We investigated the presence of altered central pain processing in Achilles tendinopathy by assessing the conditioned pain modulation (CPM) effect in people with and without Achilles tendinopathy. 20 people with Achilles tendinopathy and 23 healthy volunteers participated in this cross-sectional study. CPM was assessed by the cold pressor test. The pressure pain threshold (PPT) was recorded over the Achilles tendon before and during immersion of the participant's hand into cold water. The CPM effect was quantified as the absolute difference in PPT before and during the cold pressor test. An increase in PPT was observed in the Achilles tendinopathy and control group during the cold pressor test (ptendinopathy group (mean difference=36.4 kPa, SD=68.1 kPa; ptendinopathy compared to people without Achilles tendinopathy. A reduced conditioned pain modulation effect reflects altered central pain processing which is believed to contribute to the persistence of pain in other conditions. Altered central pain processing may also be an important factor in persistent tendon pain that has traditionally been regarded to be dominated by peripheral mechanisms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Altered Amygdala Development and Fear Processing in Prematurely Born Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismaru, Anca Liliana; Gui, Laura; Vasung, Lana; Lejeune, Fleur; Barisnikov, Koviljka; Truttmann, Anita; Borradori Tolsa, Cristina; Hüppi, Petra S

    2016-01-01

    Prematurely born children have a high risk of developmental and behavioral disabilities. Cerebral abnormalities at term age have been clearly linked with later behavior alterations, but existing studies did not focus on the amygdala. Moreover, studies of early amygdala development after premature birth in humans are scarce. To compare amygdala volumes in very preterm infants at term equivalent age (TEA) and term born infants, and to relate premature infants' amygdala volumes with their performance on the Laboratory Temperament Assessment Battery (Lab-TAB) fear episode at 12 months. Eighty one infants born between 2008 and 2014 at the University Hospitals of Geneva and Lausanne, taking part in longitudinal and functional imaging studies, who had undergone a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan at TEA enabling manual amygdala delineation. Amygdala volumes assessed by manual segmentation of MRI scans; volumes of cortical and subcortical gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) automatically segmented in 66 infants; scores for the Lab-TAB fear episode for 42 premature infants at 12 months. Amygdala volumes were smaller in preterm infants at TEA than term infants (mean difference 138.03 mm(3), p motor activity in the fear episode. Our results indicate that premature birth is associated with a reduction in amygdala volumes and white matter volumes at TEA, suggesting that altered amygdala development might be linked to alterations in white matter connectivity reported in premature infants. Moreover, our data suggests that such alterations might affect infants' fear-processing capabilities.

  14. Soluble Fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase-1 Alters Cellular Metabolism and Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lissette C. Sánchez-Aranguren

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a maternal hypertensive disorder that affects up to 1 out of 12 pregnancies worldwide. It is characterized by proteinuria, endothelial dysfunction, and elevated levels of the soluble form of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1, known as sFlt-1. sFlt-1 effects are mediated in part by decreasing VEGF signaling. The direct effects of sFlt-1 on cellular metabolism and bioenergetics in preeclampsia, have not been established. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether sFlt-1 causes mitochondrial dysfunction leading to disruption of normal functioning in endothelial and placental cells in preeclampsia. Endothelial cells (ECs and first-trimester trophoblast (HTR-8/SVneo were treated with serum from preeclamptic women rich in sFlt-1 or with the recombinant protein. sFlt-1, dose-dependently inhibited ECs respiration and acidification rates indicating a metabolic phenotype switch enhancing glycolytic flux. HTR-8/SVneo displayed a strong basal glycolytic metabolism, remaining less sensitive to sFlt-1-induced mitochondrial impairment. Moreover, results obtained in ECs exposed to serum from preeclamptic subjects demonstrated that increased sFlt-1 leads to metabolic perturbations accountable for mitochondrial dysfunction observed in preeclampsia. sFlt-1 exacerbated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS formation and mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation in ECs and trophoblasts exposed to serum from preeclamptic women. Forcing oxidative metabolism by culturing cells in galactose media, further sensitized cells to sFlt-1. This approach let us establish that sFlt-1 targets mitochondrial function in ECs. Effects of sFlt-1 on HTR-8/SVneo cells metabolism were amplified in galactose, demonstrating that sFlt-1 only target cells that rely mainly on oxidative metabolism. Together, our results establish the early metabolic perturbations induced by sFlt-1 and the resulting endothelial and mitochondrial dysfunction

  15. Overexpression of plastid terminal oxidase inSynechocystissp. PCC 6803 alters cellular redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feilke, Kathleen; Ajlani, Ghada; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2017-09-26

    Cyanobacteria are the most ancient organisms performing oxygenic photosynthesis, and they are the ancestors of plant plastids. All plastids contain the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX), while only certain cyanobacteria contain PTOX. Many putative functions have been discussed for PTOX in higher plants including a photoprotective role during abiotic stresses like high light, salinity and extreme temperatures. Since PTOX oxidizes PQH 2 and reduces oxygen to water, it is thought to protect against photo-oxidative damage by removing excess electrons from the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. To investigate the role of PTOX we overexpressed rice PTOX fused to the maltose-binding protein (MBP-OsPTOX) in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a model cyanobacterium that does not encode PTOX. The fusion was highly expressed and OsPTOX was active, as shown by chlorophyll fluorescence and P 700 absorption measurements. The presence of PTOX led to a highly oxidized state of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P) + pool, as detected by NAD(P)H fluorescence. Moreover, in the PTOX overexpressor the electron transport capacity of PSI relative to PSII was higher, indicating an alteration of the photosystem I (PSI) to photosystem II (PSII) stoichiometry. We suggest that PTOX controls the expression of responsive genes of the photosynthetic apparatus in a different way from the PQ/PQH 2 ratio.This article is part of the themed issue 'Enhancing photosynthesis in crop plants: targets for improvement'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Cellular alterations and enhanced induction of cleft palate after coadministration of retinoic acid and TCDD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, B.D.; Birnbaum, L.S. (National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1989-06-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and retinoic acid (RA) are both teratogenic in mice. TCDD is a highly toxic, stable environmental contaminant, while RA is a naturally occurring form of vitamin A. Exposure to TCDD induces hydronephrosis and cleft palate, and exposure to RA induces limb defects and cleft palate. Teratology studies previously have shown that the incidence of clefting is higher after exposure to RA + TCDD than would be observed for the same doses of either compound given alone. This study examines the cellular effects which result in cleft palate, after po administration on gestation Day (GD) 10 or 12 of RA + TCDD in corn oil (10 ml/kg total volume). Exposure on GD 10 to 6 micrograms TCDD + 40 mg RA/kg inhibited early growth of the shelves and clefting was due to a failure of shelves to meet and fuse. This effect on mesenchyme was observed in previous studies to occur after exposure on GD 10 to 40 mg/kg RA alone, but not after TCDD alone. After exposure on GD 12 to 6 micrograms TCDD + 80 mg RA/kg, clefting was due to a failure of shelves to fuse after making contact, because the medial cells differentiated into an oral-like epithelium. This response was observed in previous studies to occur after exposure to TCDD alone, but RA alone on GD 12 resulted in differentiation toward nasal-like cells. The interaction between TCDD and RA results in RA-like clefting after exposure on GD 10 and TCDD-like clefting after exposure on GD 12, and this clefting occurs at higher incidences than would occur after the same levels of either agent alone. After exposure on either GD 10 or 12 to RA + TCDD, the programmed cell death of the medial cells does not occur, and these cells continue to express EGF receptors and to bind 125I-EGF. The effects of RA and TCDD may involve modulation of the cells responses to embryonic growth and differentiation factors.

  17. Targeted mutation of the MLN64 START domain causes only modest alterations in cellular sterol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Tatsuro; Kostetskii, Igor; Zhang, Zhibing; Martinez, Federico; Liu, Pei; Walkley, Steven U; Dwyer, Nancy K; Blanchette-Mackie, E Joan; Radice, Glenn L; Strauss, Jerome F

    2004-04-30

    The StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain, first identified in the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), is involved in the intracellular trafficking of lipids. Sixteen mammalian START domain-containing proteins have been identified to date. StAR, a protein targeted to mitochondria, stimulates the movement of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membranes, where it is metabolized into pregnenolone in steroidogenic cells. MLN64, the START domain protein most closely related to StAR, is localized to late endosomes along with other proteins involved in sterol trafficking, including NPC1 and NPC2, where it has been postulated to participate in sterol distribution to intracellular membranes. To investigate the role of MLN64 in sterol metabolism, we created mice with a targeted mutation in the Mln64 START domain, expecting to find a phenotype similar to that in humans and mice lacking NPC1 or NPC2 (progressive neurodegenerative symptoms, free cholesterol accumulation in lysosomes). Unexpectedly, mice homozygous for the Mln64 mutant allele were viable, neurologically intact, and fertile. No significant alterations in plasma lipid levels, liver lipid content and distribution, and expression of genes involved in sterol metabolism were observed, except for an increase in sterol ester storage in mutant mice fed a high fat diet. Embryonic fibroblast cells transfected with the cholesterol side-chain cleavage system and primary cultures of granulosa cells from Mln64 mutant mice showed defects in sterol trafficking as reflected in reduced conversion of endogenous cholesterol to steroid hormones. These observations suggest that the Mln64 START domain is largely dispensable for sterol metabolism in mice.

  18. Myocardial perfusion alterations observed months after radiotherapy are related to the cellular damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, I.; Sonmez, B. [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Sezen, O.; Zengin, A.Y.; Bahat, Z. [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Yenilmez, E.; Yulug, E. [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Histology and Embryology; Abidin, I. [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Biophysics

    2010-07-01

    Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) is one of the widely used tools to follow developing radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD). But the clinical significance of MPS defects has not been fully understood. We have investigated the biodistribution alterations related to perfusion defects following radiotherapy (RT) and showed coexisting morphological changes. Animals, methods: A total of 18 Wistar rats were divided into three groups (1 control and 2 irradiated groups). A single cardiac 20 Gy radiation dose was used to induce long term cardiac defects. Biodistribution studies with technetium ({sup 99m}Tc) sestamibi and histological evaluations were performed 4 and 6 months after irradiation. The percent radioactivity (%ID/g) was calculated for each heart. For determination of the myocardial damage, positive apoptotic cardiomyocytes, myocardial cell degeneration, myocardial fibrosis, vascular damage and ultrastructural structures were evaluated. Results: Six months after treatment, a significant drop of myocardial uptake was observed (p < 0.05). Irradiation-induced apoptosis rose within the first 4 months after radiation treatment and were stayed elevated until the end of the observation period (p < 0.05). Also, the irradiation has induced myocardial degeneration, perivascular and interstitial fibrosis in the heart at the end of six and four months (p < 0.01). The severity and extent of myocardial injury has became more evident at the end of six month (p < 0.05). At ultrastructural level, prominent changes have been observed in the capillary endothelial and myocardial cells. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the reduced rest myocardial perfusion, occuring months after the radiation, indicates a serious myocard tissue damage which is characterized by myocardial degeneration and fibrosis. (orig.)

  19. Methylglyoxal synthase regulates cell elongation via alterations of cellular methylglyoxal and spermidine content in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Min; Song, Sung-Hyun; Lee, Jin-Woo; Kwak, Min-Kyu; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2017-10-01

    Methylglyoxal regulates cell division and differentiation through its interaction with polyamines. Loss of their biosynthesizing enzyme causes physiological impairment and cell elongation in eukaryotes. However, the reciprocal effects of methylglyoxal and polyamine production and its regulatory metabolic switches on morphological changes in prokaryotes have not been addressed. Here, Bacillus subtilis methylglyoxal synthase (mgsA) and polyamine biosynthesizing genes encoding arginine decarboxylase (SpeA), agmatinase (SpeB), and spermidine synthase (SpeE), were disrupted or overexpressed. Treatment of 0.2mM methylglyoxal and 1mM spermidine led to the elongation and shortening of B. subtilis wild-type cells to 12.38±3.21μm (P<0.05) and 3.24±0.73μm (P<0.01), respectively, compared to untreated cells (5.72±0.68μm). mgsA-deficient (mgsA - ) and -overexpressing (mgsA OE ) mutants also demonstrated cell shortening and elongation, similar to speB- and speE-deficient (speB - and speE - ) and -overexpressing (speB OE and speE OE ) mutants. Importantly, both mgsA-depleted speB OE and speE OE mutants (speB OE /mgsA - and speE OE /mgsA - ) were drastically shortened to 24.5% and 23.8% of parental speB OE and speE OE mutants, respectively. These phenotypes were associated with reciprocal alterations of mgsA and polyamine transcripts governed by the contents of methylglyoxal and spermidine, which are involved in enzymatic or genetic metabolite-control mechanisms. Additionally, biophysically detected methylglyoxal-spermidine Schiff bases did not affect morphogenesis. Taken together, the findings indicate that methylglyoxal triggers cell elongation. Furthermore, cells with methylglyoxal accumulation commonly exhibit an elongated rod-shaped morphology through upregulation of mgsA, polyamine genes, and the global regulator spx, as well as repression of the cell division and shape regulator, FtsZ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. On the Action of General Anesthetics on Cellular Function: Barbiturate Alters the Exocytosis of Catecholamines in a Model Cell System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Daixin; Ewing, Andrew

    2018-01-22

    General anesthetics are essential in many areas, however, the cellular mechanisms of anesthetic-induced amnesia and unconsciousness are incompletely understood. Exocytosis is the main mechanism of signal transduction and neuronal communication through the release of chemical transmitters from vesicles to the extracellular environment. Here, we use disk electrodes placed on top of PC12 cells to show that treatment with barbiturate induces fewer molecules released during exocytosis and changes the event dynamics perhaps by inducing a less stable fusion pore that is prone to close faster during partial exocytosis. Larger events are essentially abolished. However, use of intracellular vesicle impact electrochemical cytometry using a nano-tip electrode inserted into a cell shows that the distribution of vesicle transmitter content does not change after barbiturate treatment. This indicates that barbiturate selectively alters the pore size of larger events or perhaps differentially between types of vesicles. Alteration of exocytosis in this manner could be linked to the effects of general anesthetics on memory loss. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Asbestos-Induced Cellular and Molecular Alteration of Immunocompetent Cells and Their Relationship with Chronic Inflammation and Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Maeda, Megumi; Lee, Suni; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Shoko; Hatayama, Tamayo; Kojima, Yoko; Tabata, Rika; Kishimoto, Takumi; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Otsuki, Takemi

    2012-01-01

    Asbestos causes lung fibrosis known as asbestosis as well as cancers such as malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer. Asbestos is a mineral silicate containing iron, magnesium, and calcium with a core of SiO2. The immunological effect of silica, SiO2, involves the dysregulation of autoimmunity because of the complications of autoimmune diseases found in silicosis. Asbestos can therefore cause alteration of immunocompetent cells to result in a decline of tumor immunity. Additionally, due to its physical characteristics, asbestos fibers remain in the lung, regional lymph nodes, and the pleural cavity, particularly at the opening sites of lymphatic vessels. Asbestos can induce chronic inflammation in these areas due to the production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. As a consequence, immunocompetent cells can have their cellular and molecular features altered by chronic and recurrent encounters with asbestos fibers, and there may be modification by the surrounding inflammation, all of which eventually lead to decreased tumor immunity. In this paper, the brief results of our investigation regarding reduction of tumor immunity of immunocompetent cells exposed to asbestos in vitro are discussed, as are our findings concerned with an investigation of chronic inflammation and analyses of peripheral blood samples derived from patients with pleural plaque and mesothelioma that have been exposed to asbestos. PMID:22500091

  2. Numerical Validation of Chemical Compositional Model for Wettability Alteration Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekbauov, Bakhbergen; Berdyshev, Abdumauvlen; Baishemirov, Zharasbek; Bau, Domenico

    2017-12-01

    Chemical compositional simulation of enhanced oil recovery and surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation processes is a complex task that involves solving dozens of equations for all grid blocks representing a reservoir. In the present work, we perform a numerical validation of the newly developed mathematical formulation which satisfies the conservation laws of mass and energy and allows applying a sequential solution approach to solve the governing equations separately and implicitly. Through its application to the numerical experiment using a wettability alteration model and comparisons with existing chemical compositional model's numerical results, the new model has proven to be practical, reliable and stable.

  3. Cryotherapy Reduces Inflammatory Response Without Altering Muscle Regeneration Process and Extracellular Matrix Remodeling of Rat Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Ramos, Gracielle; Pinheiro, Clara Maria; Messa, Sabrina Peviani; Delfino, Gabriel Borges; Marqueti, Rita de Cássia; Salvini, Tania de Fátima; Durigan, Joao Luiz Quagliotti

    2016-01-04

    The application of cryotherapy is widely used in sports medicine today. Cooling could minimize secondary hypoxic injury through the reduction of cellular metabolism and injury area. Conflicting results have also suggested cryotherapy could delay and impair the regeneration process. There are no definitive findings about the effects of cryotherapy on the process of muscle regeneration. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a clinical-like cryotherapy on inflammation, regeneration and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling on the Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of rats 3, 7 and 14 days post-injury. It was observed that the intermittent application of cryotherapy (three 30-minute sessions, every 2 h) in the first 48 h post-injury decreased inflammatory processes (mRNA levels of TNF-α, NF-κB, TGF-β and MMP-9 and macrophage percentage). Cryotherapy did not alter regeneration markers such as injury area, desmin and Myod expression. Despite regulating Collagen I and III and their growth factors, cryotherapy did not alter collagen deposition. In summary, clinical-like cryotherapy reduces the inflammatory process through the decrease of macrophage infiltration and the accumulation of the inflammatory key markers without influencing muscle injury area and ECM remodeling.

  4. Closed loop control of laser welding processes using cellular neural network cameras: Measurement technology

    OpenAIRE

    Blug, A.; Abt, F.; Nicolosi, L.; Carl, D.; Dausinger, F.; Höfler, H.; Tetzlaff, R.; Weber, R.

    2009-01-01

    Today, image processing using coaxial camera setups is used to monitor the quality of laser material processes such as laser welding, cutting or ablation. This article proposes a sensing system for the next step: Using image based quality features to form an instant feedback signal in order to maintain the process in the desired state. The key component of the system is a camera based on Cellular Neural Networks (CNN). This technology enables real time image processing which is necessary for ...

  5. Maternal obesity induced by a high fat diet causes altered cellular development in fetal brains suggestive of a predisposition of offspring to neurological disorders in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Ewa K; Srinivasan, Malathi; Stachowiak, Michal K; Patel, Mulchand S

    2013-12-01

    Fetal development in an obese maternal intrauterine environment has been shown to predispose the offspring for a number of metabolic disorders in later life. The observation that a large percentage of women of child-bearing age in the US are overweight/obese during pregnancy is therefore a source of concern. A high fat (HF) diet-induced obesity in female rats has been used as a model for maternal obesity. The objective of this study was to determine cellular development in brains of term fetuses of obese rats fed a HF diet from the time of weaning. Fetal brains were dissected out on gestational day 21 and processed for immunohistochemical analysis in the hypothalamic as well as extra-hypothalamic regions. The major observation of this study is that fetal development in the obese HF female rat induced several alterations in the HF fetal brain. Marked increases were observed in orexigenic signaling and a significant decrease was observed for anorexigenic signaling in the vicinity of the 3rd ventricle in HF brains. Additionally, our results indicated diminished migration and maturation of stem-like cells in the 3rd ventricular region as well as in the brain cortex. The results from the present study indicate developmental alterations in the hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic regions in the HF fetal brain suggestive of a predisposition for the development of obesity and possibly neurodevelopmental abnormalities in the offspring.

  6. Perfluorinated chemicals: Differential toxicity, inhibition of aromatase activity and alteration of cellular lipids in human placental cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorrochategui, Eva; Pérez-Albaladejo, Elisabet [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Casas, Josefina [Department of Biomedicinal Chemistry, IQAC–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Lacorte, Sílvia, E-mail: slbqam@cid.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Porte, Cinta, E-mail: cinta.porte@cid.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    The cytotoxicity of eight perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), namely, perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was assessed in the human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3. Only the long chain PFCs – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – showed significant cytotoxicity in JEG-3 cells with EC50 values in the range of 107 to 647 μM. The observed cytotoxicity was to some extent related to a higher uptake of the longer chain PFCs by cells (PFDoA > PFOS ≫ PFNA > PFOA > PFHxA). Moreover, this work evidences a high potential of PFOS, PFOA and PFBS to act as aromatase inhibitors in placental cells with IC50s in the range of 57–80 μM, the inhibitory effect of PFBS being particularly important despite the rather low uptake of the compound by cells. Finally, exposure of JEG-3 cells to a mixture of the eight PFCs (0.6 μM each) led to a relative increase (up to 3.4-fold) of several lipid classes, including phosphatidylcholines (PCs), plasmalogen PC and lyso plasmalogen PC, which suggests an interference of PFCs with membrane lipids. Overall, this work highlights the ability of the PFC mixture to alter cellular lipid pattern at concentrations well below those that generate toxicity, and the potential of the short chain PFBS, often considered a safe substitute of PFOS, to significantly inhibit aromatase activity in placental cells. - Highlights: • Eight perfluorinated chemicals of different chain lengths have been selected. • Long chain ones – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – were cytotoxic in placenta cells. • The uptake of long chain perfluorinated chemicals by cells was comparatively higher. • PFOS, PFOA and the short chain PFBS significantly inhibited aromatase activity. • A mixture of perfluorinated chemicals significantly altered placenta cell

  7. Perfluorinated chemicals: Differential toxicity, inhibition of aromatase activity and alteration of cellular lipids in human placental cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrochategui, Eva; Pérez-Albaladejo, Elisabet; Casas, Josefina; Lacorte, Sílvia; Porte, Cinta

    2014-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of eight perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), namely, perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was assessed in the human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3. Only the long chain PFCs – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – showed significant cytotoxicity in JEG-3 cells with EC50 values in the range of 107 to 647 μM. The observed cytotoxicity was to some extent related to a higher uptake of the longer chain PFCs by cells (PFDoA > PFOS ≫ PFNA > PFOA > PFHxA). Moreover, this work evidences a high potential of PFOS, PFOA and PFBS to act as aromatase inhibitors in placental cells with IC50s in the range of 57–80 μM, the inhibitory effect of PFBS being particularly important despite the rather low uptake of the compound by cells. Finally, exposure of JEG-3 cells to a mixture of the eight PFCs (0.6 μM each) led to a relative increase (up to 3.4-fold) of several lipid classes, including phosphatidylcholines (PCs), plasmalogen PC and lyso plasmalogen PC, which suggests an interference of PFCs with membrane lipids. Overall, this work highlights the ability of the PFC mixture to alter cellular lipid pattern at concentrations well below those that generate toxicity, and the potential of the short chain PFBS, often considered a safe substitute of PFOS, to significantly inhibit aromatase activity in placental cells. - Highlights: • Eight perfluorinated chemicals of different chain lengths have been selected. • Long chain ones – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – were cytotoxic in placenta cells. • The uptake of long chain perfluorinated chemicals by cells was comparatively higher. • PFOS, PFOA and the short chain PFBS significantly inhibited aromatase activity. • A mixture of perfluorinated chemicals significantly altered placenta cell

  8. EBImage—an R package for image processing with applications to cellular phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Grégoire; Fuchs, Florian; Sklyar, Oleg; Boutros, Michael; Huber, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Summary: EBImage provides general purpose functionality for reading, writing, processing and analysis of images. Furthermore, in the context of microscopy-based cellular assays, EBImage offers tools to segment cells and extract quantitative cellular descriptors. This allows the automation of such tasks using the R programming language and use of existing tools in the R environment for signal processing, statistical modeling, machine learning and data visualization. Availability: EBImage is free and open source, released under the LGPL license and available from the Bioconductor project (http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/EBImage.html). Contact: gregoire.pau@ebi.ac.uk PMID:20338898

  9. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy induces misfolding of alleged prion-resistant species cellular prion protein without altering its pathobiological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Enric; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Pintado, Belén; Ordóñez, Montserrat; Márquez, Mercedes; Fondevila, Dolors; Torres, Juan María; Pumarola, Martí; Castilla, Joaquín

    2013-05-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prions were responsible for an unforeseen epizootic in cattle which had a vast social, economic, and public health impact. This was primarily because BSE prions were found to be transmissible to humans. Other species were also susceptible to BSE either by natural infection (e.g., felids, caprids) or in experimental settings (e.g., sheep, mice). However, certain species closely related to humans, such as canids and leporids, were apparently resistant to BSE. In vitro prion amplification techniques (saPMCA) were used to successfully misfold the cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) of these allegedly resistant species into a BSE-type prion protein. The biochemical and biological properties of the new prions generated in vitro after seeding rabbit and dog brain homogenates with classical BSE were studied. Pathobiological features of the resultant prion strains were determined after their inoculation into transgenic mice expressing bovine and human PrP(C). Strain characteristics of the in vitro-adapted rabbit and dog BSE agent remained invariable with respect to the original cattle BSE prion, suggesting that the naturally low susceptibility of rabbits and dogs to prion infections should not alter their zoonotic potential if these animals became infected with BSE. This study provides a sound basis for risk assessment regarding prion diseases in purportedly resistant species.

  10. Closed loop control of laser welding processes using cellular neural network cameras - experimental results

    OpenAIRE

    Abt, F.; Blug, A.; Nicolosi, L.; Dausinger, F.; Weber, R.; Tetzlaff, R.; Carl, D.; Höfler, H.

    2009-01-01

    Today, image processing using coaxial camera setups is used to monitor the quality of laser material processes such as laser welding, cutting or ablation. This article shows the potentials of a sensing system for the next step: A closed loop control of a full penetration keyhole welding process. With Cellular Neural Networks (CNN) it is possible to integrate processor elements in the electronic circuitry of CMOS cameras resulting in a Single-Instruction-Multiple-Data (SIMD)-architecture on th...

  11. Cellular Automata as a learning process in Architecture and Urban design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Brath; Foged, Isak Worre

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the application of cellular automata as method for investigating the dynamic parameters and interrelationships that constitute the urban space. With increasing aspects needed for integration during the architectural and urban design process with the relations between these asp......This paper explores the application of cellular automata as method for investigating the dynamic parameters and interrelationships that constitute the urban space. With increasing aspects needed for integration during the architectural and urban design process with the relations between....... An architectural methodological response to this situation is presented through the development of a conceptual computational design system that allows these dynamics to unfold and to be observed for architectural design decision taking. Reflecting on the development and implementation of a cellular automata based...

  12. Altered auditory and multisensory temporal processing in autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie D Kwakye

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are characterized by deficits in social reciprocity and communication, as well as repetitive behaviors and restricted interests. Unusual responses to sensory input and disruptions in the processing of both unisensory and multisensory stimuli have also frequently been reported. However, the specific aspects of sensory processing that are disrupted in ASD have yet to be fully elucidated. Recent published work has shown that children with ASD can integrate low-level audiovisual stimuli, but do so over an extended range of time when compared with typically-developing (TD children. However, the possible contributions of altered unisensory temporal processes to the demonstrated changes in multisensory function are yet unknown. In the current study, unisensory temporal acuity was measured by determining individual thresholds on visual and auditory temporal order judgment (TOJ tasks, and multisensory temporal function was assessed through a cross-modal version of the TOJ task. Whereas no differences in thresholds for the visual TOJ task were seen between children with ASD and TD, thresholds were higher in ASD on the auditory TOJ task, providing preliminary evidence for impairment in auditory temporal processing. On the multisensory TOJ task, children with ASD showed performance improvements over a wider range of temporal intervals than TD children, reinforcing prior work showing an extended temporal window of multisensory integration in ASD. These findings contribute to a better understanding of basic sensory processing differences, which may be critical for understanding more complex social and cognitive deficits in ASD, and ultimately may contribute to more effective diagnostic and interventional strategies.

  13. Using Primary Literature in an Undergraduate Assignment: Demonstrating Connections among Cellular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeong, Foong May

    2015-01-01

    Learning basic cell biology in an essential module can be daunting to second-year undergraduates, given the depth of information that is provided in major molecular and cell biology textbooks. Moreover, lectures on cellular pathways are organised into sections, such that at the end of lectures, students might not see how various processes are…

  14. Infant avoidance training alters cellular activation patterns in prefronto-limbic circuits during adult avoidance learning: I. Cellular imaging of neurons expressing the synaptic plasticity early growth response protein 1 (Egr1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröger, Nicole; Mannewitz, Anja; Bock, Jörg; de Schultz, Tony Fernando; Guttmann, Katja; Poeggel, Gerd; Braun, Katharina

    2017-11-01

    Both positive feedback learning and negative feedback learning are essential for adapting and optimizing behavioral performance. There is increasing evidence in humans and animals that the ability of negative feedback learning emerges postnatally. Our work in rats, using a two-way active avoidance task (TWA) as an experimental paradigm for negative feedback learning, revealed that medial and lateral prefrontal regions of infant rats undergo dramatic synaptic reorganization during avoidance training, resulting in improved avoidance learning in adulthood. The aim of this study was to identify changes of cellular activation patterns during the course of training and in relation to infant pretraining. We applied a quantitative cellular imaging technique using the immunocytochemical detection of the activity marker early growth response protein 1 (Egr1) as a candidate contributing to learning-induced synaptic plasticity. We found region-specific cellular activity patterns, which indicate that during the acquisition phase, Egr1 expression is specifically elevated in cellular ensembles of the orbitofrontal, dorsal anterior cingulate and hippocampal CA1 region. During memory retrieval Egr1 expression is elevated in cellular ensembles of the dentate gyrus. Moreover, we, for the first time, show here that TWA training during infancy alters adult learning- and memory-related patterns of Egr1 expression in these brain regions. It is tempting to speculate that during infant learning, specific Egr1-expressing cellular ensembles are "tagged" representing long-term memory formation, and that these cell ensembles may be reactivated during adult learning.

  15. Utility of hesperidinase for food function research: enzymatic digestion of botanical extracts alters cellular antioxidant capacities and anti-inflammatory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lu; Huang, Haiqiu; Yu, Liangli Lucy; Wang, Thomas T Y

    2014-08-27

    Food-derived phytochemicals, many known for their health beneficial effects, often exist in conjugated forms containing sugar moieties such as glucose or rhamnose in foods. The uptake of these compounds requires colonic bacterial cleavage of sugar moieties. However, most studies involved in screening extracts for biological activities do not take this process into account. This study seeks to determine the utility of commercially available hesperidinase to mimic colonic digestion and to test the effects of this treatment on the biological properties of extracts. Using hesperidinase resulted in efficient hydrolysis of Engelhardia roxburghiana Wall. extract containing rhamnose conjugates. Enzymatic digestion enhanced the extract's cellular antioxidant ability by 2-fold in HepG2/C3A and the anti-inflammatory effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 expression in mouse macrophage J774A.1 and human monocyte THP-1 cells. Enzymatic digestion also efficiently processed extracts with mixed rhamnose and glucose conjugates and altered their biological activities. Results of the present study supported the importance of considering enzymatic digestion during the biological activity studies of botanicals.

  16. Role of Passive Diffusion, Transporters, and Membrane Trafficking-Mediated Processes in Cellular Drug Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocucci, E; Kim, J Y; Bai, Y; Pabla, N

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular drug accumulation is thought to be dictated by two major processes, passive diffusion through the lipid membrane or membrane transporters. The relative role played by these distinct processes remains actively debated. Moreover, the role of membrane-trafficking in drug transport remains underappreciated and unexplored. Here we discuss the distinct processes involved in cellular drug distribution and propose that better experimental models are required to elucidate the differential contributions of various processes in intracellular drug accumulation. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  17. Homeostasis-altering molecular processes as mechanisms of inflammasome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liston, Adrian; Masters, Seth L

    2017-03-01

    The innate immune system uses a distinct set of germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to initiate downstream inflammatory cascades. This recognition system is in stark contrast to the adaptive immune system, which relies on highly variable, randomly generated antigen receptors. A key limitation of the innate immune system's reliance on fixed PRRs is its inflexibility in responding to rapidly evolving pathogens. Recent advances in our understanding of inflammasome activation suggest that the innate immune system also has sophisticated mechanisms for responding to pathogens for which there is no fixed PRR. This includes the recognition of debris from dying cells, known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which can directly activate PRRs in a similar manner to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Distinct from this, emerging data for the inflammasome components NLRP3 (NOD-, LRR- and pyrin domain-containing 3) and pyrin suggest that they do not directly detect molecular patterns, but instead act as signal integrators that are capable of detecting perturbations in cytoplasmic homeostasis, for example, as initiated by infection. Monitoring these perturbations, which we term 'homeostasis-altering molecular processes' (HAMPs), provides potent flexibility in the capacity of the innate immune system to detect evolutionarily novel infections; however, HAMP sensing may also underlie the sterile inflammation that drives chronic inflammatory diseases.

  18. Stochastic processes, multiscale modeling, and numerical methods for computational cellular biology

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the modeling and mathematical analysis of stochastic dynamical systems along with their simulations. The collected chapters will review fundamental and current topics and approaches to dynamical systems in cellular biology. This text aims to develop improved mathematical and computational methods with which to study biological processes. At the scale of a single cell, stochasticity becomes important due to low copy numbers of biological molecules, such as mRNA and proteins that take part in biochemical reactions driving cellular processes. When trying to describe such biological processes, the traditional deterministic models are often inadequate, precisely because of these low copy numbers. This book presents stochastic models, which are necessary to account for small particle numbers and extrinsic noise sources. The complexity of these models depend upon whether the biochemical reactions are diffusion-limited or reaction-limited. In the former case, one needs to adopt the framework of s...

  19. Wnt Signaling Alteration in the Spinal Cord of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Transgenic Mice: Special Focus on Frizzled-5 Cellular Expression Pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos González-Fernández

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive paralysis due to degeneration of motor neurons by unknown causes. Recent evidence shows that Wnt signaling is involved in neurodegenerative processes, including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. However, to date, little is known regarding the expression of Wnt signaling components in this fatal condition. In the present study we used transgenic SOD1G93A mice to evaluate the expression of several Wnt signaling components, with special focus on Frizzled-5 cellular expression alteration along disease progression.Based on previous studies demonstrating the expression of Wnts and their transcriptional regulation during Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis development, we have analyzed the mRNA expression of several Wnt signaling components in the spinal cord of SOD1G93A transgenic mice at different stages of the disease by using real time quantitative PCR analysis. Strikingly, one of the molecules that seemed not to be altered at mRNA level, Frizzled-5, showed a clear up-regulation at late stages in neurons, as evidenced by immunofluorescence assays. Moreover, increased Frizzled-5 appears to correlate with a decrease in NeuN signal in these cells, suggesting a correlation between neuronal affectation and the increased expression of this receptor.Our data suggest the involvement of Wnt signaling pathways in the pathophysiology of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and, more specifically, the implication of Frizzled-5 receptor in the response of neuronal cells against neurodegeneration. Nevertheless, further experimental studies are needed to shed light on the specific role of Frizzled-5 and the emerging but increasing Wnt family of proteins research field as a potential target for this neuropathology.

  20. The cellular distribution of extracellular superoxide dismutase in macrophages is altered by cellular activation but unaffected by the natural occurring R213G substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfredsen, Randi Heidemann; Goldstrohm, David; Hartney, John

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is responsible for the dismutation of the superoxide radical produced in the extracellular space and known to be expressed by inflammatory cells, including macrophages and neutrophils. Here we show that EC-SOD is produced by resting macrophages...... and associated with the cell surface via the extracellular matrix (ECM)-binding region. Upon cellular activation induced by lipopolysaccharide, EC-SOD is relocated and detected both in the cell culture medium and in lipid raft structures. Although the secreted material presented a significantly reduced ligand......-binding capacity, this could not be correlated to proteolytic removal of the ECM-binding region, because the integrity of the material recovered from the medium was comparable to that of the cell surface-associated protein. The naturally occurring R213G amino acid substitution located in the ECM-binding region...

  1. The effect of oxidant and the non-oxidant alteration of cellular thiol concentration on the formation of protein mixed-disulfides in HEK 293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasen Lee Gilge

    Full Text Available Cellular molecules possess various mechanisms in responding to oxidant stress. In terms of protein responses, protein S-glutathionylation is a unique post-translational modification of protein reactive cysteines forming disulfides with glutathione molecules. This modification has been proposed to play roles in antioxidant, regulatory and signaling in cells under oxidant stress. Recently, the increased level of protein S-glutathionylation has been linked with the development of diseases. In this report, specific S-glutathionylated proteins were demonstrated in human embryonic kidney 293 cells treated with two different oxidative reagents: diamide and hydrogen peroxide. Diamide is a chemical oxidizing agent whereas hydrogen peroxide is a physiological oxidant. Under the experimental conditions, these two oxidants decreased glutathione concentration without toxicity. S-glutathionylated proteins were detected by immunoblotting and glutathione concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. We further show the effect of alteration of the cellular thiol pool on the amount of protein S-glutathionylation in oxidant-treated cells. Cellular thiol concentrations were altered either by a specific way using buthionine sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis or by a non-specific way, incubating cells in cystine-methionine deficient media. Cells only treated with either buthionine sulfoximine or cystine-methionine deficient media did not induce protein S-glutathionylation, even though both conditions decreased 65% of cellular glutathione. Moreover, the amount of protein S-glutathionylation under both conditions in the presence of oxidants was not altered when compared to the amount observed in regular media with oxidants present. Protein S-glutathionylation is a dynamic reaction which depends on the rate of adding and removing glutathione. Phenylarsine oxide, which specifically forms a covalent adduct with

  2. Processed fruit juice ready to drink: screening acute toxicity at the cellular level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Leal da Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the acute toxicity at the cellular level of processed juice ready for consumption Orange and Grape flavors, produced by five companies with significant influence on the food market of South American countries, especially in Brazil. This evaluation was performed in root meristem cells of Allium cepa L., at the exposure times of 24 and 48 hours, directly with marketed liquid preparations. Based on the results, it was found that fruit juices, of all companies considered, promoted significant antiproliferative effect to root meristems at the exposure time of 24 hours and resulted in at both exposure times, statistically significant number of mitotic spindle changes and chromosomal breaks. Therefore, under the study conditions, all juice samples analyzed were cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic to root meristem cells. These results indicate that such beverages have relevant potential to cause cellular disorders and, thus, need to be evaluated more fully in more complex test systems, as those in rodents, and then establish specific toxicity at the cellular level of these juices and ensure the well-being of those who consume them.

  3. A single amino acid substitution in the transmembrane envelope glycoprotein of feline immunodeficiency virus alters cellular tropism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Vahlenkamp, T.W.; Verschoor, E.J.; Schuurman, N.M.P.; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Egberink, H.F.; Ronde, A. de

    1997-01-01

    The cellular tropism of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is affected by changes in variable region 3 (V3) of the surface (SU) envelope glycoprotein (Verschoor, E. J., et al., J. Virol. 69:4752- 4757, 1995). By using high-dose DNA transfection, an FIV molecular clone with a non-CRFK-tropic V3

  4. Biophysical and biochemical models of mechanisms of cellular development via the cellular cycle in normal tissue, cancerous tissue, and inflammatory processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponizovskiy, M R

    2013-01-01

    The significant separate biochemical discoveries of pro- and anti-apoptotic -autophagy, and -proliferative processes in normal and pathology cells were learned in detail from the point of view of biophysics, physical chemistry, and thermodynamics, which made possible the proposal that a common mechanism relates to all of these processes: intracellular balances in catabolic and anabolic processes interconnect with extracellular balances, promoting and maintaining the stability of internal medium and internal energy of cells as well as normal cell development. Nevertheless, violations to these interconnections of intracellular and extracellular balances promote pathologic processes. The study of cellular cycle mechanisms in normal cells explained the mechanisms of the maintenance of stability of the internal medium and internal energy of cells as a component of the overall stability of an organism. It explained the development of the cellular cycle as the oscillating changes in the flow of energy and substances. In addition, violations to mechanisms of the maintenance of stability of the cellular internal medium and internal energy in cancer tissue were elucidated and compared with violations of these mechanisms in inflammatory processes. All of this eliminated a lot of doubts and queries that were expressed by the authors of some experiments.

  5. On alterations in the refractive index and scattering properties of biological tissue caused by histological processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Htet; DeAngelo, Bianca; Soldano, John; Kostyk, Piotr; Rodriguez, Braulio; Xu, M.

    2013-02-01

    Clinical tissue processing such as formalin fixing, paraffin-embedding and histological staining alters significantly the optical properties of the tissue. We document the alterations in the optical properties of prostate cancer tissue specimens in the 500nm to 700nm spectral range caused by histological processing with quantitative differential interference contrast (qDIC) microscopy. A simple model to explain these alterations is presented at the end.

  6. The anti‑dengue virus properties of statins may be associated with alterations in the cellular antiviral profile expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan-Marrugo, Owen Lloyd; Arellanos-Soto, Daniel; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo; Ramos-Jimenez, Javier; Vidaltamayo, Roman; Rivas-Estilla, Ana María

    2016-09-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) susceptibility to cholesterol depleting treatments has been previously reported. There are numerous questions regarding how DENV seizes cellular machinery and cholesterol to improve viral production and the effect of cholesterol sequestering agents on the cellular antiviral response. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the mechanisms involved in the negative regulation of DENV replication induced by agents that diminish intracellular cholesterol levels. Cholesterol synthesis was pharmacologically (fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin treatment) and genetically (HMGCR‑RNAi) inhibited, in uninfected and DENV2‑infected hepatoma Huh‑7 cells. The cholesterol levels, DENV titer and cellular antiviral expression profile were evaluated. A reduction in the DENV titer, measured as plaque forming units, was observed in DENV‑infected cells following 48 h treatment with 10 µM fluvastatin, 10 µM atorvastatin, 20 µM lovastatin and 20 µM simvastatin, which achieved 70, 70, 65 and 55% DENV2 inhibition, respectively, compared with the untreated cells. In addition, the cytopathic effect was reduced in the statin‑treated DENV‑infected cells. Statins simultaneously reduced cholesterol levels at 48 h, with the exception of DENV2 infected cells. Genetic inhibition of cholesterol synthesis was performed using RNA interference for 3‑hydroxy‑3‑methylglutaryl‑CoA reductase (HMGCR‑siRNA), which indicated a slight reduction in DENV2 titer at 48 h post‑infection, however, with no significant reduction in cholesterol levels. In addition, DENV2 infection was observed to augment the intracellular cholesterol levels in all experimental conditions. Comparison between the cellular antiviral response triggered by DENV2 infection, statin treatment and HMGCR‑siRNA in infected, uninfected, treated and untreated Huh7 cells, showed different expression profiles for the antiviral genes evaluated. All

  7. Proteomic characterization of cellular and molecular processes that enable the Nanoarchaeum equitans--Ignicoccus hospitalis relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Giannone

    Full Text Available Nanoarchaeum equitans, the only cultured representative of the Nanoarchaeota, is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. The molecular mechanisms that enable this relationship are unknown. Using whole-cell proteomics, differences in the relative abundance of >75% of predicted protein-coding genes from both Archaea were measured to identify the specific response of I. hospitalis to the presence of N. equitans on its surface. A purified N. equitans sample was also analyzed for evidence of interspecies protein transfer. The depth of cellular proteome coverage achieved here is amongst the highest reported for any organism. Based on changes in the proteome under the specific conditions of this study, I. hospitalis reacts to N. equitans by curtailing genetic information processing (replication, transcription in lieu of intensifying its energetic, protein processing and cellular membrane functions. We found no evidence of significant Ignicoccus biosynthetic enzymes being transported to N. equitans. These results suggest that, under laboratory conditions, N. equitans diverts some of its host's metabolism and cell cycle control to compensate for its own metabolic shortcomings, thus appearing to be entirely dependent on small, transferable metabolites and energetic precursors from I. hospitalis.

  8. Network-Guided Key Gene Discovery for a Given Cellular Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Feng Q; Ollert, Markus

    2018-01-01

    and the following-up network analysis, opens up new avenues to predict key genes driving a given biological process or cellular function. Here we review and compare the current approaches in predicting key genes, which have no chances to stand out by classic differential expression analysis, from gene......Identification of key genes for a given physiological or pathological process is an essential but still very challenging task for the entire biomedical research community. Statistics-based approaches, such as genome-wide association study (GWAS)- or quantitative trait locus (QTL)-related analysis...... have already made enormous contributions to identifying key genes associated with a given disease or phenotype, the success of which is however very much dependent on a huge number of samples. Recent advances in network biology, especially network inference directly from genome-scale data...

  9. Cellular processing of the amyloidogenic cystatin C variant of hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, Icelandic type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Merz, G S; Schwenk, V

    1999-01-01

    of an amyloidogenic mutation on the intracellular processing of its protein product. The protein, a mutant of the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C, is the amyloid precursor protein in Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage with Amyloidosis--Icelandic type (HCHWA-I). The amyloid fibers are composed of mutant cystatin C......An important gap in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the amyloidoses is the identification of the cellular events that lead from synthesis of an amyloid precursor protein to its conversion to the amyloid fiber subunit. We address this question by characterizing the effects...... (L68Q) that lacks the first 10 amino acids. We have previously shown that processing of wild-type cystatin C entails formation of a transient intracellular dimer that dissociates prior to secretion, such that extracellular cystatin C is monomeric. We report here that the cystatin C mutation engenders...

  10. Regularity and mechanism of wheat straw properties change in ball milling process at cellular scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chongfeng; Xiao, Weihua; Ji, Guanya; Zhang, Yang; Cao, Yaoyao; Han, Lujia

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the change of structure and physicochemical properties of wheat straw in ball milling process at cellular scale, a series of wheat straws samples with different milling time were produced using an ultrafine vibration ball mill. A multitechnique approach was used to analyze the variation of wheat straw properties. The results showed that the characteristics of wheat straw powder displayed regular changes as a function of the milling time, i.e., the powder underwent the inversion of breakage to agglomerative regime during wheat straw ball milling process. The crystallinity index, bulk density and water retention capacity of wheat straw were exponential relation with ball milling time. Moreover, ball milling continually converted macromolecules of wheat straw cell wall into water-soluble substances resulting in the water extractives proportional to milling time. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. A Memristive Multilayer Cellular Neural Network With Applications to Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaofang; Feng, Gang; Duan, Shukai; Liu, Lu

    2017-08-01

    The memristor has been extensively studied in electrical engineering and biological sciences as a means to compactly implement the synaptic function in neural networks. The cellular neural network (CNN) is one of the most implementable artificial neural network models and capable of massively parallel analog processing. In this paper, a novel memristive multilayer CNN (Mm-CNN) model is presented along with its performance analysis and applications. In this new CNN design, the memristor crossbar circuit acts as the synapse, which realizes one signed synaptic weight with a pair of memristors and performs the synaptic weighting compactly and linearly. Moreover, the complex weighted summation is executed in an efficient way with a proper design of Mm-CNN cell circuits. The proposed Mm-CNN has several merits, such as compactness, nonvolatility, versatility, and programmability of synaptic weights. Its performance in several image processing applications is illustrated through simulations.

  12. Nitric Oxide and ERK mediates regulation of cellular processes by Ecdysterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Kumar, Geetha B.; Banerji, Asoke; Nair, Bipin G.

    2016-01-01

    The complex process of wound healing is a major problem associated with diabetes, venous or arterial disease, old age and infection. A wide range of pharmacological effects including anabolic, anti-diabetic and hepato-protective activities have been attributed to Ecdysterone. In earlier studies, Ecdysterone has been shown to modulate eNOS and iNOS expression in diabetic animals and activate osteogenic differentiation through the Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) pathway in periodontal ligament stem cells. However, in the wound healing process, Ecdysterone has only been shown to enhance granulation tissue formation in rabbits. There have been no studies to date, which elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the complex cellular process involved in wound healing. The present study, demonstrates a novel interaction between the phytosteroid Ecdysterone and Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS), in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-dependent manner, thereby promoting cell proliferation, cell spreading and cell migration. These observations were further supported by the 4-amino-5-methylamino- 2′ ,7′ -difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF FM) fluorescence assay which indicated that Ecdysterone activates NOS resulting in increased Nitric Oxide (NO) production. Additionally, studies with inhibitors of both the EGFR and ERK, demonstrated that Ecdysterone activates NOS through modulation of EGFR and ERK. These results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that Ecdysterone enhances Nitric Oxide production and modulates complex cellular processes by activating ERK1/2 through the EGF pathway. - Highlights: • Ecdysterone significantly enhances cell migration in a dose dependent manner. • Ecdysterone augments cell spreading during the initial phase of cell migration through actin cytoskeletal rearrangement. • Ecdysterone enhances cell proliferation in a nitric oxide dependent manner. • Ecdysterone enhances nitric oxide production via activation of EGFR

  13. Nitric Oxide and ERK mediates regulation of cellular processes by Ecdysterone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Kumar, Geetha B.; Banerji, Asoke; Nair, Bipin G., E-mail: bipin@amrita.edu

    2016-08-15

    The complex process of wound healing is a major problem associated with diabetes, venous or arterial disease, old age and infection. A wide range of pharmacological effects including anabolic, anti-diabetic and hepato-protective activities have been attributed to Ecdysterone. In earlier studies, Ecdysterone has been shown to modulate eNOS and iNOS expression in diabetic animals and activate osteogenic differentiation through the Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) pathway in periodontal ligament stem cells. However, in the wound healing process, Ecdysterone has only been shown to enhance granulation tissue formation in rabbits. There have been no studies to date, which elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the complex cellular process involved in wound healing. The present study, demonstrates a novel interaction between the phytosteroid Ecdysterone and Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS), in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-dependent manner, thereby promoting cell proliferation, cell spreading and cell migration. These observations were further supported by the 4-amino-5-methylamino- 2′ ,7′ -difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF FM) fluorescence assay which indicated that Ecdysterone activates NOS resulting in increased Nitric Oxide (NO) production. Additionally, studies with inhibitors of both the EGFR and ERK, demonstrated that Ecdysterone activates NOS through modulation of EGFR and ERK. These results clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that Ecdysterone enhances Nitric Oxide production and modulates complex cellular processes by activating ERK1/2 through the EGF pathway. - Highlights: • Ecdysterone significantly enhances cell migration in a dose dependent manner. • Ecdysterone augments cell spreading during the initial phase of cell migration through actin cytoskeletal rearrangement. • Ecdysterone enhances cell proliferation in a nitric oxide dependent manner. • Ecdysterone enhances nitric oxide production via activation of EGFR

  14. Effects of multiple enzyme–substrate interactions in basic units of cellular signal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaton, D D; Krishnan, J

    2012-01-01

    Covalent modification cycles are a ubiquitous feature of cellular signalling networks. In these systems, the interaction of an active enzyme with the unmodified form of its substrate is essential for signalling to occur. However, this interaction is not necessarily the only enzyme–substrate interaction possible. In this paper, we analyse the behaviour of a basic model of signalling in which additional, non-essential enzyme–substrate interactions are possible. These interactions include those between the inactive form of an enzyme and its substrate, and between the active form of an enzyme and its product. We find that these additional interactions can result in increased sensitivity and biphasic responses, respectively. The dynamics of the responses are also significantly altered by the presence of additional interactions. Finally, we evaluate the consequences of these interactions in two variations of our basic model, involving double modification of substrate and scaffold-mediated signalling, respectively. We conclude that the molecular details of protein–protein interactions are important in determining the signalling properties of enzymatic signalling pathways. (paper)

  15. MARINE AEROSOLS ALTER SOIL PROCESSES IN COASTAL FORESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most models of watershed biogeochemistry include the movement of materials from land to rivers and eventually the ocean. Few conceptual views, however, acknowledge the influence of materials derived from the ocean on terrestrial ecosystems processes. Based on spatial patterns o...

  16. Altered Auditory and Multisensory Temporal Processing in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kwakye, Leslie D.; Foss-Feig, Jennifer H.; Cascio, Carissa J.; Stone, Wendy L.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by deficits in social reciprocity and communication, as well as by repetitive behaviors and restricted interests. Unusual responses to sensory input and disruptions in the processing of both unisensory and multisensory stimuli also have been reported frequently. However, the specific aspects of sensory processing that are disrupted in ASD have yet to be fully elucidated. Recent published work has shown that children with ASD can integrate low-...

  17. Magnetic cellular nonlinear network with spin wave bus for image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khitun, Alexander; Bao, Mingqiang; Wang, Kang L.

    2010-03-01

    We describe and analyze a cellular nonlinear network based on magnetic nanostructures for image processing. The network consists of magneto-electric cells integrated onto a common ferromagnetic film-spin wave bus. The magneto-electric cell is an artificial two-phase multiferroic structure comprising piezoelectric and ferromagnetic materials. A bit of information is assigned to the cell's magnetic polarization, which can be controlled by the applied voltage. The information exchange among the cells is via the spin waves propagating in the spin wave bus. Each cell changes its state as a combined effect: magneto-electric coupling and the interaction with the spin waves. The distinct feature of a network with a spin wave bus is the ability to control the inter-cell communication by an external global parameter — magnetic field. The latter makes it possible to realize different image processing functions on the same template without rewiring or reconfiguration. We present the results of numerical simulations illustrating image filtering, erosion, dilation, horizontal and vertical line detection, inversion and edge detection accomplished on one template by the proper choice of the strength and direction of the external magnetic field. We also present numerical assets on the major network parameters such as cell density, power dissipation and functional throughput, and compare them with the parameters projected for other nano-architectures such as CMOL-CrossNet, Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata, and Quantum Dot-Image Processor. Potentially, the utilization of spin wave phenomena at the nanometer scale may provide a route to low-power consumption and functional logic circuits for special task data processing.

  18. Heavy metal tolerance genes alter cellular thermodynamics in Pseudomonas putida and river Pseudomonas spp. and influence amebal predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTee, Michael R; Gibbons, Sean M; Feris, Kevin; Gordon, Nathan S; Gannon, James E; Ramsey, Philip W

    2013-10-01

    Predation rates were measured for two Acanthamoeba castellanii strains feeding on metal-tolerant and metal-sensitive strains of Pseudomonas putida and compared with cellular thermodynamic data. Predation rates by A. castellanii strain ATCC 30010 correlated with cell volume of the prey. To explore whether this observation could be environmentally relevant, pseudomonad species were isolated from a pristine and a metal-contaminated river and were paired based on phylogenetic and physiological relatedness. Then, cellular thermodynamics and predation rates were measured on the most similar pseudomonad pair. Under cadmium stress, the strain from contaminated river sediments, Pseudomonas sp. CF150, exited metabolic dormancy faster than its pair from pristine sediments, Pseudomonas sp. N9, but consumed available resources less efficiently (more energy was lost as heat). Predation rates by both strains of ameba were greater on Pseudomonas sp. CF150 than on Pseudomonas sp. N9 at the highest cadmium concentration. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluorescence-based codetection with protein markers reveals distinct cellular compartments for altered MicroRNA expression in solid tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sempere, Lorenzo F; Preis, Meir; Yezefski, Todd

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput profiling experiments have linked altered expression of microRNAs (miRNA) to different types of cancer. Tumor tissues are a heterogeneous mixture of not only cancer cells, but also supportive and reactive tumor microenvironment elements. To clarify the clinical significance...... of altered miRNA expression in solid tumors, we developed a sensitive fluorescence-based in situ hybridization (ISH) method to visualize miRNA accumulation within individual cells in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens. This ISH method was implemented to be compatible with routine clinical...... immunohistochemical (IHC) assays to enable the detection of miRNAs and protein markers in the same tissue section for colocalization and functional studies....

  20. Cellular processes involved in human epidermal cells exposed to extremely low frequency electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, J-F; Hinsenkamp, M

    2015-05-01

    We observed on different tissues and organisms a biological response after exposure to pulsed low frequency and low amplitude electric or electromagnetic fields but the precise mechanism of cell response remains unknown. The aim of this publication is to understand, using bioinformatics, the biological relevance of processes involved in the modification of gene expression. The list of genes analyzed was obtained after microarray protocol realized on cultures of human epidermal explants growing on deepidermized human skin exposed to a pulsed low frequency electric field. The directed acyclic graph on a WebGestalt Gene Ontology module shows six categories under the biological process root: "biological regulation", "cellular process", "cell proliferation", "death", "metabolic process" and "response to stimulus". Enriched derived categories are coherent with the type of in vitro culture, the stimulation protocol or with the previous results showing a decrease of cell proliferation and an increase of differentiation. The Kegg module on WebGestalt has highlighted "cell cycle" and "p53 signaling pathway" as significantly involved. The Kegg website brings out interactions between FoxO, MAPK, JNK, p53, p38, PI3K/Akt, Wnt, mTor or NF-KappaB. Some genes expressed by the stimulation are known to have an exclusive function on these pathways. Analyses performed with Pathway Studio linked cell proliferation, cell differentiation, apoptosis, cell cycle, mitosis, cell death etc. with our microarrays results. Medline citation generated by the software and the fold change variation confirms a diminution of the proliferation, activation of the differentiation and a less well-defined role of apoptosis or wound healing. Wnt and DKK functional classes, DKK1, MACF1, ATF3, MME, TXNRD1, and BMP-2 genes proposed in previous publications after a manual analysis are also highlighted with other genes after Pathway Studio automatic procedure. Finally, an analysis conducted on a list of genes

  1. Real time control of curved laser welding processes by cellular neural networks (CNN): first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolosi, L.; Tetzlaff, R.

    2010-10-01

    In the last decades the laser beam welding (LBW) has outclassed older welding techniques in the industrial scenario. Despite the improvement in welding technology, sophisticated methods of fault detection are not commonly used in commercially available equipments yet. A recent analysis of process images have revealed the possibility to build up a real time closed loop control system. By the use of image based quality features, a feedback signal can be provided to maintain the process in the desired state. The development of the presented visual control system has been focused on the adjustment of the laser power according to the detection of the so called full penetration hole. Due to the high dynamics of the laser welding, a fast real time image processing with controlling rates in the multi kilo Hertz range is necessary to have a robust feedback control. In this paper an algorithm for the real time control of welding processes is described. It has been implemented on the Eye-RIS v1.2, a visual system which mounts a cellular structure. By applying this algorithm in real time applications, controlling rates of about 7 kHz can be reached. In the following some real time control results are also described.

  2. Grasp posture alters visual processing biases near the hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    Observers experience biases in visual processing for objects within easy reach of their hands that may assist them in evaluating items that are candidates for action. I investigated the hypothesis that hand postures affording different types of actions differentially bias vision. Across three experiments, participants performed global motion detection and global form perception tasks while their hands were positioned a) near the display in a posture affording a power grasp, b) near the display in a posture affording a precision grasp, or c) in their laps. Although the power grasp posture facilitated performance on the motion task, the precision grasp posture instead facilitated performance on the form task. These results suggest that the visual system weights processing based on an observer’s current affordances for specific actions: fast and forceful power grasps enhance temporal sensitivity, while detail-oriented precision grasps enhance spatial sensitivity. PMID:25862545

  3. Dopaminergic medication alters auditory distractor processing in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Dejan; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Dreo, Jurij; Čuš, Anja; Pirtošek, Zvezdan; Repovš, Grega

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients show signs of cognitive impairment, such as executive dysfunction, working memory problems and attentional disturbances, even in the early stages of the disease. Though motor symptoms of the disease are often successfully addressed by dopaminergic medication, it still remains unclear, how dopaminergic therapy affects cognitive function. The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of dopaminergic medication on visual and auditory attentional processing. 14 PD patients and 13 matched healthy controls performed a three-stimulus auditory and visual oddball task while their EEG was recorded. The patients performed the task twice, once on- and once off-medication. While the results showed no significant differences between PD patients and controls, they did reveal a significant increase in P3 amplitude on- vs. off-medication specific to processing of auditory distractors and no other stimuli. These results indicate significant effect of dopaminergic therapy on processing of distracting auditory stimuli. With a lack of between group differences the effect could reflect either 1) improved recruitment of attentional resources to auditory distractors; 2) reduced ability for cognitive inhibition of auditory distractors; 3) increased response to distractor stimuli resulting in impaired cognitive performance; or 4) hindered ability to discriminate between auditory distractors and targets. Further studies are needed to differentiate between these possibilities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Towards the prediction of essential genes by integration of network topology, cellular localization and biological process information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemke Ney

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of essential genes is important for the understanding of the minimal requirements for cellular life and for practical purposes, such as drug design. However, the experimental techniques for essential genes discovery are labor-intensive and time-consuming. Considering these experimental constraints, a computational approach capable of accurately predicting essential genes would be of great value. We therefore present here a machine learning-based computational approach relying on network topological features, cellular localization and biological process information for prediction of essential genes. Results We constructed a decision tree-based meta-classifier and trained it on datasets with individual and grouped attributes-network topological features, cellular compartments and biological processes-to generate various predictors of essential genes. We showed that the predictors with better performances are those generated by datasets with integrated attributes. Using the predictor with all attributes, i.e., network topological features, cellular compartments and biological processes, we obtained the best predictor of essential genes that was then used to classify yeast genes with unknown essentiality status. Finally, we generated decision trees by training the J48 algorithm on datasets with all network topological features, cellular localization and biological process information to discover cellular rules for essentiality. We found that the number of protein physical interactions, the nuclear localization of proteins and the number of regulating transcription factors are the most important factors determining gene essentiality. Conclusion We were able to demonstrate that network topological features, cellular localization and biological process information are reliable predictors of essential genes. Moreover, by constructing decision trees based on these data, we could discover cellular rules governing

  5. Determining the Market Leader of Cellular Phone Using Analytical Hierarchy Process (Ahp) at Smartphone Android in Manado

    OpenAIRE

    Kondoy, Fandy F.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular-phone market in Manado is fairly competitive. Two of the most well-known are Samsung and Sony. The cell phone has influenced society and culture in ways that make life easier and more controllable. The objectives of this research are to identify the market leader of cellular phone in Manado using Analytical Hierarchy Process, and to analyze the key strengths of each cellular phone brand. To achieve these objectives, expert opinions are analyzed as data. These data are analyzed by...

  6. Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 p30II alters cellular gene expression to selectively enhance signaling pathways that activate T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feuer Gerold

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 contains both regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13II and p30II, which are incompletely defined in the virus life cycle or HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Proviral clones of the virus with pX ORF-II mutations diminish the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads in vivo. Exogenous expression of p30II differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein/p300 and represses tax/rex RNA nuclear export. Results Herein, we further characterized the role of p30II in regulation of cellular gene expression, using stable p30II expression system employing lentiviral vectors to test cellular gene expression with Affymetrix U133A arrays, representing ~33,000 human genes. Reporter assays in Jurkat T cells and RT-PCR in Jurkat and primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes were used to confirm selected gene expression patterns. Our data reveals alterations of interrelated pathways of cell proliferation, T-cell signaling, apoptosis and cell cycle in p30II expressing Jurkat T cells. In all categories, p30II appeared to be an overall repressor of cellular gene expression, while selectively increasing the expression of certain key regulatory genes. Conclusions We are the first to demonstrate that p30II, while repressing the expression of many genes, selectively activates key gene pathways involved in T-cell signaling/activation. Collectively, our data suggests that this complex retrovirus, associated with lymphoproliferative diseases, relies upon accessory gene products to modify cellular environment to promote clonal expansion of the virus genome and thus maintain proviral loads in vivo.

  7. Antioxidant-Rich Fraction of Urtica dioica Mediated Rescue of Striatal Mito-Oxidative Damage in MPTP-Induced Behavioral, Cellular, and Neurochemical Alterations in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Rohit; Joshi, Bhuwan Chandra; Kalia, Ajudhiya Nath; Prakash, Atish

    2017-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) having a complex and multi-factorial neuropathology includes mainly the degeneration of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway, which is a cumulative effect of depleted endogenous antioxidant enzymes, increased oxidative DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, and neuroinflammation. The present study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of a potent antioxidant from Urtica dioica in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of parkinsonism. MPTP was administered intranigrally for the induction of PD in male Wistar rats. Behavioral alterations were assessed in between the study period. Animals were sacrificed immediately after behavioral session, and different biochemical, cellular, and neurochemical parameters were measured. Intranigrally repeated administration of MPTP showed significant impairment of motor co-ordination and marked increase of mito-oxidative damage and neuroinflammation in rats. Intranigral MPTP significantly decreases the dopamine and its metabolites with impairment of dopaminergic cell density in rat brain. However, post-treatment with the potent antioxidant fraction of Urtica dioica Linn. (UD) (20, 40, 80 mg/kg) improved the motor function, mito-oxidative defense alteration significantly and dose dependently in MPTP-treated rats. In addition, the potent antioxidant fraction of UD attenuated the pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-β) and restored the level of dopamine and its metabolites in MPTP-induced PD in rats. Moreover, minocycline (30 mg/kg) with lower dose of UD (20 mg/kg) had significantly potentiated the protective effect of minocycline as compared to its effect with other individual drug-treated groups. In conclusion, Urtica dioica protected the dopaminergic neurons probably by reducing mito-oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and cellular alteration along with enhanced neurotrophic potential. The above results revealed that the antioxidant rich

  8. Alterations in macrophage cellular proteome induced by calcium oxalate crystals: the association of HSP90 and F-actin is important for phagosome formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhto, Nilubon; Sintiprungrat, Kitisak; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2013-08-02

    The presence of macrophages in renal interstitium is the key feature of progressive renal inflammation in kidney stone disease. However, response of macrophages to calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals, the major crystalline composition of kidney stone, remained unclear. This study aimed to investigate alterations in the cellular proteome of macrophages induced by COM crystals using a proteomics approach. U937-derived macrophages (by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate activation) were incubated without or with 100 μg/mL COM crystals for 24 h. Their cellular proteins were resolved by 2-DE (n = 10 gels; 5 were derived from 5 independent cultures in each group) and visualized with Deep Purple fluorescent dye. Spot matching, quantitative intensity analysis, and statistics revealed 18 differentially expressed protein spots, which were successfully identified by Q-TOF MS and MS/MS analyses. The altered levels of α-tubulin, β-actin and ezrin were validated by Western blot analysis. Protein interaction network analysis using STRING software showed that 90 kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) was associated with β-actin and α-tubulin (all these three proteins were increased in the COM-treated macrophages). Multiple immunofluorescence stainings confirmed the associations of HSP90 with filamentous form of actin (F-actin) and α-tubulin. However, only the association between HSP90 and F-actin was found on the phagosome membrane surrounding COM crystal, indicating that the association of HSP90 with F-actin, but not with α-tubulin, is important for phagosome formation. Silencing of HSP90 (siHSP90) reduced expression of cytoskeletal proteins and phagosome marker (Rab5) and successfully diminished COM crystal-induced phagocytosis and migration of macrophages. Our findings enlightened the significant role of these altered proteins, especially HSP90, in enhanced phagocytic activity of the COM-exposed macrophages.

  9. Exciting fear in adolescence: Does pubertal development alter threat processing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Spielberg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Adolescent development encompasses an ostensible paradox in threat processing. Risk taking increases dramatically after the onset of puberty, contributing to a 200% increase in mortality. Yet, pubertal maturation is associated with increased reactivity in threat-avoidance systems. In the first part of this paper we propose a heuristic model of adolescent affective development that may help to reconcile aspects of this paradox, which focuses on hypothesized pubertal increases in the capacity to experience (some fear-evoking experiences as an exciting thrill. In the second part of this paper, we test key features of this model by examining brain activation to threat cues in a longitudinal study that disentangled pubertal and age effects. Pubertal increases in testosterone predicted increased activation to threat cues, not only in regions associated with threat avoidance (i.e., amygdala, but also regions associated with reward pursuit (i.e., nucleus accumbens. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis that puberty is associated with a maturational shift toward more complex processing of threat cues—which may contribute to adolescent tendencies to explore and enjoy some types of risky experiences.

  10. Altering adsorbed proteins or cellular gene expression in bone-metastatic cancer cells affects PTHrP and Gli2 without altering cell growth

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    Jonathan M. Page

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The contents of this data in brief are related to the article titled “Matrix Rigidity Regulates the Transition of Tumor Cells to a Bone-Destructive Phenotype through Integrin β3 and TGF-β Receptor Type II”. In this DIB we will present our supplemental data investigating Integrin expression, attachment of cells to various adhesion molecules, and changes in gene expression in multiple cancer cell lines. Since the interactions of Integrins with adsorbed matrix proteins are thought to affect the ability of cancer cells to interact with their underlying substrates, we examined the expression of Integrin β1, β3, and β5 in response to matrix rigidity. We found that only Iβ3 increased with increasing substrate modulus. While it was shown that fibronectin greatly affects the expression of tumor-produced factors associated with bone destruction (parathyroid hormone-related protein, PTHrP, and Gli2, poly-l-lysine, vitronectin and type I collagen were also analyzed as potential matrix proteins. Each of the proteins was independently adsorbed on both rigid and compliant polyurethane films which were subsequently used to culture cancer cells. Poly-l-lysine, vitronectin and type I collagen all had negligible effects on PTHrP or Gli2 expression, but fibronectin was shown to have a dose dependent effect. Finally, altering the expression of Iβ3 demonstrated that it is required for tumor cells to respond to the rigidity of the matrix, but does not affect other cell growth or viability. Together these data support the data presented in our manuscript to show that the rigidity of bone drives Integrinβ3/TGF-β crosstalk, leading to increased expression of Gli2 and PTHrP.

  11. Altered salience processing in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegelbeckers, Jana; Bunzeck, Nico; Duzel, Emrah; Bonath, Björn; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Krauel, Kerstin

    2015-06-01

    Attentional problems in patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have often been linked with deficits in cognitive control. Whether these deficits are associated with increased sensitivity to external salient stimuli remains unclear. To address this issue, we acquired functional brain images (fMRI) in 38 boys with and without ADHD (age: 11-16 years). To differentiate the effects of item novelty, contextual rareness and task relevance, participants performed a visual oddball task including four stimulus categories: a frequent standard picture (62.5%), unique novel pictures (12.5%), one repeated rare picture (12.5%), and a target picture (12.5%) that required a specific motor response. As a main finding, we can show considerable overlap in novelty-related BOLD responses between both groups, but only healthy participants showed neural deactivation in temporal as well as frontal regions in response to novel pictures. Furthermore, only ADHD patients, but not healthy controls, engaged wide parts of the novelty network when processing the rare but familiar picture. Our results provide first evidence that ADHD patients show enhanced neural activity in response to novel but behaviorally irrelevant stimuli as well as reduced habituation to familiar items. These findings suggest an inefficient use of neuronal resources in children with ADHD that could be closely linked to increased distractibility. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Alteration of cellular behavior and response to PI3K pathway inhibition by culture in 3D collagen gels.

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    Brian Fallica

    Full Text Available Most investigations into cancer cell drug response are performed with cells cultured on flat (2D tissue culture plastic. Emerging research has shown that the presence of a three-dimensional (3D extracellular matrix (ECM is critical for normal cell behavior including migration, adhesion, signaling, proliferation and apoptosis. In this study we investigate differences between cancer cell signaling in 2D culture and a 3D ECM, employing real-time, live cell tracking to directly observe U2OS human osteosarcoma and MCF7 human breast cancer cells embedded in type 1 collagen gels. The activation of the important PI3K signaling pathway under these different growth conditions is studied, and the response to inhibition of both PI3K and mTOR with PI103 investigated. Cells grown in 3D gels show reduced proliferation and migration as well as reduced PI3K pathway activation when compared to cells grown in 2D. Our results quantitatively demonstrate that a collagen ECM can protect U2OS cells from PI103. Overall, our data suggests that 3D gels may provide a better medium for investigation of anti-cancer drugs than 2D monolayers, therefore allowing better understanding of cellular response and behavior in native like environments.

  13. Modulation of insulin action by vanadate: evidence of a role for phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity to alter cellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantus, I G; Deragon, G; Lai, R; Tang, S

    A number of vanadium compounds (vanadate, vanadyl sulfate, metavanadate) have insulin-mimicking actions both in vitro and in vivo. They have multiple biological effects in cultured cells and interact directly with various enzymes. The inhibitory action on phosphoprotein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and enhancement of cellular tyrosine phosphorylation appear to be the most relevant to explain the ability to mimic insulin. We demonstrated that in rat adipocytes both acute insulin effects, e.g. stimulation of IGF-II and transferrin binding and a chronic effect, insulin receptor downregulation, were stimulated by vanadate. Vanadate also enhanced insulin binding, particularly at very low insulin concentrations, associated with increased receptor affinity. This resulted in increased adipocyte insulin sensitivity. Finally vanadate augmented the extent of activation of the insulin receptor kinase by submaximal insulin concentrations. This was associated with a prolongation of the insulin biological response, lipogenesis, after removal of hormone. in rat adipocytes vanadate promotes insulin action by three mechanisms, 1) a direct insulin-mimetic action, 2) an enhancement of insulin sensitivity and 3) a prolongation of insulin biological response. These data suggest that PTP inhibitors have potential as useful therapeutic agents in insulin-resistant and relatively insulin-deficient forms of diabetes mellitus.

  14. Myofibroblasts electrotonically coupled to cardiomyocytes alter conduction: insights at the cellular level from a detailed in silico tissue structure model

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    Florian Jousset

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fibrotic myocardial remodeling is typically accompanied by the appearance of myofibroblasts (MFBs. In vitro, MFBs were shown to slow conduction and precipitate ectopic activity following gap junctional coupling to cardiomyocytes (CMCs. To gain further mechanistic insights into this arrhythmogenic MFB-CMC crosstalk, we performed numerical simulations in cell-based high-resolution two-dimensional tissue models that replicated experimental conditions. Cell dimensions were determined using confocal microscopy of single and co-cultured neonatal rat ventricular CMCs and MFBs. Conduction was investigated as a function of MFB density in three distinct cellular tissue architectures: CMC strands with endogenous MFBs, CMC strands with coating MFBs of two different sizes, and CMC strands with MFB inserts. Simulations were performed to identify individual contributions of heterocellular gap junctional coupling and of the specific electrical phenotype of MFBs. With increasing MFB density, both endogenous and coating MFBs slowed conduction. At MFB densities of 5-30%, conduction slowing was most pronounced in strands with endogenous MFBs due to the MFB-dependent increase in axial resistance. At MFB densities >40%, very slow conduction and spontaneous activity was primarily due to MFB-induced CMC depolarization. Coating MFBs caused non-uniformities of resting membrane potential, which were more prominent with large than with small MFBs. In simulations of MFB inserts connecting two CMC strands conduction delays increased with increasing insert lengths and block appeared for inserts >1.2 mm. Thus, electrophysiological properties of engineered CMC-MFB co-cultures depend on MFB density, MFB size and their specific positioning in respect to CMCs. These factors may influence conduction characteristics in the heterocellular myocardium.

  15. An antipsychotic drug exerts anti-prion effects by altering the localization of the cellular prion protein.

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    Claudia Stincardini

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are neurodegenerative conditions characterized by the conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC, an endogenous membrane glycoprotein of uncertain function, into PrPSc, a pathological isoform that replicates by imposing its abnormal folding onto PrPC molecules. A great deal of evidence supports the notion that PrPC plays at least two roles in prion diseases, by acting as a substrate for PrPSc replication, and as a mediator of its toxicity. This conclusion was recently supported by data suggesting that PrPC may transduce neurotoxic signals elicited by other disease-associated protein aggregates. Thus, PrPC may represent a convenient pharmacological target for prion diseases, and possibly other neurodegenerative conditions. Here, we sought to characterize the activity of chlorpromazine (CPZ, an antipsychotic previously shown to inhibit prion replication by directly binding to PrPC. By employing biochemical and biophysical techniques, we provide direct experimental evidence indicating that CPZ does not bind PrPC at biologically relevant concentrations. Instead, the compound exerts anti-prion effects by inducing the relocalization of PrPC from the plasma membrane. Consistent with these findings, CPZ also inhibits the cytotoxic effects delivered by a PrP mutant. Interestingly, we found that the different pharmacological effects of CPZ could be mimicked by two inhibitors of the GTPase activity of dynamins, a class of proteins involved in the scission of newly formed membrane vesicles, and recently reported as potential pharmacological targets of CPZ. Collectively, our results redefine the mechanism by which CPZ exerts anti-prion effects, and support a primary role for dynamins in the membrane recycling of PrPC, as well as in the propagation of infectious prions.

  16. Absence of PAF receptor alters cellular infiltrate but not rolling and adhesion of leukocytes in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, David Henrique; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; de Miranda, Aline Silva; Fagundes, Caio Tavares; Campos, Roberta Dayrell de Lima; Arantes, Rosa Esteves; Vilela, Márcia de Carvalho; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio

    2011-04-18

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a condition induced in some susceptible species to the study of multiple sclerosis (MS). The platelet activating factor (PAF) is an important mediator of immune responses and seems to be involved in MS. However, the participation of PAF in EAE and MS remains controversial. Thus, in this study, we aimed to evaluate the role of PAF receptor in the pathogenesis of EAE. EAE was induced using an emulsion containing MOG(35-55). EAE-induced PAF receptor knock out (PAFR(-/-)) mice presented milder disease when compared to C57BL/6 wild type (WT) animals. PAFR(-/-) animals had lower inflammatory infiltrates in central nervous system (CNS) tissue when compared to WT mice. However, intravital microscopy in cerebral microvasculature revealed similar levels of rolling and adhering leukocytes in both WT and PAFR(-/-) mice. Interleukine (IL)-17 and chemokines C-C motif legends (CCL)2 and CCL5 were significantly lower in PAFR(-/-) mice when compared to WT mice. Brain infiltrating cluster of differentiation (CD)4(+) leukocytes and IL-17(+) leukocytes was diminished in PAFR(-/-) when compared to WT mice. Taken together, our results suggest that PAF receptor is important in the induction and development of EAE, although it has no influence in rolling and adhesion steps of cell recruitment. The absence of PAF receptor results in milder disease by altering the type of inflammatory mediators and cells that are present in CNS tissue. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cultured fibroblast monolayers secrete a protein that alters the cellular binding of somatomedin-C/insulinlike growth factor I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemmons, D.R.; Elgin, R.G.; Han, V.K.; Casella, S.J.; D'Ercole, A.J.; Van Wyk, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    We studied somatomedin-C/insulinlike growth factor (Sm-C/IGF-I) binding to human fibroblasts in both adherent monolayers and in suspension cultures. The addition of Sm-C/IGF-I in concentrations between 0.5 and 10 ng/ml to monolayers cultures resulted in a paradoxical increase in 125 I-Sm-C/IGF-I binding and concentrations between 25 and 300 ng/ml were required to displace the labeled peptide. The addition of unlabeled insulin resulted in no displacement of labeled Sm-C/IGF-I from the adherent cells. When fibroblast suspensions were used Sm-C/IGF-I concentrations between 1 and 10 ng/ml caused displacement, the paradoxical increase in 125 I-Sm-C/IGF-I binding was not detected, and insulin displaced 60% of the labeled peptide. Affinity cross-linking to fibroblast monolayers revealed a 43,000-mol wt 125 I-Sm-C-binding-protein complex that was not detected after cross-linking to suspended cells. The 43,000-mol wt complex was not detected after cross-linking to smooth muscle cell monolayers, and binding studies showed that 125 I-Sm-C/IGF-I was displaced greater than 90% by Sm-C/IGF-I using concentrations between 0.5 and 10 ng/ml. Because fibroblast-conditioned medium contains the 43,000-mol wt complex, smooth muscle cells were incubated with conditioned medium for 24 h prior to initiation of the binding studies. 125 I-Sm-C/IGF-I-binding increased 1.6-fold compared to control cultures and after cross-linking the 43,000-mol wt complex could be detected on the smooth muscle cell surface. Human fibroblast monolayers secrete a protein that binds 125 I-Sm-C/IGF-I which can be transferred to the smooth muscle cell surface and alters 125I-Sm-C/IGF-I binding

  18. Tribulus terrestris (Linn.) Attenuates Cellular Alterations Induced by Ischemia in H9c2 Cells Via Antioxidant Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshma, P L; Lekshmi, V S; Sankar, Vandana; Raghu, K G

    2015-06-01

    Tribulus terrestris L. was evaluated for its cardioprotective property against myocardial ischemia in a cell line model. Initially, methanolic extract was prepared and subjected to sequential extraction with various solvents. The extract with high phenolic content (T. terrestris L. ethyl acetate extract-TTME) was further characterized for its chemical constituents and taken forward for evaluation against cardiac ischemia. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of phenolic compounds like caffeic acid (12.41 ± 0.22 mg g(-1)), chlorogenic acid (0.52 ± 0.06 mg g(-1)) and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (0.60 ± 0.08 mg g(-1)). H9c2 cells were pretreated with TTME (10, 25, 50 and 100 µg/ml) for 24 h before the induction of ischemia. Then ischemia was induced by exposing cells to ischemia buffer, in a hypoxic chamber, maintained at 0.1% O2, 95% N2 and 5% CO2, for 1 h. A significant (p ≤ 0.05) increase in reactive oxygen species generation (56%), superoxide production (18%), loss of plasma membrane integrity, dissipation of transmembrane potential, permeability transition pore opening and apoptosis had been observed during ischemia. However, pretreatment with TTME was found to significantly (p ≤ 0.05) attenuate the alterations caused by ischemia. The overall results of this study partially reveal the scientific basis of the use of T. terrestris L. in the traditional system of medicine for heart diseases. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Focused Metabolite Profiling for Dissecting Cellular and Molecular Processes of Living Organisms in Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Regulatory control in biological systems is exerted at all levels within the central dogma of biology. Metabolites are the end products of all cellular regulatory processes and reflect the ultimate outcome of potential changes suggested by genomics and proteomics caused by an environmental stimulus or genetic modification. Following on the heels of genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, metabolomics has become an inevitable part of complete-system biology because none of the lower "-omics" alone provide direct information about how changes in mRNA or protein are coupled to changes in biological function. The challenges are much greater than those encountered in genomics because of the greater number of metabolites and the greater diversity of their chemical structures and properties. To meet these challenges, much developmental work is needed, including (1) methodologies for unbiased extraction of metabolites and subsequent quantification, (2) algorithms for systematic identification of metabolites, (3) expertise and competency in handling a large amount of information (data set), and (4) integration of metabolomics with other "omics" and data mining (implication of the information). This article reviews the project accomplishments.

  20. Model Development and Process Analysis for Lean Cellular Design Planning in Aerospace Assembly and Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburn, Monty D.

    Successful lean manufacturing and cellular manufacturing execution relies upon a foundation of leadership commitment and strategic planning built upon solid data and robust analysis. The problem for this study was to create and employ a simple lean transformation planning model and review process that could be used to identify functional support staff resources required to plan and execute lean manufacturing cells within aerospace assembly and manufacturing sites. The lean planning model was developed using available literature for lean manufacturing kaizen best practices and validated through a Delphi panel of lean experts. The resulting model and a standardized review process were used to assess the state of lean transformation planning at five sites of an international aerospace manufacturing and assembly company. The results of the three day, on-site review were compared with baseline plans collected from each of the five sites to determine if there analyzed, with focus on three critical areas of lean planning: the number and type of manufacturing cells identified, the number, type, and duration of planned lean and continuous kaizen events, and the quantity and type of functional staffing resources planned to support the kaizen schedule. Summarized data of the baseline and on-site reviews was analyzed with descriptive statistics. ANOVAs and paired-t tests at 95% significance level were conducted on the means of data sets to determine if null hypotheses related to cell, kaizen event, and support resources could be rejected. The results of the research found significant differences between lean transformation plans developed by site leadership and plans developed utilizing the structured, on-site review process and lean transformation planning model. The null hypothesis that there was no difference between the means of pre-review and on-site cell counts was rejected, as was the null hypothesis that there was no significant difference in kaizen event plans. These

  1. Selected papers from the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemenman, Ilya; Faeder, James R; Hlavacek, William S; Jiang, Yi; Wall, Michael E; Zilman, Anton

    2011-10-01

    This special issue consists of 11 original papers that elaborate on work presented at the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing, which was held on the campus of St John's College in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, 11-14 August 2010. Now in its fourth year, the q-bio conference has changed considerably over time. It is now well established and a major event in systems biology. The 2010 conference saw attendees from all continents (except Antarctica!) sharing novel results and participating in lively discussions at both the oral and poster sessions. The conference was oversubscribed and grew to 27 contributed talks, 16 poster spotlights and 137 contributed posters. We deliberately decreased the number of invited speakers to 21 to leave more space for contributed presentations, and the attendee feedback confirmed that the choice was a success. Although the q-bio conference has grown and matured, it has remained true to the original goal of being an intimate and dynamic event that brings together modeling, theory and quantitative experimentation for the study of cell regulation and information processing. Funded in part by a grant from NIGMS and by DOE funds through the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development program, the conference has continued to exhibit youth and vigor by attracting (and partially supporting) over 100 undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral researchers. The associated q-bio summer school, which precedes the conference each year, further emphasizes the development of junior scientists and makes q-bio a singular event in its impact on the future of quantitative biology. In addition to an increased international presence, the conference has notably diversified its demographic representation within the USA, including increased participation from the southeastern corner of the country. One big change in the conference this year is our new publication partner, Physical Biology. Although we are very

  2. Targeted disruption of the idol gene alters cellular regulation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor by sterols and liver x receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Elena; Hong, Cynthia; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Tu, Yiping; Hu, Yan; Zelcer, Noam; Boyadjian, Rima; de Jong, Pieter J; Young, Stephen G; Fong, Loren G; Tontonoz, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Previously, we identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase Idol (inducible degrader of the low-density lipoprotein [LDL] receptor [LDLR]) as a posttranscriptional regulator of the LDLR pathway. Idol stimulates LDLR degradation through ubiquitination of its C-terminal domain, thereby limiting cholesterol uptake. Here we report the generation and characterization of mouse embryonic stem cells homozygous for a null mutation in the Idol gene. Cells lacking Idol exhibit markedly elevated levels of the LDLR protein and increased rates of LDL uptake. Furthermore, despite an intact sterol responsive element-binding protein (SREBP) pathway, Idol-null cells exhibit an altered response to multiple regulators of sterol metabolism, including serum, oxysterols, and synthetic liver X receptor (LXR) agonists. The ability of oxysterols and lipoprotein-containing serum to suppress LDLR protein levels is reduced, and the time course of suppression is delayed, in cells lacking Idol. LXR ligands have no effect on LDLR levels in Idol-null cells, indicating that Idol is required for LXR-dependent inhibition of the LDLR pathway. In line with these results, the half-life of the LDLR protein is prolonged in the absence of Idol. Finally, the ability of statins and PCSK9 to alter LDLR levels is independent of, and additive with, the LXR-Idol pathway. These results demonstrate that the LXR-Idol pathway is an important contributor to feedback inhibition of the LDLR by sterols and a biological determinant of cellular LDL uptake.

  3. Targeted Disruption of the Idol Gene Alters Cellular Regulation of the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor by Sterols and Liver X Receptor Agonists ▿ §

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Elena; Hong, Cynthia; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Tu, Yiping; Hu, Yan; Zelcer, Noam; Boyadjian, Rima; de Jong, Pieter J.; Young, Stephen G.; Fong, Loren G.; Tontonoz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase Idol (inducible degrader of the low-density lipoprotein [LDL] receptor [LDLR]) as a posttranscriptional regulator of the LDLR pathway. Idol stimulates LDLR degradation through ubiquitination of its C-terminal domain, thereby limiting cholesterol uptake. Here we report the generation and characterization of mouse embryonic stem cells homozygous for a null mutation in the Idol gene. Cells lacking Idol exhibit markedly elevated levels of the LDLR protein and increased rates of LDL uptake. Furthermore, despite an intact sterol responsive element-binding protein (SREBP) pathway, Idol-null cells exhibit an altered response to multiple regulators of sterol metabolism, including serum, oxysterols, and synthetic liver X receptor (LXR) agonists. The ability of oxysterols and lipoprotein-containing serum to suppress LDLR protein levels is reduced, and the time course of suppression is delayed, in cells lacking Idol. LXR ligands have no effect on LDLR levels in Idol-null cells, indicating that Idol is required for LXR-dependent inhibition of the LDLR pathway. In line with these results, the half-life of the LDLR protein is prolonged in the absence of Idol. Finally, the ability of statins and PCSK9 to alter LDLR levels is independent of, and additive with, the LXR-Idol pathway. These results demonstrate that the LXR-Idol pathway is an important contributor to feedback inhibition of the LDLR by sterols and a biological determinant of cellular LDL uptake. PMID:21343340

  4. Floodplain geomorphic processes and environmental impacts of human alteration along coastal plain rivers, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupp, C.R.; Pierce, Aaron R.; Noe, G.B.

    2009-01-01

    Human alterations along stream channels and within catchments have affected fluvial geomorphic processes worldwide. Typically these alterations reduce the ecosystem services that functioning floodplains provide; in this paper we are concerned with the sediment and associated material trapping service. Similarly, these alterations may negatively impact the natural ecology of floodplains through reductions in suitable habitats, biodiversity, and nutrient cycling. Dams, stream channelization, and levee/canal construction are common human alterations along Coastal Plain fluvial systems. We use three case studies to illustrate these alterations and their impacts on floodplain geomorphic and ecological processes. They include: 1) dams along the lower Roanoke River, North Carolina, 2) stream channelization in west Tennessee, and 3) multiple impacts including canal and artificial levee construction in the central Atchafalaya Basin, Louisiana. Human alterations typically shift affected streams away from natural dynamic equilibrium where net sediment deposition is, approximately, in balance with net erosion. Identification and understanding of critical fluvial parameters (e.g., stream gradient, grain-size, and hydrography) and spatial and temporal sediment deposition/erosion process trajectories should facilitate management efforts to retain and/or regain important ecosystem services. ?? 2009, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  5. Global proteomic analysis in trypanosomes reveals unique proteins and conserved cellular processes impacted by arginine methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Kaylen; Li, Jun; Fisk, John C; Wang, Hao; Aletta, John M; Qu, Jun; Read, Laurie K

    2013-10-08

    Arginine methylation is a common posttranslational modification with reported functions in transcription, RNA processing and translation, and DNA repair. Trypanosomes encode five protein arginine methyltransferases, suggesting that arginine methylation exerts widespread impacts on the biology of these organisms. Here, we performed a global proteomic analysis of Trypanosoma brucei to identify arginine methylated proteins and their sites of modification. Using an approach entailing two-dimensional chromatographic separation and alternating electron transfer dissociation and collision induced dissociation, we identified 1332 methylarginines in 676 proteins. The resulting data set represents the largest compilation of arginine methylated proteins in any organism to date. Functional classification revealed numerous arginine methylated proteins involved in flagellar function, RNA metabolism, DNA replication and repair, and intracellular protein trafficking. Thus, arginine methylation has the potential to impact aspects of T. brucei gene expression, cell biology, and pathogenesis. Interestingly, pathways with known methylated proteins in higher eukaryotes were identified in this study, but often different components of the pathway were methylated in trypanosomes. Methylarginines were often identified in glycine rich contexts, although exceptions to this rule were detected. Collectively, these data inform on a multitude of aspects of trypanosome biology and serve as a guide for the identification of homologous arginine methylated proteins in higher eukaryotes. T. brucei is a protozoan parasite that causes lethal African sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in livestock, thereby imposing a significant medical and economic burden on sub-Saharan Africa. The parasite encounters very different environments as it cycles between mammalian and insect hosts, and must exert cellular responses to these varying milieus. One mechanism by which all cells respond to changing

  6. Rutin as a Mediator of Lipid Metabolism and Cellular Signaling Pathways Interactions in Fibroblasts Altered by UVA and UVB Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Gęgotek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rutin is a natural nutraceutical that is a promising compound for the prevention of UV-induced metabolic changes in skin cells. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of rutin on redox and endocannabinoid systems, as well as proinflammatory and proapoptotic processes, in UV-irradiated fibroblasts. Methods. Fibroblasts exposed to UVA and UVB radiation were treated with rutin. The activities and levels of oxidants/antioxidants and endocannabinoid system components, as well as lipid, DNA, and protein oxidation products, and the proinflammatory and pro/antiapoptotic proteins expression were measured. Results. Rutin reduced UV-induced proinflammatory response and ROS generation and enhanced the activity/levels of antioxidants (SOD, GSH-Px, vitamin E, GSH, and Trx. Rutin also normalized UV-induced Nrf2 expression. Its biological activity prevented changes in the levels of the lipid mediators: MDA, 4-HNE, and endocannabinoids, as well as the endocannabinoid receptors CB1/2, VR1, and GPR55 expression. Furthermore, rutin prevented the protein modifications (tyrosine derivatives formation in particular and decreased the levels of the proapoptotic markers—caspase-3 and cytochrome c. Conclusion. Rutin prevents UV-induced inflammation and redox imbalance at protein and transcriptional level which favors lipid, protein, and DNA protection. In consequence rutin regulates endocannabinoid system and apoptotic balance.

  7. Simulation of Corrosion Process for Structure with the Cellular Automata Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M. C.; Wen, Q. Q.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, from the mesoscopic point of view, under the assumption of metal corrosion damage evolution being a diffusive process, the cellular automata (CA) method was proposed to simulate numerically the uniform corrosion damage evolution of outer steel tube of concrete filled steel tubular columns subjected to corrosive environment, and the effects of corrosive agent concentration, dissolution probability and elapsed etching time on the corrosion damage evolution were also investigated. It was shown that corrosion damage increases nonlinearly with increasing elapsed etching time, and the longer the etching time, the more serious the corrosion damage; different concentration of corrosive agents had different impacts on the corrosion damage degree of the outer steel tube, but the difference between the impacts was very small; the heavier the concentration, the more serious the influence. The greater the dissolution probability, the more serious the corrosion damage of the outer steel tube, but with the increase of dissolution probability, the difference between its impacts on the corrosion damage became smaller and smaller. To validate present method, corrosion damage measurements for concrete filled square steel tubular columns (CFSSTCs) sealed at both their ends and immersed fully in a simulating acid rain solution were conducted, and Faraday’s law was used to predict their theoretical values. Meanwhile, the proposed CA mode was applied for the simulation of corrosion damage evolution of the CFSSTCs. It was shown by the comparisons of results from the three methods aforementioned that they were in good agreement, implying that the proposed method used for the simulation of corrosion damage evolution of concrete filled steel tubular columns is feasible and effective. It will open a new approach to study and evaluate further the corrosion damage, loading capacity and lifetime prediction of concrete filled steel tubular structures.

  8. Сalculation theory for shrinkage stresses in cellular concrete wall panels in carbonation processes with account of creep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chepurnenko Anton Sergeevich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The task of comprehensive analysis presented in this article is a development of theory of calculation of shrinkage stresses in cellular concrete wall panels; such stresses occur due to carbonation of concrete because of the creep of material. Analytical dependences characterizing the influence of carbonation on the modulus of elasticity, shrinkage and creep of autoclaved cellular concrete, as well as the regularity of variation of carbonation degree as per thickness of the wall panels depending on time, were obtained. The proposed theory of calculation of shrinkage stresses in cellular concrete wall panels, with account of concrete creep, makes it possible to predict the influence of carbonation processes on crack resistance thereof, and thus to develop measures of technological and structural nature, in order to improve their operational reliability and durability.

  9. Cellular processing of the amyloidogenic cystatin C variant of hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, Icelandic type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Merz, G S; Schwenk, V

    1999-01-01

    An important gap in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the amyloidoses is the identification of the cellular events that lead from synthesis of an amyloid precursor protein to its conversion to the amyloid fiber subunit. We address this question by characterizing the effects of an amyloidog......An important gap in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the amyloidoses is the identification of the cellular events that lead from synthesis of an amyloid precursor protein to its conversion to the amyloid fiber subunit. We address this question by characterizing the effects...

  10. Training practices of cell processing laboratory staff: analysis of a survey by the Alliance for Harmonization of Cellular Therapy Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keever-Taylor, Carolyn A; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke; Celluzzi, Christina; Loper, Kathy; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Schwartz, Joseph; Mcgrath, Eoin; Eldridge, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Methods for processing products used for hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation must ensure their safety and efficacy. Personnel training and ongoing competency assessment is critical to this goal. Here we present results from a global survey of methods used by a diverse array of cell processing facilities for the initial training and ongoing competency assessment of key personnel. The Alliance for Harmonisation of Cellular Therapy Accreditation (AHCTA) created a survey to identify facility type, location, activity, personnel, and methods used for training and competency. A survey link was disseminated through organizations represented in AHCTA to processing facilities worldwide. Responses were tabulated and analyzed as a percentage of total responses and as a percentage of response by region group. Most facilities were based at academic medical centers or hospitals. Facilities with a broad range of activity, product sources and processing procedures were represented. Facilities reported using a combination of training and competency methods. However, some methods predominated. Cellular sources for training differed for training versus competency and also differed based on frequency of procedures performed. Most facilities had responsibilities for procedures in addition to processing for which training and competency methods differed. Although regional variation was observed, training and competency requirements were generally consistent. Survey data showed the use of a variety of training and competency methods but some methods predominated, suggesting their utility. These results could help new and established facilities in making decisions for their own training and competency programs. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Whey Protein Concentrate Renders MDA-MB-231 Cells Sensitive to Rapamycin by Altering Cellular Redox State and Activating GSK3β/mTOR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shih-Hsuan; Tseng, Yang-Ming; Wu, Szu-Hsien; Tsai, Shih-Meng; Tsai, Li-Yu

    2017-11-21

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is an amino acid-rich supplement that has been shown to increase cellular antioxidant capacity. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a crucial regulator of signaling in mammalian cells, and serves as a therapeutic target for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). This study was designed to investigate the effect of combining WPC with rapamycin on MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. These cells were found to be insensitive to rapamycin and exhibited higher glutathione (GSH) and reactive oxygen species levels than non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells. However, for MDA-MB-231 cells, the half maximal inhibitory concentration of rapamycin was lower when this drug was administered in combination with WPC than when used alone. Furthermore, combining WPC with rapamycin depleted GSH levels and reduced Nrf2 nuclear accumulation. In addition, WPC activated GSK3β/mTOR signaling, and GSK3β appeared to be involved in the WPC-mediated Nrf2 reduction and mTOR activation. In conclusion, WPC induced rapamycin sensitivity in MDA-MB-231 cells by altering their redox state and activating GSK3β/mTOR signaling. These results not only suggest a novel therapeutic approach for breast cancer treatment, but also provide insight into the critical pathways affecting the resistance to mTOR inhibition observed in a subgroup of TNBC patients.

  12. Biochemical aspects of overtraining in endurance sports : the metabolism alteration process syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibois, Cyril; Cazorla, Georges; Poortmans, Jacques-Rémi; Déléris, Gérard

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that endurance overtraining could result from successive and cumulative alterations in metabolism, which become chronic during training. The onset of this process is a biochemical alteration in carbohydrate (saccharide) metabolism. During endurance exercises, the amount of saccharide chains from two blood glycoproteins (alpha(2)-macroglobulin and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein) was found to have decreased, i.e. concentrations of these proteins remained unchanged but their quality changed. These saccharide chains were probably used for burning liver glycogen stores during exercise. This step was followed by alterations in lipid metabolism. The most relevant aspect of this step was that the mean chain length of blood fatty acids decreased, i.e. the same amount of fatty acids were found within the blood, but overtrained individuals presented shorter fatty acids than well-trained individuals. This suggests that alterations appeared in the liver synthesis of long-chain fatty acids or that higher peroxidation of blood lipoparticles occurred. For the final step of this overtraining process, it was found that these dysfunctions in carbohydrate/lipid metabolism led to the higher use of amino acids, which probably resulted from protein catabolism. The evolution of three protein concentrations (alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein, alpha(2)-macroglobulin and IgG(3)) correlated with this amino acid concentration increase, suggesting a specific catabolism of these proteins. At this time only, overtraining was clinically diagnosed through conventional symptoms. Therefore, this process described successive alterations in exercise metabolism that shifted from the main energetic stores of exercise (carbohydrates and lipids) towards molecular pools (proteins) normally not substantially used for the energetic supply of skeletal muscles. Now, a general biochemical model of the overtraining process may be proposed which includes most of the previously identified metabolic

  13. Altered BOLD response during inhibitory and error processing in adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Wierenga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN are often cognitively rigid and behaviorally over-controlled. We previously showed that adult females recovered from AN relative to healthy comparison females had less prefrontal activation during an inhibition task, which suggested a functional brain correlate of altered inhibitory processing in individuals recovered from AN. However, the degree to which these functional brain alterations are related to disease state and whether error processing is altered in AN individuals is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the current study, ill adolescent AN females (n = 11 and matched healthy comparison adolescents (CA with no history of an eating disorder (n = 12 performed a validated stop signal task (SST during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to explore differences in error and inhibitory processing. The groups did not differ on sociodemographic variables or on SST performance. During inhibitory processing, a significant group x difficulty (hard, easy interaction was detected in the right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, right middle frontal gyrus (MFG, and left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC, which was characterized by less activation in AN compared to CA participants during hard trials. During error processing, a significant group x accuracy (successful inhibit, failed inhibit interaction in bilateral MFG and right PCC was observed, which was characterized by less activation in AN compared to CA participants during error (i.e., failed inhibit trials. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Consistent with our prior findings in recovered AN, ill AN adolescents, relative to CA, showed less inhibition-related activation within the dorsal ACC, MFG and PCC as inhibitory demand increased. In addition, ill AN adolescents, relative to CA, also showed reduced activation to errors in the bilateral MFG and left PCC. These findings suggest that altered prefrontal and cingulate activation during

  14. Proteomic Analysis Implicates Dominant Alterations of RNA Metabolism and the Proteasome Pathway in the Cellular Response to Carbon-Ion Irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy with heavy ions is considered advantageous compared to irradiation with photons due to the characteristics of the Braggs peak and the high linear energy transfer (LET value. To understand the mechanisms of cellular responses to different LET values and dosages of heavy ion radiation, we analyzed the proteomic profiles of mouse embryo fibroblast MEF cells exposed to two doses from different LET values of heavy ion 12C. Total proteins were extracted from these cells and examined by Q Exactive with Liquid Chromatography (LC-Electrospray Ionization (ESI Tandem MS (MS/MS. Using bioinformatics approaches, differentially expressed proteins with 1.5 or 2.0-fold changes between different dosages of exposure were compared. With the higher the dosage and/or LET of ion irradiation, the worse response the cells were in terms of protein expression. For instance, compared to the control (0 Gy, 771 (20.2% proteins in cells irradiated at 0.2 Gy of carbon-ion radiation with 12.6 keV/μm, 313 proteins (8.2% in cells irradiated at 2 Gy of carbon-ion radiation with 12.6 keV/μm, and 243 proteins (6.4% in cells irradiated at 2 Gy of carbon-ion radiation with 31.5 keV/μm exhibited changes of 1.5-fold or greater. Gene ontology (GO analysis, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG analysis, Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS analysis, and BioCarta analysis all indicated that RNA metabolic processes (RNA splicing, destabilization and deadenylation and proteasome pathways may play key roles in the cellular response to heavy-ion irradiation. Proteasome pathways ranked highest among all biological processes associated with heavy carbon-ion irradiation. In addition, network analysis revealed that cellular pathways involving proteins such as Col1a1 and Fn1 continued to respond to high dosages of heavy-ion irradiation, suggesting that these pathways still protect cells against damage. However, pathways such as those involving Ikbkg1

  15. Tank waste remediation system optimized processing strategy with an altered treatment scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaathaug, E.J.

    1996-03-01

    This report provides an alternative strategy evolved from the current Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) programmatic baseline for accomplishing the treatment and disposal of the Hanford Site tank wastes. This optimized processing strategy with an altered treatment scheme performs the major elements of the TWRS Program, but modifies the deployment of selected treatment technologies to reduce the program cost. The present program for development of waste retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification technologies continues, but the optimized processing strategy reuses a single facility to accomplish the separations/low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification and the high-level waste (HLW) vitrification processes sequentially, thereby eliminating the need for a separate HLW vitrification facility

  16. RESEARCH CONCERNING INSTALATION OF ALTERATIVE PROCESSES IN COW AND BUFFALO BUTTER DURING FREEZING STORAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Lup –Dragomir

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Physicochemical characteristics and freshness indicators of cow and buffalo butter during freezing (-15 ... -18oC storage were studied. Changes in freshness parameters and alterative processes installation, when butter becomes improperly for consumption were studied, inducing acidity, peroxide value (PV, iodine value (IV andthe presence of epyhidrinic aldehyde. There was an increase of titrable acidity during storage, cow butter hydrolysis was installed after 35 days and after 30 days for buffalo butter. Hydrolysis processes are installed more quickly in terms of freezing than oxidative processes, being intensified by a higher water content inproduct and by hydrolitic enzymes presence.

  17. Evolution and regulation of cellular periodic processes: a role for paralogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trachana, Kalliopi; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Bork, Peer

    2010-01-01

    paralogues. Thus, diverged temporal expression of paralogues seems to facilitate cellular orchestration under different periodic stimuli. Lineage-specific functional repertoires of periodic-associated paralogues imply that this mode of regulation might have evolved independently in several organisms....... performed the first systematic comparison in three organisms (Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) by using public microarray data. We observed that although diurnal-regulated and ultradian-regulated genes are not generally cell-cycle-regulated, they tend to have cell-cycle-regulated...

  18. Chronic loss of noradrenergic tone produces β-arrestin2-mediated cocaine hypersensitivity and alters cellular D2 responses in the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaval-Cruz, Meriem; Goertz, Richard B; Puttick, Daniel J; Bowles, Dawn E; Meyer, Rebecca C; Hall, Randy A; Ko, Daijin; Paladini, Carlos A; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine blocks plasma membrane monoamine transporters and increases extracellular levels of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT). The addictive properties of cocaine are mediated primarily by DA, while NE and 5-HT play modulatory roles. Chronic inhibition of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), which converts DA to NE, increases the aversive effects of cocaine and reduces cocaine use in humans, and produces behavioral hypersensitivity to cocaine and D2 agonism in rodents, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We found a decrease in β-arrestin2 (βArr2) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) following chronic genetic or pharmacological DBH inhibition, and overexpression of βArr2 in the NAc normalized cocaine-induced locomotion in DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice. The D2/3 agonist quinpirole decreased excitability in NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs) from control, but not Dbh -/- animals, where instead there was a trend for an excitatory effect. The Gαi inhibitor NF023 abolished the quinpirole-induced decrease in excitability in control MSNs, but had no effect in Dbh -/- MSNs, whereas the Gαs inhibitor NF449 restored the ability of quinpirole to decrease excitability in Dbh -/- MSNs, but had no effect in control MSNs. These results suggest that chronic loss of noradrenergic tone alters behavioral responses to cocaine via decreases in βArr2 and cellular responses to D2/D3 activation, potentially via changes in D2-like receptor G-protein coupling in NAc MSNs. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  19. Dietary turmeric modulates DMBA-induced p21ras, MAP kinases and AP-1/NF-κB pathway to alter cellular responses during hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, Rachana; Ingle, Arvind; Maru, Girish

    2008-01-01

    The chemopreventive efficacy of turmeric has been established in experimental systems. However, its mechanism(s) of action are not fully elucidated in vivo. The present study investigates the mechanism of turmeric-mediated chemoprevention in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis at 2, 4, 6, 10 and 12 weeks. Dietary turmeric (1%) led to decrease in DMBA-induced tumor burden and multiplicity, and enhanced the latency period in parallel, to its modulatory effects on oncogene products and various cellular responses during HBP tumorigenesis. DMBA-induced expression of ras oncogene product, p21 and downstream target, the mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased by turmeric during HBP carcinogenesis. Turmeric also diminished the DMBA-induced mRNA expression of proto-oncogenes (c-jun, c-fos) and NF-κB, leading to decreased protein levels and in further attenuation of DMBA-induced AP-1/NF-κB DNA-binding in the buccal pouch nuclear extracts. Besides, buccal pouch of hamsters receiving turmeric diet showed significant alterations in DMBA-induced effects: (a) decrease in cell proliferation (diminished PCNA and Bcl2 expression), (b) enhanced apoptosis (increased expression of Bax, caspase-3 and apoptotic index), (c) decrease in inflammation (levels of Cox-2, the downstream target of AP-1/NF-κB, and PGE2) and (d) aberrant expression of differentiation markers, the cytokeratins (1, 5, 8, and 18). Together, the protective effects of dietary turmeric converge on augmenting apoptosis of the initiated cells and decreasing cell proliferation in DMBA-treated animals, which in turn, is reflected in decreased tumor burden, multiplicity and enhanced latency period. Some of these biomarkers are likely to be helpful in monitoring clinical trials and evaluating drug effect measurements

  20. Novel cellular targets of AhR underlie alterations in neutrophilic inflammation and iNOS expression during influenza virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head Wheeler, Jennifer L.; Martin, Kyle C.; Lawrence, B. Paige

    2012-01-01

    The underlying reasons for variable clinical outcomes from respiratory viral infections remain uncertain. Several studies suggest that environmental factors contribute to this variation, but limited knowledge of cellular and molecular targets of these agents hampers our ability to quantify or modify their contribution to disease and improve public health. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an environment sensing transcription factor that binds many anthropogenic and natural chemicals. The immunomodulatory properties of AhR ligands are best characterized with extensive studies of changes in CD4+ T cell responses. Yet, AhR modulates other aspects of immune function. We previously showed that during influenza virus infection, AhR activation modulates neutrophil accumulation in the lung, and this contributes to increased mortality in mice. Enhanced levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in infected lungs are observed during the same timeframe as AhR-mediated increased pulmonary neutrophilia. In this study, we evaluated whether these two consequences of AhR activation are causally linked. Reciprocal inhibition of AhR-mediated elevations in iNOS and pulmonary neutrophilia reveal that, although they are contemporaneous, they are not causally related. We show using Cre/loxP technology that elevated iNOS levels and neutrophil number in the infected lung result from separate, AhR-dependent signaling in endothelial and respiratory epithelial cells, respectively. Studies using mutant mice further reveal that AhR-mediated alterations in these innate responses to infection require a functional nuclear localization signal and DNA binding domain. Thus, gene targets of AhR in non-hematopoietic cells are important new considerations for understanding AhR-mediated changes in innate anti-viral immunity. PMID:23233726

  1. Intrinsic cellular and molecular properties of in vivo hippocampal synaptic plasticity are altered in the absence of key synaptic matrix molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Stephan; Gottschling, Christine; Faissner, Andreas; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2017-08-01

    Hippocampal synaptic plasticity comprises a key cellular mechanism for information storage. In the hippocampus, both long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are triggered by synaptic Ca 2+ -elevations that are typically mediated by the opening of voltage-gated cation channels, such as N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR), in the postsynaptic density. The integrity of the post-synaptic density is ensured by the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we explored whether synaptic plasticity is affected in adult behaving mice that lack the ECM proteins brevican, neurocan, tenascin-C, and tenascin-R (KO). We observed that the profiles of synaptic potentiation and depression in the dentate gyrus (DG) were profoundly altered compared to plasticity profiles in wild-type littermates (WT). Specifically, synaptic depression was amplified in a frequency-dependent manner and although late-LTP (>24 hr) was expressed following strong afferent tetanization, the early component of LTP (4 hr) elicited by weaker tetanization was equivalent in WT and KO animals. Furthermore, this latter form of LTP was NMDAR-dependent in WT but not KO mice. Scrutiny of DG receptor expression revealed significantly lower levels of both the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor, of the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGlu5 and of the L-type calcium channel, Ca v 1.3 in KO compared to WT animals. Homer 1a and of the P/Q-type calcium channel, Ca v 1.2 were unchanged in KO mice. Taken together, findings suggest that in mice that lack multiple ECM proteins, synaptic plasticity is intact, but is fundamentally different. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Induction and reversion process of molecular and cytological alterations after highly irradiated food ingestion in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo M, M.I.; Fernandez C, M.

    1984-01-01

    The molecular and cytological alterations induced in a mammal (Mus musculus) fed ad libitum with a balanced pellet diet irradiated with 50 KGy gamma radiation from weaning, for different periods, are analyzed. The transient chromosomal changes that recall tumor-like phenomena could be the expression of the damage and repair processes induced by changed molecules present in irradiated food. The reversible alterations of DNA structure and cytoplasmatic soluble proteins observed in mice fed with irradiated pellet diet could be interpreted as a result of the enhancement of the repair processes which could also explain the significant increase of the radioresistance of DNA found at 200 days after irradiated food ingestion. Finally, our results would suggest an induction of a pseudo-neoplasia due to a prolongated and exclusive ingestion of food irradiated with sterilizing gamma dose. Moreover, the maintenance of the irradiated diet induce the reversion of the observed phenomena by an eventual activation of the repair mechanisms. (Author)

  3. Small molecule inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus RnpA alter cellular mRNA turnover, exhibit antimicrobial activity, and attenuate pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D Olson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is estimated to cause more U.S. deaths annually than HIV/AIDS. The emergence of hypervirulent and multidrug-resistant strains has further amplified public health concern and accentuated the need for new classes of antibiotics. RNA degradation is a required cellular process that could be exploited for novel antimicrobial drug development. However, such discovery efforts have been hindered because components of the Gram-positive RNA turnover machinery are incompletely defined. In the current study we found that the essential S. aureus protein, RnpA, catalyzes rRNA and mRNA digestion in vitro. Exploiting this activity, high through-put and secondary screening assays identified a small molecule inhibitor of RnpA-mediated in vitro RNA degradation. This agent was shown to limit cellular mRNA degradation and exhibited antimicrobial activity against predominant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA lineages circulating throughout the U.S., vancomycin intermediate susceptible S. aureus (VISA, vancomycin resistant S. aureus (VRSA and other Gram-positive bacterial pathogens with high RnpA amino acid conservation. We also found that this RnpA-inhibitor ameliorates disease in a systemic mouse infection model and has antimicrobial activity against biofilm-associated S. aureus. Taken together, these findings indicate that RnpA, either alone, as a component of the RNase P holoenzyme, and/or as a member of a more elaborate complex, may play a role in S. aureus RNA degradation and provide proof of principle for RNA catabolism-based antimicrobial therapy.

  4. Infant avoidance training alters cellular activation patterns in prefronto-limbic circuits during adult avoidance learning: II. Cellular imaging of neurons expressing the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc/Arg3.1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröger, Nicole; Mannewitz, Anja; Bock, Jörg; Becker, Susann; Guttmann, Katja; Poeggel, Gerd; Braun, Katharina

    2018-03-01

    Positive and negative feedback learning is essential to optimize behavioral performance. We used the two-way active avoidance (TWA) task as an experimental paradigm for negative feedback learning with the aim to test the hypothesis that neuronal ensembles activate the activity-regulated cytoskeletal (Arc/Arg3.1) protein during different phases of avoidance learning and during retrieval. A variety of studies in humans and other animals revealed that the ability of aversive feedback learning emerges postnatally. Our previous findings demonstrated that rats, which as infants are not capable to learn an active avoidance strategy, show improved avoidance learning as adults. Based on these findings, we further tested the hypothesis that specific neuronal ensembles are "tagged" during infant TWA training and then reactivated during adult re-exposure to the same learning task. Using cellular imaging by immunocytochemical detection of Arc/Arg3.1, we observed that, compared to the untrained control group, (1) only in the dentate gyrus the density of Arc/Arg3.1-expressing neurons was elevated during the acquisition phase of TWA learning, and (2) this increase in Arc/Arg3.1-expressing neurons was not specific for the TWA learning task. With respect to the effects of infant TWA training we found that compared to the naïve non-pretrained group (a) the infant pretraining group displayed a higher density of Arc/Arg3.1-expressing neurons in the anterior cingulate cortex during acquisition on training day 1, and (b) the infant pretraining group displayed elevated density of Arc/Arg3.1-expressing neurons in the dentate gyrus during retrieval on test day 5. Correlation analysis for the acquisition phase revealed for the ACd that the animals which showed the highest number of avoidances and the fastest escape latencies displayed the highest density of Arc/Arg3.1-expressing neurons. Taken together, we are the first to use the synaptic plasticity protein Arc/Arg3.1 to label neuronal

  5. Long-Term Calorie Restriction Enhances Cellular Quality-Control Processes in Human Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calorie restriction (CR retards aging, acts as a hormetic intervention, and increases serum corticosterone and HSP70 expression in rodents. However, less is known regarding the effects of CR on these factors in humans. Serum cortisol and molecular chaperones and autophagic proteins were measured in the skeletal muscle of subjects on CR diets for 3–15 years and in control volunteers. Serum cortisol was higher in the CR group than in age-matched sedentary and endurance athlete groups (15.6 ± 4.6 ng/dl versus 12.3 ± 3.9 ng/dl and 11.2 ± 2.7 ng/dl, respectively; p ≤ 0.001. HSP70, Grp78, beclin-1, and LC3 mRNA and/or protein levels were higher in the skeletal muscle of the CR group compared to controls. Our data indicate that CR in humans is associated with sustained rises in serum cortisol, reduced inflammation, and increases in key molecular chaperones and autophagic mediators involved in cellular protein quality control and removal of dysfunctional proteins and organelles.

  6. Energetics of cellular repair processes in a respiratory-deficient mutant of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.K.; Gupta, I.; Lata, K.

    1982-01-01

    Repair of potentially lethal damage induced by cytoxic agents like UV irradiation (254 nm), psorelen-plus-UVA (365 mn), and methyl methanesulfonate has been studied in the presence of a glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, in yeast cells. Simultaneously, effects of 2-deoxy-D-glucose were also investigated on parameters of energy metabolism like glucose utilization, rate of ATP production, and ATP content of cells. The following results were obtained. (i) 2-Deoxy-D-glucose is able to inhibit repair of potentially lethal damage induced by all the cytotoxic agents tested. The 2-deoxy-D-glucose-induced inhibition of repair depends upon the type of lesion and the pattern of cellular energy metabolism, the inhibition being greater in respiratory-deficient mutants than in the wild type. (ii) A continuous energy flow is necessary for repair of potentially lethal damage in yeast cells. Energy may be supplied by the glycolytic and/or the respiratory pathway; respiratory metabolism is not essential for this purpose. (iii) The magnitude of repair correlates with the rate of ATP production in a sigmoid manner

  7. Cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting: Generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and processing parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    method based uncertainty and reliability analysis. The reliability of the scanning paths are established using cumulative probability distribution functions for process output criteria such as sample density, thermal homogeneity, etc. A customized genetic algorithm is used along with the simulation model......Selective laser melting is yet to become a standardized industrial manufacturing technique. The process continues to suffer from defects such as distortions, residual stresses, localized deformations and warpage caused primarily due to the localized heating, rapid cooling and high temperature...... gradients that occur during the process. While process monitoring and control of selective laser melting is an active area of research, establishing the reliability and robustness of the process still remains a challenge.In this paper, a methodology for generating reliable, optimized scanning paths...

  8. Diurnal Regulation of Cellular Processes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Insights from Transcriptomic, Fluxomic, and Physiological Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Rajib; Liu, Deng; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Liberton, Michelle; Yu, Jingjie; Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi, Maitrayee; Balassy, Andrea; Zhang, Fuzhong; Moon, Tae Seok; Maranas, Costas D; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2016-05-03

    Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is the most widely studied model cyanobacterium, with a well-developed omics level knowledgebase. Like the lifestyles of other cyanobacteria, that of Synechocystis PCC 6803 is tuned to diurnal changes in light intensity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns of all of the genes of this cyanobacterium over two consecutive diurnal periods. Using stringent criteria, we determined that the transcript levels of nearly 40% of the genes in Synechocystis PCC 6803 show robust diurnal oscillating behavior, with a majority of the transcripts being upregulated during the early light period. Such transcripts corresponded to a wide array of cellular processes, such as light harvesting, photosynthetic light and dark reactions, and central carbon metabolism. In contrast, transcripts of membrane transporters for transition metals involved in the photosynthetic electron transport chain (e.g., iron, manganese, and copper) were significantly upregulated during the late dark period. Thus, the pattern of global gene expression led to the development of two distinct transcriptional networks of coregulated oscillatory genes. These networks help describe how Synechocystis PCC 6803 regulates its metabolism toward the end of the dark period in anticipation of efficient photosynthesis during the early light period. Furthermore, in silico flux prediction of important cellular processes and experimental measurements of cellular ATP, NADP(H), and glycogen levels showed how this diurnal behavior influences its metabolic characteristics. In particular, NADPH/NADP(+) showed a strong correlation with the majority of the genes whose expression peaks in the light. We conclude that this ratio is a key endogenous determinant of the diurnal behavior of this cyanobacterium. Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes that use energy from sunlight and CO2 as feedstock. Certain cyanobacterial strains are amenable to facile genetic manipulation, thus enabling

  9. Diurnal Regulation of Cellular Processes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Insights from Transcriptomic, Fluxomic, and Physiological Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Saha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is the most widely studied model cyanobacterium, with a well-developed omics level knowledgebase. Like the lifestyles of other cyanobacteria, that of Synechocystis PCC 6803 is tuned to diurnal changes in light intensity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns of all of the genes of this cyanobacterium over two consecutive diurnal periods. Using stringent criteria, we determined that the transcript levels of nearly 40% of the genes in Synechocystis PCC 6803 show robust diurnal oscillating behavior, with a majority of the transcripts being upregulated during the early light period. Such transcripts corresponded to a wide array of cellular processes, such as light harvesting, photosynthetic light and dark reactions, and central carbon metabolism. In contrast, transcripts of membrane transporters for transition metals involved in the photosynthetic electron transport chain (e.g., iron, manganese, and copper were significantly upregulated during the late dark period. Thus, the pattern of global gene expression led to the development of two distinct transcriptional networks of coregulated oscillatory genes. These networks help describe how Synechocystis PCC 6803 regulates its metabolism toward the end of the dark period in anticipation of efficient photosynthesis during the early light period. Furthermore, in silico flux prediction of important cellular processes and experimental measurements of cellular ATP, NADP(H, and glycogen levels showed how this diurnal behavior influences its metabolic characteristics. In particular, NADPH/NADP+ showed a strong correlation with the majority of the genes whose expression peaks in the light. We conclude that this ratio is a key endogenous determinant of the diurnal behavior of this cyanobacterium.

  10. Altered insula response to sweet taste processing after recovery from anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberndorfer, Tyson A; Frank, Guido K W; Simmons, Alan N; Wagner, Angela; McCurdy, Danyale; Fudge, Julie L; Yang, Tony T; Paulus, Martin P; Kaye, Walter H

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that altered function of higher-order appetitive neural circuitry may contribute to restricted eating in anorexia nervosa and overeating in bulimia nervosa. This study used sweet tastes to interrogate gustatory neurocircuitry involving the anterior insula and related regions that modulate sensory-interoceptive-reward signals in response to palatable foods. Participants who had recovered from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were studied to avoid confounding effects of altered nutritional state. Functional MRI measured brain response to repeated tastes of sucrose and sucralose to disentangle neural processing of caloric and noncaloric sweet tastes. Whole-brain functional analysis was constrained to anatomical regions of interest. Relative to matched comparison women (N=14), women recovered from anorexia nervosa (N=14) had significantly diminished and women recovered from bulimia nervosa (N=14) had significantly elevated hemodynamic response to tastes of sucrose in the right anterior insula. Anterior insula response to sucrose compared with sucralose was exaggerated in the recovered group (lower in women recovered from anorexia nervosa and higher in women recovered from bulimia nervosa). The anterior insula integrates sensory reward aspects of taste in the service of nutritional homeostasis. One possibility is that restricted eating and weight loss occur in anorexia nervosa because of a failure to accurately recognize hunger signals, whereas overeating in bulimia nervosa could represent an exaggerated perception of hunger signals. This response may reflect the altered calibration of signals related to sweet taste and the caloric content of food and may offer a pathway to novel and more effective treatments.

  11. Short Range-Ordered Minerals: Insight into Aqueous Alteration Processes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R. V.; Golden, D. C.

    2011-01-01

    involved. The style of aqueous alteration (hydrolytic vs. acid sulfate) impacts which phases will form (e.g., oxides, oxysulfates, and oxyhydroxides). Knowledge on the formation processes of SRO phases in basaltic materials on Earth has allowed significant enhancement in our understanding of the aqueous processes at work on Mars. The 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will provide an instrument suite that should improve our understanding of the mineralogical and chemical compositions of SRO phases. CheMin is an X-ray diffraction instrument that may provide broad X-ray diffraction peaks for SRO phases; e.g., broad peaks around 0.33 and 0.23 nm for allophane. Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) heats samples and detects evolved gases of volatile-bearing phases including SRO phases (i.e., carbonates, sulfates, hydrated minerals). The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and ChemCam element analyzers will provide chemical characterization of samples. The identification of SRO phases in surface materials on MSL will be challenging due to their nanocrystalline properties; their detection and identification will require utilizing the MSL instrument suite in concert. Ultimately, sample return missions will be required to definitively identify and fully characterize SRO minerals with state-of-the-art laboratory instrumentation back on Earth.

  12. Modeling Wettability Alteration using Chemical EOR Processes in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojdeh Delshad; Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori

    2007-09-30

    The objective of our search is to develop a mechanistic simulation tool by adapting UTCHEM to model the wettability alteration in both conventional and naturally fractured reservoirs. This will be a unique simulator that can model surfactant floods in naturally fractured reservoir with coupling of wettability effects on relative permeabilities, capillary pressure, and capillary desaturation curves. The capability of wettability alteration will help us and others to better understand and predict the oil recovery mechanisms as a function of wettability in naturally fractured reservoirs. The lack of a reliable simulator for wettability alteration means that either the concept that has already been proven to be effective in the laboratory scale may never be applied commercially to increase oil production or the process must be tested in the field by trial and error and at large expense in time and money. The objective of Task 1 is to perform a literature survey to compile published data on relative permeability, capillary pressure, dispersion, interfacial tension, and capillary desaturation curve as a function of wettability to aid in the development of petrophysical property models as a function of wettability. The new models and correlations will be tested against published data. The models will then be implemented in the compositional chemical flooding reservoir simulator, UTCHEM. The objective of Task 2 is to understand the mechanisms and develop a correlation for the degree of wettability alteration based on published data. The objective of Task 3 is to validate the models and implementation against published data and to perform 3-D field-scale simulations to evaluate the impact of uncertainties in the fracture and matrix properties on surfactant alkaline and hot water floods.

  13. Processing of stimulus content but not of emotional valence is altered in persons with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, A P; Dykens, E M

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) exhibit hypersociability and may respond atypically to emotional information in social and nonsocial stimuli. It is not yet clear whether these difficulties are specific to emotional content or stimulus type. This study examined the neural processes supporting social and emotional information processing in WS. Visual event-related potentials were recorded in 19 adults with WS and 10 typical peers during a picture-viewing task requiring detection of smiling faces among other social and nonsocial images with positive and negative emotional content. The participant groups were not significantly different in affective processing of positive and negative stimuli and perceived faces as different from nonsocial images. Participants with WS showed subtle differences in face-specific perceptual processes (e.g. face inversion, N170 lateralisation), suggesting a more feature-based processing. They also demonstrated reduced attention and arousal modulation (P3, late positive potential) in response to faces vs. nonsocial images. These differences were independent of intelligence quotient. There was no evidence of greater than typical perceptual, attentional or affective processing of social information in WS. The results support the idea that altered face perception processes and not the increased salience of social stimuli or difficulties with emotion discrimination may contribute to the hypersocial phenotype in WS. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Navigating neurites utilize cellular topography of Schwann cell somas and processes for optimal guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Fagundo, Cristina; Mitchel, Jennifer A.; Ramchal, Talisha D.; Dingle, Yu-Ting L.; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2013-01-01

    The path created by aligned Schwann cells (SCs) after nerve injury underlies peripheral nerve regeneration. We developed geometric bioinspired substrates to extract key information needed for axon guidance by deconstructing the topographical cues presented by SCs. We have previously reported materials that directly replicate SC topography with micro- and nanoscale resolution, but a detailed explanation of the means of directed axon extension on SC topography has not yet been described. Here, using neurite tracing and time-lapse microscopy, we analyzed the SC features that influence axon guidance. Novel poly(dimethylsiloxane) materials, fabricated via photolithography, incorporated bioinspired topographical components with the shapes and sizes of aligned SCs, namely somas and processes, where the length of the processes were varied but the soma geometry and dimensions were kept constant. Rat dorsal root ganglia neurites aligned to all materials presenting bioinspired topography after a 5 days in culture and to bioinspired materials presenting soma and process features after only 17 hours in culture. Key findings of this study were: Neurite response to underlying bioinspired topographical features was time dependent, where at 5 days, neurites aligned most strongly to materials presenting combinations of soma and process features, with higher than average density of either process or soma features; but at 17 hours they aligned more strongly to materials presenting average densities of soma and process features and to materials presenting process features only. These studies elucidate the influence of SC topography on axon guidance in a time-dependent setting and have implications for the optimization of nerve regeneration strategies. PMID:23557939

  15. A Configurable Design for Morphological Erosion and Dilation Operations in Image Processing using Quantum-dot Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Mardiris

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel configurable design for the implementation of basic morphological operations based on Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA technology. QCA is a promising technology in the field of nanoelectronics that could be utilized in many image processing applications. QCA architecture will provide better performance by exploiting parallel processing, better silicon-area utilization, maximization of clock speed and very low power consumption. Fundamentals of QCA technology and circuit design and the basic operations of mathematical morphology are presented in brief. A new innovative QCA design that is capable to implement either the erosion or the dilation morphological operation, configured by the value of one-bit input is designed, simulated and tested with success.

  16. Induction of Nrf2-mediated cellular defenses and alteration of phase I activities as mechanisms of chemoprotective effects of coffee in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavin, C; Marin-Kuan, M; Langouët, S; Bezençon, C; Guignard, G; Verguet, C; Piguet, D; Holzhäuser, D; Cornaz, R; Schilter, B

    2008-04-01

    Coffee consumption has been associated with a significant decrease in the risk of developing chronic diseases such as Parkinson disease, diabetes type-2 and several types of cancers (e.g. colon, liver). In the present study, a coffee-dependent induction of enzymes involved in xenobiotic detoxification processes was observed in rat liver and primary hepatocytes. In addition, coffee was found to induce the mRNA and protein expression of enzymes involved in cellular antioxidant defenses. These inductions were correlated with the activation of the Nrf2 transcription factor as shown using an ARE-reporter luciferase assay. The induction of detoxifying enzymes GSTs and AKR is compatible with a protection against both genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). This hypothesis was confirmed in in vitro and ex vivo test systems, where coffee reduced both AFB1-DNA and protein adducts. Interestingly, coffee was also found to inhibit cytochrome CYP1A1/2, indicating that other mechanisms different from a stimulation of detoxification may also play a significant role in the chemoprotective effects of coffee. Further investigations in either human liver cell line and primary hepatocytes indicated that the chemoprotective effects of coffee against AFB1 genotoxicity are likely to be of relevance for humans. These data strongly suggest that coffee may protect against the adverse effects of AFB1. In addition, the coffee-mediated stimulation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway resulting in increased endogenous defense mechanisms against electrophilic but also oxidative insults further support that coffee may be associated with a protection against various types of chemical stresses.

  17. Implementation of a configurable laboratory information management system for use in cellular process development and manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russom, Diana; Ahmed, Amira; Gonzalez, Nancy; Alvarnas, Joseph; DiGiusto, David

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory requirements for the manufacturing of cell products for clinical investigation require a significant level of record-keeping, starting early in process development and continuing through to the execution and requisite follow-up of patients on clinical trials. Central to record-keeping is the management of documentation related to patients, raw materials, processes, assays and facilities. To support these requirements, we evaluated several laboratory information management systems (LIMS), including their cost, flexibility, regulatory compliance, ongoing programming requirements and ability to integrate with laboratory equipment. After selecting a system, we performed a pilot study to develop a user-configurable LIMS for our laboratory in support of our pre-clinical and clinical cell-production activities. We report here on the design and utilization of this system to manage accrual with a healthy blood-donor protocol, as well as manufacturing operations for the production of a master cell bank and several patient-specific stem cell products. The system was used successfully to manage blood donor eligibility, recruiting, appointments, billing and serology, and to provide annual accrual reports. Quality management reporting features of the system were used to capture, report and investigate process and equipment deviations that occurred during the production of a master cell bank and patient products. Overall the system has served to support the compliance requirements of process development and phase I/II clinical trial activities for our laboratory and can be easily modified to meet the needs of similar laboratories.

  18. A differential genome-wide transcriptome analysis: impact of cellular copper on complex biological processes like aging and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Servos

    Full Text Available The regulation of cellular copper homeostasis is crucial in biology. Impairments lead to severe dysfunctions and are known to affect aging and development. Previously, a loss-of-function mutation in the gene encoding the copper-sensing and copper-regulated transcription factor GRISEA of the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina was reported to lead to cellular copper depletion and a pleiotropic phenotype with hypopigmentation of the mycelium and the ascospores, affected fertility and increased lifespan by approximately 60% when compared to the wild type. This phenotype is linked to a switch from a copper-dependent standard to an alternative respiration leading to both a reduced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and of adenosine triphosphate (ATP. We performed a genome-wide comparative transcriptome analysis of a wild-type strain and the copper-depleted grisea mutant. We unambiguously assigned 9,700 sequences of the transcriptome in both strains to the more than 10,600 predicted and annotated open reading frames of the P. anserina genome indicating 90% coverage of the transcriptome. 4,752 of the transcripts differed significantly in abundance with 1,156 transcripts differing at least 3-fold. Selected genes were investigated by qRT-PCR analyses. Apart from this general characterization we analyzed the data with special emphasis on molecular pathways related to the grisea mutation taking advantage of the available complete genomic sequence of P. anserina. This analysis verified but also corrected conclusions from earlier data obtained by single gene analysis, identified new candidates of factors as part of the cellular copper homeostasis system including target genes of transcription factor GRISEA, and provides a rich reference source of quantitative data for further in detail investigations. Overall, the present study demonstrates the importance of systems biology approaches also in cases were mutations in single genes are analyzed to

  19. Sexual Abuse Exposure Alters Early Processing of Emotional Words: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Grégoire

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the time course of emotional information processing between trauma-exposed and control participants, using electrophysiological measures. We conceived an emotional Stroop task with two types of words: trauma-related emotional words and neutral words. We assessed the evoked cerebral responses of sexual abuse victims without post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and no abuse participants. We focused particularly on an early wave (C1/P1, the N2pc, and the P3b. Our main result indicated an early effect (55–165 ms of emotionality, which varied between non-exposed participants and sexual abuse victims. This suggests that potentially traumatic experiences modulate early processing of emotional information. Our findings showing neurobiological alterations in sexual abuse victims (without PTSD suggest that exposure to highly emotional events has an important impact on neurocognitive function even in the absence of psychopathology.

  20. Alteration and arenization processes of granitic waste rock piles from former uranium Mines in Limousin, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzari, Aisha; Boekhout, Flora; Gérard, Martine; Galoisy, Laurence; Phrommavanh, Vannapha; Descostes, Michael

    2014-05-01

    France counts approximately 200 former uranium mines, 50 of which are located in the Limousin region. Mining activities between 1945 and 2001 have generated close to 200 000 tons of waste rocks in the Limousin, with uranium levels corresponding essentially to the geological background. Waste rock piles from three former mining sites in this region, were selected according to their age, uranium content and petrological signature. These sites are part of the two-mica granitic complex of St Sylvestre massif, formed 324 million years ago. Granitic blocks that build up the waste rock piles have experienced different processes and intensities of alteration before their emplacement at the surface. These processes are responsible for the petrological heterogeneity throughout the waste rock pile at the time of construction. It is important to make a distinction within waste rocks between natural-cut-off waste rocks and economic-cut-off waste rocks. The latter represents a minority and is linked to stock prices. Natural-cut-off waste rocks contain about 20 ppm of uranium; economic-cut-off waste rocks contain about 100 to 300 ppm of uranium. The aims of this study are to 1) assess the neo-formation of U-bearing minerals hosted by these rocks, and 2) to characterize the weathering processes since the construction of the rock piles, including both mechanical and chemical processes. The structure of the waste rocks piles, from metric blocks to boulders of tens centimeters, induces an enhanced weathering rate, compared to a granitic massif. Mechanical fracturing and chemical leaching by rainwater (arenization) of the waste rocks produce a sandy-silty alteration phase. Silty-clay weathering aureoles of submetric-granitic blocks evolving into technic soil are mainly located below growing birch trees. Sampling on the rock piles was restricted to surface rocks. Samples collected consist mainly of granites, and rare lamprophyres with a high radiometric signal, thereby especially

  1. Real time control of curved laser welding processes by cellular neural networks (CNN): first results

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolosi, L.; Tetzlaff, R.

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades the laser beam welding (LBW) has outclassed older welding techniques in the industrial scenario. Despite the improvement in welding technology, sophisticated methods of fault detection are not commonly used in commercially available equipments yet. A recent analysis of process images have revealed the possibility to build up a real time closed loop control system. By the use of image based quality features, a feedback signal can be provided to maintain th...

  2. Long latency auditory evoked potentials and central auditory processing in children with reading and writing alterations: Preliminary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares, Aparecido José Couto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Presently, it is admitted that individuals with reading and writing alterations may present delay in the development of listening skills, which may interfere in the learning process. The assessment of the listening skills can occur in a behavioral way, through central auditory processing (CAP tests, or by electrophysiological assessment highlighting the long latency auditory evoked potentials (LLAEP. The use of the LLAEP as a means of complementary assessment of individuals with reading and writing alterations can become an important data both for further characterization of the alterations, as for the therapeutic guidance of this population. Objective: Characterize the CAP and the LLAEP in children with reading and writing alterations. Method: Research approved by the Institution's Ethic Commission under nº 305/10. The assessment of CAP and LLAEP was performed in 12 children aged between 8 and 12 years old (average of 10,6 years, with reading and writing alterations confirmed in specific evaluation. Results: The most altered CAP skills were temporal ordination and figure-ground for linguistic sounds. There were found altered results in P300 and in MMN. Conclusion: The individuals with reading and writing alterations performed below the expected on CAP tests. The MMN allowed a better characterization of the auditory function of this population. There was evidence of association between the CAP results and the alteration of the LLAEP.

  3. Implications of alteration processes on radon emanation, radon production rate and W-Sn exploration in the Panasqueira ore district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Filipa; Pereira, Alcides

    2018-05-01

    Alteration processes have strong impacts on the chemical and physical properties of rock masses. Because they can affect the contents and the distribution of U as well as enhance the permeability of the bedrock, they may lead to a significant increase of radon release to the environment. However, their influence on radon emanation and radon production rate has yet to be properly assessed. To investigate the impact of alteration processes on the radiological properties, samples were collected in the Panasqueira region under the influence of surface weathering, deuteric, hydrothermal and fault related alteration. Major and trace elements (U, Th), physical, and radiological properties were measured in metasedimentary and fault rocks. The degree of alteration and weathering progress were assessed through indices of alteration, porosity and bulk density. Overall, an increase of the radon emanation coefficient from (approximately) 0.1 to 0.4 and radon production rate (from 40 to over 160Bq·m -3 ·h -1 ) is observed with the progress of physicochemical alteration. Decoupling of physical and chemical alteration however implies both must be quantified towards a proper assessment of the degree of alteration. The behavior of radiogenic elements upon alteration is shown to be complex and contingent upon the alteration process. An atypical increase of radon emanation in the ore district due to U mobilization was caused by hydrothermal alteration. Because radon emanation is not dependent upon the pelitic nature of the metasedimentary rocks, it may thus become a proxy for W-Sn exploration. The dependency of radon production rate from the latter constrains its use for exploration. Nevertheless, it may provide a reliable estimation of the bedrock contribution to indoor radon concentrations. Higher indoor radon concentrations, hence, a higher risk of exposure to radon are expected in the ore district as well as within fault zones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Morphology of Filamentous Fungi: Linking Cellular Biology to Process Engineering Using Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Rainer; Cordes, Christiana; Horn, Harald; Kampen, Ingo; Kwade, Arno; Neu, Thomas R.; Nörtemann, Bernd

    In various biotechnological processes, filamentous fungi, e.g. Aspergillus niger, are widely applied for the production of high value-added products due to their secretion efficiency. There is, however, a tangled relationship between the morphology of these microorganisms, the transport phenomena and the related productivity. The morphological characteristics vary between freely dispersed mycelia and distinct pellets of aggregated biomass. Hence, advantages and disadvantages for mycel or pellet cultivation have to be balanced out carefully. Due to this inadequate understanding of morphogenesis of filamentous microorganisms, fungal morphology, along with reproducibility of inocula of the same quality, is often a bottleneck of productivity in industrial production. To obtain an optimisation of the production process it is of great importance to gain a better understanding of the molecular and cell biology of these microorganisms as well as the approaches in biochemical engineering and particle technique, in particular to characterise the interactions between the growth conditions, cell morphology, spore-hyphae-interactions and product formation. Advances in particle and image analysis techniques as well as micromechanical devices and their applications to fungal cultivations have made available quantitative morphological data on filamentous cells. This chapter provides the ambitious aspects of this line of action, focussing on the control and characterisation of the morphology, the transport gradients and the approaches to understand the metabolism of filamentous fungi. Based on these data, bottlenecks in the morphogenesis of A. niger within the complex production pathways from gene to product should be identified and this may improve the production yield.

  5. Altered neural processing of reward and punishment in adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landes, I; Bakos, S; Kohls, G; Bartling, J; Schulte-Körne, G; Greimel, E

    2018-05-01

    Altered reward and punishment function has been suggested as an important vulnerability factor for the development of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Prior ERP studies found evidence for neurophysiological dysfunctions in reinforcement processes in adults with MDD. To date, only few ERP studies have examined the neural underpinnings of reinforcement processing in adolescents diagnosed with MDD. The present event-related potential (ERP) study aimed to investigate neurophysiological mechanisms of anticipation and consumption of reward and punishment in adolescents with MDD in one comprehensive paradigm. During ERP recording, 25 adolescents with MDD and 29 healthy controls (12-17 years) completed a Monetary Incentive Delay Task comprising both a monetary reward and a monetary punishment condition. During anticipation, the cue-P3 signaling attentional allocation was recorded. During consumption, the feedback-P3 and Reward Positivity (RewP) were recorded to capture attentional allocation and outcome evaluation, respectively. Compared to controls, adolescents with MDD showed prolonged cue-P3 latencies to reward cues. Furthermore, unlike controls, adolescents with MDD displayed shorter feedback-P3 latencies in the reward versus punishment condition. RewPs did not differ between groups. It remains unanswered whether the observed alterations in adolescent MDD represent a state or trait. Delayed neural processing of reward cues corresponds to the clinical presentation of adolescent MDD with reduced motivational tendencies to obtain rewards. Relatively shorter feedback-P3 latencies in the reward versus punishment condition could indicate a high salience of performance-contingent reward. Frequent exposure of negatively biased adolescents with MDD to performance-contingent rewards might constitute a promising intervention approach. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Altered monetary loss processing and reinforcement-based learning in individuals with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kube, Jana; Mathar, David; Horstmann, Annette; Kotz, Sonja A; Villringer, Arno; Neumann, Jane

    2017-12-29

    Individuals with obesity are often characterized by alterations in reward processing. This may affect how new information is used to update stimulus values during reinforcement-based learning. Here, we investigated obesity-related changes in non-food reinforcement processing, their impact on learning performance as well as the neural underpinnings of reinforcement-based learning in obesity. Nineteen individuals with obesity (BMI > = 30 kg/m 2 , 10 female) and 23 lean control participants (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m 2 , 11 female) performed a probabilistic learning task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in which they learned to choose between advantageous and disadvantageous choice options in separate monetary gain, loss, and neutral conditions. During learning individuals with obesity made a significantly lower number of correct choices and accumulated a significantly lower overall monetary outcome than lean control participants. FMRI analyses revealed aberrant medial prefrontal cortex responses to monetary losses in individuals with obesity. There were no significant group differences in the regional representation of prediction errors. However, we found evidence for increased functional connectivity between the ventral striatum and insula in individuals with obesity. The present results suggest that obesity is associated with aberrant value representations for monetary losses, alterations in functional connectivity during the processing of learning outcomes, as well as a decresased reinforcement-based learning performance. This may affect how new information is incorporated to adjust dysfunctional behavior and could be a factor contributing to the maintenance of dysfunctional eating behavior in obesity.

  7. Cognitive alterations in motor imagery process after left hemispheric ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Motor imagery training is a promising rehabilitation strategy for stroke patients. However, few studies had focused on the neural mechanisms in time course of its cognitive process. This study investigated the cognitive alterations after left hemispheric ischemic stroke during motor imagery task. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eleven patients with ischemic stroke in left hemisphere and eleven age-matched control subjects participated in mental rotation task (MRT of hand pictures. Behavior performance, event-related potential (ERP and event-related (desynchronization (ERD/ERS in beta band were analyzed to investigate the cortical activation. We found that: (1 The response time increased with orientation angles in both groups, called "angle effect", however, stoke patients' responses were impaired with significantly longer response time and lower accuracy rate; (2 In early visual perceptual cognitive process, stroke patients showed hypo-activations in frontal and central brain areas in aspects of both P200 and ERD; (3 During mental rotation process, P300 amplitude in control subjects decreased while angle increased, called "amplitude modulation effect", which was not observed in stroke patients. Spatially, patients showed significant lateralization of P300 with activation only in contralesional (right parietal cortex while control subjects showed P300 in both parietal lobes. Stroke patients also showed an overall cortical hypo-activation of ERD during this sub-stage; (4 In the response sub-stage, control subjects showed higher ERD values with more activated cortical areas particularly in the right hemisphere while angle increased, named "angle effect", which was not observed in stroke patients. In addition, stroke patients showed significant lower ERD for affected hand (right response than that for unaffected hand. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cortical activation was altered differently in each cognitive sub-stage of motor imagery after

  8. Altered visual information processing systems in bipolar disorder: evidence from visual MMN and P3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko eMaekawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Mismatch negativity (MMN and P3 are unique ERP components that provide objective indices of human cognitive functions such as short-term memory and prediction. Bipolar disorder (BD is an endogenous psychiatric disorder characterized by extreme shifts in mood, energy, and ability to function socially. BD patients usually show cognitive dysfunction, and the goal of this study was to access their altered visual information processing via visual MMN (vMMN and P3 using windmill pattern stimuli.Methods: Twenty patients with BD and 20 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and handedness participated in this study. Subjects were seated in front of a monitor and listened to a story via earphones. Two types of windmill patterns (standard and deviant and white circle (target stimuli were randomly presented on the monitor. All stimuli were presented in random order at 200-ms durations with an 800-ms inter-stimulus interval. Stimuli were presented at 80% (standard, 10% (deviant, and 10% (target probabilities. The participants were instructed to attend to the story and press a button as soon as possible when the target stimuli were presented. Event-related potentials were recorded throughout the experiment using 128-channel EEG equipment. vMMN was obtained by subtracting standard from deviant stimuli responses, and P3 was evoked from the target stimulus.Results: Mean reaction times for target stimuli in the BD group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Additionally, mean vMMN-amplitudes and peak P3-amplitudes were significantly lower in the BD group than in controls.Conclusions: Abnormal vMMN and P3 in patients indicate a deficit of visual information processing in bipolar disorder, which is consistent with their increased reaction time to visual target stimuli.Significance: Both bottom-up and top-down visual information processing are likely altered in BD.

  9. Cellular Aspects of Shigella Pathogenesis: Focus on the Manipulation of Host Cell Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killackey, Samuel A; Sorbara, Matthew T; Girardin, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterium that is responsible for shigellosis. Over the years, the study of Shigella has provided a greater understanding of how the host responds to bacterial infection, and how bacteria have evolved to effectively counter the host defenses. In this review, we provide an update on some of the most recent advances in our understanding of pivotal processes associated with Shigella infection, including the invasion into host cells, the metabolic changes that occur within the bacterium and the infected cell, cell-to-cell spread mechanisms, autophagy and membrane trafficking, inflammatory signaling and cell death. This recent progress sheds a new light into the mechanisms underlying Shigella pathogenesis, and also more generally provides deeper understanding of the complex interplay between host cells and bacterial pathogens in general.

  10. Cellular responses of human astrocytoma cells to dust from the Acheson process: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldussen, Yke Jildouw; Ervik, Torunn Kringlen; Berlinger, Balazs; Kero, Ida; Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh

    2018-03-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is largely used in various products such as diesel particulate filters and solar panels. It is produced through the Acheson process where aerosolized fractions of SiC and other by-products are generated in the work environment and may potentially affect the workers' health. In this study, dust was collected directly on a filter in a furnace hall over a time period of 24h. The collected dust was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and found to contain a high content of graphite particles, and carbon and silicon containing particles. Only 6% was classified as SiC, whereof only 10% had a fibrous structure. To study effects of exposure beyond the respiratory system, neurotoxic effects on human astrocytic cells, were investigated. Both low, occupationally relevant, and high doses from 9E-6μg/cm 2 up to 4.5μg/cm 2 were used, respectively. Cytotoxicity assay indicated no effects of low doses but an effect of the higher doses after 24h. Furthermore, investigation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicated no effects with low doses, whereas a higher dose of 0.9μg/cm 2 induced a significant increase in ROS and DNA damage. In summary, low doses of dust from the Acheson process may exert no or little toxic effects, at least experimentally in the laboratory on human astrocytes. However, higher doses have implications and are likely a result of the complex composition of the dust. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A new model for anaerobic processes of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors based on cellular automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2002-01-01

    The advantageous performance of the UASB reactors is due to the immobilisation of the active biomass, since bacteria coagulate forming aggregates usually called granules. Changes in organic loading rate, hydraulic loading rate or influent substrate composition usually result in changes in granule...... characteristics and lead to different reactor behaviour. A dynamic mathematical model has been developed for the anaerobic digestion of a glucose based synthetic wastewater in UASB reactors. Cellular automata (CA) theory has been applied to simulate the granule development process. The model takes...... into consideration that granule diameter and granule microbial composition are functions of the reactor operational parameters and is capable of predicting the UASB performance and the layer structure of the granules....

  12. Photostable bipolar fluorescent probe for video tracking plasma membranes related cellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinfu; Wang, Chao; Jin, Liji; Han, Zhuo; Xiao, Yi

    2014-08-13

    Plasma membranes can sense the stimulations and transmit the signals from extracellular environment and then make further responses through changes in locations, shapes or morphologies. Common fluorescent membrane markers are not well suited for long time tracking due to their shorter retention time inside plasma membranes and/or their lower photostability. To this end, we develop a new bipolar marker, Mem-SQAC, which can stably insert into plasma membranes of different cells and exhibits a long retention time over 30 min. Mem-SQAC also inherits excellent photostability from the BODIPY dye family. Large two-photon absorption cross sections and long wavelength fluorescence emissions further enhance the competitiveness of Mem-SQAC as a membrane marker. By using Mem-SQAC, significant morphological changes of plasma membranes have been monitored during heavy metal poisoning and drug induced apoptosis of MCF-7 cells; the change tendencies are so distinctly different from each other that they can be used as indicators to distinguish different cell injuries. Further on, the complete processes of endocytosis toward Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by RAW 264.7 cells have been dynamically tracked. It is discovered that plasma membranes take quite different actions in response to the two bacteria, information unavailable in previous research reports.

  13. Aging process alters hippocampal and cortical secretase activities of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, Karine; Cechinel, Laura Reck; Schallenberger, Bruna; Meireles, Louisiana; Basso, Carla; Lovatel, Gisele Agustini; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2017-01-15

    A growing body of evidence has demonstrated amyloid plaques in aged brain; however, little attention has been given to amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing machinery during the healthy aging process. The amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic pathways, represented respectively by β- and α-secretases (BACE and TACE), are responsible for APP cleavage. Our working hypothesis is that the normal aging process could imbalance amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic pathways specifically BACE and TACE activities. Besides, although it has been showed that exercise can modulate secretase activities in Alzheimer Disease models the relationship between exercise effects and APP processing during healthy aging process is rarely studied. Our aim was to investigate the aging process and the exercise effects on cortical and hippocampal BACE and TACE activities and aversive memory performance. Young adult and aged Wistar rats were subjected to an exercise protocol (20min/day for 2 weeks) and to inhibitory avoidance task. Biochemical parameters were evaluated 1h and 18h after the last exercise session in order to verify transitory and delayed exercise effects. Aged rats exhibited impaired aversive memory and diminished cortical TACE activity. Moreover, an imbalance between TACE and BACE activities in favor of BACE activity was observed in aged brain. Moderate treadmill exercise was unable to alter secretase activities in any brain areas or time points evaluated. Our results suggest that aging-related aversive memory decline is partly linked to decreased cortical TACE activity. Additionally, an imbalance between secretase activities can be related to the higher vulnerability to neurodegenerative diseases induced by aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cellular distribution and function of ion channels involved in transport processes in rat tracheal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Anne; Faulhaber, Johannes; Srisawang, Lalita; Stortz, Andreas; Salomon, Johanna J; Mall, Marcus A; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Transport of water and electrolytes in airway epithelia involves chloride-selective ion channels, which are controlled either by cytosolic Ca 2+ or by cAMP The contributions of the two pathways to chloride transport differ among vertebrate species. Because rats are becoming more important as animal model for cystic fibrosis, we have examined how Ca 2+ - dependent and cAMP- dependent Cl - secretion is organized in the rat tracheal epithelium. We examined the expression of the Ca 2+ -gated Cl - channel anoctamin 1 (ANO1), the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl - channel, the epithelial Na + channel ENaC, and the water channel aquaporin 5 (AQP5) in rat tracheal epithelium. The contribution of ANO1 channels to nucleotide-stimulated Cl - secretion was determined using the channel blocker Ani9 in short-circuit current recordings obtained from primary cultures of rat tracheal epithelial cells in Ussing chambers. We found that ANO1, CFTR and AQP5 proteins were expressed in nonciliated cells of the tracheal epithelium, whereas ENaC was expressed in ciliated cells. Among nonciliated cells, ANO1 occurred together with CFTR and Muc5b and, in addition, in a different cell type without CFTR and Muc5b. Bioelectrical studies with the ANO1-blocker Ani9 indicated that ANO1 mediated the secretory response to the nucleotide uridine-5'-triphosphate. Our data demonstrate that, in rat tracheal epithelium, Cl - secretion and Na + absorption are routed through different cell types, and that ANO1 channels form the molecular basis of Ca 2+ -dependent Cl - secretion in this tissue. These characteristic features of Cl - -dependent secretion reveal similarities and distinct differences to secretory processes in human airways. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  15. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang, E-mail: bambang-ariwahjoedi@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia); Centre for Intelligent Signal and Imaging Research, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar (Malaysia); Ginta, Turnad Lenggo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia); Centre for Intelligent Signal and Imaging Research, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tro (Malaysia); Parman, Setyamartana [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia); Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad [Kebabangan Petroleum Operating Company Sdn Bhd, Lvl. 52, Tower 2, PETRONAS Twin Towers, KLCC, 50088 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm{sup −3} respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm{sup −1}, linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively.

  16. Human myosin VIIa is a very slow processive motor protein on various cellular actin structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Osamu; Komatsu, Satoshi; Sakai, Tsuyoshi; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Mizutani, Takeomi; Watanabe, Tomonobu M; Ikebe, Reiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2017-06-30

    Human myosin VIIa (MYO7A) is an actin-linked motor protein associated with human Usher syndrome (USH) type 1B, which causes human congenital hearing and visual loss. Although it has been thought that the role of human myosin VIIa is critical for USH1 protein tethering with actin and transportation along actin bundles in inner-ear hair cells, myosin VIIa's motor function remains unclear. Here, we studied the motor function of the tail-truncated human myosin VIIa dimer (HM7AΔTail/LZ) at the single-molecule level. We found that the HM7AΔTail/LZ moves processively on single actin filaments with a step size of 35 nm. Dwell-time distribution analysis indicated an average waiting time of 3.4 s, yielding ∼0.3 s -1 for the mechanical turnover rate; hence, the velocity of HM7AΔTail/LZ was extremely slow, at 11 nm·s -1 We also examined HM7AΔTail/LZ movement on various actin structures in demembranated cells. HM7AΔTail/LZ showed unidirectional movement on actin structures at cell edges, such as lamellipodia and filopodia. However, HM7AΔTail/LZ frequently missed steps on actin tracks and exhibited bidirectional movement at stress fibers, which was not observed with tail-truncated myosin Va. These results suggest that the movement of the human myosin VIIa motor protein is more efficient on lamellipodial and filopodial actin tracks than on stress fibers, which are composed of actin filaments with different polarity, and that the actin structures influence the characteristics of cargo transportation by human myosin VIIa. In conclusion, myosin VIIa movement appears to be suitable for translocating USH1 proteins on stereocilia actin bundles in inner-ear hair cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Combined effects of hydrologic alteration and cyprinid fish in mediating biogeochemical processes in a Mediterranean stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Gracia, Francesc; Almeida, David; Bonet, Berta; Casals, Frederic; Espinosa, Carmen; Flecker, Alexander S; García-Berthou, Emili; Martí, Eugènia; Tuulaikhuu, Baigal-Amar; Vila-Gispert, Anna; Zamora, Lluis; Guasch, Helena

    2017-12-01

    Flow regimes are important drivers of both stream community and biogeochemical processes. However, the interplay between community and biogeochemical responses under different flow regimes in streams is less understood. In this study, we investigated the structural and functional responses of periphyton and macroinvertebrates to different densities of the Mediterranean barbel (Barbus meridionalis, Cyprinidae) in two stream reaches differing in flow regime. The study was conducted in Llémena Stream, a small calcareous Mediterranean stream with high nutrient levels. We selected a reach with permanent flow (permanent reach) and another subjected to flow regulation (regulated reach) with periods of flow intermittency. At each reach, we used in situ cages to generate 3 levels of fish density. Cages with 10 barbels were used to simulate high fish density (>7indm -2 ); cages with open sides were used as controls (i.e. exposed to actual fish densities of each stream reach) thus having low fish density; and those with no fish were used to simulate the disappearance of fish that occurs with stream drying. Differences in fish density did not cause significant changes in periphyton biomass and macroinvertebrate density. However, phosphate uptake by periphyton was enhanced in treatments lacking fish in the regulated reach with intermittent flow but not in the permanent reach, suggesting that hydrologic alteration hampers the ability of biotic communities to compensate for the absence of fish. This study indicates that fish density can mediate the effects of anthropogenic alterations such as flow intermittence derived from hydrologic regulation on stream benthic communities and associated biogeochemical processes, at least in eutrophic streams. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. From Hills to Holes: How Climate Change and Mining are Altering Runoff Processes in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Canadian environments are under considerable pressure from both climate and land-use change. While warming temperatures are widespread and amplified in the north, surface mining has resulted in large-scale landscape disturbance. How these changes affect catchment response is profound, fundamentally altering the cycling and delivery of water and geochemicals to the drainage network. In permafrost-underlain environments, coupled mass and energy processes control runoff response, and as ground thaw increases, new subsurface pathways become accessible while changing overall catchment storage. With surface mining, watersheds are altered such that they bare little resemblance to what existed prior to mining. In this presentation, data will be presented from long-term experiments exploring the impact of climate and mining on runoff processes in cold catchments using stable isotopes of water and associated hydrometric measurements. In southern Yukon, results from the Wolf Creek Research Basin highlights the influence of surface energy balances on controlling the timing and magnitude of flow response, with inter-annual variability largely driven by how atmospheric forcing interacts with permafrost-underlain areas of the catchment. In mountainous areas of southern British Columbia, surface mining reconfigures landscapes as valleys are filled with waste-rock. Mine-influenced catchments exhibit attenuated flows with delays in spring freshet and a more muted to precipitation. Stable isotopes in stream water suggests that both waste-rock and reference catchments are well mixed, however reference catchments are more responsive to enrichment and depletion events and that mine-influenced catchments had a heavier isotope signature than reference watersheds, suggesting enhanced influence of rainfall on recharge. In both cases, snow storage and release exerts considerable control on streamflow responses, and future changes in streamflow regimes will reflect both a changes in the snow

  19. Anatomical alterations of the visual motion processing network in migraine with and without aura.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Granziera

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from migraine with aura (MWA and migraine without aura (MWoA show abnormalities in visual motion perception during and between attacks. Whether this represents the consequences of structural changes in motion-processing networks in migraineurs is unknown. Moreover, the diagnosis of migraine relies on patient's history, and finding differences in the brain of migraineurs might help to contribute to basic research aimed at better understanding the pathophysiology of migraine.To investigate a common potential anatomical basis for these disturbances, we used high-resolution cortical thickness measurement and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to examine the motion-processing network in 24 migraine patients (12 with MWA and 12 MWoA and 15 age-matched healthy controls (HCs. We found increased cortical thickness of motion-processing visual areas MT+ and V3A in migraineurs compared to HCs. Cortical thickness increases were accompanied by abnormalities of the subjacent white matter. In addition, DTI revealed that migraineurs have alterations in superior colliculus and the lateral geniculate nucleus, which are also involved in visual processing.A structural abnormality in the network of motion-processing areas could account for, or be the result of, the cortical hyperexcitability observed in migraineurs. The finding in patients with both MWA and MWoA of thickness abnormalities in area V3A, previously described as a source in spreading changes involved in visual aura, raises the question as to whether a "silent" cortical spreading depression develops as well in MWoA. In addition, these experimental data may provide clinicians and researchers with a noninvasively acquirable migraine biomarker.

  20. Theoretical aspects and modelling of cellular decision making, cell killing and information-processing in photodynamic therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkigkitzis, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this report is to provide a mathematical model of the mechanism for making binary fate decisions about cell death or survival, during and after Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) treatment, and to supply the logical design for this decision mechanism as an application of rate distortion theory to the biochemical processing of information by the physical system of a cell. Based on system biology models of the molecular interactions involved in the PDT processes previously established, and regarding a cellular decision-making system as a noisy communication channel, we use rate distortion theory to design a time dependent Blahut-Arimoto algorithm where the input is a stimulus vector composed of the time dependent concentrations of three PDT related cell death signaling molecules and the output is a cell fate decision. The molecular concentrations are determined by a group of rate equations. The basic steps are: initialize the probability of the cell fate decision, compute the conditional probability distribution that minimizes the mutual information between input and output, compute the cell probability of cell fate decision that minimizes the mutual information and repeat the last two steps until the probabilities converge. Advance to the next discrete time point and repeat the process. Based on the model from communication theory described in this work, and assuming that the activation of the death signal processing occurs when any of the molecular stimulants increases higher than a predefined threshold (50% of the maximum concentrations), for 1800s of treatment, the cell undergoes necrosis within the first 30 minutes with probability range 90.0%-99.99% and in the case of repair/survival, it goes through apoptosis within 3-4 hours with probability range 90.00%-99.00%. Although, there is no experimental validation of the model at this moment, it reproduces some patterns of survival ratios of predicted experimental data. Analytical modeling based on cell death

  1. Theoretical aspects and modelling of cellular decision making, cell killing and information-processing in photodynamic therapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this report is to provide a mathematical model of the mechanism for making binary fate decisions about cell death or survival, during and after Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) treatment, and to supply the logical design for this decision mechanism as an application of rate distortion theory to the biochemical processing of information by the physical system of a cell. Methods Based on system biology models of the molecular interactions involved in the PDT processes previously established, and regarding a cellular decision-making system as a noisy communication channel, we use rate distortion theory to design a time dependent Blahut-Arimoto algorithm where the input is a stimulus vector composed of the time dependent concentrations of three PDT related cell death signaling molecules and the output is a cell fate decision. The molecular concentrations are determined by a group of rate equations. The basic steps are: initialize the probability of the cell fate decision, compute the conditional probability distribution that minimizes the mutual information between input and output, compute the cell probability of cell fate decision that minimizes the mutual information and repeat the last two steps until the probabilities converge. Advance to the next discrete time point and repeat the process. Results Based on the model from communication theory described in this work, and assuming that the activation of the death signal processing occurs when any of the molecular stimulants increases higher than a predefined threshold (50% of the maximum concentrations), for 1800s of treatment, the cell undergoes necrosis within the first 30 minutes with probability range 90.0%-99.99% and in the case of repair/survival, it goes through apoptosis within 3-4 hours with probability range 90.00%-99.00%. Although, there is no experimental validation of the model at this moment, it reproduces some patterns of survival ratios of predicted experimental data. Conclusions

  2. Reservoir-induced Alterations in Flood Seasonality: Patterns, Processes, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeshu, G. W.; Li, H. Y.; Yigzaw, W.; Hejazi, M. I.; Tang, J.; Demissie, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Reservoirs are by far the most significant human activities that are imposing hydrologic alterations, specifically related to extreme flow conditions. This study presents the effects of reservoir regulation on flood seasonality in different hydrologic and climate settings across the contiguous United States. The data employed consists of reservoir information from the National Inventory of Dams (NID) and Global Reservoir and Dam (GRanD) database along with USGS stream flow data for pre- and post-impoundment periods. A new flood seasonality index was developed with circular statistics to reveal any significant shifts in flood timing between pre- and post-impoundments periods at each USGS station. Reservoir Impact Index (RII) was developed as a function of storage capacity and mean annual streamflow to quantify the regulation effects of reservoirs on flood seasonality. Process understanding of how reservoir regulation affects flow seasonality was analyzed based on RII using simple but physically-based reservoir models with different degrees of complexity, e.g., simple linear and hedging models. Results indicate that the shift in seasonality of annual maximum flood (AMF) at downstream generally increases with increasing RII, given that reservoir has enough storage to regulate the flood. The process modeling results also imply that reservoir state prior to the occurrence of AMF, antecedent climatic patterns and catchment state affect the shift in AMF arrival at downstream. These findings will help improve the ability to examine issues connected to flood frequency characteristics including nutrient delivery, sediment load and stream temperature shifts at downstream of dams.

  3. Growth Hormone Receptor Antagonist Transgenic Mice Have Increased Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Mass, Altered Glucose Homeostasis and No Change in White Adipose Tissue Cellular Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comisford, Ross; Lubbers, Ellen R; Householder, Lara A; Suer, Ozan; Tchkonia, Tamara; Kirkland, James L; List, Edward O; Kopchick, John J; Berryman, Darlene E

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-resistant/deficient mice experience improved glucose homeostasis and substantially increased lifespan. Recent evidence suggests that long-lived GH-resistant/deficient mice are protected from white adipose tissue (WAT) dysfunction, including WAT cellular senescence, impaired adipogenesis and loss of subcutaneous WAT in old age. This preservation of WAT function has been suggested to be a potential mechanism for the extended lifespan of these mice. The objective of this study was to examine WAT senescence, WAT distribution and glucose homeostasis in dwarf GH receptor antagonist (GHA) transgenic mice, a unique mouse strain having decreased GH action but normal longevity. 18-month-old female GHA mice and wild-type (WT) littermate controls were used. Prior to dissection, body composition, fasting blood glucose as well as glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. WAT distribution was determined by weighing four distinct WAT depots at the time of dissection. Cellular senescence in four WAT depots was assessed using senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining to quantify the senescent cell burden, and real-time qPCR to quantify gene expression of senescence markers p16 and IL-6. GHA mice had a 22% reduction in total body weight, a 33% reduction in lean mass and a 10% increase in body fat percentage compared to WT controls. GHA mice had normal fasting blood glucose and improved insulin sensitivity; however, they exhibited impaired glucose tolerance. Moreover, GHA mice displayed enhanced lipid storage in the inguinal subcutaneous WAT depot (p < 0.05) and a 1.7-fold increase in extra-/intraperitoneal WAT ratio compared to controls (p < 0.05). Measurements of WAT cellular senescence showed no difference between GHA mice and WT controls. Similar to other mice with decreased GH action, female GHA mice display reduced age-related lipid redistribution and improved insulin sensitivity, but no change in cellular senescence. The similar abundance of

  4. Growth hormone receptor antagonist (GHA) transgenic mice have increased subcutaneous adipose tissue mass, altered glucose homeostasis, and no change in white adipose tissue cellular senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comisford, Ross; Lubbers, Ellen R.; Householder, Lara; Suer, Ozan; Tchkonia, Tamara; Kirkland, James L.; List, Edward O.; Kopchick, John J.; Berryman, Darlene E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Growth hormone (GH) resistant/deficient mice experience improved glucose homeostasis and substantially increased lifespan. Recent evidence suggests long-lived GH resistant/deficient mice are protected from white adipose tissue (WAT) dysfunction, including WAT cellular senescence, impaired adipogenesis and loss of subcutaneous WAT in old age. This preservation of WAT function has been suggested to be a potential mechanism for the extended lifespan of these mice. OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to examine white adipose tissue (WAT) senescence, WAT distribution, and glucose homeostasis in dwarf growth hormone receptor antagonist (GHA) transgenic mice, a unique mouse strain having decreased GH action but normal longevity. METHODS 18mo old female GHA mice and wild type (WT) littermate controls were used. Prior to dissection, body composition, fasting blood glucose, and glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. WAT distribution was determined by weighing four distinct WAT depots at the time of dissection. Cellular senescence in four WAT depots was assessed using senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining to quantify the senescent cell burden and real time qPCR to quantify gene expression of senescence markers p16 and IL-6. RESULTS GHA mice had a 22% reduction in total body weight, 33% reduction in lean mass, and a 10% increase in body fat percentage compared to WT controls. GHA mice had normal fasting blood glucose and improved insulin sensitivity; however, they exhibited impaired glucose tolerance. Moreover, GHA mice displayed enhanced lipid storage in the inguinal subcutaneous WAT depot (p<.05) and a 1.7 fold increase in extra-/intraperitoneal WAT ratio compared to controls (p<.05). Measurements of WAT cellular senescence showed no difference between GHA mice and WT controls. CONCLUSIONS Similar to other mice with decreased GH action, female GHA mice display reduced age-related lipid redistribution and improved insulin

  5. Altered Food-Cue Processing in Chronically Ill and Recovered Women with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Nicole; Smeets, Paul A. M.; van Elburg, Annemarie A.; Danner, Unna N.; van Meer, Floor; Hoek, Hans W.; Adan, Roger A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe mental disorder characterized by food restriction and weight loss. This study aimed to test the model posed by Brooks et al. (2012a,b) that women suffering from chronic AN show decreased food-cue processing activity in brain regions associated with energy balance and food reward (bottom-up; BU) and increased activity in brain regions associated with cognitive control (top-down; TD) when compared with long-term recovered AN (REC) and healthy controls (HC). Three groups of women, 15 AN (mean illness duration 7.8 ± 4.1 years), 14 REC (mean duration of recovery 4.7 ± 2.7 years) and 15 HC viewed alternating blocks of food and non-food images preceded by a short instruction during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), after fasting overnight. Functional region of interests (fROIs) were defined in BU (e.g., striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, hypothalamus, and cerebellum), TD (e.g., medial and lateral prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulate), the insula, and visual processing areas (VPA). Food-cue processing activation was extracted from all fROIs and compared between the groups. In addition, functional connectivity between the fROIs was examined by modular partitioning of the correlation matrix of all fROIs. We could not confirm the hypothesis that BU areas are activated to a lesser extent in AN upon visual processing of food images. Among the BU areas the caudate showed higher activation in both patient groups compared to HC. In accordance with Brooks et al.’s model, we did find evidence for increased TD control in AN and REC. The functional connectivity analysis yielded two clusters in HC and REC, but three clusters in AN. In HC, fROIs across BU, TD, and VPA areas clustered; in AN, one cluster span across BU, TD, and insula; one across BU, TD, and VPA areas; and one was confined to the VPA network. In REC, BU, TD, and VPA or VPA and insula clustered. In conclusion, despite weight recovery, neural processing of food

  6. Altered food cue processing in chronically ill and recovered women with Anorexia Nervosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eSanders

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia Nervosa (AN is a severe mental disorder characterized by food restriction and weight loss.This study aimed to test the model posed by Brooks et al. (2012, that women suffering from chronic AN show decreased food cue processing activity in brain regions associated with energy balance and food reward (bottom-up; BU and increased activity in brain regions associated with cognitive control (top-down; TD when compared to long term recovered AN (REC and healthy controls (HC. Three groups of women, 15 AN (mean illness duration 7.8 ± 4.1 y, 14 REC (mean duration of recovery 4.7 ± 2.7 yr and 15 HC viewed alternating blocks of food and non-food images preceded by a short instruction during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, after fasting overnight. Functional ROIs (fROIs were defined in BU (e.g. striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, hypothalamus and cerebellum, TD (e.g. medial and lateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, the insula and visual processing areas (VPA. Food-cue processing activation was extracted from all fROIs and compared between the groups. In addition, functional connectivity between the fROIs was examined by modular partitioning of the correlation matrix of all fROIs.We could not confirm the hypothesis that BU areas are activated to a lesser extent in AN upon visual processing of food images. Among the BU areas the caudate showed higher activation in both patient groups compared to HC. In accordance with Brooks et al.’s model, we did find evidence for increased TD control in AN and REC. The functional connectivity analysis yielded two clusters in HC and REC, but three clusters in AN. In HC fROIs across BU, TD and VPA areas clustered, in AN one cluster span across BU, TD and insula, one across BU, TD and VPA areas and one was confined to the VPA network. In REC BU, TD and VPA or VPA and insula clustered.In conclusion, despite weight recovery, neural processing of food cues is also altered in recovered AN patient

  7. Alterations in the Emotional Regulation Process in Gambling Addiction: The Role of Anger and Alexithymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniaci, Giuseppe; Picone, Francesca; van Holst, Ruth J; Bolloni, Corinna; Scardina, Silvana; Cannizzaro, Carla

    2017-06-01

    This study aims at the assessment of alexithymia and anger levels in 100 treatment-seeking pathological gamblers compared with controls, who were matched for age, gender and education. Furthermore a positive correlation between alexithymia, anger and severity of gambling disorder and a relationship between gambling behaviour and anger after controlling for alexithymia, are investigated. Finally the role that gender plays in anger in pathological gamblers was also evaluated. Psychological assessment includes the South Oaks Gambling Screen, State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2 and the twenty-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale. Statistical analysis of the results shows a higher level of anger in pathological gamblers than in controls, together with alterations in emotional processing. Severity of gambling behaviour positively correlates with alexithymia scores, state-anger and trait-anger. Moreover, a significant contribution of anger in predicting gambling behaviour was suggested after controlling for alexithymia. In conclusion, anger and alexithymia must be regarded as relevant components of the assessment of pathological gamblers, in order to select the best therapeutical strategies to prevent self-defeating behaviours and to reduce drop-out from treatments.

  8. MicroRNA Expression Is Altered in an Ovalbumin-Induced Asthma Model and Targeting miR-155 with Antagomirs Reveals Cellular Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian W Plank

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that are differentially regulated during development and in inflammatory diseases. A role for miRNAs in allergic asthma is emerging and further investigation is required to determine whether they may serve as potential therapeutic targets. We profiled miRNA expression in murine lungs from an ovalbumin-induced allergic airways disease model, and compared expression to animals receiving dexamethasone treatment and non-allergic controls. Our analysis identified 29 miRNAs that were significantly altered during allergic inflammation. Target prediction analysis revealed novel genes with altered expression in allergic airways disease and suggests synergistic miRNA regulation of target mRNAs. To assess the impacts of one induced miRNA on pathology, we targeted miR-155-5p using a specific antagomir. Antagomir administration successfully reduced miR-155-5p expression with high specificity, but failed to alter the disease phenotype. Interestingly, further investigation revealed that antagomir delivery has variable efficacy across different immune cell types, effectively targeting myeloid cell populations, but exhibiting poor uptake in lymphocytes. Our findings demonstrate that antagomir-based targeting of miRNA function in the lung is highly specific, but highlights cell-specificity as a key limitation to be considered for antagomir-based strategies as therapeutics.

  9. Cutting an NKG2D Ligand Short: Cellular Processing of the Peculiar Human NKG2D Ligand ULBP4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Zöller

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced cell surface expression of MHC class I-related glycoproteins of the MIC and ULBP families allows for immune recognition of dangerous “self cells” by human cytotoxic lymphocytes via the NKG2D receptor. With two MIC molecules (MICA and MICB and six ULBP molecules (ULBP1–6, there are a total of eight human NKG2D ligands (NKG2DL. Since the discovery of the NKG2D–NKG2DL system, the cause for both redundancy and diversity of NKG2DL has been a major and ongoing matter of debate. NKG2DL diversity has been attributed, among others, to the selective pressure by viral immunoevasins, to diverse regulation of expression, to differential tissue expression as well as to variations in receptor interactions. Here, we critically review the current state of knowledge on the poorly studied human NKG2DL ULBP4. Summarizing available facts and previous studies, we picture ULBP4 as a peculiar ULBP family member distinct from other ULBP family members by various aspects. In addition, we provide novel experimental evidence suggesting that cellular processing gives rise to mature ULBP4 glycoproteins different to previous reports. Finally, we report on the proteolytic release of soluble ULBP4 and discuss these results in the light of known mechanisms for generation of soluble NKG2DL.

  10. Altered Cortical Swallowing Processing in Patients with Functional Dysphagia: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollbrink, Andreas; Warnecke, Tobias; Winkels, Martin; Pantev, Christo; Dziewas, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Objective Current neuroimaging research on functional disturbances provides growing evidence for objective neuronal correlates of allegedly psychogenic symptoms, thereby shifting the disease concept from a psychological towards a neurobiological model. Functional dysphagia is such a rare condition, whose pathogenetic mechanism is largely unknown. In the absence of any organic reason for a patient's persistent swallowing complaints, sensorimotor processing abnormalities involving central neural pathways constitute a potential etiology. Methods In this pilot study we measured cortical swallow-related activation in 5 patients diagnosed with functional dysphagia and a matched group of healthy subjects applying magnetoencephalography. Source localization of cortical activation was done with synthetic aperture magnetometry. To test for significant differences in cortical swallowing processing between groups, a non-parametric permutation test was afterwards performed on individual source localization maps. Results Swallowing task performance was comparable between groups. In relation to control subjects, in whom activation was symmetrically distributed in rostro-medial parts of the sensorimotor cortices of both hemispheres, patients showed prominent activation of the right insula, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and lateral premotor, motor as well as inferolateral parietal cortex. Furthermore, activation was markedly reduced in the left medial primary sensory cortex as well as right medial sensorimotor cortex and adjacent supplementary motor area (pdysphagia - a condition with assumed normal brain function - seems to be associated with distinctive changes of the swallow-related cortical activation pattern. Alterations may reflect exaggerated activation of a widely distributed vigilance, self-monitoring and salience rating network that interferes with down-stream deglutition sensorimotor control. PMID:24586948

  11. Altered frontocingulate activation during aversive interoceptive processing in young adults transitioning to problem stimulant use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lorraine Stewart

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Problems associated with stimulant use have been linked to frontocingulate, insular, and thalamic dysfunction during decision-making and alterations in interoceptive processing. However, little is known about how interoception and decision-making interact and contribute to dysfunctions that promote the transition from recreational drug use to abuse or dependence. Here, we investigate brain activation in response to reward, punishment, and uncertainty during an aversive interoceptive challenge in current and former stimulant (cocaine and amphetamine users using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Young adults previously identified as recreational users (n=184 were followed up three years later. Of these, 18 individuals progressed to problem stimulant use (PSU, whereas 15 desisted stimulant use (DSU. PSU, DSU, and 14 healthy comparison subjects (CTL performed a two-choice prediction task at three fixed error rates (20%=reward, 50%=uncertainty, 80%=punishment during which they anticipated and experienced episodes of inspiratory breathing load. Although groups did not differ in insula activation or subjective breathing load ratings, PSU exhibited lower right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG and bilateral anterior cingulate (ACC activation than DSU and CTL during aversive interoceptive processing as well as lower right IFG in response to decision making involving uncertainty. However, PSU exhibited greater bilateral IFG activation than DSU and CTL while making choices within the context of punishing feedback, and both PSU and DSU showed lower thalamic activation during breathing load than CTL. Findings suggest that frontocingulate attenuation, reflecting reduced resources devoted to goal maintenance and action selection in the presence of uncertainty and interoceptive perturbations, may be a biomarker for susceptibility to problem stimulant use.

  12. Thermal nociceptive threshold testing detects altered sensory processing in broiler chickens with spontaneous lameness.

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    Becky Hothersall

    Full Text Available Lameness is common in commercially reared broiler chickens but relationships between lameness and pain (and thus bird welfare have proved complex, partly because lameness is often partially confounded with factors such as bodyweight, sex and pathology. Thermal nociceptive threshold (TNT testing explores the neural processing of noxious stimuli, and so can contribute to our understanding of pain. Using an acute model of experimentally induced articular pain, we recently demonstrated that TNT was reduced in lame broiler chickens, and was subsequently attenuated by administration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs. This study extended these findings to a large sample of commercial broilers. It examined factors affecting thermal threshold (Part 1 and the effect of an NSAID drug (meloxicam, 5 mg/kg and of an opioid (butorphanol; 4 mg/kg (Part 2. Spontaneously lame and matched non-lame birds (n=167 from commercial farms were exposed to ramped thermal stimulations via a probe attached to the lateral aspect of the tarsometatarsus. Baseline skin temperature and temperature at which a behavioural avoidance response occurred (threshold were recorded. In Part 1 bird characteristics influencing threshold were modelled; In Part 2 the effect of subcutaneous administration of meloxicam or butorphanol was investigated. Unexpectedly, after accounting for other influences, lameness increased threshold significantly (Part 1. In Part 2, meloxicam affected threshold differentially: it increased further in lame birds and decreased in non-lame birds. No effect of butorphanol was detected. Baseline skin temperature was also consistently a significant predictor of threshold. Overall, lameness significantly influenced threshold after other bird characteristics were taken into account. This, and a differential effect of meloxicam on lame birds, suggests that nociceptive processing may be altered in lame birds, though mechanisms for this require further

  13. Differential regulation of angiogenic cellular processes and claudin-5 by histamine and VEGF via PI3K-signaling, transcription factor SNAI2 and interleukin-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakkonen, Johanna P; Lappalainen, Jari P; Theelen, Thomas L; Toivanen, Pyry I; Nieminen, Tiina; Jauhiainen, Suvi; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Sluimer, Judith C; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2017-02-01

    Histamine and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) are central regulators in vascular pathologies. Their gene regulation leading to vascular remodeling has remained obscure. In this study, EC regulation mechanisms of histamine and VEGF were compared by RNA sequencing of primary endothelial cells (ECs), functional in vitro assays and in vivo permeability mice model. By RNA sequencing, similar transcriptional alterations of genes involved in activation of primary ECs, cell proliferation and adhesion were observed between histamine and VEGF. Seventy-six commonly regulated genes were found, representing ~53% of all VEGF-regulated transcripts and ~26% of all histamine-regulated transcripts. Both factors regulated tight junction formation and expression of pro-angiogenic transcription factors (TFs) affecting EC survival, migration and tube formation. Novel claudin-5 upstream regulatory genes were identified. VEGF was demonstrated to regulate expression of SNAI2, whereas pro-angiogenic TFs NR4A1, MYCN and RCAN1 were regulated by both histamine and VEGF. Claudin-5 was shown to be regulated VEGFR2/PI3K-Akt dependently by VEGF and PI3K-Akt independently by histamine. Interleukin-8 was shown to downregulate claudin-5 by histamine. Additionally, SNAI2, NR4A1 and MYCN were shown to mediate EC survival, migration and tube formation and to regulate expression of claudin-5. Further systemic delivery of VEGF and histamine was shown to induce a fast vascular hyperpermeability response in intact vasculature of C57/Bl6 mice followed by regulation of NR4A1 and MYCN. Our study identifies novel claudin-5 upstream regulatory genes of histamine and VEGF that induce cellular angiogenic processes. Our results increase knowledge of angiogenic EC phenotype and provide novel treatment targets for vascular pathologies.

  14. Interplay between cellular activity and three-dimensional scaffold-cell constructs with different foam structure processed by electron beam melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nune, Krishna C; Misra, R Devesh K; Gaytan, Sara M; Murr, Lawrence E

    2015-05-01

    The cellular activity, biological response, and consequent integration of scaffold-cell construct in the physiological system are governed by the ability of cells to adhere, proliferate, and biomineralize. In this regard, we combine cellular biology and materials science and engineering to fundamentally elucidate the interplay between cellular activity and interconnected three-dimensional foamed architecture obtained by a novel process of electron beam melting and computational tools. Furthermore, the organization of key proteins, notably, actin, vinclulin, and fibronectin, involved in cellular activity and biological functions and relationship with the structure was explored. The interconnected foamed structure with ligaments was favorable to cellular activity that includes cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. The primary rationale for favorable modulation of cellular functions is that the foamed structure provided a channel for migration and communication between cells leading to highly mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) by the differentiating osteoblasts. The filopodial interaction amongst cells on the ligaments was a governing factor in the secretion of ECM, with consequent influence on maturation and mineralization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Synaptic plasticity, neural circuits, and the emerging role of altered short-term information processing in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Gregg W; Gogos, Joseph A

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity alters the strength of information flow between presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons and thus modifies the likelihood that action potentials in a presynaptic neuron will lead to an action potential in a postsynaptic neuron. As such, synaptic plasticity and pathological changes in synaptic plasticity impact the synaptic computation which controls the information flow through the neural microcircuits responsible for the complex information processing necessary to drive adaptive behaviors. As current theories of neuropsychiatric disease suggest that distinct dysfunctions in neural circuit performance may critically underlie the unique symptoms of these diseases, pathological alterations in synaptic plasticity mechanisms may be fundamental to the disease process. Here we consider mechanisms of both short-term and long-term plasticity of synaptic transmission and their possible roles in information processing by neural microcircuits in both health and disease. As paradigms of neuropsychiatric diseases with strongly implicated risk genes, we discuss the findings in schizophrenia and autism and consider the alterations in synaptic plasticity and network function observed in both human studies and genetic mouse models of these diseases. Together these studies have begun to point toward a likely dominant role of short-term synaptic plasticity alterations in schizophrenia while dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) may be due to a combination of both short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity alterations.

  16. The Latarjet coracoid process transfer procedure: alterations in the neurovascular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freehill, Michael T; Srikumaran, Umasuthan; Archer, Kristin R; McFarland, Edward G; Petersen, Steve A

    2013-05-01

    The Latarjet coracoid process transfer procedure is an established, reliable treatment for glenoid deficiency associated with recurrent anterior shoulder instability, but changes in neurovascular anatomy resulting from the procedure are a concern. The purpose of our cadaveric study was to identify changes in the neurovascular anatomy after a Latarjet procedure. We obtained 4 paired, fresh-frozen cadaveric forequarters (8 shoulders) from the Maryland State Anatomy Board. In each shoulder, we preoperatively measured the distances from the midanterior glenoid rim to the musculocutaneous nerve, axillary nerve, and axillary artery in 2 directions (lateral to medial and superior to inferior) and with the arm in 2 positions (0° abduction/neutral rotation; 30° abduction/30° external rotation), for a total of 12 measurements. We then created a standardized bony defect in the anterior-inferior glenoid, reconstructed it with the Latarjet procedure, and repeated the same measurements. Two examiners independently took each measurement twice. Inter-rater reliability was adequate, allowing pre-Latarjet measurements to be combined, averaged, and compared with combined and averaged post-Latarjet measurements by using paired Student t tests (significance, P ≤ .05). We found (1) significant differences in the location of the musculocutaneous nerve in the superior-to-inferior direction for both arm positions, (2) notably lax and consistently overlapping musculocutaneous and axillary nerves, and (3) an unchanged axillary artery location. The Latarjet procedure resulted in consistent and clinically significant alterations in the anatomic relationships of the musculocutaneous and axillary nerves, which may make them vulnerable to injury during revision surgery. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Alteration of immature sedimentary rocks on Earth and Mars. Recording Aqueous and Surface-atmosphere Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, Kenneth M. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Mustard, John F. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Salvatore, Mark R. [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-03-05

    The rock alteration and rind formation in analog environments like Antarctica may provide clues to rock alteration and therefore paleoclimates on Mars. Clastic sedimentary rocks derived from basaltic sources have been studied in situ by martian rovers and are likely abundant on the surface of Mars. Moreover, how such rock types undergo alteration when exposed to different environmental conditions is poorly understood compared with alteration of intact basaltic flows. Here we characterize alteration in the chemically immature Carapace Sandstone from Antarctica, a terrestrial analog for martian sedimentary rocks. We employ a variety of measurements similar to those used on previous and current Mars missions. Laboratory techniques included bulk chemistry, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), hyperspectral imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Through these methods we find that primary basaltic material in the Carapace Sandstone is pervasively altered to hydrated clay minerals and palagonite as a result of water–rock interaction. A thick orange rind is forming in current Antarctic conditions, superimposing this previous aqueous alteration signature. The rind exhibits a higher reflectance at visible-near infrared wavelengths than the rock interior, with an enhanced ferric absorption edge likely due to an increase in Fe3+ of existing phases or the formation of minor iron (oxy)hydroxides. This alteration sequence in the Carapace Sandstone results from decreased water–rock interaction over time, and weathering in a cold, dry environment, mimicking a similar transition early in martian history. This transition may be recorded in sedimentary rocks on Mars through a similar superimposition mechanism, capturing past climate changes at the hand sample scale. These results also suggest that basalt-derived sediments could have sourced significant volumes of hydrated minerals on early Mars due to their greater permeability compared with intact igneous rocks.

  18. Mineralogical and geochemical features of the alteration processes of magmatic ores in the Beni Bousera ultramafic massif (north Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjar, Zaineb; Gervilla, Fernando; Essaifi, Abderrahim; Wafik, Amina

    2017-08-01

    The Beni Bousera ultramafic massif (Internal Rif, Morocco) is characterized by the presence of two types of small-scale magmatic mineralizations (i) a mineralization consisting mainly of chromite and Ni arsenides associated to orthopyroxene and cordierite (Cr-Ni ores), and (ii) a mineralization mainly composed of magmatic Fe-Ni-Cu sulfides containing variable amounts of graphite and chromite associated to phlogopite, clinopyroxène and plagioclase (S-G ores). Theses ores underwent High-T (450-550 °C) and Low-T (150-300 °C) alteration processes. The High-T alteration processes are tentatively related to intrusion of leucogranite dykes. They are preserved in the Galaros Cr-Ni ore deposit where nickeline is partly dissolved and transformed to maucherite, and orthopyroxene alters to phlogopite. Ni and Co were mobilized to the fluid phase, rising up their availability and promoting their diffusion into chromite and phlogopite, which have significantly higher contents in Ni and Co in phlogopite-rich ores than in orthopyroxene- and nickeline-rich ones. The Low-T alteration processes are related to serpentinization/weathering spatially associated with a regional shear zone. They affected both the Cr-Ni and S-G ores. In the Cr-Ni ores, Ni-arsenides were completely leached out while chromite is fractured within a matrix of chlorite, vermiculite and Ni-rich serpentine. In S-G ores, the silicates were altered into amphibole, Fe-rich chlorite and pectolite in clinopyroxene- and plagioclase-bearing ores while sulfides were completely leached out in phlogopite-bearing ores where iron oxides and hydroxides, and Fe-rich vermiculite were deposited. Chromite composition is not affected by the Low-T alteration processes.

  19. PREFACE: Selected papers from the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing Selected papers from the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemenman, Ilya; Faeder, James R.; Hlavacek, William S.; Jiang, Yi; Wall, Michael E.; Zilman, Anton

    2011-10-01

    Summary This special issue consists of 11 original papers that elaborate on work presented at the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing, which was held on the campus of St John's College in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, 11-14 August 2010. Now in its fourth year, the q-bio conference has changed considerably over time. It is now well established and a major event in systems biology. The 2010 conference saw attendees from all continents (except Antarctica!) sharing novel results and participating in lively discussions at both the oral and poster sessions. The conference was oversubscribed and grew to 27 contributed talks, 16 poster spotlights and 137 contributed posters. We deliberately decreased the number of invited speakers to 21 to leave more space for contributed presentations, and the attendee feedback confirmed that the choice was a success. Although the q-bio conference has grown and matured, it has remained true to the original goal of being an intimate and dynamic event that brings together modeling, theory and quantitative experimentation for the study of cell regulation and information processing. Funded in part by a grant from NIGMS and by DOE funds through the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development program, the conference has continued to exhibit youth and vigor by attracting (and partially supporting) over 100 undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral researchers. The associated q-bio summer school, which precedes the conference each year, further emphasizes the development of junior scientists and makes q-bio a singular event in its impact on the future of quantitative biology. In addition to an increased international presence, the conference has notably diversified its demographic representation within the USA, including increased participation from the southeastern corner of the country. One big change in the conference this year is our new publication partner, Physical Biology. Although we are very

  20. Deep-sea mud volcanoes - a window to alteration processes in old oceanic crust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensen, Christian; Scholz, Florian; Nuzzo, Marianne; Valadares, Vasco; Terrinha, Pedro; Liebetrau, Volker; Kaul, Norbert; Manzoni, Sonia; Schmidt, Mark; Gràcia, Eulàlia

    2013-04-01

    A number of deep sea mud volcanoes (>4700 m water depth) were discovered during a recent expedition with the German research vessel Meteor along a prominent WSW-ENE trending strike-slip fault (SWIM 1; Zitellini et al., 2009) in the western extension of the Gulf of Cadiz (NE Atlantic). Mud volcanism was unambiguously related to tectonic activity along the fault and fluids expelled at these sites show a very distinct geochemical composition that has not been reported from any other mud volcano to date. In previous studies on deep-water mud volcanoes in the Western Gulf of Cadiz accretionary wedge it was hypothesized that the discharge fluids were affected by alteration processes occurring in the old (>140 Ma) and deeply buried (>4 km) oceanic crust (Scholz et al., 2009; Sallarès et al, 2011). This hypothesis is supported by recent findings at the mud volcanoes located to the west of the realm of tectonic deformation driven by the accretionary wedge of the Gulf of Cadiz. Pore water geochemical analyses revealed fluid sources from oceanic crust and oldest sedimentary strata. Regardless of the ultimate source, these findings suggest that large strike-slip faults may play a significant, yet unrecognized role in terms of fluid circulation and element redistribution. To date, hot vents and cold seeps occurring at active spreading centers and forearcs of subduction zones have been pinpointed as hotspots of fluid activity. However, bearing in mind that transform-type plate boundaries are equal in length compared to other types of plate boundaries, fluid exchange at this type of plate boundary may provide a similarly important pathway for water and element exchange between the lithosphere and ocean. Sallarès V., Gailler A., Gutscher M.-A., Graindorge D., Bartolomé R., Gràcia E., Díaz J., Dañobeitia J.J. and Zitellini N. (2011) Seismic evidence for the presence of Jurassic oceanic crust in the central Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberian margin), Earth and Planetary Science Letters

  1. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  2. Myofibroblasts Electrotonically Coupled to Cardiomyocytes Alter Conduction: Insights at the Cellular Level from a DetailedIn silicoTissue Structure Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Florian; Maguy, Ange; Rohr, Stephan; Kucera, Jan P

    2016-01-01

    Fibrotic myocardial remodeling is typically accompanied by the appearance of myofibroblasts (MFBs). In vitro , MFBs were shown to slow conduction and precipitate ectopic activity following gap junctional coupling to cardiomyocytes (CMCs). To gain further mechanistic insights into this arrhythmogenic MFB-CMC crosstalk, we performed numerical simulations in cell-based high-resolution two-dimensional tissue models that replicated experimental conditions. Cell dimensions were determined using confocal microscopy of single and co-cultured neonatal rat ventricular CMCs and MFBs. Conduction was investigated as a function of MFB density in three distinct cellular tissue architectures: CMC strands with endogenous MFBs, CMC strands with coating MFBs of two different sizes, and CMC strands with MFB inserts. Simulations were performed to identify individual contributions of heterocellular gap junctional coupling and of the specific electrical phenotype of MFBs. With increasing MFB density, both endogenous and coating MFBs slowed conduction. At MFB densities of 5-30%, conduction slowing was most pronounced in strands with endogenous MFBs due to the MFB-dependent increase in axial resistance. At MFB densities >40%, very slow conduction and spontaneous activity was primarily due to MFB-induced CMC depolarization. Coating MFBs caused non-uniformities of resting membrane potential, which were more prominent with large than with small MFBs. In simulations of MFB inserts connecting two CMC strands, conduction delays increased with increasing insert lengths and block appeared for inserts >1.2 mm. Thus, electrophysiological properties of engineered CMC-MFB co-cultures depend on MFB density, MFB size and their specific positioning in respect to CMCs. These factors may influence conduction characteristics in the heterocellular myocardium.

  3. Proanthocyanidins from the American Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) inhibit matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity in human prostate cancer cells via alterations in multiple cellular signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déziel, Bob A; Patel, Kunal; Neto, Catherine; Gottschall-Pass, Katherine; Hurta, Robert A R

    2010-10-15

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in the Western world, and it is believed that an individual's diet affects his risk of developing cancer. There has been an interest in examining phytochemicals, the secondary metabolites of plants, in order to determine their potential anti-cancer activities in vitro and in vivo. In this study we document the effects of proanthocyanidins (PACs) from the American Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in DU145 human prostate cancer cells. Cranberry PACs decreased cellular viability of DU145 cells at a concentration of 25 µg/ml by 30% after 6 h of treatment. Treatment of DU145 cells with PACs resulted in an inhibition of both MMPs 2 and 9 activity. PACs increased the expression of TIMP-2, a known inhibitor of MMP activity, and decreased the expression of EMMPRIN, an inducer of MMP expression. PACs decreased the expression of PI-3 kinase and AKT proteins, and increased the phosphorylation of both p38 and ERK1/2. Cranberry PACs also decreased the translocation of the NF-κB p65 protein to the nucleus. Cranberry PACs increased c-jun and decreased c-fos protein levels. These results suggest that cranberry PACs decreases MMP activity through the induction and/or inhibition of specific temporal MMP regulators, and by affecting either the phosphorylation status and/or expression of MAP kinase, PI-3 kinase, NF-κB and AP-1 pathway proteins. This study further demonstrates that cranberry PACs are a strong candidate for further research as novel anti-cancer agents. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Relaxation of cellular K+gradients by valinomycin induces diatoxanthin accumulation in Cyclotella meneghiniana cells and alters FCPa fluorescence yield in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rana A; Dietzel, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting involves all major thylakoid membrane complexes. One important factor is the proton motive force (pmf) driving ATP production. Its proton gradient (ΔpH) component regulates the high energy quenching. Potassium ions largely contribute to the formation of the electric field (ΔΨ). ΔΨ and ΔpH partially compensate each other to form pmf. Whilst in plants considerable progress has been made in analyzing the interplay of H + and K + gradients, in diatoms knowledge in this field is still scarce. We relaxed cellular K + gradients by valinomycin in Cyclotella meneghiniana. We observed a slow decrease of PSII maximum quantum yield in the dark upon valinomycin addition correlating with diatoxanthin accumulation which we attribute to the breakdown of organellar K + gradients (either plastid or mitochondria) which might compensate for the loss of the K + gradient by adjustment of the thylakoid pH in a secondary step. This response is reversible when ΔpH is relaxed. Similarly, we found higher non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) caused by higher DT accumulation in the steady state in valinomycin-treated cells. In vitro fucoxanthin chlorophyll a (FCPa) antenna complexes in liposomes with natural lipid composition showed a decrease in fluorescence yield if a K + gradient is built up. The effect reversed by relaxing the gradient. We interpret these fluorescence changes with surface charge dynamics and FCPa organization in the membrane rather than a direct influence of K + gradients on FCPa complexes. Both experiments reveal that K + gradients might contribute to fine tuning of light harvesting capacity in relation to pmf in diatoms. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  5. Altered poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism impairs cellular responses to genotoxic stress in a hypomorphic mutant of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hong; Coyle, Donna L.; Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L.; Meyer, Ralph G.; Jacobson, Elaine L.; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Jacobson, Myron K.

    2007-01-01

    Genotoxic stress activates nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) metabolism leading to PAR synthesis catalyzed by DNA damage activated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and rapid PAR turnover by action of nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG). The involvement of PARP-1 and PARP-2 in responses to DNA damage has been well studied but the involvement of nuclear PARG is less well understood. To gain insights into the function of nuclear PARG in DNA damage responses, we have quantitatively studied PAR metabolism in cells derived from a hypomorphic mutant mouse model in which exons 2 and 3 of the PARG gene have been deleted (PARG-Δ2,3 cells), resulting in a nuclear PARG containing a catalytic domain but lacking the N-terminal region (A domain) of the protein. Following DNA damage induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), we found that the activity of both PARG and PARPs in intact cells is increased in PARG-Δ2,3 cells. The increased PARG activity leads to decreased PARP-1 automodification with resulting increased PARP activity. The degree of PARG activation is greater than PARP, resulting in decreased PAR accumulation. Following MNNG treatment, PARG-Δ2,3 cells show reduced formation of XRCC1 foci, delayed H2AX phosphorylation, decreased DNA break intermediates during repair, and increased cell death. Our results show that a precise coordination of PARPs and PARG activities is important for normal cellular responses to DNA damage and that this coordination is defective in the absence of the PARG A domain

  6. Microglial inhibitory mechanism of Coenzyme Q10 against Aβ (1-42 induced cognitive dysfunctions: possible behavioral, biochemical, cellular and histopathological alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti eSingh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a debilitating disease with complex pathophysiology. Amyloid beta (Aβ (1-42 is a reliable model of AD that recapitulates many aspects of human AD. Objective: The present study has been designed to investigate the neuroprotective potential of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 and its modulation with minocycline (microglial inhibitor against Aβ (1-42 induced cognitive dysfunction in rats. Method: Intrahippocampal (i.h. Aβ (1-42 (1µg/µl; 4µl/site were administered followed by drug treatment with galantamine (2 mg/kg, CoQ10 (20 and 40 mg/kg, minocycline (50 and 100 mg/kg and their combinations for a period of 21 days. Various neurobehavioral parameters followed by biochemical, acetylcholinesterase (AChE level, proinflammatory markers (TNF-α, mitochondrial respiratory enzyme complexes (I-IV and histopathological examinations were assessed.Results: Aβ (1-42 administration significantly impaired cognitive performance in Morris water maze (MWM performance test, causes oxidative stress, raised AChE level, caused neuroinflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction and histopathological alterations as compared to sham treatment. Treatment with CoQ10 (20 and 40 mg/kg and minocycline (50 and 100 mg/kg alone for 21days significantly improved cognitive performance as evidenced by reduced transfer latency and increased time spent in target quadrant (TSTQ, reduced AChE activity, oxidative damage (reduced LPO, nitrite level and restored SOD, catalase and GHS levels, TNF-α level, restored mitochondrial respiratory enzyme complex (I, II, III, IV activities and histopathological alterations as compared to control (Aβ (1-42 treated animals group. Further, combination of minocycline (50 and 100 mg/kg with CoQ10 (20 and 40 mg/kg significantly modulate the protective effect of CoQ10 as compared to their effect alone. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the neuroprotective effect of CoQ10 could be due to its microglia inhibitory

  7. Comparative Effects of Ingested PVC Micro Particles With and Without Adsorbed Benzo(apyrene vs. Spiked Sediments on the Cellular and Sub Cellular Processes of the Benthic Organism Hediste diversicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Gomiero

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Plastic micro litter represents an emerging contaminant as well as a multiple stress agent in aquatic environments. Microplastics are found even in the remote areas of the world. Together with their occurrence in all environmental compartments, there is a growing concern about their potential to adsorb pollutants co-occurring in the environment. At present, little is known about this source of exposure for aquatic organisms in the benthic environment. Exposure conditions were set up to mimick the contribution of microplastics through different exposure routes. Potential biological effects resulting from these exposures were investigated in the model organism Hediste diversicolor, an annelid worm. Cellular effects including alterations of immunological responses, lysosomal compartment changes, mitochondrial activity, oxyradical production and onset of genotoxicity were assessed in coelomocytes while temporary and permanent effects of oxidative stress were also performed at tissue level. In this study polyvinylchloride (PVC microparticles were shown to adsorb benzo(apyrene with a time and dose-dependent relationship. The elevated bioavailability of the model pollutant after ingestion induced a clear pattern of biological responses. Toxicity mainly targeted impairment of cellular functioning and genotoxicity in H. diversicolor coelomocytes, while permanent effects of oxidative stress were observed at tissue level. Coelomocytes responded fast and with a higher degree of sensitivity to the adverse stimuli. The results showed that microplastic particles in sediments may play a significant role as vectors for organic pollutants. The highest adverse responses were observed in those H. diversicolor exposed to sediments spiked with PVC particles pre-incubated with B[a]P when compared against sediments spiked with B[a]P and plastic microparticles separately.

  8. Microglia in the mouse retina alter the structure and function of retinal pigmented epithelial cells: a potential cellular interaction relevant to AMD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Ma

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of legal blindness in the elderly in the industrialized word. While the immune system in the retina is likely to be important in AMD pathogenesis, the cell biology underlying the disease is incompletely understood. Clinical and basic science studies have implicated alterations in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE layer as a locus of early change. Also, retinal microglia, the resident immune cells of the retina, have been observed to translocate from their normal position in the inner retina to accumulate in the subretinal space close to the RPE layer in AMD eyes and in animal models of AMD.In this study, we examined the effects of retinal microglia on RPE cells using 1 an in vitro model where activated retinal microglia are co-cultured with primary RPE cells, and 2 an in vivo mouse model where retinal microglia are transplanted into the subretinal space. We found that retinal microglia induced in RPE cells 1 changes in RPE structure and distribution, 2 increased expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory, chemotactic, and pro-angiogenic molecules, and 3 increased extent of in vivo choroidal neovascularization in the subretinal space.These findings share similarities with important pathological features found in AMD and suggest the relevance of microglia-RPE interactions in AMD pathogenesis. We speculate that the migration of retinal microglia into the subretinal space in early stages of the disease induces significant changes in RPE cells that perpetuate further microglial accumulation, increase inflammation in the outer retina, and fosters an environment conducive for the formation of neovascular changes responsible for much of vision loss in advanced AMD.

  9. Suitability of the cellular viability technique as a control tool of the chlorine dosage on the activated sludge of a biological process affected by bulking; Empleo de la viabilidad celular como herramienta para el control de la dosificacion de cloro sobre un fango activado con problemas de bulking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montaya Martinez, T.; Zornoza Zornoza, A.; Granell Munoz, P.; Fayos, G.; Fajarddo, V.; Zorrilla, F.; Alonso Molina, J. L.; Morenilla Martinez, J. J.; Bernacer Bonora, I.; Martinez Francisco, F. J.

    2009-07-01

    This work demonstrates the suitability of the cellular viability technique as a control tool of the chlorine dosage on the activated sludge of a biological process affected by the overabundance of the filamentous bacteria (Thiothrix-021N). This technique was used to establish the chlorine dosage according to the observed damages on cellular membranes of both, floc-forming bacteria as well as filamentous bacteria. To identify the filamentous bacteria responsible for the macro-structural alteration of the flocs, several criteria were, met, including morphologic characteristics as well as conventional microbiological stains: Gram, Neisser and polyhydroxy alkanoates. FISH was used to confirm the obtained results, providing a definitive identification of the filamentous bacteria responsible for the alteration. (Author) 11 refs.

  10. Dissociating motivational direction and affective valence: specific emotions alter central motor processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Stephen A; Cauraugh, James H; Janelle, Christopher M

    2007-11-01

    We aimed to clarify the relation between affective valence and motivational direction by specifying how central and peripheral components of extension movements are altered according to specific unpleasant affective states. As predicted, premotor reaction time was quicker for extension movements initiated during exposure to attack than for extension movements initiated during exposure to all other valence categories (mutilation, erotic couples, opposite-sex nudes, neutral humans, household objects, blank). Exposure to erotic couples and mutilations yielded greater peak force than exposure to images of attack, neutral humans, and household objects. Finally, motor reaction time and peak electromyographic amplitude were not altered by valence. These findings indicate that unpleasant states do not unilaterally prime withdrawal movements, and that the quick execution of extension movements during exposure to threatening images is due to rapid premotor, rather than motor, reaction time. Collectively, our findings support the call for dissociating motivational direction and affective valence.

  11. Immunoendocrine alterations following Marine Corps Martial Arts training are associated with changes in moral cognitive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlik, Jacob A; Deckert, Jake A; Clopton, Aaron W; Gigliotti, Nicole; Chan, Marcia A; Benedict, Stephen H; Herda, Trent J; Gallagher, Philip M; Vardiman, John P

    2016-02-01

    Combined physical and psychological stress events have been associated with exacerbated endocrine responses and increased alterations in immune cell trafficking when compared to exercise stress alone. Military training programs are rigorous in nature and often purposefully delivered in environments combining high levels of both physical and mental stress. The objective of this study was to assess physiological and cognitive changes following U.S. Marine Corps Martial Arts training. Seven active-duty, male Marines were observed during a typical Marine Corps Martial Arts training session. Immune parameters, including immunomodulatory cytokines, and hormone concentrations were determined from blood samples obtained at baseline, immediately post training (IP) and at 15min intervals post-training to 1h (R15, R30, R45, R60). Assessments of cognitive moral functioning (moral judgment and intent) were recorded at intervals during recovery. There were significant fluctuations in immunoendocrine parameters. Peak endocrine measures were observed within the IP-R15 time interval. Distributions of circulating immune cells were significantly altered with neutrophils and all lymphocyte subsets elevated at IP. IFN-γ and IL-17a exhibited small, non-significant, parallel increases over the recovery period. Moral functioning was informed by different social identities during the recovery resulting in changes in moral decision-making. These data demonstrate that the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program induces significant alterations in lymphocyte and leukocyte distributions, but does not shift the balance of Th1/Th2 cytokines or induce a systemic inflammatory response. The program does, however, induce alterations in moral decision-making ability associated with the observed endocrine responses, even suggesting a potential interaction between one's social identities and endocrine responses upon moral decision-making. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Conversion of psychological stress into cellular stress response: roles of the sigma-1 receptor in the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Teruo

    2015-04-01

    Psychiatrists empirically recognize that excessive or chronic psychological stress can result in long-lasting impairments of brain functions that partly involve neuronal cell damage. Recent studies begin to elucidate the molecular pathways activated/inhibited by psychological stress. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis under psychological stress causes inflammatory oxidative stresses in the brain, in part due to elevation of cytokines. Psychological stress or neuropathological conditions (e.g., accumulation of β-amyloids) trigger 'cellular stress responses', which promote upregulation of molecular chaperones to protect macromolecules from degradation. The unfolded protein response, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-specific cellular stress response, has been recently implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders and the pharmacology of certain clinically used drugs. The sigma-1 receptor is an ER protein whose ligands are shown to exert antidepressant-like and neuroprotective actions. Recent studies found that the sigma-1 receptor is a novel ligand-operated ER chaperone that regulates bioenergetics, free radical generation, oxidative stress, unfolded protein response and cytokine signaling. The sigma-1 receptor also regulates morphogenesis of neuronal cells, such as neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and myelination, which can be perturbed by cellular stress. The sigma-1 receptor may thus contribute to a cellular defense system that protects nervous systems against chronic psychological stress. Findings from sigma receptor research imply that not only cell surface monoamine effectors but also intracellular molecules, especially those at the ER, may provide novel therapeutic targets for future drug developments. © 2014 The Author. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  13. EBER2 RNA-induced transcriptome changes identify cellular processes likely targeted during Epstein Barr Virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benecke Bernd-Joachim

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the physiological role of the EBER1 and 2 nuclear RNAs during Epstein Barr viral infection. The EBERs are transcribed by cellular RNA Polymerase III and their strong expression results in 106 to 107 copies per EBV infected cell, making them reliable diagnostic markers for the presence of EBV. Although the functions of most of the proteins targeted by EBER RNAs have been studied, the role of EBERs themselves still remains elusive. Findings The cellular transcription response to EBER2 expression using the wild-type and an internal deletion mutant was determined. Significant changes in gene expression patterns were observed. A functional meta-analysis of the regulated genes points to inhibition of stress and immune responses, as well as activation of cellular growth and cytoskeletal reorganization as potential targets for EBER2 RNA. Different functions can be assigned to different parts of the RNA. Conclusion These results provide new avenues to the understanding of EBER2 and EBV biology, and set the grounds for a more in depth functional analysis of EBER2 using transcriptome activity measurements.

  14. Cellular basis of memory for addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    DESPITE THE IMPORTANCE OF NUMEROUS PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS, AT ITS CORE, DRUG ADDICTION INVOLVES A BIOLOGICAL PROCESS: the ability of repeated exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and loss of control over drug use, that define a state of addiction. Here, we review the types of molecular and cellular adaptations that occur in specific brain regions to mediate addiction-associated behavioral abnormalities. These include alterations in gene expression achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms, plasticity in the neurophysiological functioning of neurons and synapses, and associated plasticity in neuronal and synaptic morphology mediated in part by altered neurotrophic factor signaling. Each of these types of drug-induced modifications can be viewed as a form of "cellular or molecular memory." Moreover, it is striking that most addiction-related forms of plasticity are very similar to the types of plasticity that have been associated with more classic forms of "behavioral memory," perhaps reflecting the finite repertoire of adaptive mechanisms available to neurons when faced with environmental challenges. Finally, addiction-related molecular and cellular adaptations involve most of the same brain regions that mediate more classic forms of memory, consistent with the view that abnormal memories are important drivers of addiction syndromes. The goal of these studies which aim to explicate the molecular and cellular basis of drug addiction is to eventually develop biologically based diagnostic tests, as well as more effective treatments for addiction disorders.

  15. Carbon nanotubes affect the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to denitrification in marine sediments by altering cellular internalization of nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Huang, Haining; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is an important pathway for nitrate transformation in marine sediments, and this process has been observed to be negatively affected by engineered nanomaterials. However, previous studies only focused on the potential effect of a certain type of nanomaterial on microbial denitrification. Here we show that the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) to denitrification in marine sediments is highly affected by the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It was found that the removal efficiency of total NOX−-N (NO3−-N and NO2−-N) in the presence of CuO NPs was only 62.3%, but it increased to 81.1% when CNTs appeared in this circumstance. Our data revealed that CuO NPs were more easily attached to CNTs rather than cell surface because of the lower energy barrier (3.5 versus 36.2 kT). Further studies confirmed that the presence of CNTs caused the formation of large, incompact, non-uniform dispersed, and more negatively charged CuO-CNTs heteroaggregates, and thus reduced the nanoparticle internalization by cells, leading to less toxicity to metabolism of carbon source, generation of reduction equivalent, and activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. These results indicate that assessing nanomaterial-induced risks in real circumstances needs to consider the “mixed” effects of nanomaterials. PMID:27279546

  16. Thermal expansion behavior in fabricated cellular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oruganti, R.K.; Ghosh, A.K.; Mazumder, J.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal expansion behavior of cellular structures is of interest in applications where undesirable deformation and failure are caused by thermal expansion mismatch. This report describes the role of processing-induced effects and metallurgical aspects of melt-processed cellular structures, such as a bi-material structure designed to contract on heating, as well as uni-material structures of regular and stochastic topology. This bi-material structure utilized the principle of internal geometric constraints to alter the expansion behavior of the internal ligaments to create overall contraction of the structure. Homogenization design method was used to design the structure, and fabrication was by direct metal deposition by laser melting of powder in another part of a joint effort. The degree of porosity and grain size in the fabricated structure are characterized and related to the laser deposition parameters. The structure was found to contract upon heating over a short range of temperature subsequent to which normal expansion ensued. Also examined in this report are uni-material cellular structures, in which internal constraints arise from residual stress variations caused by the fabrication process, and thereby alter their expansion characteristics. A simple analysis of thermal strain of this material supports the observed thermal expansion behavior

  17. Impact of pnpR, a LysR-type regulator-encoding gene, on the cellular processes of Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiongzhen; Tu, Hui; Huang, Fei; Wang, Yicheng; Dong, Weiliang; Wang, Wenhui; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Fei; Cui, Zhongli

    2016-06-01

    LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs) regulate various cellular processes in bacteria. pnpR is an LTTR-encoding gene involved in the regulation of hydroquinone (HQ) degradation, and its effects on the cellular processes of Pseudomonas putida DLL-E4 were investigated at the physiological, biochemical and molecular levels. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that pnpR positively regulated its own expression and that of the pnpC1C2DECX1X2 operon; additionally, pnpR partially regulated the expression of pnpA when P. putida was grown on para-nitrophenol (PNP) or HQ. Strains DLL-E4 and DLL-ΔpnpR exhibited similar cellular morphologies and growth rates. Transcriptome analysis revealed that pnpR regulated the expression of genes in addition to those involved in PNP degradation. A total of 20 genes were upregulated and 19 genes were downregulated by at least 2-fold in strain DLL-ΔpnpR relative to strain DLL-E4. Bioinformatic analysis revealed putative PnpR-binding sites located in the upstream regions of genes involved in PNP degradation, carbon catabolite repression and other cellular processes. The utilization of L-aspartic acid, L-histidine, L-pyroglutamic acid, L-serine, γ-aminobutyric acid, D,L-lactic acid, D-saccharic acid, succinic acid and L-alaninamide was increased at least 1.3-fold in strain DLL-ΔpnpR as shown by BIOLOG assays, indicating that pnpR plays a potential negative regulation role in the utilization of carbon sources. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. An image processing framework for automated analysis of swimming behavior in tadpoles with vestibular alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Kasra; Fritzsch, Bernd; Buchholz, James H. J.

    2017-03-01

    Micogravity, as experienced during prolonged space flight, presents a problem for space exploration. Animal models, specifically tadpoles, with altered connections of the vestibular ear allow the examination of the effects of microgravity and can be quantitatively monitored through tadpole swimming behavior. We describe an image analysis framework for performing automated quantification of tadpole swimming behavior. Speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion is used to smooth tadpole image signals by diffusing noise while retaining edges. A narrow band level set approach is used for sharp tracking of the tadpole body. The use of level set method for interface tracking provides an inherent advantage of using level set based image segmentation algorithm (active contouring). Active contour segmentation is followed by two-dimensional skeletonization, which allows the automated quantification of tadpole deflection angles, and subsequently tadpole escape (or C-start) response times. Evaluation of the image analysis methodology was performed by comparing the automated quantifications of deflection angles to manual assessments (obtained using a standard grading scheme), and produced a high correlation (r2 = 0.99) indicating high reliability and accuracy of the proposed method. The methods presented form an important element of objective quantification of the escape response of the tadpole vestibular system to mechanical and biochemical manipulations, and can ultimately contribute to a better understanding of the effects of altered gravity perception on humans.

  19. Multilevel alterations in the processing of audio-visual emotion expressions in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, Geneviève; Bertone, Armando; Lepore, Franco; Nassim, Marouane; Lassonde, Maryse; Mottron, Laurent; Collignon, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    The abilities to recognize and integrate emotions from another person's facial and vocal expressions are fundamental cognitive skills involved in the effective regulation of social interactions. Deficits in such abilities have been suggested as a possible source for certain atypical social behaviors manifested by persons with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In the present study, we assessed the recognition and integration of emotional expressions in ASD using a validated set of ecological stimuli comprised of dynamic visual and auditory (non-verbal) vocal clips. Autistic participants and typically developing controls (TD) were asked to discriminate between clips depicting expressions of disgust and fear presented either visually, auditorily or audio-visually. The group of autistic participants was less efficient to discriminate emotional expressions across all conditions (unimodal and bimodal). Moreover, they necessitated a higher signal-to-noise ratio for the discrimination of visual or auditory presentations of disgust versus fear expressions. These results suggest an altered sensitivity to emotion expressions in this population that is not modality-specific. In addition, the group of autistic participants benefited from exposure to bimodal information to a lesser extent than did the TD group, indicative of a decreased multisensory gain in this population. These results are the first to compellingly demonstrate joint alterations for both the perception and the integration of multisensory emotion expressions in ASD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities, ventricular dilatation, altered cellular functions, inflammation, and neuronal injury in brains of mice due to common, persistent, parasitic infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Jong-Hee

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, approximately two billion people are chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii with largely unknown consequences. Methods To better understand long-term effects and pathogenesis of this common, persistent brain infection, mice were infected at a time in human years equivalent to early to mid adulthood and studied 5–12 months later. Appearance, behavior, neurologic function and brain MRIs were studied. Additional analyses of pathogenesis included: correlation of brain weight and neurologic findings; histopathology focusing on brain regions; full genome microarrays; immunohistochemistry characterizing inflammatory cells; determination of presence of tachyzoites and bradyzoites; electron microscopy; and study of markers of inflammation in serum. Histopathology in genetically resistant mice and cytokine and NRAMP knockout mice, effects of inoculation of isolated parasites, and treatment with sulfadiazine or αPD1 ligand were studied. Results Twelve months after infection, a time equivalent to middle to early elderly ages, mice had behavioral and neurological deficits, and brain MRIs showed mild to moderate ventricular dilatation. Lower brain weight correlated with greater magnitude of neurologic abnormalities and inflammation. Full genome microarrays of brains reflected inflammation causing neuronal damage (Gfap, effects on host cell protein processing (ubiquitin ligase, synapse remodeling (Complement 1q, and also increased expression of PD-1L (a ligand that allows persistent LCMV brain infection and CD 36 (a fatty acid translocase and oxidized LDL receptor that mediates innate immune response to beta amyloid which is associated with pro-inflammation in Alzheimer's disease. Immunostaining detected no inflammation around intra-neuronal cysts, practically no free tachyzoites, and only rare bradyzoites. Nonetheless, there were perivascular, leptomeningeal inflammatory cells, particularly contiguous to the aqueduct of

  1. Alteration of the digestive motility linked with radiation-induced inflammatory processes in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, C.

    2000-12-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation, whether accidental or for medical reasons, may lead to gastro-intestinal injury, characterized by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. The aetiology of radiation-induced diarrhea remains to date unclear. In this study, we have investigated the acute effects of a 10 Gy abdominal irradiation on rat digestive functions. The objective of the first study was to evaluate the role of sensory afferent neurons, capsaicin-sensitive, on morphological changes and the inflammatory response following exposure. Three days after irradiation, we observed an inflammatory response characterized by neutrophils infiltration and mast cells de-granulation. No effect of capsaicin pre-treatment was seen on these parameters. However, neutrophils infiltration was increased as early as one day after irradiation in capsaicin-treated rats. No difference in severity of diarrhea was observed after denervation nor in morphological changes. These data demonstrate that abdominal irradiation results in diarrhea concomitant with an inflammatory response, and that sensory innervation does not play a major protective role. The objective of the rest of the work was in the first instance to characterize radiation-induced alterations of intestinal and colonic motility leading to diarrhea and secondly to evaluate the role of serotonin in such disorders. Perturbations in intestinal (MMC) and colonic (LSB) motor profiles were observed from the first day onwards. Migrating motor complexes (MMC) were completely disrupted at three days at the same time as the onset of diarrhea. In addition to inhibition of LSB, colonic fluid absorptive capacity was decreased and serotonin colonic tissue levels were increased three days after irradiation. Radiation-induced diarrhea was reduced by treatment with an antagonist of 5-HT 3 receptors, granisetron, as were alterations of colonic motility and serotonin tissue levels. However, this treatment did not significantly ameliorate

  2. Depression and treatment response: dynamic interplay of signaling pathways and altered neural processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duric, Vanja

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1960s, when the first tricyclic and monoamine oxidase inhibitor antidepressant drugs were introduced, most of the ensuing agents were designed to target similar brain pathways that elevate serotonin and/or norepinephrine signaling. Fifty years later, the main goal of the current depression research is to develop faster-acting, more effective therapeutic agents with fewer side effects, as currently available antidepressants are plagued by delayed therapeutic onset and low response rates. Clinical and basic science research studies have made significant progress towards deciphering the pathophysiological events within the brain involved in development, maintenance, and treatment of major depressive disorder. Imaging and postmortem brain studies in depressed human subjects, in combination with animal behavioral models of depression, have identified a number of different cellular events, intracellular signaling pathways, proteins, and target genes that are modulated by stress and are potentially vital mediators of antidepressant action. In this review, we focus on several neural mechanisms, primarily within the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, which have recently been implicated in depression and treatment response. PMID:22585060

  3. Modeling cellular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Matthäus, Franziska; Pahle, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    This contributed volume comprises research articles and reviews on topics connected to the mathematical modeling of cellular systems. These contributions cover signaling pathways, stochastic effects, cell motility and mechanics, pattern formation processes, as well as multi-scale approaches. All authors attended the workshop on "Modeling Cellular Systems" which took place in Heidelberg in October 2014. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatori, Tadatsugu

    1990-01-01

    There has been a renewal of interest in cellular automata, partly because they give an architecture for a special purpose computer with parallel processing optimized to solve a particular problem. The lattice gas cellular automata are briefly surveyed, which are recently developed to solve partial differential equations such as hydrodynamics or magnetohydrodynamics. A new model is given in the present paper to implement the magnetic Lorentz force in a more deterministic and local procedure than the previous one. (author)

  5. Intracellular insulin processing is altered in monocytes from patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trischitta, V.; Benzi, L.; Brunetti, A.; Cecchetti, P.; Marchetti, P.; Vigneri, R.; Navalesi, R.

    1987-01-01

    We studied total cell-associated A14-[ 125 I]insulin radioactivity (including surface-bound and internalized radioactivity), insulin internalization, and its intracellular degradation at 37 C in monocytes from nonobese type II untreated diabetic patients (n = 9) and normal subjects (n = 7). Total cell-associated radioactivity was decreased in diabetic patients [2.65 +/- 1.21% (+/- SD) vs. 4.47 +/- 1.04% of total radioactivity. Insulin internalization was also reduced in diabetic patients (34.0 +/- 6.8% vs. 59.0 +/- 11.3% of cell-associated radioactivity. Using high performance liquid chromatography six intracellular forms of radioactivity derived from A14-[ 125 I] insulin were identified; 10-20% of intracellular radioactivity had approximately 300,000 mol wt and was identified as radioactivity bound to the insulin receptor, and the remaining intracellular radioactivity included intact A14-[ 125 I]insulin, [ 125 I]iodide, or [ 125 I]tyrosine, and three intermediate compounds. A progressive reduction of intact insulin and a corresponding increase in iodine were found when the incubation time was prolonged. Intracellular insulin degradation was reduced in monocytes from diabetic patients; intracellular intact insulin was 65.6 +/- 18.1% vs. 37.4 +/- 18.0% of intracellular radioactivity after 2 min and 23.6 +/- 22.3% vs. 3.9 +/- 2.3% after 60 min in diabetic patients vs. normal subjects, respectively. In conclusion, 1) human monocytes internalize and degrade insulin in the intracellular compartment in a stepwise time-dependent manner; and 2) in monocytes from type II diabetic patients total cell-associated radioactivity, insulin internalization, and insulin degradation are significantly reduced. These defects may be related to the cellular insulin resistance present in these patients

  6. Expertise in folk music alters the brain processing of Western harmony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervaniemi, M; Tupala, T; Brattico, E

    2012-04-01

    In various paradigms of modern neurosciences of music, experts of Western classical music have displayed superior brain architecture when compared with individuals without explicit training in music. In this paper, we show that chord violations embedded in musical cadences were neurally processed in a facilitated manner also by musicians trained in Finnish folk music. This result, obtained by using early right anterior negativity (ERAN) as an index of harmony processing, suggests that tonal processing is advanced in folk musicians by their long-term exposure to both Western and non-Western music. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. Altered neuronal response during rapid auditory processing and its relation to phonological processing in prereading children at familial risk for dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschle, Nora M; Stering, Patrice L; Meissner, Sarah N; Gaab, Nadine

    2014-09-01

    Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a learning disability affecting 5-17% of children. Although researchers agree that DD is characterized by deficient phonological processing (PP), its cause is debated. It has been suggested that altered rapid auditory processing (RAP) may lead to deficient PP in DD and studies have shown deficient RAP in individuals with DD. Functional neuroimaging (fMRI) studies have implicated hypoactivations in left prefrontal brain regions during RAP in individuals with DD. When and how these neuronal alterations evolve remains unknown. In this article, we investigate functional networks during RAP in 28 children with (n = 14) and without (n = 14) a familial risk for DD before reading onset (mean: 5.6 years). Results reveal functional alterations in left-hemispheric prefrontal regions during RAP in prereading children at risk for DD, similar to findings in individuals with DD. Furthermore, activation during RAP in left prefrontal regions positively correlates with prereading measures of PP and with neuronal activation during PP in posterior dorsal and ventral brain areas. Our results suggest that neuronal differences during RAP predate reading instruction and thus are not due to experience-dependent brain changes resulting from DD itself and that there is a functional relationship between neuronal networks for RAP and PP within the prereading brain. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Altered processing of self-related emotional stimuli in mindfulness meditators.

    OpenAIRE

    Lutz J; Brühl A B; Doerig N; Scheerer H; Achermann R; Weibel A; Jäncke L; Herwig U

    2016-01-01

    Mental health benefits of mindfulness techniques are thought to involve changes in self processing such as decreased attachment to the self higher self compassion and lower emotional reactivity to inner experience. However self related emotion processing in regular mindfulness practitioners is not extensively studied. In the current work we investigate differential neural and behavioral correlates of self criticism and self praise in 22 mid to long term mindfulness meditators (LTM) compared t...

  9. Early Stages of Sensory Processing, but Not Semantic Integration, Are Altered in Dyslexic Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patrícia B; Ueki, Karen; Oliveira, Darlene G; Boggio, Paulo S; Macedo, Elizeu C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify which stages of language processing are impaired in individuals with dyslexia. For this, a visual-auditory crossmodal task with semantic judgment was used. The P100 potentials were chosen, related to visual processing and initial integration, and N400 potentials related to semantic processing. Based on visual-auditory crossmodal studies, it is understood that dyslexic individuals present impairments in the integration of these two types of tasks and impairments in processing spoken and musical auditory information. The present study sought to investigate and compare the performance of 32 adult participants (14 individuals with dyslexia), in semantic processing tasks in two situations with auditory stimuli: sentences and music, with integrated visual stimuli (pictures). From the analysis of the accuracy, both the sentence and the music blocks showed significant effects on the congruency variable, with both groups having higher scores for the incongruent items than for the congruent ones. Furthermore, there was also a group effect when the priming was music, with the dyslexic group showing an inferior performance to the control group, demonstrating greater impairments in processing when the priming was music. Regarding the reaction time variable, a group effect in music and sentence priming was found, with the dyslexic group being slower than the control group. The N400 and P100 components were analyzed. In items with judgment and music priming, a group effect was observed for the amplitude of the P100, with higher means produced by individuals with dyslexia, corroborating the literature that individuals with dyslexia have difficulties in early information processing. A congruency effect was observed in the items with music priming, with greater P100 amplitudes found in incongruous situations. Analyses of the N400 component showed the congruency effect for amplitude in both types of priming, with the mean amplitude for incongruent

  10. An fMRI-study of locally oriented perception in autism: altered early visual processing of the block design test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölte, S; Hubl, D; Dierks, T; Holtmann, M; Poustka, F

    2008-01-01

    Autism has been associated with enhanced local processing on visual tasks. Originally, this was based on findings that individuals with autism exhibited peak performance on the block design test (BDT) from the Wechsler Intelligence Scales. In autism, the neurofunctional correlates of local bias on this test have not yet been established, although there is evidence of alterations in the early visual cortex. Functional MRI was used to analyze hemodynamic responses in the striate and extrastriate visual cortex during BDT performance and a color counting control task in subjects with autism compared to healthy controls. In autism, BDT processing was accompanied by low blood oxygenation level-dependent signal changes in the right ventral quadrant of V2. Findings indicate that, in autism, locally oriented processing of the BDT is associated with altered responses of angle and grating-selective neurons, that contribute to shape representation, figure-ground, and gestalt organization. The findings favor a low-level explanation of BDT performance in autism.

  11. Default Mode Network Alterations during Implicit Emotional Faces Processing in First-episode, Treatment-naive Major Depression Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huqing eShi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have focused on resting-state default mode network (DMN alterations in the development and maintenance of depression; however, only a few studies have addressed DMN changes during task-related processing and their results are inconsistent. Therefore, we explored DMN patterns in young adult patients with first-episode, treatment-naïve major depressive disorder (MDD performing an implicit emotional processing task. Patients with MDD (N = 29 and healthy controls (N = 33 were subjected to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI at rest and while performing a gender judgment task. Group independent component analysis (ICA was used to identify DMN component under task state for both groups. The DMN of participants with MDD had decreased functional connectivity in bilateral prefrontal areas compared to controls. Right prefrontal gyrus connectivity for MDD patients correlated negatively with scores on maladaptive scales of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ. Our findings suggest that depressed people have altered DMN patterns during implicit emotional processing, which might be related to impaired internal monitoring and emotional regulation ability.

  12. Altered top-down cognitive control and auditory processing in tinnitus: evidences from auditory and visual spatial stroop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araneda, Rodrigo; De Volder, Anne G; Deggouj, Naïma; Philippot, Pierre; Heeren, Alexandre; Lacroix, Emilie; Decat, Monique; Rombaux, Philippe; Renier, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of external stimulus. Currently, the pathophysiology of tinnitus is not fully understood, but recent studies indicate that alterations in the brain involve non-auditory areas, including the prefrontal cortex. Here, we hypothesize that these brain alterations affect top-down cognitive control mechanisms that play a role in the regulation of sensations, emotions and attention resources. The efficiency of the executive control as well as simple reaction speed and processing speed were evaluated in tinnitus participants (TP) and matched control subjects (CS) in both the auditory and the visual modalities using a spatial Stroop paradigm. TP were slower and less accurate than CS during both the auditory and the visual spatial Stroop tasks, while simple reaction speed and stimulus processing speed were affected in TP in the auditory modality only. Tinnitus is associated both with modality-specific deficits along the auditory processing system and an impairment of cognitive control mechanisms that are involved both in vision and audition (i.e. that are supra-modal). We postulate that this deficit in the top-down cognitive control is a key-factor in the development and maintenance of tinnitus and may also explain some of the cognitive difficulties reported by tinnitus sufferers.

  13. Standardized Kaempferia parviflora Extract Inhibits Intrinsic Aging Process in Human Dermal Fibroblasts and Hairless Mice by Inhibiting Cellular Senescence and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

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    Ji-Eun Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic skin aging is a complex biological phenomenon mainly caused by cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction. This study evaluated the inhibitory effect of Kaempferia parviflora Wall ex. Baker ethanol extract (KPE on H2O2-stimulated cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction both in vitro and in vivo. KPE significantly increased cell growth and suppressed senescence-associated β-galactosidase activation. KPE inhibited the expression of cell-cycle inhibitors (p53, p21, p16, and pRb and stimulated the expression of cell-cycle activators (E2F1 and E2F2. H2O2-induced hyperactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (AKT signaling pathway was suppressed by KPE through regulated expression of forkhead box O3a (FoxO3a and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. KPE attenuated inflammatory mediators (interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-8, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and increased the mRNA expression of PGC-1α, ERRα, NRF1, and Tfam, which modulate mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Consequently, reduced ATP levels and increased ROS level were also reversed by KPE treatment. In hairless mice, KPE inhibited wrinkle formation, skin atrophy, and loss of elasticity by increasing the collagen and elastic fibers. The results indicate that KPE prevents intrinsic aging process in hairless mice by inhibiting cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting its potential as a natural antiaging agent.

  14. Altered Topology in Information Processing of a Narrated Story in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

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    Yogev-Seligmann, Galit; Oren, Noga; Ash, Elissa L; Hendler, Talma; Giladi, Nir; Lerner, Yulia

    2016-05-03

    The ability to store, integrate, and manipulate information declines with aging. These changes occur earlier, faster, and to a greater degree as a result of neurodegeneration. One of the most common and early characteristics of cognitive decline is difficulty with comprehension of information. The neural mechanisms underlying this breakdown of information processing are poorly understood. Using functional MRI and natural stimuli (e.g., stories), we mapped the neural mechanisms by which the human brain accumulates and processes information with increasing duration and complexity in participants with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and healthy older adults. To explore the mechanisms of information processing, we measured the reliability of brain responses elicited by listening to different versions of a narrated story created by segmenting the story into words, sentences, and paragraphs and then scrambling the segments. Comparing healthy older adults and participants with aMCI revealed that in both groups, all types of stimuli similarly recruited primary auditory areas. However, prominent differences between groups were found at the level of processing long and complex stimuli. In healthy older adults, parietal and frontal regions demonstrated highly synchronized responses in both the paragraph and full story conditions, as has been previously reported in young adults. Participants with aMCI, however, exhibited a robust functional shift of long time scale processing to the pre- and post-central sulci. Our results suggest that participants with aMCI experienced a functional shift of higher order auditory information processing, possibly reflecting a functional response to concurrent or impending neuronal or synaptic loss. This observation might assist in understanding mechanisms of cognitive decline in aMCI.

  15. Processing of spatial-frequency altered faces in schizophrenia: effects of illness phase and duration.

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    Steven M Silverstein

    Full Text Available Low spatial frequency (SF processing has been shown to be impaired in people with schizophrenia, but it is not clear how this varies with clinical state or illness chronicity. We compared schizophrenia patients (SCZ, n = 34, first episode psychosis patients (FEP, n = 22, and healthy controls (CON, n = 35 on a gender/facial discrimination task. Images were either unaltered (broadband spatial frequency, BSF, or had high or low SF information removed (LSF and HSF conditions, respectively. The task was performed at hospital admission and discharge for patients, and at corresponding time points for controls. Groups were matched on visual acuity. At admission, compared to their BSF performance, each group was significantly worse with low SF stimuli, and most impaired with high SF stimuli. The level of impairment at each SF did not depend on group. At discharge, the SCZ group performed more poorly in the LSF condition than the other groups, and showed the greatest degree of performance decline collapsed over HSF and LSF conditions, although the latter finding was not significant when controlling for visual acuity. Performance did not change significantly over time for any group. HSF processing was strongly related to visual acuity at both time points for all groups. We conclude the following: 1 SF processing abilities in schizophrenia are relatively stable across clinical state; 2 face processing abnormalities in SCZ are not secondary to problems processing specific SFs, but are due to other known difficulties constructing visual representations from degraded information; and 3 the relationship between HSF processing and visual acuity, along with known SCZ- and medication-related acuity reductions, and the elimination of a SCZ-related impairment after controlling for visual acuity in this study, all raise the possibility that some prior findings of impaired perception in SCZ may be secondary to acuity reductions.

  16. Perturbations of Amino Acid Metabolism Associated with Glyphosate-Dependent Inhibition of Shikimic Acid Metabolism Affect Cellular Redox Homeostasis and Alter the Abundance of Proteins Involved in Photosynthesis and Photorespiration1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Driscoll, Simon P.; Bulman, Christopher A.; Ying, Liu; Emami, Kaveh; Treumann, Achim; Mauve, Caroline; Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H.

    2011-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate inhibits the shikimate pathway of the synthesis of amino acids such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. However, much uncertainty remains concerning precisely how glyphosate kills plants or affects cellular redox homeostasis and related processes in glyphosate-sensitive and glyphosate-resistant crop plants. To address this issue, we performed an integrated study of photosynthesis, leaf proteomes, amino acid profiles, and redox profiles in the glyphosate-sensitive soybean (Glycine max) genotype PAN809 and glyphosate-resistant Roundup Ready Soybean (RRS). RRS leaves accumulated much more glyphosate than the sensitive line but showed relatively few changes in amino acid metabolism. Photosynthesis was unaffected by glyphosate in RRS leaves, but decreased abundance of photosynthesis/photorespiratory pathway proteins was observed together with oxidation of major redox pools. While treatment of a sensitive genotype with glyphosate rapidly inhibited photosynthesis and triggered the appearance of a nitrogen-rich amino acid profile, there was no evidence of oxidation of the redox pools. There was, however, an increase in starvation-associated and defense proteins. We conclude that glyphosate-dependent inhibition of soybean leaf metabolism leads to the induction of defense proteins without sustained oxidation. Conversely, the accumulation of high levels of glyphosate in RRS enhances cellular oxidation, possibly through mechanisms involving stimulation of the photorespiratory pathway. PMID:21757634

  17. Perturbations of amino acid metabolism associated with glyphosate-dependent inhibition of shikimic acid metabolism affect cellular redox homeostasis and alter the abundance of proteins involved in photosynthesis and photorespiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Driscoll, Simon P; Bulman, Christopher A; Ying, Liu; Emami, Kaveh; Treumann, Achim; Mauve, Caroline; Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H

    2011-09-01

    The herbicide glyphosate inhibits the shikimate pathway of the synthesis of amino acids such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. However, much uncertainty remains concerning precisely how glyphosate kills plants or affects cellular redox homeostasis and related processes in glyphosate-sensitive and glyphosate-resistant crop plants. To address this issue, we performed an integrated study of photosynthesis, leaf proteomes, amino acid profiles, and redox profiles in the glyphosate-sensitive soybean (Glycine max) genotype PAN809 and glyphosate-resistant Roundup Ready Soybean (RRS). RRS leaves accumulated much more glyphosate than the sensitive line but showed relatively few changes in amino acid metabolism. Photosynthesis was unaffected by glyphosate in RRS leaves, but decreased abundance of photosynthesis/photorespiratory pathway proteins was observed together with oxidation of major redox pools. While treatment of a sensitive genotype with glyphosate rapidly inhibited photosynthesis and triggered the appearance of a nitrogen-rich amino acid profile, there was no evidence of oxidation of the redox pools. There was, however, an increase in starvation-associated and defense proteins. We conclude that glyphosate-dependent inhibition of soybean leaf metabolism leads to the induction of defense proteins without sustained oxidation. Conversely, the accumulation of high levels of glyphosate in RRS enhances cellular oxidation, possibly through mechanisms involving stimulation of the photorespiratory pathway.

  18. Sleep, Plasticity and the Pathophysiology of Neurodevelopmental Disorders: The Potential Roles of Protein Synthesis and Other Cellular Processes

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    Dante Picchioni

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is important for neural plasticity, and plasticity underlies sleep-dependent memory consolidation. It is widely appreciated that protein synthesis plays an essential role in neural plasticity. Studies of sleep-dependent memory and sleep-dependent plasticity have begun to examine alterations in these functions in populations with neurological and psychiatric disorders. Such an approach acknowledges that disordered sleep may have functional consequences during wakefulness. Although neurodevelopmental disorders are not considered to be sleep disorders per se, recent data has revealed that sleep abnormalities are among the most prevalent and common symptoms and may contribute to the progression of these disorders. The main goal of this review is to highlight the role of disordered sleep in the pathology of neurodevelopmental disorders and to examine some potential mechanisms by which sleep-dependent plasticity may be altered. We will also briefly attempt to extend the same logic to the other end of the developmental spectrum and describe a potential role of disordered sleep in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. We conclude by discussing ongoing studies that might provide a more integrative approach to the study of sleep, plasticity, and neurodevelopmental disorders.

  19. Altered food-cue processing in chronically ill and recovered women with anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Nicole; Smeets, Paul A. M.; van Elburg, Annemarie A.; Danner, Unna N.; van Meer, Floor; Hoek, Hans W.; Adan, Roger A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe mental disorder characterized by food restriction and weight loss. This study aimed to test the model posed by Brooks et al. (2012a,b) that women suffering from chronic AN show decreased food-cue processing activity in brain regions associated with energy balance

  20. Altered food-cue processing in chronically ill and recovered women with anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Nicole; Smeets, Paul A M; van Elburg, Annemarie A.; Danner, Unna N.; van Meer, Floor; Hoek, Hans W.; Adan, Roger A H

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe mental disorder characterized by food restriction and weight loss.This study aimed to test the model posed by Brooks et al. (2012a,b) that women suffering from chronic AN show decreased food-cue processing activity in brain regions associated with energy balance and

  1. TRANSLOCATION OF NUTRIENTS BY FRESHWATER MUSSELS – ALTERATION OF ECOSYSTEM AND COMMUNITY PROCESSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrient demand and availability is a major driver of ecosystem processes. We examined the impact of freshwater mussels, a highly imperiled faunal group, on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling and storage in three Oklahoma streams. We found that filter-feeding by freshwater m...

  2. Altered Evoked Gamma-Band Responses Reveal Impaired Early Visual Processing in ADHD Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Daniel; Krauel, Kerstin; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Schadow, Jeanette; Hinrichs, Hermann; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2010-01-01

    Neurophysiological studies yield contrary results whether attentional problems of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are related to early visual processing deficits or not. Evoked gamma-band responses (GBRs), being among the first cortical responses occurring as early as 90 ms after visual stimulation in human EEG, have…

  3. Macromitophagy is a longevity assurance process that in chronologically aging yeast limited in calorie supply sustains functional mitochondria and maintains cellular lipid homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, Michelle T.; Koupaki, Olivia; Gomez-Perez, Alejandra; Levy, Sean; Pluska, Lukas; Mattie, Sevan; Rafeh, Rami; Iouk, Tatiana; Sheibani, Sara; Greenwood, Michael; Vali, Hojatollah; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2013-01-01

    Macromitophagy controls mitochondrial quality and quantity. It involves the sequestration of dysfunctional or excessive mitochondria within double-membrane autophagosomes, which then fuse with the vacuole/lysosome to deliver these mitochondria for degradation. To investigate a physiological role of macromitophagy in yeast, we examined how the atg32Δ-dependent mutational block of this process influences the chronological lifespan of cells grown in a nutrient-rich medium containing low (0.2%) concentration of glucose. Under these longevity-extending conditions of caloric restriction (CR) yeast cells are not starving. We also assessed a role of macromitophagy in lifespan extension by lithocholic acid (LCA), a bile acid that prolongs yeast longevity under CR conditions. Our findings imply that macromitophagy is a longevity assurance process underlying the synergistic beneficial effects of CR and LCA on yeast lifespan. Our analysis of how the atg32Δ mutation influences mitochondrial morphology, composition and function revealed that macromitophagy is required to maintain a network of healthy mitochondria. Our comparative analysis of the membrane lipidomes of organelles purified from wild-type and atg32Δ cells revealed that macromitophagy is required for maintaining cellular lipid homeostasis. We concluded that macromitophagy defines yeast longevity by modulating vital cellular processes inside and outside of mitochondria. PMID:23553280

  4. The order of information processing alters economic gain-loss framing effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Youngbin; Huettel, Scott

    2018-01-01

    Adaptive decision making requires analysis of available information during the process of choice. In many decisions that information is presented visually - which means that variations in visual properties (e.g., salience, complexity) can potentially influence the process of choice. In the current study, we demonstrate that variation in the left-right positioning of risky and safe decision options can influence the canonical gain-loss framing effect. Two experiments were conducted using an economic framing task in which participants chose between gambles and certain outcomes. The first experiment demonstrated that the magnitude of the gain-loss framing effect was greater when the certain option signaling the current frame was presented on the left side of the visual display. Eye-tracking data during task performance showed a left-gaze bias for initial fixations, suggesting that the option presented on the left side was processed first. Combination of eye-tracking and choice data revealed that there was a significant effect of direction of first gaze (i.e. left vs. right) as well as an interaction between gaze direction and identity of the first fixated information (i.e. certain vs. gamble) regardless of frame. A second experiment presented the gamble and certain options in a random order, with a temporal delay between their presentations. We found that the magnitude of gain-loss framing was larger when the certain option was presented first, regardless of left and right positioning, only in individuals with lower risk-taking tendencies. The effect of presentation order on framing was not present in high risk-takers. These results suggest that the sequence of visual information processing as well as their left-right positioning can bias choices by changing the impact of the presented information during risky decision making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Links between contaminant hotspots in low flow estuarine systems and altered sediment biogeochemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Michael D.; Dafforn, Katherine A.; Scanes, Peter; Potts, Jaimie; Simpson, Stuart L.; Sim, Vivian X. Y.; Johnston, Emma L.

    2017-11-01

    The urbanisation of coastal zones is a major threat to the health of global estuaries and has been linked to increased contamination (e.g. metals) and excess organic matter. Urban stormwater networks collect and funnel contaminants into waterways at point sources (e.g. stormdrains). Under dry, low flow conditions, these stormwater contaminants can accumulate in sediments over time and result in modifications to benthic sediment biogeochemical processes. To quantify these processes, this field study measured differences in benthic metabolism (CR, GPP, NEM) and sediment-water nutrient fluxes (NH3, NOx, PO4) associated with stormdrains (0 m, 200 m and 1000 m away) and increased water-retention (embayments vs channels). Significant changes to benthic metabolism were detected with distance from stormdrains, and with differences in water-retention rates, above natural spatial and temporal variation. Oxygen consumption was ∼50% higher at stormdrains (0 m) compared to 1000 m away and >70% higher at stormdrains (0 m) located in embayments compared to channels. Oxygen production also appeared to decrease with distance from stormdrains in embayments, but patterns were variable. These changes to benthic metabolism were of a magnitude expected to influence benthic nutrient cycling, but NH3, NOx and PO4 fluxes were generally low, and highly spatially and temporally variable. Overall, metal (Cu) contamination explained most of the variation in sediment biogeochemical processes between embayments and channels, while sediment grain size explained differences in fluxes with distance from stormdrains. Importantly, although there was evidence of increased productivity associated with stormdrains, we also detected evidence of early hypoxia suggesting that systems with legacy stormwater contaminants exist on a tipping point. Future work should investigate changes to sediment processes after a major rainfall event, when large and sudden inputs of potentially toxic contaminants occur

  6. Acoustic noise alters selective attention processes as indicated by direct current (DC) brain potential changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmel, Karin; Schätzer, Julia; Trimmel, Michael

    2014-09-26

    Acoustic environmental noise, even of low to moderate intensity, is known to adversely affect information processing in animals and humans via attention mechanisms. In particular, facilitation and inhibition of information processing are basic functions of selective attention. Such mechanisms can be investigated by analyzing brain potentials under conditions of externally directed attention (intake of environmental information) versus internally directed attention (rejection of environmental stimuli and focusing on memory/planning processes). This study investigated brain direct current (DC) potential shifts-which are discussed to represent different states of cortical activation-of tasks that require intake and rejection of environmental information under noise. It was hypothesized that without background noise rejection tasks would show more positive DC potential changes compared to intake tasks and that under noise both kinds of tasks would show positive DC shifts as an expression of cortical inhibition caused by noise. DC potential shifts during intake and rejection tasks were analyzed at 16 standard locations in 45 persons during irrelevant speech or white noise vs. control condition. Without noise, rejection tasks were associated with more positive DC potential changes compared to intake tasks. During background noise, however, this difference disappeared and both kinds of tasks led to positive DC shifts. Results suggest-besides some limitations-that noise modulates selective attention mechanisms by switching to an environmental information processing and noise rejection mode, which could represent a suggested "attention shift". Implications for fMRI studies as well as for public health in learning and performance environments including susceptible persons are discussed.

  7. Acoustic Noise Alters Selective Attention Processes as Indicated by Direct Current (DC Brain Potential Changes

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    Karin Trimmel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic environmental noise, even of low to moderate intensity, is known to adversely affect information processing in animals and humans via attention mechanisms. In particular, facilitation and inhibition of information processing are basic functions of selective attention. Such mechanisms can be investigated by analyzing brain potentials under conditions of externally directed attention (intake of environmental information versus internally directed attention (rejection of environmental stimuli and focusing on memory/planning processes. This study investigated brain direct current (DC potential shifts—which are discussed to represent different states of cortical activation—of tasks that require intake and rejection of environmental information under noise. It was hypothesized that without background noise rejection tasks would show more positive DC potential changes compared to intake tasks and that under noise both kinds of tasks would show positive DC shifts as an expression of cortical inhibition caused by noise. DC potential shifts during intake and rejection tasks were analyzed at 16 standard locations in 45 persons during irrelevant speech or white noise vs. control condition. Without noise, rejection tasks were associated with more positive DC potential changes compared to intake tasks. During background noise, however, this difference disappeared and both kinds of tasks led to positive DC shifts. Results suggest—besides some limitations—that noise modulates selective attention mechanisms by switching to an environmental information processing and noise rejection mode, which could represent a suggested “attention shift”. Implications for fMRI studies as well as for public health in learning and performance environments including susceptible persons are discussed.

  8. Processing and storage of Indian cereal and cereal products alters its resistant starch content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Ruchi H; Sheth, Mini K

    2011-10-01

    Resistant Starch (RS) is prebiotic in nature and is defined as the sum of starch and products of starch degradation not absorbed in small intestine of healthy individuals but later are fermented by natural microflora of the colon to produce short chain fatty acids. RS acts as a nutraceutical and its consumption leads to many health benefits. The aim of the study is to analyze the RS content in raw and processed cereals and cereal products and determine various processing and storage effects on the RS content. RS content in raw cereals ranged from 0.53 g% (pearl millet)-2.09 g% (rice). Of all the processing techniques applied in the study, roasting, baking and boiling increased the RS content followed by shallow frying. Steaming and frying showed a decrease in RS content. The puffed, flaked and extruded cereal products obtained from market when analyzed also showed very less retention of RS content. Storage of different cereal products at 4°C up to 12 and 24 h significantly increased RS content. Amylose showed a higher correlation with RS in maize produces than in other cereal products.

  9. Agent-Based Modeling of Mitochondria Links Sub-Cellular Dynamics to Cellular Homeostasis and Heterogeneity.

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    Giovanni Dalmasso

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are semi-autonomous organelles that supply energy for cellular biochemistry through oxidative phosphorylation. Within a cell, hundreds of mobile mitochondria undergo fusion and fission events to form a dynamic network. These morphological and mobility dynamics are essential for maintaining mitochondrial functional homeostasis, and alterations both impact and reflect cellular stress states. Mitochondrial homeostasis is further dependent on production (biogenesis and the removal of damaged mitochondria by selective autophagy (mitophagy. While mitochondrial function, dynamics, biogenesis and mitophagy are highly-integrated processes, it is not fully understood how systemic control in the cell is established to maintain homeostasis, or respond to bioenergetic demands. Here we used agent-based modeling (ABM to integrate molecular and imaging knowledge sets, and simulate population dynamics of mitochondria and their response to environmental energy demand. Using high-dimensional parameter searches we integrated experimentally-measured rates of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy, and using sensitivity analysis we identified parameter influences on population homeostasis. By studying the dynamics of cellular subpopulations with distinct mitochondrial masses, our approach uncovered system properties of mitochondrial populations: (1 mitochondrial fusion and fission activities rapidly establish mitochondrial sub-population homeostasis, and total cellular levels of mitochondria alter fusion and fission activities and subpopulation distributions; (2 restricting the directionality of mitochondrial mobility does not alter morphology subpopulation distributions, but increases network transmission dynamics; and (3 maintaining mitochondrial mass homeostasis and responding to bioenergetic stress requires the integration of mitochondrial dynamics with the cellular bioenergetic state. Finally, (4 our model suggests sources of, and stress conditions

  10. Cesium Toxicity Alters MicroRNA Processing and AGO1 Expressions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Il Lae Jung

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short RNA fragments that play important roles in controlled gene silencing, thus regulating many biological processes in plants. Recent studies have indicated that plants modulate miRNAs to sustain their survival in response to a variety of environmental stimuli, such as biotic stresses, cold, drought, nutritional starvation, and toxic heavy metals. Cesium and radio-cesium contaminations have arisen as serious problems that both impede plant growth and enter the food chain through contaminated plants. Many studies have been performed to define plant responses against cesium intoxication. However, the complete profile of miRNAs in plants during cesium intoxication has not been established. Here we show the differential expression of the miRNAs that are mostly down-regulated during cesium intoxication. Furthermore, we found that cesium toxicity disrupts both the processing of pri-miRNAs and AGONOUTE 1 (AGO1-mediated gene silencing. AGO 1 seems to be especially destabilized by cesium toxicity, possibly through a proteolytic regulatory pathway. Our study presents a comprehensive profile of cesium-responsive miRNAs, which is distinct from that of potassium, and suggests two possible mechanisms underlying the cesium toxicity on miRNA metabolism.

  11. Reduced risk avoidance and altered neural correlates of feedback processing in patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrass, Tanja; Schuermann, Beate; Roepke, Stefan; Kessler-Scheil, Sonia; Kathmann, Norbert

    2016-09-30

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show deficits in reward-guided decision making and learning. The present study examined risk-taking behavior in combination with feedback processing. Eighteen BPD patients and 18 healthy controls performed a probabilistic two-choice gambling task, while an electroencephalogram was recorded. Options differed in risk, but were identical in expected value and outcome probability. The feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the feedback-related P300 were analyzed. Healthy controls preferred low-risk over high-risk options, whereas BPD patients chose both option with equal probability. FRN amplitudes were reduced in BPD, but effects of feedback valence and risk did not differ between groups. This suggests attenuated outcome processing in the anterior cingulate cortex, but intact reward prediction error signaling. Furthermore, the modulation of the feedback-related P300 with feedback valence and risk was smaller in BPD patients, and decreased P300 amplitudes were associated with increased behavioral risk-taking behavior. These findings could relate to the reduced ability of BPD patients to learn and adequately adjust their behavior based on feedback information, possibly due to reduced significance of negative feedback. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Altered Neural Processing to Social Exclusion in Young Adult Marijuana Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Jodi M; Curran, Max T; Calderon, Vanessa; Schuster, Randi M; Evins, A Eden

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have reported that peer groups are one of the most important predictors of adolescent and young adult marijuana use, and yet the neural correlates of social processing in marijuana users have not yet been studied. In the current study, marijuana-using young adults (n = 20) and non-using controls (n = 22) participated in a neuroimaging social exclusion task called Cyberball, a computerized ball-tossing game in which the participant is excluded from the game after a pre-determined number of ball tosses. Controls, but not marijuana users, demonstrated significant activation in the insula, a region associated with negative emotion, when being excluded from the game. Both groups demonstrated activation of the ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC), a region associated with affective monitoring, during peer exclusion. Only the marijuana group showed a correlation between vACC activation and scores on a self-report measure of peer conformity. This study indicates that marijuana users show atypical neural processing of social exclusion, which may be either caused by, or the result of, regular marijuana use.

  13. Dendritic spine remodeling after spinal cord injury alters neuronal signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andrew M; Choi, Jin-Sung; Waxman, Stephen G; Hains, Bryan C

    2009-10-01

    Central sensitization, a prolonged hyperexcitability of dorsal horn nociceptive neurons, is a major contributor to abnormal pain processing after spinal cord injury (SCI). Dendritic spines are micron-sized dendrite protrusions that can regulate the efficacy of synaptic transmission. Here we used a computational approach to study whether changes in dendritic spine shape, density, and distribution can individually, or in combination, adversely modify the input-output function of a postsynaptic neuron to create a hyperexcitable neuronal state. The results demonstrate that a conversion from thin-shaped to more mature, mushroom-shaped spine structures results in enhanced synaptic transmission and fidelity, improved frequency-following ability, and reduced inhibitory gating effectiveness. Increasing the density and redistributing spines toward the soma results in a greater probability of action potential activation. Our results demonstrate that changes in dendritic spine morphology, documented in previous studies on spinal cord injury, contribute to the generation of pain following SCI.

  14. Alterations in Neural Processing and Psychopathology in Children Raised in Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slopen, Natalie; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Fox, Nathan A.; Zeanah, Charles H.; Nelson, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Context Children raised in institutional settings often experience severe deprivation in social, emotional, and cognitive stimulation. Although this deprivation is likely to disrupt brain development in ways that increase risk for psychopathology, neurodevelopmental mechanisms linking adverse early environments to psychopathology remain poorly understood. Objective To examine whether abnormalities in the neural processing of facial and emotional stimuli are related to the high rates of psychopathology observed among institutionally reared children. Design, Setting, and Participants Data were drawn from the Bucharest Early Intervention Project, a cohort of children raised in institutions in Romania and an age-matched sample of community control subjects. At entry to the study (mean age=22 months), event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to measure neural processing in two tasks: familiar and unfamiliar faces (n=114), and facial displays of emotion (n=74). Main Outcome Measure Psychiatric symptoms were assessed using the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment (PAPA) at 54 months. Results As previously reported, institutionally-reared children had elevated symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity (ADHD), anxiety, depression, and disruptive behavior compared to control children and peak amplitudes of the P100 and P700 in response to facial stimuli were blunted among institutionalized children compared to community children in both tasks. Current analyses reveal that children with reduced P100 and P700 amplitudes in response to facial stimuli exhibited higher levels of ADHD and anxiety symptoms. Peak amplitude of the P700 in response to facial stimuli significantly mediated the association between institutional rearing and ADHD symptoms at 54 months. Conclusion Exposure to institutional rearing disrupts the P700, conferring risk for the onset of psychopathology. The high levels of ADHD symptoms among children exposed to early-life deprivation may be attributable, in

  15. Alterations in neural processing and psychopathology in children raised in institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slopen, Natalie; McLaughlin, Katie A; Fox, Nathan A; Zeanah, Charles H; Nelson, Charles A

    2012-10-01

    Young children raised in institutional settings experience severe deprivation in social, emotional, and cognitive stimulation. Although this deprivation is likely to disrupt brain development in ways that increase the risk for psychopathology, neurodevelopmental mechanisms linking adverse early environments to psychopathology remain poorly understood. To examine whether abnormalities in the neural processing of facial and emotional stimuli are related to the high rates of psychopathology observed among institutionally reared children. Data were drawn from the Bucharest Early Intervention Project, a cohort of children raised in institutions in Romania and an age-matched sample of community control subjects. At entry to the study (mean age, 22 months), event-related potentials were used to measure neural processing in 2 tasks: familiar and unfamiliar faces (n=114) and facial displays of emotion (n=74). Psychiatric symptoms were assessed using the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment among children aged 54 months. As previously reported, institutionally reared children had elevated symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety, depression, and disruptive behavior compared with control children, and peak amplitudes of the P100 and P700 in response to facial stimuli were blunted among institutionalized children compared with community children in both tasks. Current analyses reveal that children with reduced P100 and P700 amplitudes in response to facial stimuli exhibited higher levels of ADHD and anxiety symptoms. Peak amplitude of the P700 in response to facial stimuli significantly mediated the association between institutional rearing and ADHD symptoms at 54 months. Exposure to institutional rearing disrupts the P700, conferring risk for the onset of psychopathology. The high levels of ADHD symptoms among children exposed to early life deprivation may be attributable, in part, to abnormal patterns of neurodevelopment generated by these adverse

  16. Identification of microbes from the surfaces of food-processing lines based on the flow cytometric evaluation of cellular metabolic activity combined with cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzwa, W; Duber, A; Myszka, K; Białas, W; Czaczyk, K

    2016-09-01

    In this study the design of a flow cytometry-based procedure to facilitate the detection of adherent bacteria from food-processing surfaces was evaluated. The measurement of the cellular redox potential (CRP) of microbial cells was combined with cell sorting for the identification of microorganisms. The procedure enhanced live/dead cell discrimination owing to the measurement of the cell physiology. The microbial contamination of the surface of a stainless steel conveyor used to process button mushrooms was evaluated in three independent experiments. The flow cytometry procedure provided a step towards monitoring of contamination and enabled the assessment of microbial food safety hazards by the discrimination of active, mid-active and non-active bacterial sub-populations based on determination of their cellular vitality and subsequently single cell sorting to isolate microbial strains from discriminated sub-populations. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.97; p vitality and the identification of species from defined sub-populations, although the identified microbes were limited to culturable cells.

  17. Altered brain mechanisms of emotion processing in pre-manifest Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Marianne J U; Warren, Jason D; Henley, Susie M D; Draganski, Bogdan; Frackowiak, Richard S; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2012-04-01

    Huntington's disease is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that causes motor, cognitive and psychiatric impairment, including an early decline in ability to recognize emotional states in others. The pathophysiology underlying the earliest manifestations of the disease is not fully understood; the objective of our study was to clarify this. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate changes in brain mechanisms of emotion recognition in pre-manifest carriers of the abnormal Huntington's disease gene (subjects with pre-manifest Huntington's disease): 16 subjects with pre-manifest Huntington's disease and 14 control subjects underwent 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance scanning while viewing pictures of facial expressions from the Ekman and Friesen series. Disgust, anger and happiness were chosen as emotions of interest. Disgust is the emotion in which recognition deficits have most commonly been detected in Huntington's disease; anger is the emotion in which impaired recognition was detected in the largest behavioural study of emotion recognition in pre-manifest Huntington's disease to date; and happiness is a positive emotion to contrast with disgust and anger. Ekman facial expressions were also used to quantify emotion recognition accuracy outside the scanner and structural magnetic resonance imaging with voxel-based morphometry was used to assess the relationship between emotion recognition accuracy and regional grey matter volume. Emotion processing in pre-manifest Huntington's disease was associated with reduced neural activity for all three emotions in partially separable functional networks. Furthermore, the Huntington's disease-associated modulation of disgust and happiness processing was negatively correlated with genetic markers of pre-manifest disease progression in distributed, largely extrastriatal networks. The modulated disgust network included insulae, cingulate cortices, pre- and postcentral gyri, precunei, cunei, bilateral putamena

  18. Alteration of sodium, potassium-adenosine triphosphatase activity in rabbit ciliary processes by cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delamere, N.A.; Socci, R.R.; King, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    The response of sodium, potassium-adenosine triphosphatase (Na,K-ATPase) to cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase was examined in membranes obtained from rabbit iris-ciliary body. In the presence of the protein kinase together with 10(-5) M cAMP, Na,K-ATPase activity was reduced. No change in Na,K-ATPase activity was detected in response to the protein kinase without added cAMP. Likewise cAMP alone did not alter Na,K-ATPase activity. Reduction of Na,K-ATPase activity was also observed in the presence of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit. The response of the enzyme to the kinase catalytic subunit was also examined in membranes obtained from rabbit ciliary processes. In the presence of 8 micrograms/ml of the catalytic subunit, ciliary process Na,K-ATPase activity was reduced by more than 50%. To examine whether other ATPases were suppressed by the protein kinase, calcium-stimulated ATPase activity was examined; its activity was stimulated by the catalytic subunit. To test whether the response of the ciliary process Na,K-ATPase is unique, experiments were also performed using membrane preparations from rabbit lens epithelium or rabbit kidney; the catalytic subunit significantly reduced the activity of Na,K-ATPase from the kidney but not the lens. These Na,K-ATPase studies suggest that in the iris-ciliary body, cAMP may alter sodium pump activity. In parallel 86Rb uptake studies, we observed that ouabain-inhibitable potassium uptake by intact pieces of iris-ciliary body was reduced by exogenous dibutryl cAMP or by forskolin

  19. Ultrahigh Pressure Processing Produces Alterations in the Metabolite Profiles of Panax ginseng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mee Youn; Singh, Digar; Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2016-06-22

    Ultrahigh pressure (UHP) treatments are non-thermal processing methods that have customarily been employed to enhance the quality and productivity of plant consumables. We aimed to evaluate the effects of UHP treatments on ginseng samples (white ginseng: WG; UHP-treated WG: UWG; red ginseng: RG; UHP-treated RG: URG; ginseng berries: GB; and UHP-treated GB: UGB) using metabolite profiling based on ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-linear trap quadrupole-ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-LTQ-IT-MS/MS) and gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS). Multivariate data analyses revealed a clear demarcation among the GB and UGB samples, and the phenotypic evaluations correlated the highest antioxidant activities and the total phenolic and flavonoid compositions with the UGB samples. Overall, eight amino acids, seven organic acids, seven sugars and sugar derivatives, two fatty acids, three notoginsenosides, three malonylginsenosides, and three ginsenosides, were identified as significantly discriminant metabolites between the GB and UGB samples, with relatively higher proportions in the latter. Ideally, these metabolites can be used as quality biomarkers for the assessment of ginseng products and our results indicate that UHP treatment likely led to an elevation in the proportions of total extractable metabolites in ginseng samples.

  20. Saltwater intrusion into tidal freshwater marshes alters the biogeochemical processing of organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, S. C.; Franklin, R. B.; Berrier, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental perturbations in wetlands affect the integrated plant-microbial-soil system, causing biogeochemical responses that can manifest at local to global scales. The objective of this study was to determine how saltwater intrusion affects carbon mineralization and greenhouse gas production in coastal wetlands. Working with tidal freshwater marsh soils that had experienced ~ 3.5 yr of in situ saltwater additions, we quantified changes in soil properties, measured extracellular enzyme activity associated with organic matter breakdown, and determined potential rates of anaerobic carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) production. Soils from the field plots treated with brackish water had lower carbon content and higher C : N ratios than soils from freshwater plots, indicating that saltwater intrusion reduced carbon availability and increased organic matter recalcitrance. This was reflected in reduced activities of enzymes associated with the hydrolysis of cellulose and the oxidation of lignin, leading to reduced rates of soil CO2 and CH4 production. The effects of long-term saltwater additions contrasted with the effects of short-term exposure to brackish water during three-day laboratory incubations, which increased rates of CO2 production but lowered rates of CH4 production. Collectively, our data suggest that the long-term effect of saltwater intrusion on soil CO2 production is indirect, mediated through the effects of elevated salinity on the quantity and quality of autochthonous organic matter inputs to the soil. In contrast, salinity, organic matter content, and enzyme activities directly influence CH4 production. Our analyses demonstrate that saltwater intrusion into tidal freshwater marshes affects the entire process of carbon mineralization, from the availability of organic carbon through its terminal metabolism to CO2 and/or CH4, and illustrate that long-term shifts in biogeochemical functioning are not necessarily consistent with short

  1. Alteration processes of medieval stained glass windows. Study and protection treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Navarro, J. María

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The anxiety caused by the fast growing decay of historical stained glass windows as a consequence of increasing environmental pollution, encouraged institutions of several countries to sponsor a series of scientific works aimed both to slow down this fast forwarding deterioration and to develop repair and preservation methods. After an initial review of the chemical composition of the stained glass windows and of the differences depending on historical epochs and origins, a discussion about chemical attack mechanisms, degradation processes and formation of superficial crusts opens up. Finally, the methodology used in their cleaning and restoration is briefly exposed and some criteria on the still polemic quest.

    La inquietud creada por la creciente alteración que, como consecuencia del aumento de la contaminación atmosférica, están sufriendo las vidrieras históricas, ha movido a las instituciones de varios países a patrocinar la realización de una serie de trabajos científicos dirigidos, por una parte, a detener el avance de este deterioro y, por otra, a desarrollar métodos para su restauración y conservación. Tras una revisión inicial sobre la composición química de las vidrieras y sus diferencias según las distintas épocas y lugares de procedencia, se discuten los mecanismos de ataque químico, los procesos de degradación y la formación de costras superficiales. Finalmente se expone brevemente la metodología seguida para su limpieza y restauración y se comentan algunos de los criterios sobre la todavía polémica cuestión de los tratamientos de protección.

  2. Training practices of cell processing laboratory staff : Analysis of a survey by the Alliance for Harmonization of Cellular Therapy Accreditation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keever-Taylor, Carolyn A.; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke; Celluzzi, Christina; Loper, Kathy; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Schwartz, Joseph; Mcgrath, Eoin; Eldridge, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background aims: Methods for processing products used for hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation must ensure their safety and efficacy. Personnel training and ongoing competency assessment is critical to this goal. Here we present results from a global survey of methods used by a

  3. Sleep influences the immune response and the rejection process alters sleep pattern: Evidence from a skin allograft model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Francieli Silva; Andersen, Monica Levy; Guindalini, Camila; Araujo, Leandro Pires; Lopes, José Daniel; Tufik, Sergio

    2017-03-01

    Sleep generally regulates immune functions in a supportive manner and can affect parameters that are directly involved in the rejection process. The first objective was to assess whether sleep deprivation (SD) or sleep restriction (SR) affects the allograft rejection process in mice. The second objective was to investigate whether the rejection process itself modulates the sleep pattern of allografted mice. Adult BALB/c and C57BL/6J male mice were used as the donors and recipients, respectively, except for the syngeneic group (ISOTX), which received skin from mice of the same strain (C57BL/6J). The recipients were randomly assigned to either one of two control groups - TX (allogenic) or ISOTX (syngeneic) - which underwent stereotaxic surgery to enable sleep recording prior to the allograft but were not sleep deprived; one of two paradoxical sleep deprived groups - SDTX and TXSD - which underwent 72h of continuous SD either before or after the allograft respectively, and one of two sleep restricted groups - SRTX and TXSR - which underwent 21h of SD and 3h of sleep for 15days either before or after the allograft respectively. The skin allograft was inspected daily to determine the survival time, expected as 8.0±0.4days in this transplant model under no treatment. The sleep pattern was controlled throughout the rejection process in the SD and SR groups. Draining lymph nodes, spleen, blood and skin grafts were harvested on the 5th day after transplantation for evaluation of the immune parameters related to allograft rejection. In the control groups, we observed a reduction in paradoxical sleep throughout the entire allograft rejection process. Acute and chronic experimental sleep loss in the SD and SR groups produced marked alterations in the immune response. Both SD and SR prolonged allograft survival compared to the non-sleep-deprived group. There were reductions in the following parameters involved in the allograft rejection under sleep loss: CD4 + and CD8 + T cell

  4. Cellular processes of v-Src transformation revealed by gene profiling of primary cells - Implications for human cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maślikowski, Bart M; Néel, Benjamin D; Wu, Ying; Wang, Lizhen; Rodrigues, Natalie A; Gillet, Germain; Bédard, Pierre-André

    2010-01-01

    Cell transformation by the Src tyrosine kinase is characterized by extensive changes in gene expression. In this study, we took advantage of several strains of the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) to characterize the patterns of v-Src-dependent gene expression in two different primary cell types, namely chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) and chicken neuroretinal (CNR) cells. We identified a common set of v-Src regulated genes and assessed if their expression is associated with disease-free survival using several independent human tumor data sets. CEF and CNR cells were infected with transforming, non-transforming, and temperature sensitive mutants of RSV to identify the patterns of gene expression in response to v-Src-transformation. Microarray analysis was used to measure changes in gene expression and to define a common set of v-Src regulated genes (CSR genes) in CEF and CNR cells. A clustering enrichment regime using the CSR genes and two independent breast tumor data-sets was used to identify a 42-gene aggressive tumor gene signature. The aggressive gene signature was tested for its prognostic value by conducting survival analyses on six additional tumor data sets. The analysis of CEF and CNR cells revealed that cell transformation by v-Src alters the expression of 6% of the protein coding genes of the genome. A common set of 175 v-Src regulated genes (CSR genes) was regulated in both CEF and CNR cells. Within the CSR gene set, a group of 42 v-Src inducible genes was associated with reduced disease- and metastasis-free survival in several independent patient cohorts with breast or lung cancer. Gene classes represented within this group include DNA replication, cell cycle, the DNA damage and stress responses, and blood vessel morphogenesis. By studying the v-Src-dependent changes in gene expression in two types of primary cells, we identified a set of 42 inducible genes associated with poor prognosis in breast and lung cancer. The identification of these genes provides a

  5. Genome plasticity in filamentous plant pathogens contributes to the emergence of novel effectors and their cellular processes in the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yanhan; Li, Ying; Qi, Zhongqiang; Zheng, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-02-01

    Plant diseases cause extensive yield loss of crops worldwide, and secretory 'warfare' occurs between plants and pathogenic organisms all the time. Filamentous plant pathogens have evolved the ability to manipulate host processes and facilitate colonization through secreting effectors inside plant cells. The stresses from hosts and environment can drive the genome dynamics of plant pathogens. Remarkable advances in plant pathology have been made owing to these adaptable genome regions of several lineages of filamentous phytopathogens. Characterization new effectors and interaction analyses between pathogens and plants have provided molecular insights into the plant pathways perturbed during the infection process. In this mini-review, we highlight promising approaches of identifying novel effectors based on the genome plasticity. We also discuss the interaction mechanisms between plants and their filamentous pathogens and outline the possibilities of effector gene expression under epigenetic control that will be future directions for research.

  6. Biochemical Alterations during the Obese-Aging Process in Female and Male Monosodium Glutamate (MSG-Treated Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René J. Hernández-Bautista

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, from children to the elderly, has increased in the world at an alarming rate over the past three decades, implying long-term detrimental consequences for individual’s health. Obesity and aging are known to be risk factors for metabolic disorder development, insulin resistance and inflammation, but their relationship is not fully understood. Prevention and appropriate therapies for metabolic disorders and physical disabilities in older adults have become a major public health challenge. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate inflammation markers, biochemical parameters and glucose homeostasis during the obese-aging process, to understand the relationship between obesity and health span during the lifetime. In order to do this, the monosodium glutamate (MSG obesity mice model was used, and data were evaluated at 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 months in both female and male mice. Our results showed that obesity was a major factor contributing to premature alterations in MSG-treated mice metabolism; however, at older ages, obesity effects were attenuated and MSG-mice became more similar to normal mice. At a younger age (four months old, the Lee index, triglycerides, total cholesterol, TNF-α and transaminases levels increased; while adiponectin decreased and glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity levels were remarkably altered. However, from 16 months old-on, the Lee index and TNF-α levels diminished significantly, while adiponectin increased, and glucose and insulin homeostasis was recovered. In summary, MSG-treated obese mice showed metabolic changes and differential susceptibility by gender throughout life and during the aging process. Understanding metabolic differences between genders during the lifespan will allow the discovery of specific preventive treatment strategies for chronic diseases and functional decline.

  7. Guinea-pig interpubic joint (symphysis pubica relaxation at parturition: Underlying cellular processes that resemble an inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz-de-Toro Mónica

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At term, cervical ripening in coordination with uterine contractions becomes a prerequisite for a normal vaginal delivery. Currently, cervical ripening is considered to occur independently from uterine contractions. Many evidences suggest that cervical ripening resembles an inflammatory process. Comparatively little attention has been paid to the increased flexibility of the pelvic symphysis that occurs in many species to enable safe delivery. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the guinea-pig interpubic joint relaxation process observed during late pregnancy and parturition resembles an inflammatory process. Methods Samples of pubic symphysis were taken from pregnant guinea-pigs sacrificed along gestation, parturition and postpartum. Serial sections of paraffin-embedded tissues were used to measure the interpubic distance on digitalized images, stained with Giemsa to quantify leukocyte infiltration and to describe the vascular area changes, or studied by the picrosirius-polarization method to evaluate collagen remodeling. P4 and E2 serum levels were measured by a sequential immunometric assay. Results Data showed that the pubic relaxation is associated with an increase in collagen remodeling. In addition, a positive correlation between E2 serum levels and the increase in the interpubic distance was found. On the other hand, a leukocyte infiltration in the interpubic tissue around parturition was described, with the presence of almost all inflammatory cells types. At the same time, histological images show an increase in vascular area (angiogenesis. Eosinophils reached their highest level immediately before parturition; whereas for the neutrophilic and mononuclear infiltration higher values were recorded one day after parturition. Correlation analysis showed that eosinophils and mononuclear cells were positively correlated with E2 levels, but only eosinophilic infiltration was associated with collagen remodeling

  8. Mindfulness training alters emotional memory recall compared to active controls: support for an emotional information processing model of mindfulness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug eRoberts-Wolfe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigating the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e. memory biases in relation to both clinical symptomatology and well-being in comparison to active control conditions.Methods: Fifty-eight university students (28 female, age = 20.1 ± 2.7 years participated in either a 12-week course containing a "meditation laboratory" or an active control course with similar content or experiential practice laboratory format (music. Participants completed an emotional word recall task and self-report questionnaires of well-being and clinical symptoms before and after the 12-week course.Results: Meditators showed greater increases in positive word recall compared to controls F(1, 56 = 6.6, p = .02. The meditation group increased significantly more on measures of well-being [F(1, 56 = 6.6, p = .01], with a marginal decrease in depression and anxiety [(F(1, 56 = 3.0, p = .09] compared to controls. Increased positive word recall was associated with increased psychological well-being [r = 0.31, p = .02] and decreased clinical symptoms [r = -0.29, p = .03].Conclusion: Mindfulness training was associated with greater improvements in processing efficiency for positively valenced stimuli than active control conditions. This change in emotional information processing was associated with improvements in psychological well-being and less depression and anxiety. These data suggest that mindfulness training may improve well-being via changes in emotional information processing.

  9. E-cadherin acts as a regulator of transcripts associated with a wide range of cellular processes in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Soncin

    Full Text Available We have recently shown that expression of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin is required for LIF-dependent pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem (ES cells.In this study, we have assessed global transcript expression in E-cadherin null (Ecad-/- ES cells cultured in either the presence or absence of LIF and compared these to the parental cell line wtD3.We show that LIF has little effect on the transcript profile of Ecad-/- ES cells, with statistically significant transcript alterations observed only for Sp8 and Stat3. Comparison of Ecad-/- and wtD3 ES cells cultured in LIF demonstrated significant alterations in the transcript profile, with effects not only confined to cell adhesion and motility but also affecting, for example, primary metabolic processes, catabolism and genes associated with apoptosis. Ecad-/- ES cells share similar, although not identical, gene expression profiles to epiblast-derived pluripotent stem cells, suggesting that E-cadherin expression may inhibit inner cell mass to epiblast transition. We further show that Ecad-/- ES cells maintain a functional β-catenin pool that is able to induce β-catenin/TCF-mediated transactivation but, contrary to previous findings, do not display endogenous β-catenin/TCF-mediated transactivation. We conclude that loss of E-cadherin in mouse ES cells leads to significant transcript alterations independently of β-catenin/TCF transactivation.

  10. Stimulus-Responsive Prochelators for Manipulating Cellular Metals

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, QIN; FRANZ, KATHERINE J.

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions are essential for a wide range of physiological processes, but they can also be toxic if not appropriately regulated by a complex network of metal trafficking proteins. Intervention in cellular metal distribution with small molecule or peptide chelating agents has promising therapeutic potential to harness metals to fight disease. Molecular outcomes associated with forming metal-chelate interactions in situ include altering concentration and subcellular metal distribution, inhibiti...

  11. Roles of Apoptosis and Cellular Senescence in Cancer and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerella, Claudia; Grandjenette, Cindy; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and aging are two similar processes representing the final outcome of timedependent accumulation of various irreversible dysfunctions, mainly caused by stress-induced DNA and cellular damages. Apoptosis and senescence are two types of cellular response to damages that are altered in both cancer and aging, albeit through different mechanisms. Carcinogenesis is associated with a progressive reduction in the ability of the cells to trigger apoptosis and senescence. In contrast, in aging tissues, there is an increased accumulation of senescent cells, and the nature of apoptosis deregulation varies depending on the tissue. Thus, the prevailing model suggests that apoptosis and cellular senescence function as two essential tumor-suppressor mechanisms, ensuring the health of the individual during early and reproductive stages of life, but become detrimental and promote aging later in life. The recent discovery that various anticancer agents, including canonical inducers of apoptosis, act also as inducers of cellular senescence indicates that pro-senescence strategies may have applications in cancer prevention therapy. Therefore, dissection of the mechanisms mediating the delicate balance between apoptosis and cellular senescence will be beneficial in the therapeutic exploitation of both processes in the development of future anticancer and anti-aging strategies, including minimizing the side effects of such strategies. Here, we provide an overview of the roles of apoptosis and cellular senescence in cancer and aging.

  12. Agent-Based Phytoplankton Models of Cellular and Population Processes: Fostering Individual-Based Learning in Undergraduate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berges, J. A.; Raphael, T.; Rafa Todd, C. S.; Bate, T. C.; Hellweger, F. L.

    2016-02-01

    Engaging undergraduate students in research projects that require expertise in multiple disciplines (e.g. cell biology, population ecology, and mathematical modeling) can be challenging because they have often not developed the expertise that allows them to participate at a satisfying level. Use of agent-based modeling can allow exploration of concepts at more intuitive levels, and encourage experimentation that emphasizes processes over computational skills. Over the past several years, we have involved undergraduate students in projects examining both ecological and cell biological aspects of aquatic microbial biology, using the freely-downloadable, agent-based modeling environment NetLogo (https://ccl.northwestern.edu/netlogo/). In Netlogo, actions of large numbers of individuals can be simulated, leading to complex systems with emergent behavior. The interface features appealing graphics, monitors, and control structures. In one example, a group of sophomores in a BioMathematics program developed an agent-based model of phytoplankton population dynamics in a pond ecosystem, motivated by observed macroscopic changes in cell numbers (due to growth and death), and driven by responses to irradiance, temperature and a limiting nutrient. In a second example, junior and senior undergraduates conducting Independent Studies created a model of the intracellular processes governing stress and cell death for individual phytoplankton cells (based on parameters derived from experiments using single-cell culturing and flow cytometry), and then this model was embedded in the agents in the pond ecosystem model. In our experience, students with a range of mathematical abilities learned to code quickly and could use the software with varying degrees of sophistication, for example, creation of spatially-explicit two and three-dimensional models. Skills developed quickly and transferred readily to other platforms (e.g. Matlab).

  13. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc. is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  14. [General and ethical considerations for the informed consent process: Guidelines from the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibert, Jean-Baptiste; Polomeni, Alice; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bordessoule, Dominique

    2016-11-01

    Informed consent is not restricted to clinical research and must be applied to high-risk care such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. If standardized informed consent might improve inequalities in medical practices between different transplantation centers, it is strongly recommended that it be adapted with an honest dialogue between physicians and patients and physicians and donors. In an attempt to harmonize clinical practices among French hematopoietic stem cell transplantation centers, the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC) held its sixth annual workshop series in September 2015 in Lille. This event brought together practitioners from across the country. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the French law concerning patients' rights and ethical practices for an informed consent process to be applied to care or research. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. High-Concentrate Diet-Induced Change of Cellular Metabolism Leads to Decreases of Immunity and Imbalance of Cellular Activities in Rumen Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyan Lu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In animals, the immune and cellular processes of tissue largely depend on the status of local metabolism. However, in the rumen epithelium, how the cellular metabolism affects epithelial immunity, and cellular processes, when the diet is switched from energy-rich to energy-excess status, with regard to animal production and health, have not as yet been reported. Methods: RNA-seq was applied to compare the biological processes altered by an increase of dietary concentration from 10% to 35% with those altered by an increase of dietary concentration from 35% to 65% (dietary concentrate: the non-grass component in diet, including corn, soya bean meal and additive. High concentrate diet composed of 35% grass, 55% corn, 8% soya bean meal and 2% additive. In addition to the functional analysis of enriched genes in terms of metabolism, the immune system, and cellular process, the highly correlated genes to the enriched metabolism genes were identified, and the function and signaling pathways related to the differentially expressed neighbors were compared among the groups. Results: The variation trends of molar proportions of ruminal SCFAs and those of enriched pathways belonging to metabolism, immune system, and cellular process were altered with the change of diets. With regard to metabolism, lipid metabolism and amino acid metabolism were most affected. According to the correlation analysis, both innate and adaptive immune responses were promoted by the metabolism genes enriched under the 65% concentrate diet. However, the majority of immune responses were suppressed under the 35% concentrate diet. Moreover, the exclusive upregulation of cell growth and dysfunction of cellular transport and catabolism were induced by the metabolism genes enriched under the 65% concentrate diet. On the contrary, a balanced regulation of cellular processes was detected under the 35% concentrate diet. Conclusions: These results indicated that the

  16. Analysis of the planned post-mining landscape of MIBRAG's open-cast mines with regard to a possible environmental impact of alteration processes in mixed dumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolas, P.; Hofmann, B.

    2010-01-01

    There has been an increasing body of knowledge with regard to hydro- and geochemical alteration processes in overburden dumps and their impact on groundwater quality in lignite mining and reclamation operations associated with post-mining landscapes in Germany. The operators of the MIBRAG mines have examined issues regarding alteration processes and how they affect the environment and which opportunities exist to actively influence the dumping process. The objectives were to counteract any possible negative impact of the alteration processes. Special emphasis was on the impact caused by oxidation of sulfur containing minerals. This paper presented an analysis of the situation at United Schleenhain Mine and how it reflects on the work to date for MIBRAG's mines. A future outlook was also presented. Specifically, the paper discussed the development of the United Schleenhain mine and the post-mining landscape. The potential for discharge of substances was also evaluated along with acidification. 1 tab., 5 figs.

  17. HDACi: cellular effects, opportunities for restorative dentistry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H F

    2011-12-01

    Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins alters gene expression and induces a host of cellular effects. The acetylation process is homeostatically balanced by two groups of cellular enzymes, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). HAT activity relaxes the structure of the human chromatin, rendering it transcriptionally active, thereby increasing gene expression. In contrast, HDAC activity leads to gene silencing. The enzymatic balance can be \\'tipped\\' by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), leading to an accumulation of acetylated proteins, which subsequently modify cellular processes including stem cell differentiation, cell cycle, apoptosis, gene expression, and angiogenesis. There is a variety of natural and synthetic HDACi available, and their pleiotropic effects have contributed to diverse clinical applications, not only in cancer but also in non-cancer areas, such as chronic inflammatory disease, bone engineering, and neurodegenerative disease. Indeed, it appears that HDACi-modulated effects may differ between \\'normal\\' and transformed cells, particularly with regard to reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis, proliferation, and cell cycle arrest. The potential beneficial effects of HDACi for health, resulting from their ability to regulate global gene expression by epigenetic modification of DNA-associated proteins, also offer potential for application within restorative dentistry, where they may promote dental tissue regeneration following pulpal damage.

  18. Electrohydrodynamic jet process for pore-structure-controlled 3D fibrous architecture as a tissue regenerative material: fabrication and cellular activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Seong; Kim, GeunHyung

    2014-07-22

    In this study, we propose a new scaffold fabrication method, "direct electro-hydrodynamic jet process," using the initial jet of an electrospinning process and ethanol media as a target. The fabricated three-dimensional (3D) fibrous structure was configured with multilayered microsized struts consisting of randomly entangled micro/nanofibrous architecture, similar to that of native extracellular matrixes. The fabrication of the structure was highly dependent on various processing parameters, such as the surface tension of the target media, and the flow rate and weight fraction of the polymer solution. As a tissue regenerative material, the 3D fibrous scaffold was cultured with preosteoblasts to observe the initial cellular activities in comparison with a solid-freeform fabricated 3D scaffold sharing a similar structural geometry. The cell-culture results showed that the newly developed scaffold provided outstanding microcellular environmental conditions to the seeded cells (about 3.5-fold better initial cell attachment and 2.1-fold better cell proliferation).

  19. Phenolic compounds, antioxidant potential and antiproliferative potential of 10 common edible flowers from China assessed using a simulated in vitro digestion-dialysis process combined with cellular assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weisu; Mao, Shuqin; Zhang, Liuquan; Lu, Baiyi; Zheng, Lufei; Zhou, Fei; Zhao, Yajing; Li, Maiquan

    2017-11-01

    Phenolic compounds could be sensitive to digestive conditions, thus a simulated in vitro digestion-dialysis process and cellular assays was used to determine phenolic compounds and antioxidant and antiproliferative potentials of 10 common edible flowers from China and their functional components. Gallic acid, ferulic acid, and rutin were widely present in these flowers, which demonstrated various antioxidant capacities (DPPH, ABTS, FRAP and CAA values) and antiproliferative potentials measured by the MTT method. Rosa rugosa, Paeonia suffruticosa and Osmanthus fragrans exhibited the best antioxidant and antiproliferative potentials against HepG2, A549 and SGC-7901 cell lines, except that Osmanthus fragrans was not the best against SGC-7901 cells. The in vitro digestion-dialysis process decreased the antioxidant potential by 33.95-90.72% and the antiproliferative potential by 13.22-87.15%. Following the in vitro digestion-dialysis process, phenolics were probably responsible for antioxidant (R 2 = 0.794-0.924, P digestion and dialysis along with the reduction of phenolics. Nevertheless, they still had considerable antioxidant and antiproliferative potential, which merited further investigation in in vivo studies. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. The role of actin networks in cellular mechanosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azatov, Mikheil

    Physical processes play an important role in many biological phenomena, such as wound healing, organ development, and tumor metastasis. During these processes, cells constantly interact with and adapt to their environment by exerting forces to mechanically probe the features of their surroundings and generating appropriate biochemical responses. The mechanisms underlying how cells sense the physical properties of their environment are not well understood. In this thesis, I present my studies to investigate cellular responses to the stiffness and topography of the environment. In order to sense the physical properties of their environment, cells dynamically reorganize the structure of their actin cytoskeleton, a dynamic network of biopolymers, altering the shape and spatial distribution of protein assemblies. Several observations suggest that proteins that crosslink actin filaments may play an important role in cellular mechanosensitivity. Palladin is an actin-crosslinking protein that is found in the lamellar actin network, stress fibers and focal adhesions, cellular structures that are critical for mechanosensing of the physical environment. By virtue of its close interactions with these structures in the cell, palladin may play an important role in cell mechanics. However, the role of actin crosslinkers in general, and palladin in particular, in cellular force generation and mechanosensing is not well known. I have investigated the role of palladin in regulating the plasticity of the actin cytoskeleton and cellular force generation in response to alterations in substrate stiffness. I have shown that the expression levels of palladin modulate the forces exerted by cells and their ability to sense substrate stiffness. Perturbation experiments also suggest that palladin levels in cells altered myosin motor activity. These results suggest that the actin crosslinkers, such as palladin, and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant

  1. Overview of molecular, cellular, and genetic neurotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, David R

    2005-05-01

    It has become increasingly evident that the field of neurotoxicology is not only rapidly growing but also rapidly evolving, especially over the last 20 years. As the number of drugs and environmental and bacterial/viral agents with potential neurotoxic properties has grown, the need for additional testing has increased. Only recently has the technology advanced to a level that neurotoxicologic studies can be performed without operating in a "black box." Examination of the effects of agents that are suspected of being toxic can occur on the molecular (protein-protein), cellular (biomarkers, neuronal function), and genetic (polymorphisms) level. Together, these areas help to elucidate the potential toxic profiles of unknown (and in some cases, known) agents. The area of proteomics is one of the fastest growing areas in science and particularly applicable to neurotoxicology. Lubec et al, provide a review of the potential and limitations of proteomics. Proteomics focuses on a more comprehensive view of cellular proteins and provides considerably more information about the effects of toxins on the CNS. Proteomics can be classified into three different focuses: post-translational modification, protein-expression profiling, and protein-network mapping. Together, these methods represent a more complete and powerful image of protein modifications following potential toxin exposure. Cellular neurotoxicology involves many cellular processes including alterations in cellular energy homeostasis, ion homeostasis, intracellular signaling function, and neurotransmitter release, uptake, and storage. The greatest hurdle in cellular neurotoxicology has been the discovery of appropriate biomarkers that are reliable, reproducible, and easy to obtain. There are biomarkers of exposure effect, and susceptibility. Finding the appropriate biomarker for a particular toxin is a daunting task. The appropriate biomarker for a particular toxin is a daunting task. The advantage to biomarker

  2. Differential cellular metabolite alterations in HaCaT cells caused by exposure to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-binding polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons chrysene, benzo[a]pyrene and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Potratz

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are ubiquitous in the human environment. Since they are present in crude oilfractions used for the production of rubber and plastics, consumers may come into direct dermal contacts with these compounds (e.g., via tool handles on a daily basis. Some individual PAHs are identified as genotoxic mutagens thereby prompting particular toxicological and environmental concern. Among this group, benzo[a]pyrene (BAP constitutes a model carcinogen which is also used as reference compound for risk assessment purposes. It acts as a strong agonist of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR and becomes metabolically activated toward mutagenic and carcinogenic intermediates by cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases (CYPs. While BAP has been exhaustively characterized with regard to its toxicological properties, there is much less information available for other PAHs. We treated an AHR-proficient immortal human keratinocyte cell line (i.e., HaCaT with three selected PAHs: BAP, chrysene (CRY and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DALP. Compound-mediated alterations of endogenous metabolites were investigated by an LC–MS/MS-based targeted approach. To examine AHR-dependent changes of the measured metabolites, AHR-deficient HaCaT knockdown cells (AHR-KD were used for comparison. Our results reveal that 24 metabolites are sufficient to separate the PAH-exposed cells from untreated controls by application of a multivariate model. Alterations in the metabolomics profiles caused by each PAH show influences on the energy and lipid metabolism of the cells indicating reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle activity and β-oxidation. Up-regulation of sphingomyelin levels after exposure to BAP and DALP point to pro-apoptotic processes caused by these two potent PAHs. Our results suggest that in vitro metabolomics can serve as tool to develop bioassays for application in hazard assessment. Keywords: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, Metabolomics, Aryl

  3. Vesicular Trafficking Defects, Developmental Abnormalities, and Alterations in the Cellular Death Process Occur in Cell Lines that Over-Express Dictyostelium GTPase, Rab2, and Rab2 Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Maringer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Small molecular weight GTPase Rab2 has been shown to be a resident of pre-Golgi intermediates and required for protein transport from the ER to the Golgi complex, however, the function of Rab2 in Dictyostelium has yet to be fully characterized. Using cell lines that over-express DdRab2, as well as cell lines over-expressing constitutively active (CA, and dominant negative (DN forms of the GTPase, we report a functional role in vesicular transport specifically phagocytosis, and endocytosis. Furthermore, Rab2 like other GTPases cycles between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound state. We found that this GTP/GDP cycle for DdRab2 is crucial for normal Dictyostelium development and cell–cell adhesion. Similar to Rab5 and Rab7 in C. elegans, we found that DdRab2 plays a role in programmed cell death, possibly in the phagocytic removal of apoptotic corpses.

  4. [Epigenetic alterations in acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Meneses, María Del Pilar; Pérez-Vera, Patricia

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer. It is well-known that genetic alterations constitute the basis for the etiology of ALL. However, genetic abnormalities are not enough for the complete development of the disease, and additional alterations such as epigenetic modifications are required. Such alterations, like DNA methylation, histone modifications, and noncoding RNA regulation have been identified in ALL. DNA hypermethylation in promoter regions is one of the most frequent epigenetic modifications observed in ALL. This modification frequently leads to gene silencing in tumor suppressor genes, and in consequence, contributes to leukemogenesis. Alterations in histone remodeling proteins have also been detected in ALL, such as the overexpression of histone deacetylases enzymes, and alteration of acetyltransferases and methyltransferases. ALL also shows alteration in the expression of miRNAs, and in consequence, the modification in the expression of their target genes. All of these epigenetic modifications are key events in the malignant transformation since they lead to the deregulation of oncogenes as BLK, WNT5B and WISP1, and tumor suppressors such as FHIT, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, and TP53, which alter fundamental cellular processes and potentially lead to the development of ALL. Both genetic and epigenetic alterations contribute to the development and evolution of ALL. Copyright © 2017 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. 1,4-Naphthoquinones: From Oxidative Damage to Cellular and Inter-Cellular Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars-Oliver Klotz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Naphthoquinones may cause oxidative stress in exposed cells and, therefore, affect redox signaling. Here, contributions of redox cycling and alkylating properties of quinones (both natural and synthetic, such as plumbagin, juglone, lawsone, menadione, methoxy-naphthoquinones, and others to cellular and inter-cellular signaling processes are discussed: (i naphthoquinone-induced Nrf2-dependent modulation of gene expression and its potentially beneficial outcome; (ii the modulation of receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor by naphthoquinones, resulting in altered gap junctional intercellular communication. Generation of reactive oxygen species and modulation of redox signaling are properties of naphthoquinones that render them interesting leads for the development of novel compounds of potential use in various therapeutic settings.

  6. Mapping cellular processes in the mesenchyme during palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 reveals complex proliferation changes and perturbed cell packing and polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Lara J; Economou, Andrew D; Cobourne, Martyn T; Green, Jeremy B A

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11 deletion syndromes represent a spectrum of overlapping conditions including cardiac defects and craniofacial malformations. Amongst the craniofacial anomalies that are seen, cleft of the secondary palate is a common feature. Haploinsufficiency of TBX1 is believed to be a major contributor toward many of the developmental structural anomalies that occur in these syndromes, and targeted deletion of Tbx1 in the mouse reproduces many of these malformations, including cleft palate. However, the cellular basis of this defect is only poorly understood. Here, palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 has been analysed, focusing on cellular properties within the whole mesenchymal volume of the palatal shelves. Novel image analyses and data presentation tools were applied to quantify cell proliferation rates, including regions of elevated as well as reduced proliferation, and cell packing in the mesenchyme. Also, cell orientations (nucleus-Golgi axis) were mapped as a potential marker of directional cell movement. Proliferation differed only subtly between wild-type and mutant until embryonic day (E)15.5 when proliferation in the mutant was significantly lower. Tbx1(-/-) palatal shelves had slightly different cell packing than wild-type, somewhat lower before elevation and higher at E15.5 when the wild-type palate has elevated and fused. Cell orientation is biased towards the shelf distal edge in the mid-palate of wild-type embryos but is essentially random in the Tbx1(-/-) mutant shelves, suggesting that polarised processes such as directed cell rearrangement might be causal for the cleft phenotype. The implications of these findings in the context of further understanding Tbx1 function during palatogenesis and of these methods for the more general analysis of genotype-phenotype functional relationships are discussed. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Anatomical Society.

  7. Mindfulness training alters emotional memory recall compared to active controls: support for an emotional information processing model of mindfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Wolfe, Douglas; Sacchet, Matthew D; Hastings, Elizabeth; Roth, Harold; Britton, Willoughby

    2012-01-01

    While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e., memory) biases in relation to both clinical symptomatology and well-being in comparison to active control conditions. Fifty-eight university students (28 female, age = 20.1 ± 2.7 years) participated in either a 12-week course containing a "meditation laboratory" or an active control course with similar content or experiential practice laboratory format (music). Participants completed an emotional word recall task and self-report questionnaires of well-being and clinical symptoms before and after the 12-week course. Meditators showed greater increases in positive word recall compared to controls [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.02]. The meditation group increased significantly more on measures of well-being [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.01], with a marginal decrease in depression and anxiety [F(1, 56) = 3.0, p = 0.09] compared to controls. Increased positive word recall was associated with increased psychological well-being (r = 0.31, p = 0.02) and decreased clinical symptoms (r = -0.29, p = 0.03). Mindfulness training was associated with greater improvements in processing efficiency for positively valenced stimuli than active control conditions. This change in emotional information processing was associated with improvements in psychological well-being and less depression and anxiety. These data suggest that mindfulness training may improve well-being via changes in emotional information processing. Future research with a fully randomized design will be

  8. Mindfulness Training Alters Emotional Memory Recall Compared to Active Controls: Support for an Emotional Information Processing Model of Mindfulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Wolfe, Douglas; Sacchet, Matthew D.; Hastings, Elizabeth; Roth, Harold; Britton, Willoughby

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e., memory) biases in relation to both clinical symptomatology and well-being in comparison to active control conditions. Methods: Fifty-eight university students (28 female, age = 20.1 ± 2.7 years) participated in either a 12-week course containing a “meditation laboratory” or an active control course with similar content or experiential practice laboratory format (music). Participants completed an emotional word recall task and self-report questionnaires of well-being and clinical symptoms before and after the 12-week course. Results: Meditators showed greater increases in positive word recall compared to controls [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.02]. The meditation group increased significantly more on measures of well-being [F(1, 56) = 6.6, p = 0.01], with a marginal decrease in depression and anxiety [F(1, 56) = 3.0, p = 0.09] compared to controls. Increased positive word recall was associated with increased psychological well-being (r = 0.31, p = 0.02) and decreased clinical symptoms (r = −0.29, p = 0.03). Conclusion: Mindfulness training was associated with greater improvements in processing efficiency for positively valenced stimuli than active control conditions. This change in emotional information processing was associated with improvements in psychological well-being and less depression and anxiety. These data suggest that mindfulness training may improve well-being via changes in emotional information processing. Future

  9. Cellular dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, J.L.; Chin, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation dose is a useful predictive parameter for describing radiation toxicity in conventional radiotherapy. Traditionally, in vitro radiation biology dose-effect relations are expressed in the form of cell survival curves, a semilog plot of cell survival versus dose. However, the characteristic linear or linear quadratic survival curve shape, for high- and low-LET radiations respectively, is only strictly valid when the radiation dose is uniform across the entire target population. With an external beam of 60 Co gamma rays or x-rays, a uniform field may be readily achievable. When radionuclides are incorporated into a cell milieu, several new problems emerge which can result in a departure from uniformity in energy deposition throughout a cell population. This nonuniformity can have very important consequences for the shape of the survival curve. Cases in which perturbations of source uniformity may arise include: 1. Elemental sources may equilibrate in the cell medium with partition coefficients between the extracellular, cytosol, and nuclear compartments. The effect of preferential cell internalization or binding to cell membrane of some radionuclides can increase or decrease the slope of the survival curve. 2. Radionuclides bound to antibodies, hormones, metabolite precursors, etc., may result in a source localization pattern characteristic of the carrier agent, i.e., the sources may bind to cell surface receptors or antigens, be internalized, bind to secreted antigen concentrated around a fraction of the cell population, or become directly incorporated into the cell DNA. We propose to relate the distribution of energy deposition in cell nuclei to biological correlates of cellular inactivation. The probability of each cell's survival is weighted by its individual radiation burden, and the summation of these probabilities for the cell population can be used to predict the number or fraction of cell survivors

  10. Dissolution studies of natural analogues spent fuel and U(VI)-Silicon phases of and oxidative alteration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Morales, I.

    2000-01-01

    In order to understand the long-term behavior of the nuclear spent fuel in geological repository conditions, we have performed dissolution studies with natural analogues to UO 2 as well as with solid phases representatives of the oxidative alteration pathway of uranium dioxide, as observed in both natural environment and laboratory studies. In all cases, we have studied the influence of the bicarbonate concentration in the dissolution process, as a first approximation to the groundwater composition of a granitic environment, where carbonate is one of the most important complexing agents. As a natural analogue to the nuclear spent fuel some uraninite samples from the Oklo are deposit in Gabon, where chain fission reactions took place 2000 millions years ago, as well as a pitchblende sample from the mine Fe ore deposit, in Salamanca (spain) have been studied. The studies have been performed at 25 and 60 deg C and 60 deg C, and they have focussed on the determination of both the thermodynamic and the kinetic properties of the different samples studied, using batch and continuous experimental methodologies, respectively. (Author)

  11. PAV-1, a new rat hepatic stellate cell line converts retinol into retinoic acid, a process altered by ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvant, Patrick; Sapin, Vincent; Abergel, Armand; Schmidt, Carsten K; Blanchon, Loïc; Alexandre-Gouabau, Marie Cécile; Rosenbaum, Jean; Bommelaer, Gilles; Rock, Edmond; Dastugue, Bernard; Nau, Heinz; Azaïs-Braesco, Véronique

    2002-08-01

    During liver fibrogenesis or long term culture, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) evolved from "quiescent" to activated phenotype called "myofibroblast-like", a transition prevented by retinoic acid (RA). Little is known about RA generation by HSCs. Our study aimed to check the ability of these cells to produce RA from retinol (Rol) and the alterations of this metabolic step by ethanol. To study this metabolic pathway, primary cultures of HSCs represent the most physiological model but technically suffer several drawbacks. To circumvent these problems, an immortalized rat HSC line (named PAV-1) has been established. We validated PAV-1 cell line as a convenient model to study retinoids metabolism by HSCs. Then, we showed that PAV-1 cells express Rol-binding proteins (RBPs), enzymes and nuclear receptors involved in RA signaling pathway. We also demonstrated in situ generation of functional all-trans-RA (ATRA), using transient transfections with a RA-sensitive reporter gene, in situ modulation of tissue transglutaminase (tTG) activity and HPLC experiments. This production was Rol dose-dependent; 4-methylpyrazole, citral, and ethanol-inhibited which argues in favor of an enzymatic process.In conclusion, we first demonstrate in situ RA generation from Rol in a newly immortalized rat HSC line, named PAV-1. Inhibition of RA production by ethanol in PAV-1 and recent data, suggesting fundamental role of RA to prevent fibrosis development in the liver, allow us to hypothesize that Rol metabolism could be a primary target for ethanol during development of hepatic fibrosis.

  12. Inactivation of a single copy of Crebbp selectively alters pre-mRNA processing in mouse hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine E Lemieux

    Full Text Available Global expression analysis of fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells (FL HSCs revealed the presence of unspliced pre-mRNA for a number of genes in normal FL HSCs. In a subset of these genes, Crebbp+/- FL HSCs had less unprocessed pre-mRNA without a corresponding reduction in total mRNA levels. Among the genes thus identified were the key regulators of HSC function Itga4, Msi2 and Tcf4. A similar but much weaker effect was apparent in Ep300+/- FL HSCs, indicating that, in this context as in others, the two paralogs are not interchangeable. As a group, the down-regulated intronic probe sets could discriminate adult HSCs from more mature cell types, suggesting that the underlying mechanism is regulated with differentiation stage and is active in both fetal and adult hematopoiesis. Consistent with increased myelopoiesis in Crebbp hemizygous mice, targeted reduction of CREBBP abundance by shRNA in the multipotent EML cell line triggered spontaneous myeloid differentiation in the absence of the normally required inductive signals. In addition, differences in protein levels between phenotypically distinct EML subpopulations were better predicted by taking into account not only the total mRNA signal but also the amount of unspliced message present. CREBBP thus appears to selectively influence the timing and degree of pre-mRNA processing of genes essential for HSC regulation and thereby has the potential to alter subsequent cell fate decisions in HSCs.

  13. Nitrogen soil emissions and belowground plant processes in Mediterranean annual pastures are altered by ozone exposure and N-inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, L.; Bermejo-Bermejo, V.; García-Torres, L.; Alonso, R.; de la Cruz, A.; Calvete-Sogo, H.; Vallejo, A.

    2017-09-01

    Increasing tropospheric ozone (O3) and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition alter the structure and composition of pastures. These changes could affect N and C compounds in the soil that in turn can influence soil microbial activity and processes involved in the emission of N oxides, methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2), but these effects have been scarcely studied. Through an open top chamber (OTC) field experiment, the combined effects of both pollutants on soil gas emissions from an annual experimental Mediterranean community were assessed. Four O3 treatments and three different N input levels were considered. Fluxes of nitric (NO) and nitrous (N2O) oxide, CH4 and CO2 were analysed as well as soil mineral N and dissolved organic carbon. Belowground plant parameters like root biomass and root C and N content were also sampled. Ozone strongly increased soil N2O emissions, doubling the cumulative emission through the growing cycle in the highest O3 treatment, while N-inputs enhanced more slightly NO; CH4 and CO2 where not affected. Both N-gases had a clear seasonality, peaking at the start and at the end of the season when pasture physiological activity is minimal; thus, higher microorganism activity occurred when pasture had a low nutrient demand. The O3-induced peak of N2O under low N availability at the end of the growing season was counterbalanced by the high N inputs. These effects were related to the O3 x N significant interaction found for the root-N content in the grass and the enhanced senescence of the community. Results indicate the importance of the belowground processes, where competition between plants and microorganisms for the available soil N is a key factor, for understanding the ecosystem responses to O3 and N.

  14. Altered olfactory processing of stress-related body odors and artificial odors in patients with panic disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria-Beatrice Wintermann

    Full Text Available Patients with Panic Disorder (PD direct their attention towards potential threat, followed by panic attacks, and increased sweat production. Onés own anxiety sweat odor influences the attentional focus, and discrimination of threat or non-threat. Since olfactory projection areas overlap with neuronal areas of a panic-specific fear network, the present study investigated the neuronal processing of odors in general and of stress-related sweat odors in particular in patients with PD.A sample of 13 patients with PD with/ without agoraphobia and 13 age- and gender-matched healthy controls underwent an fMRI investigation during olfactory stimulation with their stress-related sweat odors (TSST, ergometry as well as artificial odors (peach, artificial sweat as non-fearful non-body odors.The two groups did not differ with respect to their olfactory identification ability. Independent of the kind of odor, the patients with PD showed activations in fronto-cortical areas in contrast to the healthy controls who showed activations in olfaction-related areas such as the amygdalae and the hippocampus. For artificial odors, the patients with PD showed a decreased neuronal activation of the thalamus, the posterior cingulate cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex. Under the presentation of sweat odor caused by ergometric exercise, the patients with PD showed an increased activation in the superior temporal gyrus, the supramarginal gyrus, and the cingulate cortex which was positively correlated with the severity of the psychopathology. For the sweat odor from the anxiety condition, the patients with PD showed an increased activation in the gyrus frontalis inferior, which was positively correlated with the severity of the psychopathology.The results suggest altered neuronal processing of olfactory stimuli in PD. Both artificial odors and stress-related body odors activate specific parts of a fear-network which is associated with an increased severity of the

  15. SUMO regulation of cellular processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Van Gene

    2009-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christopher Ptak and Richard W. Wozniak 97 7 SUMO Modification of Ion Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Benson, Jorge A. Iñiguez-Lluhí, and Jeffrey Martens 117...

  16. SUMO regulation of cellular processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Van Gene

    2009-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vasupradha Vethantham and James L. Manley 41 4 SUMO and Chromatin Remodelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Wotton and Jacqueline C. Merrill 59 5 Functions...

  17. Association of transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) gene polymorphisms in donors with acute cellular rejection in living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Hideya; Masuda, Satohiro; Nakamura, Taro; Oike, Fumitaka; Takada, Yasutsugu; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2013-06-01

    Despite improvements in immunosuppressive therapy, acute cellular rejection (ACR) remains an important cause of mortality and graft loss in patients undergoing liver transplantation. Recently, associations between gene polymorphisms and the incidence of ACR have been reported, though few studies have investigated those polymorphisms in donors. Transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2) are involved in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen-mediated processing and presentation to cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to determine whether TAP1 and TAP2 gene polymorphisms in the donor have affected on ACR incidence in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). We examined 155 LDLTs treated at Nagoya University or Kyoto University from 2004 to 2009 and analyzed the gene polymorphisms of TAP-1 p.Ile333Val, TAP-1 p.Asp697Gly, TAP-2 p.Arg651Cys, and TAP-2 p.Gln687Stop. Thirty-seven recipients developed early ACR. Of the investigated gene polymorphisms, the TAP-1 p.697Gly allele in donors was associated with incidence of early ACR (OR=2.97, 95%CI 1.33-6.63, p=0.008). The TAP-1 p.697Gly allele in donors was associated with increased incidence of early ACR following LDLT. The TAP-1 697 polymorphism in donors can be genotyped prior to LDLT, which may contribute to individualize immunosuppression strategies for recipients and donor selection.

  18. Mechanism of Diphtheria Toxin Catalytic Domain Delivery to the Eukaryotic Cell Cytosol and the Cellular Factors that Directly Participate in the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Research on diphtheria and anthrax toxins over the past three decades has culminated in a detailed understanding of their structure function relationships (e.g., catalytic (C), transmembrane (T), and receptor binding (R) domains), as well as the identification of their eukaryotic cell surface receptor, an understanding of the molecular events leading to the receptor-mediated internalization of the toxin into an endosomal compartment, and the pH triggered conformational changes required for pore formation in the vesicle membrane. Recently, a major research effort has been focused on the development of a detailed understanding of the molecular interactions between each of these toxins and eukaryotic cell factors that play an essential role in the efficient translocation of their respective catalytic domains through the trans-endosomal vesicle membrane pore and delivery into the cell cytosol. In this review, I shall focus on recent findings that have led to a more detailed understanding of the mechanism by which the diphtheria toxin catalytic domain is delivered to the eukaryotic cell cytosol. While much work remains, it is becoming increasingly clear that the entry process is facilitated by specific interactions with a number of cellular factors in an ordered sequential fashion. In addition, since diphtheria, anthrax lethal factor and anthrax edema factor all carry multiple coatomer I complex binding motifs and COPI complex has been shown to play an essential role in entry process, it is likely that the initial steps in catalytic domain entry of these divergent toxins follow a common mechanism. PMID:22069710

  19. Image processing with cellular nonlinear networks implemented on field-programmable gate arrays for real-time applications in nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, S; Murari, A; Vagliasindi, G; Arena, P; Mazon, D; De Maack, A

    2010-08-01

    In the past years cameras have become increasingly common tools in scientific applications. They are now quite systematically used in magnetic confinement fusion, to the point that infrared imaging is starting to be used systematically for real-time machine protection in major devices. However, in order to guarantee that the control system can always react rapidly in case of critical situations, the time required for the processing of the images must be as predictable as possible. The approach described in this paper combines the new computational paradigm of cellular nonlinear networks (CNNs) with field-programmable gate arrays and has been tested in an application for the detection of hot spots on the plasma facing components in JET. The developed system is able to perform real-time hot spot recognition, by processing the image stream captured by JET wide angle infrared camera, with the guarantee that computational time is constant and deterministic. The statistical results obtained from a quite extensive set of examples show that this solution approximates very well an ad hoc serial software algorithm, with no false or missed alarms and an almost perfect overlapping of alarm intervals. The computational time can be reduced to a millisecond time scale for 8 bit 496560-sized images. Moreover, in our implementation, the computational time, besides being deterministic, is practically independent of the number of iterations performed by the CNN-unlike software CNN implementations.

  20. Image processing with cellular nonlinear networks implemented on field-programmable gate arrays for real-time applications in nuclear fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palazzo, S.; Vagliasindi, G.; Arena, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, 95125 Catania (Italy); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Mazon, D. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); De Maack, A. [Arts et Metiers Paris Tech Engineering College (ENSAM), 13100 Aix-en-Provence (France); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2010-08-15

    In the past years cameras have become increasingly common tools in scientific applications. They are now quite systematically used in magnetic confinement fusion, to the point that infrared imaging is starting to be used systematically for real-time machine protection in major devices. However, in order to guarantee that the control system can always react rapidly in case of critical situations, the time required for the processing of the images must be as predictable as possible. The approach described in this paper combines the new computational paradigm of cellular nonlinear networks (CNNs) with field-programmable gate arrays and has been tested in an application for the detection of hot spots on the plasma facing components in JET. The developed system is able to perform real-time hot spot recognition, by processing the image stream captured by JET wide angle infrared camera, with the guarantee that computational time is constant and deterministic. The statistical results obtained from a quite extensive set of examples show that this solution approximates very well an ad hoc serial software algorithm, with no false or missed alarms and an almost perfect overlapping of alarm intervals. The computational time can be reduced to a millisecond time scale for 8 bit 496x560-sized images. Moreover, in our implementation, the computational time, besides being deterministic, is practically independent of the number of iterations performed by the CNN - unlike software CNN implementations.

  1. Image processing with cellular nonlinear networks implemented on field-programmable gate arrays for real-time applications in nuclear fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, S.; Murari, A.; Vagliasindi, G.; Arena, P.; Mazon, D.; de Maack, A.; Jet-Efda Contributors

    2010-08-01

    In the past years cameras have become increasingly common tools in scientific applications. They are now quite systematically used in magnetic confinement fusion, to the point that infrared imaging is starting to be used systematically for real-time machine protection in major devices. However, in order to guarantee that the control system can always react rapidly in case of critical situations, the time required for the processing of the images must be as predictable as possible. The approach described in this paper combines the new computational paradigm of cellular nonlinear networks (CNNs) with field-programmable gate arrays and has been tested in an application for the detection of hot spots on the plasma facing components in JET. The developed system is able to perform real-time hot spot recognition, by processing the image stream captured by JET wide angle infrared camera, with the guarantee that computational time is constant and deterministic. The statistical results obtained from a quite extensive set of examples show that this solution approximates very well an ad hoc serial software algorithm, with no false or missed alarms and an almost perfect overlapping of alarm intervals. The computational time can be reduced to a millisecond time scale for 8 bit 496×560-sized images. Moreover, in our implementation, the computational time, besides being deterministic, is practically independent of the number of iterations performed by the CNN—unlike software CNN implementations.

  2. Image processing with cellular nonlinear networks implemented on field-programmable gate arrays for real-time applications in nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palazzo, S.; Vagliasindi, G.; Arena, P.; Murari, A.; Mazon, D.; De Maack, A.

    2010-01-01

    In the past years cameras have become increasingly common tools in scientific applications. They are now quite systematically used in magnetic confinement fusion, to the point that infrared imaging is starting to be used systematically for real-time machine protection in major devices. However, in order to guarantee that the control system can always react rapidly in case of critical situations, the time required for the processing of the images must be as predictable as possible. The approach described in this paper combines the new computational paradigm of cellular nonlinear networks (CNNs) with field-programmable gate arrays and has been tested in an application for the detection of hot spots on the plasma facing components in JET. The developed system is able to perform real-time hot spot recognition, by processing the image stream captured by JET wide angle infrared camera, with the guarantee that computational time is constant and deterministic. The statistical results obtained from a quite extensive set of examples show that this solution approximates very well an ad hoc serial software algorithm, with no false or missed alarms and an almost perfect overlapping of alarm intervals. The computational time can be reduced to a millisecond time scale for 8 bit 496x560-sized images. Moreover, in our implementation, the computational time, besides being deterministic, is practically independent of the number of iterations performed by the CNN - unlike software CNN implementations.

  3. Optimization of process variables of zanamivir-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles and the prediction of their cellular transport in Caco-2 cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li-Li; Cao, Yue; Zhu, Xiao-Yin; Cui, Jing-Hao; Cao, Qing-Ri

    2015-01-15

    The aim of this study was to optimize the process variables of zanamivir-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and to predict their cellular transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers. Zanamivir-loaded SLNs were prepared by a double emulsion solvent evaporation method. The effects of process variables on the mean particle size and zeta potential of SLNs were investigated and the physicochemical properties of SLNs were characterized. In addition, the cytotoxicity and transport ability of SLNs were also studied in Caco-2 cell model. The mean particle size of drug-loaded SLNs was significantly affected by the process variables. The SLNs were prepared using glyceryl monosterate (1% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or 1.5% poloxamer 188 as surfactant) had a regular shape with a relatively lower mean particle size (324.2 and 224.9 nm, respectively), higher encapsulation efficacy (55.7 and 42.4%, respectively) and sustained drug release over 12h. The crystalline form of drug had been partly changed and no physicochemical interaction had occurred between drug and carriers in SLNs. The cell viability was approximately 100% even at a high concentration of blank SLNs. There was no remarkable difference in drug permeation between drug-loaded SLNs and drug solution at 2h, while drug-loaded SLNs showed a significant decrease in drug permeation compared with the drug solution at 4h. The process variables of zanamivir-loaded SLNs were successfully optimized in this study. However, these SLNs significantly reduced the transport ability of zanamivir across Caco-2 cell monolayers. Further studies are needed to fully understand the real absorption mechanism of developed SLNs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Electromagnetic cellular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifra, Michal; Fields, Jeremy Z; Farhadi, Ashkan

    2011-05-01

    Chemical and electrical interaction within and between cells is well established. Just the opposite is true about cellular interactions via other physical fields. The most probable candidate for an other form of cellular interaction is the electromagnetic field. We review theories and experiments on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields generally, and if the cell-generated electromagnetic field can mediate cellular interactions. We do not limit here ourselves to specialized electro-excitable cells. Rather we describe physical processes that are of a more general nature and probably present in almost every type of living cell. The spectral range included is broad; from kHz to the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. We show that there is a rather large number of theories on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields and discuss experimental evidence on electromagnetic cellular interactions in the modern scientific literature. Although small, it is continuously accumulating. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cellular redox, cancer and human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Gregorio, Alfredo; Manzo-Merino, Joaquín; Lizano, Marcela

    2018-02-15

    High-risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is the causative agent of different human cancers. A persistent HR-HPV infection alters several cellular processes involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, immune evasion, genomic instability and transformation. Cumulative evidence from past studies indicates that HR-HPV proteins are associated with oxidative stress (OS) and has been proposed as a risk factor for cancer development. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) regulate a plethora of processes inducing cellular proliferation, differentiation and death. Oxidative stress (OS) is generated when an imbalance in the redox state occurs due to deregulation of the oxidant and antioxidant systems, which, in turn, promotes the damage of DNA, proteins and lipids, allowing the accumulation of mutations and genome instability. OS has been associated with the establishment and development of different cancers, and it has recently been proposed as a co-factor in cervical cancer development. This review is focused on evidence regarding the association of OS with HR-HPV proteins, and the interplay of the viral proteins with different elements of the antioxidant and DNA damage response (DDR) systems, emphasizing the processes that might be required for the viral life cycle and viral DNA integration into the host genome, which is a key element in the carcinogenic process induced by HR-HPV. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Biological soil crust as a bio-mediator alters hydrological processes in stabilized dune system of the Tengger Desert, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinrong

    2016-04-01

    Biological soil crust (BSC) is a vital component in the stabilized sand dunes with a living cover up to more than 70% of the total, which has been considered as a bio-mediator that directly influences and regulates the sand dune ecosystem processes. However, its influences on soil hydrological processes have been long neglected in Chinese deserts. In this study, BSCs of different successional stages were chose to test their influence on the hydrological processes of stabilized dune, where the groundwater deep exceeds 30m, further to explore why occur the sand-binding vegetation replacement between shrubs and herbs. Our long-term observation (60 years) shows that cyanobacteria crust has been colonized and developed after 3 years since the sand-binding vegetation has been established and dune fixation using planted xerophytic shrubs and made sand barrier (straw-checkerboard) on shifting dune surface, lichen and moss crust occurred after 20 years, and the cover of moss dominated crust could reach 70 % after 50 years. The colonization and development of BSC altered the initial soil water balance of revegetated areas by influencing rainfall infiltration, soil evaporation and dew water entrapment. The results show that BSC obviously reduced the infiltration that occurred during most rainfall events (80%), when rainfall was greater than 5 mm or less than 20 mm. The presence of BSC reduced evaporation of topsoil after small rainfall (<5 mm) because its high proportion of finer particles slowed the evaporation rate, thus keeping the water in the soil surface longer, and crust facilitated topsoil evaporation when rainfall reached 10 mm. The amount of dew entrapment increases with the succession of BSC. Moreover, the effect of the later successional BSC to dew entrapment, rainfall infiltration and evaporation was more obvious than the early successional BSC on stabilized dunes. In general, BSC reduced the amount of rainfall water that reached deeper soil (0.4-3m), which is

  7. Altered orbitofrontal activity and dorsal striatal connectivity during emotion processing in dependent marijuana users after 28 days of abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Kaeli; Yao, Shuxia; Heinz, Marcel; Zhou, Feng; Dau, Wolfgang; Banger, Markus; Weber, Bernd; Hurlemann, René; Becker, Benjamin

    2018-03-01

    Intact cognitive and emotional functioning is vital for the long-term success of addiction treatment strategies. Accumulating evidence suggests an association between chronic marijuana use and lasting alterations in cognitive brain function. Despite initial evidence for altered emotion processing in dependent marijuana users after short abstinence periods, adaptations in the domain of emotion processing after longer abstinence remain to be determined. Using task-based and resting state fMRI, the present study investigated emotion processing in 19 dependent marijuana users and 18 matched non-using controls after an abstinence period of > 28 days. Relative to the control subjects, negative emotional stimuli elicited increased medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) activity and stronger mOFC-dorsal striatal and mOFC-amygdala functional coupling in dependent marijuana users (p < 0.022, FWE-corrected). Furthermore, mOFC-dorsal striatal functional connectivity was increased at rest in marijuana users (p < 0.03, FWE-corrected). Yet, processing of positive stimuli and subjective ratings of valence and arousal were comparable in both groups. Together, the present findings provide the first evidence for persisting emotion processing alterations in dependent marijuana users. Alterations might reflect long-term neural adaptations as a consequence of chronic marijuana use or predisposing risk factors for the development of marijuana dependence.

  8. CYP2A6 Genetic Variation Alters Striatal-Cingulate Circuits, Network Hubs, and Executive Processing in Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sufang; Yang, Yihong; Hoffmann, Ewa; Tyndale, Rachel F; Stein, Elliot A

    2017-04-01

    Variation in the CYP2A6 gene alters the rate of nicotine metabolic inactivation and is associated with smoking behaviors and cessation success rates. The underlying neurobiological mechanisms of this genetic influence are unknown. Intrinsic functional connectivity strength, a whole-brain, data-driven, graph theory-based method, was applied to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data in 66 smokers and 92 nonsmokers. A subset of subjects (n = 23/20; smokers/nonsmokers) performed the monetary incentive delay task, probing reward anticipation, and a go/no-go task, probing response inhibition, on two occasions, in the presence and absence of a nicotine patch. A significant CYP2A6 genotype × smoking effect was found in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and ventral striatum, such that the normal (vs. slow) genotype individuals showed greater functional connectivity strength among smokers but not nonsmokers. Functional connectivity strength was negatively associated with severity of nicotine dependence in slow metabolizers. Both hubs were biased by inputs from the insula identified from seed-based connectivity. Similar gene × environment interactions were seen in ventral striatum during smoking abstinence when subjects performed the monetary incentive delay task and in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex when they performed the go/no-go task; both reductions were "normalized" in smokers (and increased in nonsmokers) after acute nicotine administration. Because the CYP2A6 effect was seen only in smokers, these data suggest that the rate of nicotine metabolism-and thus the concentration of nicotine presented to the brain over the course of nicotine addiction-shapes brain circuits that, among other functions, compute reward and impulsivity processes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. The Impact of Metal Ion Exposure on the Cellular Behavior of Human Osteoblasts and PBMCs: In Vitro Analyses of Osteolytic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Jonitz-Heincke

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteolysis in the periprosthetic tissue can be caused by metallic wear particles and ions that can originate from implant surface corrosion. These products influence cellular behavior and stimulate the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of CoCr29Mo6 ions on cell survival, differentiation, and cytokine expression in human osteoblasts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Thus, we exposed cells with a mixture of 200 µg/L ion solution and determined cell viability and apoptosis/necrosis. Gene expression analyses of osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation markers as well as pro-osteolytic mediators (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1, MMP1, TIMP1 were performed. These markers were also investigated in mixed cultures of adherent and non-adherent PBMCs as well as in co-cultures of human osteoblasts and PBMCs. The ion solution induced necrosis in osteoblasts and PBMCs in single cultures. All examined mediators were highly expressed in the co-culture of osteoblasts and PBMCs whereas in the single cell cultures only IL-6, IL-8, and MMP1 were found to be stimulated. While the applied concentration of the CoCr29Mo6 ion solutions had only marginal effects on human osteoblasts and PBMCs alone, the co-culture may provide a comprehensive model to study osteolytic processes in response to Co and Cr ions.

  10. Enhanced protein adsorption and cellular adhesion using transparent titanate nanotube thin films made by a simple and inexpensive room temperature process: application to optical biochips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nador, Judit; Orgovan, Norbert; Fried, Miklos; Petrik, Peter; Sulyok, Attila; Ramsden, Jeremy J; Korosi, Laszlo; Horvath, Robert

    2014-10-01

    A new type of titanate nanotube (TNT) coating is investigated for exploitation in biosensor applications. The TNT layers were prepared from stable but additive-free sols without applying any binding compounds. The simple, fast spin-coating process was carried out at room temperature, and resulted in well-formed films around 10nm thick. The films are highly transparent as expected from their nanostructure and may, therefore, be useful as coatings for surface-sensitive optical biosensors to enhance the specific surface area. In addition, these novel coatings could be applied to medical implant surfaces to control cellular adhesion. Their morphology and structure was characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and their chemical state by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For quantitative surface adhesion studies, the films were prepared on optical waveguides. The coated waveguides were shown to still guide light; thus, their sensing capability remains. Protein adsorption and cell adhesion studies on the titanate nanotube films and on smooth control surfaces revealed that the nanostructured titanate enhanced the adsorption of albumin; furthermore, the coatings considerably enhanced the adhesion of living mammalian cells (human embryonic kidney and preosteoblast). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Impact of Metal Ion Exposure on the Cellular Behavior of Human Osteoblasts and PBMCs: In Vitro Analyses of Osteolytic Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonitz-Heincke, Anika; Tillmann, Jenny; Klinder, Annett; Krueger, Simone; Kretzer, Jan Philippe; Høl, Paul Johan; Paulus, Alexander C; Bader, Rainer

    2017-07-03

    Osteolysis in the periprosthetic tissue can be caused by metallic wear particles and ions that can originate from implant surface corrosion. These products influence cellular behavior and stimulate the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of CoCr29Mo6 ions on cell survival, differentiation, and cytokine expression in human osteoblasts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Thus, we exposed cells with a mixture of 200 µg/L ion solution and determined cell viability and apoptosis/necrosis. Gene expression analyses of osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation markers as well as pro-osteolytic mediators ( IL-6 , IL-8 , TNF-α , MCP-1 , MMP1 , TIMP1 ) were performed. These markers were also investigated in mixed cultures of adherent and non-adherent PBMCs as well as in co-cultures of human osteoblasts and PBMCs. The ion solution induced necrosis in osteoblasts and PBMCs in single cultures. All examined mediators were highly expressed in the co-culture of osteoblasts and PBMCs whereas in the single cell cultures only IL-6 , IL-8 , and MMP1 were found to be stimulated. While the applied concentration of the CoCr29Mo6 ion solutions had only marginal effects on human osteoblasts and PBMCs alone, the co-culture may provide a comprehensive model to study osteolytic processes in response to Co and Cr ions.

  12. Comparative genomic analysis of a neurotoxigenic Clostridium species using partial genome sequence: Phylogenetic analysis of a few conserved proteins involved in cellular processes and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Dixit, Aparna; Tomar, Arvind; Singh, Lokendra

    2010-04-01

    Clostridial organisms produce neurotoxins, which are generally regarded as the most potent toxic substances of biological origin and potential biological warfare agents. Clostridium tetani produces tetanus neurotoxin and is responsible for the fatal tetanus disease. In spite of the extensive immunization regimen, the disease is an important cause of death especially among neonates. Strains of C. tetani have not been genetically characterized except the complete genome sequencing of strain E88. The present study reports the genetic makeup and phylogenetic affiliations of an environmental strain of this bacterium with respect to C. tetani E88 and other clostridia. A shot gun library was constructed from the genomic DNA of C. tetani drde, isolated from decaying fish sample. Unique clones were sequenced and sequences compared with its closest relative C. tetani E88. A total of 275 clones were obtained and 32,457 bases of non-redundant sequence were generated. A total of 150 base changes were observed over the entire length of sequence obtained, including, additions, deletions and base substitutions. Of the total 120 ORFs detected, 48 exhibited closest similarity to E88 proteins of which three are hypothetical proteins. Eight of the ORFs exhibited similarity with hypothetical proteins from other organisms and 10 aligned with other proteins from unrelated organisms. There is an overall conservation of protein sequences among the two strains of C. tetani and. Selected ORFs involved in cellular processes and metabolism were subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Partial sleep deprivation does not alter processes involved in semantic word priming: event-related potential evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Paniz; Muller-Gass, Alexandra; Campbell, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    Sleep deprivation has generally been observed to have a detrimental effect on tasks that require sustained attention for successful performance. It might however be possible to counter these effects by altering cognitive strategies. A recent semantic word priming study indicated that subjects used an effortful predictive-expectancy search of semantic memory following normal sleep, but changed to an automatic, effortless strategy following total sleep deprivation. Partial sleep deprivation occurs much more frequently than total sleep deprivation. The present study therefore employed a similar priming task following either 4h of sleep or following normal sleep. The purpose of the study was to determine whether partial sleep deprivation would also lead to a shift in cognitive strategy to compensate for an inability to sustain attention and effortful processing necessary for using the predicative expectancy strategy. Sixteen subjects were presented with word pairs, a prime and a target that were either strongly semantically associated (cat...dog), weakly associated (cow...barn) or not associated (apple...road). The subject's task was to determine if the target word was semantically associated to the prime. A strong priming effect was observed in both conditions. RTs were slower, accuracy lower, and N400 larger to unassociated targets, independent of the amount of sleep. The overall N400 did not differ as a function of sleep. The scalp distribution of the N400 was also similar following both normal sleep and sleep loss. There was thus little evidence of a difference in the processing of the target stimulus as a function of the amount sleep. Similarly, ERPs in the period between the onset of the prime and the subsequent target also did not differ between the normal sleep and sleep loss conditions. In contrast to total sleep deprivation, subjects therefore appeared to use a common predictive expectancy strategy in both conditions. This strategy does however require an

  14. Viral capsid assembly as a model for protein aggregation diseases: Active processes catalyzed by cellular assembly machines comprising novel drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marreiros, Rita; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas; Bader, Verian; Selvarajah, Suganya; Dey, Debendranath; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Korth, Carsten

    2015-09-02

    Viruses can be conceptualized as self-replicating multiprotein assemblies, containing coding nucleic acids. Viruses have evolved to exploit host cellular components including enzymes to ensure their replicative life cycle. New findings indicate that also viral capsid proteins recruit host factors to accelerate their assembly. These assembly machines are RNA-containing multiprotein complexes whose composition is governed by allosteric sites. In the event of viral infection, the assembly machines are recruited to support the virus over the host and are modified to achieve that goal. Stress granules and processing bodies may represent collections of such assembly machines, readily visible by microscopy but biochemically labile and difficult to isolate by fractionation. We hypothesize that the assembly of protein multimers such as encountered in neurodegenerative or other protein conformational diseases, is also catalyzed by assembly machines. In the case of viral infection, the assembly machines have been modified by the virus to meet the virus' need for rapid capsid assembly rather than host homeostasis. In the case of the neurodegenerative diseases, it is the monomers and/or low n oligomers of the so-called aggregated proteins that are substrates of assembly machines. Examples for substrates are amyloid β peptide (Aβ) and tau in Alzheimer's disease, α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease, prions in the prion diseases, Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) in subsets of chronic mental illnesses, and others. A likely continuum between virus capsid assembly and cell-to-cell transmissibility of aggregated proteins is remarkable. Protein aggregation diseases may represent dysfunction and dysregulation of these assembly machines analogous to the aberrations induced by viral infection in which cellular homeostasis is pathologically reprogrammed. In this view, as for viral infection, reset of assembly machines to normal homeostasis should be the goal of protein aggregation

  15. Evidence against the rescue of defective DeltaF508-CFTR cellular processing by curcumin in cell culture and mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuanlin; Sonawane, N D; Salinas, Danieli; Qian, Liman; Pedemonte, Nicoletta; Galietta, Luis J V; Verkman, A S

    2004-09-24

    Curcumin, the yellow colored component of the spice turmeric, has been reported to rescue defective DeltaF508-cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cellular processing in homozygous mutant mice, restoring nasal potential differences and improving survival (Egan, M. E., Pearson, M., Weiner, S. A., Rajendran, V., Rubin, D., Glockner-Pagel, J., Canny, S., Du, K., Lukacs, G. L., and Caplan, M. J. (2004) Science 304, 600-602). Because of the implied potential use of curcumin or similar compounds in the therapy of cystic fibrosis caused by the DeltaF508 mutation, we tried to reproduce and extend the pre-clinical data of Egan et al. Fluorometric measurements of iodide influx in Fischer rat thyroid cells expressing DeltaF508-CFTR showed no effect of curcumin (1-40 microm) when added for up to 24 h prior to assay in cells grown at 37 degrees C. Controls, including 27 degrees C rescue and 4 mm phenylbutyrate at 37 degrees C, were strongly positive. Also, curcumin did not increase short circuit current in primary cultures of a human airway epithelium homozygous for DeltaF508-CFTR with a 27 degrees C rescue-positive control. Nasal potential differences in mice were measured in response to topical perfusion with serial solutions containing amiloride, low Cl-, and forskolin. Robust low Cl- and forskolin-induced hyperpolarization of 22 +/- 3 mV was found in wild type mice, with 2.1 +/- 0.4 mV hyperpolarization in DeltaF508 homozygous mutant mice. No significant increase in Cl-/forskolin hyperpolarization was seen in any of the 22 DeltaF508 mice studied using different curcumin preparations and administration regimens, including that used by Egan et al. Assay of serum curcumin by ethyl acetate extraction followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry indicated a maximum serum concentration of 60 nm, well below that of 5-15 microm, where cellular effects by sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium pump inhibition are proposed to occur. Our results do not

  16. Understanding the processes involved in weathering and experimental alteration of glassy materials. The case of some volcanic glasses from eastern Sicily (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liotta, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to study the effects of weathering and experimental alteration in order to understand the geochemical processes involved and the variation of mineral phases in altered natural glasses. For the first time, five samples of natural volcanic glasses having different composition were collected in eastern Sicily (Italy) in order to be artificially altered and analyzed. The study of naturally altered samples has allowed to observe the effects of weathering after a period of time corresponding to the age of the sample. Moreover, the use of samples of natural glass of volcanic origin has allowed to obtain some powder or thin plates of fresh silicate glass that have been subjected to artificial alteration in the laboratory, in order to model the geochemical processes that have occurred. Alteration experiments were conducted in pure water at 90 C; samples have been altered from 1 to 1000 days of experiment. The characterization of the samples was obtained by Raman spectroscopy, which showed the effects of the devitrification and the presence of some secondary minerals such as carbonates and anatase on the obsidian thin plates, but also phillipsite and chabazite, two varieties of zeolite usually found in the cavities of oldest basalts. Solid modifications were observed by SEM. The analysis showed the formation of several secondary minerals having a composition compatible with smectites, determined by EDS spectroscopy. All these results allow to test the geochemical modeling in the long term. Further analysis will be needed to reach a full understanding of the weathering of glassy materials. (author)

  17. Processing the Bouguer anomaly map of Biga and the surrounding area by the cellular neural network: application to the southwestern Marmara region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, D.

    2007-04-01

    An image processing technique called the cellular neural network (CNN) approach is used in this study to locate geological features giving rise to gravity anomalies such as faults or the boundary of two geologic zones. CNN is a stochastic image processing technique based on template optimization using the neighborhood relationships of cells. These cells can be characterized by a functional block diagram that is typical of neural network theory. The functionality of CNN is described in its entirety by a number of small matrices (A, B and I) called the cloning template. CNN can also be considered to be a nonlinear convolution of these matrices. This template describes the strength of the nearest neighbor interconnections in the network. The recurrent perceptron learning algorithm (RPLA) is used in optimization of cloning template. The CNN and standard Canny algorithms were first tested on two sets of synthetic gravity data with the aim of checking the reliability of the proposed approach. The CNN method was compared with classical derivative techniques by applying the cross-correlation method (CC) to the same anomaly map as this latter approach can detect some features that are difficult to identify on the Bouguer anomaly maps. This approach was then applied to the Bouguer anomaly map of Biga and its surrounding area, in Turkey. Structural features in the area between Bandirma, Biga, Yenice and Gonen in the southwest Marmara region are investigated by applying the CNN and CC to the Bouguer anomaly map. Faults identified by these algorithms are generally in accordance with previously mapped surface faults. These examples show that the geologic boundaries can be detected from Bouguer anomaly maps using the cloning template approach. A visual evaluation of the outputs of the CNN and CC approaches is carried out, and the results are compared with each other. This approach provides quantitative solutions based on just a few assumptions, which makes the method more

  18. Nested cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quasthoff, U.

    1985-07-01

    Cellular automata by definition consist of a finite or infinite number of cells, say of unit length, with each cell having the same transition function. These cells are usually considered as the smallest elements and so the space filled with these cells becomes discrete. Nevertheless, large pictures created by such cellular automata look very fractal. So we try to replace each cell by a couple of smaller cells, which have the same transition functions as the large ones. There are automata where this replacement does not destroy the macroscopic structure. In these cases this nesting process can be iterated. The paper contains large classes of automata with the above properties. In the case of one dimensional automata with two states and next neighbour interaction and a nesting function of the same type a complete classification is given. (author)

  19. [The social catholic doctrine in the industrializing process of Francoist Spain: the case of the Alter pharmaceutical group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Nozal, Raúl; González Bueno, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Alter Laboratories and the group of companies developed by Juan José Alonso Grijalba (1894-1962) under Franco's regime held the Catholic social doctrine as the foundation of his business. This pharmacist was a strong advocate and propagandist of these ideas. In this paper, we outline the biography of this entrepreneur, describe his ideological principles, and analyze how these theories were implemented in the Alter Laboratories in their economic, cultural-recreational, and moral-religious dimensions. The business approach revealed by the writings of Juan José Alonso is a "patriarchal patronage"; his goal appears to have been the conversion of Alter into a "factory convent" with the programmatic foundations of Catholic humanism, in which the employer assumes a clearly despotic role and the intervention of workers is reduced to accepting the standards and perks offered by the employer.

  20. [AN OVERALL SOUND PROCESS] Altered Dynamics and Instrumentation at the Onset of Recapitulation in the Nineteenth-Century Symphony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Craig Cannon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In standard sonata form, the onset of recapitulation exactly quotes the beginning of the exposition, preserving both “structural” parameters (melody, rhythm, harmony, key, as well as “secondary” ones (dynamics, instrumentation, register, tempo. In practice, however, composers may alter any aspect of the main theme upon its return. Most analysis of such recapitulatory alteration has focused on structural change, with other parameters receiving relatively little attention. This paper examines composers’ handling of two secondary parameters—dynamic markings and instrumental density—at the beginnings of recapitulations in the nineteenth-century symphonic repertoire. In order to analyse a large number of works, a system of classifications for recapitulatory alterations is necessary. The alterations fall into four broad types: “similar” recapitulations have few or no changes to dynamics and instrumentation, “intensified” recapitulations are louder or more fully orchestrated than the beginning of the exposition, “attenuated” recapitulations have quieter dynamics or sparser orchestration, and “contradictory” recapitulations have alterations to dynamics and instrumentation that work in opposite directions. After explaining this classification system in detail, with examples from specific symphonies, the paper then gives the results of an analytical survey of 483 sonata-form movements from 282 symphonies dating from the years 1800 to 1899. Similar and intensified recapitulations are most common, with preferences changing over time. Until about the 1840s, similar recapitulations were most common, but from around the 1860s on, intensified returns became the default choice. Attenuated and contradictory recapitulations, by contrast, are very rare throughout the century.

  1. Neuroimaging meta-analysis of cannabis use studies reveals convergent functional alterations in brain regions supporting cognitive control and reward processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanes, Julio A; Riedel, Michael C; Ray, Kimberly L; Kirkland, Anna E; Bird, Ryan T; Boeving, Emily R; Reid, Meredith A; Gonzalez, Raul; Robinson, Jennifer L; Laird, Angela R; Sutherland, Matthew T

    2018-03-01

    Lagging behind rapid changes to state laws, societal views, and medical practice is the scientific investigation of cannabis's impact on the human brain. While several brain imaging studies have contributed important insight into neurobiological alterations linked with cannabis use, our understanding remains limited. Here, we sought to delineate those brain regions that consistently demonstrate functional alterations among cannabis users versus non-users across neuroimaging studies using the activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis framework. In ancillary analyses, we characterized task-related brain networks that co-activate with cannabis-affected regions using data archived in a large neuroimaging repository, and then determined which psychological processes may be disrupted via functional decoding techniques. When considering convergent alterations among users, decreased activation was observed in the anterior cingulate cortex, which co-activated with frontal, parietal, and limbic areas and was linked with cognitive control processes. Similarly, decreased activation was observed in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which co-activated with frontal and occipital areas and linked with attention-related processes. Conversely, increased activation among users was observed in the striatum, which co-activated with frontal, parietal, and other limbic areas and linked with reward processing. These meta-analytic outcomes indicate that cannabis use is linked with differential, region-specific effects across the brain.

  2. Review of cellular mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning

    2017-06-01

    Living cells and tissues experience physical forces and chemical stimuli in the human body. The process of converting mechanical forces into biochemical activities and gene expression is mechanochemical transduction or mechanotransduction. Significant advances have been made in understanding mechanotransduction at the cellular and molecular levels over the last two decades. However, major challenges remain in elucidating how a living cell integrates signals from mechanotransduction with chemical signals to regulate gene expression and to generate coherent biological responses in living tissues in physiological conditions and diseases.

  3. Cellular: Toward personal communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Stuart

    1991-09-01

    The cellular industry is one of the fastest growing segment of the telecommunications industry. With an estimated penetration rate of 20 percent in the near future, cellular is becoming an ubiquitous telecommunications service in the U.S. In this paper we will examine the major advancements in the cellular industry: customer equipment, cellular networks, engineering tools, customer support, and nationwide seamless service.

  4. Movies of cellular and sub-cellular motion by digital holographic microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lingfeng

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many biological specimens, such as living cells and their intracellular components, often exhibit very little amplitude contrast, making it difficult for conventional bright field microscopes to distinguish them from their surroundings. To overcome this problem phase contrast techniques such as Zernike, Normarsky and dark-field microscopies have been developed to improve specimen visibility without chemically or physically altering them by the process of staining. These techniques have proven to be invaluable tools for studying living cells and furthering scientific understanding of fundamental cellular processes such as mitosis. However a drawback of these techniques is that direct quantitative phase imaging is not possible. Quantitative phase imaging is important because it enables determination of either the refractive index or optical thickness variations from the measured optical path length with sub-wavelength accuracy. Digital holography is an emergent phase contrast technique that offers an excellent approach in obtaining both qualitative and quantitative phase information from the hologram. A CCD camera is used to record a hologram onto a computer and numerical methods are subsequently applied to reconstruct the hologram to enable direct access to both phase and amplitude information. Another attractive feature of digital holography is the ability to focus on multiple focal planes from a single hologram, emulating the focusing control of a conventional microscope. Methods A modified Mach-Zender off-axis setup in transmission is used to record and reconstruct a number of holographic amplitude and phase images of cellular and sub-cellular features. Results Both cellular and sub-cellular features are imaged with sub-micron, diffraction-limited resolution. Movies of holographic amplitude and phase images of living microbes and cells are created from a series of holograms and reconstructed with numerically adjustable

  5. Systems biology of cellular rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbeter, A; Gérard, C; Gonze, D; Leloup, J-C; Dupont, G

    2012-08-31

    Rhythms abound in biological systems, particularly at the cellular level where they originate from the feedback loops present in regulatory networks. Cellular rhythms can be investigated both by experimental and modeling approaches, and thus represent a prototypic field of research for systems biology. They have also become a major topic in synthetic biology. We review advances in the study of cellular rhythms of biochemical rather than electrical origin by considering a variety of oscillatory processes such as Ca++ oscillations, circadian rhythms, the segmentation clock, oscillations in p53 and NF-κB, synthetic oscillators, and the oscillatory dynamics of cyclin-dependent kinases driving the cell cycle. Finally we discuss the coupling between cellular rhythms and their robustness with respect to molecular noise.

  6. Origami interleaved tube cellular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Tachi, Tomohiro; Calisch, Sam; Miura, Koryo

    2014-01-01

    A novel origami cellular material based on a deployable cellular origami structure is described. The structure is bi-directionally flat-foldable in two orthogonal (x and y) directions and is relatively stiff in the third orthogonal (z) direction. While such mechanical orthotropicity is well known in cellular materials with extruded two dimensional geometry, the interleaved tube geometry presented here consists of two orthogonal axes of interleaved tubes with high interfacial surface area and relative volume that changes with fold-state. In addition, the foldability still allows for fabrication by a flat lamination process, similar to methods used for conventional expanded two dimensional cellular materials. This article presents the geometric characteristics of the structure together with corresponding kinematic and mechanical modeling, explaining the orthotropic elastic behavior of the structure with classical dimensional scaling analysis. (paper)

  7. Optimized Reaction Conditions for Removal of Cellular Organic Matter of Microcystis aeruginosa During the Destabilization and Aggregation Process Using Ferric Sulfate in Water Purification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pivokonský, Martin; Polášek, Pavel; Pivokonská, Lenka; Tomášková, Hana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 5 (2009), s. 514-522 ISSN 1061-4303 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/07/0295 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Microcystis aeruginosa * cellular organic matter * destabilization * aggregation * optimized reaction conditions * water purification Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.965, year: 2009

  8. Mitochondrial Optic Atrophy (OPA) 1 Processing Is Altered in Response to Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburamani, Ana A.; Hurling, Chloe; Stolp, Helen; Sobotka, Kristina; Gressens, Pierre; Hagberg, Henrik; Thornton, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Perturbation of mitochondrial function and subsequent induction of cell death pathways are key hallmarks in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury, both in animal models and in term infants. Mitoprotective therapies therefore offer a new avenue for intervention for the babies who suffer life-long disabilities as a result of birth asphyxia. Here we show that after oxygen-glucose deprivation in primary neurons or in a mouse model of HI, mitochondrial protein homeostasis is altered, manifesting as a change in mitochondrial morphology and functional impairment. Furthermore we find that the mitochondrial fusion and cristae regulatory protein, OPA1, is aberrantly cleaved to shorter forms. OPA1 cleavage is normally regulated by a balanced action of the proteases Yme1L and Oma1. However, in primary neurons or after HI in vivo, protein expression of YmelL is also reduced, whereas no change is observed in Oma1 expression. Our data strongly suggest that alterations in mitochondria-shaping proteins are an early event in the pathogenesis of neonatal HI injury. PMID:26393574

  9. Mitochondrial Optic Atrophy (OPA) 1 Processing Is Altered in Response to Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburamani, Ana A; Hurling, Chloe; Stolp, Helen; Sobotka, Kristina; Gressens, Pierre; Hagberg, Henrik; Thornton, Claire

    2015-09-17

    Perturbation of mitochondrial function and subsequent induction of cell death pathways are key hallmarks in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury, both in animal models and in term infants. Mitoprotective therapies therefore offer a new avenue for intervention for the babies who suffer life-long disabilities as a result of birth asphyxia. Here we show that after oxygen-glucose deprivation in primary neurons or in a mouse model of HI, mitochondrial protein homeostasis is altered, manifesting as a change in mitochondrial morphology and functional impairment. Furthermore we find that the mitochondrial fusion and cristae regulatory protein, OPA1, is aberrantly cleaved to shorter forms. OPA1 cleavage is normally regulated by a balanced action of the proteases Yme1L and Oma1. However, in primary neurons or after HI in vivo, protein expression of YmelL is also reduced, whereas no change is observed in Oma1 expression. Our data strongly suggest that alterations in mitochondria-shaping proteins are an early event in the pathogenesis of neonatal HI injury.

  10. Developmental changes in reading do not alter the development of visual processing skills: An application of explanatory item response models in grades K-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi L Santi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Visual processing has been widely studied in regard to its impact on a students’ ability to read. A less researched area is the role of reading in the development of visual processing skills. A cohort-sequential, accelerated-longitudinal design was utilized with 932 kindergarten, first, and second grade students to examine the impact of reading acquisition on the processing of various types of visual discrimination and visual motor test items. Students were assessed four times per year on a variety of reading measures and reading precursors and two popular measures of visual processing over a three-year period. Explanatory item response models were used to examine the roles of person and item characteristics on changes in visual processing abilities and changes in item difficulties over time. Results showed different developmental patterns for five types of visual processing test items, but most importantly failed to show consistent effects of learning to read on changes in item difficulty. Thus, the present study failed to find support for the hypothesis that learning to read alters performance on measures of visual processing. Rather, visual processing and reading ability improved together over time with no evidence to suggest cross-domain influences from reading to visual processing. Results are discussed in the context of developmental theories of visual processing and brain-based research on the role of visual skills in learning to read.

  11. Is Neural Processing of Negative Stimuli Altered in Addiction Independent of Drug Effects? Findings From Drug-Naïve Youth with Internet Gaming Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Sarah W; Gross, James J; Chawla, Megha; Ma, Shan-Shan; Shi, Xing-Hui; Liu, Lu; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Zhu, Lei; Worhunsky, Patrick D; Zhang, Jintao

    2017-11-20

    Difficulties in emotion regulation are commonly reported among individuals with alcohol and drug addictions and contribute to the acquisition and maintenance of addictive behaviors. Alterations in neural processing of negative affective stimuli have further been demonstrated among individuals with addictions. However, it is unclear whether these alterations are a general feature of addictions or are a result of prolonged exposure to drugs of abuse. To test the hypothesis of altered negative affect processing independent of drug effects, this study assessed neural function among drug-naïve youth with a behavioral addiction-Internet gaming disorder (IGD). Fifty-six young adults (28 with IGD, 28 matched controls) participated in fMRI scanning during performance of a well-validated emotion regulation task. Between-group differences in neural activity during task performance were assessed using a whole-brain, mixed-effects ANOVA with correction for multiple comparisons at currently recommended thresholds (voxel-level peffects.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 20 December 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.283.

  12. Adaptation of the deoxyglucose method for use at cellular level: histological processing of the central nervous system for high resolution radio-autography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Des Rosiers, M.H.; Descarries, Laurent

    1978-01-01

    Vascular perfusion of all products required for primary fixation, postfixation, dehydration and embedding of nervous tissue in Epon permits radio-autographic detection of radioactivity accumulated in the central nervous system after intravenous injection of [ 3 H]deoxyglucose. This histological technique should allow application of the deoxyglucose method at cellular if not subcellular level, since a high proportion of the tracer appears to be retained in situ in specimens adequately preserved for light and electron microscope radio-autography [fr

  13. Interaction processes at the concrete-bentonite interface after 13 years of FEBEX-Plug operation. Part I: Concrete alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, María Cruz; García Calvo, José Luis; Cuevas, Jaime; Turrero, María Jesús; Fernández, Raúl; Torres, Elena; Ruiz, Ana I.

    2017-06-01

    This paper evaluates the modifications created in the concrete of the FEBEX shotcreted concrete plug after 13 years in the Grimsel Test Site conditions. During this time the concrete interacted with granite groundwater and also with bentonite porewater at the concrete/bentonite contact. Three long cores and 6 small cores from different parts of the concrete plug were evaluated. Mechanical performance was not modified during this time but hydraulic conductivity increased. The main transport mechanisms involved in the alteration of the concrete were groundwater flow from the host rock to the concrete and diffusion at the concrete/bentonite interface. Leaching occurred in the concrete parts near the host rock due to the action of granite water with further portlandite dissolution. The joint action of granite groundwater and bentonite porewater has caused many changes to the concrete matrix which was located at a depth lower than 5 cm from the bentonite-concrete interface. In the first centimetre C-S-H was significantly altered, incorporating elements like Al, S and Mg which change the initial microstructure by loss of compactness. The ettringite content was very high along the length of the concrete plug due to the shotcreting technique which made use of accelerator additives that caused the formation of ettringite. An increase in the ettringite content is also shown near the bentonite barrier. Therefore, sulphate diffused from the bentonite into the concrete, causing the massive formation of new ettringite. Chloride also diffused from the bentonite barrier deeper into the concrete by up to 4-5 cm from where the formation of Friedel's salt was detected.

  14. Flat Cellular (UMTS) Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, H.G.P.; Samuel, L.G.; Mullender, Sape J.; Polakos, P.; Rittenhouse, G.

    Traditionally, cellular systems have been built in a hierarchical manner: many specialized cellular access network elements that collectively form a hierarchical cellular system. When 2G and later 3G systems were designed there was a good reason to make system hierarchical: from a cost-perspective

  15. Raman-Mössbauer-XRD studies of selected samples from "Los Azulejos" outcrop: A possible analogue for assessing the alteration processes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalla, E. A.; Sanz-Arranz, A.; Lopez-Reyes, G.; Sansano, A.; Medina, J.; Schmanke, D.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Rodríguez-Losada, J. A.; Martínez-Frías, J.; Rull, F.

    2016-06-01

    The outcrop of "Los Azulejos" is visible at the interior of the Cañadas Caldera in Tenerife Island (Spain). It exhibits a great variety of alteration processes that could be considered as terrestrial analogue for several geological processes on Mars. This outcrop is particularly interesting due to the content of clays, zeolite, iron oxides, and sulfates corresponding to a hydrothermal alteration catalogued as "Azulejos" type alteration. A detailed analysis by portable and laboratory Raman systems as well as other different techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy has been carried out (using twin-instruments from Martian lander missions: Mössbauer spectrometer MIMOS-II from the NASA-MER mission of 2001 and the XRD diffractometer from the NASA-MSL Curiosity mission of 2012). The mineral identification presents the following mineral species: magnetite, goethite, hematite, anatase, rutile, quartz, gregoryite, sulfate (thenardite and hexahydrite), diopside, feldspar, analcime, kaolinite and muscovite. Moreover, the in-situ Raman and Micro-Raman measurements have been performed in order to compare the capabilities of the portable system specially focused for the next ESA Exo-Mars mission. The mineral detection confirms the sub-aerial alteration on the surface and the hydrothermal processes by the volcanic fluid circulations in the fresh part. Therefore, the secondary more abundant mineralization acts as the color agent of the rocks. Thus, the zeolite-illite group is the responsible for the bluish coloration, as well as the feldspars and carbonates for the whitish and the iron oxide for the redish parts. The XRD system was capable to detect a minor proportion of pyroxene, which is not visible by Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopy due to the "Azulejos" alteration of the parent material on the outcrop. On the other hand, Mössbauer spectroscopy was capable of detecting different types of iron-oxides (Fe3+/2+-oxide phases). These analyses

  16. Targeting Mitochondria to Counteract Age-Related Cellular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina T. Madreiter-Sokolowski

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Senescence is related to the loss of cellular homeostasis and functions, which leads to a progressive decline in physiological ability and to aging-associated diseases. Since mitochondria are essential to energy supply, cell differentiation, cell cycle control, intracellular signaling and Ca2+ sequestration, fine-tuning mitochondrial activity appropriately, is a tightrope walk during aging. For instance, the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS ensures a supply of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, but is also the main source of potentially harmful levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Moreover, mitochondrial function is strongly linked to mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial shape, which undergo various alterations during aging. Since mitochondria play such a critical role in an organism’s process of aging, they also offer promising targets for manipulation of senescent cellular functions. Accordingly, interventions delaying the onset of age-associated disorders involve the manipulation of mitochondrial function, including caloric restriction (CR or exercise, as well as drugs, such as metformin, aspirin, and polyphenols. In this review, we discuss mitochondria’s role in and impact on cellular aging and their potential to serve as a target for therapeutic interventions against age-related cellular dysfunction.

  17. Attenuation of proinflammatory cytokines and apoptotic process by verapamil and diltiazem against quinolinic acid induced Huntington like alterations in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-02-04

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disease with complex pathophysiology. Recently, role of neuroinflammation and interplay between various other cellular cascades have been suggested to be involved in pathophysiology of Huntington disease. Involvement of calcium overload mediated oxidative damage and excitotoxicity have been suggested to play a central role in quinolinic acid induced Huntington like symptoms. The present study has been carried out to investigate the neuroprotective effect of calcium channel blockers (verapamil and diltiazem) against quinolinic acid induced dysfunction in motor, biochemical and neuroinflammatory signaling in rats. Intrastriatal quinolinic acid administration leads to significant motor [locomotor (72% reduction), rotarod (55% reduction), balance beam walk performance] dysfunction coupled with the marked oxidative damage and increased neuroinflammatory markers [TNF-α (140%), IL-6 (115%), caspase-3(75%)] levels in striatum as compared to the sham treatment. Verapamil (10 and 20mg/kg), diltiazem (10 and 20mg/kg) drug treatment for 21days resulted in a significant improvement in the motor function (improvement in locomotor activity, rotarod and balance beam walk performance). Further, verapamil (10 and 20mg/kg), diltiazem (10 and 20mg/kg) treatment significantly attenuated oxidative damage, level of proinflammatory mediators (TNF-α IL-6 and caspase-3) in quinolinic acid treated animals. Results of the present study demonstrate that protective effect of these calcium channel blockers (verapamil, diltiazem) might be due to their inhibitory action on different neuroinflammatory pathways against quinolinic acid induced Huntington disease like symptoms in rats. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of cellular manufacturing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heragu, Sunderesh; Zijm, Willem H.M.; Meng, Gang; Heragu, S.S.; van Ommeren, Jan C.W.; van Houtum, Geert-Jan

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an open queuing network modeling approach to estimate performance measures of a cellular manufacturing layout. It is assumed a layout and production data for a planning period of specified length are available. The production data takes into account, processing and handling

  19. Petrography and Mineral Chemistry of Magmatic and Hydrothermal Biotite in Porphyry Copper-Gold Deposits: A Tool for Understanding Mineralizing Fluid Compositional Changes During Alteration Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifudin Idrus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.1.47-64This study aims to understand the petrography and chemistry of both magmatic and hydrothermal biotites in porphyry copper-gold deposits, and to evaluate the fluid compositional changes during alteration processes. A total of 206 biotite grains from selected rock samples taken from the Batu Hijau porphyry Cu-Au deposit was analyzed. Detailed petrography and biotite chemistry analysis were performed on thin sections and polished thin sections, respectively, representing various rocks and alteration types. A JEOL JXA-8900R electron microprobe analyzer (EMPA was used for the chemistry analysis. The biotite is texturally divided into magmatic and hydrothermal types. Ti, Fe, and F contents can be used to distinguish the two biotite types chemically. Some oxide and halogen contents of biotite from various rocks and alteration types demonstrate a systematic variation in chemical composition. Biotite halogen chemistry shows a systematic increase in log (XCl/XOH and decrease in log (XF/XOH values from biotite (potassic through chlorite-sericite (intermediate argillic to actinolite (inner propylitic zones. The y-intercepts on the log (XCl/XOH vs. XMg and log (XF/XOH vs. XFe plotted for biotite from potassic and intermediate argillic zones are similar or slightly different. In contrast, the y-intercepts on the log (XCl/XOH vs. XMg and log (XF/XOH vs. XFe plotted for biotite from inner propylitic zone display different values in comparison to the two alteration zones. Halogen (F,Cl fugacity ratios in biotite show a similar pattern: in the potassic and intermediate argillic zones they show little variation, whereas in the inner propylitic zone they are distinctly different. These features suggest the hydrothermal fluid composition remained fairly constant in the inner part of the deposit during the potassic and intermediate argillic alteration events, but changed significantly towards the outer part affected by inner propylitic

  20. Altered cell mechanics from the inside: dispersed single wall carbon nanotubes integrate with and restructure actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Brian D; Shams, Hengameh; Horst, Travis A; Basu, Saurav; Rape, Andrew D; Wang, Yu-Li; Rohde, Gustavo K; Mofrad, Mohammad R K; Islam, Mohammad F; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2012-05-23

    With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics.

  1. Altered Cell Mechanics from the Inside: Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Integrate with and Restructure Actin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad F. Islam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics.

  2. Mir-513a-3p contributes to the controlling of cellular migration processes in the A549 lung tumor cells by modulating integrin β-8 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Marina Bonfogo; Lima, Kelvin Furtado; da Silva, Andrea Renata; Dos Santos, Robson Augusto Souza; Moraes, Karen C M

    2017-12-04

    Lung tumors are a frequent type of cancer in humans and a leading cause of death, and the late diagnostic contributes to high mortality rates. New therapeutic strategies are needed, and the heptapeptide angiotensin-(1-7) [ang-(1-7)] demonstrated the ability to control cancer growth rates and migration in vitro and in vivo. However, the possible use of the heptapeptide in clinical trials demands deeper analyses to elucidate molecular mechanisms of its effect in the target cells. In this study, we investigated relevant elements that control pro-inflammatory environment and cellular migration, focusing in the post-transcription mechanism using lung tumor cell line. In our cellular model, the microRNA-513a-3p was identified as a novel element targeting ITG-β8, thereby controlling the protein level and its molecular function in the controlling of migration and pro-inflammatory environment. These findings provide useful information for future studies, using miR-513a-3p as an innovative molecular tool to control lung tumor cell migration, which will support more effective clinical treatment of the patients with the widely used chemotherapeutic agents, increasing survival rates.

  3. Business model renewal and ambidexterity: Structural alteration and strategy formation process during transition to a Cloud business model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Khanagha (Saeed); H.W. Volberda (Henk); I. Oshri (Ilan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThis paper presents the findings of a longitudinal study of a large corporation's transition to a new business model in the face of a major transformation in the ICT industry brought about by Cloud computing. We build theory on the process of business model innovation through a

  4. Acute 5-HT2A receptor blocking alters the processing of fearful faces in orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornboll, Bettina; Macoveanu, Julian; Rowe, James; Elliott, Rebecca; Paulson, Olaf B.; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Knudsen, Gitte M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor has been implicated in neural-processing of emotionally salient information. To elucidate its role in processing of fear and anger, healthy individuals were studied with functional MRI (fMRI) after 5-HT2A receptor blockade, while judging the gender of neutral, fearful and angry faces. Methods 5-HT2A receptors were blocked with ketanserin to a variable degree across subjects by adjusting the time between ketanserin-infusion and onset of the fMRI protocol. Neocortical 5-HT2A receptor binding in terms of the binding potential (BPp) was assessed prior to fMRI with 18F-altanserin positron emission tomography (PET) and subsequently integrated in the fMRI data analysis. Also functional connectivity analysis was employed to evaluate the effect of ketanserin blocking on connectivity. Results Compared to a control session, 5-HT2A receptor blockade reduced the neural response to fearful faces in medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), independently of 5-HT2A receptor occupancy or neocortical 5-HT2A receptor BPp. The medial OFC also showed increased functional coupling with left amygdala during processing of fearful faces depending on the amount of blocked 5-HT2A receptors. Conclusions 5-HT2A receptor mediated signaling increases the sensitivity of OFC to fearful facial expressions and regulates the strength of a negative feedback signal from OFC to amygdala during processing of fearful faces. PMID:23824248

  5. Altered insular activation and increased insular functional connectivity during sad and happy face processing in adolescent major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henje Blom, Eva; Connolly, Colm G; Ho, Tiffany C; LeWinn, Kaja Z; Mobayed, Nisreen; Han, Laura; Paulus, Martin P; Wu, Jing; Simmons, Alan N; Yang, Tony T

    2015-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a leading cause of disability worldwide and occurs commonly first during adolescence. The insular cortex (IC) plays an important role in integrating emotion processing with interoception and has been implicated recently in the pathophysiology of adult and adolescent MDD. However, no studies have yet specifically examined the IC in adolescent MDD during processing of faces in the sad-happy continuum. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate the IC during sad and happy face processing in adolescents with MDD compared to healthy controls (HCL). Thirty-one adolescents (22 female) with MDD and 36 (23 female) HCL underwent a well-validated emotional processing fMRI paradigm that included sad and happy face stimuli. The MDD group showed significantly less differential activation of the anterior/middle insular cortex (AMIC) in response to sad versus happy faces compared to the HCL group. AMIC also showed greater functional connectivity with right fusiform gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, and right amygdala/parahippocampal gyrus in the MDD compared to HCL group. Moreover, differential activation to sad and happy faces in AMIC correlated negatively with depression severity within the MDD group. Small age-range and cross-sectional nature precluded assessment of development of the AMIC in adolescent depression. Given the role of the IC in integrating bodily stimuli with conscious cognitive and emotional processes, our findings of aberrant AMIC function in adolescent MDD provide a neuroscientific rationale for targeting the AMIC in the development of new treatment modalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Prism adaptation does not alter configural processing of faces [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1wk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet H. Bultitude

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with hemispatial neglect (‘neglect’ following a brain lesion show difficulty responding or orienting to objects and events on the left side of space. Substantial evidence supports the use of a sensorimotor training technique called prism adaptation as a treatment for neglect. Reaching for visual targets viewed through prismatic lenses that induce a rightward shift in the visual image results in a leftward recalibration of reaching movements that is accompanied by a reduction of symptoms in patients with neglect. The understanding of prism adaptation has also been advanced through studies of healthy participants, in whom adaptation to leftward prismatic shifts results in temporary neglect-like performance. Interestingly, prism adaptation can also alter aspects of non-lateralised spatial attention. We previously demonstrated that prism adaptation alters the extent to which neglect patients and healthy participants process local features versus global configurations of visual stimuli. Since deficits in non-lateralised spatial attention are thought to contribute to the severity of neglect symptoms, it is possible that the effect of prism adaptation on these deficits contributes to its efficacy. This study examines the pervasiveness of the effects of prism adaptation on perception by examining the effect of prism adaptation on configural face processing using a composite face task. The composite face task is a persuasive demonstration of the automatic global-level processing of faces: the top and bottom halves of two familiar faces form a seemingly new, unknown face when viewed together. Participants identified the top or bottom halves of composite faces before and after prism adaptation. Sensorimotor adaptation was confirmed by significant pointing aftereffect, however there was no significant change in the extent to which the irrelevant face half interfered with processing. The results support the proposal that the therapeutic effects

  7. Differential Kinetics in Alteration and Recovery of Cognitive Processes from a Chronic Sleep Restriction in Young Healthy Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabat, Arnaud; Gomez-Merino, Danielle; Roca-Paixao, Laura; Bougard, Clément; Van Beers, Pascal; Dispersyn, Garance; Guillard, Mathias; Bourrilhon, Cyprien; Drogou, Catherine; Arnal, Pierrick J; Sauvet, Fabien; Leger, Damien; Chennaoui, Mounir

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction (CSR) induces neurobehavioral deficits in young and healthy people with a morning failure of sustained attention process. Testing both the kinetic of failure and recovery of different cognitive processes (i.e., attention, executive) under CSR and their potential links with subject's capacities (stay awake, baseline performance, age) and with some biological markers of stress and anabolism would be useful in order to understand the role of sleep debt on human behavior. Twelve healthy subjects spent 14 days in laboratory with 2 baseline days (B1 and B2, 8 h TIB) followed by 7 days of sleep restriction (SR1-SR7, 4 h TIB), 3 sleep recovery days (R1-R3, 8 h TIB) and two more ones 8 days later (R12-R13). Subjective sleepiness (KSS), maintenance of wakefulness latencies (MWT) were evaluated four times a day (10:00, 12:00 a.m. and 2:00, 4:00 p.m.) and cognitive tests were realized at morning (8:30 a.m.) and evening (6:30 p.m.) sessions during B2, SR1, SR4, SR7, R2, R3 and R13. Saliva (B2, SR7, R2, R13) and blood (B1, SR6, R1, R12) samples were collected in the morning. Cognitive processes were differently impaired and recovered with a more rapid kinetic for sustained attention process. Besides, a significant time of day effect was only evidenced for sustained attention failures that seemed to be related to subject's age and their morning capacity to stay awake. Executive processes were equally disturbed/recovered during the day and this failure/recovery process seemed to be mainly related to baseline subject's performance and to their capacity to stay awake. Morning concentrations of testosterone, cortisol and α-amylase were significantly decreased at SR6-SR7, but were either and respectively early (R1), tardily (after R2) and not at all (R13) recovered. All these results suggest a differential deleterious and restorative effect of CSR on cognition through biological changes of the stress pathway and subject's capacity (ClinicalTrials-NCT01989741).

  8. DIFFERENTIAL KINETICS IN ALTERATION AND RECOVERY OF COGNITIVE PROCESSES FROM A CHRONIC SLEEP RESTRICTION IN YOUNG HEALTHY MEN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Alexandre Rabat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic sleep restriction (CSR induces neurobehavioral deficits in young and healthy people with a morning failure of sustained attention process. Testing both the kinetic of failure and recovery of different cognitive processes (i.e. attention, executive under CSR and their potential links with subject’s capacities (stay awake, baseline performance, age and with some biological markers of stress and anabolism would be useful in order to understand the role of sleep debt on human behavior. Twelve healthy subjects spent 14 days in laboratory with 2 baseline days (B1 and B2, 8h TIB followed by 7 days of sleep restriction (SR1-SR7, 4h TIB, 3 sleep recovery days (R1-R3, 8h TIB and 2 more ones 8 days later (R12-R13. Subjective sleepiness (KSS, maintenance of wakefulness latencies (MWT were evaluated 4 times a day (10:00, 12:00 a.m. and 2:00, 4:00 p.m. and cognitive tests were realized at morning (8:30 a.m. and evening (6:30 p.m. sessions during B2, SR1, SR4, SR7, R2, R3 and R13. Saliva (B2, SR7, R2, R13 and blood (B1, SR6, R1, R12 samples were collected in the morning. Cognitive processes were differently impaired and recovered with a more rapid kinetic for sustained attention process. Besides, a significant time of day effect was only evidenced for sustained attention failures that seemed to be related to subject’s age and their morning capacity to stay awake. Executive processes were equally disturbed/recovered during the day and this failure/recovery process seemed to be mainly related to baseline subject’s performance and to their capacity to stay awake. Morning concentrations of testosterone, cortisol and α-amylase were significantly decreased at SR6-SR7, but were either and respectively early (R1, tardily (after R2 and no recovered (R13. All these results suggest a differential deleterious and restorative effect of CSR on cognition through biological changes of the stress pathway and subject’s capacity (ClinicalTrials-NCT01989741.

  9. Acute serotonin 2A receptor blocking alters the processing of fearful faces in the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornboll, Bettina; Macoveanu, Julian; Rowe, James

    2013-01-01

    Background: The serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor has been implicated in neural-processing of emotionally salient information. To elucidate its role in processing of fear and anger, healthy individuals were studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) after 5-HT2A receptor blockade, while...... judging the gender of neutral, fearful and angry faces. Methods: 5-HT2A receptors were blocked with ketanserin to a variable degree across subjects by adjusting the time between ketanserin-infusion and onset of the fMRI protocol. Neocortical 5-HT2A receptor binding in terms of the binding potential (BPp...... ) was assessed prior to fMRI with (18)F-altanserin positron emission tomography (PET) and subsequently integrated in the fMRI data analysis. Also functional connectivity analysis was employed to evaluate the effect of ketanserin blocking on connectivity. Results: Compared to a control session, 5-HT2A receptor...

  10. Adults with high social anhedonia have altered neural connectivity with ventral lateral prefrontal cortex when processing positive social signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hong; Tully, Laura M; Lincoln, Sarah Hope; Hooker, Christine I

    2015-01-01

    Social anhedonia (SA) is a debilitating characteristic of schizophrenia, a common feature in individuals at psychosis-risk, and a vulnerability for developing schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Prior work (Hooker et al., 2014) revealed neural deficits in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) when processing positive social cues in a community sample of people with high SA. Lower VLPFC neural activity was related to more severe self-reported schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms as well as the exacerbation of symptoms after social stress. In the current study, psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis was applied to further investigate the neural mechanisms mediated by the VLPFC during emotion processing. PPI analysis revealed that, compared to low SA controls, participants with high SA exhibited reduced connectivity between the VLPFC and the motor cortex, the inferior parietal and the posterior temporal regions when viewing socially positive (relative to neutral) emotions. Across all participants, VLPFC connectivity correlated with behavioral and self-reported measures of attentional control, emotion management, and reward processing. Our results suggest that impairments to the VLPFC mediated neural circuitry underlie the cognitive and emotional deficits associated with social anhedonia, and may serve as neural targets for prevention and treatment of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.

  11. Altered top-down and bottom-up processing of fear conditioning in panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, U; Straube, B; Reinhardt, I; Maslowski, N I; Wittchen, H-U; Ströhle, A; Wittmann, A; Pfleiderer, B; Konrad, C; Ewert, A; Uhlmann, C; Arolt, V; Jansen, A; Kircher, T

    2014-01-01

    Although several neurophysiological models have been proposed for panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD/AG), there is limited evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on key neural networks in PD/AG. Fear conditioning has been proposed to represent a central pathway for the development and maintenance of this disorder; however, its neural substrates remain elusive. The present study aimed to investigate the neural correlates of fear conditioning in PD/AG patients. The blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response was measured using fMRI during a fear conditioning task. Indicators of differential conditioning, simple conditioning and safety signal processing were investigated in 60 PD/AG patients and 60 matched healthy controls. Differential conditioning was associated with enhanced activation of the bilateral dorsal inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) whereas simple conditioning and safety signal processing were related to increased midbrain activation in PD/AG patients versus controls. Anxiety sensitivity was associated positively with the magnitude of midbrain activation. The results suggest changes in top-down and bottom-up processes during fear conditioning in PD/AG that can be interpreted within a neural framework of defensive reactions mediating threat through distal (forebrain) versus proximal (midbrain) brain structures. Evidence is accumulating that this network plays a key role in the aetiopathogenesis of panic disorder.

  12. Altered Cross-Modal Processing in the Primary Auditory Cortex of Congenitally Deaf Adults: A Visual-Somatosensory fMRI Study with a Double-Flash Illusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Mark W.; Neville, Helen J.

    2012-01-01

    The developing brain responds to the environment by using statistical correlations in input to guide functional and structural changes—that is, the brain displays neuroplasticity. Experience shapes brain development throughout life, but neuroplasticity is variable from one brain system to another. How does the early loss of a sensory modality affect this complex process? We examined cross-modal neuroplasticity in anatomically defined subregions of Heschl's gyrus, the site of human primary auditory cortex, in congenitally deaf humans by measuring the fMRI signal change in response to spatially coregistered visual, somatosensory, and bimodal stimuli. In the deaf Heschl's gyrus, signal change was greater for somatosensory and bimodal stimuli than that of hearing participants. Visual responses in Heschl's gyrus, larger in deaf than hearing, were smaller than those elicited by somatosensory stimulation. In contrast to Heschl's gyrus, in the superior-temporal cortex visual signal was comparable to somatosensory signal. In addition, deaf adults perceived bimodal stimuli differently; in contrast to hearing adults, they were susceptible to a double-flash visual illusion induced by two touches to the face. Somatosensory and bimodal signal change in rostrolateral Heschl's gyrus predicted the strength of the visual illusion in the deaf adults in line with the interpretation that the illusion is a functional consequence of the altered cross-modal organization observed in deaf auditory cortex. Our results demonstrate that congenital and profound deafness alters how vision and somatosensation are processed in primary auditory cortex. PMID:22787048

  13. Altered reward processing in the orbitofrontal cortex and hippocampus in healthy first-degree relatives of patients with depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macoveanu, J; Knorr, U; Skimminge, A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Healthy first-degree relatives of patients with major depression (rMD+) show brain structure and functional response anomalies and have elevated risk for developing depression, a disorder linked to abnormal serotonergic neurotransmission and reward processing. METHOD: In a two...... intervention compared to placebo. Conversely, for positive outcomes, the left hippocampus showed attenuated response to high wins in the rMD+ compared to the rMD- group. The SSRI intervention reinforced the hippocampal response to large wins. A subsequent structural analysis revealed that the abnormal neural...

  14. Cellular aging and restorative processes: subjective sleep quality and duration moderate the association between age and telomere length in a sample of middle-aged and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribbet, Matthew R; Carlisle, McKenzie; Cawthon, Richard M; Uchino, Bert N; Williams, Paula G; Smith, Timothy W; Gunn, Heather E; Light, Kathleen C

    2014-01-01

    To examine whether subjective sleep quality and sleep duration moderate the association between age and telomere length (TL). Participants completed a demographic and sleep quality questionnaire, followed by a blood draw. Social Neuroscience Laboratory. One hundred fifty-four middle-aged to older adults (age 45-77 y) participated. Participants were excluded if they were on immunosuppressive treatment and/or had a disease with a clear immunologic (e.g., cancer) component. N/A. Subjective sleep quality and sleep duration were assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and TL was determined using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). There was a significant first-order negative association between age and TL. Age was also negatively associated with the self-reported sleep quality item and sleep duration component of the PSQI. A significant age × self-reported sleep quality interaction revealed that age was more strongly related to TL among poor sleepers, and that good sleep quality attenuated the association between age and TL. Moreover, adequate subjective sleep duration among older adults (i.e. greater than 7 h per night) was associated with TL comparable to that in middle-aged adults, whereas sleep duration was unrelated to TL for the middle-aged adults in our study. The current study provides evidence for an association between sleep quality, sleep duration, and cellular aging. Among older adults, better subjective sleep quality was associated with the extent of cellular aging, suggesting that sleep duration and sleep quality may be added to a growing list of modifiable behaviors associated with the adverse effects of aging.

  15. Reflections Lederberg and the 'Cellularity' of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    He tried to observe bacterial mating and the details of conjugation at the cellular level [3]. (reproduced in the Classics section), processes that are still being investigated [4]. He made the important discovery that penicillin induces the formation of spheroplasts. The announcing. Lederberg and the 'Cellularity' of Bacteria.

  16. The beta-receptor blocker metoprolol alters detoxification processes in the non-target organism Dreissena polymorpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contardo-Jara, Valeska, E-mail: contardo@igb-berlin.d [Dpt. Ecophysiology and Aquaculture, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany); Pflugmacher, Stephan, E-mail: pflugmacher@igb-berlin.d [Dpt. Ecophysiology and Aquaculture, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany); Nuetzmann, Gunnar, E-mail: nuetzmann@igb-berlin.d [Dpt. Ecohydrology, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany); Kloas, Werner, E-mail: werner.kloas@igb-berlin.d [Dpt. Ecophysiology and Aquaculture, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany); Wiegand, Claudia, E-mail: wiegand@biology.sdu.d [University of Southern Denmark Institute of Biology, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2010-06-15

    Due to increasing amounts of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) in the aquatic environment, their largely unknown effects to non-target organisms need to be assessed. This study examined physiological changes in the freshwater mussel Dreissena polymorpha exposed to increasing concentrations (0.534, 5.34, 53.4 and 534 mug L{sup -1}) of the beta-blocker metoprolol in a flow-through system for seven days. The two lower concentrations represent the environmentally relevant range. Surprisingly, metallothionein mRNA was immediately up-regulated in all treatments. For the two higher concentrations mRNA up-regulation in gills was found for P-glycoprotein after one day, and after four days for pi class glutathione S-transferase, demonstrating elimination and biotransformation processes, respectively. Additionally, catalase and superoxide dismutase were up-regulated in the digestive gland indicating oxidative stress. In all treated mussels a significant up-regulation of heat shock protein mRNA was observed in gills after four days, which suggests protein damage and the requirement for repair processes. Metoprolol was 20-fold bioaccumulated for environmentally relevant concentrations. - Evidence for significant physiological changes in an aquatic mollusc due to exposure to a pharmaceutically active compound detected by real-time PCR.

  17. "That pulled the rug out from under my feet!" - adverse experiences and altered emotion processing in patients with functional neurological symptoms compared to healthy comparison subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Astrid; Fiess, Johanna; Schmidt, Roger; Rockstroh, Brigitte

    2015-06-24

    Medically unexplained movement or sensibility disorders, recently defined in DSM-5 as functional neurological symptoms (FNS), are still insufficiently understood. Stress and trauma have been addressed as relevant factors in FNS genesis. Altered emotion processing has been discussed. The present study screened different types and times of adverse experiences in childhood and adulthood in patients with FNS as well as in healthy individuals. The relationship between stress profile, aspects of emotion processing and symptom severity was examined, with the hypothesis that particularly emotional childhood adversities would have an impact on dysfunctional emotion processing as a mediator of FNS. Adverse childhood experiences (ACE), recent negative life events (LE), alexithymia, and emotion regulation style were assessed in 45 inpatients diagnosed with dissociative disorder expressing FNS, and in 45 healthy comparison subjects (HC). Patients reported more severe FNS, more (particularly emotional) ACE, and more LE than HC. FNS severity varied with emotional ACE and negative LE, and LE partially mediated the relation between ACE and FNS. Alexithymia and suppressive emotion regulation style were stronger in patients than HC, and alexithymia varied with FNS severity. Structural equation modeling verified partial mediation of the relationship between emotional ACE and FNS by alexithymia. Early, emotional and accumulating stress show a substantial impact on FNS-associated emotion processing, influencing FNS. Understanding this complex interplay of stress, emotion processing and the severity of FNS is relevant not only for theoretical models, but, as a consequence also inform diagnostic and therapeutic adjustments.

  18. Chemical Alteration of Soils on Earth as a Function of Precipitation: Insights Into Weathering Processes Relevant to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundson, R.; Chadwick, O.; Ewing, S.; Sutter, B.; Owen, J.; McKay, C.

    2004-12-01

    Soils lie at the interface of the atmosphere and lithosphere, and the rates of chemical and physical processes that form them hinge on the availability of water. Here we quantify the effect of these processes on soil volume and mass in different rainfall regimes. We then use the results of this synthesis to compare with the growing chemical dataset for soils on Mars in order to identify moisture regimes on Earth that may provide crude analogues for past Martian weathering conditions. In this synthesis, the rates of elemental gains/losses, and corresponding volumetric changes, were compared for soils in nine soil chronosequences (sequences of soils of differing ages) - sequences formed in climates ranging from ~1 to ~4500 mm mean annual precipitation (MAP). Total elemental chemistry of soils and parent materials were determined via XRF, ICP-MS, and/or ICP-OES, and the absolute elemental gains or losses (and volume changes) were determined by normalizing data to an immobile index element. For the chronosequences examined, the initial stages of soil formation (103^ to 104^ yr), regardless of climate, generally show volumetric expansion due to (1) reduction in bulk density by biological/physical turbation, (2) addition of organic matter, (3) accumulation of water during clay mineral synthesis, and/or (4) accumulation of atmospheric salts and dust. Despite large differences in parent materials (basalt, sandstone, granitic alluvium), there was a systematic relationship between long-term (105^ to 106^ yr) volumetric change and rainfall, with an approximate cross-over point between net expansion (and accumulation of atmospheric solutes and dust) and net collapse (net losses of Si, Al, and alkaline earths and alkali metals) between approximately 20 and 100 mm MAP. Recently published geochemical data of soils at Gusev Crater (Gellert et al. 2004. Science 305:829), when normalized to Ti, show apparent net losses of Si and Al that range between 5 and 50% of values relative to

  19. IGF-I enhances cellular senescence via the reactive oxygen species-p53 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handayaningsih, Anastasia-Evi; Takahashi, Michiko; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Iguchi, Genzo; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Suda, Kentaro [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Takahashi, Yutaka, E-mail: takahash@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular senescence plays an important role in tumorigenesis and aging process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrated IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in primary confluent cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These results may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging. -- Abstract: Cellular senescence is characterized by growth arrest, enlarged and flattened cell morphology, the expression of senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal), and by activation of tumor suppressor networks. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a critical role in cellular growth, proliferation, tumorigenesis, and regulation of aging. In the present study, we show that IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in mouse, rat, and human primary cells in the confluent state. IGF-I induced expression of a DNA damage marker, {gamma}H2AX, the increased levels of p53 and p21 proteins, and activated SA-{beta}-gal. In the confluent state, an altered downstream signaling of IGF-I receptor was observed. Treatment with a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, N-acetylcystein (NAC) significantly suppressed induction of these markers, indicating that ROS are involved in the induction of cellular senescence by IGF-I. In p53-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts, the IGF-I-induced augmentation of SA-{beta}-gal and p21 was inhibited, demonstrating that p53 is required for cellular senescence induced by IGF-I. Thus, these data reveal a novel pathway whereby IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner and may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging.

  20. Increasing the availability of threonine, isoleucine, valine, and leucine relative to lysine while maintaining an ideal ratio of lysine:methionine alters mammary cellular metabolites, mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X; Zhou, Z; Wang, L; Saremi, B; Helmbrecht, A; Wang, Z; Loor, J J

    2018-03-14

    in mTORC1 phosphorylation status, it resulted in the lowest phosphorylation of Akt and eEF2 and mRNA abundance of CSN2 and various AA transporters (SLC7A5, SLC36A1, SLC38A2, SLC38A9, SLC43A1). Overall, data indicate that an increase in Val at an ideal ratio of Lys:Met could further enhance milk protein synthesis by altering intracellular concentrations of essential AA and metabolites that could play a regulatory role, increasing phosphorylation status of mTORC1 and key signaling proteins, and upregulation of AA transporters. The Authors. Published by FASS Inc. and Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Dairy Science Association®. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

  1. High pressure processing alters water distribution enabling the production of reduced-fat and reduced-salt pork sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huijuan; Han, Minyi; Bai, Yun; Han, Yanqing; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-04-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) was used to explore novel methods for modifying the textural properties of pork sausages with reduced-salt, reduced-fat and no fat replacement additions. A 2×7 factorial design was set up, incorporating two pressure levels (0.1 or 200 MPa) and seven fat levels (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30%). Sausages treated at 200 MPa exhibited improved tenderness at all fat levels compared with 0.1 MPa treated samples, and the shear force of sausages treated at 200 MPa with 15 or 20% fat content was similar to the 0.1 MPa treated sausages with 30% fat. HPP significantly changed the P₂ peak ratio of the four water components in raw sausages, resulting in improved textural properties of emulsion-type sausages with reduced-fat and reduced-salt. Significant correlations were found between pH, color, shear force and water proportions. The scanning and transmission micrographs revealed the formation of smaller fat globules and an improved network structure in the pressure treated sausages. In conclusion, there is potential to manufacture sausages with reduced-fat and reduced-salt by using HPP to maintain textural qualities. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Altered neural correlates of affective processing after internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Månsson, Kristoffer N T; Carlbring, Per; Frick, Andreas; Engman, Jonas; Olsson, Carl-Johan; Bodlund, Owe; Furmark, Tomas; Andersson, Gerhard

    2013-12-30

    Randomized controlled trials have yielded promising results for internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT) for patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). The present study investigated anxiety-related neural changes after iCBT for SAD. The amygdala is a critical hub in the neural fear network, receptive to change using emotion regulation strategies and a putative target for iCBT. Twenty-two subjects were included in pre- and post-treatment functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T assessing neural changes during an affective face processing task. Treatment outcome was assessed using social anxiety self-reports and the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. ICBT yielded better outcome than ABM (66% vs. 25% CGI-I responders). A significant differential activation of the left amygdala was found with relatively decreased reactivity after iCBT. Changes in the amygdala were related to a behavioral measure of social anxiety. Functional connectivity analysis in the iCBT group showed that the amygdala attenuation was associated with increased activity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex and decreased activity in the right ventrolateral and dorsolateral (dlPFC) cortices. Treatment-induced neural changes with iCBT were consistent with previously reported studies on regular CBT and emotion regulation in general. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Altered reward processing in pathological computer gamers--ERP-results from a semi-natural gaming-design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duven, Eva C P; Müller, Kai W; Beutel, Manfred E; Wölfling, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Internet Gaming Disorder has been added as a research diagnosis in section III for the DSM-V. Previous findings from neuroscientific research indicate an enhanced motivational attention toward cues related to computer games, similar to findings in substance-related addictions. On the other hand in clinical observational studies tolerance effects are reported by patients with Internet Gaming disorder. In the present study we investigated whether an enhanced motivational attention or tolerance effects are present in patients with Internet Gaming Disorder. A clinical sample from the Outpatient Clinic for Behavioral Addictions in Mainz, Germany was recruited, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for Internet Gaming Disorder. In a semi-natural EEG design participants played a computer game during the recording of event-related potentials to assess reward processing. The results indicated an attenuated P300 for patients with Internet Gaming Disorder in response to rewards in comparison to healthy controls, while the latency of N100 was prolonged and the amplitude of N100 was increased. Our findings support the hypothesis that tolerance effects are present in patients with Internet Gaming Disorder, when actively playing computer games. In addition, the initial orienting toward the gaming reward is suggested to consume more capacity for patients with Internet Gaming Disorder, which has been similarly reported by other studies with other methodological background in disorders of substance-related addictions.

  4. Linearizable cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobe, Atsushi; Yura, Fumitaka

    2007-01-01

    The initial value problem for a class of reversible elementary cellular automata with periodic boundaries is reduced to an initial-boundary value problem for a class of linear systems on a finite commutative ring Z 2 . Moreover, a family of such linearizable cellular automata is given

  5. Cellular modelling of river catchments and reaches: Advantages, limitations and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulthard, T. J.; Hicks, D. M.; Van De Wiel, M. J.

    2007-10-01

    The last decade has witnessed the development of a series of cellular models that simulate the processes operating within river channels and drive their geomorphic evolution. Their proliferation can be partly attributed to the relative simplicity of cellular models and their ability to address some of the shortcomings of other numerical models. By using relaxed interpretations of the equations determining fluid flow, cellular models allow rapid solutions of water depths and velocities. These can then be used to drive (usually) conventional sediment transport relations to determine erosion and deposition and alter the channel form. The key advance of using these physically based yet simplified approaches is that they allow us to apply models to a range of spatial scales (1-100 km 2) and time periods (1-100 years) that are especially relevant to contemporary management and fluvial studies. However, these approaches are not without their limitations and technical problems. This paper reviews the findings of nearly 10 years of research into modelling fluvial systems with cellular techniques, principally focusing on improvements in routing water and how fluvial erosion and deposition (including lateral erosion) are represented. These ideas are illustrated using sample simulations of the River Teifi, Wales. A detailed case study is then presented, demonstrating how cellular models can explore the interactions between vegetation and the morphological dynamics of the braided Waitaki River, New Zealand. Finally, difficulties associated with model validation and the problems, prospects and future issues important to the further development and application of these cellular fluvial models are outlined.

  6. Altered energy production, lowered antioxidant potential, and inflammatory processes mediate CNS damage associated with abuse of the psychostimulants MDMA and methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Luke A.; Loftis, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage associated with psychostimulant dependence may be an ongoing, degenerative process with adverse effects on neuropsychiatric function. However, the molecular mechanisms regarding how altered energy regulation affects immune response in the context of substance use disorders are not fully understood. This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the effects of psychostimulant [particularly 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine] exposure on brain energy regulation, immune response, and neuropsychiatric function. Importantly, the neuropsychiatric impairments (e.g., cognitive deficits, depression, and anxiety) that persist following abstinence are associated with poorer treatment outcomes – increased relapse rates, lower treatment retention rates, and reduced daily functioning. Qualifying the molecular changes within the CNS according to the exposure and use patterns of specifically abused substances should inform the development of new therapeutic approaches for addiction treatment. PMID:24485894

  7. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  8. Altered processing of rewarding and aversive basic taste stimuli in symptomatic women with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Monteleone, Palmiero; Esposito, Fabrizio; Prinster, Anna; Volpe, Umberto; Cantone, Elena; Pellegrino, Francesca; Canna, Antonietta; Milano, Walter; Aiello, Marco; Di Salle, Francesco; Maj, Mario

    2017-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have displayed a dysregulation in the way in which the brain processes pleasant taste stimuli in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). However, exactly how the brain processes disgusting basic taste stimuli has never been investigated, even though disgust plays a role in food intake modulation and AN and BN patients exhibit high disgust sensitivity. Therefore, we investigated the activation of brain areas following the administration of pleasant and aversive basic taste stimuli in symptomatic AN and BN patients compared to healthy subjects. Twenty underweight AN women, 20 symptomatic BN women and 20 healthy women underwent fMRI while tasting 0.292 M sucrose solution (sweet taste), 0.5 mM quinine hydrochloride solution (bitter taste) and water as a reference taste. In symptomatic AN and BN patients the pleasant sweet stimulus induced a higher activation in several brain areas than that induced by the aversive bitter taste. The opposite occurred in healthy controls. Moreover, compared to healthy controls, AN patients showed a decreased response to the bitter stimulus in the right amygdala and left anterior cingulate cortex, while BN patients showed a decreased response to the bitter stimulus in the right amygdala and left insula. These results show an altered processing of rewarding and aversive taste stimuli in ED patients, which may be relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of AN and BN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Plasmonic Nanostructured Cellular Automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhazraji, Emad; Ghalib, A.; Manzoor, K.; Alsunaidi, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have investigated the scattering plasmonic resonance characteristics of silver nanospheres with a geometrical distribution that is modelled by Cellular Automata using time-domain numerical analysis. Cellular Automata are discrete mathematical structures that model different natural phenomena. Two binary one-dimensional Cellular Automata rules are considered to model the nanostructure, namely rule 30 and rule 33. The analysis produces three-dimensional scattering profiles of the entire plasmonic nanostructure. For the Cellular Automaton rule 33, the introduction of more Cellular Automata generations resulted only in slight red and blue shifts in the plasmonic modes with respect to the first generation. On the other hand, while rule 30 introduced significant red shifts in the resonance peaks at early generations, at later generations however, a peculiar effect is witnessed in the scattering profile as new peaks emerge as a feature of the overall Cellular Automata structure rather than the sum of the smaller parts that compose it. We strongly believe that these features that emerge as a result adopting the different 256 Cellular Automata rules as configuration models of nanostructures in different applications and systems might possess a great potential in enhancing their capability, sensitivity, efficiency, and power utilization.

  10. Probing Cellular Dynamics with Mesoscopic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    . Advances in computing hardware and software now allow explicit simulation of some aspects of cellular dynamics close to the molecular scale. Vesicle fusion is one example of such a process. Experiments, however, typically probe cellular behavior from the molecular scale up to microns. Standard particle...... soon be coupled to Mass Action models allowing the parameters in such models to be continuously tuned according to the finer resolution simulation. This will help realize the goal of a computational cellular simulation that is able to capture the dynamics of membrane-associated processes...

  11. Cellular reprogramming dynamics follow a simple 1D reaction coordinate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teja Pusuluri, Sai; Lang, Alex H.; Mehta, Pankaj; Castillo, Horacio E.

    2018-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming, the conversion of one cell type to another, induces global changes in gene expression involving thousands of genes, and understanding how cells globally alter their gene expression profile during reprogramming is an ongoing problem. Here we reanalyze time-course data on cellular reprogramming from differentiated cell types to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and show that gene expression dynamics during reprogramming follow a simple 1D reaction coordinate. This reaction coordinate is independent of both the time it takes to reach the iPSC state as well as the details of the experimental protocol used. Using Monte-Carlo simulations, we show that such a reaction coordinate emerges from epigenetic landscape models where cellular reprogramming is viewed as a ‘barrier-crossing’ process between cell fates. Overall, our analysis and model suggest that gene expression dynamics during reprogramming follow a canonical trajectory consistent with the idea of an ‘optimal path’ in gene expression space for reprogramming.

  12. Symposium cellular response to DNA damage the role of poly(ADP-ribose) poly(ADP-ribose) in the cellular response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is a chromatin-bound enzyme which, on activation by DNA strand breaks, catalyzes the successive transfer of ADP-ribose units from NAD to nuclear proteins. Poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis is stimulated by DNA strand breaks, and the polymer may alter the structure and/or function of chromosomal proteins to facilitate the DNA repair process. Inhibitors of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase or deficiencies of the substrate, NAD, lead to retardation of the DNA repair process. When DNA strand breaks are extensive or when breaks fail to be repaired, the stimulus for activation of Poly(ADP-ribose) persists and the activated enzyme is capable of totaly consuming cellular pools of NAD. Depletion of NAD and consequent lowering of cellular ATP pools, due to activation of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, may account for rapid cell death before DNA repair takes place and before the genetic effects of DNA damage become manifest

  13. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  14. Recent advances in cellular glycomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Jun-Ichi; Fujitani, Naoki; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2013-02-21

    A large variety of glycans is intricately located on the cell surface, and the overall profile (the glycome, given the entire repertoire of glycoconjugate-associated sugars in cells and tissues) is believed to be crucial for the diverse roles of glycans, which are mediated by specific interactions that control cell-cell adhesion, immune response, microbial pathogenesis and other cellular events. The glycomic profile also reflects cellular alterations, such as development, differentiation and cancerous change. A glycoconjugate-based approach would therefore be expected to streamline discovery of novel cellular biomarkers. Development of such an approach has proven challenging, due to the technical difficulties associated with the analysis of various types of cellular glycomes; however, recent progress in the development of analytical methodologies and strategies has begun to clarify the cellular glycomics of various classes of glycoconjugates. This review focuses on recent advances in the technical aspects of cellular glycomic analyses of major classes of glycoconjugates, including N- and O-linked glycans, derived from glycoproteins, proteoglycans and glycosphingolipids. Articles that unveil the glycomics of various biologically important cells, including embryonic and somatic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and cancer cells, are discussed.

  15. Plant-Pathogen Effectors: Cellular Probes Interfering with Plant Defenses in Spatial and Temporal Manners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toruño, Tania Y.; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Coaker, Gitta

    2017-01-01

    Plants possess large arsenals of immune receptors capable of recognizing all pathogen classes. To cause disease, pathogenic organisms must be able to overcome physical barriers, suppress or evade immune perception, and derive nutrients from host tissues. Consequently, to facilitate some of these processes, pathogens secrete effector proteins that promote colonization. This review covers recent advances in the field of effector biology, focusing on conserved cellular processes targeted by effectors from diverse pathogens. The ability of effectors to facilitate pathogen entry into the host interior, suppress plant immune perception, and alter host physiology for pathogen benefit is discussed. Pathogens also deploy effectors in a spatial and temporal manner, depending on infection stage. Recent advances have also enhanced our understanding of effectors acting in specific plant organs and tissues. Effectors are excellent cellular probes that facilitate insight into biological processes as well as key points of vulnerability in plant immune signaling networks. PMID:27359369

  16. Cellular MR Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Michel Modo; Mathias Hoehn; Jeff W.M. Bulte

    2005-01-01

    Cellular MR imaging is a young field that aims to visualize targeted cells in living organisms. In order to provide a different signal intensity of the targeted cell, they are either labeled with MR contrast agents in vivo or prelabeled in vitro. Either (ultrasmall) superparamagnetic iron oxide [(U)SPIO] particles or (polymeric) paramagnetic chelates can be used for this purpose. For in vivo cellular labeling, Gd3+- and Mn2+- chelates have mainly been used for targeted hepatobiliary imaging, ...

  17. Sequestration of DROSHA and DGCR8 by Expanded CGG RNA Repeats Alters MicroRNA Processing in Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Sellier

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of 55–200 CGG repeats in the 5′ UTR of FMR1. These expanded CGG repeats are transcribed and accumulate in nuclear RNA aggregates that sequester one or more RNA-binding proteins, thus impairing their functions. Here, we have identified that the double-stranded RNA-binding protein DGCR8 binds to expanded CGG repeats, resulting in the partial sequestration of DGCR8 and its partner, DROSHA, within CGG RNA aggregates. Consequently, the processing of microRNAs (miRNAs is reduced, resulting in decreased levels of mature miRNAs in neuronal cells expressing expanded CGG repeats and in brain tissue from patients with FXTAS. Finally, overexpression of DGCR8 rescues the neuronal cell death induced by expression of expanded CGG repeats. These results support a model in which a human neurodegenerative disease originates from the alteration, in trans, of the miRNA-processing machinery.

  18. Cellular Transplantation Alters the Disease Progression in Becker's Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Alok; Paranjape, Amruta; Sane, Hemangi; Bhagawanani, Khushboo; Gokulchandran, Nandini; Badhe, Prerna

    2013-01-01

    Becker’s Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) is a dystrophinopathy manifested as progressive muscle degeneration. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells (BMMNCs) have shown some myogenic potential. The paracrine effects of the BMMNCs reduce the inflammation and are thought to reduce muscle degeneration. We treated a 39 year old dental surgeon suffering from BMD. Muscle strength was reduced when measured using modified Medical Research Council’s Manual Muscle Testing (mMRC-MMT). Static sitting balance ...

  19. Lipids, lipid droplets and lipoproteins in their cellular context; an ultrastructural approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesman, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipids are essential for cellular life, functioning either organized as bilayer membranes to compartmentalize cellular processes, as signaling molecules or as metabolic energy storage. Our current knowledge on lipid organization and cellular lipid homeostasis is mainly based on biochemical data.

  20. Heavy metals and epigenetic alterations in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffo, Maria; Caruso, Gerardo; Fata, Giuseppe La; Barresi, Valeria; Visalli, Maria; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella

    2014-12-01

    Heavy metals and their derivatives can cause various diseases. Numerous studies have evaluated the possible link between exposure to heavy metals and various cancers. Recent data show a correlation between heavy metals and aberration of genetic and epigenetic patterns. From a literature search we noticed few experimental and epidemiological studies that evaluate a possible correlation between heavy metals and brain tumors. Gliomas arise due to genetic and epigenetic alterations of glial cells. Changes in gene expression result in the alteration of the cellular division process. Epigenetic alterations in brain tumors include the hypermethylation of CpG group, hypomethylation of specific genes, aberrant activation of genes, and changes in the position of various histones. Heavy metals are capable of generating reactive oxygen assumes that key functions in various pathological mechanisms. Alteration of homeostasis of metals could cause the overproduction of reactive oxygen species and induce DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and alteration of proteins. In this study we summarize the possible correlation between heavy metals, epigenetic alterations and brain tumors. We report, moreover, the review of relevant literature.

  1. Geochemical modelling of the weathering zone of the 'Mina Fe' U deposit (Spain): A natural analogue for nuclear spent fuel alteration and stability processes in radwaste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcos, D.; Perez del Villar, L.; Bruno, J.; Domenech, C.

    2008-01-01

    The 'Mina Fe' U deposit (Salamanca, Spain) has been studied in the context of Enresa's programme for U-mine sites restoration and also as a natural analogue for processes in high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) geological disposal. The investigations encompassed an array of geoscience disciplines, such as structural geology, mineralogy, hydrogeology and elemental and isotopic geochemistry and hydrogeochemistry of the site. Based on the obtained results, a conceptual mineralogical and geochemical model was performed integrating the main geochemical processes occurring at the site: the interaction between oxidised and slightly acidic water with pyrite, pitchblende, calcite and dolomite, as essential minerals of the U fracture-filling mineralisation, and hydroxyapatite from the host rock, as the main source of P. This conceptual model has been tested in a systematic numerical model, which includes the main kinetic (pyrite and pitchblende dissolution) and equilibrium processes (carbonate mineral dissolution, and goethite, schoepite and autunite secondary precipitation). The results obtained from the reactive-transport model satisfactorily agree with the conceptual model previously established. The assumption of the precipitation of coffinite as a secondary mineral in the system cannot be correctly evaluated due to the lack of hydrochemical data from the reducing zone of the site and valid thermodynamic and kinetic data for this hydrated U(IV)-silicate. This precipitation can also be hampered by the probable existence of dissolved U(IV)-organic matter and/or uranyl carbonate complexes, which are thermodynamically stable under the alkaline and reducing conditions that prevail in the reducing zone of the system. Finally, the intense downwards oxic and acidic alteration in the upper part of the system is of no relevance for the performance assessment of a HLNW disposal. However, the acidic and oxidised conditions are quickly buffered to neutral-alkaline and reducing at very

  2. What the Erythrocytic Nuclear Alteration Frequencies Could Tell Us about Genotoxicity and Macrophage Iron Storage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana M M Gomes

    Full Text Available Erythrocytic nuclear alterations have been considered as an indicative of organism's exposure to genotoxic agents. Due to their close relationship among their frequencies and DNA damages, they are considered excellent markers of exposure in eukaryotes. However, poor data has been found in literature concerning their genesis, differential occurrence and their life span. In this study, we use markers of cell viability; genotoxicity and cellular turn over in order to shed light to these events. Tilapia and their blood were exposed to cadmium in acute exposure and in vitro assays. They were analyzed using flow cytometry for oxidative stress and membrane disruption, optical microscopy for erythrocytic nuclear alteration, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for cadmium content in aquaria water, blood and cytochemical and analytical electron microscopy techniques for the hemocateretic aspects. The results showed a close relationship among the total nuclear alterations and cadmium content in the total blood and melanomacrophage centres area, mismatching reactive oxygen species and membrane damages. Moreover, nuclear alterations frequencies (vacuolated, condensed and blebbed showed to be associated to cadmium exposure whereas others (lobed and bud were associated to depuration period. Decrease on nuclear alterations frequencies was also associated with hemosiderin increase inside spleen and head kidney macrophages mainly during depurative processes. These data disclosure in temporal fashion the main processes that drive the nuclear alterations frequencies and their relationship with some cellular and systemic biomarkers.

  3. Promotion of bone regeneration on titanium implants through a chemical treatment process using calcium phosphate slurry: Microscopic analysis, cellular response, and animal experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tatsuro; Ohtsu, Naofumi; Tomozawa, Masanari; Hirano, Mitsuhiro; Takita, Hiroko; Iizuka, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2018-02-16

    The present study provides scientific evidence that a new chemical treatment process using calcium phosphate slurry promotes bone regeneration on titanium (Ti) implants. The material's surface modified by the treatment was analyzed using microscopic observation and the bone regeneration efficacy was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Formation of a thin hydroxyapatite layer with a thickness of about 50 nm and an increase of surface roughness were confirmed by microscopic observations. Histological evaluation of rat femora implanted with the specimens showed that the areas of the specimens directly attached to bone tissue were significantly more extensive than those implanted with control Ti at 2 and 8 weeks. Likewise, on the treated Ti, ALP activity, osteopontin, osteocalcin, and calcium contents of rat bone marrow stromal cells were significantly higher than on the control Ti. Furthermore, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed greater expression of messenger ribonucleic acid encoding Cbfa1 and collagen type1 on the treated Ti at 2 weeks. Based on these results, we concluded that the new process was effective to enhance the osteoconductivity of Ti. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Vascular Wall-Resident Multipotent Stem Cells of Mesenchymal Nature within the Process of Vascular Remodeling: Cellular Basis, Clinical Relevance, and Implications for Stem Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Klein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Until some years ago, the bone marrow and the endothelial cell compartment lining the vessel lumen (subendothelial space were thought to be the only sources providing vascular progenitor cells. Now, the vessel wall, in particular, the vascular adventitia, has been established as a niche for different types of stem and progenitor cells with the capacity to differentiate into both vascular and nonvascular cells. Herein, vascular wall-resident multipotent stem cells of mesenchymal nature (VW-MPSCs have gained importance because of their large range of differentiation in combination with their distribution throughout the postnatal organism which is related to their existence in the adventitial niche, respectively. In general, mesenchymal stem cells, also designated as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, contribute to the maintenance of organ integrity by their ability to replace defunct cells or secrete cytokines locally and thus support repair and healing processes of the affected tissues. This review will focus on the central role of VW-MPSCs within vascular reconstructing processes (vascular remodeling which are absolute prerequisite to preserve the sensitive relationship between resilience and stability of the vessel wall. Further, a particular advantage for the therapeutic application of VW-MPSCs for improving vascular function or preventing vascular damage will be discussed.

  5. A New Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamic Fractional Visco-Inelastic Model to Predict Experimentally Inaccessible Processes and Investigate Pathophysiological Cellular Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Farsaci

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available After remarking on non-equilibrium thermodynamics with internal variables, this paper highlights the importance of these variables to the study of biological systems. Internal variables can provide a more detailed description of biological processes that occur inside cells, tissues and organs. In order to introduce a fractional model on a visco-inelastic medium based on Kluitenberg’s non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the origin of the complex dynamic modulus is shown by means of linear response theory. This research recalls our previous work to develop an ultrasound wave technique that allows us to investigate biological systems, and introduces the fractional visco-inelastic model and relative generalized relaxation time, to show that it is possible to obtain the Cole–Cole model in a particular case.

  6. Multiplex Assay for Live-Cell Monitoring of Cellular Fates of Amyloid-β Precursor Protein (APP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykänen, Niko-Petteri; Yan, Xu; Sakha, Prasanna; Huttunen, Henri J.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. APP has a short half-life and undergoes complex proteolytic processing that is highly responsive to various stimuli such as changes in cellular lipid or energy homeostasis. Cellular trafficking of APP is controlled by its large protein interactome, including dozens of cytosolic adaptor proteins, and also by interactions with lipids. Currently, cellular regulation of APP is mostly studied based on appearance of APP-derived proteolytic fragments to conditioned media and cellular extracts. Here, we have developed a novel live-cell assay system based on several indirect measures that reflect altered APP trafficking and processing in cells. Protein-fragment complementation assay technology for detection of APP-BACE1 protein-protein interaction forms the core of the new assay. In a multiplex form, the assay can measure four endpoints: total cellular APP level, total secreted sAPP level in media, APP-BACE1 interaction in cells and in exosomes released by the cells. Functional validation of the assay with pharmacological and genetic tools revealed distinct patterns of cellular fates of APP, with immediate mechanistic implications. This new technology will facilitate functional genomics studies of late-onset Alzheimer's disease, drug discovery efforts targeting APP and characterization of the physiological functions of APP and its proteolytic fragments. PMID:24932508

  7. Profiling and functional data on the developing olfactory/GnRH system reveal cellular and molecular pathways essential for this process and potentially relevant for the Kallmann syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia eGaraffo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic development, immature neurons in the olfactory epithelium (OE extend axons through the nasal mesenchyme, to contact projection neurons in the olfactory bulb. Axon navigation is accompanied by migration of the GnRH+ neurons, which enter the anterior forebrain and home in the septo-hypothalamic area. This process can be interrupted at various points and lead to the onset of the Kallmann syndrome (KS, a disorder characterized by anosmia and central hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Several genes has been identified in human and mice that cause KS or a KS-like phenotype. In mice a set of transcription factors appears to be required for olfactory connectivity and GnRH neuron migration; thus we explored the transcriptional network underlying this developmental process by profiling the OE and the adjacent mesenchyme at three embryonic ages. We also profiled the OE from embryos null for Dlx5, a homeogene that causes a KS-like phenotype when deleted. We identified 20 interesting genes belonging to the following categories: 1 transmembrane adhesion/receptor, 2 axon-glia interaction, 3 scaffold/adapter for signalling, 4 synaptic proteins. We tested some of them in zebrafish embryos: the depletion of five (of six Dlx5 targets affected axonal extension and targeting, while three (of three affected GnRH neuron position and neurite organization. Thus, we confirmed the importance of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and identified new molecules needed for olfactory connection and GnRH neuron migration. Using available and newly generated data, we predicted/prioritized putative KS-disease genes, by building conserved co-expression networks with all known disease genes in human and mouse. The results show the overall validity of approaches based on high-throughput data and predictive bioinformatics to identify genes potentially relevant for the molecular pathogenesis of KS. A number of candidate will be discussed, that should be tested in

  8. Architected Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  9. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including protein markers, pathogens and cellular debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jennifer S [Santa Fe, NM; Swanson, Basil I [Los Alamos, NM; Grace, Karen M [Los Alamos, NM; Grace, Wynne K [Los Alamos, NM; Shreve, Andrew P [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of a biological target is described including injecting a biological target-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, with the recognition ligands adapted for binding to selected biological targets, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between selected biological targets within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting the fluorescent-label in any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  10. Can color changes alter the neural correlates of recognition memory? Manipulation of processing affects an electrophysiological indicator of conceptual implicit memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoyu; Gao, Chuanji; Zhou, Jianshe; Guo, Chunyan

    2016-09-28

    It has been widely shown that recognition memory includes two distinct retrieval processes: familiarity and recollection. Many studies have shown that recognition memory can be facilitated when there is a perceptual match between the studied and the tested items. Most event-related potential studies have explored the perceptual match effect on familiarity on the basis of the hypothesis that the specific event-related potential component associated with familiarity is the FN400 (300-500 ms mid-frontal effect). However, it is currently unclear whether the FN400 indexes familiarity or conceptual implicit memory. In addition, on the basis of the findings of a previous study, the so-called perceptual manipulations in previous studies may also involve some conceptual alterations. Therefore, we sought to determine the influence of perceptual manipulation by color changes on recognition memory when the perceptual or the conceptual processes were emphasized. Specifically, different instructions (perceptually or conceptually oriented) were provided to the participants. The results showed that color changes may significantly affect overall recognition memory behaviorally and that congruent items were recognized with a higher accuracy rate than incongruent items in both tasks, but no corresponding neural changes were found. Despite the evident familiarity shown in the two tasks (the behavioral performance of recognition memory was much higher than at the chance level), the FN400 effect was found in conceptually oriented tasks, but not perceptually oriented tasks. It is thus highly interesting that the FN400 effect was not induced, although color manipulation of recognition memory was behaviorally shown, as seen in previous studies. Our findings of the FN400 effect for the conceptual but not perceptual condition support the explanation that the FN400 effect indexes conceptual implicit memory.

  11. MECHANISMS OF CELLULAR CYTOTOXICITY INDUCTION IN GASTRIC MUCOSAL INFLAMMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Matveeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development and chronicity of inflammatory process in gastric mucosa may contribute to persistence of a number of microorganisms – Helicobacter (H. pylori, Staphylococcus (S. aureus, Candida species (spp., Herpesvirus and others in the host organism. Many authors have recognized an important role of T helper (Th type 1 and regulatory T cells in evolvement of gastritis, whereas importance of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs is still to be confirmed. This review presents analysis of available scientific data about induction mechanisms of cellular cytotoxicity in inflammatory process affecting gastric mucosa. Bacterial populations, depending on their density, are able to regulate expression of genes encoding synthesis of protein virulence factors, thus accelerating adaptation for changing environmental conditions. Upon receptor-mediated recognition of characteristic microbial structures, i.e., pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and danger signals altered by stress, or cellular structures damaged by infectious pathogens (DAMPs, transcription factors are activated, thus leading to production of early pro-inflammatory interleukins (IL, interferons (IFN type I and induction of immune responses. It is shown that the antigens of H. pylori and Candida spp. promote infiltration of mucosa gastric by activated CD8+CTLs, and Herpesvirus induce a significant increase in the number of perforin-positive (Pr+ CD8+ and CD16+ cells, phenotypic changes in CD4+lymphocytes, with acquisition of direct cytolytic activity.

  12. Cellular automata a parallel model

    CERN Document Server

    Mazoyer, J

    1999-01-01

    Cellular automata can be viewed both as computational models and modelling systems of real processes. This volume emphasises the first aspect. In articles written by leading researchers, sophisticated massive parallel algorithms (firing squad, life, Fischer's primes recognition) are treated. Their computational power and the specific complexity classes they determine are surveyed, while some recent results in relation to chaos from a new dynamic systems point of view are also presented. Audience: This book will be of interest to specialists of theoretical computer science and the parallelism challenge.

  13. 'Biomoleculas': cellular metabolism didactic software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menghi, M L; Novella, L P; Siebenlist, M R

    2007-01-01

    'Biomoleculas' is a software that deals with topics such as the digestion, cellular metabolism and excretion of nutrients. It is a pleasant, simple and didactic guide, made by and for students. In this program, each biomolecule (carbohydrates, lipids and proteins) is accompanied until its degradation and assimilation by crossing and interrelating the different metabolic channels to finally show the destination of the different metabolites formed and the way in which these are excreted. It is used at present as a teaching-learning process tool by the chair of Physiology and Biophysics at the Facultad de Ingenieria - Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios

  14. Different N-terminal isoforms of Oct-1 control expression of distinct sets of genes and their high levels in Namalwa Burkitt's lymphoma cells affect a wide range of cellular processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratova, Elizaveta V; Stepchenko, Alexander G; Portseva, Tatiana; Mogila, Vladic A; Georgieva, Sofia G

    2016-11-02

    Oct-1 transcription factor has various functions in gene regulation. Its expression level is increased in several types of cancer and is associated with poor survival prognosis. Here we identified distinct Oct-1 protein isoforms in human cells and compared gene expression patterns and functions for Oct-1A, Oct-1L, and Oct-1X isoforms that differ by their N-terminal sequences. The longest isoform, Oct-1A, is abundantly expressed and is the main Oct-1 isoform in most of human tissues. The Oct-1L and the weakly expressed Oct-1X regulate the majority of Oct-1A targets as well as additional sets of genes. Oct-1X controls genes involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, RNA processing, and cellular response to stress. The high level of Oct-1 isoforms upregulates genes related to cell cycle progression and activates proliferation both in Namalwa Burkitt's lymphoma cells and primary human fibroblasts. It downregulates expression of genes related to antigen processing and presentation, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, oxidative metabolism, and cell adhesion, thus facilitating pro-oncogenic processes. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. The New Cellular Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  16. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.M.

    1984-11-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  17. Characterization of in vivo tumorigenicity tests using severe immunodeficient NOD/Shi-scid IL2Rγnull mice for detection of tumorigenic cellular impurities in human cell-processed therapeutic products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Kusakawa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of human cell-processed therapeutic products (hCTPs with tumorigenic cells is one of the major concerns in the manufacturing and quality control of hCTPs. However, no quantitative method for detecting the tumorigenic cellular impurities is currently standardized. NOD/Shi-scid IL2Rγnull (NOG mice have shown high xeno-engraftment potential compared with other well-known immunodeficient strains, e.g. nude mice. Hypothesizing that tumorigenicity test using NOG mice could be a sensitive and quantitative method to detect a small amount of tumorigenic cells in hCTPs, we examined tumor formation after subcutaneous transplantation of HeLa cells, as a model of tumorigenic cells, in NOG mice and nude mice. Sixteen weeks after inoculation, the 50% tumor-producing dose (TPD50 values of HeLa cells were stable at 1.3 × 104 and 4.0 × 105 cells in NOG and nude mice, respectively, indicating a 30-fold higher sensitivity of NOG mice compared to that of nude mice. Transplanting HeLa cells embedded with Matrigel in NOG mice further decreased the TPD50 value to 7.9 × 10 cells, leading to a 5000-fold higher sensitivity, compared with that of nude mice. Additionally, when HeLa cells were mixed with 106 or 107 human mesenchymal stem cells as well as Matrigel, the TPD50 values in NOG mice were comparable to those of HeLa cells alone with Matrigel. These results suggest that the in vivo tumorigenicity test using NOG mice with Matrigel is a highly sensitive and quantitative method to detect a trace amount of tumorigenic cellular impurities in human somatic cells, which can be useful in the quality assessment of hCTPs.

  18. Altered Cortical Ensembles in Mouse Models of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Jordan P; Peterka, Darcy S; Gogos, Joseph A; Yuste, Rafael

    2017-04-05

    In schizophrenia, brain-wide alterations have been identified at the molecular and cellular levels, yet how these phenomena affect cortical circuit activity remains unclear. We studied two mouse models of schizophrenia-relevant disease processes: chronic ketamine (KET) administration and Df(16)A +/- , modeling 22q11.2 microdeletions, a genetic variant highly penetrant for schizophrenia. Local field potential recordings in visual cortex confirmed gamma-band abnormalities similar to patient studies. Two-photon calcium imaging of local cortical populations revealed in both models a deficit in the reliability of neuronal coactivity patterns (ensembles), which was not a simple consequence of altered single-neuron activity. This effect was present in ongoing and sensory-evoked activity and was not replicated by acute ketamine administration or pharmacogenetic parvalbumin-interneuron suppression. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that schizophrenia is an "attractor" disease and demonstrate that degraded neuronal ensembles are a common consequence of diverse genetic, cellular, and synaptic alterations seen in chronic schizophrenia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. RNA assemblages orchestrate complex cellular processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hansen, Heidi Theil; Christiansen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs are monocistronic, and therefore mechanisms exist that coordinate the synthesis of multiprotein complexes in order to obtain proper stoichiometry at the appropriate intracellular locations. RNA-binding proteins containing low-complexity sequences are prone to generate liquid drop...

  20. Alteration of the digestive motility linked with radiation-induced inflammatory processes in rats; Alterations de la motricite digestive associees aux processus inflammatoires induits par les rayonnements ionisants chez le rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, C

    2000-12-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation, whether accidental or for medical reasons, may lead to gastro-intestinal injury, characterized by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. The aetiology of radiation-induced diarrhea remains to date unclear. In this study, we have investigated the acute effects of a 10 Gy abdominal irradiation on rat digestive functions. The objective of the first study was to evaluate the role of sensory afferent neurons, capsaicin-sensitive, on morphological changes and the inflammatory response following exposure. Three days after irradiation, we observed an inflammatory response characterized by neutrophils infiltration and mast cells de-granulation. No effect of capsaicin pre-treatment was seen on these parameters. However, neutrophils infiltration was increased as early as one day after irradiation in capsaicin-treated rats. No difference in severity of diarrhea was observed after denervation nor in morphological changes. These data demonstrate that abdominal irradiation results in diarrhea concomitant with an inflammatory response, and that sensory innervation does not play a major protective role. The objective of the rest of the work was in the first instance to characterize radiation-induced alterations of intestinal and colonic motility leading to diarrhea and secondly to evaluate the role of serotonin in such disorders. Perturbations in intestinal (MMC) and colonic (LSB) motor profiles were observed from the first day onwards. Migrating motor complexes (MMC) were completely disrupted at three days at the same time as the onset of diarrhea. In addition to inhibition of LSB, colonic fluid absorptive capacity was decreased and serotonin colonic tissue levels were increased three days after irradiation. Radiation-induced diarrhea was reduced by treatment with an antagonist of 5-HT{sub 3} receptors, granisetron, as were alterations of colonic motility and serotonin tissue levels. However, this treatment did not significantly ameliorate

  1. Radiopharmaceutical cellular uptake mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Cipriana; Rusu, V.

    1996-01-01

    Cellular radiopharmaceutical specificity depends mainly of the uptake mechanisms. Usually, this can be one of the classical membrane transport type (a passive or active transport, a receptor mediated one or a combination of them). It can also be an electrochemical gradient dependent membrane transport in relation with Nernst equation, as in case of 99m Tc MIBI, the representative molecule of a widely studied family tracers, with applications in cardiac and oncological scintigraphy. Another mechanism can be an ATP dependent active transport, that results in the most important 201 Tl inflow. 201 Tl inflow is also an example of multiple mechanisms involved in cellular ionic inflow. Over 30% of 201 Tl transport imply other ways, like Na + - K + - Cl - co-transport. For a given tracer, the mechanism may depend also on the cell type. In conclusion, knowledge of the radiotracer uptake mechanisms allows finding the 'ideal' radiotracer with high specificity for the tissue to be visualized. (authors)

  2. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  3. Radiolabeled cellular blood elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, M.L.; Ezikowitz, M.D.; Hardeman, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers delivered by guest lectures and participants at the Advanced Study Institute's colloquium on Radiolabeled Cellular Blood Elements at Maratea, Italy on August 29, to September 9, 1982. The book includes chapters on basic cell physiology and critical reviews of data and experience in the preparation and use of radiolabeled cells, as well as reports on very recent developments, from a faculty that included experts on cell physiology in health and disease and on the technology of in vivo labeling

  4. Implications of recent research on microstructure modifications, through heat-related processing and trait alteration to bio-functions, molecular thermal stability and mobility, metabolic characteristics and nutrition in cool-climate cereal grains and other types of seeds with advanced molecular techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yuguang; Zhang, Huihua; Yu, Peiqiang

    2018-02-16

    The cutting-edge synchrotron radiation based and globar-sourced vibrational infrared microspectroscopy have recently been developed. These novel techniques are able to reveal structure features at cellular and molecular levels with the tested tissues being intact. However, to date, the advanced techniques are unfamiliar or unknown to food and feed scientists and have not been used to study the molecular structure changes in cool-climate cereal grain seeds and other types of bio-oil and bioenergy seeds. This article aims to provide some recent research in cool-climate cereal grains and other types of seeds on molecular structures and metabolic characteristics of carbohydrate and protein, and implication of microstructure modification through heat-related processing and trait alteration to bio-functions, molecular thermal stability and mobility, and nutrition with advanced molecular techniques- synchrotron radiation based and globar-sourced vibrational infrared microspectroscopy in the areas of (1) Inherent microstructure of cereal grain seeds; (2) The nutritional values of cereal grains; (3) Impact and modification of heat-related processing to cereal grain; (4) Conventional nutrition evaluation methodology; (5) Synchrotron radiation-based and globar-sourced vibrational (micro)-spectroscopy for molecular structure study and molecular thermal stability and mobility, and (6) Recent molecular spectroscopic technique applications in research on raw, traits altered and processed cool-climate cereal grains and other types of seeds. The information described in this article gives better insights of research progress and update in cool-climate cereal grains and other seeds with advanced molecular techniques.

  5. Wavefront cellular learning automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradabadi, Behnaz; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2018-02-01

    This paper proposes a new cellular learning automaton, called a wavefront cellular learning automaton (WCLA). The proposed WCLA has a set of learning automata mapped to a connected structure and uses this structure to propagate the state changes of the learning automata over the structure using waves. In the WCLA, after one learning automaton chooses its action, if this chosen action is different from the previous action, it can send a wave to its neighbors and activate them. Each neighbor receiving the wave is activated and must choose a new action. This structure for the WCLA is necessary in many dynamic areas such as social networks, computer networks, grid computing, and web mining. In this paper, we introduce the WCLA framework as an optimization tool with diffusion capability, study its behavior over time using ordinary differential equation solutions, and present its accuracy using expediency analysis. To show the superiority of the proposed WCLA, we compare the proposed method with some other types of cellular learning automata using two benchmark problems.

  6. Environment Aware Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented rise of mobile user demand over the years have led to an enormous growth of the energy consumption of wireless networks as well as the greenhouse gas emissions which are estimated currently to be around 70 million tons per year. This significant growth of energy consumption impels network companies to pay huge bills which represent around half of their operating expenditures. Therefore, many service providers, including mobile operators, are looking for new and modern green solutions to help reduce their expenses as well as the level of their CO2 emissions. Base stations are the most power greedy element in cellular networks: they drain around 80% of the total network energy consumption even during low traffic periods. Thus, there is a growing need to develop more energy-efficient techniques to enhance the green performance of future 4G/5G cellular networks. Due to the problem of traffic load fluctuations in cellular networks during different periods of the day and between different areas (shopping or business districts and residential areas), the base station sleeping strategy has been one of the main popular research topics in green communications. In this presentation, we present several practical green techniques that provide significant gains for mobile operators. Indeed, combined with the base station sleeping strategy, these techniques achieve not only a minimization of the fossil fuel consumption but also an enhancement of mobile operator profits. We start with an optimized cell planning method that considers varying spatial and temporal user densities. We then use the optimal transport theory in order to define the cell boundaries such that the network total transmit power is reduced. Afterwards, we exploit the features of the modern electrical grid, the smart grid, as a new tool of power management for cellular networks and we optimize the energy procurement from multiple energy retailers characterized by different prices and pollutant

  7. Cardiac troponin and tropomyosin: structural and cellular perspectives to unveil the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra de A. Marques

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Inherited myopathies affect both skeletal and cardiac muscle and are commonly associated with genetic dysfunctions, leading to the production of anomalous proteins. In cardiomyopathies, mutations frequently occur in sarcomeric genes, but the cause-effect scenario between genetic alterations and pathological processes remains elusive. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM was the first cardiac disease associated with a genetic background. Since the discovery of the first mutation in the β-myosin heavy chain, more than 1,400 new mutations in 11 sarcomeric genes have been reported, awarding HCM the title of the disease of the sarcomere. The most common macroscopic phenotypes are left ventricle and interventricular septal thickening, but because the clinical profile of this disease is quite heterogeneous, these phenotypes are not suitable for an accurate diagnosis. The development of genomic approaches for clinical investigation allows for diagnostic progress and understanding at the molecular level. Meanwhile, the lack of accurate in vivo models to better comprehend the cellular events triggered by this pathology has become a challenge. Notwithstanding, the imbalance of Ca2+ concentrations, altered signaling pathways, induction of apoptotic factors, and heart remodeling leading to abnormal anatomy have already been reported. Of note, a misbalance of signaling biomolecules, such as kinases and tumor suppressors (e.g., Akt and p53, seems to participate in apoptotic and fibrotic events. In HCM, structural and cellular information about defective sarcomeric proteins and their altered interactome is emerging but still represents a bottleneck for developing new concepts in basic research and for future therapeutic interventions. This review focuses on the structural and cellular alterations triggered by HCM-causing mutations in troponin and tropomyosin proteins and how structural biology can aid in the discovery of new platforms for therapeutics. We

  8. Cardiac Troponin and Tropomyosin: Structural and Cellular Perspectives to Unveil the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Mayra de A; de Oliveira, Guilherme A P

    2016-01-01

    Inherited myopathies affect both skeletal and cardiac muscle and are commonly associated with genetic dysfunctions, leading to the production of anomalous proteins. In cardiomyopathies, mutations frequently occur in sarcomeric genes, but the cause-effect scenario between genetic alterations and pathological processes remains elusive. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was the first cardiac disease associated with a genetic background. Since the discovery of the first mutation in the β-myosin heavy chain, more than 1400 new mutations in 11 sarcomeric genes have been reported, awarding HCM the title of the "disease of the sarcomere." The most common macroscopic phenotypes are left ventricle and interventricular septal thickening, but because the clinical profile of this disease is quite heterogeneous, these phenotypes are not suitable for an accurate diagnosis. The development of genomic approaches for clinical investigation allows for diagnostic progress and understanding at the molecular level. Meanwhile, the lack of accurate in vivo models to better comprehend the cellular events triggered by this pathology has become a challenge. Notwithstanding, the imbalance of Ca 2+ concentrations, altered signaling pathways, induction of apoptotic factors, and heart remodeling leading to abnormal anatomy have already been reported. Of note, a misbalance of signaling biomolecules, such as kinases and tumor suppressors (e.g., Akt and p53), seems to participate in apoptotic and fibrotic events. In HCM, structural and cellular information about defective sarcomeric proteins and their altered interactome is emerging but still represents a bottleneck for developing new concepts in basic research and for future therapeutic interventions. This review focuses on the structural and cellular alterations triggered by HCM-causing mutations in troponin and tropomyosin proteins and how structural biology can aid in the discovery of new platforms for therapeutics. We highlight the importance

  9. Monocyte Activation in Immunopathology: Cellular Test for Development of Diagnostics and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A. Ivanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several highly prevalent human diseases are associated with immunopathology. Alterations in the immune system are found in such life-threatening disorders as cancer and atherosclerosis. Monocyte activation followed by macrophage polarization is an important step in normal immune response to pathogens and other relevant stimuli. Depending on the nature of the activation signal, macrophages can acquire pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotypes that are characterized by the expression of distinct patterns of secreted cytokines and surface antigens. This process is disturbed in immunopathologies resulting in abnormal monocyte activation and/or bias of macrophage polarization towards one or the other phenotype. Such alterations could be used as important diagnostic markers and also as possible targets for the development of immunomodulating therapy. Recently developed cellular tests are designed to analyze the phenotype and activity of living cells circulating in patient’s bloodstream. Monocyte/macrophage activation test is a successful example of cellular test relevant for atherosclerosis and oncopathology. This test demonstrated changes in macrophage activation in subclinical atherosclerosis and breast cancer and could also be used for screening a panel of natural agents with immunomodulatory activity. Further development of cellular tests will allow broadening the scope of their clinical implication. Such tests may become useful tools for drug research and therapy optimization.

  10. A bead-based western for high-throughput cellular signal transduction analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treindl, Fridolin; Ruprecht, Benjamin; Beiter, Yvonne; Schultz, Silke; Döttinger, Anette; Staebler, Annette; Joos, Thomas O.; Kling, Simon; Poetz, Oliver; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans; Kuster, Bernhard; Templin, Markus F.

    2016-01-01

    Dissecting cellular signalling requires the analysis of large number of proteins. The DigiWest approach we describe here transfers the western blot to a bead-based microarray platform. By combining gel-based protein separation with immobilization on microspheres, hundreds of replicas of the initial blot are created, thus enabling the comprehensive analysis of limited material, such as cells collected by laser capture microdissection, and extending traditional western blotting to reach proteomic scales. The combination of molecular weight resolution, sensitivity and signal linearity on an automated platform enables the rapid quantification of hundreds of specific proteins and protein modifications in complex samples. This high-throughput western blot approach allowed us to identify and characterize alterations in cellular signal transduction that occur during the development of resistance to the kinase inhibitor Lapatinib, revealing major changes in the activation state of Ephrin-mediated signalling and a central role for p53-controlled processes. PMID:27659302

  11. Cellular response within the periodontal ligament on application of orthodontic forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazeer Ahmed Meeran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During application of controlled orthodontic force on teeth, remodeling of the periodontal ligament (PDL and the alveolar bone takes place. Orthodontic forces induce a multifaceted bone remodeling response. Osteoclasts responsible for bone resorption are mainly derived from the macrophages and osteoblasts are produced by proliferations of the cells of the periodontal ligament. Orthodontic force produces local alterations in vascularity, as well as cellular and extracellular matrix reorganization, leading to the synthesis and release of various neurotransmitters, cytokines, growth factors, colony-stimulating factors, and metabolites of arachidonic acid. Although many studies have been reported in the orthodontic and related scientific literature, research is constantly being done in this field resulting in numerous current updates in the biology of tooth movement, in response to orthodontic force. Therefore, the aim of this review is to describe the mechanical and biological processes taking place at the cellular level during orthodontic tooth movement.

  12. Selective mRNA translation coordinates energetic and metabolic adjustments to cellular oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco-Price, Cristina; Kaiser, Kayla A; Jang, Charles J H; Larive, Cynthia K; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2008-12-01

    Cellular oxygen deprivation (hypoxia/anoxia) requires an acclimation response that enables survival during an energy crisis. To gain new insights into the processes that facilitate the endurance of transient oxygen deprivation, the dynamics of the mRNA translation state and metabolites were quantitatively monitored in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings exposed to a short (2 h) or prolonged (9 h) period of oxygen and carbon dioxide deprivation and following 1 h of re-aeration. Hypoxia stress and reoxygenation promoted adjustments in the levels of polyribosomes (polysomes) that were highly coordinated with cellular ATP content. A quantitative comparison of steady-state and polysomal mRNA populations revealed that over half of the cellular mRNAs were restricted from polysome complexes during the stress, with little or no change in abundance. This selective repression of translation was rapidly reversed upon reoxygenation. Comparison of the adjustment in gene transcripts and metabolites demonstrated that profiling of polysomal mRNAs strongly augments the prediction of cellular processes that are altered during cellular oxygen deprivation. The selective translation of a subset of mRNAs promotes the conservation of ATP and facilitates the transition to anaerobic metabolism during low-oxygen stress.

  13. A study of the alterability of terminal residues stabilized by a mineral-binder-based solidification/stabilization process; Etude de l`alterabilite de residus ultimes stabilises par un procede de solidification, stabilisation a base de liants mineraux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humez, N.; Prost, R. [Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques (INRA), 78 - Versailles (France). Unite de Science du Sol; Piketty, L.; Schnuriger, B.; Benchara, A.; Pichat, P. [Centre de Solidification, Stabilisation et Stockage, Sarp Industries, 78 - Limay (France)

    1997-12-31

    A new laboratory approach has been developed for the study of the long term behaviour of stabilized terminal residues, and is based on the experimental method for the study of rock alteration. The method consists in examining the migration of elements that are present in the solution contained in the pores, and studying the structural modifications which result from the dissolution of certain constituents, the transformation and the neo-formation of other ones in the material. The method allows for the evaluation, in a short time, of the alterability and perenniality of stabilized terminal wastes. Results show that the long term alterability of solidified/stabilized samples that have been processed using the ECOFIX method, is low

  14. Evaluation of Structural Cellular Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. A.; Zwissler, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary design information presented. First report discusses state of structural-cellular-glass programs as of June 1979. Second report gives further details of program to develop improved cellular glasses and to characterize properties of glasses and commercially available materials.

  15. Cellular communication through light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fels

    Full Text Available Information transfer is a fundamental of life. A few studies have reported that cells use photons (from an endogenous source as information carriers. This study finds that cells can have an influence on other cells even when separated with a glass barrier, thereby disabling molecule diffusion through the cell-containing medium. As there is still very little known about the potential of photons for intercellular communication this study is designed to test for non-molecule-based triggering of two fundamental properties of life: cell division and energy uptake. The study was performed with a cellular organism, the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. Mutual exposure of cell populations occurred under conditions of darkness and separation with cuvettes (vials allowing photon but not molecule transfer. The cell populations were separated either with glass allowing photon transmission from 340 nm to longer waves, or quartz being transmittable from 150 nm, i.e. from UV-light to longer waves. Even through glass, the cells affected cell division and energy uptake in neighboring cell populations. Depending on the cuvette material and the number of cells involved, these effects were positive or negative. Also, while paired populations with lower growth rates grew uncorrelated, growth of the better growing populations was correlated. As there were significant differences when separating the populations with glass or quartz, it is suggested that the cell populations use two (or more frequencies for cellular information transfer, which influences at least energy uptake, cell division rate and growth correlation. Altogether the study strongly supports a cellular communication system, which is different from a molecule-receptor-based system and hints that photon-triggering is a fine tuning principle in cell chemistry.

  16. Cellular communication through light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fels, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Information transfer is a fundamental of life. A few studies have reported that cells use photons (from an endogenous source) as information carriers. This study finds that cells can have an influence on other cells even when separated with a glass barrier, thereby disabling molecule diffusion through the cell-containing medium. As there is still very little known about the potential of photons for intercellular communication this study is designed to test for non-molecule-based triggering of two fundamental properties of life: cell division and energy uptake. The study was performed with a cellular organism, the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. Mutual exposure of cell populations occurred under conditions of darkness and separation with cuvettes (vials) allowing photon but not molecule transfer. The cell populations were separated either with glass allowing photon transmission from 340 nm to longer waves, or quartz being transmittable from 150 nm, i.e. from UV-light to longer waves. Even through glass, the cells affected cell division and energy uptake in neighboring cell populations. Depending on the cuvette material and the number of cells involved, these effects were positive or negative. Also, while paired populations with lower growth rates grew uncorrelated, growth of the better growing populations was correlated. As there were significant differences when separating the populations with glass or quartz, it is suggested that the cell populations use two (or more) frequencies for cellular information transfer, which influences at least energy uptake, cell division rate and growth correlation. Altogether the study strongly supports a cellular communication system, which is different from a molecule-receptor-based system and hints that photon-triggering is a fine tuning principle in cell chemistry.

  17. Engineering Cellular Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds...... of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation....

  18. Cellular mechanics and motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  19. Cellular network entropy as the energy potential in Waddington's differentiation landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Christopher R. S.; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Severini, Simone; Widschwendter, Martin; Enver, Tariq; Zhou, Joseph X.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation is a key cellular process in normal tissue development that is significantly altered in cancer. Although molecular signatures characterising pluripotency and multipotency exist, there is, as yet, no single quantitative mark of a cellular sample's position in the global differentiation hierarchy. Here we adopt a systems view and consider the sample's network entropy, a measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, computable from a sample's genome-wide expression profile. We demonstrate that network entropy provides a quantitative, in-silico, readout of the average undifferentiated state of the profiled cells, recapitulating the known hierarchy of pluripotent, multipotent and differentiated cell types. Network entropy further exhibits dynamic changes in time course differentiation data, and in line with a sample's differentiation stage. In disease, network entropy predicts a higher level of cellular plasticity in cancer stem cell populations compared to ordinary cancer cells. Importantly, network entropy also allows identification of key differentiation pathways. Our results are consistent with the view that pluripotency is a statistical property defined at the cellular population level, correlating with intra-sample heterogeneity, and driven by the degree of signaling promiscuity in cells. In summary, network entropy provides a quantitative measure of a cell's undifferentiated state, defining its elevation in Waddington's landscape. PMID:24154593

  20. Cellular manganese content is developmentally regulated in human dopaminergic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kevin K.; Lowe, Edward W., Jr.; Aboud, Asad A.; Neely, M. Diana; Redha, Rey; Bauer, Joshua A.; Odak, Mihir; Weaver, C. David; Meiler, Jens; Aschner, Michael; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2014-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is both an essential biological cofactor and neurotoxicant. Disruption of Mn biology in the basal ganglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as parkinsonism and Huntington's disease. Handling of other essential metals (e.g. iron and zinc) occurs via complex intracellular signaling networks that link metal detection and transport systems. However, beyond several non-selective transporters, little is known about the intracellular processes regulating neuronal Mn homeostasis. We hypothesized that small molecules that modulate intracellular Mn could provide insight into cell-level Mn regulatory mechanisms. We performed a high throughput screen of 40,167 small molecules for modifiers of cellular Mn content in a mouse striatal neuron cell line. Following stringent validation assays and chemical informatics, we obtained a chemical `toolbox' of 41 small molecules with diverse structure-activity relationships that can alter intracellular Mn levels under biologically relevant Mn exposures. We utilized this toolbox to test for differential regulation of Mn handling in human floor-plate lineage dopaminergic neurons, a lineage especially vulnerable to environmental Mn exposure. We report differential Mn accumulation between developmental stages and stage-specific differences in the Mn-altering activity of individual small molecules. This work demonstrates cell-level regulation of Mn content across neuronal differentiation.

  1. Elliptical Particle Clustering in Cellular Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atis, Severine; Sapsis, Themistoklis; Peacock, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The transport of finite-sized objects by fluid flows is relevant to a wide variety of phenomena, such as debris transport on the ocean surface or bacteria advection in fluid environment. The shape of the advected objects can strongly alter their coupling with the surrounding flow field, and hence, greatly affecting their dispersion by the flow. We present the results of investigations of the behavior of neutrally buoyant, elliptical particles in two-dimensional cellular flows. We find that their trajectories, and overall organization, are markedly different than for spherical particles, with clear clustering for the elliptical particles associated with vortices.

  2. Cellular Events in Nicotine Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Penton, Rachel E.; Lester, Robin A.J.

    2009-01-01

    In the twenty-five years since the observation that chronic exposure to nicotine could regulate the number and function of high affinity nicotine binding sites in the brain there has been a major effort to link alterations in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) to nicotine-induced behaviors that drive the addiction to tobacco products. Here we review the proposed roles of various nAChR subtypes in the addiction process, with emphasis on how they are regulated by nicotine and the implic...

  3. Overview of cellular automaton models for corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Brokate, Cristian Felipe; De Lamare, Jacques; Dung di Caprio; Feron, Damien; Chausse, Annie

    2014-01-01

    A review of corrosion process modeling using cellular automata methods is presented. This relatively new and growing approach takes into account the stochastic nature of the phenomena and uses physico-chemical rules to make predictions at a mesoscopic scale. Milestone models are analyzed and perspectives are established. (authors)

  4. Dynamic cellular manufacturing system design considering ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kamal Deep

    tradeoff in a dynamic cellular manufacturing system is proposed in consideration with multiple part process route. This paper puts emphasize on the .... limited number of distinct paths considering resource capacity. The best routing is ..... all the other methods considered such as bond energy algorithm, direct clustering ...

  5. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Corby eKistler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g. amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH, enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported.

  6. Chronic Allium sativum administration alters spontaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of Allium sativum extract on the medial prefrontal cortex and neurobehaviour of adult Wistar rats. ... altered spontaneous alternation, while cellular pathologic changes were observed in the medial prefrontal cortex of these test groups in a dose dependent sequence.

  7. Geomicrobiology of the Ocean Crust: The Phylogenetic Diversity, Abundance, and Distribution of Microbial Communities Inhabiting Basalt and Implications for Rock Alteration Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have revealed either irregular granular or tubular, segmented channels observed throughout the glass alteration...Candidatus Scalindua brodac, and Cand. div. OPi 11. Soil-others (ɘ.5% each): Firnicutes, Cyanobacteria , Deinococcus- Therm us, Cand. divs. OPl 11...dissimilatory sulfate and sulfur reducing capabilities, such as Desulfbvibrio, however most sequences from this study do not cluster with these organisms

  8. Algorithmic crystal chemistry: A cellular automata approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivovichev, S. V.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic-molecular mechanisms of crystal growth can be modeled based on crystallochemical information using cellular automata (a particular case of finite deterministic automata). In particular, the formation of heteropolyhedral layered complexes in uranyl selenates can be modeled applying a one-dimensional three-colored cellular automaton. The use of the theory of calculations (in particular, the theory of automata) in crystallography allows one to interpret crystal growth as a computational process (the realization of an algorithm or program with a finite number of steps).

  9. Cellular image classification

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiang; Lin, Feng

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces new techniques for cellular image feature extraction, pattern recognition and classification. The authors use the antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) in patient serum as the subjects and the Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) technique as the imaging protocol to illustrate the applications of the described methods. Throughout the book, the authors provide evaluations for the proposed methods on two publicly available human epithelial (HEp-2) cell datasets: ICPR2012 dataset from the ICPR'12 HEp-2 cell classification contest and ICIP2013 training dataset from the ICIP'13 Competition on cells classification by fluorescent image analysis. First, the reading of imaging results is significantly influenced by one’s qualification and reading systems, causing high intra- and inter-laboratory variance. The authors present a low-order LP21 fiber mode for optical single cell manipulation and imaging staining patterns of HEp-2 cells. A focused four-lobed mode distribution is stable and effective in optical...

  10. Cellular-scale hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abkarian, Manouk [Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux, Universite de Montpellier, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Faivre, Magalie [CEA-LETI, Division of Technology for Biology and Health, 17, Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Horton, Renita; Stone, Howard A [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Smistrup, Kristian [MIC, Department of Micro and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Best-Popescu, Catherine A [Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Microfluidic tools are providing many new insights into the chemical, physical and physicochemical responses of cells. Both suspension-level and single-cell measurements have been studied. We review our studies of these kinds of problems for red blood cells with particular focus on the shapes of individual cells in confined geometries, the development and use of a 'differential manometer' for evaluating the mechanical response of individual cells or other objects flowing in confined geometries, and the cross-streamline drift of cells that pass through a constriction. In particular, we show how fluid mechanical effects on suspended cells can be studied systematically in small devices, and how these features can be exploited to develop methods for characterizing physicochemical responses and possibly for the diagnosis of cellular-scale changes to environmental factors.

  11. Cellular based cancer vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Met, Ö; Svane, I M

    2012-01-01

    -associated antigens introduced to dendritic cells (DCs) generated in vitro. This may in part result from suboptimal maturation of DCs leading to insufficient production of IL-12, a key driver of cellular immunity. Therefore, tremendous efforts have been put into the design of maturation cocktails that are able...... of tolerogenic molecules and activation-induced dendritic cell death should be avoided. Thus, compounds such as IFN-γ may initially induce immunity but later on tolerance. Maturation with PGE(2) obviously promotes migration via expression of CCR7 but on the down side PGE(2) limits the production of IL-12...... to transiently affect in vitro migration via autocrine receptor-mediated endocytosis of CCR7. In the current review, we discuss optimal design of DC maturation focused on pre-clinical as well as clinical results from standard and polarized dendritic cell based cancer vaccines....

  12. Passive Noise Filtering by Cellular Compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeger, Thomas; Battich, Nico; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2016-03-10

    Chemical reactions contain an inherent element of randomness, which presents itself as noise that interferes with cellular processes and communication. Here we discuss the ability of the spatial partitioning of molecular systems to filter and, thus, remove noise, while preserving regulated and predictable differences between single living cells. In contrast to active noise filtering by network motifs, cellular compartmentalization is highly effective and easily scales to numerous systems without requiring a substantial usage of cellular energy. We will use passive noise filtering by the eukaryotic cell nucleus as an example of how this increases predictability of transcriptional output, with possible implications for the evolution of complex multicellularity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Shedding of glycan-modifying enzymes by signal peptide peptidase-like 3 (SPPL3) regulates cellular N-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Matthias; Künzel, Ulrike; Higel, Fabian; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Colombo, Alessio; Fukumori, Akio; Haug-Kröper, Martina; Klier, Bärbel; Grammer, Gudula; Seidl, Andreas; Schröder, Bernd; Obst, Reinhard; Steiner, Harald; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Haass, Christian; Fluhrer, Regina

    2014-12-17

    Protein N-glycosylation is involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmunity, tumour progression and metastasis. Signal peptide peptidase-like 3 (SPPL3) is an intramembrane-cleaving aspartyl protease of the GxGD type. Its physiological function, however, has remained enigmatic, since presently no physiological substrates have been identified. We demonstrate that SPPL3 alters the pattern of cellular N-glycosylation by triggering the proteolytic release of active site-containing ectodomains of glycosidases and glycosyltransferases such as N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V, β-1,3 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 and β-1,4 galactosyltransferase 1. Cleavage of these enzymes leads to a reduction in their cellular activity. In line with that, reduced expression of SPPL3 results in a hyperglycosylation phenotype, whereas elevated SPPL3 expression causes hypoglycosylation. Thus, SPPL3 plays a central role in an evolutionary highly conserved post-translational process in eukaryotes. © 2014 The Authors.

  14. Shedding of glycan-modifying enzymes by signal peptide peptidase-like 3 (SPPL3) regulates cellular N-glycosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Matthias; Künzel, Ulrike; Higel, Fabian; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Colombo, Alessio; Fukumori, Akio; Haug-Kröper, Martina; Klier, Bärbel; Grammer, Gudula; Seidl, Andreas; Schröder, Bernd; Obst, Reinhard; Steiner, Harald; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Haass, Christian; Fluhrer, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Protein N-glycosylation is involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmunity, tumour progression and metastasis. Signal peptide peptidase-like 3 (SPPL3) is an intramembrane-cleaving aspartyl protease of the GxGD type. Its physiological function, however, has remained enigmatic, since presently no physiological substrates have been identified. We demonstrate that SPPL3 alters the pattern of cellular N-glycosylation by triggering the proteolytic release of active site-containing ectodomains of glycosidases and glycosyltransferases such as N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V, β-1,3 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 and β-1,4 galactosyltransferase 1. Cleavage of these enzymes leads to a reduction in their cellular activity. In line with that, reduced expression of SPPL3 results in a hyperglycosylation phenotype, whereas elevated SPPL3 expression causes hypoglycosylation. Thus, SPPL3 plays a central role in an evolutionary highly conserved post-translational process in eukaryotes. PMID:25354954

  15. Cellular zinc fluxes and the regulation of apoptosis/gene-directed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Tran, A Q; Ho, L H; Chai, F; Zalewski, P D

    2000-05-01

    The maintenance of discrete subcellular pools of zinc (Zn) is critical for the functional and structural integrity of cells. Among the important biological processes influenced by Zn is apoptosis, a process that is important in cellular homeostasis (an important cellular homeostatic process). It has also been identified as a major mechanism contributing to cell death in response to toxins and in disease, offering hope that novel therapies that target apoptotic pathways may be developed. Because Zn levels in the body can be increased in a relatively nontoxic manner, it may be possible to prevent or ameliorate degenerative disorders that are associated with high rates of apoptotic cell death. This review begins with brief introductions that address, first, the cellular biology of Zn, especially the critical labile Zn pools, and, second, the phenomenon of apoptosis. We then review the evidence relating Zn to apoptosis and address three major hypotheses: (1) that a specific pool or pools of intracellular labile Zn regulates apoptosis; (2) that systemic changes in Zn levels in the body, due to dietary factors, altered physiological states or disease, can influence cell susceptibility to apoptosis, and (3) that this altered susceptibility to apoptosis contributes to pathophysiological changes in the body. Other key issues are the identity of the molecular targets of Zn in the apoptotic cascade, the types of cells and tissues most susceptible to Zn-regulated apoptosis, the role of Zn as a coordinate regulator of mitosis and apoptosis and the apparent release of tightly bound intracellular pools of Zn during the later stages of apoptosis. This review concludes with a section highlighting areas of priority for future studies.

  16. Statistical mechanics of cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfram, S.

    1983-01-01

    Cellular automata are used as simple mathematical models to investigate self-organization in statistical mechanics. A detailed analysis is given of ''elementary'' cellular automata consisting of a sequence of sites with values 0 or 1 on a line, with each site evolving deterministically in discrete time steps according to p definite rules involving the values of its nearest neighbors. With simple initial configurations, the cellular automata either tend to homogeneous states, or generate self-similar patterns with fractal dimensions approx. =1.59 or approx. =1.69. With ''random'' initial configurations, the irreversible character of the cellular automaton evolution leads to several self-organization phenomena. Statistical properties of the structures generated are found to lie in two universality classes, independent of the details of the initial state or the cellular automaton rules. More complicated cellular automata are briefly considered, and connections with dynamical systems theory and the formal theory of computation are discussed

  17. In vivo tracking techniques for cellular regeneration, replacement, and redirection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarntzen, E.H.J.G.; Srinivas, M.; Walczak, P.; Janowski, M.; Heerschap, A.; Vries, I.J.M. de; Figdor, C.G.; Bulte, J.W.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular therapy can be defined as the transplantation of living cells for the treatment of medical conditions. Three main objectives of cellular therapy are regeneration of damaged tissue, replacement of function by secretion of biologically active molecules, and redirection of aberrant processes.

  18. 9-cis-retinoic Acid and troglitazone impacts cellular adhesion, proliferation, and integrin expression in K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Amanda M; Gambill, Jessica; Phomakay, Venusa; Staten, C Tyler; Kelley, Melissa D

    2014-01-01

    Retinoids are established pleiotropic regulators of both adaptive and innate immune responses. Recently, troglitazone, a PPAR gamma agonist, has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects. Separately, retinoids and troglitazone are implicated in immune related processes; however, their combinatory role in cellular adhesion and proliferation has not been well established. In this study, the effect of 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA) and troglitazone on K562 cellular adhesion and proliferation was investigated. Troglitazone exposure decreased K562 cellular adhesion to RGD containing extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, FN-120, and vitronectin in a concentration and time-dependent manner. In the presence of troglitazone, 9-cis-retinoic acid restores cellular adhesion to levels comparable to vehicle treatment alone on fibronectin, FN-120, and vitronectin substrates within 72 hours. Due to the prominent role of integrins in attachment to extracellular matrix proteins, we evaluated the level of integrin α5 subunit expre