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Sample records for alport syndrome molecular

  1. Alport syndrome. Molecular genetic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael

    2009-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a progressive renal disease that is characterised by hematuria and progressive renal failure, and often accompanied by progressive high-tone sensorineural hearing loss and ocular changes in form of macular flecks and lenticonus. AS is a genetic heterogenous disease, and X-...

  2. Alport Syndrome Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with X-linked Alport Syndrome will show abnormal staining for COL4A5 in the skin biopsy. This approach ... and enzyme tests are performed on cultured tissue cells and/or white blood cells. During amniocentesis, a ...

  3. [Alport's syndrome (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huismans, H

    1978-05-01

    A case report is given of a 22-years old student (whose brother had Alport's syndrome) with recurrent central corneal swelling and paracentral erosions of the cornea of both eyes. Further signs of beginning Alport's syndrome in this case are disturbance of re-adaptation after dazzling (Mesoptometer) and paracentral scotomata in the visual fields. Remarkable was the small diameter of the disc in both eyes (1.37 mm). Local therapy was Scopolamin-eye-drops, Actihaemyl- and especially Cystein-Gel (2.4%). PMID:672101

  4. X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jais, Jean Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Giatras, Iannis;

    2003-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a type IV collagen hereditary disease characterized by progressive hematuric nephritis, hearing loss, and ocular changes. Mutations in the COL4A5 collagen gene are responsible for the more common X-linked dominant form of the disease characterized by much less severe disease...... in girls and women. A "European Community Alport Syndrome Concerted Action" (ECASCA) group was established to delineate the Alport syndrome phenotype in each gender and to determine genotype-phenotype correlations in a large number of families. Data concerning 329 families, 250 of them with an X...... to increase after the age of 60 yr in women. Because of the absence of genotype-phenotype correlation and the large intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity, early prognosis of the disease in X-linked Alport syndrome carriers remains moot. Risk factors for developing renal failure have been identified...

  5. Alport syndrome in southern Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, U; Hertz, Jens Michael; Wieslander, J;

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to study the epidemiology of Alport syndrome in southern Sweden, to search for mutations in the COL4A5 gene and to estimate the mutation frequency.......The aim of the present investigation is to study the epidemiology of Alport syndrome in southern Sweden, to search for mutations in the COL4A5 gene and to estimate the mutation frequency....

  6. The 2014International Workshop on Alport Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Jeffrey H; Baigent, Colin; Flinter, Frances; Gross, Oliver; Judge, Parminder; Kashtan, Clifford E; Lagas, Sharon; Savige, Judith; Blatt, Dave; Ding, Jie; Gale, Daniel P; Midgley, Julian P; Povey, Sue; Prunotto, Marco; Renault, Daniel; Skelding, Jules; Turner, A Neil; Gear, Susie

    2014-10-01

    Alport syndrome, historically referred to as hereditary glomerulonephritis with sensorineural deafness and anterior lenticonus, is a genetic disease of collagen α3α4α5(IV) resulting in renal failure. The collagen α3α4α5(IV) heterotrimer forms a network that is a major component of the kidney glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and basement membranes in the cochlea and eye. Alport syndrome, estimated to affect 1 in 5000-10,000 individuals, is caused by mutations in any one of the three genes that encode the α chain components of the collagen α3α4α5(IV) heterotrimer: COL4A3, COL4A4, and COL4A5. Although angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition is effective in Alport syndrome patients for slowing progression to end-stage renal disease, it is neither a cure nor an adequate long-term protector. The 2014 International Workshop on Alport Syndrome, held in Oxford, UK, from January 3-5, was organized by individuals and families living with Alport syndrome, in concert with international experts in the clinical, genetic, and basic science aspects of the disease. Stakeholders from diverse communities-patient families, physicians, geneticists, researchers, Pharma, and funding organizations-were brought together so that they could meet and learn from each other and establish strategies and collaborations for the future, with the overall aim of discovering much needed new treatments to prolong kidney function.

  7. Skin Biopsy for the diagnosis of Alport Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lagona, E; Tsartsali, L; Kostaridou, S; Skiathitou, A; Georgaki, E; Sotsiou, F

    2008-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is the most common hereditary nephritis often associated with extrarenal manifestations. It was first described by Alport on 1927. There is a primary disorder in collagen type IV which is the main component of the basement membranes. Alport syndrome is more frequently inherited as an X-linked and less commonly as an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive trait. We describe the case of a 3-year-old boy with the X-linked variant of AS. The diagnosis was at first speculat...

  8. Association of Alport's syndrome with HLA-DR2 antigen in a group of unrelated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Donadi

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available A few family studies have evaluated HLA antigens in Alport's syndrome; however, there are no large population studies. In the present report, we studied 40 unrelated white patients with Alport's syndrome seen at the Unit of Renal Transplantation, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were typed using a complement-dependent microlymphocytotoxicity assay. A control white population (N = 403 from the same geographical area was also typed for HLA antigens. Although the frequencies of HLA-A and -B antigens of patients were not statistically different from controls, the frequency of HLA-DR2 antigen observed in patients (65% was significantly increased in relation to controls (26%; P<0.001. The relative risk and etiologic fraction for HLA-DR2 antigen were 5.2 and 0.525, respectively. Although few immunological abnormalities have been shown in Alport's syndrome, in this report we emphasize the association of HLA molecules and Alport's syndrome. Besides the well-known inherited molecular defects encoded by type IV collagen genes in Alport's syndrome, the major histocompatibility alleles may be in linkage disequilibrium with these defective collagen genes

  9. Type IV renal tubular acidosis associated with Alport's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Tkácová, R.; Roland, R.; Böör, A.; Kovácová, A.; Lazúrová, I.; Tkác, I.; Hildebrand, T.; Sefara, P.

    1993-01-01

    A case of hereditary nephritis with mild reduction of renal function associated with renal tubular acidosis type IV is described. The patient was admitted with life-threatening hyperkalaemia. To our knowledge, type IV renal tubular acidosis has not been reported previously in association with Alport's syndrome in an adult patient.

  10. Albumin contributes to kidney disease progression in Alport syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarad, George; Knutsen, Russell H; Mecham, Robert P; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2016-07-01

    Alport syndrome is a familial kidney disease caused by defects in the collagen type IV network of the glomerular basement membrane. Lack of collagen-α3α4α5(IV) changes the glomerular basement membrane morphologically and functionally, rendering it leaky to albumin and other plasma proteins. Filtered albumin has been suggested to be a cause of the glomerular and tubular injuries observed at advanced stages of Alport syndrome. To directly investigate the role that albumin plays in the progression of disease in Alport syndrome, we generated albumin knockout (Alb(-/-)) mice to use as a tool for removing albuminuria as a component of kidney disease. Mice lacking albumin were healthy and indistinguishable from control littermates, although they developed hypertriglyceridemia. Dyslipidemia was observed in Alb(+/-) mice, which displayed half the normal plasma albumin concentration. Alb mutant mice were bred to collagen-α3(IV) knockout (Col4a3(-/-)) mice, which are a model for human Alport syndrome. Lack of circulating and filtered albumin in Col4a3(-/-);Alb(-/-) mice resulted in dramatically improved kidney disease outcomes, as these mice lived 64% longer than did Col4a3(-/-);Alb(+/+) and Col4a3(-/-);Alb(+/-) mice, despite similar blood pressures and serum triglyceride levels. Further investigations showed that the absence of albumin correlated with reduced transforming growth factor-β1 signaling as well as reduced tubulointerstitial, glomerular, and podocyte pathology. We conclude that filtered albumin is injurious to kidney cells in Alport syndrome and perhaps in other proteinuric kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27147675

  11. Outcomes of male patients with Alport syndrome undergoing renal replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Temme, Johanna; Kramer, Anneke; Jager, Kitty J;

    2012-01-01

    Patients with the hereditary disease Alport syndrome commonly require renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the second or third decade of life. This study compared age at onset of RRT, renal allograft, and patient survival in men with Alport syndrome receiving various forms of RRT (peritoneal dialysis...

  12. Síndrome de Alport: estudo de uma família Alport's syndrome: a family study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Antônio de Macedo Leal

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: A síndrome de Alport caracteriza-se por nefropatia hereditária, geralmente associada à surdez neurossensorial (Alport, 1927 e alterações oculares (Sohar, 1954. Estudaram-se as manifestações da síndrome em membros de uma mesma família, considerando aspectos clínicos e genéticos. Pacientes e Método: Foram submetidos a exame oftalmológico quinze indivíduos de uma família, dos quais quatro apresentavam síndrome de Alport. Os exames foram realizados na Clínica Oftalmológica do Hospital Getúlio Vargas - Universidade Federal do Piauí (HGV/UFPI. Resultados: Revelaram-se quatro indivíduos afetados pela síndrome de Alport, dos quais três apresentavam surdez moderada, lenticone anterior bilateral e nefropatia crônica, e um tinha manifestação renal isolada. Todos os pacientes eram brancos, do sexo masculino, com idade entre 12 e 25 anos. A acuidade visual dos olhos com lenticone variou de 20/50 a 20/100. Conclusões: A análise da família identificou três casos confirmados e um suspeito, sugerindo padrão de herança recessiva ligada ao X, não sendo possível afastar a herança autossômica dominante com penetrância incompleta.Purpose: Alport's Syndrome is characterized by hereditary nephritis, usually associated with neurosensitve deafness (Alport, 1927 and ocular disease (Sohar, 1954. Thus we intended to analize manifestations of the syndrome in a family, regarding clinical and genetical aspects. Patients and method: Fifteen patients of the same family of which four had Alport´s syndrome were submitted to ophthalmologic examination. The examinations were performed at the Ophthalmologic Clinic of HGV/UFPI. Results: Four patients with Alport´s syndrome were revealed, of which three had moderate deafness, anterior lenticonus and chronic nephropathy, and one of them had renal disease alone. All the patients were white, male aged 12 to 25 years. The visual acuity of eyes with lenticonus varied between 20/50 and 20

  13. Ocular, Ear and Renal Manifestations of Alport Syndrome in Three Iranian Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Davari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alport syndrome is a genetic disorder of basement membranes caused by mutations in type IV collagen network. It was first identified by Dr. Alport in 1927. Its major clinical manifestations are included: glomerulopathy, sensory hearing loss, anterior lenticonus, and the prevalence of Alports’ gene in general population is about 1 in 5000 and the disease prevalence is 1 in 10000 [1-3]. Here we report ocular, ear and renal manifestations of Alport syndrome in 3 families that living in the east city of Iran, Birjand, and we have followed all of this family for 6 years so far.

  14. Cataract in a patient with the Alport syndrome and diffuse Leiomyomatosis Catarata em paciente com sindrome de alport e leiomiomatose difusa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Santiago - Cabán

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of painless progressive loss of vision in a 15 years old male patient with Alport syndrome and diffuse Leiomyomatosis. After a comprehensive history and ocular examination, a diagnosis of bilateral posterior subcapsular cataracts was given. Patient underwent cataract extraction. His best corrected post-operative visual acuity was 20/25 in both eyes. We conclude that posterior subcapsular cataracts may lead to painless and progressive loss of vision in patients with Alport syndrome and Diffuse Leiomyomatosis.Nós descrevemos o caso de perda visual progressiva indolor em um paciente de 15 anos, sexo masculino, com Síndrome de Alport e Leiomiomatose difusa. Após história completa e exame oftalmológico, foi feito o diagnóstico de catarata subcapsular posterior bilateral. O paciente foi submetido à cirurgia de catarata. Nós concluímos que cataratas subcapsulares posteriores podem levar a perda visual progressiva e indolor em pacientes com Síndrome de Alport e Leiomiomatose Difusa.

  15. An Overlapping Case of Alport Syndrome and Thin Basement Membrane Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alganabi, Mashriq; Eter, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 48-year-old male who presented with hematuria of at least 10 years, and has a daughter with hematuria as well. The patient has a history of degenerative hearing loss, decreased vision and cataract formation, but no diabetes, hypertension or proteinuria. A full serology and urology workup was negative for any abnormality. A kidney biopsy for the patient revealed a diagnosis of Alport syndrome but was unable to rule out thin basement membrane disease. The biopsy was inconclusive in making the diagnosis but the patient’s clinical presentation led to the diagnosis of Alport syndrome. The patient’s 10-year-old daughter also has hematuria with no clear etiology but now can subsequently be anticipatorily managed for Alport syndrome progression. Due to the rarity of the disease, diagnosis is often missed or delayed by primary care providers especially when no associated proteinuria has yet developed. This can lead to confusion and misdiagnosis with thin basement membrane disease, a generally benign hematuria without kidney failure progression. Additionally, biopsy can be inconclusive in these patients, relying on the physician’s history and physical examination findings to diagnose. It is important to appropriately diagnose Alport syndrome not only to manage the patient’s rate of kidney failure progression but also allow for a higher degree of suspicion, screening and intervention in the patient’s family members. Both the inconclusive nature of kidney biopsies and the usefulness of diagnosis for family member screening are often overlooked in medical literature but are explored in this case.

  16. Revisão sobre a perda auditiva na Síndrome de Alport, analisando os aspectos clínicos, genéticos e biomoleculares Revision about hearing loss in the Alport's syndrome, analyzing the clinical, genetic and bio-molecular aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima R. A. Alves

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A Síndrome de Alport é uma desordem hereditária, caracterizada por hematúria, freqüentemente levando à falência renal. Pode ser acompanhada de alterações extra-renais, tais como: perda auditiva (PA sensório-neural e alterações oculares. São descritas formas dominantes ligadas ao X, devidas às mutações no lócus COL4A5 e uma forma autossômica recessiva resultando de mutações no lócus COL4A3 ou COL4A4. Ainda foi sugerido um tipo autossômico dominante de SA. A doença decorre de alterações nas cadeias de colágeno tipo IV e os sintomas refletem o comprometimento da membrana basal de vários órgãos. As redes alfa3.alfa4.alfa5(IV ocorrem no rim, na cóclea e no olho. O objetivo foi caracterizar a PA neste grupo de pacientes. Quando o quadro progride para o estágio final de falência renal, o melhor método de tratamento é o transplante, que tem contribuído para o aumento da sobrevida. Nesta revisão bibliográfica, observamos que: 1. A SA caracteriza-se por hematúria, que evolui para falência renal e pode ser acompanhada de manifestações extra-renais. A PA é um achado extra-renal freqüente e um dos primeiros sintomas na SA, sendo um fator relevante para o prognóstico da evolução da doença renal; 2. A SA é genética e decorre da alteração das cadeias do colágeno tipo IV nas membranas basais; 3. A perda auditiva na SA é sensório-neural, de intensidade variável, progressiva e simétrica. Acomete as freqüências médias e altas; 4. Na investigação das perdas auditivas, o otorrinolaringologista deve incluir um exame de urina. É fundamental que o otologista atue no acompanhamento deste grupo de pacientes.Alport Syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by hematuria, which often leads to renal failure. It may also be accompanied by extra-renal alterations, such as: sensorineural hearing loss, and ocular abnormalities. Dominant forms related to the X chromosome and caused by mutations in the locus COL4A5

  17. Contact lens fitting in a patient with Alport syndrome and posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy: a case report

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    Juliana Maria da Silva Rosa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alport Syndrome is a hereditary disease that is caused by a gene mutation and affects the production of collagen in basement membranes; this condition causes hemorrhagic nephritis associated with deafness and ocular changes. The X-linked form of this disease is the most common and mainly affects males. Typical ocular findings are dot-and-fleck retinopathy, anterior lenticonus, and posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy. Some cases involving polymorphous corneal dystrophy and corneal ectasia have been previously described. Here we present a case report of a 33-year-old female with Alport syndrome, posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy, and irregular astigmatism, whose visual acuity improved with a rigid gas permeable contact lens.

  18. Alport syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereditary nephritis; Hematuria - nephropathy - deafness; Hemorrhagic familial nephritis; Hereditary deafness and nephropathy ... women have high blood pressure, swelling, and nerve deafness as a complication of pregnancy. In men, deafness, ...

  19. Alport syndrome: significance of gingival biopsy in the initial diagnosis and periodontal evaluation after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toygar, Hilal Uslu; Toygar, Okan; Guzeldemir, Esra; Cilasun, Ulkem; Nacar, Ahmet; Bal, Nebil

    2009-01-01

    Alport Syndrome (AS) is an important hereditary disorder affecting the glomerular basement membrane. Diagnosis of AS is based on the presence of hematuric nephropathy, renal failure, hearing loss, ocular abnormalities and changes in the glomerular basement membrane of the lamina densa. The aims of this case report were to show the changes in the gingival tissues in a patient with AS under therapy with cyclosporin-A after renal transplantation and to discuss the possible role of type IV collagen in gingival basal lamina as an alternative approach for the diagnosis of AS. A 20-year-old male patient with AS underwent periodontal therapy including a series of gingivectomy surgeries. Gingival samples obtained during the second surgery were examined histopathologically and by transmission electron microscopy for further pathological examination. Gingivectomy procedures have been performed every 6 months over the last 4 years. The excessive and fibrous gingival enlargements resulted in migration of the anterior teeth, but no alveolar bone loss occurred. This is the first report to demonstrate the possible changes in the gingival tissues caused by AS. It is suggested that gingival biopsy can be an initial diagnostic tool instead of renal or skin biopsies. Proper dental and periodontal care and regular visits to the dentist could provide limited gingival hyperplasia to patients with AS.

  20. Alport syndrome: significance of gingival biopsy in the initial diagnosis and periodontal evaluation after renal transplantation

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    Hilal Uslu Toygar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Alport Syndrome (AS is an important hereditary disorder affecting the glomerular basement membrane. Diagnosis of AS is based on the presence of hematuric nephropathy, renal failure, hearing loss, ocular abnormalities and changes in the glomerular basement membrane of the lamina densa. The aims of this case report were to show the changes in the gingival tissues in a patient with AS under therapy with cyclosporin-A after renal transplantation and to discuss the possible role of type IV collagen in gingival basal lamina as an alternative approach for the diagnosis of AS. A 20-year-old male patient with AS underwent periodontal therapy including a series of gingivectomy surgeries. Gingival samples obtained during the second surgery were examined histopathologically and by transmission electron microscopy for further pathological examination. Gingivectomy procedures have been performed every 6 months over the last 4 years. The excessive and fibrous gingival enlargements resulted in migration of the anterior teeth, but no alveolar bone loss occurred. This is the first report to demonstrate the possible changes in the gingival tissues caused by AS. It is suggested that gingival biopsy can be an initial diagnostic tool instead of renal or skin biopsies. Proper dental and periodontal care and regular visits to the dentist could provide limited gingival hyperplasia to patients with AS.

  1. Mutations in the codon for a conserved arginine-1563 in the COL4A5 collagen gene in Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J; Gregory, M C; Hertz, Jens Michael;

    1993-01-01

    for arginine to the translation stop codon TGA. In Utah kindred 2123 and in the Danish kindred A13, there was a C-->T mutation in the noncoding strand changing the same codon to CAA for glutamine. Both mutations were confirmed by allele-specific hybridization on PCR-amplified DNA from other family members....... kindreds. All three kindreds have classical Alport syndrome of the juvenile type. DNA-sequencing analyses demonstrated two different single base changes in the codon for arginine-1563 located in exon 48. In Utah kindred 2103, there was a substitution of C by T resulting in the change of the CGA codon...

  2. Mutation in the alpha 5(IV) collagen chain in juvenile-onset Alport syndrome without hearing loss or ocular lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J; Hertz, Jens Michael; Tryggvason, K

    1992-01-01

    A single base mutation was identified in the type IV collagen alpha 5 chain gene (COL4A5) of a Danish kindred with Alport syndrome. The 27-year-old male proband developed hematuria in childhood and terminal renal failure at the age of 25 years. He has no hearing loss or ocular lesions. Electron.......9-kb fragments present in control DNA but the presence of a 2.2-kb variant fragment, indicating the loss of an MspI restriction site in the 3' end of the gene. The mother had all three fragments, indicating heterozygosity. PCR amplification of exon 14 (counted from the 3' end) and subsequent denaturing...

  3. Percepção auditiva em síndrome de Alport Auditory perception in Alport’s Syndrome

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    Carla Mherlyn Viveiros

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Alport é caracterizada por comprometimentos auditivos, renal, e visual. Objetivo deste estudo é caracterizar as EOAT e a atividade do SOEM (efeito de supressão em indivíduos com Síndrome de Alport. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram avaliados dez indivíduos com diagnóstico de síndrome de Alport. Foi realizado estudo prospectivo. Foi realizado registro das EOAT na ausência e na presença de estimulação acústica contralateral com a utilização do programa de computador ILO 92 - Otodynamics. RESULTADOS: As amplitudes de resposta das EOAT foram presentes para a resposta global (A e por faixa de freqüência em 1000, 1500, 2000 e 3000 Hz, em 4 (40% dos indivíduos e ausentes em 6 (60% dos indivíduos com perda auditiva. Foram ausentes as respostas na freqüência de 4000 Hz, nas orelhas direita e esquerda. Esses achados são compatíveis com o nível de audição (em dBNA avaliados. Os indivíduos com resposta global presente em EOAT apresentaram supressão dessa resposta na presença de ruído. CONCLUSÃO: Indivíduos com síndrome de Alport apresentam resultados de EOAT compatíveis com a perda auditiva. Ocorreu o efeito de supressão, sugerindo que a perda auditiva é predominantemente originada por uma disfunção coclear.Alport’s Syndrome is characterized by the presence of renal, hearing and visual disorders. Objective: To characterize the TOAE and the MOES activity (suppression effect in individuals with Alport’s Syndrome. MATERIAL AND METHOD: This is a prospective study of a sample included ten individuals with a diagnosis of Alport’s Syndrome. MOES recording was made in the presence and absence of contralateral stimulation (CLS stimulation using the computer software ILO 92 - Otodynamics. RESULTS: TOAE was present in the global response (A and in frequency ranges of 1000, 1500, 2000 and 3000 Hz in 4 individuals (40%, and absent in 6 individuals (60% with hearing loss. We observed no responses at 4000 Hz in the right

  4. High mutation detection rate in the COL4A5 collagen gene in suspected Alport syndrome using PCR and direct DNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, P; Heiskari, N; Zhou, J;

    1998-01-01

    Approximately 85% of patients with Alport syndrome (hereditary nephritis) have been estimated to have mutations in the X chromosomal COL4A5 collagen gene; the remaining cases are autosomal with mutations in the COL4A3 or COL4A4 genes located on chromosome 2. In the present work, the promoter sequ...

  5. Failure of two subsequent renal grafts by anti-GBM glomerulonephritis in Alport's syndrome: case report and review of the literature.

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    Goldman, M; Depierreux, M; De Pauw, L; Vereerstraeten, P; Kinnaert, P; Noël, L H; Grünfeld, J P; Toussaint, C

    1990-07-01

    We describe a patient with Alport's syndrome who developed severe crescentic glomerulonephritis after each of two successive transplantations, leading to accelerated graft failure on both occasions. This complication occurred in the 7th postoperative month for the first transplant and in the immediate postoperative period for the second. Immunopathological studies of the second transplant demonstrated that the glomerular lesions were mediated by antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies displaying the same pattern of reactivity as the MCA-Pl monoclonal antibody directed against the Good-pasture antigen. This observation indicates that the anti-GBM immunization induced by renal transplantation in some patients with Alport's syndrome may be responsible for recurrent graft failure. PMID:2206225

  6. A nonsense mutation in the COL4A5 collagen gene in a family with X-linked juvenile Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Heiskari, N; Zhou, J;

    1995-01-01

    The X-linked form of Alport syndrome is associated with mutations in the COL4A5 gene encoding the alpha 5-chain of type IV collagen. By using PCR-amplification and direct sequencing we identified a novel mutation involving a deletion of the last two bases in the codon GGA for Glycine-1479 in exon...... 47 of the COL4A5 gene in a patient with a juvenile form of X-linked Alport syndrome with deafness. This two base deletion caused a shift in the reading frame and introduced a premature stop codon which resulted in an alpha 5(IV)-chain shortened by 202 residues and lacking almost the entire NC1 domain...

  7. X-Linked and Autosomal Recessive Alport Syndrome: Pathogenic Variant Features and Further Genotype-Phenotype Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savige, Judith; Storey, Helen; Il Cheong, Hae; Gyung Kang, Hee; Park, Eujin; Hilbert, Pascale; Persikov, Anton; Torres-Fernandez, Carmen; Ars, Elisabet; Torra, Roser; Hertz, Jens Michael; Thomassen, Mads; Shagam, Lev; Wang, Dongmao; Wang, Yanyan; Flinter, Frances; Nagel, Mato

    2016-01-01

    Alport syndrome results from mutations in the COL4A5 (X-linked) or COL4A3/COL4A4 (recessive) genes. This study examined 754 previously- unpublished variants in these genes from individuals referred for genetic testing in 12 accredited diagnostic laboratories worldwide, in addition to all published COL4A5, COL4A3 and COL4A4 variants in the LOVD databases. It also determined genotype-phenotype correlations for variants where clinical data were available. Individuals were referred for genetic testing where Alport syndrome was suspected clinically or on biopsy (renal failure, hearing loss, retinopathy, lamellated glomerular basement membrane), variant pathogenicity was assessed using currently-accepted criteria, and variants were examined for gene location, and age at renal failure onset. Results were compared using Fisher's exact test (DNA Stata). Altogether 754 new DNA variants were identified, an increase of 25%, predominantly in people of European background. Of the 1168 COL4A5 variants, 504 (43%) were missense mutations, 273 (23%) splicing variants, 73 (6%) nonsense mutations, 169 (14%) short deletions and 76 (7%) complex or large deletions. Only 135 of the 432 Gly residues in the collagenous sequence were substituted (31%), which means that fewer than 10% of all possible variants have been identified. Both missense and nonsense mutations in COL4A5 were not randomly distributed but more common at the 70 CpG sequences (pAla substitutions were underrepresented in all three genes (p< 0.0001) probably because of an association with a milder phenotype. The average age at end-stage renal failure was the same for all mutations in COL4A5 (24.4 ±7.8 years), COL4A3 (23.3 ± 9.3) and COL4A4 (25.4 ± 10.3) (COL4A5 and COL4A3, p = 0.45; COL4A5 and COL4A4, p = 0.55; COL4A3 and COL4A4, p = 0.41). For COL4A5, renal failure occurred sooner with non-missense than missense variants (p<0.01). For the COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes, age at renal failure occurred sooner with two non

  8. Complete amino acid sequence of the human alpha 5 (IV) collagen chain and identification of a single-base mutation in exon 23 converting glycine 521 in the collagenous domain to cysteine in an Alport syndrome patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J; Hertz, Jens Michael; Leinonen, A;

    1992-01-01

    of genomic DNA from members of a kindred with Alport syndrome revealed a new HindIII cleavage site within the coding sequence of one of the cDNA clones characterized. The proband had a new 1.25-kilobase HindIII fragment and a lack of a 1.35-kilobase fragment, and his mildly affected female cousin had both...

  9. Features of gene mutation and clinical phenotype in Alport syndrome%Alport 综合征家系的基因突变及临床表型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何威; 高春林; 夏正坤

    2016-01-01

    目的: Alport综合征( Alport syndrome,AS)是常见的遗传性肾小球疾病,且目前认为有3种遗传方式,文中分析AS家系的基因突变特征,总结临床表型特点。方法应用二代测序外显子序列捕获技术对30例确诊或疑似AS患儿的COL4A3、COL4A4、COL4A5基因进行测序,对其家系成员针对突变位点进行Sanger测序验证;并经Provean对基因突变进行蛋白功能预测。收集临床资料,并结合基因突变结果进行分析。结果30例患儿经基因测序后均可明确诊断为AS。其中常染色体隐性遗传4例,均为男性患儿;X连锁显性遗传26例,男性患儿16例,女性患儿10例。二代测序结果共检测出不同的COL4A3、COL4A4、COL4A5基因突变35个,其中包括错义突变19个、同义突变2个、剪切位点突变4个、无义突变3个、插入突变2个、缺失突变4个、复杂突变1个。通过Sanger测序对家系成员进行验证,结果发现20个突变来源于母亲、8个突变来源于父亲、8个为新生突变、1个先证者纯合基因突变分别来自父母双方、1个突变来源不详。30例患儿均以血尿和(或)蛋白尿起病,17例患儿合并阳性家族史,1例合并高频神经性耳聋,无患儿出现眼部病变及肾功能不全。23例患儿行肾穿刺活检,光镜可见肾小球微小病变为13例,系膜增生性病变10例。电镜下,仅9例表现为肾小球基膜致密层分层撕裂等AS典型改变。结论 AS以X连锁显性遗传多见,致病性突变以错义突变为主。 AS患儿病理多表现为肾小球轻微病变,电镜表现常不典型,肾外表现少见。%Objective The article was to analyze the features of gene mutation and clinical phenotype in Alport syndrome. Methods Next-generation sequencing was applied to capture the exons of COL4A3, COL4A4, COL4A5 genes in 30 cases of children with suspected or confirmed diagnosis of Alport syndrome and Sanger method

  10. Identification of microRNAs and their target genes in Alport syndrome using deep sequencing of iPSCs samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-biao CHEN; Jian-rong HUANG; Xiang-qi YU; Xiao-cong LIN; Yong DAI

    2015-01-01

      结论:在实验组与对照组之间,发现了30个具有显著差异性表达的 microRNAs,包括19个上调表达与11个下调表达。差异性表达的microRNA的靶基因主要聚集在细胞膜和细胞代谢过程;靶基因主要参与嘌呤代谢通路与丝裂原活化蛋白激酶(MAPK)通路。%MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of smal RNA molecules that are implicated in post-transcriptional reg-ulation of gene expression during development. The discovery and understanding of miRNAs has revolutionized the traditional view of gene expression. Alport syndrome (AS) is an inherited disorder of type IV col agen, which most commonly leads to glomerulonephritis and kidney failure. Patients with AS inevitably reach end-stage renal disease and require renal replacement therapy, starting in young adulthood. In this study, Solexa sequencing was used to identify and quantitatively profile smal RNAs from an AS family. We identified 30 known miRNAs that showed a sig-nificant change in expression between two individuals. Nineteen miRNAs were up-regulated and eleven were down-regulated. Forty-nine novel miRNAs showed significantly different levels of expression between two individuals. Gene target predictions for the miRNAs revealed that high ranking target genes were implicated in cell, cel part and cel ular process categories. The purine metabolism pathway and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway were enriched by the largest number of target genes. These results strengthen the notion that miRNAs and their target genes are involved in AS and the data advance our understanding of miRNA function in the patho-genesis of AS.

  11. Dados clínicos e da audição em indivíduos com Síndrome de Alport Clinical data and hearing of individuals with Alport syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Regina Abreu Alves

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A Síndrome de Alport (SA é uma desordem hereditária, caracterizada por nefropatia, muitas vezes, com perda auditiva sensorioneural e com defeitos oculares. OBJETIVO: Analisar os dados clínicos e da audição em indivíduos com SA, com ênfase na correlação entre alteração renal e perda auditiva (PA. FORMA DE ESTUDO: clínico prospectivo com coorte transversal. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODO: 37 indivíduos realizaram avaliação otorrinolaringológica e testes audiológicos. Foram considerados para a análise estatística da PA os resultados das audiometrias de tons puros. RESULTADOS: Nos 28 indivíduos que apresentavam alterações clínicas foram encontrados 46,4% de DLX e 53,6% de AD. A PA ocorreu em 46,1% dos avaliados. 12 pacientes tinham PA no exame audiométrico 11,5%, leve e 34,6%, moderada. Comparados os familiares normais aos que tinham alteração renal, todos os que apresentavam PA mostravam comprometimento renal. Em 30,8% a configuração era descendente suave em agudos e em 11,5% era plana. CONCLUSÕES: A distribuição dos padrões de herança não coincide com o descrito na literatura. A PA é um achado extra-renal freqüente. Existe associação entre acometimento renal e PA (p= 0,009. As configurações mais freqüentes foram: descendente suave em agudos e plana. Não há associação entre a PA e a idade. Não existe correlação entre PA e sexo neste grupo.Alport Syndrome (AS is a hereditary disease, characterized by nephropathy, often times with sensorineural hearing loss and ocular defects. AIM: to analyze the clinical and hearing information from individuals with AS, more specifically the correlation between renal disorder and hearing loss (HL. STUDY DESIGN: clinical prospective with cross-sectional cohort. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 37 individuals underwent otorhinolaryngological evaluation and were submitted to audiologic tests. For HL statistical analysis we considered only the results from the pure tone audiometries

  12. [Alport syndrom (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönenberg, H; Marenberg, H G

    1977-04-01

    A deaf-and-dumb patient died at the age of ten of failure of the kidneys. An uncle of the boy died at the age of 42, an aunt at the age of 16 years, both of atrophic kidneys. The mother of the proband is suffering from hard hearing on one side and recurrent episodes of pyuria. Repeated examinations in two aunts revealed slight pyuria resp. erythruria. Contrary to most reports affected members of the family showed pyuria rather than haematuria. A special inheritance could not be proved. PMID:323696

  13. Podocyturia: A Clue for the Rational Use of Amiloride in Alport Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimarchi, H; Canzonieri, R; Muryan, A; Schiel, A; Araoz, A; Paulero, M; Andrews, J; Rengel, T; Forrester, M; Lombi, F; Pomeranz, V; Iriarte, R; Zotta, E

    2016-01-01

    No specific or efficient treatment exists for Alport syndrome, an X-linked hereditary disease caused by mutations in collagen type IV, a crucial component of the glomerular basement membrane. Kidney failure is usually a major complication of the disease, and patients require renal replacement therapy early in life. Microhematuria and subsequently proteinuria are hallmarks of kidney involvement, which are due to primary basement membrane alterations that mainly cause endothelial thrombosis and podocyte contraction and ulterior irreversible detachment. Commonly drug-based approaches include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers, which are employed to reduce proteinuria and thus retard kidney disease progression and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, as any hereditary disease, it is expressed as early as in the intrauterine life, and usually an index case is helpful to detect family-related cases. As no specific treatment exists, pathophysiologically based approaches are useful. The present case illustrates the reduction rate of urinary podocyte loss and proteinuria after amiloride administration and suggests the molecular pathways involved in Alport renal disease. Finally, podocyturia rather than proteinuria should be considered as an earlier biomarker of kidney involvement and disease progression in Alport disease. PMID:26942026

  14. Podocyturia: A Clue for the Rational Use of Amiloride in Alport Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Trimarchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available No specific or efficient treatment exists for Alport syndrome, an X-linked hereditary disease caused by mutations in collagen type IV, a crucial component of the glomerular basement membrane. Kidney failure is usually a major complication of the disease, and patients require renal replacement therapy early in life. Microhematuria and subsequently proteinuria are hallmarks of kidney involvement, which are due to primary basement membrane alterations that mainly cause endothelial thrombosis and podocyte contraction and ulterior irreversible detachment. Commonly drug-based approaches include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers, which are employed to reduce proteinuria and thus retard kidney disease progression and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, as any hereditary disease, it is expressed as early as in the intrauterine life, and usually an index case is helpful to detect family-related cases. As no specific treatment exists, pathophysiologically based approaches are useful. The present case illustrates the reduction rate of urinary podocyte loss and proteinuria after amiloride administration and suggests the molecular pathways involved in Alport renal disease. Finally, podocyturia rather than proteinuria should be considered as an earlier biomarker of kidney involvement and disease progression in Alport disease.

  15. Targeted exome sequencing integrated with clinicopathological information reveals novel and rare mutations in atypical, suspected and unknown cases of Alport syndrome or proteinuria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajshekhar Chatterjee

    Full Text Available We applied customized targeted next-generation exome sequencing (NGS to determine if mutations in genes associated with renal malformations, Alport syndrome (AS or nephrotic syndrome are a potential cause of renal abnormalities in patients with equivocal or atypical presentation. We first sequenced 4,041 exons representing 292 kidney disease genes in a Caucasian woman with a history of congenital vesicoureteral reflux (VUR, recurrent urinary tract infections and hydronephrosis who presented with nephrotic range proteinuria at the age of 45. Her biopsy was remarkable for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, a potential complication of longstanding VUR. She had no family history of renal disease. Her proteinuria improved initially, however, several years later she presented with worsening proteinuria and microhematuria. NGS analysis revealed two deleterious COL4A3 mutations, one novel and the other previously reported in AS, and a novel deleterious SALL2 mutation, a gene linked to renal malformations. Pedigree analysis confirmed that COL4A3 mutations were nonallelic and compound heterozygous. The genomic results in conjunction with subsequent abnormal electron microscopy, Collagen IV minor chain immunohistochemistry and progressive sensorineural hearing loss confirmed AS. We then modified our NGS approach to enable more efficient discovery of variants associated with AS or a subset of FSGS by multiplexing targeted exome sequencing of 19 genes associated with AS or FSGS in 14 patients. Using this approach, we found novel or known COL4A3 or COL4A5 mutations in a subset of patients with clinically diagnosed or suspected AS, APOL1 variants associated with FSGS in African Americans and novel mutations in genes associated with nephrotic syndrome. These studies demonstrate the successful application of targeted capture-based exome sequencing to simultaneously evaluate genetic variations in many genes in patients with complex renal phenotypes and

  16. X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jais, J P; Knebelmann, B; Giatras, I;

    2000-01-01

    -linked transmission, were collected. Characteristics of the 401 male patients belonging to the 195 families with COL4A5 mutation are presented. All male patients were hematuric, and the rate of progression to end-stage renal failure and deafness was mutation-dependent. Large deletions, non-sense mutations, or small...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Alport syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for making one component of a protein called type IV collagen. This protein plays an important role in the ... in these genes result in abnormalities of the type IV collagen in glomeruli, which prevents the kidneys from properly ...

  18. Alport综合征患儿临床表型及基因型单中心分析%Features of clinical phenotype and genotype in Alport syndrome: a monocentric study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙蕾; 匡新宇; 郝胜; 王平; 钮小玲; 朱光华; 周君梅; 黄文彦

    2015-01-01

    目的 了解儿童Alport综合征(AS)临床表型及基因突变的特点.方法 回顾性分析2011年5月至2014年5月于上海交通大学附属儿童医院肾脏风湿科明确诊断并具有完整资料(临床、肾组织病理、基因检测结果)的AS患儿25例.采用外显子捕获-二代测序技术进行基因检测,包括COL4A3、COL4A4、COL4A5基因,并同时进行家系验证.结果 (1)25例患儿中X连锁AS(XL-AS)19例(76%),常染色体隐性遗传AS (AR-AS)6例(24%).25例患儿均以血尿和(或)蛋白尿起病,8例以上呼吸道感染为诱因.其中2例(8%)存在听力损伤,1例(4%)患儿存在眼部病变.(2)25例均行肾组织活检,光镜表现为:16例轻微病变,8例系膜增生,1例局灶节段硬化.电镜下仅2例(8%)见肾小球基底膜致密层撕裂分层等典型AS改变,另4例表现为薄基底膜病,8例系膜增生性改变,6例轻微病变,5例未见肾小球.肾组织Ⅳ型胶原α链间接免疫荧光检测中21例(84%)存在表达缺失.(3)对25例(来自23个家系)行COL4A3、COL4A4及COL4A5基因突变检查,发现突变类型24种(16种突变未见报道).其中COL4A3基因突变1种(4%),COL4A4基因突变5种(21%),COL4A5基因突变18种(75%).同时对25例患儿的直系家庭成员全部可疑致病突变进行了验证,结果发现13例突变遗传自母亲,3例遗传自父亲,2例(同胞姐妹)患儿的1种突变遗传自父亲、另一种遗传自母亲,7例为新生突变.结论 (1)AS以X连锁显性遗传为主,病理检查多表现为轻微病变或系膜增生性改变,电镜下少数患儿可表现为薄基底膜病.(2)25例患儿共检出24种COL4A3、COL4A4、COL4A5基因突变,其中16种未见报道.%Objective To analyze the clinical features and gene mutation of Chinese children with Alport syndrome (AS).Method From May 2011 to May 2014,clinical and pathological information gathered from 25 patients was retrospectively analyzed.COL4A5,COL4A4 and COL4A3 genes were analyzed using

  19. Podocyturia: A Clue for the Rational Use of Amiloride in Alport Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    H. Trimarchi; R. Canzonieri; Muryan, A.; Schiel, A.; Araoz, A.; Paulero, M.; Andrews, J; Rengel, T.; Forrester, M.; F. Lombi; V. Pomeranz; Iriarte, R.; Zotta, E.

    2016-01-01

    No specific or efficient treatment exists for Alport syndrome, an X-linked hereditary disease caused by mutations in collagen type IV, a crucial component of the glomerular basement membrane. Kidney failure is usually a major complication of the disease, and patients require renal replacement therapy early in life. Microhematuria and subsequently proteinuria are hallmarks of kidney involvement, which are due to primary basement membrane alterations that mainly cause endothelial thrombosis and...

  20. Progression of Alport Kidney Disease in Col4a3 Knock Out Mice Is Independent of Sex or Macrophage Depletion by Clodronate Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munkyung Kim

    Full Text Available Alport syndrome is a genetic disease of collagen IV (α3, 4, 5 resulting in renal failure. This study was designed to investigate sex-phenotype correlations and evaluate the contribution of macrophage infiltration to disease progression using Col4a3 knock out (Col4a3KO mice, an established genetic model of autosomal recessive Alport syndrome. No sex differences in the evolution of body mass loss, renal pathology, biomarkers of tubular damage KIM-1 and NGAL, or deterioration of kidney function were observed during the life span of Col4a3KO mice. These findings confirm that, similar to human autosomal recessive Alport syndrome, female and male Col4a3KO mice develop renal failure at the same age and with similar severity. The specific contribution of macrophage infiltration to Alport disease, one of the prominent features of the disease in human and Col4a3KO mice, remains unknown. This study shows that depletion of kidney macrophages in Col4a3KO male mice by administration of clodronate liposomes, prior to clinical onset of disease and throughout the study period, does not protect the mice from renal failure and interstitial fibrosis, nor delay disease progression. These results suggest that therapy targeting macrophage recruitment to kidney is unlikely to be effective as treatment of Alport syndrome.

  1. Nephritogenic antigen determinants in epidermal and renal basement membranes of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kashtan, C; Fish, A. J.; Kleppel, M; Yoshioka, K; Michael, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    We probed epidermal basement membranes (EBM) of acid-urea denatured skin from members of kindreds with Alport-type familial nephritis (FN) for the presence of antigens reactive with Goodpasture sera (GPS) and serum (FNS) from an Alport patient who developed anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis in a renal allograft. By immunoblotting, GPS reacted primarily with the 28,000 molecular weight (mol wt) monomer but also the 24,000 mol wt and 26,000 mol wt monomers of the noncollagenous ...

  2. Molecular diagnosis of Down ' s syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王树玉; 贾婵维; 任国庆; 马延敏; 吕巍; 丁锋; 韩健

    2003-01-01

    Objective To establish a new diagnostic method for Down ' s syndrome using polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Methods DNA extracted from five healthy individuals and five Down ' s syndrome patients was amplified in six specific tetranucleotide repeat loci on chromosome 21 using PCR. An accurate diagnosis was made by analyzing allelic distribution at each locus. Results All Down ' s syndrome patients were identified as having at least two loci with three alleles, while none of the healthy individuals had three alleles. In addition, when two alleles were identified for a particular locus in the Down ' s syndrome samples, it was more likely that the intensity ratio between the two alleles was close to 2∶ 1.Conclusion The molecular method can provide a fast, accurate, and economical alternation for the traditional cytogenetic diagnostic method for Down ' s syndrome.

  3. Molecular diagnosis of Turner's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Gicquel, C.; Cabrol, S; Schneid, H.; Girard, F; Le Bouc, Y

    1992-01-01

    Turner's syndrome is a common disorder which occurs in around 1/3000 live births in girls. Diagnostic use of polymorphic DNA markers for the X chromosome could help to reduce the number of time consuming karyotype analyses needed. The M27 beta probe maps on the X chromosome to Xcen-Xp11-22 and in 83% of female subjects detects heterozygosity with multiallelic polymorphism. In Southern blotting, a single X chromosome yields a single hybridisation band. In this study, genomic DNA was extracted ...

  4. Turcot syndrome confirmed with molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, C; Olschwang, S; Jeannin, S; Vandenbos, F; Sobol, H; Frenay, M

    2007-04-01

    Turcot syndrome is clinically characterized by the occurrence of primary brain tumor and colorectal tumor and has, in previous reports, been shown associated with germline mutations in the genes APC, MLH1, MHS6, and PMS2. To date, only few families have been documented by molecular analysis. We report two new families with Turcot syndrome to illustrate and review its characteristics and facilitate diagnosis. Molecular analysis revealed two germline mutations, one in the MLH1 gene and one in MSH2. The latter has never been describe in the literature. Personal and familial relevant anamnestic data from patients with glioma might aid in the diagnosis of genetic disorders. The subsequent molecular characterization may contribute to the appropriate care of affected patients and asymptomatic gene carriers. PMID:17389002

  5. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains…

  6. X-连锁Alport综合征的听力表现与皮肤α5(Ⅳ)胶原表达的关系%Relationship between Hearing Phenotype and Collagen Type IVα5 Chain Expression in Skin in X-linked Alport Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董程; 陈斯琦; 张焱琴; 薛俊芳; 陈丽; 王芳; 刘玉和; 丁洁

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨中国人X连锁Alport综合征患者的听力表型与皮肤组织Ⅳ型胶原α5链表达的关系。方法收集2008年8月至2013年8月期间确诊为X连锁Alport综合征的31例患者临床资料,采用纯音听阈测试或ABR+40Hz相关电位检查+声导抗+耳声发射的方式进行听力评估,并采用免疫组化染色检测皮肤组织基膜Ⅳ型胶原α5链的表达,采用Pearson相关分析方法分析二者的关系。结果31例X连锁Alport综合征中听力下降患者均表现为轻、中度感音神经性聋。听觉损害共28例(90.3%),其中22例男性中中度12例,轻度5例,轻微损害5例;女性6例,轻度3例,轻微损害3例。按皮肤Ⅳ胶原α5链染色分级,阴性17例均为男性,其中听力正常4例(3例OAE异常),听力下降13例(轻度4例,中度9例);大部阴性与可疑阳性各1例,均为男性,分别为中度和轻度;连续±2例(男性),正常和中度各1例;间断阳性3例均为女性,均为正常或轻度;连续++7例(男3,女4),其中听力正常4例,听力下降3例(2例轻度,1例中度)。染色阴性的11例听力下降患者听阈与年龄呈正相关(P=0.043,r=0.616)。结论X连锁Alport综合征患者皮肤组织Ⅳ胶原α5链的表达男性低于女性,听力表现与皮肤组织Ⅳ胶原α5链的表达有一定的关系,其中Ⅳ胶原α5链表达阴性的患者听力下降程度与年龄存在相关性,但也存在听力正常的患者,说明还有其他因素影响患者的听力。皮肤组织中Ⅳ胶原α5链表达在一定程度上能反映耳蜗基底膜中Ⅳ胶原α5链的表达和功能。%Objective To study the relationship between the expression distribution of collagen typeⅣα5 chain (α5 (Ⅳchain) within the skin and hearing phenotype in Chinese individuals with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS). Methods The clinical data of 31 cases diagnosed with XLAS between 2008 August and 2013

  7. Rett syndrome molecular diagnosis and implications in genetic counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noruzinia M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome is a rare genetic X-linked dominant disorder. This syndrome is the most frequent cause of mental retardation in girls. In the classical form of the disease, the presenting signs and the course of development are characteristic. However clinical diagnosis can be very difficult when the expression is not in the classical form. Mutations in MeCP2 are responsible for 80% of cases. When MeCP2 mutation is found in an index case, genetic counseling is similar to that in other X-linked dominant genetic diseases. However, mutations in this gene can cause a spectrum of atypical forms. On the other hand, other genetic conditions like translocations, sex chromosome numerical anomalies, and mutations in other genes can complicate genetic counseling in this syndrome. We present the first case of molecular diagnosis of Rett syndrome in Iran and discuss the recent developments in its genetic counseling.

  8. Laminin α2-mediated focal adhesion kinase activation triggers Alport glomerular pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane Delimont

    Full Text Available It has been known for some time that laminins containing α1 and α2 chains, which are normally restricted to the mesangial matrix, accumulate in the glomerular basement membranes (GBM of Alport mice, dogs, and humans. We show that laminins containing the α2 chain, but not those containing the α1 chain activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK on glomerular podocytes in vitro and in vivo. CD151-null mice, which have weakened podocyte adhesion to the GBM rendering these mice more susceptible to biomechanical strain in the glomerulus, also show progressive accumulation of α2 laminins in the GBM, and podocyte FAK activation. Analysis of glomerular mRNA from both models demonstrates significant induction of MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12, MMPs linked to GBM destruction in Alport disease models, as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. SiRNA knockdown of FAK in cultured podocytes significantly reduced expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and IL-6, but not MMP-12. Treatment of Alport mice with TAE226, a small molecule inhibitor of FAK activation, ameliorated fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, significantly reduced proteinuria and blood urea nitrogen levels, and partially restored GBM ultrastructure. Glomerular expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-12 mRNAs was significantly reduced in TAE226 treated animals. Collectively, this work identifies laminin α2-mediated FAK activation in podocytes as an important early event in Alport glomerular pathogenesis and suggests that FAK inhibitors, if safe formulations can be developed, might be employed as a novel therapeutic approach for treating Alport renal disease in its early stages.

  9. The Molecular Genetics of Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, David B

    2015-09-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sensorimotor trait defined by symptoms that interfere with sleep onset and maintenance in a clinically meaningful way. Nonvolitional myoclonus while awake and asleep is a sign of the disorder and an informative endophenotype. The genetic contributions to RLS/periodic leg movements are substantial, are among the most robust defined to date for a common disease, and account for much of the variance in disease expressivity. The disorder is polygenic, as revealed by recent genome-wide association studies. Experimental studies are revealing mechanistic details of how these common variants might influence RLS expressivity.

  10. Olmsted syndrome: clinical, molecular and therapeutic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchatelet, Sabine; Hovnanian, Alain

    2015-03-17

    Olmsted syndrome (OS) is a rare genodermatosis classically characterized by the combination of bilateral mutilating transgredient palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) and periorificial keratotic plaques, but which shows considerable clinical heterogeneity. The disease starts usually at birth or in early childhood. About 73 cases have been reported worldwide. OS is observed in both sexes, although male cases are more frequent. The most suggestive symptoms associate PPK with pseudoainhum and periorificial keratotic plaques. Frequently associated features include hair and nail abnormalities, leukokeratosis, corneal default and recurrent infections. Pain and itching are variable but can be severe. Most of reported OS cases are sporadic, although familial cases with different mode of inheritance were also described. Mutations in TRPV3 (Transient receptor potential vanilloid-3) gene have recently been identified as a cause of autosomal dominant (gain-of-function mutations) or recessive OS. Mutations in MBTPS2 (membrane-bound transcription factor protease, site 2) gene were identified in a recessive X-linked form. The diagnosis relies mainly on clinical features associating severe PPK and periorificial keratotic plaques, but can be challenging in patients with incomplete phenotype or atypical features. OS has to be differentiated from other severe forms of PPK including Vohwinkel, Clouston, Papillon-Lefèvre or Haim-Munk syndromes, Mal de Meleda, pachyonychia congenita, Tyrosinemia type II and acrodermatitis enteropathica. When differential diagnoses are difficult to exclude, genetic studies are essential to search for a TRPV3 or MBTPS2 mutation. However, additional genes remain to be identified. No specific and satisfactory therapy is currently available for OS. Current treatments of hyperkeratosis (mainly emollients, keratolytics, retinoids or corticosteroids), either topical or systemic, are symptomatic and offer only temporary partial relief. Specific management of pain and

  11. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F.; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A.; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNA...

  12. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms in childhood irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Shulman, Robert J

    2016-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects a large number of children throughout the world. The symptom expression of IBS is heterogeneous, and several factors which may be interrelated within the IBS biopsychosocial model play a role. These factors include visceral hyperalgesia, intestinal permeability, gut microbiota, psychosocial distress, gut inflammation, bile acids, food intolerance, colonic bacterial fermentation, and genetics. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of these factors are being actively investigated. In this mini-review, we present updates of these mechanisms and, where possible, relate the findings to childhood IBS. Mechanistic elucidation may lead to the identification of biomarkers as well as personalized childhood IBS therapies. PMID:26883355

  13. Cytogenetic and molecular findings in patients with Turner's syndrome stigmata.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuznetzova, T; Baranov, A; Schwed, N; Ivaschenko, T; Malet, P; Giollant, M.; Savitsky, G A; Baranov, V.

    1995-01-01

    Cytogenetic and DNA analysis in 12 people with stigmata of Turner's syndrome was carried out. Cytogenetic analysis of these patients showed two subjects with 46,X, i(Xq) karyotypes, one with 45,X/46,X, i(Xq), one with 46,X,t(X;Y), and eight with 45,X/46,X,mar. Molecular analysis of DNA samples was performed in nine out of 12 patients with marker chromosomes. PCR analysis with oligoprimers specific for SRY, DYZ1, or DYZ3 loci identified Y chromosome material in five patients in the latter grou...

  14. Molecular and clinical study of 61 Angelman syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Shinji; Harada, Naoki; Jinno, Yoshihiro; Niikawa, Norio [Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Imaizumi, Kiyoshi; Kuroki, Yoshikazu; Fukushima; Yoshimitsu; Sugimoto, Tateo; Renedo, Monica

    1994-08-15

    We analyzed 61 Angelman syndrome (AS) patients by cytogenetic and molecular techniques. On the basis of molecular findings, the patients were classified into the following 4 groups: familial cases without deletion, familial cases with submicroscopic deletion, sporadic cases with deletion, and sporadic cases without deletion. Among 53 sporadic cases, 37 (70%) had molecular deletion, which commonly extended from D15S9 to D15S12, although not all deletions were identical. Of 8 familial cases, 3 sibs from one family had a molecular deletion involving only 2 loci, D15S10 and GABRB3, which define the critical region for AS phenotypes. The parental origin of deletion, both in sporadic and familial cases, was exclusively maternal and consistent with a genomic imprinting hypothesis. Among sporadic and familial cases without deletion, no uniparental disomy was found and most of them were shown to inherit chromosomes 15 from both parents (biparental inheritance). A discrepancy between cytogenetic and molecular deletion was observed in 14 (26%) of 53 patients in whom cytogenetic analysis could be performed. Ten (43%) of 23 patients with a normal karyotype showed a molecular deletion, and 4 (13%) of 30 patients with cytogenetic deletion, del(15) (q11q13), showed no molecular deletion. Most clinical manifestations, including neurological signs and facial characteristics, were not distinct in each group except for hypopigmentation of skin or hair. Familial cases with submicroscopic deletion were not associated with hypopigmentation. These findings suggested that a gene for hypopigmentation is located outside the critical region of AS and is not imprinted. 37 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Fishing the Molecular Bases of Treacher Collins Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Andrea M. J.; Scampoli, Nadia L.; Calcaterra, Nora B.

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, and mutations in the TCOF1 gene are responsible for over 90% of TCS cases. The knowledge about the molecular mechanisms responsible for this syndrome is relatively scant, probably due to the difficulty of reproducing the pathology in experimental animals. Zebrafish is an emerging model for human disease studies, and we therefore assessed it as a model for studying TCS. We identified in silico the putative zebrafish TCOF1 ortholog and cloned the corresponding cDNA. The derived polypeptide shares the main structural domains found in mammals and amphibians. Tcof1 expression is restricted to the anterior-most regions of zebrafish developing embryos, similar to what happens in mouse embryos. Tcof1 loss-of-function resulted in fish showing phenotypes similar to those observed in TCS patients, and enabled a further characterization of the mechanisms underlying craniofacial malformation. Besides, we initiated the identification of potential molecular targets of treacle in zebrafish. We found that Tcof1 loss-of-function led to a decrease in the expression of cellular proliferation and craniofacial development. Together, results presented here strongly suggest that it is possible to achieve fish with TCS-like phenotype by knocking down the expression of the TCOF1 ortholog in zebrafish. This experimental condition may facilitate the study of the disease etiology during embryonic development. PMID:22295061

  16. Fishing the molecular bases of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Andrea M J; Scampoli, Nadia L; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, and mutations in the TCOF1 gene are responsible for over 90% of TCS cases. The knowledge about the molecular mechanisms responsible for this syndrome is relatively scant, probably due to the difficulty of reproducing the pathology in experimental animals. Zebrafish is an emerging model for human disease studies, and we therefore assessed it as a model for studying TCS. We identified in silico the putative zebrafish TCOF1 ortholog and cloned the corresponding cDNA. The derived polypeptide shares the main structural domains found in mammals and amphibians. Tcof1 expression is restricted to the anterior-most regions of zebrafish developing embryos, similar to what happens in mouse embryos. Tcof1 loss-of-function resulted in fish showing phenotypes similar to those observed in TCS patients, and enabled a further characterization of the mechanisms underlying craniofacial malformation. Besides, we initiated the identification of potential molecular targets of treacle in zebrafish. We found that Tcof1 loss-of-function led to a decrease in the expression of cellular proliferation and craniofacial development. Together, results presented here strongly suggest that it is possible to achieve fish with TCS-like phenotype by knocking down the expression of the TCOF1 ortholog in zebrafish. This experimental condition may facilitate the study of the disease etiology during embryonic development.

  17. Fishing the molecular bases of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M J Weiner

    Full Text Available Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, and mutations in the TCOF1 gene are responsible for over 90% of TCS cases. The knowledge about the molecular mechanisms responsible for this syndrome is relatively scant, probably due to the difficulty of reproducing the pathology in experimental animals. Zebrafish is an emerging model for human disease studies, and we therefore assessed it as a model for studying TCS. We identified in silico the putative zebrafish TCOF1 ortholog and cloned the corresponding cDNA. The derived polypeptide shares the main structural domains found in mammals and amphibians. Tcof1 expression is restricted to the anterior-most regions of zebrafish developing embryos, similar to what happens in mouse embryos. Tcof1 loss-of-function resulted in fish showing phenotypes similar to those observed in TCS patients, and enabled a further characterization of the mechanisms underlying craniofacial malformation. Besides, we initiated the identification of potential molecular targets of treacle in zebrafish. We found that Tcof1 loss-of-function led to a decrease in the expression of cellular proliferation and craniofacial development. Together, results presented here strongly suggest that it is possible to achieve fish with TCS-like phenotype by knocking down the expression of the TCOF1 ortholog in zebrafish. This experimental condition may facilitate the study of the disease etiology during embryonic development.

  18. Serrated polyposis syndrome: Molecular, pathological and clinical aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carla Guarinos; Cristina Sánchez-Fortún; María Rodríguez-Soler; Cristina Alenda; Artemio Payá; Rodrigo Jover

    2012-01-01

    Hyperplastic polyps have traditionally been considered not to have malignant potential.New pathological classification of serrated polyps and recent discoveries about the serrated pathway of carcinogenesis have revolutionized the concepts and revitalized the research in this area.Until recently,it has been thought that most colorectal cancers arise from conventional adenomas via the traditional tumor suppressor pathway initiated by a mutation of the APC gene,but it has been found that this pathway accounts for only approximately 70%-80%of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases.The majority of the remaining colorectal cancer cases follow an alternative pathway leading to CpG island methylator phenotype carcinoma with BRAF mutation and with or without microsatellite instability.The mechanism of carcinomas arising from this alternative pathway seems to begin with an activating mutation of the BRAF oncogene.Serrated polyposis syndrome is a relatively rare condition characterized by multiple and/or large serrated polyps of the colon.Clinical characteristics,etiology and relationship of serrated polyposis syndrome to CRC have not been clarified yet.Patients with this syndrome show a high risk of CRC and both sporadic and hereditary cases have been described.Clinical criteria have been used for diagnosis and frequent colonoscopy surveillance should be performed in order to prevent colorectal cancer.In this review,we try to gather new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of serrated polyps in order to understand their possible clinical implications and to make an approach to the management of this syndrome.

  19. Molecular Characterization of Peroxisome Biogenesis Disorders with Zellweger Syndrome Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nassiri

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome biogenesis disorders, Zellweger syndrome spectrum (PBD, ZSS are constituted of three different phenotypically disorders: Zellweger syndrome (ZS, the most severe; neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD; and infantile refsum disease (IRD, the least severe, that have been originally described based on their biochemical and molecular bases of these disorders which had been fully determined. Individuals with PBD, ZSS usually come to clinical attention in the newborn period or later in childhood. The diagnosis of PBD, ZSS can be definitively determined by biochemical assays. Measurement of plasma very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA levels is the most commonly used and most informative initial screen. Mutations in thirteen different PEX genes - those that encode peroxins, the proteins required for normal peroxisome assembly - have been identified in PBD, ZSS. Mutations in PEX1, the most common cause of PBD, ZSS, are observed in about 68% of affected individuals. Sequence analysis is available clinically for the following seven genes: PEX1, PXMP3 (PEX2, PRXR1 (PEX5, PEX6, PEX10, PEX12, and PEX26.

  20. Comparative molecular approaches in Prader-Willi syndrome diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botezatu, Anca; Puiu, Maria; Cucu, Natalia; Diaconu, Carmen C; Badiu, C; Arsene, C; Iancu, Iulia V; Plesa, Adriana; Anton, Gabriela

    2016-01-10

    Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes are two distinct neurogenetic disorders caused by chromosomal deletions, uniparental disomy or loss of the imprinted gene expression in the 15q11-q13 region. PWS results from the lack of the paternally expressed gene contribution in the region. The aim of our study was to compare a new molecular approach based on the quantification of the expression of non-imprinted bi-allelic gene (NIPA1 and OCA2) with in house MS-PCR and the MS-MLPA test. Blood samples were collected from 12 patients, clinical criteria positives for Prader-Willi syndrome. DNA and RNA samples were isolated from white blood cells. Epigenetic changes at SNRPN gene locus were evaluated by MS-PCR technique. The expression levels of two non-imprinted genes (NIPA1 and OCA2) were evaluated in qReal-Time PCR, in order to identify type 1 and type 2 deletions. SALSA MS-MLPA kit ME028 was used to detect copy number changes and to analyze CpG islands methylation of the 15q11 region. MS-MLPA test confirmed that 8/12 patients presented different types of deletion at the SNRPN gene level (promoter, introns, and exons) and 4/8 displayed type 1 or type 2 deletion. In children with 15q11-13 deletions, the decreased level of NIPA1and OCA2 gene expression is related to chromosomal abnormality in the investigated area. The deletions were confirmed by MS-MLPA analysis, thus recommending NIPA1 and OCA2 gene expression as an alternate method to investigate deletions. PMID:26335514

  1. Identification by molecular diagnosis of mosaic Turner's syndrome in an obligate carrier female for fragile X syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Tejada, M. I.; Mornet, E; Tizzano, E.; Molina, M.; Baiget, M; Boue, A

    1994-01-01

    A case of mosaic Turner's syndrome with a 45,X/46,XX/47,XXX karyotype, who was also a fragile X obligate carrier as the mother of an affected boy, was identified by molecular diagnosis. Complete haplotyping and direct DNA analysis showed that the X chromosome in all metaphases was the normal X. At the age of 57, she is mentally normal. Her external appearance was typical of Turner's syndrome. This report shows that molecular studies in conjunction with cytogenetic analysis can help in the cli...

  2. Tcof1-Related Molecular Networks in Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiewen; Si, Jiawen; Wang, Minjiao; Huang, Li; Fang, Bing; Shi, Jun; Wang, Xudong; Shen, Guofang

    2016-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a rare, autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by craniofacial deformities, and is primarily caused by mutations in the Tcof1 gene. This article was aimed to perform a comprehensive literature review and systematic bioinformatic analysis of Tcof1-related molecular networks in TCS. First, the up- and down-regulated genes in Tcof1 heterozygous haploinsufficient mutant mice embryos and Tcof1 knockdown and Tcof1 over-expressed neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells were obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. The GeneDecks database was used to calculate the 500 genes most closely related to Tcof1. Then, the relationships between 4 gene sets (a predicted set and sets comparing the wildtype with the 3 Gene Expression Omnibus datasets) were analyzed using the DAVID, GeneMANIA and STRING databases. The analysis results showed that the Tcof1-related genes were enriched in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, differentiation, and migration. They were also enriched in several signaling pathways, such as the ribosome, p53, cell cycle, and WNT signaling pathways. Additionally, these genes clearly had direct or indirect interactions with Tcof1 and between each other. Literature review and bioinformatic analysis finds imply that special attention should be given to these pathways, as they may offer target points for TCS therapies.

  3. Cytogenetic and molecular studies of down syndrome individual with leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, J.J.; Hassold, T.J. [Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Williams, B.J. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Zupursky, A.; Doyle, J. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada); Sherman, S.L. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jacobs, P.A. [Salisbury District Hospital (United Kingdom); Shugar, A.L.; Soukup, S.W. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-04-01

    There is an increased risk of leukemia in Down syndrome (DS) patients, with estimates ranging from 14 to 30 times the incidence rate observed for chromosomally normal children. Furthermore, one type of leukemia, called {open_quotes}transient leukemia{close_quotes} (TL), occurs almost exclusively in DS infants. The basis of the association between DS and leukemia is unknown, but we and others have hypothesized that it may be influenced by the mechanism of origin of the extra chromosome. Therefore, we initiated a cytogenetic and molecular study of nondisjunction in leukemic DS individuals. To date, we have obtained blood and/or tissue samples from 55 individuals consisting of 17 cases with TL, 7 cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia subtype M7 (ANLL-M7, or acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, postulated to be related to TL), and 31 cases of other forms of leukemia. Analysis of these cases suggests differences between DS children with TL and those with other types of leukemia or DS individuals with no history of leukemia. Specifically, the TL and ANLL-M7 cases have a highly significant increase in the frequency of {open_quotes}atypical{close_quotes} constitutional karyotypes (i.e., mosaic trisomies, rings, and/or isochromosomes) and are almost always male. Additionally, genetic mapping studies suggest an increase in the frequency of disomic homozygosity, especially in proximal 21q, in DS individuals with TL and ANLL-M7. 19 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Angelman syndrome: review of clinical and molecular aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bird LM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lynne M Bird1Department of Pediatrics, University of California, Division of Genetics, Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, California, USAAbstract: “Angelman syndrome” (AS is a neurodevelopmental disorder whose main features are intellectual disability, lack of speech, seizures, and a characteristic behavioral profile. The behavioral features of AS include a happy demeanor, easily provoked laughter, short attention span, hypermotoric behavior, mouthing of objects, sleep disturbance, and an affinity for water. Microcephaly and subtle dysmorphic features, as well as ataxia and other movement disturbances, are additional features seen in most affected individuals. AS is due to deficient expression of the ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A gene, which displays paternal imprinting. There are four molecular classes of AS, and some genotype–phenotype correlations have emerged. Much remains to be understood regarding how insufficiency of E6-AP, the protein product of UBE3A, results in the observed neurodevelopmental deficits. Studies of mouse models of AS have implicated UBE3A in experience-dependent synaptic remodeling.Keywords: Angelman syndrome, chromosome 15q11-13, UBE3A, imprinting

  5. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A; Brunner, Han G; Burke, Christopher J; Carr, Ian M; Carvalho, Daniel R; Chandler, Kate E; Christen, Hans-Jurgen; Corry, Peter C; Cowan, Frances M; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; De Laet, Corinne; De Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G M; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J; Guet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C J; Hayward, Bruce E; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D; Kingston, Helen M; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Kornberg, Andrew J; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J; Livingston, John H; Lourenco, Charles M; Lyall, E G Hermione; Lynch, Sally A; Lyons, Michael J; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B; Mewasingh, Leena D; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K; Ostergaard, John R; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Burgi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A; Corcoles, C Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B P; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy N A; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S H; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L; Willemsen, Michel A A; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J

    2007-10-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation-positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified.

  6. Usher syndrome: molecular links of pathogenesis, proteins and pathways.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, H.; Wijk, E. van; Marker, T.; Wolfrum, U.; Roepman, R.

    2006-01-01

    Usher syndrome is the most common form of deaf-blindness. The syndrome is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, and to date, eight causative genes have been identified. The proteins encoded by these genes are part of a dynamic protein complex that is present in hair cells of the inner ear a

  7. Alport familial nephritis. Absence of 28 kilodalton non-collagenous monomers of type IV collagen in glomerular basement membrane.

    OpenAIRE

    Kleppel, M M; Kashtan, C. E.; Butkowski, R J; Fish, A. J.; Michael, A. F.

    1987-01-01

    Alport-type familial nephritis (FN), a genetic disorder, results in progressive renal insufficiency and sensorineural hearing loss. Immunochemical and biochemical analyses of the non-collagenous (NC1) domain of type IV collagen isolated from the glomerular basement membranes (GBM) of three males with this disease demonstrate absence of the normally occurring 28-kilodalton (kD) NC1 monomers, but persistence of the 26- and 24-kD monomeric subunits derived from alpha 1 and 2 (both type IV) colla...

  8. Fragile X syndrome. Molecular and clinical insights and treatment issues.

    OpenAIRE

    Hagerman, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited cause of mental retardation that is known. The prevalence of mental retardation from this syndrome ranges from 1 in 1,250 to 1 in 4,000 in the general population, although the prevalence of female carriers has been reported to be as high as 1 in 259. The discovery of the FMR1 gene mutation in 1991 has simplified diagnosis, enhanced our understanding of the spectrum of involvement in the fragile X syndrome, and stimulated research regarding t...

  9. Molecular analysis for diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and Marfan-associated disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ling-gen; YAO Xiu-ping; ZHANG Lin; HUI Ru-tai; ZHOU Xian-liang

    2011-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a systemic disorder of connective tissue, caused by mutations in the FBN1, TGFBR1 or TGFBR2 genes. This syndrome is characterized by involvement of three major systems, skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular. The continuing improvements in molecular biology and increasing availability of molecular diagnosis in clinical practice allow recognition of Marfan syndrome in patients with incomplete phenotypes. Additionally, molecular analyses could also be used for preimplantation genetic diagnosis. The identification of a mutation allows for early diagnosis, prognosis, genetic counseling, preventive management of carriers and reassurance for unaffected relatives. The importance of knowing in advance the location of the putative family mutation is highlighted by its straightforward application to prenatal and postnatal screening.

  10. Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome: Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, E.A.; Grillo, A.; Ferrero, G.B.; Baldini, A.; Ballabio, A.; Zoghbi, H.Y.; Roth, E.J. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Magenis, E.; Grompe, M. [Oregon Health Science Univ., Portland, OR (United States); Hulten, M. [East Birmingham Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-01-15

    The microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome (MIM309801) is a severe developmental disorder observed in XX individuals with distal Xp segmental monosomy. The phenotype of this syndrome overlaps with that of both Aicardi (MIM 305050) and Goltz (MIM 305600) syndromes, two X-linked dominant, male-lethal disorders. Here the authors report the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization of 3 patients with this syndrome. Two of these patients are females with a terminal Xpter-p22.2 deletion. One of these 2 patients had an aborted fetus with anencephaly and the same chromosome abnormality. The third patient is an XX male with Xp/Yp exchange spanning the SRY gene which results in distal Xp monosomy. The extensive clinical variability observed in these patients and the results of the molecular analysis suggest that X-inactivation plays an important role in determining the phenotype of the MLS syndrome. The authors propose that the MLS, Aicardi, and Goltz syndromes are due to the involvement of the same gene(s), and that different patterns of X-inactivation are responsible for the phenotypic differences observed in these 3 disorders. However, they cannot rule out that each component of the MLS phenotype is caused by deletion of a different gene (a contiguous gene syndrome). 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Churg-Strauss vasculitis and idiopathic hypereosinophyl syndrome: role of molecular biology in the differential diagnosis of hypereosinophyl syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. d'Ascanio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hypereosinophilic syndromes are a heterogeneous group of uncommon disorders characterized by the presence of marked peripheral blood eosinophilia, tissue eosinophilia, or both, resulting in a wide variety of clinical manifestations, often without an identifiable cause. Churg-Strauss syndrome is a systemic vasculitis characterized by prominent peripheral eosinophilia, asthma and systemic involvement. The presence of mild to severe eosinophilia and systemic involvement raise the search of many trigger factor that need to be ruled out. Distinguishing CSS from idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome may be particularly challenging, especially in ANCA negative patients. Methods: The aim of the present study was to present a small case series of patients referred to a Rheumatology Unit for mild to severe eosinophilia and signs and symptoms of systemic involvement and to outline the clinical significance of molecular biology in the work-up of hypereosinophilia. Results: Eleven patients with moderate to severe peripheral eosinophylia, were referred to our Unit from 1996 to 2007. Female to male ratio was 7/4, mean age 40.54 (range 22-75. Three out of eleven patients resulted positive for molecular biology. The diagnosis of idiopathic hypereosinophylia was confirmed in one out of three on the basis of the clinical picture and bone marrow biopsy. Conclusions: Molecular biology may be useful in the screening and in the follow-up of a new hypereosinophylic patient.

  12. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F.; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A.; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S.; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M.; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T.; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A.; Brunner, Han G.; Burke, Christopher J.; Carr, Ian M.; Carvalho, Daniel R.; Chandler, Kate E.; Christen, Hans-Juergen; Corry, Peter C.; Cowan, Frances M.; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; De laet, Corinne; De Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D.; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G. M.; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J.; Gueet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Hayward, Bruce E.; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P.; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G.; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D.; Kingston, Helen M.; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Kornberg, Andrew J.; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J.; Livingston, John H.; Lourenco, Charles M.; Lyall, E. G. Hermione; Lynch, Sally A.; Lyons, Michael J.; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P.; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B.; Mewasingh, Leena D.; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K.; Ostergaard, John R.; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R. Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M.; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Buergi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A.; Corcoles, C. Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P.; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B. P.; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L.; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy N. A.; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L.; Willemsen, Michel A. A.; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J.

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-> 5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease comple

  13. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha;

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease com...

  14. Síndrome de Alport: reporte de caso y revisión

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto Urrego-Díaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de una paciente de 4 años de edad, con hermano gemelo dicigoto asintomático, hija de padres no consanguíneos y sin antecedentes familiares de enfermedad renal. Inicia su cuadro clínico con edemas y proteinuria severa como manifestación de un síndrome nefrótico primario de cambios mínimos; este se diagnosticó por biopsia renal y, en un principio, se manejó con esteroides. Su evolución no fue adecuada debido a múltiples recaídas que la clasificaron como síndrome nefrótico corticorresistente. Por ello, se requirió un cambio en su tratamiento y una segunda biopsia renal, cuyo resultado histológico sorprendió al grupo médico tratante porque los cambios en la membrana basal glomerular confirmaban que se trataba de un Síndrome de Alport.

  15. Molecular and Genetic Basis of Inherited Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Gigante

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotic syndrome is an heterogeneous disease characterized by increased permeability of the glomerular filtration barrier for macromolecules. Podocytes, the visceral epithelial cells of glomerulus, play critical role in ultrafiltration of plasma and are involved in a wide number of inherited and acquired glomerular diseases. The identification of mutations in nephrin and other podocyte genes as causes of genetic forms of nephrotic syndrome has revealed new important aspects of the pathogenesis of proteinuric kidney diseases and expanded our knowledge of the glomerular biology. Moreover, a novel concept of a highly dynamic slit diaphragm proteins is emerging. The most significant discoveries in our understanding of the structure and function of the glomerular filtration barrier are reviewed in this paper.

  16. [Molecular genetic studies of mitochondrial ornithine transporter deficiency (HHH syndrome)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, S; Miyamoto, T; Kanazawa, N

    2001-11-01

    Mitochondrial ornithine transporter deficiency has been called HHH syndrome, because this disorder is characterized by three biochemical abnormalities; hyperornithinemia, hyperammonemia, and homocitrullinuria, and presents with various neurological symptoms; mental retardation, spastic paraparesis with pyramidal signs, cerebellar ataxia and episodic disturbance of consciousness or coma due to hyperammonemia. We identified four mutations in the mitochondrial ornithine transporter gene (ORNT1) of Japanese patients with HHH syndrome. These include a nonsense mutation (R179X), associated with exon skipping, missense mutations (G27E, P126R), and an insertion of AAC between codons 228 and 229, leading to an insertion of amino acid Asn. Especially, R179X was detected 4 of 7 Japanese patients (8 of 14 alleles), implying that this is a common mutation in Japanese population.

  17. Molecular characterization of Blau syndrome: Genetic linkage to chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromp, G.; Duivaniemi, H.; Christiano, A. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Blau syndrome is an autosomal, dominantly-inherited disease characterized by multi-organ, tissue-specific inflammation. Its clinical phenotype includes granulomatous uveitis, arthritis and skin rash. The syndrome is unique in that it is the sole human model for a variety of multi-system inflammatory diseases that afflict a significant percentage of the population. Karyotypic analysis of the large, three generation kindred whose disease originally characterized the syndrome was unremarkable. Following exclusion of a number of extracellular matrix candidates genes, a genome-wide search was undertaken of the Blau susceptibility locus. Fifty-seven members of the family were genotyped for about 200 highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers. Linkage analysis was performed using the LINKAGE package of programs under a model of dominant inheritance with reduced penetrance. Five liability classes were used to specify penetrances and phenocopy rates for those affected the arthritis, uveitis, skin rash and combinations thererof. In addition, five age-dependent penetrance classes were used for unaffected individuals. The marker D16S298 gave a maximum lod score of 3.6 at {theta} = 0.05 with two-point analysis. Lod scores for flanking markers were consistent. These data provide convincing evidence that the Blau susceptibility locus is situated within the 16p12-q21 interval. Fine mapping of the candidate interval with additional families exhibiting the Blau phenotype, as well as with more polymorphic markers, is underway.

  18. Cytogenetic and Molecular Investigation in Children with Possible Fragile X Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Ozer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Fragile X syndrome (FXS is the most common cause of inherited mental retardation and is due to a mutation in the X-linked FMR1 gene. Molecular genetic testing and chromosome analysis are indicated for this disorder. In this context, we tried to determine the frequency of the FXS, and other chro¬mosomal abnormalities of Turkish pediatric neurology outpatients. Materials and Methods: Cytogenetic and molecular screenings were performed to esti-mate the prevalence of the fragile X in 107 patients with mental retardation, language disorders, hyperactivity, develop¬mental delay or fragile X syndrome phenotype. Only 26 out of 107 patients were screened, molecularly. Results: Cytogenetically fragile X-positive cells was found in 8 cases (7.5% of 107 patients; in 4.7% of males and in 2.8% of females. The autosomal fragile sites (FS was found in 14 (13.1% cases. One (0.9% patient had pericentric inversion of chromosome 9. Molecular analysis were performed for 26 patients and all patients showed normal CGG expansion. Conclusion: In diagnosis of fragile X syndrome, chromosome analysis must be run in conjunction with the molecular studies. It is recommended that all members of the fragile X family under risk should be screened both by cytogenetic and molecular methods. Genetic counseling can be useful to patients and families considering genetic testing. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(2.000: 76-83

  19. Shigatoxin-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome: current molecular mechanisms and future therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keir LS

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay S Keir,1 Stephen D Marks,2 Jon Jin Kim21Academic Renal Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol; 2Department of Paediatric Nephrology, Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United KingdomAbstract: Hemolytic uremic syndrome is the leading cause of acute kidney injury in childhood. Ninety percent of cases are secondary to gastrointestinal infection with shigatoxin-producing bacteria. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of shigatoxin leading to hemolytic uremic syndrome and the emerging role of the complement system and vascular endothelial growth factor in its pathogenesis. We also review the evidence for treatment options to date, in particular antibiotics, plasma exchange, and immunoadsorption, and link this to the molecular pathology. Finally, we discuss future avenues of treatment, including shigatoxin-binding agents and complement inhibitors, such as eculizumab.Keywords: hemolytic uremic syndrome, shigatoxin, diarrhea, Escherichia coli, complement, alternative pathway, eculizumab

  20. Clinical and molecular delineation of the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolen, D.A.; Sharp, A.J.; Hurst, J.A.; Firth, H.V.; Knight, S.J.; Goldenberg, A.; Saugier-Veber, P.; Pfundt, R.P.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Destree, A.; Grisart, B.; Rooms, L.; Aa, N. van der; Field, M.; Hackett, A.; Bell, K.; Nowaczyk, M.J.; Mancini, G.M.; Poddighe, P.J.; Schwartz, C.E.; Rossi, E.; Gregori, M. de; Antonacci-Fulton, L.L.; McLellan, MD2nd; Garrett, J.M.; Wiechert, M.A.; Miner, T.L.; Crosby, S.; Ciccone, R.; Willatt, L.; Rauch, A.; Zenker, M.; Aradhya, S.; Manning, M.A.; Strom, T.M.; Wagenstaller, J.; Krepischi-Santos, A.C.; Vianna-Morgante, A.M.; Rosenberg, C.; Price, S.M.; Stewart, H.; Shaw-Smith, C.; Brunner, H.G.; Wilkie, A.O.; Veltman, J.A.; Zuffardi, O.; Eichler, E.E.; Vries, L.B.A. de

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The chromosome 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome is a novel genomic disorder that has originally been identified using high resolution genome analyses in patients with unexplained mental retardation. AIM: We report the molecular and/or clinical characterisation of 22 individuals with the 1

  1. 22q13.3 Deletion Syndrome : Clinical and Molecular Analysis Using Array CGH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhar, S. U.; del Gaudio, D.; German, J. R.; Peters, S. U.; Ou, Z.; Bader, P. I.; Berg, J. S.; Blazo, M.; Brown, C. W.; Graham, B. H.; Grebe, T. A.; Lalani, S.; Irons, M.; Sparagana, S.; Williams, M.; Phillips, J. A.; Beaudet, A. L.; Stankiewicz, P.; Patel, A.; Cheung, S. W.; Sahoo, T.

    2010-01-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion syndrome results from loss of terminal segments of varying sizes at 22qter. Few genotype phenotype correlations have been found but all patients have mental retardation and severe delay, or absence of, expressive speech. We carried out clinical and molecular characterization of

  2. Malignant Tregs express low molecular splice forms of FOXP3 in Sézary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsgaard, T; Gjerdrum, L M; Ralfkiaer, E;

    2008-01-01

    Sézary syndrome (SS) is an aggressive variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. During disease progression, immunodeficiency develops; however, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we study the regulatory T cell (Treg) function and the expression of FOXP3...

  3. A further case of a Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype in a patient with Angelman syndrome molecular defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Molfetta Greice Andreotti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Angelman syndrome (AS and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS are distinct human neurogenetic disorders; however, a clinical overlap between AS and PWS has been identified. We report on a further case of a patient showing the PWS phenotype with the AS molecular defect. Despite the PWS phenotype, the DNA methylation analysis of SNRPN revealed an AS pattern. Cytogenetic and FISH analysis showed normal chromosomes 15 and microsatellite analysis showed heterozygous loci inside and outside the 15q11-13 region. The presence of these atypical cases could be more frequent than previously expected and we reinforce that the DNA methylation analysis is important for the correct diagnosis of severe mental deficiency, congenital hypotonia and obesity.

  4. Apert and Crouzon syndromes-Cognitive development, brain abnormalities, and molecular aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Marilyse B L; Maximino, Luciana P; Perosa, Gimol B; Abramides, Dagma V M; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Yacubian-Fernandes, Adriano

    2016-06-01

    Apert and Crouzon are the most common craniosynostosis syndromes associated with mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene. We conducted a study to examine the molecular biology, brain abnormalities, and cognitive development of individuals with these syndromes. A retrospective longitudinal review of 14 patients with Apert and Crouzon syndromes seen at the outpatient Craniofacial Surgery Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies in Brazil from January 1999 through August 2010 was performed. Patients between 11 and 36 years of age (mean 18.29 ± 5.80), received cognitive evaluations, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular DNA analyses. Eight patients with Apert syndrome (AS) had full scale intelligence quotients (FSIQs) that ranged from 47 to 108 (mean 76.9 ± 20.2), and structural brain abnormalities were identified in five of eight patients. Six patients presented with a gain-of-function mutation (p.Ser252Trp) in FGFR2 and FSIQs in those patients ranged from 47 to78 (mean 67.2 ± 10.7). One patient with a gain-of-function mutation (p.Pro253Arg) had a FSIQ of 108 and another patient with an atypical splice mutation (940-2A →G) had a FSIQ of 104. Six patients with Crouzon syndrome had with mutations in exons IIIa and IIIc of FGFR2 and their FSIQs ranged from 82 to 102 (mean 93.5 ± 6.7). These reveal that molecular aspects are another factor that can be considered in studies of global and cognitive development of patients with Apert and Crouzon syndrome (CS). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27028366

  5. The RASopathies as an example of RAS/MAPK pathway disturbances - clinical presentation and molecular pathogenesis of selected syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezniakow, Natalia; Gos, Monika; Obersztyn, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    The RASopathies are a class of developmental syndromes. Each of them exhibits distinctive phenotypic features, although there are numerous overlapping clinical manifestations that include: dysmorphic craniofacial features, congenital cardiac defects, skin abnormalities, varying degrees of intellectual disability and increased risk of malignancies. These disorders include: Noonan syndrome, Costello syndrome, LEOPARD syndrome, cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFC), capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome (CM-AVM), Legius syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The RASopathies are associated with the presence of germline mutation in genes encoding specific proteins of the RAS/mitogen - activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic and postnatal development. In this review, we present the clinical and molecular features of selected syndromes from the RASopathies group.

  6. Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular diagnosis of Angelman syndrome: Estimated prevalence rate in a Danish country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, M.B.; Brondum-Nielsen, K.; Hansen, L.K.; Wulff, K.

    1995-06-19

    Angelman syndrome (AS) was initially considered a rather rare abnormality, but in later years, with the possibilities for cytogenetic and molecular diagnosis an increasing number of patients have been reported. The incidence is quoted to be around 1:20,000. The etiology of AS is associated with the lack of maternal allele(s) of one or more loci at 15q11-q13, and is considered an effect of parental imprinting of that region, since a similar deficiency of paternal alleles leads to Prader-Willi syndrome. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  7. HNPCC (Lynch Syndrome: Differential Diagnosis, Molecular Genetics and Management - a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Henry T

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HNPCC (Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC, wherein it accounts for between 2-7 percent of the total CRC burden. When considering the large number of extracolonic cancers integral to the syndrome, namely carcinoma of the endometrium, ovary, stomach, hepatobiliary system, pancreas, small bowel, brain tumors, and upper uroepithelial tract, these estimates of its frequency are likely to be conservative. The diagnosis is based upon its natural history in concert with a comprehensive cancer family history inclusive of all anatomic sites. In order for surveillance and management to be effective and, indeed, lifesaving, among these high-risk patients, the linchpin to cancer control would be the physician, who must be knowledgeable about hereditary cancer syndromes, their molecular and medical genetics, genetic counseling, and, most importantly, the natural history of the disorders, so that the entirety of this knowledge can be melded to highly-targeted management.

  8. The neurobehavioral and molecular phenotype of Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Logan K; Fitzpatrick, Sarah; Shaffer, Rebecca; Melnyk, Sophia; Begtrup, Amber H; Fox, Emma; Schaefer, Tori L; Mathieu-Frasier, Lauren; Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy; Horn, Paul A; Erickson, Craig A

    2015-11-01

    Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder associated with developmental delay, speech impairment, gait ataxia, and a unique behavioral profile. AS is caused by loss of maternal expression of the paternally imprinted UBE3A gene. In this study we aim to contribute to understanding of the neurobehavioral phenotype of AS with particular focus on the neuropsychiatric presentation of the disorder. We also undertake initial exploration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plasma levels in AS. Twelve individuals ages 3 years or older with a confirmed genetic diagnosis of AS underwent detailed medical history, phenotypic characterization, and BDNF plasma sampling. The results of this study demonstrate that individuals with AS suffer from significant developmental delay, impaired adaptive behavior, and sleep disruption. Additionally, hyperactivity/impulsivity appears to be the primary behavioral domain noted in these individuals. The majority of individuals in this project met criteria for autism spectrum disorder on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS); however, a negative correlation was noted between ADOS score and developmental age. BDNF plasma levels in AS individuals were significantly elevated compared to neurotypical controls. This is the first report of abnormal BDNF levels in AS, and one that necessitates larger future studies. The results provide a clue to understanding abnormal neuronal development in AS and may help guide future AS research. PMID:26219744

  9. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  10. Molecular genetic analysis of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokkonen, H.M.; Kahkonen, T.M.; Leisti, J. [Oulu Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)

    1994-09-01

    Angelman (AS) and Prader-Willi (PWS) syndromes are caused by the loss of either maternal (AS) or paternal (PWS) contributions to chromosome 15q11-q13 region, which is subject to genomic imprinting. DNA methylation has been postulated to play a crucial role in genomic imprinting and the diagnostic test used is based on the differential parental methylation of 15q11-q13. We report here the DNA studies of 39 classical PWS and 12 AS patients. For DNA polymorphism and dosage studies we used nine genomic probes and five microsatellite markers specific for chromosome 15. To study the methylation patterns the probes DN34 (D15S9) and PW71 (D15S63), which show a parental-specific DNA methylation imprint, were used. Among the PWS patients, 29 (77%) cases with a deletion belonging to four different size classes and 9 (23%) with maternal uniparental disomy were found, respectively. Of the AS patients, 8 (67%) had a deletion, 1 (8%) paternal uniparental disomy and 3 (25%) biparental inheritance, respectively. Two sibs with biparental disomy showed a typical methylation pattern for AS, indicating that the maternal chromosome 15 carried a paternal methylation imprint. In the DNA methylation analysis the probe PW71 was useful: in our study it detected all deletions and uniparental disomy patients as well as potential imprinting mutations. The probe DN34 couldn`t identify patients which have a deletion outside the D15S9 locus. In the diagnosis of AS and PWS, the differential methylation of the parental 15q11-q13 offers a rapid diagnostic test but does not distinguish between a deletion and uniparental disomy. In our material the probe 4a.1, which detects DNA sequences from both the locus SNRPN (15q12) and SNRPNP1 (6pter-p21), proved to be reliable detecting all deletions. For detection of parental origin of deletion or uniparental disomy, microsatellite markers proved useful.

  11. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Elucidating Neurocognitive Basis of Functional Impairments Associated with Intellectual Disability in Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachidi, Mohammed; Lopes, Carmela

    2010-01-01

    Down syndrome, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, is associated with brain disorders due to chromosome 21 gene overdosage. Molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the neuromorphological alterations and cognitive impairments are reported herein in a global model. Recent advances in Down syndrome research have lead to…

  12. Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome with stroke-like imaging presentation: clinical, biochemical and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Rashed, Mohamed S; Al-Dirbashi, Osama Y; Patay, Zoltan; Rahbeeni, Zuhair; Abu-Amero, Khaled K

    2008-01-15

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in ORNT1 gene that encodes a mitochondrial ornithine transporter. It has variable clinical presentations with episodic hyperammonemia, liver dysfunction, and chronic neurological manifestations. In this work, we report the findings of HHH syndrome in 3 Saudi siblings. The 4-year-old proband presented with recurrent Reye-like episodes, hypotonia, and multiple stroke-like lesions on brain MRI. Biochemical and molecular analysis confirmed that she had HHH syndrome. She significantly improved on protein restriction and sodium benzoate. Her two older siblings have milder phenotypes with protein intolerance and learning problems. In comparison to their sister, their homocitrulline and orotic acid were only mildly elevated even before treatment. The three patients were homozygous for a novel mutation in ORNT1 with a Gly220Arg change. In view of the CNS lesions, which initially were felt to be suggestive of MELAS, we sequenced the entire mtDNA genome and no potential pathogenic mutations were detected. Analysis of ORNT2 did not provide explanation of the clinical and biochemical variability. This work presents a yet unreported CNS involvement pattern, notably multiple supratentorial stroke-like lesions in association with HHH syndrome. Moreover, it illustrates considerable clinical/biochemical correlation, and describes a novel mutation. We suggest including HHH syndrome in the differential diagnosis of patients found to have stroke-like lesions on brain MRI.

  13. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome: first molecular diagnosis in a Brazilian child

    OpenAIRE

    Cresio Alves; Julia Constanca Fernandes; Silvana Sampaio; Raquel de Melo Alves Paiva; Rodrigo Tocantins Calado

    2013-01-01

    Herein the first molecular diagnosis of a Brazilian child with Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome is reported. A 6-year-old boy was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis at the age of 15 months due to recurrent respiratory infections, diarrhea and therapeutic response to pancreatic enzymes. Three sweat tests were negative. At the age of 5 years, he began to experience pain in the lower limbs, laxity of joints, lameness and frequent falls. A radiological study revealed metaphyseal chondrodysplasia. A complet...

  14. Down syndrome: Molecular mapping of the congenital heart disease and duodenal stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenburg, J.R. (University of California, Los Angeles (United States)); Bradley, C.; Disteche, C.M. (University of Washington, Seattle (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of congenital heart and gut disease and mental retardation. DS individuals also have characteristic facies, hands, and dermatoglyphics, in addition to abnormalities of the immune system, and increased risk of leukemia, and an Alzheimer-like dementia. Although their molecular basis is unknown, recent work on patients with DS and partial duplications of chromosome 21 has suggested small chromosomal regions located in band q22 that are likely to contain the genes for some of these features. The authors now extend these analyses to define molecular markers for the congenital heart disease, the duodenal stenosis, and an 'overlap' region for the facial and some of the skeletal features. They report the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular analysis of two patients. These studies provide the molecular basis for the construction of a DS phenotypic map and focus the search for genes responsible for the physical features, congenital heart disease, and duodenal stenosis of DS.

  15. Practice guidelines for the molecular analysis of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birch Rachael

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS and Angelman syndrome (AS are clinically distinct neurodevelopmental genetic disorders that map to 15q11-q13. The primary phenotypes are attributable to loss of expression of imprinted genes within this region which can arise by means of a number of mechanisms. The most sensitive single approach to diagnosing both PWS and AS is to study methylation patterns within 15q11-q13; however many techniques exist for this purpose. Given the diversity of techniques available, there is a need for consensus testing and reporting guidelines. Methods Testing and reporting guidelines have been drawn up and agreed in accordance with the procedures of the UK Clinical Molecular Genetics Society and the European Molecular Genetics Quality Network. Results A practical set of molecular genetic testing and reporting guidelines has been developed for these two disorders. In addition, advice is given on appropriate reporting policies, including advice on test sensitivity and recurrence risks. In considering test sensitivity, the possibility of differential diagnoses is discussed. Conclusion An agreed set of practice guidelines has been developed for the diagnostic molecular genetic testing of PWS and AS.

  16. Clinical and molecular characterization of two patients with palmoplantar keratoderma-congenital alopecia syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, M; Morlino, S; Sana, M E; Paradisi, M; Tadini, G; Angioni, A; Malacarne, M; Grammatico, P; Iascone, M; Forzano, F

    2016-08-01

    Palmoplantar keratoderma-congenital alopecia (PPKCA) syndrome is a rare genodermatosis, with two clinically recognizable forms: dominant (Type 1) and recessive (Type 2). Reports of only 18 patients have been published to date, and the molecular basis of the condition is unknown. We describe two cases with PPKCA Type 2 (PPKCA2), comprising a novel patient, originally reported as an example of autosomal ichthyosis follicularis-atrichia-photophobia syndrome, and the 6-year follow-up of a previously published case. Extensive molecular studies of both patients excluded mutations in all the known genes associated with PPK and partially overlapping syndromes. The striking similarities between these two patients confirm PPKCA2 as a discrete genodermatosis, of which the main features are congenital and universal alopecia, diffuse keratosis pilaris, facial erythema, and a specific PPK with predominant involvement of the fingertips and borders of the hands and feet, with evolution of sclerodactyly, contractures and constrictions. Clinical follow-up of these patients has demonstrated progressive worsening of the hand involvement and attenuation of facial erythema. PMID:27339777

  17. Craniofacial development: current concepts in the molecular basis of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gijn, Daniel Richard; Tucker, Abigail S; Cobourne, Martyn T

    2013-07-01

    The human face and skull are an elegant example of the anatomical sophistication that results from the interplay between the molecular cascades and the tissue interactions that are necessary for the proper development of the craniofacial complex. When it fails to develop normally the consequences can have life-long implications for the biological, psychological, and aesthetic wellbeing of an affected person. Among the many syndromes that affect the region, understanding of the biology that underlies Treacher Collins syndrome has advanced in the last decade, particularly concerning the causative TCOF1 gene that encodes TREACLE protein, a serine/alanine-rich nucleolar phosphoprotein with an essential function during ribosome biogenesis in cranial neural crest cells. Abnormal growth and differentiation of these cells affect much of the craniofacial skeleton.

  18. Blepharophimosis, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus syndrome: clinical and molecular analysis of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Francesca; Giachino, Daniela; Russo, Lucia; Pilia, Giuseppe; Ariani, Francesca; Scala, Elisa; Chiappe, Francesca; Sampieri, Katia; Caporossi, Aldo; Renieri, Alessandra; Lasorella, Giacomo

    2006-06-01

    Blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (OMIM #U10100) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder in which an eyelid malformation is associated (type I) or not (type H) with premature ovarian failure in the affected female. It is invariably characterized by 4 major features: (1) bilaterally shortened horizontal palpebral fissure (blepharophimosis); (2) severe impairment of the superior palpebral levator (ptosis); (3) a vertical skin fold arising from the lower eyelid, which inserts medially in the upper lid (epicanthus inversus) and (4) an increased inner can-thal distance with a normal outer canthal distance (telecanthus). The mutations causing this disorder are found in the FOXL2 gene, a forkhead transcription factor, located in 3q23. Although many patients with blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome have an affected parent, a conspicuous number of sporadic cases also have been reported. We describe here a sporadic case with a mutation in the FOXL2 gene that was well characterized both clinically and molecularly.

  19. Application of molecular biology at the approach of Bartter's syndrome: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Geisilaine Soares Dos; Miranda, Débora Marques de; Pereira, Paula Cristina de Barros; Sarubi, Helena Cunha; Rodrigues, Luciana Bastos; Marco, Luiz Armando Cunha de; Silva, Ana Cristina Simões E

    2012-03-01

    This paper aims to show the utility of molecular biology for diagnose Bartter syndrome (BS) by the case report of two sisters and to propose a diagram for the molecular approach of this syndrome. The two reported cases presented prematurity, pregnancy complicated with polyhydramnio and low birth weight. During the first year of life, children exhibited polyuria, polydipsia and failure to thrive, leading to the investigation of renal tubular diseases and innate errors of metabolism. The laboratorial exams suggested BS, but the definitive diagnostic was only obtained by the detection of homozygous mutation on the exon 5 of the gene KCNJ1, resulting in a substitution of the aminoacid alanin for valin on codon 214 (A214V) in both DNA stripes in the two sisters and a heterozygous mutation in their parents. The definitive diagnostic of BS is frequently very difficult to be obtained. Consequently, considering the reported cases, we showed the utility of molecular techniques for the definitive diagnostic of BS and we proposed a diagram for the rational use of these techniques.

  20. Molecular analyses of 17p11.2 deletions in 62 Smith-Magenis syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juyal, R.C.; Figuera, L.E.; Hauge, X. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable, multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome caused by an interstitial deletion involving band p11.2 of chromosome 17. Toward the molecular definition of the interval defining this microdeletion syndrome, 62 unrelated SMS patients in conjunction with 70 available unaffected parents were molecularly analyzed with respect to the presence or absence of 14 loci in the proximal region of the short arm of chromosome 17. A multifaceted approach was used to determine deletion status at the various loci that combined (1) FISH analysis, (2) PCR and Southern analysis of somatic cell hybrids retaining the deleted chromosome 17 from selected patients, and (3) genotype determination of patients for whom a parent(s) was available at four microsatellite marker loci and at four loci with associated RFLPs. The relative order of two novel anonymous markers and a new microsatellite marker was determined in 17p11.2. The results confirmed that the proximal deletion breakpoint in the majority of SMS patients is located between markers D17S58 (EW301) and D17S446 (FG1) within the 17p11.1-17p11.2 region. The common distal breakpoint was mapped between markers cCI17-638, which lies distal to D17S71, and cCI17-498, which lies proximal to the Charcot Marie-Tooth disease type 1A locus. The locus D17S258 was found to be deleted in all 62 patients, and probes from this region can be used for diagnosis of the SMS deletion by FISH. Ten patients demonstrated molecularly distinct deletions; of these, two patients had smaller deletions and will enable the definition of the critical interval for SMS. 49 refs.

  1. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B...

  2. Molecular definition of a region of chromosome 21 that causes features of the Down syndrome phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Korenberg, Julie R; Kawashima, Hiroko; Pulst, Stefan-M.; Ikeuchi, T; Ogasawara, N; Yamamoto, K.; Schonberg, Steven A.; West, Ruth; Allen, Leland; Magenis, Ellen; Ikawa, K; Taniguchi, N; Epstein, Charles J.

    1990-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of mental retardation and heart disease. Although it is usually caused by the presence of an extra chromosome 21, a subset of the diagnostic features may be caused by the presence of only band 21q22. We now present evidence that significantly narrows the chromosomal region responsible for several of the phenotypic features of DS. We report a molecular and cytogenetic analysis of a three-generation family containing four individuals with clinical DS as manif...

  3. Molecular biological analysis of genotyping and phylogeny of severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志刚; 李兰娟; 罗芸; 张俊彦; 王敏雅; 程苏云; 张严峻; 王晓萌; 卢亦愚; 吴南屏; 梅玲玲; 王赞信

    2004-01-01

    Background SARS-CoV is the causative agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) which has been associated with outbreaks of SARS in Guangdong, Hong Kong and Beijing of China, and other regions worldwide. SARS-CoV from human has shown some variations but its origin is still unknown. The genotyping and phylogeny of SARS-CoV were analyzed and reported in this paper. Methods Full or partial genomes of 44 SARS-CoV strains were collected from GenBank. The genotype, single nucleotide polymorphism and phylogeny of these SARS-CoV strains were analyzed by molecular biological, bioinformatic and epidemiological methods. Conclusion The results mentioned above suggest that SARS-CoV is responding to host immunological pressures and experiencing variation which provide clues, information and evidence of molecular biology for the clinical pathology, vaccine developing and epidemic investigation.

  4. Conservation of nucleotide sequences for molecular diagnosis of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Furuse

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection due to the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV is widespread. The present study was performed to assess the protocols used for the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV by analyzing the nucleotide sequences of viruses detected between 2012 and 2015, including sequences from the large outbreak in eastern Asia in 2015. Although the diagnostic protocols were established only 2 years ago, mismatches between the sequences of primers/probes and viruses were found for several of the assays. Such mismatches could lead to a lower sensitivity of the assay, thereby leading to false-negative diagnosis. A slight modification in the primer design is suggested. Protocols for the molecular diagnosis of viral infections should be reviewed regularly after they are established, particularly for viruses that pose a great threat to public health such as MERS-CoV.

  5. Molecular Diagnosis of Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome Caused by Puumala Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerqvist, Nina; Hagström, Åsa; Lundahl, Malin; Nilsson, Elin; Juremalm, Mikael; Larsson, Inger; Alm, Erik; Bucht, Göran; Ahlm, Clas; Klingström, Jonas

    2016-05-01

    Rodent-borne hantaviruses cause two severe acute diseases: hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Eurasia, and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS; also called hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome [HCPS]) in the Americas. Puumala virus (PUUV) is the most common causative agent of HFRS in Europe. Current routine diagnostic methods are based on serological analyses and can yield inconclusive results. Hantavirus-infected patients are viremic during the early phase of disease; therefore, detection of viral RNA genomes can be a valuable complement to existing serological methods. However, the high genomic sequence diversity of PUUV has hampered the development of molecular diagnostics, and currently no real-time reverse transcription-quantitative (RT)-PCR assay is available for routine diagnosis of HFRS. Here, we present a novel PUUV RT-PCR assay. The assay was validated for routine diagnosis of HFRS on samples collected in Sweden during the winter season from 2013 to 2014. The assay allowed detection of PUUV RNA in 98.7% of confirmed clinical HFRS samples collected within 8 days after symptomatic onset. In summary, this study shows that real-time RT-PCR can be a reliable alternative to serological tests during the early phase of HFRS. PMID:26962084

  6. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of human microtia via a pig model of HOXA1 syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruimin Qiao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microtia is a congenital malformation of the outer ears. Although both genetic and environmental components have been implicated in microtia, the genetic causes of this innate disorder are poorly understood. Pigs have naturally occurring diseases comparable to those in humans, providing exceptional opportunity to dissect the molecular mechanism of human inherited diseases. Here we first demonstrated that a truncating mutation in HOXA1 causes a monogenic disorder of microtia in pigs. We further performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq analysis on affected and healthy pig embryos (day 14.25. We identified a list of 337 differentially expressed genes (DEGs between the normal and mutant samples, shedding light on the transcriptional network involving HOXA1. The DEGs are enriched in biological processes related to cardiovascular system and embryonic development, and neurological, renal and urological diseases. Aberrant expressions of many DEGs have been implicated in human innate deformities corresponding to microtia-associated syndromes. After applying three prioritizing algorithms, we highlighted appealing candidate genes for human microtia from the 337 DEGs. We searched for coding variants of functional significance within six candidate genes in 147 microtia-affected individuals. Of note, we identified one EVC2 non-synonymous mutation (p.Asp1174Asn as a potential disease-implicating variant for a human microtia-associated syndrome. The findings advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human microtia, and provide an interesting example of the characterization of human disease-predisposing variants using pig models.

  7. Clinical and molecular analysis of Noonan syndrome in Indonesia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iffa Mutmainah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome (NS; OMIM#163950 is a relatively common autosomal dominant disorder with a worldwide prevalence of approximately 1:1,000 to 1:2,500. The syndrome is characterized by distinctive facial features, congenital heart defects (CHD, and short stature. Distinctive facial features consist of a broad and high forehead, hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, a high arched palate, low set and posteriorly rotated ears with a thick helix, and a short neck with excess nuchal skin and low posterior hairline. Additional relatively frequent features include chest deformities, cryptorchidism in males, mild intellectual disability, and bleeding diathesis.1,2 In 2001, missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene were reported in about 50% of NS cases. This gene encodes the tyrosine protein phosphatase non-receptor SHP2, which is involved in ERK activation via RAS-MAPK pathway.3 Later, several other genes involved in the RAS-MAPK pathway were found to be mutated in NS individuals without PTPN11 mutations, including KRAS, SOS1, RAF1, NRAS, BRAF, MAP2K1, and RIT1, as well as mutations in SHOC2 and CBL causing an NS-like disorder (�Noo-Noonan syndrome-like disorder with loose anagen hair/NSLH and Noonan syndrome-like disorder with or without juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia/NSLL, respectively.2,4,5 The involvement of two other genes, A2ML1 and RRAS is still unclear.6,7 Despite the relatively high frequency of NS in the general population, no Indonesian patients have been reported. Here, we report the first Indonesian case with a confirmed molecular diagnosis of NS.

  8. Standard and AEGIS nicking molecular beacons detect amplicons from the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaren, Ozlem; Glushakova, Lyudmyla G; Bradley, Kevin M; Hoshika, Shuichi; Benner, Steven A

    2016-10-01

    This paper combines two advances to detect MERS-CoV, the causative agent of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, that have emerged over the past few years from the new field of "synthetic biology". Both are based on an older concept, where molecular beacons are used as the downstream detection of viral RNA in biological mixtures followed by reverse transcription PCR amplification. The first advance exploits the artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS). AEGIS adds nucleotides to the four found in standard DNA and RNA (xNA); AEGIS nucleotides pair orthogonally to the A:T and G:C pairs. Placing AEGIS components in the stems of molecular beacons is shown to lower noise by preventing unwanted stem invasion by adventitious natural xNA. This should improve the signal-to-noise ratio of molecular beacons operating in complex biological mixtures. The second advance introduces a nicking enzyme that allows a single target molecule to activate more than one beacon, allowing "signal amplification". Combining these technologies in primers with components of a self-avoiding molecular recognition system (SAMRS), we detect 50 copies of MERS-CoV RNA in a multiplexed respiratory virus panel by generating fluorescence signal visible to human eye and/or camera. PMID:27421627

  9. Molecular Characterization of Three Canine Models of Human Rare Bone Diseases: Caffey, van den Ende-Gupta, and Raine Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Hytönen, Marjo K.; Meharji Arumilli; Lappalainen, Anu K; Marta Owczarek-Lipska; Vidhya Jagannathan; Sruthi Hundi; Elina Salmela; Patrick Venta; Eva Sarkiala; Tarja Jokinen; Daniela Gorgas; Juha Kere; Pekka Nieminen; Cord Drögemüller; Hannes Lohi

    2016-01-01

    One to two percent of all children are born with a developmental disorder requiring pediatric hospital admissions. For many such syndromes, the molecular pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. Parallel developmental disorders in other species could provide complementary models for human rare diseases by uncovering new candidate genes, improving the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and opening possibilities for therapeutic trials. We performed various experiments, e.g. combined ge...

  10. Molecular Characterization of Three Canine Models of Human Rare Bone Diseases: Caffey, van den Ende-Gupta, and Raine Syndromes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hytönen, Marjo K.; Arumilli, Meharji; Lappalainen, Anu K; Owczarek, Marta; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Hundi, Sruthi; Salmela, Elina; Venta, Patrick; Sarkiala, Eva; Jokinen, Tarja; Gorgas, Daniela; Kere, Juha; Nieminen, Pekka; Drögemüller, Cord; Lohi, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    One to two percent of all children are born with a developmental disorder requiring pediatric hospital admissions. For many such syndromes, the molecular pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. Parallel developmental disorders in other species could provide complementary models for human rare diseases by uncovering new candidate genes, improving the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and opening possibilities for therapeutic trials. We performed various experiments, e.g. combined ge...

  11. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome in Grey Alpine Cattle: Morphologic, Immunophenotypic, and Molecular Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, L V; Benazzi, C; Dittmer, K E; Thompson, K G; Murgiano, L; Drögemüller, C; Avallone, G; Gentile, A; Edwards, J F; Piffer, C; Bolcato, M; Brunetti, B

    2015-09-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by a mutation in either the EVC or EVC2 gene, and presents with short limbs, polydactyly, and ectodermal and heart defects. The aim of this study was to understand the pathologic basis by which deletions in the EVC2 gene lead to chondrodysplastic dwarfism and to describe the morphologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular hallmarks of EvC syndrome in cattle. Five Grey Alpine calves, with a known mutation in the EVC2 gene, were autopsied. Immunohistochemistry was performed on bone using antibodies to collagen II, collagen X, sonic hedgehog, fibroblast growth factor 2, and Ki67. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to analyze EVC1 and EVC2 gene expression. Autopsy revealed long bones that were severely reduced in length, as well as genital and heart defects. Collagen II was detected in control calves in the resting, proliferative, and hypertrophic zones and in the primary and secondary spongiosa, with a loss of labeling in the resting zone of 2 dwarfs. Collagen X was expressed in hypertrophic zone in the controls but was absent in the EvC cases. In affected calves and controls, sonic hedgehog labeled hypertrophic chondrocytes and primary and secondary spongiosa similarly. FGF2 was expressed in chondrocytes of all growth plate zones in the control calves but was lost in most EvC cases. The Ki67 index was lower in cases compared with controls. EVC and EVC2 transcripts were detected. Our data suggest that EvC syndrome of Grey Alpine cattle is a disorder of chondrocyte differentiation, with accelerated differentiation and premature hypertrophy of chondrocytes, and could be a spontaneous model for the equivalent human disease.

  12. Molecular basis for the Kallmann syndrome-linked fibroblast growth factor receptor mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, Ryan D.; Kathir, Karuppanan Muthusamy; Rajalingam, Dakshinamurthy [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Kumar, Thallapuranam K. Suresh, E-mail: sthalla@uark.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural basis of the Kallmann syndrome is elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann syndrome mutation (A168S) induces a subtle conformational change(s). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural interactions mediated by beta-sheet G are most perturbed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ligand (FGF)-receptor interaction(s) is completely abolished by Kallmann mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann mutation directly affects the FGF signaling process. -- Abstract: Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a developmental disease that expresses in patients as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. KS is commonly associated with mutations in the extracellular D2 domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). In this study, for the first time, the molecular basis for the FGFR associated KS mutation (A168S) is elucidated using a variety of biophysical experiments, including multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Secondary and tertiary structural analysis using far UV circular dichroism, fluorescence and limited trypsin digestion assays suggest that the KS mutation induces subtle tertiary structure change in the D2 domain of FGFR. Results of isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show the KS mutation causes a 10-fold decrease in heparin binding affinity and also a complete loss in ligand (FGF-1) binding. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N chemical perturbation data suggest that complete loss in the ligand (FGF) binding affinity is triggered by a subtle conformational change that disrupts crucial structural interactions in both the heparin and the FGF binding sites in the D2 domain of FGFR. The novel findings reported in this study are expected to provide valuable clues toward a complete understanding of the other genetic diseases linked to mutations in the FGFR.

  13. Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: toward improving early molecular diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Rebeh, Imen; Bonnet, Crystel; Bouassida, Walid; Hadjamor, Imen; Ayadi, Hammadi; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Petit, Christine; Masmoudi, Saber

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deaf-blindness cases. The most severe form of this syndrome, Usher syndrome type I (USH1), is characterized by profound congenital sensorineural deafness, vestibular dysfunction, and retinitis pigmentosa. Six USH1 genes have been identified, MYO7A, CDH23, PCDH15, USH1C, SANS, and CIB2, encoding myosin VIIA, cadherin-23, protocadherin-15, harmonin, scaffold protein containing ankyrin repeats and a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain, and calcium- and integrin-binding member 2, respectively. Methods In the present study, we recruited four Tunisian families with a diagnosis of USH1, together with healthy unrelated controls. Affected members underwent detailed audiologic and ocular examinations. We used the North African Deafness (NADf) chip to search for known North African mutations associated with USH. Then, we selected microsatellite markers covering USH1 known loci to genotype the DNA samples. Finally, we performed DNA sequencing of three known USH1 genes: MYO7A, PCDH15, and USH1C. Results Four biallelic mutations, all single base changes, were found in the MYO7A, USH1C, and PCDH15 genes. These mutations consist of a previously reported splicing defect c.470+1G>A in MYO7A, three novel variants, including two nonsense (p.Arg3X and p.Arg134X) in USH1C and PCDH15, respectively, and one frameshift (p.Lys615Asnfs*6) in MYO7A. Conclusions We found a remarkable genetic heterogeneity in the studied families with USH1 with a variety of mutations, among which three were novel. These novel mutations will be included in the NADf mutation screening chip that will allow a higher diagnosis efficiency of this extremely genetically heterogeneous disease. Ultimately, efficient molecular diagnosis of USH in a patient’s early childhood is of utmost importance, allowing better educational and therapeutic management. PMID:27440999

  14. Phenotypic and molecular assessment of seven patients with 6p25 deletion syndrome: Relevance to ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritch Robert

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thirty-nine patients have been described with deletions involving chromosome 6p25. However, relatively few of these deletions have had molecular characterization. Common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome patients include hydrocephalus, hearing loss, and ocular, craniofacial, skeletal, cardiac, and renal malformations. Molecular characterization of deletions can identify genes that are responsible for these phenotypes. Methods We report the clinical phenotype of seven patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6p25 and compare them to previously reported patients. Molecular characterization of the deletions was performed using polymorphic marker analysis to determine the extents of the deletions in these seven 6p25 deletion syndrome patients. Results Our results, and previous data, show that ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most highly penetrant phenotypes of the 6p25 deletion syndrome. While deletion of the forkhead box C1 gene (FOXC1 probably underlies the ocular dysgenesis, no gene in this region is known to be involved in hearing impairment. Conclusions Ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome. We conclude that a locus for dominant hearing loss is present at 6p25 and that this locus is restricted to a region distal to D6S1617. Molecular characterization of more 6p25 deletion patients will aid in refinement of this locus and the identification of a gene involved in dominant hearing loss.

  15. Unambiguous molecular detections with multiple genetic approach for the complicated chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Lung-Huang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS causes a developmental disorder during the embryonic stage, usually because of hemizygous deletions. The clinical pictures of patients with 22q11DS vary because of polymorphisms: on average, approximately 93% of affected individuals have a de novo deletion of 22q11, and the rest have inherited the same deletion from a parent. Methods using multiple genetic markers are thus important for the accurate detection of these microdeletions. Methods We studied 12 babies suspected to carry 22q11DS and 18 age-matched healthy controls from unrelated Taiwanese families. We determined genomic variance using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. Results Changes in genomic copy number were significantly associated with clinical manifestations for the classical criteria of 22q11DS using MPLA and qPCR (p Conclusion Both MLPA and qPCR could produce a clearly defined range of deleted genomic DNA, whereas there must be a deleted genome that is not distinguishable using MLPA. These data demonstrate that such multiple genetic approaches are necessary for the unambiguous molecular detection of these types of complicated genomic syndromes.

  16. Chromosomal Instability and Molecular Defects in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, Tomer; Akov, Shira; Bohndorf, Martina; Mlody, Barbara; Adjaye, James; Benvenisty, Nissim; Goldberg, Michal

    2016-08-30

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) results from the absence of the NBS1 protein, responsible for detection of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NBS is characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and cancer predisposition. Here, we show successful reprogramming of NBS fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (NBS-iPSCs). Our data suggest a strong selection for karyotypically normal fibroblasts to go through the reprogramming process. NBS-iPSCs then acquire numerous chromosomal aberrations and show a delayed response to DSB induction. Furthermore, NBS-iPSCs display slower growth, mitotic inhibition, a reduced apoptotic response to stress, and abnormal cell-cycle-related gene expression. Importantly, NBS neural progenitor cells (NBS-NPCs) show downregulation of neural developmental genes, which seems to be mediated by P53. Our results demonstrate the importance of NBS1 in early human development, shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this severe syndrome, and further expand our knowledge of the genomic stress cells experience during the reprogramming process. PMID:27545893

  17. The relationship between irritable bowel syndrome and psychiatric disorders: from molecular changes to clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadgyas-Stanculete, Mihaela; Buga, Ana-Maria; Popa-Wagner, Aurel; Dumitrascu, Dan L

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional syndrome characterized by chronic abdominal pain accompanied by altered bowel habits. Although generally considered a functional disorder, there is now substantial evidence that IBS is associated with a poor quality of life and significant negative impact on work and social domains. Neuroimaging studies documented changes in the prefrontal cortex, ventro-lateral and posterior parietal cortex and thalami, and implicate alteration of brain circuits involved in attention, emotion and pain modulation. Emerging data reveals the interaction between psychiatric disorders including generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia and IBS, which suggests that this association should not be ignored when developing strategies for screening and treatment. Psychological, social and genetic factors appear to be important in the development of IBS symptomatology through several mechanisms: alteration of HPA axis modulation, enhanced perception of visceral stimuli or psychological vulnerability. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms of IBS with or without psychiatric comorbidities is crucial for elucidating the pathophysiology and for the identification of new therapeutical targets in IBS. PMID:25408914

  18. Molecular analysis of genes on Xp controlling Turner syndrome and premature ovarian failure (POF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, A R; Ross, J L

    2001-06-01

    Monosomy X has been known to be the chromosomal basis of Turner syndrome (TS) for more than four decades. A large body of cytogenetic data indicates that most TS features are due to reduced dosage of genes on the short arm of the X chromosome (Xp). Phenotype mapping studies using molecular cytogenetic and genetic techniques are beginning to localize the Xp genes that are important for various TS features, and a comprehensive catalog of candidate genes is becoming available through the Human Genome Project and related research. It is now possible to assess the contributions of individual genes to the TS phenotype by mutational analysis of karyotypically normal persons with specific TS features. This strategy has succeeded in identifying a gene involved in short stature and is being applied to premature ovarian failure and other TS phenotypes.

  19. Molecular and clinical analysis of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmani Aiman

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ellis-van Creveld (EvC syndrome is an autosomal recessive chondrodysplastic condition with clinical manifestations that include short-limbs and ribs, postaxial polydactyly and dysplastic nails and teeth. In about two thirds of patients, mutations in either EVC or EVC2 genes have been found to be the underlying cause. Methods In this paper, we describe the molecular (DNA sequencing and clinical analysis of six children diagnosed with EvC from four different families from the United Arab Emirates (UAE. Results All the children had the common clinical and radiological features of this syndrome. However, DNA sequence analysis of the genes shown to be involved (EVC and EVC2 revealed a novel splice site mutation (c.2047-1G>T in intron 13 of EVC2 gene in one family. In addition, we confirm previous mutational analyses that showed a truncating mutation in exon 13 of EVC gene (c.1813C>T; p.Q605X in the second family and a single nucleotide deletion (c.981delG; p.K327fs in exon 8 of EVC2 gene in the third family. No mutations in the exons, splice sites or the promoter regions of either gene have been found in the index case of the fourth family who exhibited "EvC-like" features. Conclusions Given the small population size of UAE, our data illustrates further the molecular heterogeneity observed in EvC patients and excludes the possibility of a common founder effect for this condition in the UAE reflecting the current ethnic diversity of the country.

  20. Molecular cytogenetic detection of chromosome 15 deletions in patients with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, D.E.; Weksberg, R.; Shuman, C. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are clinically distinct genetic disorders involving alterations of chromosome 15q11-q13. Approximately 75% of individuals with PWS and AS have deletions within 15q11-q13 by molecular analysis. We have evaluated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the clinical laboratory detection of del(15)(q11q13) using the cosmid probes D15S11 and GABRB3 (ONCOR, Gaithersburg, NY). 4/4 PWS and 1/1 AS patients previously identified as having cytogenetic deletions were deleted for both probes. In a prospectively ascertained series of 54 patient samples referred to rule out either PWS or AS, 8 were deleted for D15S11 and GABRB3. In addition, an atypical deletion patient with PWS was also identified who was found to be deleted for GABRB3 but not D15S11. The SNRPN locus was also deleted in this patient. Only 4 of the 9 patient samples having molecular cytogenetic deletions were clearly deleted by high resolution banding (HRB) analysis. The microscopic and submicroscopic deletions have been confirmed by dinucleotide (CA) repeat analysis. Microsatellite polymorphism analysis was also used to demonstrate that five non-deletion patients in this series had biparental inheritance of chromosome 15, including region q11-q13. Deletions were not detected by either HRB, FISH or microsatellite polymorphism analysis in samples obtained from parents of the deletion patients. Methylation studies of chromosome 15q11-q13 are in progress for this series of PWS and AS families. FISH analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 in patients with PWS and AS is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for deletion detection.

  1. Clinical spectrum and molecular diagnosis of Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients with an imprinting mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, S.; Cassidy, S.B.; Conroy, J.M. [Univ. of Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-20

    Recent studies have identified a new class of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) patients who have biparental inheritance, but neither the typical deletion nor uniparental disomy (UPD) or translocation. However, these patients have uniparental DNA methylation throughout 15q11-q13, and thus appear to have a mutation in the imprinting process for this region. Here we describe detailed clinical findings of five AS imprinting mutation patients (three families) and two PWS imprinting mutation patients (one new family). All these patients have essentially the classical clinical phenotype for the respective syndrome, except that the incidence of microcephaly is lower in imprinting mutation AS patients than in deletion AS patients. Furthermore, imprinting mutation AS and PWS patients do not typically have hypopigmentation, which is commonly found in patients with the usual large deletion. Molecular diagnosis of these cases is initially achieved by DNA methylation analyses of the DN34/ZNF127, PW71 (D15S63), and SNRPN loci. The latter two probes have clear advantages in the simple molecular diagnostic analysis of PWS and AS patients with an imprinting mutation, as has been found for typical deletion or UPD PWS and AS cases. With the recent finding of inherited microdeletions in PWS and AS imprinting mutation families, our studies define a new class of these two syndromes. The clinical and molecular identification of these PWS and AS patients has important genetic counseling consequences. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Molecular Etiology of Hereditary Single-Side Deafness: Its Association With Pigmentary Disorders and Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Ah Reum; Choi, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Young; Chun, Eun Hi; Oh, Seung-Ha; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-10-01

    Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL)/single-side deafness (SSD) is a frequently encountered disability in children. The etiology of a substantial portion of USNHL/SSD still remains unknown, and genetic causes have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the authors evaluated the heritability of USNHL/SSD.The authors sequentially recruited 50 unrelated children with SSD. For an etiologic diagnosis, we performed a rigorous review on the phenotypes of family members of all children and conducted, if necessary, molecular genetic tests including targeted exome sequencing of 129 deafness genes.Among the 50 SSD children cohort, the authors identify 4 (8%) unrelated SSD probands from 4 families (SH136, SB173, SB177, and SB199) with another hearing impaired family members. Notably, all 4 probands in our cohort with a familial history of SSD also have pigmentary abnormalities such as brown freckles or premature gray hair within first degree relatives, which may indicate that genes whose products are involved with pigmentary disorder could be candidates for heritable SSD. Indeed, SH136 and SB199 turned out to segregate a mutation in MITF and PAX3, respectively, leading to a molecular diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (WS).We report, for the first time in the literature, a significant heritability of pediatric SSD. There is a strong association between the heritability of USNHL/SSD and the pigmentary abnormality, shedding a new light on the understanding of the molecular basis of heritable USNHL/SSD. In case of children with congenital SSD, it would be mandatory to rigorously screen pigmentary abnormalities. WS should also be included in the differential diagnosis of children with USNHL/SSD, especially in a familial form. PMID:26512583

  3. Detection of mutations in the COL4A5 gene by SSCP in X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Juncker, I; Persson, U;

    2001-01-01

    -linked inheritance, and 15 isolated cases. We found a mutation detection rate of 52% (42/81) (58% in males and 21% in females), and 69% (20/29) in families who clearly demonstrated X-linked inheritance. Thirty-six different mutations were found in 42 patients comprising 16 missense mutations, seven frameshifts...

  4. Molecular diagnostic testing for Klinefelter syndrome and other male sex chromosome aneuploidies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hager Karl

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male sex chromosome aneuploidies are underdiagnosed despite concomitant physical and behavioral manifestations. Objective To develop a non-invasive, rapid and high-throughput molecular diagnostic assay for detection of male sex chromosome aneuploidies, including 47,XXY (Klinefelter, 47,XYY, 48,XXYY and 48,XXXY syndromes. Methods The assay utilizes three XYM and four XA markers to interrogate Y:X and X:autosome ratios, respectively. The seven markers were PCR amplified using genomic DNA isolated from a cohort of 323 males with aneuploid (n = 117 and 46,XY (n = 206 karyotypes. The resulting PCR products were subjected to Pyrosequencing, a quantitative DNA sequencing method. Results Receiver operator characteristic (ROC curves were used to establish thresholds for the discrimination of aneuploid from normal samples. The XYM markers permitted the identification of 47,XXY, 48,XXXY and 47,XYY syndromes with 100% sensitivity and specificity in both purified DNA and buccal swab samples. The 48,XXYY karyotype was delineated by XA marker data from 46,XY; an X allele threshold of 43% also permitted detection of 48,XXYY with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Analysis of X chromosome-specific biallelic SNPs demonstrated that 43 of 45 individuals (96% with 48,XXYY karyotype had two distinct X chromosomes, while 2 (4% had a duplicate X, providing evidence that 48,XXYY may result from nondisjunction during early mitotic divisions of a 46,XY embryo. Conclusions Quantitative Pyrosequencing, with high-throughput potential, can detect male sex chromosome aneuploidies with 100% sensitivity.

  5. Fragile X Syndrome: Keys to the Molecular Genetics of Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombroso, Paul J.; Ogren, Marilee P.

    2008-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation is discussed. The relationship between specific impairments in synaptic plasticity and Fragile X syndrome is investigated as it strengthens synaptic contacts between neurons.

  6. Myhre and LAPS syndromes : clinical and molecular review of 32 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michot, Caroline; Le Goff, Carine; Mahaut, Clementine; Afenjar, Alexandra; Brooks, Alice S.; Campeau, Philippe M.; Destree, Anne; Di Rocco, Maja; Donnai, Dian; Hennekam, Raoul; Heron, Delphine; Jacquemont, Sebastien; Kannu, Peter; Lin, Angela E.; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Mansour, Sahar; Marlin, Sandrine; McGowan, Ruth; Murphy, Helen; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Rio, Marlene; Simon, Marleen; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Stone, James R.; Sznajer, Yves; Tolmie, John; Touraine, Renaud; van den Ende, Jenneke; Van der Aa, Nathalie; van Essen, Ton; Verloes, Alain; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Myhre syndrome is characterized by short stature, brachydactyly, facial features, pseudomuscular hypertrophy, joint limitation and hearing loss. We identified SMAD4 mutations as the cause of Myhre syndrome. SMAD4 mutations have also been identified in laryngotracheal stenosis, arthropathy, prognathi

  7. Jacobsen Syndrome: Surgical Complications due to Unsuspected Diagnosis, the Importance of Molecular Studies in Patients with Craniosynostosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares Chávez, Etzalli P.; Toral López, Jaime; Valdés Miranda, Juan M.; González Huerta, Luz M.; Perez Cabrera, Adrian; del Refugio Rivera Vega, María; Messina Baas, Olga M.; Cuevas-Covarrubias, Sergio A.

    2016-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is an uncommon contiguous gene syndrome. About 85-92% of cases have a de novo origin. Clinical variability and severity probably depend on the size of the affected region. The typical clinical features in JBS include intellectual disability, growth retardation, craniofacial dysmorphism as well as craniosynostosis, congenital heart disease, and platelet abnormalities. The proband was a 1 year/3-month-old Mexican male. Oligonucleotide-SNP array analysis using the GeneChip Human Cytoscan HD was carried out for the patient from genomic DNA. The SNP array showed a 14.2-Mb deletion in chromosome 11q23.3q25 (120,706-134,938 Mb), which involved 163 RefSeq genes in the database of genomic variation. We report a novel deletion in JBS that increases the knowledge of the variability in the mutation sites in this region and expands the spectrum of molecular and clinical defects in this syndrome. PMID:26997943

  8. Complete exon sequencing of all known Usher syndrome genes greatly improves molecular diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacombe Didier

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Usher syndrome (USH combines sensorineural deafness with blindness. It is inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Early diagnosis is critical for adapted educational and patient management choices, and for genetic counseling. To date, nine causative genes have been identified for the three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2 and USH3. Current diagnostic strategies make use of a genotyping microarray that is based on the previously reported mutations. The purpose of this study was to design a more accurate molecular diagnosis tool. Methods We sequenced the 366 coding exons and flanking regions of the nine known USH genes, in 54 USH patients (27 USH1, 21 USH2 and 6 USH3. Results Biallelic mutations were detected in 39 patients (72% and monoallelic mutations in an additional 10 patients (18.5%. In addition to biallelic mutations in one of the USH genes, presumably pathogenic mutations in another USH gene were detected in seven patients (13%, and another patient carried monoallelic mutations in three different USH genes. Notably, none of the USH3 patients carried detectable mutations in the only known USH3 gene, whereas they all carried mutations in USH2 genes. Most importantly, the currently used microarray would have detected only 30 of the 81 different mutations that we found, of which 39 (48% were novel. Conclusions Based on these results, complete exon sequencing of the currently known USH genes stands as a definite improvement for molecular diagnosis of this disease, which is of utmost importance in the perspective of gene therapy.

  9. Spectrum of novel mutations found in Waardenburg syndrome types 1 and 2: implications for molecular genetic diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Wildhardt, Gabriele; Zirn, Birgit; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Wechtenbruch, Juliane; Suckfuell, Markus; Buske, Annegret; Bohring, Axel; Kubisch, Christian; Vogt, Stefanie; Strobl-Wildemann, Gertrud; Greally, Marie; Bartsch, Oliver; Steinberger, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Till date, mutations in the genes PAX3 and MITF have been described in Waardenburg syndrome (WS), which is clinically characterised by congenital hearing loss and pigmentation anomalies. Our study intended to determine the frequency of mutations and deletions in these genes, to assess the clinical phenotype in detail and to identify rational priorities for molecular genetic diagnostics procedures. Design: Prospective analysis. Patients: 19 Caucasian patients with typical features ...

  10. Molecular Characterization of Three Canine Models of Human Rare Bone Diseases: Caffey, van den Ende-Gupta, and Raine Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hytönen, Marjo K; Arumilli, Meharji; Lappalainen, Anu K; Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Hundi, Sruthi; Salmela, Elina; Venta, Patrick; Sarkiala, Eva; Jokinen, Tarja; Gorgas, Daniela; Kere, Juha; Nieminen, Pekka; Drögemüller, Cord; Lohi, Hannes

    2016-05-01

    One to two percent of all children are born with a developmental disorder requiring pediatric hospital admissions. For many such syndromes, the molecular pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. Parallel developmental disorders in other species could provide complementary models for human rare diseases by uncovering new candidate genes, improving the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and opening possibilities for therapeutic trials. We performed various experiments, e.g. combined genome-wide association and next generation sequencing, to investigate the clinico-pathological features and genetic causes of three developmental syndromes in dogs, including craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO), a previously undescribed skeletal syndrome, and dental hypomineralization, for which we identified pathogenic variants in the canine SLC37A2 (truncating splicing enhancer variant), SCARF2 (truncating 2-bp deletion) and FAM20C (missense variant) genes, respectively. CMO is a clinical equivalent to an infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease), for which SLC37A2 is a new candidate gene. SLC37A2 is a poorly characterized member of a glucose-phosphate transporter family without previous disease associations. It is expressed in many tissues, including cells of the macrophage lineage, e.g. osteoclasts, and suggests a disease mechanism, in which an impaired glucose homeostasis in osteoclasts compromises their function in the developing bone, leading to hyperostosis. Mutations in SCARF2 and FAM20C have been associated with the human van den Ende-Gupta and Raine syndromes that include numerous features similar to the affected dogs. Given the growing interest in the molecular characterization and treatment of human rare diseases, our study presents three novel physiologically relevant models for further research and therapy approaches, while providing the molecular identity for the canine conditions. PMID:27187611

  11. Molecular Characterization of Three Canine Models of Human Rare Bone Diseases: Caffey, van den Ende-Gupta, and Raine Syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjo K Hytönen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available One to two percent of all children are born with a developmental disorder requiring pediatric hospital admissions. For many such syndromes, the molecular pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. Parallel developmental disorders in other species could provide complementary models for human rare diseases by uncovering new candidate genes, improving the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and opening possibilities for therapeutic trials. We performed various experiments, e.g. combined genome-wide association and next generation sequencing, to investigate the clinico-pathological features and genetic causes of three developmental syndromes in dogs, including craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO, a previously undescribed skeletal syndrome, and dental hypomineralization, for which we identified pathogenic variants in the canine SLC37A2 (truncating splicing enhancer variant, SCARF2 (truncating 2-bp deletion and FAM20C (missense variant genes, respectively. CMO is a clinical equivalent to an infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease, for which SLC37A2 is a new candidate gene. SLC37A2 is a poorly characterized member of a glucose-phosphate transporter family without previous disease associations. It is expressed in many tissues, including cells of the macrophage lineage, e.g. osteoclasts, and suggests a disease mechanism, in which an impaired glucose homeostasis in osteoclasts compromises their function in the developing bone, leading to hyperostosis. Mutations in SCARF2 and FAM20C have been associated with the human van den Ende-Gupta and Raine syndromes that include numerous features similar to the affected dogs. Given the growing interest in the molecular characterization and treatment of human rare diseases, our study presents three novel physiologically relevant models for further research and therapy approaches, while providing the molecular identity for the canine conditions.

  12. Susceptibility to DNA damage as a molecular mechanism for non-syndromic cleft lip and palate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Shigeru Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Non-syndromic cleft lip/palate (NSCL/P is a complex, frequent congenital malformation, determined by the interplay between genetic and environmental factors during embryonic development. Previous findings have appointed an aetiological overlap between NSCL/P and cancer, and alterations in similar biological pathways may underpin both conditions. Here, using a combination of transcriptomic profiling and functional approaches, we report that NSCL/P dental pulp stem cells exhibit dysregulation of a co-expressed gene network mainly associated with DNA double-strand break repair and cell cycle control (p = 2.88×10(-2-5.02×10(-9. This network included important genes for these cellular processes, such as BRCA1, RAD51, and MSH2, which are predicted to be regulated by transcription factor E2F1. Functional assays support these findings, revealing that NSCL/P cells accumulate DNA double-strand breaks upon exposure to H2O2. Furthermore, we show that E2f1, Brca1 and Rad51 are co-expressed in the developing embryonic orofacial primordia, and may act as a molecular hub playing a role in lip and palate morphogenesis. In conclusion, we show for the first time that cellular defences against DNA damage may take part in determining the susceptibility to NSCL/P. These results are in accordance with the hypothesis of aetiological overlap between this malformation and cancer, and suggest a new pathogenic mechanism for the disease.

  13. Premature ovarian failure (POF) syndrome: towards the molecular clinical analysis of its genetic complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassnacht, W; Mempel, A; Strowitzki, T; Vogt, P H

    2006-01-01

    The Premature Ovarian Failure (POF) syndrome is a very heterogeneous clinical disorder due probably to the complex genetic networks controlling human folliculogenesis. Clinical subgroups of POF patients whose aetiology of ovarian failure is based on the same genetic factors are therefore difficult to establish. Some experimental evidence suggests that these genes might be clustered on the female sex chromosome in the POF1 and POF2 loci. This review is aimed to present an overview of the actual structural changes of the X chromosome causing POF, and to present a number of X and autosomal female fertility genes which are probably key genes in human folliculogenesis and are therefore prominent POF candidate genes. Towards the molecular analysis of their functional contribution to the genetic aetiology of POF in the clinic, an interdisciplinary scheme for their diagnostic analysis is presented in a pilot study focussed on chromosome analyses and the expression analysis of some major POF candidate genes (DAZL, DBX, FOXL2, INHalpha, GDF9, USP9X) in the leukocytes of 101 POF patients. It starts with a comprehensive and significantly improved clinical diagnostic program for this large and heterogeneous patient group.

  14. Impact of next-generation sequencing on molecular diagnosis of inherited non-syndromic hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Gao; Pu Dai

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most common birth defects, with inherited genetic defects play an important role, contributing to about 60% of deafness occurring in infants. However, hearing impairment is genetically heterogeneous, with both common and rare forms occurring due to mutations in estimated 500 genes. Due to the large number and presumably low mutation frequencies of those genes, it would be highly expensive and time-consuming to address this issue by conventional gene-by-gene Sanger sequencing. Next-generation sequencing is a revo-lutionary technology that allows the simultaneous screening of mutations in a large number of genes. It is cost effective compared to classical strategies of linkage analysis and direct sequencing when the number or size of genes is large, and thus has become a highly efficient strategy for identifying novel causative genes and mutations involved in heritable disease. In this review, we describe major NGS methodologies currently used for genetic disorders and highlight applications of these technologies in studies of molecular diagnosis and the discovery of genes implicated in non-syndromic hearing loss.

  15. Clinical, biochemical and molecular analysis of two infants with familial chylomicronemia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonghong; Zhou, Jing; Zheng, Wenxin; Lan, Zhangzhang; Huang, Zhiwei; Yang, Qingnan; Liu, Chengbo; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease due mainly to inherited deficiencies in the proteins or enzymes involved in the clearance of triglycerides from circulation. It usually happens in late childhood and adolescence, which can have serious consequences if misdiagnosed or untreated. In the present study, we investigated two Chinese male babies (A and B), 30d and 48d in age, respectively, who have milky plasma. Clinical, biochemical, and radiological assessments were performed, while samples from the patients were referred for molecular diagnosis, including genetic testing and subsequent analysis of related genes. The fasting serum lipids of the two patients showed extreme lipid abnormalities. Through a low-lipid formula diet including skimmed milk and dietary advice, their plasma lipid levels were significantly lower and more stable at the time of hospital discharge. The genetic testing revealed compound heterozygote mutations in the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene for patient A and two known compound heterozygote LPL gene mutations for the patient B. FCS is the most dramatic example of severe hypertriglyceridemia. Early diagnosis and timely dietary intervention is very important for affected children. PMID:27153815

  16. Trapped neutrophil syndrome in a Border Collie dog: clinical, clinico-pathologic, and molecular findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Shoubudani, Tomoaki; Nishimoto, Seira; Kawamura, Ryuta; Yabuki, Akira; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-06-01

    Trapped neutrophil syndrome (TNS) is an autosomal recessive inherited neutropenia known in Border Collies since the 1990's. Recently, the causative mutation has been identified in the canine VPS13B gene and a DNA-based diagnosis has now become available. The present paper describes clinical and clinico-pathologic findings in a Border Collie with TNS that was molecularly diagnosed for the first time in Japan. In a 10-week-old male Border Collie with microgenesis and symptoms related to recurrent infections, a hematological examination revealed severe leukopenia due to neutropenia, suggesting the dog to be affected by inherited neutropenic immunodeficiency. Direct DNA sequencing demonstrated that the dog was homozygous for the causative mutation of TNS and both its parents were heterozygous carriers. In addition, a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction-based length polymorphism analysis coupled with microchip electrophoresis was developed for the genotyping of TNS. This assay could discriminate clearly all genotypes, suggesting that it was suitable for both individual diagnosis and large-scale surveys for prevention. PMID:22240985

  17. Novel molecular variants of the Na-Cl cotransporter gene are responsible for Gitelman syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastroianni, N.; De Fusco, M.; Casari, G. [Univsersita` di Milano (Italy)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    A hereditary defect of the distal tubule accounts for the clinical features of Gitelman syndrome (GS), an autosomal recessive disease characterized by hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, metabolic alkalosis, and hypocalciuria. Recently, we cloned the cDNA coding for the human Na-Cl thiazide-sensitive cotransporter (TSC; also known as {open_quotes}NCCT{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}SLC12A3{close_quotes}) as a possible candidate for GS, and Simon et al., independently, described rotation in patients with GS. Now, we show 12 additional mutations consistent with a loss of function of the Na-Cl cotransporter in GS. Two missense replacements, R09W and P349L, are common to both studies and could represent ancient mutations. The other mutations include three deletions, two insertions, and six missense mutations. When all mutations from both studies are considered, missense mutations seem to be more frequently localized within the intracellular domains of the molecule, rather than in transmembrane or extracellular domains. One family, previously reported as a GS form with dominant inheritance, has proved to be recessive, with the affected child being a compound heterozygote. A highly informative intragenic tetranucleotide marker, useful for molecular diagnostic studies, has been identified at the acceptor splice site of exon 9. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Cytogenetic and molecular studies of Down syndrome individuals with transient leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, J.J.; Hassold, T.J. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Zipursky, A. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    There is an increased risk of leukemia in Down syndrome (DS) patients with estimates ranging from 14 to 30 times the incidence rate observed for normal children. Furthermore, one subtype of leukemia, called transient myeloproliferative disorder, or transient leukemia (TL), occurs almost exclusively in DS infants. The basis of the association between DS and leukemia is unknown but we and others have hypothesized that it may be attributable to the mechanism of origin of the extra chromosome. Therefore, we have initiated a cytogenetic and molecular study of nondisjunction in leukemic DS individuals. To date, we have obtained blood and/or tissue samples from 54 individuals, consisting of 16 cases with TL and 6 with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (postulated to be related to TL), and 32 cases of other forms of leukemia (15 ALL, 10 AML, 7 others). Our preliminary data suggest significant differences between DS children with TL and those with other types of leukemia or DS individuals with no history of leukemia. For example, the TL cases have a highly significant increase in the frequency of {open_quotes}atypical{close_quotes} constitutional karyotypes (i.e. mosaic trisomies, rings, isochromosomes) and are almost always male. Initial gene mapping studies of these cases aimed at identifying loci important in the genesis of TL will be presented and compared to similar data from DS individuals with other forms of leukemia and those without leukemia.

  19. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta ; Blair, Edward M. ; Blau, Nenad ; Bonthron, David T. ; Briggs, Tracy ; Brueton, Louise A. ; Brunner, Han G. ; Burke, Christopher J. ; Carr, Ian M. ; Carvalho, Daniel R. ; Chandler, Kate E. ; Christen, Hans-Jürgen ; Corry, Peter C. ; Cowan, Frances M. ; Cox, Helen ; D’Arrigo, Stefano ; Dean, John ; De Laet, Corinne ; De Praeter, Claudine ; Déry, Catherine ; Ferrie, Colin D. ; Flintoff, Kim ; Frints, Suzanna G. M. ; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels ; Gener, Blanca ; Goizet, Cyril ; Goutières, Françoise ; Green, Andrew J. ; Guët, Agnès ; Hamel, Ben C. J. ; Hayward, Bruce E. ; Heiberg, Arvid ; Hennekam, Raoul C. ; Husson, Marie ; Jackson, Andrew P. ; Jayatunga, Rasieka ; Jiang, Yong-Hui ; Kant, Sarina G. ; Kao, Amy ; King, Mary D. ; Kingston, Helen M. ; Klepper, Joerg ; van der Knaap, Marjo S. ; Kornberg, Andrew J. ; Kotzot, Dieter ; Kratzer, Wilfried ; Lacombe, Didier ; Lagae, Lieven ; Landrieu, Pierre Georges ; Lanzi, Giovanni ; Leitch, Andrea ; Lim, Ming J. ; Livingston, John H. ; Lourenco, Charles M. ; Lyall, E. G. Hermione ; Lynch, Sally A. ; Lyons, Michael J. ; Marom, Daphna ; McClure, John P. ; McWilliam, Robert ; Melancon, Serge B. ; Mewasingh, Leena D. ; Moutard, Marie-Laure ; Nischal, Ken K. ; Østergaard, John R. ; Prendiville, Julie ; Rasmussen, Magnhild ; Rogers, R. Curtis ; Roland, Dominique ; Rosser, Elisabeth M. ; Rostasy, Kevin ; Roubertie, Agathe ; Sanchis, Amparo ; Schiffmann, Raphael ; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine ; Seal, Sunita ; Shalev, Stavit A. ; Corcoles, C. Sierra ; Sinha, Gyan P. ; Soler, Doriette ; Spiegel, Ronen ; Stephenson, John B. P. ; Tacke, Uta ; Tan, Tiong Yang ; Till, Marianne ; Tolmie, John L. ; Tomlin, Pam ; Vagnarelli, Federica ; Valente, Enza Maria ; Van Coster, Rudy N. A. ; Van der Aa, Nathalie ; Vanderver, Adeline ; Vles, Johannes S. H. ; Voit, Thomas ; Wassmer, Evangeline ; Weschke, Bernhard ; Whiteford, Margo L. ; Willemsen, Michel A. A. ; Zankl, Andreas ; Zuberi, Sameer M. ; Orcesi, Simona ; Fazzi, Elisa ; Lebon, Pierre ; Crow, Yanick J. 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation–positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified. PMID:17846997

  20. A molecular and clinical study of Larsen syndrome caused by mutations in FLNB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bicknell, Louise S.; Farrington-Rock, Claire; Shafeghati, Yousef; Rump, Patrick; Alanay, Yasemin; Alembik, Yves; Al-Madani, Navid; Firth, Helen; Karimi-Nejad, Mohammad Hassan; Kim, Chong Ae; Leask, Kathryn; Maisenbacher, Melissa; Moran, Ellen; Pappas, John G.; Prontera, Paolo; de Ravel, Thomy; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Fryer, Alan; Unger, Sheila; Wilson, L. C.; Lachman, Ralph S.; Rimoin, David L.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Krakow, Deborah; Robertson, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Larsen syndrome is an autosomal dominant osteochondrodysplasia characterised by large-joint dislocations and craniofacial anomalies. Recently, Larsen syndrome was shown to be caused by missense mutations or small inframe deletions in FLNB, encoding the cytoskeletal protein filamin B. To

  1. Antiviral activity and underlying molecular mechanisms of Matrine against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Na; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Cai-Hong; Li, E; He, Jun-Ping; Wang, Shao-Yu; Hu, Yuan-Liang; Lei, Hai-Min; Li, Hong-Quan

    2014-04-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), caused by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), is an acute infectious disease. The prevalence of PRRS has made swine industry suffered huge financial losses. Matrine, a natural compound, has been demonstrated to possess anti-PRRSV activity in Marc-145 cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms were still unknown. The main objective of our study was to discuss the effect of Matrine on PRRSV N protein expression and PRRSV induced apoptosis. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blot were used to assess the effect of Matrine on N protein expression. Apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence staining. In addition, the effect of Matrine on caspase-3 activation was investigated by Western blot. Indirect immunofluorescence assay and Western blot analysis demonstrated that Matrine could inhibit N protein expression in Marc-145 cells. And Matrine was found to be able to impair PRRSV-induced apoptosis by inhibiting caspase-3 activation.

  2. A de novo germline MLH1 mutation in a Lynch syndrome patient with discordant immunohistochemical and molecular biology test results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabrice Airaud; Sébastien Küry; Isabelle Valo; Ingrid Maury; Dominique Bonneau; Olivier Ingster; Stéphane Bezieau

    2012-01-01

    We describe a patient with a Homo sapiens mutL homolog 1 (MLH1)-associated Lynch syndrome with previous diagnoses of two distinct primary cancers:a sigmoid colon cancer at the age of 39 years,and a right colon cancer at the age of 50 years.The mutation identified in his blood and buccal cells,c.1771delG,p.Asp591Ilefs*25,appears to be a de novo event,as it was not transmitted by either of his parents.This type of de novo event is rare in MLH1 as only three cases have been reported in the literature so far.Furthermore,the discordant results observed between replication error phenotyping and immunohistochemistry highlight the importance of the systematic use of both pre-screening tests in the molecular diagnosis of Lynch syndrome.

  3. Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome and Differential Diagnosis: A Molecular and Clinical Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangi, Giuseppe; Zollino, Marcella

    2015-09-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome is an emerging neurodevelopmental disorder caused by haploinsufficiency of the TCF4 gene on chromosome 18q21. It is characterized by severe intellectual disability, seizures, microcephaly, constipation and a distinctive facial gestalt. Although the overlapping phenotype of microcephaly, epilepsy, absent speech and constipation represents a challenge for the differential diagnosis with Angelman syndrome, Rett syndrome and Mowat-Wilson syndrome, distinctive of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome are breathing abnormalities, that can occur as either hyperventilation episodes or apnea crises, and a typical facial dysmorphism, including bitemporal narrowing, squared forehead, deep-set eyes, peculiar nose conformation, with broad nasal bridge, down-turned nasal tip and flaring nostrils, typical shape of the mouth, with a tented and M shaped upper lip, and widely spaced teeth. The occurrence of these signs in variable association of uncoordinated movements, microcephaly of postnatal onset, eye abnormalities, constipation, epilepsy and subtle brain abnormalities is highly predictive of a TCF4 mutation, making it possible to plan a genetic test of choice among severe encephalopathies. Angelman syndrome represents the nosological condition closest to Pitt-Hopkins syndrome. PMID:27617128

  4. Angelman syndrome: Validation of molecular cytogenetic analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 for deletion detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, L.; Knoll, J.H.M. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-03-13

    In a series of 18 individuals comprising parents of Angelman syndrome (AS) patients and AS patients with large deletions, microdeletions, and no deletions, we utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with genomic phage clones for loci D15S63 and GABRB3 for deletion detection of chromosome 15q11-q13. Utilization of probes at these loci allows detection of common large deletions and permits discrimination of less common small deletions. In all individuals the molecular cytogenetic data were concordant with the DNA deletion analyses. FISH provides an accurate method of deletion detection for chromosome 15q11-q13. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Clinical and molecular characteristics of East Asian patients with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meihua Wong; YingHsia Chu; Hwei Ling Tan; Hideharu Bessho; Joanne Ngeow; Tiffany Tang; MinHan Tan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) syndrome is a dominantly inherited multisystem cancer syndrome caused by a heterozygous mutation in the VHL tumor suppressor gene. Previous studies suggested that similar populations of Caucasian and Japanese patients have similar genotype or phenotype characteristics. In this comprehensive study of East Asian patients, we investigated the genetic and clinical characteristics of patients with VHL syndrome. Methods: To create a registry of clinical characteristics and mutations reported in East Asian patients with VHL syndrome, we conducted a comprehensive review of English language and non‑English language articles identi‑fied through a literature search. Publications in Japanese or Chinese language were read by native speakers of the language, who then performed the data extraction. Results: Of 237 East Asian patients with VHL syndrome, 154 unique kindreds were identified for analysis. Analyzed by kindred, missense mutations were the most common (40.9%, 63/154), followed by large/complete deletions (32.5%, 50/154) and nonsense mutations (11.7%, 18/154). Compared with a previously reported study of both East Asian and non‑East Asian patients, we found several key differences. First, missense and frameshift mutations in the VHL gene occurred less commonly in our population of East Asian patients (40.9% vs. 52.0%; P = 0.012 and 8.4% vs.13.0%; P < 0.001, respectively). Second, large/complete deletions were more common in our population of East Asian patients (32.5% vs. 10.5%; P < 0.001). Third, phenotypically, we observed that, in our population of East Asian patients with VHL syndrome, the incidence of retinal capillary hemangioblastoma was lower, whereas the incidence of renal cell carcinoma was higher. Conclusions: Evidence suggests that the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of East Asian patients with VHL syndrome differ from other populations. This should be considered when making screening recommendations for

  6. The relationship between irritable bowel syndrome and psychiatric disorders: from molecular changes to clinical manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Fadgyas-Stanculete, Mihaela; Buga, Ana-Maria; Popa-Wagner, Aurel; Dumitrascu, Dan L

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional syndrome characterized by chronic abdominal pain accompanied by altered bowel habits. Although generally considered a functional disorder, there is now substantial evidence that IBS is associated with a poor quality of life and significant negative impact on work and social domains. Neuroimaging studies documented changes in the prefrontal cortex, ventro-lateral and posterior parietal cortex and thalami, and implicate alteration of brain circuits...

  7. Preliminary molecular basis of Danggui-buxue-tang on Qi deficiency and blood stasis syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ya; LI Xiao-hui

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the molecular biology mechanism of Danggui-buxue-tang on tonifying Qi and controlling blood circulation through modulation the immune functional genes. Methods Rats were randomly divided into control group, model group, and Danggui-buxue-tang group. Effect of Dang-guibuxue-tang on mRNA expressions of IL-1β, TNF-α, HSP-70, NF-kB, p38MAPK and JNK in blood cells of rats with Qi deficiency and blood stasis were measured with real-time fluorescent quantitative-PCR at 5th, 14th and 28th day. And that in artery wall were determined at the 28th day. NF-kB/p65 and p-c-jun protein expressions in rat artery wall were detected by western blotting as well. Results In model group, TNF-α, IL-1β, NF-kB, HSP-70, p38MAPK and JNK mRNA expression in blood cell increased significantly compared with control group. Compared with model group, mRNA expression of IL-1βand JNK decreased significantly; TNF-α decreased at 5th, 14th day;HSP-70, p38MAPK decreased at 14th, 28th day; NF-kB decreased at 28th day. In model group, TNF-α, IL-1β, NF-kB, p38MAPK and JNK mRNA expression in artery increased compared with control group, excluded HSP-70, and that in Danggui-buxue-tang group decreased significantly. In model group, NF-kB/p65 and p-c-jun protein expression in artery increased compared with control group, and that in Danggui-buxue-tang group decreased significantly. Conclusions The effects of Dang-guibuxuetang on Qi deficiency and blood stasis syndrome was brought from the regulating of cytokine network at multi-link and multi-target, NF-kB, p38MAPK and JNK signal transduction pathways included. Through which the immune system and whole body reached to a functional balance status.

  8. Clinical and Molecular Features of Laron Syndrome, A Genetic Disorder Protecting from Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, Anna; Kołodziej-Rzepa, Marta; Biesaga, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a rare, genetic disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The disease is caused by mutations of the growth hormone (GH) gene, leading to GH/insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF1) signalling pathway defect. Patients with LS have characteristic biochemical features, such as a high serum level of GH and low IGF1 concentration. Laron syndrome was first described by the Israeli physician Zvi Laron in 1966. Globally, around 350 people are affected by this syndrome and there are two large groups living in separate geographic regions: Israel (69 individuals) and Ecuador (90 individuals). They are all characterized by typical appearance such as dwarfism, facial phenotype, obesity and hypogenitalism. Additionally, they suffer from hypoglycemia, hypercholesterolemia and sleep disorders, but surprisingly have a very low cancer risk. Therefore, studies on LS offer a unique opportunity to better understand carcinogenesis and develop new strategies of cancer treatment. PMID:27381597

  9. A genetic and molecular update on adrenocortical causes of Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-05-01

    Primary adrenal Cushing syndrome is the result of cortisol hypersecretion mainly by adenomas and, rarely, by bilateral micronodular or macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia. cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signalling is the major activator of cortisol secretion in the adrenal cortex. Many adenomas and hyperplasias associated with primary hypercortisolism carry somatic or germline mutations in genes that encode constituents of the cAMP-PKA pathway. In this Review, we discuss Cushing syndrome and its linkage to dysregulated cAMP-PKA signalling, with a focus on genetic findings in the past few years. In addition, we discuss the presence of germline inactivating mutations in ARMC5 in patients with primary bilateral macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia. This finding has implications for genetic counselling of affected patients; hitherto, most patients with this form of adrenal hyperplasia and Cushing syndrome were thought to have a sporadic and not a familial disorder.

  10. Bosma arrhinia microphthalmia syndrome in a Mexican patient with a molecular analysis of PAX6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Solano, Luis E; Chacón, Liliana; Morales-Mata, Dinorah; Zenteno, Juan C; Ramírez-Dueñas, Maria L; García-Ortiz, Jose E

    2016-01-01

    The association of anophthalmia, arrhinia, and hypogonadism constitutes the major clinical features for Bosma arrhinia microphthalmia syndrome. However, there is variability in the presentation of this disease; arrhinia is the most constant clinical feature, which is then combined with a spectrum of anophthalmia/microphthalmia and/or hypogonadism. This rare entity is not associated with any specific genes, but the genes that are related to arrhinia and anophthalmia have been studied in an attempt to explain this phenomenon. We analyzed the PAX6 gene in a Bosma arrhinia microphthalmia syndrome patient but found no variation or mutation that could constitute or establish a causal association in our patient.

  11. Arterial tortuosity syndrome : Clinical and molecular findings in 12 newly identified families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callewaert, B. L.; Willaert, A.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, W. S.; De Backer, J.; Devriendt, K.; Albrecht, B.; Ramos-Arroyo, M. A.; Doco-Fenzy, M.; Hennekam, R. C. M.; Pyeritz, R. E.; Krogmann, O. N.; Gillessen-kaesbach, G.; Wakeling, E. L.; Nik-zainal, S.; Francannet, C.; Mauran, P.; Booth, C.; Barrow, M.; Dekens, R.; Loeys, B. L.; Coucke, P. J.; De Paepe, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Arterial tortuosity syndrome (ATS) is a rare autosomal recessive connective tissue disease, characterized by widespread arterial involvement with elongation, tortuosity, and aneurysms of the large and middle-sized arteries. Recently, SLC2A10 mutations were identified in this condition. This gene enc

  12. White spot syndrome virus molecular epidemiology: relation with shrimp farming and disease outbreaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran Thi Tuyet, H.

    2012-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV), the causative agent of white spot disease (WSD), has been responsible for most shrimp production losses around the world since the early 1990s. Previous research has focused mainly on the characterization of WSSV genomic variation to gain a better insight in the evo

  13. A molecular analysis of fecal and mucosal bacterial communities in irritable bowel syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Codling, Caroline

    2010-02-01

    The objectives of this study were, firstly, to determine the diversity of the host\\'s gut microbiota in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) using a culture-independent method (DGGE of the 16S rRNA gene) and, secondly, to examine mucosal biopsies of IBS patients and compare them to their own fecal microbiota.

  14. Gastrointestinal Polyposis Syndromes : Clinical and molecular aspects of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis and Juvenile Polyposis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, L.A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important cause death. In the Netherlands, approximately 10.000 patients are diagnosed with CRC each year. Rare hereditary gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes predisposing to CRC, including familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), juvenile polyposis (JPS) and Peutz-Jegher

  15. Prenatal molecular testing for Beckwith-Wiedemann and Silver-Russell syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Brioude, Frédéric; Russo, Silvia;

    2016-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann and Silver-Russell syndromes (BWS/SRS) are two imprinting disorders (IDs) associated with disturbances of the 11p15.5 chromosomal region. In BWS, epimutations and genomic alterations within 11p15.5 are observed in >70% of patients, whereas in SRS they are observed in about 60% ...

  16. Scientific statement on the diagnostic criteria, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and molecular genetics of polycystic ovary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Dumesic (Daniel); S.E. Oberfield (Sharon E.); E. Stener-Victorin (Elisabet); J.C. Marshall (John C.); J.S.E. Laven (Joop); R.S. Legro (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPolycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous and complex disorder that has both adverse reproductive and metabolic implications for affected women. However, there is generally poor understanding of its etiology. Varying expert-based diagnostic criteria utilize some combination of

  17. Mowat-Wilson syndrome: the first clinical and molecular report of an indonesian patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mundhofir, F.E.; Yntema, H.G.; Burgt, I. van der; Hamel, B.C.; Faradz, S.M.; Bon, B.W. van

    2012-01-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (OMIM 235730) is a genetic condition characterized by moderate-to-severe intellectual disability, a recognizable facial phenotype, and multiple congenital anomalies. The striking facial phenotype in addition to other features such as severely impaired speech, hypotonia, microce

  18. Identification of molecular alterations in gastrointestinal carcinomas and dysplastic hamartomas in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korsse, Susanne E.; Biermann, Katharina; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Wagner, Anja; Dekker, Evelien; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M. H.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; van Leerdam, Monique E.; van Veelen, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is caused by mutations in the LKB1 gene. It is characterized by gastrointestinal polyposis and an increased cancer risk, mainly in the gastrointestinal tract. Mechanisms of PJS-associated carcinogenesis are unclear. We investigated the involvement of candidate genes and

  19. Phenotypic variability of the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA: clinical, molecular and biochemical delineation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kariminejad Ariana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA (OMIM 225400 is a rare inheritable connective tissue disorder characterized by a deficiency of collagen lysyl hydroxylase 1 (LH1; EC 1.14.11.4 due to mutations in PLOD1. Biochemically this results in underhydroxylation of collagen lysyl residues and, hence, an abnormal pattern of lysyl pyridinoline (LP and hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP crosslinks excreted in the urine. Clinically the disorder is characterized by hypotonia and kyphoscoliosis at birth, joint hypermobility, and skin hyperelasticity and fragility. Severe hypotonia usually leads to delay in gross motor development, whereas cognitive development is reported to be normal. Methods We describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular characterisation, as well as electron microscopy findings of skin, in 15 patients newly diagnosed with this rare type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Results Age at diagnosis ranged from 5 months to 27 years, with only 1/3 of the patients been diagnosed correctly in the first year of life. A similar disease frequency was found in females and males, however a broad disease severity spectrum (intra- and interfamilial, independent of molecular background or biochemical phenotype, was observed. Kyphoscoliosis, one of the main clinical features was not present at birth in 4 patients. Importantly we also noted the occurrence of vascular rupture antenatally and postnatally, as well as developmental delay in 5 patients. Conclusion In view of these findings we propose that EDS VIA is a highly variable clinical entity, presenting with a broad clinical spectrum, which may also be associated with cognitive delay and an increased risk for vascular events. Genotype/phenotype association studies and additional molecular investigations in more extended EDS VIA populations will be necessary to further elucidate the cause of the variability of the disease severity.

  20. Molecular characterization of Salmonella strains in individuals with acute diarrhea syndrome in the State of Sucre, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hectorina Rodulfo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION:In Venezuela, acute diarrheic syndrome (ADS is a primary cause of morbi-mortality, often involving the Salmonella genus. Salmonella infections are associated with acute gastroenteritis, one of the most common alimentary intoxications, and caused by the consumption of contaminated water and food, especially meat. METHODS: Conventional and molecular methods were used to detect Salmonella strains from 330 fecal samples from individuals of different ages and both sexes with ADS. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used for the molecular characterization of Salmonella, using invA, sefA, and fliC genes for the identification of this genus and the serotypes Enteritidis and Typhimurium, respectively. RESULTS: The highest frequency of individuals with ADS was found in children 0-2 years old (39.4%, and the overall frequency of positive coprocultures was 76.9%. A total of 14 (4.2% strains were biochemically and immunologically identified as Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, of which 7 were classified as belonging to the Enteritidis serotype, 4 to the Typhimurium serotype, and 3 to other serotypes. The S. enterica strains were distributed more frequently in the age groups 3-4 and 9-10 years old. CONCLUSIONS: The molecular characterization method used proved to be highly specific for the typing of S. enterica strains using DNA extracted from both the isolated colonies and selective enrichment broths directly inoculated with fecal samples, thus representing a complementary tool for the detection and identification of ADS-causing bacteria.

  1. Molecular findings of Colombian patients with type VI mucopolysaccharidosis (Maroteaux–Lamy syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Adolfo Giraldo; Paola Ayala-Ramírez; Juan Carlos Prieto; Reggie García-Robles; Johanna Carolina Acosta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Maroteaux–Lamy syndrome, or mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VI, is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficient activity of the enzyme arylsulfatase B (ARSB), required to degrade dermatan sulfate. The onset and progression of the disease vary, producing a spectrum of clinical presentation. So far, 133 mutations have been reported. The aim of this study is to determine the mutations in the ARSB gene that are responsible for this disease in Colombian pati...

  2. Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Volutrauma and Molecular Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Carrasco Loza, R; Villamizar Rodríguez, G; Medel Fernández, N

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical condition secondary to a variety of insults leading to a severe acute respiratory failure and high mortality in critically ill patients. Patients with ARDS generally require mechanical ventilation, which is another important factor that may increase the ALI (acute lung injury) by a series of pathophysiological mechanisms, whose common element is the initial volutrauma in the alveolar units, and forming part of an entity known clinically...

  3. Altered molecular specificity of surfactant phosphatidycholine synthesis in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dushianthan, Ahilanandan; Goss, Victoria; Cusack, Rebecca; Grocott, Michael P. W.; Postle, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening critical illness, characterised by qualitative and quantitative surfactant compositional changes associated with premature airway collapse, gas-exchange abnormalities and acute hypoxic respiratory failure. The underlying mechanisms for this dysregulation in surfactant metabolisms are not fully explored. Lack of therapeutic benefits from clinical trials, highlight the importance of detailed in-vivo analysis and charact...

  4. Staphylococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome 2000–2006: Epidemiology, Clinical Features, and Molecular Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    DeVries, Aaron S.; Lindsey Lesher; Patrick M Schlievert; Tyson Rogers; Lourdes G Villaume; Richard Danila; Ruth Lynfield

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Circulating strains of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) have changed in the last 30 years including the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant SA (MRSA). A report suggested staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS) was increasing over 2000-2003. The last population-based assessment of TSS was 1986. METHODS: Population-based active surveillance for TSS meeting the CDC definition using ICD-9 codes was conducted in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area (population 2,642,056) fro...

  5. Molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome: role of reduced IRS2-dependent signaling

    OpenAIRE

    González-Navarro, Herminia; Vinué, Ángela; Vila-Caballer, Marian; Fortuño, Ana; Beloqui, Oscar; Zalba, Guillermo; Burks, Deborah J.; Díez, Javier; Andrés, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The mechanisms underlying accelerated atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients remain poorly defined. In the mouse, complete disruption of insulin receptor substrate-2 (Irs2) causes insulin resistance, MetS-like manifestations, and accelerates atherosclerosis. Here, we performed human, mouse, and cell culture studies to gain insight into the contribution of defective Irs2 signaling to MetS-associated alterations. METHODS AND RESULTS: In circulating leukocytes from ...

  6. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R.M.; Zackai, E.H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-09-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, the authors have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. The authors have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. COL11A2 mutation associated with autosomal recessive Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome: molecular and clinical overlap with otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Tamar; Rabinowitz, Ronen; Hendler, Netta; Galil, Aharon; Flusser, Hagit; Chemke, Juan; Gradstein, Libe; Lifshitz, Tova; Ofir, Rivka; Elbedour, Khalil; Birk, Ohad S

    2005-01-01

    Autosomal recessive Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome (WZS) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by rhizomelic dwarfism and severe hearing loss. Mutations in the COL11A2 gene have been implicated in causing the autosomal dominant form of this syndrome as well as non-ocular Stickler syndrome and the autosomal recessive syndrome otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED). In a consanguineous Bedouin tribe living in Southern Israel, five individuals affected by autosomal recessive WZS were available for genetic analysis. Homozygosity of a mutation in the COL11A2 gene was found in all affected individuals. This finding lends molecular support to the clinical notion that autosomal recessive WZS and OSMED are a single entity. PMID:15558753

  8. Molecular analysis of FGFR 2 and associated clinical observations in two Chinese families with Crouzon syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying; Gao, Hongbin; Ai, Siming; Eswarakumar, Jacob V P; Li, Tao; Liu, Bingqian; Jiang, Hongye; Liu, Yuhua; Liu, Xialin; Li, Yonghao; Ni, Yao; Chen, Jiangna; Lin, Zhuoling; Liang, Xiaoling; Jin, Chenjin; Huang, Xinhua; Lu, Lin; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-09-01

    Crouzon syndrome, a dominantly inherited disorder and the most common type of craniosynostosis syndrome, is caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR 2) gene, and characterized by craniosynostosis, shallow orbits, ocular proptosis, midface hypoplasia and a curved, beak‑like nose. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR 2) gene in two Chinese families with Crouzon syndrome and to characterize the associated clinical features. Two families underwent complete ophthalmic examination, and three patients in two families were diagnosed with Crouzon syndrome. Genomic DNA was extracted from leukocytes of peripheral blood samples, which were collected from the family members and 200 unrelated control subjects from the same population. Exons 8 and 10 of the FGFR 2 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction analysis and were directly sequenced. Ophthalmic examinations, including best‑corrected visual acuity, slit‑lamp examination, fundus examination and Computerized Tomography scans, and physical examinations were performed to exclude systemic diseases. These patients were affected with shallow orbits and ocular proptosis, accompanied by midface hypoplasia, craniosynostosis, strabismus or papilloedema, with clinically normal hands and feet. A heterozygous FGFR 2 missense mutation, c.811‑812insGAG (p.273insGlu) in exon 8 was identified in the affected individual, but not in the unaffected family members or the normal control individuals in family 1. In family 2, another heterozygous FGFR 2 missense mutation, c.842A>G (P.Tyr281Cys or Y281C), in exon 8 was identified in the affected boy and his mother, but not in the unaffected family members or the normal control individuals. Although FGFR 2 gene mutations and polymorphisms have been reported in various ethnic groups, particularly in the area of osteology, the present study reported for the first time, to the best of

  9. Molecular basis of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome in Chinese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SIU Wai-kwan; TONG Sui-fan; SO Wing-yee; CHOW Chun-chung; TANG Mary Hoi-yin; TAM Wing-hung; CHAN Albert Yan-wo; MA Ronald Ching-wan; LAM Ching-wan; MAK Chloe Miu; YUEN Yuet-ping; LO Fai-man Ivan; CHAN Kin-wah; LAM Siu-fung; LING Siu-cheung

    2011-01-01

    Background Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome is an autosomal dominant familial cancer syndrome predisposing the affected individuals to multiple tumours in various organs.The genetic basis of VHL in Southern Chinese is largely unknown.In this study,we characterized the mutation spectrum of VHL in nine unrelated Southern Chinese families.Methods Nine probands with clinical features of VHL,two symptomatic and eight asymptomatic family members were included in this study.Prenatal diagnosis was performed twice for one proband.Two probands had only isolated bilateral phaeochromocytoma.The VHL gene was screened for mutations by polymerase chain reaction,direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA).Results The nine probands and the two symptomatic family members carried heterozygous germline mutations.Eight different VHL mutations were identified in the nine probands.One splicing mutation,NM_000551.2:c.463+1G>T,was novel.The other seven VHL mutations,c.233A>G [p.Asn78Ser],c.239G>T [p.Ser80lle],c.319C>G [p.Arg107Gly],c.481C>T [p.Arg161X],c.482G>A [p.Arg161GIn],c.499C>T [p.Arg167Trp] and an exon 2 deletion,had been previously reported.Three asymptomatic family members were positive for the mutation and the other five tested negative.In prenatal diagnosis,the fetuses were positive for the mutation.Conclusions Genetic analysis could accurately confirm VHL syndrome in patients with isolated tumours such as sporadic phaeochromocytoma or epididymal papillary cystadenoma.Mutation detection in asymptomatic family members allows regular tumour surveillance and early intervention to improve their prognosis.DNA-based diagnosis can have an important impact on clinical management for VHL families.

  10. C-reactive protein, high-molecular-weight adiponectin and development of metabolic syndrome in the Japanese general population: a longitudinal cohort study.

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    Yoshifumi Saisho

    Full Text Available AIMS: To clarify predictive values of C-reactive protein (CRP and high-molecular-weight (HMW adiponectin for development of metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study of Japanese workers who had participated in an annual health checkup in 2007 and 2011. A total of 750 subjects (558 men and 192 women, age 46±8 years who had not met the criteria of metabolic syndrome and whose CRP and HMW-adiponectin levels had been measured in 2007 were enrolled in this study. Associations between CRP, HMW-adiponectin and development of metabolic syndrome after 4 years were assessed by logistic regression analysis and their predictive values were compared by receiver operating characteristic analysis. RESULTS: Among 750 subjects, 61 (8.1% developed metabolic syndrome defined by modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III criteria and 53 (7.1% developed metabolic syndrome defined by Japan Society for the Study of Obesity (JASSO in 2011. Although CRP and HMW-adiponectin were both significantly correlated with development of metabolic syndrome, multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that HMW-adiponectin but not CRP was associated with metabolic syndrome independently of BMI or waist circumference. Adding these biomarkers to BMI or waist circumference did not improve the predictive value for metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that the traditional markers of adiposity such as BMI or waist circumference remain superior markers for predicting metabolic syndrome compared to CRP, HMW-adiponectin, or the combination of both among the Japanese population.

  11. Audiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The following conditions may affect test results: Acoustic neuroma Acoustic trauma Age-related hearing loss Alport syndrome ... Mosby Elsevier; 2010:chap 190. Read More Acoustic neuroma Acoustic trauma Age-related hearing loss Alport syndrome ...

  12. Changes in the folding landscape of the WW domain provide a molecular mechanism for an inherited genetic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucheta-Martinez, Encarna; D’Amelio, Nicola; Lelli, Moreno; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Sudol, Marius; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-07-01

    WW domains are small domains present in many human proteins with a wide array of functions and acting through the recognition of proline-rich sequences. The WW domain belonging to polyglutamine tract-binding protein 1 (PQBP1) is of particular interest due to its direct involvement in several X chromosome-linked intellectual disabilities, including Golabi-Ito-Hall (GIH) syndrome, where a single point mutation (Y65C) correlates with the development of the disease. The mutant cannot bind to its natural ligand WBP11, which regulates mRNA processing. In this work we use high-field high-resolution NMR and enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the molecular causes the disease. We find that the wild type protein is partially unfolded exchanging among multiple beta-strand-like conformations in solution. The Y65C mutation further destabilizes the residual fold and primes the protein for the formation of a disulphide bridge, which could be at the origin of the loss of function.

  13. Narcolepsy and familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome: molecular genetics of sleep disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafti, M.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Overeem, S.

    2007-01-01

    Sleep disorders are very prevalent and represent an emerging worldwide epidemic. However, research into the molecular genetics of sleep disorders remains surprisingly one of the least active fields. Nevertheless, rapid progress is being made in several prototypical disorders, leading recently to the

  14. Mowat-Wilson syndrome: neurological and molecular study in seven patients

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    José Albino da Paz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To present a seven-cases serie of Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS. Method All patients with positive mutation for the ZEB2 were evaluated by a geneticist and a neurologist, with clinical and laboratorial characterization. Results A peculiar facies and mental retardation were present in all patients. The Denver II scale showed intense delay in all aspects, especially fine motor and adaptive. Acquired microcephaly was observed in five patients. Only one patient did not present epilepsy. Epilepsy was focal and predominating in sleep, with status epilepticus in three patients. The initial seizure was associated with fever in most patients (4/6. The EEG showed epileptic focal activity (5/7. The imaging studies revealed total agenesis (4/7 and partial agenesis of the corpus callosum (1/7. Conclusion Physicians who care for patients with mental retardation and epilepsy should be aware of SMW.

  15. Novel molecular pathways elicited by mutant FGFR2 may account for brain abnormalities in Apert syndrome.

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    Erika Yeh

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (AS, the most severe form craniosynostosis, is characterized by premature fusion of coronal sutures. Approximately 70% of AS patients carry S252W gain-of-function mutation in FGFR2. Besides the cranial phenotype, brain dysmorphologies are present and are not seen in other FGFR2-asociated craniosynostosis, such as Crouzon syndrome (CS. Here, we hypothesized that S252W mutation leads not only to overstimulation of FGFR2 downstream pathway, but likewise induces novel pathological signaling. First, we profiled global gene expression of wild-type and S252W periosteal fibroblasts stimulated with FGF2 to activate FGFR2. The great majority (92% of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs were divergent between each group of cell populations and they were regulated by different transcription factors. We than compared gene expression profiles between AS and CS cell populations and did not observe correlations. Therefore, we show for the first time that S252W mutation in FGFR2 causes a unique cell response to FGF2 stimulation. Since our gene expression results suggested that novel signaling elicited by mutant FGFR2 might be associated with central nervous system (CNS development and maintenance, we next investigated if DEGs found in AS cells were also altered in the CNS of an AS mouse model. Strikingly, we validated Strc (stereocilin in newborn Fgfr2(S252W/+ mouse brain. Moreover, immunostaining experiments suggest a role for endothelial cells and cerebral vasculature in the establishment of characteristic CNS dysmorphologies in AS that has not been proposed by previous literature. Our approach thus led to the identification of new target genes directly or indirectly associated with FGFR2 which are contributing to the pathophysiology of AS.

  16. Inherited ichthyosis: Syndromic forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Kozo

    2016-03-01

    Among diseases that cause ichthyosis as one of the symptoms, there are some diseases that induce abnormalities in organs other than the skin. Of these, diseases with characteristic signs are regarded as syndromes. Although these syndromes are very rare, Netherton syndrome, Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome, and Refsum syndrome have been described in texts as representative ones. It is important to know the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms in order to establish an effective therapy and beneficial genetic counseling including a prenatal diagnosis.

  17. Molecular characterization of a balanced rearrangement of chromosome 12 in two siblings with Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsenko, Svetlana A; del Valle Torrado, Maria; Fernandes, Priscilla H; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Gallego, Marta; Herrera, Jorge; Bacino, Carlos A

    2009-12-01

    The etiology of Noonan syndrome (NS) has been greatly elucidated with the discovery of the disease causative genes PTPN11, KRAS, SOS1, and RAF1, all involved in the RAS/MAPK-signaling cascade. Given that overall mutations are identified in about 70% of patients, identification of other NS associated genes remains a high priority to fully understand the etiopathogenesis of the condition. We report two affected siblings with an apparently balanced rearrangement of chromosome 12 ins(12)(q12p11.2p12.3) which segregates with the Noonan phenotype. The rearrangement was inherited from the phenotypically normal mother who had mosaicism for the derivative chromosome 12. There were no mutations of PTPN11, KRAS, SOS1, or RAF1 genes detected in the probands. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis we identified the three breakpoints involved at 12p12.3, 12p11.2, and 12q12. By microarray analysis, there were no gains or losses near the breakpoints. Neither, the PTPN11 or KRAS region on chromosome 12 was involved in the rearrangement. We hypothesize that other NS candidate gene(s) may be located in the breakpoint regions of chromosome 12 causing the Noonan phenotype in both of these children.

  18. Molecular screening of selected long QT syndrome (LQTS) mutations in 165 consecutive bodies found in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunetta, Philippe; Levo, Antti; Laitinen, Päivi J; Fodstad, Heidi; Kontula, Kimmo; Sajantila, Antti

    2003-04-01

    The association of the long QT-syndrome (LQTS) with single accidental drowning or near-drowning cases has been recently emphasised, but no data on the prevalence of LQTS among drowning victims are currently available. In this study, we have retrospectively screened specific founder mutations in KCNQ1 (KVLQT1) and KCNH2 (HERG) genes in 165 consecutive bodies found in water in Finland. We found a KCNH2-Fin mutation in a 44-year-old woman whose death was classified as suicidal drowning, whereas no other carriers of the two LQTS founder mutations were identified among the remaining 164 victims. This study provides the first estimate of the minimum prevalence of LQTS (0.61%, CI(95): 0.02-3.33) in such a setting and demonstrates the value of genetic analysis of LQTS in putative drownings. The detection of a LQTS founder mutation in a body found in water is a relatively rare event based on our study sample. This finding is, however, of utmost medico-legal importance, since it broadens the spectrum of potential causes and manners of death.

  19. Molecular Characterization and Subtyping of Blastocystis Species in Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rojaleen; Khalil, Shehla; Mirdha, B R; Makharia, Govind K; Dattagupta, Siddharta; Chaudhry, Rama

    2016-01-01

    Blastocystis species has been extensively studied in recent few years to establish its pathogenecity. Present study was designed to identify and examine the association of Blastocystis sp. and its subtypes with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).Blastocystis sp. detected using wet-mount microscopy, trichrome staining, in-vitro culture and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) assay in a cohort of IBS patients (n = 150) and healthy controls (n = 100). Isolates of Blastocystis sp.were subtyped using Sequence Tagged Site and representative samples were sequenced at SSUrRNA locus.A total of sixty five isolates of Blastocystis sp. were identified [IBS (n = 50); Controls (n = 15)] of which 91% belonged to ST3 and 9% belonged to ST1. No other subtypes could be identified. Statistically significant association was observed between Blastocystis sp. and IBS patients; however no particular subtype could be ascertained to any particular clinical type of IBS.The frequency of occurrence of Blastocystis sp. was more in IBS patients as compared to the controls and ST3 being the most prevalent subtype. The genetic polymorphism of SSU-rRNA gene amongst the different Blastocystis sp.isolates found in this study reinforces the fact that these organisms are genetically highly divergent. PMID:26784888

  20. Clinical, neuroradiological and molecular characterization of cerebellar dysplasia with cysts (Poretti-Boltshauser syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Marta; Ginevrino, Monia; Mazza, Tommaso; Aiello, Chiara; Zanni, Ginevra; Baumgartner, Bastian; Borgatti, Renato; Brockmann, Knut; Camacho, Ana; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Haeusler, Martin; Hikel, Christiane; Klein, Andrea; Mandrile, Giorgia; Mercuri, Eugenio; Rating, Dietz; Romaniello, Romina; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Schimmel, Mareike; Spaccini, Luigina; Teber, Serap; von Moers, Arpad; Wente, Sarah; Ziegler, Andreas; Zonta, Andrea; Bertini, Enrico; Boltshauser, Eugen; Valente, Enza Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar dysplasia with cysts and abnormal shape of the fourth ventricle, in the absence of significant supratentorial anomalies and of muscular involvement, defines recessively inherited Poretti-Boltshauser syndrome (PBS). Clinical features comprise non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability of variable degree, language impairment, ocular motor apraxia and frequent occurrence of myopia or retinopathy. Recently, loss-of-function variants in the LAMA1 gene were identified in six probands with PBS. Here we report the detailed clinical, neuroimaging and genetic characterization of 18 PBS patients from 15 unrelated families. Biallelic LAMA1 variants were identified in 14 families (93%). The only non-mutated proband presented atypical clinical and neuroimaging features, challenging the diagnosis of PBS. Sixteen distinct variants were identified, which were all novel. In particular, the frameshift variant c.[2935delA] recurred in six unrelated families on a shared haplotype, suggesting a founder effect. No LAMA1 variants could be detected in 27 probands with different cerebellar dysplasias or non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, confirming the strong correlate between LAMA1 variants and PBS. PMID:26932191

  1. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Harinder; Leung, Anskar Y H; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2), the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2), transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2), tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT), RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11), DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL), and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21). A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS. PMID:27023522

  2. Molecular genetic analysis in 14 Czech Kabuki syndrome patients is confirming the utility of phenotypic scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paděrová, J; Holubová, A; Simandlová, M; Puchmajerová, A; Vlčková, M; Malíková, M; Pourová, R; Vejvalková, S; Havlovicová, M; Šenkeříková, M; Ptáková, N; Drábová, J; Geryk, J; Maver, A; Křepelová, A; Macek, M

    2016-09-01

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a dominantly inherited disorder mainly due to de novo pathogenic variation in KMT2D or KDM6A genes. Initially, a representative cohort of 14 Czech cases with clinical features suggestive of KS was analyzed by experienced clinical geneticists in collaboration with other specialties, and observed disease features were evaluated according to the 'MLL2-Kabuki score' defined by Makrythanasis et al. Subsequently, the aforementioned genes were Sanger sequenced and copy number variation analysis was performed by MLPA, followed by genome-wide array CGH testing. Pathogenic variants in KMT2D resulting in protein truncation in 43% (6/14; of which 3 are novel) of all cases were detected, while analysis of KDM6A was negative. MLPA analysis was negative in all instances. One female patient bears a 6.6 Mb duplication of the Xp21.2-Xp21.3 region that is probably disease causing. Subjective KS phenotyping identified predictive clinical features associated with the presence of a pathogenic variant in KMT2D. We provide additional evidence that this scoring approach fosters prioritization of patients prior to KMT2D sequencing. We conclude that KMT2D sequencing followed by array CGH is a diagnostic strategy with the highest diagnostic yield. PMID:26841933

  3. ISOLATION OF EGG DROP SYNDROME VIRUS AND ITS MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION USING SODIUM DODECYL SULPHATE POLYACRYLAMIDE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS

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    M. H. Rasool, S. U. Rahman and M. K. Mansoor

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Six isolates of egg drop syndrome (EDS virus were recovered from five different outbreaks of EDS in commercial laying hens in and around Faisalabad. The aberrant eggs were fed to the susceptible laying hens for experimental induction of infection. The samples from infected birds (egg washing, cloacal swabs, oviducts and spleens were collected, processed and inoculated into 11-day old duck embryos. The presence of virus in harvested allanto-amniotic fluid was monitored by spot and microhaemagglutination tests and confirmed by haemagglutination inhibition and agar gel precipitation tests. The EDS virus grew well in duck embryos and agglutinated only avian but not mammalian red blood cells. These isolates were purified through velocity density gradient centrifugation. Protein concentration was determined through Lowry method and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE was conducted by loading 300 µg protein concentration on 12.5% gel using discontinuous buffer system. All the six isolates showed 13 polypeptides, which were identical to those described in the referral EDS-76 virus (strain-127. The molecular weights of the polypeptides ranged from 6.5 KDa to 126 KDa.

  4. M118--a rationally engineered low-molecular-weight heparin designed specifically for the treatment of acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Takashi Kei; Qi, Yi Wei; Long, Alison; Capila, Ishan; Sasisekharan, Ram; Guerrero, Luis; Fier, Ian; Roach, James; Venkataraman, Ganesh

    2009-11-01

    The initial choice of anticoagulant therapy administered in emergency departments for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) has important consequences for subsequent patient care, as neither unfractionated heparin (UFH) nor low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) are ideally suited for all potential clinical treatment pathways. UFH remains widely used for surgical interventions because of the ability to rapidly reverse its anticoagulant activity. However, the unpredictable pharmacokinetic profile of UFH presents safety issues, and the low subcutaneous bioavailability limits the utility of UFH for patients who are medically managed. LMWH has superior pharmacokinetic properties, but its anticoagulant activity cannot be effectively monitored or reversed during surgery. There is an unmet medical need for a baseline anticoagulant therapy that addresses these shortcomings while retaining the beneficial properties of both UFH and LMWH. We describe here M118, a novel LMWH designed specifically for use in the treatment of ACS. M118 shows broad anticoagulant activity, including potent activity against both factor Xa (~240 IU/mg) and thrombin (factor IIa; ~170 IU/mg), low polydispersity, high (78%) subcutaneous bioavailability in rabbits, and predictable subcutaneous and intravenous pharmacokinetics. Additionally, the anticoagulant activity of M118 is monitorable by standard coagulation assays and is reversible with protamine. M118 demonstrates superior activity to conventional LMWH in a rabbit model of abdominal arterial thrombosis without increasing bleeding risk, and is currently being evaluated in a phase II clinical trial evaluating efficacy and safety in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:19888526

  5. Molecular Origin of Gerstmann-Str ussler-Scheinker Syndrome: Insight from Computer Simulation of an Amyloidogenic Prion Peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diadone, Isabella [University of L' Aquila, L' Aquila, Italy; DiNola, Alfredo [University of Rome; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Prion proteins become pathogenic through misfolding. Here, we characterize the folding of a peptide consisting of residues 109 122 of the Syrian hamster prion protein (the H1 peptide) and of a more amyloidogenic A117V point mutant that leads in humans to an inheritable form of the Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker syndrome. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are performed for 2.5 s. Both peptides lose their -helical starting conformations and assume a -hairpin that is structurally similar in both systems. In each simulation several unfolding/refolding events occur, leading to convergence of the thermodynamics of the conformational states to within 1 kJ/mol. The similar stability of the -hairpin relative to the unfolded state is observed in the two peptides. However, substantial differences are found between the two unfolded states. A local minimum is found within the free energy unfolded basin of the A117V mutant populated by misfolded collapsed conformations of comparable stability to the -hairpin state, consistent with increased amyloidogenicity. This population, in which V117 stabilizes a hydrophobic core, is absent in the wild-type peptide. These results are supported by simulations of oligomers showing a slightly higher stability of the associated structures and a lower barrier to association for the mutated peptide. Hence, a single point mutation carrying only two additional methyl groups is here shown to be responsible for rather dramatic differences of structuring within the unfolded (misfolded) state.

  6. Proxy molecular diagnosis from whole-exome sequencing reveals Papillon-Lefevre syndrome caused by a missense mutation in CTSC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mesut Erzurumluoglu

    Full Text Available Papillon-Lefevre syndrome (PLS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by severe early onset periodontitis and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis. A previously reported missense mutation in the CTSC gene (NM_001814.4:c.899G>A:p.(G300D was identified in a homozygous state in two siblings diagnosed with PLS in a consanguineous family of Arabic ancestry. The variant was initially identified in a heterozygous state in a PLS unaffected sibling whose whole exome had been sequenced as part of a previous Primary ciliary dyskinesia study. Using this information, a proxy molecular diagnosis was made on the PLS affected siblings after consent was given to study this second disorder found to be segregating within the family. The prevalence of the mutation was then assayed in the local population using a representative sample of 256 unrelated individuals. The variant was absent in all subjects indicating that the variant is rare in Saudi Arabia. This family study illustrates how whole-exome sequencing can generate findings and inferences beyond its primary goal.

  7. Virtual Screening and Molecular Docking Study of Bloom’s Syndrome Protein (BLM for Finding Potential Lead Drug Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Verma

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased levels of locus-specific mutations within the BLM result in development of Bloom Syndrome and patients are found to be immune deficient. HRDC domain amino acid Lys1270 is presumably to play role in mediating interactions with DNA. Single point mutation of Lys1270 (K1270V reduces the potency of Double Holliday junction (DHJ DNA unwinding so BLM lead to its functional loss. Quadruplex formation have role in immunoglobulin heavy chain switching and inhibiting RecQ helicases activity in-vitro in BLM. Variety of G-Quadruplex ligands are employed by molecular docking for arriving at lead compound identification. The scoring function of docking results describes protein-ligand interaction and it conjointly instructed that docking of ligand at mutational binding site shows some repressing function to make potential lead drug molecule. So as to know the elaborated purposeful functional mechanism of protein and to relate impact of mutation with function and activity; dock screening, hit identification and lead optimization facilitate in design of lead drug compound.

  8. Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome 2000-2006: epidemiology, clinical features, and molecular characteristics.

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    Aaron S DeVries

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Circulating strains of Staphylococcus aureus (SA have changed in the last 30 years including the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant SA (MRSA. A report suggested staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS was increasing over 2000-2003. The last population-based assessment of TSS was 1986. METHODS: Population-based active surveillance for TSS meeting the CDC definition using ICD-9 codes was conducted in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area (population 2,642,056 from 2000-2006. Medical records of potential cases were reviewed for case criteria, antimicrobial susceptibility, risk factors, and outcome. Superantigen PCR testing and PFGE were performed on available isolates from probable and confirmed cases. RESULTS: Of 7,491 hospitalizations that received one of the ICD-9 study codes, 61 TSS cases (33 menstrual, 28 non-menstrual were identified. The average annual incidence per 100,000 of all, menstrual, and non-menstrual TSS was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.32-0.77, 0.69 (0.39-1.16, and 0.32 (0.12-0.67, respectively. Women 13-24 years had the highest incidence at 1.41 (0.63-2.61. No increase in incidence was observed from 2000-2006. MRSA was isolated in 1 menstrual and 3 non-menstrual cases (7% of TSS cases; 1 isolate was USA400. The superantigen gene tst-1 was identified in 20 (80% of isolates and was more common in menstrual compared to non-menstrual isolates (89% vs. 50%, p = 0.07. Superantigen genes sea, seb and sec were found more frequently among non-menstrual compared to menstrual isolates [100% vs 25% (p = 0.4, 60% vs 0% (p<0.01, and 25% vs 13% (p = 0.5, respectively]. DISCUSSION: TSS incidence remained stable across our surveillance period of 2000-2006 and compared to past population-based estimates in the 1980s. MRSA accounted for a small percentage of TSS cases. tst-1 continues to be the superantigen associated with the majority of menstrual cases. The CDC case definition identifies the most severe cases and has

  9. Molecular Genetic Testing in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS: Facts and Fiction

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    Kenneth Blum

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Brain Reward Cascade (BRC is an interaction of neurotransmitters and their respective genes to control the amount of dopamine released within the brain. Any variations within this pathway, whether genetic or environmental (epigenetic, may result in addictive behaviors or RDS, which was coined to define addictive behaviors and their genetic components. Methods: To carry out this review we searched a number of important databases including: Filtered: Cochrane Systematic reviews; DARE; Pubmed Central Clinical Quaries; National Guideline Clearinghouse and unfiltered resources: PsychINFO; ACP PIER; PsychSage; Pubmed/Medline. The major search terms included: dopamine agonist therapy for Addiction; dopamine agonist therapy for Reward dependence; dopamine antagonistic therapy for addiction; dopamine antagonistic therapy for reward dependence and neurogenetics of RDS. Results: While there are many studies claiming a genetic association with RDS behavior, not all are scientifically accurate. Conclusion: Albeit our bias, this Clinical Pearl discusses the facts and fictions behind molecular genetic testing in RDS and the significance behind the development of the Genetic Addiction Risk Score (GARSPREDX™, the first test to accurately predict one’s genetic risk for RDS.

  10. Molecular genetic analysis of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froggatt, N.J. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)]|[Addenbrooke`s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Koch, D.J.; Barton, D.E. [Addenbrooke`s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    HNPCC is estimated to account for 5-10% of all cases of colorectal cancer. Recently genes for HNPCC have been mapped to chromosomes 2p and 3p and candidate genes (hMSH2 and hMLH1) have been identified. We have investigated the molecular pathology of HNPCC by linkage analysis and direct mutation analysis. 14 HNPCC families were investigated for linkage to hMSH2 and hMLH1 with microsatellite markers at D2S119, D2S123, D2S136, D2S391, D2S378 and D3S1007, D3S1029, D3S1076, D3S1298, D3S1611, respectively. Overall the only significant linkage was obtained with D2S123 (Zmax=3.77 at {theta}=0.0), but locus heterogeneity was confirmed: linkage to hMSH2 and hMLH1 was excluded in 6 and 5 families, respectively. 3 families were uniformative for linkage/exclusion to either candidate gene, but no evidence for a third HNPCC locus could be detected. There was no correlation between clinical phenotype (Lynch type I or II) and the results of linkage analysis. No individual family gave a lod score of >3 with any marker, and only a minority of our HNPCC families have been suitable for genetic linkage analysis. We therefore screened affected individuals from 37 unrelated kindreds for mutations in hMSH2 and exons 3 and 4 of the APC gene. Mutation screening was performed using exon specific primers and SSCP analysis. No abnormalities were found in the APC exons suggesting that mutations in these APC 5{prime} exons are not a common cause of HNPCC. hMSH2 screening is continuing, and one missense mutation in a highly conserved codon 322 in exon 6 has been identified.

  11. [Subchromosomal microdeletion identified by molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) in Rett syndrome girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorsanova, S G; Iurov, I Iu; Voinova, V Iu; Kurinnaia, O S; Zelenova, M A; Demidova, I A; Ulas, E V; Iurov, Iu B

    2013-01-01

    Molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) was applied for identification of subchromosomal microdeletions in a cohort of 12 girls with clinical features of RETT syndrome, but negative for MECP2 gene mutations. Recurrent microdeletions of MECP2 gene in chromosome X (locus Xq28) were identified in 5 girls of 12 studied. Probably RTT girls with subchromosomic microdeletions in Xq28 could represent a special subtype of the disease, which appears as clinically milder than the classic form of disease. In one case, an atypical form of RTT was associated with genomic abnormalities affecting CDKL5 gene and region critical for microdeletion Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes (15q11.2). In addition, data are presented for the first time that genetic variation in regions 3p13, 3q27.1, and 1q21.1-1q21.2 could associate with RTT-like clinical manifestations. Without application of molecular karyotyping technology and bioinformatic method of assessing the pathogenic significance of genomic rearrangements these RTT-like girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations were considered as cases of idiopathic mental retardation associated with autism. It should be noted that absence of intragenic mutations in MECP2 gene is not sufficient criteria to reject the clinical diagnosis of RTT. To avoid errors in the genetic diagnosis of this genetically heterogeneous brain disease molecular cytogenetic studies using high resolution oligonucleotide array CGH (molecular karyotyping) are needed.

  12. Molecular definition of the chromosome 7 deletion in Williams syndrome and parent-of-origin effects on growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Jurado, L.A.; Peoples, R.; Francke, U. [Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a developmental disorder with variable phenotypic expression associated, in most cases, with a hemizygous deletion of part of chromosomal band 7q11.23 that includes the elastin gene (ELN). We have investigated the frequency and size of the deletions, determined the parental origin, and correlated the molecular results with the clinical findings in 65 WS patients. Hemizygosity at the ELN locus was established by typing of two intragenic polymorphisms, quantitative Southern analysis, and/or FISH. Polymorphic markers covering the deletion and flanking regions were ordered by a combination of genetic and physical mapping. Genotyping of WS patients and available parents for 13 polymorphisms revealed that of 65 clinically defined WS patients, 61 (94%) had a deletion of the ELN locus and were also hemizygous (or non-informative) at loci D7S489B, D7S2476, D7S613, D7S2472, and D7S1870. None of the four patients without ELN deletion was hemizygous at any of the polymorphic loci studied. All patients were heterozygous (or noninformative) for centromeric (D7S1816, D7S1483, and D7S653) and telomeric (D7S489A, D7S675, and D7S669) flanking loci. The genetic distance between the most-centromeric deleted locus, D7S489B, and the most-telomeric one, D7S1870, is 2 cM. The breakpoints cluster at {approximately}1 cM to either side of ELN. In 39 families informative for parental origin, all deletions were de novo, and 18 were paternally and 21 maternally derived. Comparison of clinical data, collected in a standardized quantifiable format, revealed significantly more severe growth retardation and microcephaly in the maternal deletion group. An imprinted locus, silent on the paternal chromosome and contributing to statural growth, may be affected by the deletion. 53 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Molecular analysis of chromosome 21 in a patient with a phenotype of down syndrome and apparently normal karyotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlbom, B.E.; Wadelius, C.; Zech, L.; Anneren, G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1996-06-28

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused in most cases by the presence of an extra chromosome 21. It has been shown that the DS phenotype is produced by duplication of only a small part of the long arm of chromosome 21, the 21q22 region, including and distal to locus D21S55. We present molecular investigations on a woman with clinically typical DS but apparently normal chromosomes. Her parents were consanguineous and she had a sister with a DS phenotype, who died at the age of 15 days. Repeated cytogenetic investigations (G-banding and high resolution banding) on the patient and her parents showed apparently normal chromosomes. Autoradiographs of quantitative Southern blots of DNAs from the patient, her parents, trisomy 21 patients, and normal controls were analyzed after hybridization with unique DNA sequences regionally mapped on chromosome 21. Sequences D21S59, D21S1, D21S11, D21S8, D21S17, D21S55, ERG, D21S15, D21S112, and COL6A1 were all found in two copies. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with a chromosome 21-specific genomic library showed no abnormalities and only two copies of chromosome 21 were detected. Nineteen markers from the critical region studied with polymerase chain reaction amplification of di- and tetranucleotide repeats did not indicate any partial trisomy 21. From his study we conclude that the patient does not have any partial submicroscopic trisomy for any segment of chromosome 21. It seems reasonable to assume that she suffers from an autosomal recessive disorder which is phenotypically indistinguishable from DS. 23 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of chromosome 11p15 imprinting disorders: Silver–Russell and Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermann, Katja; Bliek, Jet; Brioude, Frédéric; Algar, Elizabeth; Buiting, Karin; Russo, Silvia; Tümer, Zeynep; Monk, David; Moore, Gudrun; Antoniadi, Thalia; Macdonald, Fiona; Netchine, Irène; Lombardi, Paolo; Soellner, Lukas; Begemann, Matthias; Prawitt, Dirk; Maher, Eamonn R; Mannens, Marcel; Riccio, Andrea; Weksberg, Rosanna; Lapunzina, Pablo; Grønskov, Karen; Mackay, Deborah JG; Eggermann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Molecular genetic testing for the 11p15-associated imprinting disorders Silver–Russell and Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (SRS, BWS) is challenging because of the molecular heterogeneity and complexity of the affected imprinted regions. With the growing knowledge on the molecular basis of these disorders and the demand for molecular testing, it turned out that there is an urgent need for a standardized molecular diagnostic testing and reporting strategy. Based on the results from the first external pilot quality assessment schemes organized by the European Molecular Quality Network (EMQN) in 2014 and in context with activities of the European Network of Imprinting Disorders (EUCID.net) towards a consensus in diagnostics and management of SRS and BWS, best practice guidelines have now been developed. Members of institutions working in the field of SRS and BWS diagnostics were invited to comment, and in the light of their feedback amendments were made. The final document was ratified in the course of an EMQN best practice guideline meeting and is in accordance with the general SRS and BWS consensus guidelines, which are in preparation. These guidelines are based on the knowledge acquired from peer-reviewed and published data, as well as observations of the authors in their practice. However, these guidelines can only provide a snapshot of current knowledge at the time of manuscript submission and readers are advised to keep up with the literature. PMID:27165005

  15. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Inv Dup(15) chromosomes, using probes specific for the Pradar-Willi/Angelman syndrome region: Clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leana-Cox, J. (Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Jenkins, L. (Kaiser Permanente Medical Group, San Jose, CA (United States)); Palmer, C.G.; Plattner, R. (Indiana School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Sheppard, L. (Palo Verde Laboratory, Inc., Chandler, AZ (United States)); Flejter, W.L. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Zackowski, J. (Univ. of Florida Health Science Center, Gainsville, FL (United States)); Tsien, F. (Tulane Univ. School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States)); Schwartz, S. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Twenty-seven cases of inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup[15]) were investigated by FISH with two DNA probes specific for the Prader-Willi syndrome/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on proximal 15q. Sixteen of the marker chromosomes displayed two copies of each probe, while in the remaining 11 markers no hybridization was observed. A significant association was found between the presence of this region and an abnormal phenotype (P<.01). This is the largest study to date of inv dup(15) chromosomes, that uses molecular cytogenetic methods and is the first to report a significant association between the presence of a specific chromosomal region in such markers and an abnormal phenotype. 30 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  16. Antibody profile of pregnant women with antiphospholipid syndrome and pregnancy outcome after treatment with low dose aspirin and low-weight-molecular heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasnović, Marija; Bosnjak, Ivica; Vcev, Aleksandar; Soldo, Ivan; Kosuta, Maja; Lenz, Bahrija; Glasnović-Horvatić, Elizabeta; Soldo-Butković, Silva; Mićunović, Nikola

    2007-03-01

    The aim of the research was to show our diagnostic and therapeutic experience with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in pregnant women. 36 pregnant women suspect on APS were included in the study: 32 with primary antiphospholipd syndrome (PAPS) and 4 with secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (SAPS). All pregnant women received low-molecular-weight-heparin (LMWH) and low dose aspirin (LDA) therapy. Control group represented 26 women with SAPS and previous bad reproductive anamnesis. Average pregnancy lasted 37.06 +/- 0.707 weeks. LMWH and LDA therapy was successful in 97.22%. Lupus anticoagulant (LA) was found to be more frequent in PAPS group (71.87%). Anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) were found to be more frequent in SAPS (26.66%). For three patients (3.37%), PAPS was diagnosed due to a fact that they had positive antibeta2-glycoproteinl (antibeta-GP1). To make APS diagnosis, it is of great importance to search for all antiphospholipid antibodies. LMWH and low dose of acetylsalicylic acid should be the first choice therapy.

  17. The genetic basis of inherited anomalies of the teeth. Part 1: clinical and molecular aspects of non-syndromic dental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Molla, Muriel; Verloes, Alain; Berdal, Ariane

    2008-01-01

    The genetic control of dental development represents a complex series of events, which can very schematically be divided in two pathways: specification of type, size and position of each dental organ, and specific processes for the formation of enamel and dentin. Several genes linked with early tooth positioning and development, belong to signalling pathways and have morphogenesis regulatory functions in morphogenesis of other organs where they are associated with the signalling pathways. Their mutations often show pleïotropic effects beyond dental morphogenesis resulting in syndromic developmental disorders. Some genes affecting early tooth development (MSX1, AXIN2) are associated with tooth agenesis and systemic features (cleft palate, colorectal cancer). By contrast, genes involved in enamel (AMELX, ENAM, MMP20, and KLK4) and dentin (DSPP) structures are highly specific for tooth. Mutations in these genes have been identified as causes of amelogenesis imperfecta, dentinogenesis imperfecta, dentin dysplasias and anomalies of teeth number (hypo-, oligo and anodontia), which only partially overlap with the classical phenotypic classifications of dental disorders. This review of genetic basis of inherited anomalies describes, in this first paper, the molecular bases and clinical features of inherited non-syndromic teeth disorders. And in a second part, the review focus on genetic syndromes with dental involvement. PMID:18499550

  18. Molecular typing of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1- and Enterotoxin A-producing methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus isolates from an outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, Franziska; Sanchini, Andrea; Strommenger, Birgit; Cuny, Christiane; Breier, Ann-Christin; Proquitté, Hans; Bührer, Christoph; Schenkel, Karl; Bätzing-Feigenbaum, Jörg; Greutelaers, Benedikt; Nübel, Ulrich; Gastmeier, Petra; Eckmanns, Tim; Werner, Guido

    2015-10-01

    Outbreaks of Staphylococcus aureus are common in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Usually they are documented for methicillin-resistant strains, while reports involving methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains are rare. In this study we report the epidemiological and molecular investigation of an MSSA outbreak in a NICU among preterm neonates. Infection control measures and interventions were commissioned by the Local Public Health Authority and supported by the Robert Koch Institute. To support epidemiological investigations molecular typing was done by spa-typing and Multilocus sequence typing; the relatedness of collected isolates was further elucidated by DNA SmaI-macrorestriction, microarray analysis and bacterial whole genome sequencing. A total of 213 neonates, 123 healthcare workers and 205 neonate parents were analyzed in the period November 2011 to November 2012. The outbreak strain was characterized as a MSSA spa-type t021, able to produce toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and Enterotoxin A. We identified seventeen neonates (of which two died from toxic shock syndrome), four healthcare workers and three parents putatively involved in the outbreak. Whole-genome sequencing permitted to exclude unrelated cases from the outbreak and to discuss the role of healthcare workers as a reservoir of S. aureus on the NICU. Genome comparisons also indicated the presence of the respective clone on the ward months before the first colonized/infected neonates were detected.

  19. An innovative strategy for the molecular diagnosis of Usher syndrome identifies causal biallelic mutations in 93% of European patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Crystel; Riahi, Zied; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra;

    2016-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH), the most prevalent cause of hereditary deafness-blindness, is an autosomal recessive and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Three clinical subtypes (USH1-3) are distinguishable based on the severity of the sensorineural hearing impairment, the presence or absence of vestibu......Usher syndrome (USH), the most prevalent cause of hereditary deafness-blindness, is an autosomal recessive and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Three clinical subtypes (USH1-3) are distinguishable based on the severity of the sensorineural hearing impairment, the presence or absence...

  20. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  1. Cellular and molecular deviations in bovine in vitro-produced embryos are related to the large offspring syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazzari, G.; Wrenzycki, C.; Herrmann, D.; Duchi, R.; Kruip, T.; Niemann, H.; Galli, C.

    2002-01-01

    The large offspring syndrome (LOS) is observed in bovine and ovine offspring following transfer of in vitro-produced (IVP) or cloned embryos and is characterized by a multitude of pathologic changes, of which extended gestation length and increased birthweight are predominant features. In the presen

  2. Clinical features and molecular genetic analysis of a boy with Prader-Willi syndrome caused by an imprinting defect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, A; Hansen, Claus; Baekgaard, P;

    1997-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neuroendocrine disorder caused by a non-functioning paternally derived gene(s) within the chromosome region 15q11-q13. Most cases result from microscopically visible deletions of paternal origin, or maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15. In both instances...

  3. Diagnosis of Japanese patients with HHH syndrome by molecular genetic analysis: a common mutation, R179X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, T; Kanazawa, N; Kato, S; Kawakami, M; Inoue, Y; Kuhara, T; Inoue, T; Takeshita, K; Tsujino, S

    2001-01-01

    Patients with mitochondrial ornithine transporter deficiency (or HHH syndrome) present with various neurological symptoms, including mental retardation, spastic paraparesis with pyramidal signs, cerebellar ataxia, and episodic disturbance of consciousness or coma due to hyperammonemia. We previously described three novel mutations in the ORNT1 gene in Japanese patients with HHH syndrome. In this article, we report a new patient with HHH syndrome, a 52-year-old woman, who had the typical clinical features, except for an absence of mental retardation. When we screened this patient, as well as a previously described Japanese patient, for mutations in the ORNT1 gene, we found that both were homozygous for a nonsense mutation (R179X). Furthermore, reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of fibroblast RNA from one patient showed exon 4 skipping, as had been observed in a previously reported patient with R179X. These results, together with the findings in our previous report, show that, in three of our five reported Japanese HHH patients (six of ten alleles), R179X is present, suggesting that this is a common mutation in Japanese patients with HHH syndrome.

  4. Molecular signature of clinical severity in recovering patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Ting-Shu; Chiang Ping-Cherng; Eng Hock-Liew; Liu Jien-Wei; Wang Yi-Hsi; Lin Meng-Chih; Yang Kuender D; Chen Lung-Kun; Wei Min-Li; Chen En-Shih; Chao Angel; Chen Chun-Houh; Lee Yun-Shien; Tsao Kuo-Chein; Huang Chung-Guei

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a recent epidemic human disease, is caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV). First reported in Asia, SARS quickly spread worldwide through international travelling. As of July 2003, the World Health Organization reported a total of 8,437 people afflicted with SARS with a 9.6% mortality rate. Although immunopathological damages may account for the severity of respiratory distress, little is known about how the genome-wide gene expr...

  5. Novel molecular variants of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter gene are responsible for antenatal Bartter syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas-Poussou, R; Feldmann, D. (Dirk); Vollmer, M.; Konrad, M; Kelly, L.; van den Heuvel, L.P.; Tebourbi, L; Brandis, M.; Karolyi, L.; Hebert, S C; Lemmink, H.H.; Deschênes, G.; Hildebrandt, F.; Seyberth, H. W.; Guay-Woodford, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    Antenatal Bartter syndrome is a variant of inherited renal-tubular disorders associated with hypokalemic alkalosis. This disorder typically presents as a life-threatening condition beginning in utero, with marked fetal polyuria that leads to polyhydramnios and premature delivery. Another hallmark of this variant is a marked hypercalciuria and, as a secondary consequence, the development of nephrocalcinosis and osteopenia. We have analyzed 15 probands belonging to 13 families and have performe...

  6. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of a recurrent unbalanced translocation (4;21) (p16.3;q22.1): Relevance to the Wolf-Hirschhorn and Down syndrome critical regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastio, G.; Perone, L.; Guzzetta, V. [Universita Federico II, Naples (Italy)] [and others

    1996-05-17

    We report on an aneuploidy syndrome due to the unbalanced segregation of a familial translocation (4;21)(p16.3;q22.1) causing a partial 4p monosomy and a partial 21q trisomy. The three affected children presented with severe failure to thrive, short stature, microcephaly, profound hypotonia, and mental retardation. The face, very similar in the three children, is characterized by frontal bossing, upslanting of the palpebral fissures, short nose, and deep set ears, giving the overall appearance of the Down syndrome. The molecular study has defined the aneuploid segment on both 4p and 21q. Most of the Down syndrome critical region was found to be trisomic, while only part of the candidate Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome critical region was deleted, suggesting that this region is not critical for the major malformations characteristic for WHS. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Molecular docking analyses of Avicennia marinaderived phytochemicals against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) envelope protein-VP28

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu, Sunil Kumar; KATHIRESAN, Kandasamy; Singh, Reena; Senthilraja, Poomalai

    2012-01-01

    White spot syndrome (WSS) is one of the most common and most disastrous diseases of shrimp worldwide. It causes up to 100% mortality within 3 to 4 days in commercial shrimp farms, resulting in large economic losses to the shrimp farming industry. VP28 envelope protein of WSSV is reported to play a key role in the systemic infection in shrimps. Considering the most sombre issue of viral disease in cultivated shrimp, the present study was undertaken to substantiate the inhibition potential of A...

  8. Molecular characterization of two proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, S.L.; Huang, B.; Ledbetter, D.H. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct mental retardation syndromes caused by paternal and maternal deficiencies, respectively, in chromosome 15q11{minus}q13. Approximately 70% of these patients have a large deletion of {approximately}4 Mb extending from D15S9 (ML34) through D15S12 (IR10A). To further characterize the deletion breakpoints proximal to D15S9, three new polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed that showed observed heterozygosities of 60%-87%. D15S541 and D15S542 were isolated for YAC A124A3 containing the D15S18 (IR39) locus. D15S543 was isolated from a cosmid cloned from the proximal right end of YAC 254B5 containing the D15S9 (ML34) locus. Gene-centromere mapping of these markers, using a panel of ovarian teratomas of known meiotic origin, extended the genetic map of chromosome 15 by 2-3 cM toward the centromere. Analysis of the more proximal S541/S542 markers on 53 Prader-Willi and 33 Angelman deletion patients indicated two classes of patients: 44% (35/80) of the informative patients were deleted for these markers (class I), while 56% (45/80) were not deleted (class II), with no difference between PWS and AS. In contrast, D15S543 was deleted in all informative patients (13/48) or showed the presence of a single allele (in 35/48 patients), suggesting that this marker is deleted in the majority of PWS and AS cases. These results confirm the presence of two common proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and are consistent with the same deletion mechanism being responsible for paternal and maternal deletions. One breakpoint region lies between D15S541/S542 and D15S543, with an additional breakpoint region being proximal to D15S541/S542. 46 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Prenatal diagnosis of chromosome 15 abnormalities in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region by traditional and molecular cytogenetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth-Fejel, S.; Magenis, R.E.; Leff, S. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-13

    With improvements in culturing and banding techniques, amniotic fluid studies now achieve a level of resolution at which the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) region may be questioned. Chromosome 15 heteromorphisms, detected with Q- and R-banding and used in conjunction with PWS/AS region-specific probes, can confirm a chromosome deletion and establish origin to predict the clinical outcome. We report four de novo cases of an abnormal-appearing chromosome 15 in amniotic fluid samples referred for advanced maternal age or a history of a previous chromosomally abnormal child. The chromosomes were characterized using G-, Q-, and R-banding, as well as isotopic and fluorescent in situ hybridization of DNA probes specific for the proximal chromosome 15 long arm. In two cases, one chromosome 15 homolog showed a consistent deletion of the ONCOR PWS/AS region A and B. In the other two cases, one of which involved an inversion with one breakpoint in the PWS/AS region, all of the proximal chromosome 15 long arm DNA probes used in the in situ hybridization were present on both homologs. Clinical follow-up was not available on these samples, as in all cases the parents chose to terminate the pregnancies. These cases demonstrate the ability to prenatally diagnose chromosome 15 abnormalities associated with PWS/AS. In addition, they highlight the need for a better understanding of this region for accurate prenatal diagnosis. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Vaccination and Infection as Causative Factors in Japanese Patients With Rasmussen Syndrome: Molecular Mimicry and HLA Class I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukitoshi Takahashi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasmussen syndrome is an intractable epilepsy with a putative causal relation with cellular and humoral autoimmunity. Almost half of the patients have some preceding causative factors, with infections found in 38.2%, vaccinations in 5.9% and head trauma in 8.9% of Japanese patients. In a patient with seizure onset after influenza A infections, cross-reaction of the patient's lymphocytes with GluRε2 and influenza vaccine components was demonstrated by lymphocyte stimulation test. Database analyses revealed that influenza A virus hemagglutinin and GluRε2 molecules contain peptides with the patient's HLA class I binding motif (HLA ࢤ A*0201. The relative risks of HLA class I genotypes for Rasmussen syndrome are 6.1 (A*2402, 6.4 (A*0201, 6.3 (A*2601 and 11.4 (B*4601. The relative risks of HLA class I-A and B haplotypes are infinity (A*2601+B*5401, 21.1 (A*2402+B*1501, 13.3 (A*2402+B*4801 and 5.1 (A*2402+B*5201. Some alleles and haplotypes of HLA class I may be the risk factors in Japanese patients. Cross-reactivity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes may contribute to the processes leading from infection to the involvement of CNS.

  11. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Boards & Staff Annual Report & Financials Contact Us Donate Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of ...

  12. Molecular characterization of WFS1 in an Iranian family with Wolfram syndrome reveals a novel frameshift mutation associated with early symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Maryam; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Rajab, Asadollah; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2013-10-10

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder that represents a likely source of childhood diabetes especially among countries in the consanguinity belt. The main responsible gene is WFS1 for which over one hundred mutations have been reported from different ethnic groups. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular etiology of WS and to perform a possible genotype-phenotype correlation in Iranian kindred. An Iranian family with two patients was clinically studied and WS was suspected. Genetic linkage analysis via 5 STR markers was carried out. For identification of mutations, DNA sequencing of WFS1 including all the exons, exon-intron boundaries and the promoter was performed. Linkage analysis indicated linkage to the WFS1 region. After DNA sequencing of WFS1, one novel pathogenic mutation, which causes frameshift alteration c.2177_2178insTCTTC (or c.2173_2177dupTCTTC) in exon eight, was found. The genotype-phenotype correlation analysis suggests that the presence of the homozygous mutation may be associated with early onset of disease symptoms. This study stresses the necessity of considering the molecular analysis of WFS1 in childhood diabetes with some symptoms of WS.

  13. Craniosynostoses: Phenotypic/molecular correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M.M. Jr. [Dalhousie Univ., Nova Scotia (Canada)

    1995-04-10

    From the discovery of the first known human homeobox mutation in MSX2 for craniosynostosis of the Boston type by Jams to the recent report of 2 mutations in FGFR2 in Apert syndrome by Wilkie, it is clear that the molecular aspects of syndromes with craniosynostosis are becoming known at a dizzying pace. Four of the syndromes involve mutations in FGFR2. The first to emerge was Crouzon syndrome followed by Jackson-Weiss syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, and finally Apert syndrome. Earlier, Muenke showed that Pfeiffer syndrome was heterogeneous, some families having a mutation in FGFR1. 50 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. Molecular characterization of porcine circovirus 2 isolated from diseased pigs co-infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chengqian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, we isolated a porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2 strain from piglets co-infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV. The complete genome of this strain was sequenced, phylogenetic and polymorphic analyses were carried out. BLAST searches revealed the highest sequence identity (99.5% nt and 99.3% aa to Guangxi strain EF675230. The phylogenetic tree showed that clustering of the isolates didn't strongly correlate to geographical distribution. Polymorphic analyses demonstrated that the amino acids at most of the polymorphic sites in Open Reading Frame 1(ORF1 and 2 (ORF2belong to the same amino acid group according to chemical or structural properties, and revealed that highly polymorphic regions overlapped with the known immunoreactive epitopes of ORF2.

  15. A novel mutation in KVLQT1 is the molecular basis of inherited long QT syndrome in a near-drowning patient's family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, M J; Schroeder, J J; Berry, R; Schaid, D J; Porter, C J; Michels, V V; Thibodeau, S N

    1998-08-01

    After identifying a 10-year-old boy with inherited long QT syndrome (LQTS) after a near-drowning that required defibrillation from torsades de pointes, evaluation of first degree relatives revealed a four-generation kindred comprising 26 individuals with four additional symptomatic and eight asymptomatic members harboring an abnormally prolonged QTc (defined as > or =0.46 s1/2). We set out to determine the molecular basis of their LQTS. The inherited LQTS represents a collection of genetically distinct ion channelopathies with over 40 mutations in four fundamental cardiac ion channels identified. Molecular studies, including linkage analysis and identification of the disease-associated mutation, were performed on genomic DNA isolated from peripheral blood samples from 29 available family members. Genetic linkage analysis excluded the regions for LQT2, LQT3, and LQT5. However, the chromosome 11p15.5 region (LQT1) showed evidence of linkage with a maximum lod score of 3.36. Examination of the KVLQT1 gene revealed a novel 3-bp deletion resulting in an in-frame deltaF339 (phenylalanine) deletion in the proband. This deltaF339 mutation was confirmed in nine additional family members who shared both an assigned affected phenotype and the disease-associated linked haplotype. Importantly, three asymptomatic family members, with a tentative clinical diagnosis based on their QTc, did not have this mutation and could be reclassified as unaffected. It is noteworthy that the proband's ECG suggested the sodium channel-based LQT3 genotype. These findings show the potential importance of establishing a molecular diagnosis rather than initiating genotype-specific interventions based upon inspection of a patient's ECG.

  16. Molecular signatures of cardiac defects in Down syndrome lymphoblastoid cell lines suggest altered ciliome and Hedgehog pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémentine Ripoll

    Full Text Available Forty percent of people with Down syndrome exhibit heart defects, most often an atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD and less frequently a ventricular septal defect (VSD or atrial septal defect (ASD. Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs were established from lymphocytes of individuals with trisomy 21, the chromosomal abnormality causing Down syndrome. Gene expression profiles generated from DNA microarrays of LCLs from individuals without heart defects (CHD(-; n = 22 were compared with those of LCLs from patients with cardiac malformations (CHD(+; n = 21. After quantile normalization, principal component analysis revealed that AVSD carriers could be distinguished from a combined group of ASD or VSD (ASD+VSD carriers. From 9,758 expressed genes, we identified 889 and 1,016 genes differentially expressed between CHD(- and AVSD and CHD(- and ASD+VSD, respectively, with only 119 genes in common. A specific chromosomal enrichment was found in each group of affected genes. Among the differentially expressed genes, more than 65% are expressed in human or mouse fetal heart tissues (GEO dataset. Additional LCLs from new groups of AVSD and ASD+VSD patients were analyzed by quantitative PCR; observed expression ratios were similar to microarray results. Analysis of GO categories revealed enrichment of genes from pathways regulating clathrin-mediated endocytosis in patients with AVSD and of genes involved in semaphorin-plexin-driven cardiogenesis and the formation of cytoplasmic microtubules in patients with ASD-VSD. A pathway-oriented search revealed enrichment in the ciliome for both groups and a specific enrichment in Hedgehog and Jak-stat pathways among ASD+VSD patients. These genes or related pathways are therefore potentially involved in normal cardiogenesis as well as in cardiac malformations observed in individuals with trisomy 21.

  17. Comprehensive clinical studies in 34 patients with molecularly defined UPD(14)pat and related conditions (Kagami-Ogata syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagami, Masayo; Kurosawa, Kenji; Miyazaki, Osamu; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2015-11-01

    Paternal uniparental disomy 14 (UPD(14)pat) and epimutations and microdeletions affecting the maternally derived 14q32.2 imprinted region lead to a unique constellation of clinical features such as facial abnormalities, small bell-shaped thorax with a coat-hanger appearance of the ribs, abdominal wall defects, placentomegaly, and polyhydramnios. In this study, we performed comprehensive clinical studies in patients with UPD(14)pat (n=23), epimutations (n=5), and microdeletions (n=6), and revealed several notable findings. First, a unique facial appearance with full cheeks and a protruding philtrum and distinctive chest roentgenograms with increased coat-hanger angles to the ribs constituted the pathognomonic features from infancy through childhood. Second, birth size was well preserved, with a median birth length of ±0 SD (range, -1.7 to +3.0 SD) and a median birth weight of +2.3 SD (range, +0.1 to +8.8 SD). Third, developmental delay and/or intellectual disability was invariably present, with a median developmental/intellectual quotient of 55 (range, 29-70). Fourth, hepatoblastoma was identified in three infantile patients (8.8%), and histological examination in two patients showed a poorly differentiated embryonal hepatoblastoma with focal macrotrabecular lesions and well-differentiated hepatoblastoma, respectively. These findings suggest the necessity of an adequate support for developmental delay and periodical screening for hepatoblastoma in the affected patients, and some phenotypic overlap between UPD(14)pat and related conditions and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. On the basis of our previous and present studies that have made a significant contribution to the clarification of underlying (epi)genetic factors and the definition of clinical findings, we propose the name 'Kagami-Ogata syndrome' for UPD(14)pat and related conditions.

  18. Comprehensive clinical studies in 34 patients with molecularly defined UPD(14)pat and related conditions (Kagami-Ogata syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagami, Masayo; Kurosawa, Kenji; Miyazaki, Osamu; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2015-11-01

    Paternal uniparental disomy 14 (UPD(14)pat) and epimutations and microdeletions affecting the maternally derived 14q32.2 imprinted region lead to a unique constellation of clinical features such as facial abnormalities, small bell-shaped thorax with a coat-hanger appearance of the ribs, abdominal wall defects, placentomegaly, and polyhydramnios. In this study, we performed comprehensive clinical studies in patients with UPD(14)pat (n=23), epimutations (n=5), and microdeletions (n=6), and revealed several notable findings. First, a unique facial appearance with full cheeks and a protruding philtrum and distinctive chest roentgenograms with increased coat-hanger angles to the ribs constituted the pathognomonic features from infancy through childhood. Second, birth size was well preserved, with a median birth length of ±0 SD (range, -1.7 to +3.0 SD) and a median birth weight of +2.3 SD (range, +0.1 to +8.8 SD). Third, developmental delay and/or intellectual disability was invariably present, with a median developmental/intellectual quotient of 55 (range, 29-70). Fourth, hepatoblastoma was identified in three infantile patients (8.8%), and histological examination in two patients showed a poorly differentiated embryonal hepatoblastoma with focal macrotrabecular lesions and well-differentiated hepatoblastoma, respectively. These findings suggest the necessity of an adequate support for developmental delay and periodical screening for hepatoblastoma in the affected patients, and some phenotypic overlap between UPD(14)pat and related conditions and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. On the basis of our previous and present studies that have made a significant contribution to the clarification of underlying (epi)genetic factors and the definition of clinical findings, we propose the name 'Kagami-Ogata syndrome' for UPD(14)pat and related conditions. PMID:25689926

  19. Explanation on the Molecular Mechanism of "Lack of Vital Essence Resulting in Deficiency Syndrome" of Asthenia Cold Syndrome and Asthenia Hot Syndrome Rats%基因芯片技术阐释虚寒证与虚热证大鼠“精气夺则虚”的分子机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩冰冰; 王世军

    2013-01-01

    目的:采用基因芯片技术阐释虚寒证与虚热证大鼠“精气夺则虚”的共同分子机制.方法:使用中药复方建立虚寒证、虚热证大鼠模型,基因芯片检测大鼠肝脏基因表达,筛选差异表达基因并进行聚类分析,荧光定量PCR验证芯片结果.结果:聚类结果显示虚寒模型组与虚热模型组基因表达轮廓具有相似性,与空白对照组有差异.虚寒模型组、虚热模型组与空白对照组相比较,存在共有差异表达基因28条,其中16条免疫应答相关基因.结论:虚寒证与虚热证大鼠均出现了免疫应答相关基因表达的显著改变,这可能是虚寒证与虚热证大鼠“精气夺则虚”的分子机制.%Objective:To explain the molecular mechanism of "lack of vital essence resulting in deficiency syndrome" in both asthenia cold syndrome rats and asthenia hot syndrome rats by gene chip technology.Methods:The Asthenia cold and hot syndrome rats models were induced by compound preparation of Traditional Chinese Medicine.The liver gene expression in each group was detected by gene chip.We selected the differential expression genes,analyzed the genes by cluster and conducted the significant analysis on the genetic function of differential genes.A part of genes were selected to test the accuracy of results by RT -PCR.Results:The cluster analysis showed the profile of genes expression of asthenia cold model group was similar to asthenia hot model group.Both asthenia cold model group and asthenia hot model group were different from control group.Among asthenia cold model group,asthenia hot model group and control group,there were 28 strips of differential expression gene,among which 16 stips were about immune response.Conclusion:Obvious changes have been both arose in asthenia cold model group and asthenia hot model group about genes immune response,which is possibly the molecular mechanism of "lack of vital essence resulting in deficiency syndrome".

  20. Identification of Ganglioside GM3 Molecular Species in Human Serum Associated with Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Veillon

    Full Text Available Serum GM3 molecular species were quantified in 125 Japanese residents using tandem mass spectrometry multiple reaction monitoring. Individuals were categorized by the presence or absence of metabolic disease risk factors including visceral fat accumulation, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. A total of 23 GM3 molecular species were measured, of these, eight were found to be significantly elevated in individuals with visceral fat accumulation and metabolic disease, defined as the presence of hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. All of the GM3 molecular species were composed of the sphingoid base sphingosine (d18:1 (Δ4 and, interestingly, six of the eight elevated GM3 molecular species contained a hydroxylated ceramide moiety. The hydroxylated GM3 species were, in order of decreasing abundance, d18:1-h24:0 ≈ d18:1-h24:1 > d18:1-h22:0 » d18:1-h20:0 > d18:1-h21:0 > d18:1-h18:1. Univariate and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted using a number of clinical health variables associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic disease, atherosclerosis and hypertension. GM3(d18:1-h24:1 was identified as the best candidate for metabolic screening, proving to be significantly correlated with intima-media thickness, used for the detection of atherosclerotic disease in humans, and a number of metabolic disease risk factors including autotaxin, LDL-c and homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR.

  1. Molecular Epidemiological Investigation of Infectious Hypodermal and Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus and Taura Syndrome Virus in Penaeus Vannamei Cultured in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) and Taura syndrome virus (TSV) are two important shrimp viruses in cultured shrimp in America. These two viruses were transmitted to China at the beginning of the 21st century. In this study, 214 shrimp samples of Penaeus vannamei were collected from seven different areas of China and tested by PCR for IHHNV and TSV infection. The results showed that there were a high prevalence of IHHNV (65.42%) and low prevalence of TSV (3.27%) in the tested samples. Several samples were found to be co-infected with these two viruses. A 3 kb fragment of 7 positive IHHNV samples and a structure protein region (ORF2) of three TSV positive samples were amplified and sequenced. The sequence comparison indicated that both IHHNV and TSV sequenced in China have a low genetic variations compared with the prototype IHHNV and TSV from Hawaii. Phylogenetic analysis showed that TSV isolates were clustered into two groups, Asia and America group, which was genetically correlated to geographic distribution.

  2. Molecular-genetic risk assessement of determining angiotensin-converting enzyme hyperactivity in hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildar R. Minniakhmetov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate changes in angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE blood activity and angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene polymorphism as a possible disease predictor in hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS. Four hundred and nine patients (346 males and 63 females with HFRS serologic confirmation were enrolled in the study. Their age ranged from 15 to 65 years. ACE blood activity was assessed kinetically using the Bühlmann (Switzerland kit. Peripheral blood genomic DNA was isolated by a phenol-chloroform extraction. The genotyping of DNA loci was done using a polymerase chain reaction of DNA synthesis. Statistically, ACE blood activity was significantly higher throughout the entire HFRS course with diverse severity apart from the feverish phase of moderate-to-severe uncomplicated disease forms. *A1166 and *C1166 alleles, *A1166/*A1166 and *C1166/*C1166 genotypes of angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene were not associated with HFRS severity. The results of this study indicate that high ACE activity has not adaptive characteristics due to abnormalities in angiotensin II reception. It is an adequate metabolic response of the body to endotheliotropic virus activity.

  3. Analysis of molecular variation in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in China between 2007 and 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhang Cao; Hongsheng Ouyang; Mingjun Zhang; Fuwang Chen; Xin Yang; Daxing Pang; Linzhu Ren

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, 89 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolates in China during 2007 to 2012 were randomly selected from the GenBank genetic sequence database. Evolutionary characteristics of these isolates were analyzed based on the sequences of non-struc-tural protein 2 (Nsp2) and glycoprotein 5 (GP5). The genetic variations of the isolates were also compared with six representative strains. The results showed that a high degree of genetic diversity exists among the PRRSV population in China. Highly pathogenic PRRSV isolates, with a discon-tinuous deletion of a 30 amino acid residue in the Nsp2 region, remained the most dominant virus throughout 2007-2012 in China. Owing to the extensive use of representative vaccine strains, natu-ral recombination events occurred between strains. Three isolates-HH08, DY, and YN-2011-were more closely related to vaccine strains than the other isolates. Both YN-2011 and DY were the evolu-tionary products of recombination events between strains SP and CH-1R. The results of the present study provide useful information for the epidemiology of PRRSV as well as for vaccine development.

  4. Molecular characterization of the leptin receptor gene as a candidate gene in the pulmonary hypertension syndrome in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamidele, O; Van As, P; Elferink, M G

    2012-12-15

    Leptin Receptor Gene (LEPR) is a candidate gene in understanding the genetic basis of the Pulmonary Hypertension Syndrome (PHS) in broilers. Identification and evaluation of genetic polymorphisms in LEPR may provide a link between traits like Body Weight (BW) and Total Ventricle weight (TV) to the development of PHS. In this study, primers were designed in exons, upstream and downstream sequences to identify mutations in the LEPR on four broilers selected with respect to the PHS-related traits. About 77% of the 11,820 bp of the LEPR gene covered by the primers were sequenced. No mutations were found between the chickens associating the traits to the occurrence of PHS. However, 42 single nucleotide polymorphisms and four Indels were found between the reference sequences of the red jungle fowl and the experimental population. Ten of these mutations were not previously reported in LEPR at the genomic and transcript sequences (NP_989654.1, ENSGALT00000018009). The 10 mutations include six SNPs in intron regions, two Indels and two non-synonymous SNPs. The two new non-synonymous SNPs; G301A and A1637G, led to amino acid change A89T and N534S, respectively. PMID:23755410

  5. MOLECULAR DOCKING ANALYSES OF CYNODON DACTYLON DERIVED PHYTOCHEMICALS AGAINST WHITE SPOT SYNDROME VIRUS (WSSV STRUCTURAL PROTEIN VP26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damayanthi Devi.I

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available White spot disease is a major infectious disease of penaeid shrimps caused by the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV. The viral structural proteins are responsib le for binding virus to the cellular membranes of the host that is being systematically infected. An In silic o attempt was made to identify the potential drug to inhibit the WSSV spread of diseases. For that an effort , was made to deduce the antiviral potentiality of Cynodon dactylon derived phytochemicals with docking tec hnique. To stimulate the structure based drug design the, 3D structure of the VP26 (PDB-ID: 2EDM, a tegument protein thought to be i nvolved in the entry of WSSV nucleocapsid into the host nucleus, is retrieved from PDB datab ase and docking studies are carried out with the sketched phytochemical structures using GOLD software. Among the phytochemicals scr eened, luteolin and apigenin shows the best binding affinity with binding energies of 42.51 and 38.92 K.cal/m ol exhibiting the potential to block VP26 (2EDM protein of WSSV. This study will be helpful in developing novel antiviral drugs from plant sources against aquatic important pathogens.

  6. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Cancer genetics has rapidly evolved in the last two decades. Understanding and exploring the several genetic pathways in the cancer cell is the foundation of targeted therapy. Several genomic aberrations have been identified and their role in carcinogenesis is being explored. In contrast to most cancers where these mutations are acquired, patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have inherited genomic aberrations. The understanding of the molecular pathobiology in hereditary cancer syndromes has advanced dramatically. In addition, many molecularly targeted therapies have been developed that could have potential roles in the treatment of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes. In this review, we outline the presentation, molecular biology, and possible targeted therapies for two of the most widely recognized hereditary cancer syndromes -- hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (Lynch syndrome). We will also discuss other syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (TP53). PMID:25549704

  7. Molecular Detection and Identification of Α-L-Iduronidase Gene Mutations in 5 Iranian Families Suspected for Muller Syndrome (Mucopolysaccharidosis I

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    B Nasr- Esfahani

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS-I is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage diseases, caused by α-L-iduronidase (IDUA enzyme deficiency. The clinical manifestations of MPS-I patients are variable ranging from severe to mild, and therefore prediction of disease severity is difficult. From when IDUA gene has been cloned more than 109 distinct mutations have been identified in it and this number is increasing. This mutation analysis has provided some molecular explanations for the range of MPS-I phenotypes. The aim of this study was identification and molecular characterization of IDUA gene mutations in our subset of MPS I patients. Methods: The present study performed on 5 Iranian families, each with a suspected child for MPS-I. Initially by using enzyme activity assay, the Hurler syndrome was verified and then presence of L123R mutation was evaluated by PCR-SSCP. Finally by PCR amplification of all 14 exons of the gene, SSCP and sequencing the mutations underlying the disease were identified and characterized. Results: The detected mutations turned to be L123R (in 2 patients, W402X, P533R and G51D mutations in other 3 patients. Discussion: L123R mutation, which was reported for the first time from our centre, was also present in 2 of the patients of this study but other 3 mutations were not novel. From our results, as well others, it can be concluded that the range of mutations in IDUA gene differ in different geographical areas. This should be considered when designing mutation detection strategies for MPS-I.

  8. Current status of familial gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ioan; Jung; Simona; Gurzu; Gligore; Sabin; Turdean

    2015-01-01

    Because of the rarity of familial gastrointestinal cancerpredisposing syndromes,their exploration in literature is not extensive.In this review,an update of the clinicopathological and molecular criteria of gastrointestinal familial polyposis syndromes with potential malignant transformation is performed.In addition,a guide for screening and surveillance was synthesized and a distribution of gene mutations according to the specific syndromes and geographic distribution was included.The following inherited polyposes syndromes were analyzed: familial adenomatous polyposis,the hamartomatous familial polyposes(Juvenile polyposis,Peutz-Jeghers syndrome,Cowden syndrome,BannayanRiley-Ruvalcaba syndrome,hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome,Gorlin syndrome,Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome,neurofibromatosis type Ⅰand multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome 2B),Li-Fraumeni syndrome,and MUTYHassociated adenomatous polyposis.For proper medical care,subspecialization of gastroenterologists,pathologists,and genticists in the field of familial diseases should be introduced in the medical curriculum.

  9. Dry Low Molecular Therapy for Clinical Analysis of Coronary Syndrome (ACS)%低分子干素治疗冠脉综合症的临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢玮

    2015-01-01

    目的:按照综合性的低分子肝素临床治疗冠脉综合征的相关原发性原理,合理的加强临床治疗过程的技术分析,保证合理的安全临床治疗过程中的有效低分子肝素临床性的治疗过程。方法通过对相关性的低分子肝素控制,实现合理的低分子肝素治疗问题分析。结果合理的分析临床试验中相关的低分子肝素冠脉综合症的分析,完善总体的临床性分析。结论完成认识临床上对低分子肝素对冠脉综合症的影响,保证合理的综合治疗效果。%Objective According to the comprehensive low molecular heparin associated clinical treatment of coronary syndrome of primary principle, reasonable strengthening the technical analysis of the clinical treatment process, ensure the reasonable safe effective low molecular heparin in the process of clinical treatment of the clinical treatment process, strengthening clinical treatment process. Methods Based on the correlation of low molecular heparin control, realize the reasonable analysis of the low molecular heparin treatment problem.Results The rational analysis of the clinical trial related analysis of low molecular heparin coronary syndrome (ACS), improve the overall clinical analysis.Conclusion The complete understanding of low molecular heparin on clinical coronary syndrome (ACS), the influence of reasonable comprehensive treatment effect.

  10. Molecular and clinical characterization of Waardenburg syndrome type I in an Iranian cohort with two novel PAX3 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Nazanin; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Farhadi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Tayeb; Emamdjomeh, Hesam; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-15

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a disease of abnormal neural-crest derived melanocyte development characterized by hearing loss and pigmentary disturbances in hair, eyes and skin. WS is subdivided into four major types, WS1-WS4, where WS1 is recognized by the presence of dystopia canthorum, with PAX3 being the only known gene involved. This study aimed at investigating PAX3 mutations and clinical characteristics of WS1 in a group of Iranian patients. A total of 12 WS1 patients from four unrelated Iranian families were enrolled. Waardenburg consortium guidelines were used for WS1 diagnosis. A detailed family history was traced and a thorough clinical examination was performed for all participants. Furthermore, WS1 patients underwent screening for PAX3 mutations using PCR-sequencing. Dystopia canthorum, broad high nasal root and synophrys were observed in all patients. Early graying, hair discoloration, hypoplastic blue eyes (characteristic brilliant blue iris) and hearing loss were the most common features observed, while heterochromia iridis was the least frequently observed sign among the studied Iranian WS1 patients. Genetic analysis of PAX3 revealed four mutations including c.667C>T, c.784C>T, c.951delT and c.451+3A>C. Two of the four mutations reported here (c.951delT and c.451+3A>C) are being reported for the first time in this study. Our data provide insight into genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of WS1 in an Iranian series of patients. Our results expand the spectrum of PAX3 mutations and may have implications for the genetic counseling of WS in Iran. PMID:26275939

  11. Molecular Pathology of 6 Novel GJB2 Allelic Variants Detected in Familial and Sporadic Iranian Non Syndromic Hearing Loss Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hashemzadeh Chaleshtori

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Mutations of GJB2 gene encoding connexion 26 are the most common cause of hearing loss in many popula­tions. A very wide spectrum of GJB2 gene mutations associated with hearing loss have been detected but pathogenic role has been tested only for a part of them. In this study, we have provided genetic evidence on the pathogenicity of our previ­ously reported novel GJB2 allelic variants. "nMethods: The pathogenic role of GJB2 allelic variants were assessed using co segregation of each allelic variant with hear­ing loss in family members, absence of the allelic variants in control populations, coexistence with a second GJB2 mutation, na­ture of the amino acid substitution and evolutionary conservation of the appropriate amino acid. "nResults: The GJB2 allelic variants including 363delC, 327delGGinsA, H16R and G200R have been co segregated with auto­somal recessive non syndromic hearing loss in five families and are not found in control subjects. The G130V and K102Q were found in heterozygous state in two deaf individuals. G130V results in an exchange a residue highly conserved among all the connexins but was found with a rate of 1% in control subjects and K102Q results in an exchange a residue not con­served among all the connexins and not identified in control subjects. "nConclusion: We conclude that, 363delC, 327delGGinsA, H16R and G200R may be pathogenic. However, the pathogenic­ity and inheritance of K102Q and G130V can not be assessed clearly and remains to be identified.

  12. Molecular signature of clinical severity in recovering patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV

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    Wu Ting-Shu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, a recent epidemic human disease, is caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV. First reported in Asia, SARS quickly spread worldwide through international travelling. As of July 2003, the World Health Organization reported a total of 8,437 people afflicted with SARS with a 9.6% mortality rate. Although immunopathological damages may account for the severity of respiratory distress, little is known about how the genome-wide gene expression of the host changes under the attack of SARS-CoV. Results Based on changes in gene expression of peripheral blood, we identified 52 signature genes that accurately discriminated acute SARS patients from non-SARS controls. While a general suppression of gene expression predominated in SARS-infected blood, several genes including those involved in innate immunity, such as defensins and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, were upregulated. Instead of employing clustering methods, we ranked the severity of recovering SARS patients by generalized associate plots (GAP according to the expression profiles of 52 signature genes. Through this method, we discovered a smooth transition pattern of severity from normal controls to acute SARS patients. The rank of SARS severity was significantly correlated with the recovery period (in days and with the clinical pulmonary infection score. Conclusion The use of the GAP approach has proved useful in analyzing the complexity and continuity of biological systems. The severity rank derived from the global expression profile of significantly regulated genes in patients may be useful for further elucidating the pathophysiology of their disease.

  13. Molecular history of Richter syndrome: origin from a cell already present at the time of chronic lymphocytic leukemia diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Davide; Spina, Valeria; Forconi, Francesco; Capello, Daniela; Fangazio, Marco; Rasi, Silvia; Martini, Maurizio; Gattei, Valter; Ramponi, Antonio; Larocca, Luigi M; Bertoni, Francesco; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2012-06-15

    Richter syndrome (RS) represents the transformation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia to aggressive lymphoma. We explored intraclonal diversification (ID) of immunoglobulin genes in order to (i) follow the evolutionary history of the RS clone (ii) compare the role of ID in clonally related RS vs. clonally unrelated cases. Most (10/11, 90.9%) clonally related RS stem from the predominant clone observed at CLL diagnosis. One single RS had a transformation pattern compatible with sequential evolution from a secondary CLL subclone. Once RS transformation had occurred, all secondary CLL subclones disappeared and were substituted by the dominant RS clone with its own descendants. These observations suggest that genetic lesions associated with RS transformation are acquired by a cell belonging to the original CLL clone, rather than being progressively accumulated by later CLL subclones. Accordingly, most (9/11, 81.1%) clonally related RS harbored a genetic lesion disrupting TP53 that was already present, though at subclonal levels, in 5/11 (45.5%) samples of the paired CLL phase. A fraction of clonally related RS switched off ID (4/11, 36.4%) or reduced the levels of ID (5/11, 45.4%) at transformation. Conversely, all clonally unrelated RS harbored ID and were characterized by a significantly higher mutation frequency compared to clonally related RS (median: 1.18 × 10(-3) vs. 0.13 × 10(-3); p =0.002). These data indicate that (i) clonally related RS stems from a cell that is already present within the initial CLL clone and (ii) clonally unrelated and clonally related RS are biologically distinct disorders also in terms of antigen affinity maturation.

  14. Molecular history of Richter syndrome: origin from a cell already present at the time of chronic lymphocytic leukemia diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Davide; Spina, Valeria; Forconi, Francesco; Capello, Daniela; Fangazio, Marco; Rasi, Silvia; Martini, Maurizio; Gattei, Valter; Ramponi, Antonio; Larocca, Luigi M; Bertoni, Francesco; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2012-06-15

    Richter syndrome (RS) represents the transformation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia to aggressive lymphoma. We explored intraclonal diversification (ID) of immunoglobulin genes in order to (i) follow the evolutionary history of the RS clone (ii) compare the role of ID in clonally related RS vs. clonally unrelated cases. Most (10/11, 90.9%) clonally related RS stem from the predominant clone observed at CLL diagnosis. One single RS had a transformation pattern compatible with sequential evolution from a secondary CLL subclone. Once RS transformation had occurred, all secondary CLL subclones disappeared and were substituted by the dominant RS clone with its own descendants. These observations suggest that genetic lesions associated with RS transformation are acquired by a cell belonging to the original CLL clone, rather than being progressively accumulated by later CLL subclones. Accordingly, most (9/11, 81.1%) clonally related RS harbored a genetic lesion disrupting TP53 that was already present, though at subclonal levels, in 5/11 (45.5%) samples of the paired CLL phase. A fraction of clonally related RS switched off ID (4/11, 36.4%) or reduced the levels of ID (5/11, 45.4%) at transformation. Conversely, all clonally unrelated RS harbored ID and were characterized by a significantly higher mutation frequency compared to clonally related RS (median: 1.18 × 10(-3) vs. 0.13 × 10(-3); p =0.002). These data indicate that (i) clonally related RS stems from a cell that is already present within the initial CLL clone and (ii) clonally unrelated and clonally related RS are biologically distinct disorders also in terms of antigen affinity maturation. PMID:21796624

  15. Molecular Analysis of Collagen XVIII Reveals Novel Mutations, Presence of a Third Isoform, and Possible Genetic Heterogeneity in Knobloch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, O. T.; Sertié, A. L.; Der Kaloustian, V. M.; Kok, F.; Carpenter, M.; Murray, J.; Czeizel, A. E.; Kliemann, S. E.; Rosemberg, S.; Monteiro, M.; Olsen, B. R.; Passos-Bueno, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    Knobloch syndrome (KS) is a rare disease characterized by severe ocular alterations, including vitreoretinal degeneration associated with retinal detachment and occipital scalp defect. The responsible gene, COL18A1, has been mapped to 21q22.3, and, on the basis of the analysis of one family, we have demonstrated that a mutation affecting only one of the three COL18A1 isoforms causes this phenotype. We report here the results of the screening of both the entire coding region and the exon-intron boundaries of the COL18A1 gene (which includes 43 exons), in eight unrelated patients with KS. Besides 20 polymorphic changes, we identified 6 different pathogenic changes in both alleles of five unrelated patients with KS (three compound heterozygotes and two homozygotes). All are truncating mutations leading to deficiency of one or all collagen XVIII isoforms and endostatin. We have verified that, in exon 41, the deletion c3514-3515delCT, found in three unrelated alleles, is embedded in different haplotypes, suggesting that this mutation has occurred more than once. In addition, our results provide evidence of nonallelic genetic heterogeneity in KS. We also show that the longest human isoform (NC11-728) is expressed in several tissues (including the human eye) and that lack of either the short variant or all of the collagen XVIII isoforms causes similar phenotypes but that those patients who lack all forms present more-severe ocular alterations. Despite the small sample size, we found low endostatin plasma levels in those patients with mutations leading to deficiency of all isoforms; in addition, it seems that absence of all collagen XVIII isoforms causes predisposition to epilepsy. PMID:12415512

  16. Auriculotemporal Syndrome (Frey Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motz, Kevin M; Kim, Young J

    2016-04-01

    Frey syndrome is a common sequela of parotidectomy, and although it is not frequently manifested clinically, it can cause significant morbidity for those affected. Frey syndrome results from synkinetic autonomic reinnervation by transected postganglionic parasympathetic nerve fiber within the parotid gland to the overlying sweat glands of the skin. Many surgical techniques have been proposed to prevent the development of Frey syndrome. For those who develop clinical symptoms of Frey syndrome, objective testing can be performed with a Minor starch-iodine test. Some of the current methods to prevent and treat symptomatic Frey syndrome are reviewed. PMID:26902982

  17. Molecular dissection of a contiguous gene syndrome: Frequent submicroscopic deletions, evolutionarily conserved sequences, and a hypomethylated island in the Miller-Dieker chromosome region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS), composed of characteristic facial abnormalities and a severe neuronal migration disorder affecting the cerebral cortex, is caused by visible or submicroscopic deletions of chromosome band 17p13. Twelve anonymous DNA markers were tested against a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing 17p deletions from seven MDS patients. All patients, including three with normal karyotypes, are deleted for a variable set of 5-12 markers. Two highly polymorphic VNTR (variable number of tandem repeats) probes, YNZ22 and YNH37, are codeleted in all patients tested and make molecular diagnosis for this disorder feasible. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, YNZ22 and YNH37 were shown to be within 30 kilobases (kb) of each other. Cosmid clones containing both VNTR sequences were identified, and restriction mapping showed them to be 100 kb were completely deleted in all patients, providing a minimum estimate of the size of the MDS critical region. A hypomethylated island and evolutionarily conserved sequences were identified within this 100-kb region, indications of the presence of one or more expressed sequences potentially involved in the pathophysiology of this disorder. The conserved sequences were mapped to mouse chromosome 11 by using mouse-rat somatic cell hybrids, extending the remarkable homology between human chromosome 17 and mouse chromosome 11 by 30 centimorgans, into the 17p telomere region

  18. Impact of I30T and I30M substitution in MPZ gene associated with Dejerine-Sottas syndrome type B (DSSB): A molecular modeling and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrahari, Ashish; George Priya Doss, C

    2015-10-01

    Myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene encodes MPZ protein is a vital component of the myelin sheath. Mutationsassociated with MPZ gene leads to severe de-hypomyelination Dejerine-Sottas syndrome type B (DSSB) also termed as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 3. In this work, we employed a set of various in silico prediction methods to screen 97 nsSNPs associated with MPZ gene. Based on this, we identified the nsSNPs to be most deleterious and pathogenic associated with DSSB. To get more insight into the mutational effect at three-dimensional structural level, we modeled the homology structure of native type as well as I30T and I30M mutant of MPZ protein using Modeler 9.13 software. Molecular dynamics simulation was initiated to explain the impact of the mutation on its structure and function. The obtained results depict that the protein with I30T mutation had variable structural conformation and dynamic behavior than native and mutant I30M of MPZ protein. We hope our computational insight might be helpful in rationalizing the deleterious mutations in DSSB and the advancement of novel pharmacological strategy.

  19. From clinical suspect to molecular confirmation of noonan syndrome; contribution of “best practice” genetic counseling and new technical possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukvic Nenad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome (NS is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by variable expressivity of clinical features such as: postnatal growth reduction, congenital heart disease, characteristic facial dysmorphisms and development delay. In ~75% of all NS cases, germline mutations involving RAS-MAPK signaling pathway genes (PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, SHOC2, MEK1, CBL are causative. We reported a case of 13-year-old girl [born at 36w by CS (BW 3250 g (~95°, BL 48 cm (~75°] referred for genetic counseling due to growth retardation, facial dysmorphisms, development delay and learning disability. After birth she presented frequent vomiting, with failure to thrive and at 5 months of age underwent surgery for intestinal malrotation. Because of short stature, Growth Hormone (GH therapy have been introduced at age of 3yrs up to 11yrs. Negative molecular testing for PTPN11 and SOS1 genes, normal female karyotype and aCGH analysis were observed. Objective examination: H 138 cm, (A; p.Val14Ile has been identified. Even though KRAS mutations are usually associated with NS severe phenotype with cardiac involvement (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, this finding is not present in our patient.

  20. Molecular genetic analysis of a patient with Hunter syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type II) and {alpha}-L-iduronidase pseudodeficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronovich, E.L.; Whitley, C.B. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) type I and type II are lysosomal storage disorders resulting from {alpha}-L-iduronidase (IDUA) and iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) deficiency, respectively. The a priori probability that both disorders would occur in a single individual is less than 1-in-5-billion. Nevertheless, such a proband was referred for whom clinical findings (i.e., a male with coarse facies, dysostosis multiplex and mental retardation) and biochemical tests indicated these concomitant diagnoses. In repeated studies, leukocyte 4MU-{alpha}-L-iduronidase activities in this kindred were: <1.0 nmol/mg protein/hr in proband; 5.7 in sister; 4.9 in mother; 15.0 in father (normal range: 11.0-18.4). Multiple techniques, including automated sequencing of the entire IDS and IDUA coding regions, were employed to unravel the molecular genetic basis of these intriguing observations. The IDS mutation R468W - previously observed in 4 unrelated MPS II patients - was identified in the proband, his mother and sister, thus explaining their biochemical phenotypes. Additionally, the proband, his sister and father were found to be heterozygous for a common IDUA mutation, W402X. Notably, a new IDUA mutation was also identified in the proband, his sister and mother accounting for deficiency of IDUA activity in these individuals. The asymptomatic sister, who had normal glycosaminoglycan excretion, is a compound heterozygote for W402X and this new allele; we believe this new mutation is the first IDUA pseudodeficiency gene to be elucidated at the molecular level.

  1. Molecular diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis Type II (Hunter syndrome) by automated sequencing and computer-assisted interpretation: Toward mutation mapping of the Iduronate-2-sulfatase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, J.J.; Aronovich, E.L.; Braun, S.E.; Whitley, C.B. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Virtually all mutations causing Hunter syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type II) are expected to be new mutations. Therefore, as a means of molecular diagnosis, we developed a rapid method to sequence the entire iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) coding region. PCR amplicons representing the IDS cDNA were sequenced with an automatic instrument, and output was analyzed by computer-assisted interpretation of tracings, using Staden programs on a Sun computer. Mutations were found in 10 of 11 patients studied. Unique missense mutations were identified in five patients: H229Y (685{r_arrow}T, severe phenotype); P358R (1073C{r_arrow}G, severe); R468W (1402C{r_arrow}T, mild); P469H (1406C{r_arrow}A, mild); and Y523C (1568A{r_arrow}G, mild). Nonsense mutations were identified in two patients: R172X (514C{r_arrow}T, severe) and Q389X (1165C{r_arrow}T, severe). Two other patients with severe disease had insertions of 1 and 14 bp, in exons 3 and 6, respectively. In another patient with severe disease, the predominant (<95%) IDS message resulted from aberrant splicing, which skipped exon 3. In this last case, consensus sequences for splice sites in exon 3 were intact, but a 395C{r_arrow}G mutation was identified 24 bp upstream from the 3` splice of exon 3. This mutation created a cryptic 5` splice site with a better consensus sequence for 5` splice sites than the natural 5` splice site of intron 3. A minor population of the IDS message was processed by using this cryptic splice site; however, no correctly spliced message was detected in leukocytes from this patient. The mutational topology of the IDS gene is presented. 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. High-molecular-weight adiponectin is selectively reduced in women with polycystic ovary syndrome independent of body mass index and severity of insulin resistance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, A

    2010-03-01

    Context: High-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin contributes to insulin resistance (IR), which is closely associated with the pathophysiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Abnormalities in adipocyte function have been identified in PCOS and potentially contribute to lower adiponectin concentrations. Objective: Our objective was to determine which variables in plasma and adipose tissue influence HMW adiponectin in a well characterized cohort of women with PCOS. Design: This was a cross-sectional study. Settings and Participants: A teaching hospital. Women with PCOS (n = 98) and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls (n = 103) (including 68 age-, BMI-, and IR-matched pairs). Interventions: A standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was performed for each participant. Subcutaneous adipose tissue samples were taken by needle biopsy for a subset of PCOS women (n = 9) and controls (n = 8). Main Outcome Measures: Serum levels of HMW adiponectin and their relation to indices of insulin sensitivity, body composition, and circulating androgens as well as adipose tissue expression levels of ADIPOQ, TNFalpha, PPARgamma, and AR were assessed. Results: HMW adiponectin was significantly lower in women with PCOS compared with both BMI- and BMI- and IR-matched controls (P = 0.009 and P = 0.027, respectively). Although BMI and IR were the main predictors of HMW adiponectin, an interaction between waist to hip ratio and plasma testosterone contributed to its variance (P = 0.026). Adipose tissue gene expression analysis demonstrated that AR and TNFalpha (P = 0.008 and P = 0.035, respectively) but not ADIPOQ mRNA levels were increased in PCOS compared with controls. Conclusions: HMW adiponectin is selectively reduced in women with PCOS, independent of BMI and IR. Gene expression analysis suggests that posttranscriptional\\/translational modification contributes to reduced HMW adiponectin in PCOS.

  3. Size of the exon 1-CAG repeats of the androgen receptor gene employed as a molecular marker in the diagnosis of Turner syndrome in girls with short stature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, C C; Kochi, C; Longui, C A; Rocha, M N; Richeti, F; Evangelista, N M A; Calliari, L E P; Monte, O

    2008-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is one of the most common chromosomal abnormalities among girls. Complete monosomy of X chromosome is responsible for almost 50% of all cases of TS, and mosaicism and X anomaly are detected in the other half. It has already been demonstrated that early diagnosis of these children allows appropriate growth hormone treatment with better final height prognosis and introduction of estrogen at an ideal chronological age. Sixty-four short-stature girls were selected and the clinical data obtained were birth weight and height, weight and height at the first medical visit and target height. Other clinical data including cardiac and renal abnormalities, otitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis, cubitus valgus, short neck, widely separated nipples, and pigmented nevi were obtained from the patients' medical records. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the screening of a group of short-stature girls for TS based on the number of CAG repeats of the androgen receptor gene analyzed by GeneScan software. Patient samples with two alleles (heterozygous) were 49/64 (76.5%) and with one allele (homozygous) were 15/64 (23.5%). A karyotype was determined in 30 patients, 9 homozygous and 21 heterozygous. In the homozygous group, 6/9 were 45,X and 3/9 were 46,XX. In the heterozygous group, 17/21 were 46,XX, and 4/21 were TS patients with mosaicism (45,X/46,XX; 45,X/46XiXq; 46XdelXp). The pattern obtained by GeneScan in two patients with mosaicism in the karyotype was an imbalance between the peak heights of the two alleles, suggesting that this imbalance could be present when there is a mosaicism. The frequency of TS abnormalities (18.7%) did not differ between TS and 46,XX girls. Thus, it is important to accurately assess the incidence of TS in growth-retarded girls, even in the absence of other dysmorphisms. In this study, we diagnosed 6 cases of TS 45,X (9.4%) by molecular analysis, with a 100% sensitivity and 85% specificity. This molecular analysis was able to

  4. Bi Syndrome (Arthralgia Syndrome)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG En-qin

    2010-01-01

    @@ The word 'Bi' (痹) in Chinese means an obstruction.Bi Syndrome refers the syndrome characterized by the obstruction of qi and blood in the meridians due to the invasion of external pathogenic wind, cold and dampness, manifested as soreness, pain, numbness,heavy sensation, swelling of joints and limbs, limitation of movements and so on.

  5. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: genitopatellar syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome have distinct clinical features reflecting distinct molecular mechanisms. Hum Mutat. 2012 Nov;33(11):1520-5. ... with a qualified healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Contact Us Selection Criteria for Links ...

  7. ANTICOAGULANTS IN ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    I. A. Latfullin; A. A. Podolskaya

    2016-01-01

    Clinical efficacy of unfractionated and low molecular heparins in acute coronary syndrome is discussed. New synthetic heparin derivative fondaparinux (Arixtra) is focused. Author’s brief experience of fondaparinux clinical implementation is presented.

  8. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min

    2016-05-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It leads not only to secondary distortion of skull shape but to various complications including neurologic, ophthalmic and respiratory dysfunction. Craniosynostosis is very heterogeneous in terms of its causes, presentation, and management. Both environmental factors and genetic factors are associated with development of craniosynostosis. Nonsyndromic craniosynostosis accounts for more than 70% of all cases. Syndromic craniosynostosis with a certain genetic cause is more likely to involve multiple sutures or bilateral coronal sutures. FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1 genes are major causative genes of genetic syndromes associated with craniosynostosis. Although most of syndromic craniosynostosis show autosomal dominant inheritance, approximately half of patients are de novo cases. Apert syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, and Antley-Bixler syndrome are related to mutations in FGFR family (especially in FGFR2), and mutations in FGFRs can be overlapped between different syndromes. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, Muenke syndrome, and craniofrontonasal syndrome are representative disorders showing isolated coronal suture involvement. Compared to the other types of craniosynostosis, single gene mutations can be more frequently detected, in one-third of coronal synostosis patients. Molecular diagnosis can be helpful to provide adequate genetic counseling and guidance for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis. PMID:27226847

  9. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min

    2016-05-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It leads not only to secondary distortion of skull shape but to various complications including neurologic, ophthalmic and respiratory dysfunction. Craniosynostosis is very heterogeneous in terms of its causes, presentation, and management. Both environmental factors and genetic factors are associated with development of craniosynostosis. Nonsyndromic craniosynostosis accounts for more than 70% of all cases. Syndromic craniosynostosis with a certain genetic cause is more likely to involve multiple sutures or bilateral coronal sutures. FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1 genes are major causative genes of genetic syndromes associated with craniosynostosis. Although most of syndromic craniosynostosis show autosomal dominant inheritance, approximately half of patients are de novo cases. Apert syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, and Antley-Bixler syndrome are related to mutations in FGFR family (especially in FGFR2), and mutations in FGFRs can be overlapped between different syndromes. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, Muenke syndrome, and craniofrontonasal syndrome are representative disorders showing isolated coronal suture involvement. Compared to the other types of craniosynostosis, single gene mutations can be more frequently detected, in one-third of coronal synostosis patients. Molecular diagnosis can be helpful to provide adequate genetic counseling and guidance for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis.

  10. Two Likely Pathogenic Variants of COL2A1 in Unrelated Korean Patients With Ocular-Only Variants of Stickler Syndrome: The First Molecular Diagnosis in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Je Moon; Jang, Mi-Ae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Sang Jin

    2015-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder that affects the ocular, auditory, and musculoskeletal systems. Ocular-only variant of Stickler syndrome type 1 (OSTL1) is characterized by high risk of retinal detachment without systemic involvement and is caused by alternatively spliced exon 2 mutation of COL2A1. We report the cases of two Korean families with OSTL1 carrying likely pathogenic variants of COL2A1. All patients presented with membranous vitreous anomaly, peripheral ret...

  11. Rett syndrome: clinical and molecular characterization of two Brazilian patients Síndrome de Rett: caracterização clínica e molecular de dois casos brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Stachon

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rett syndrome (RS is recognized as a pan-ethnic condition. Since the identification of mutations in the MECP2 gene, more patients have been diagnosed, and a broad spectrum of phenotypes has been reported. There is a lack of phenotype-genotype studies. OBJECTIVE: To describe two cases of Brazilian patients with identified MECP2 mutations. METHOD: We present two female Brazilian patients with RS. RESULTS: Both patients presented with regression at 2-3 years of age, when stereotypic hand movements, social withdrawal and postnatal deceleration of head growth rate were observed. Both patients presented verbal communication impairment. Case 1 had loss of purposeful hand movements, and severe seizure episodes. Case 2 had milder impairment of purposeful hand movements, and no seizures. They had different mutations, D97Y and R294X, found in exons 3 and 4 of MECP2 gene, respectively. CONCLUSION: Testing for MECP2 mutations is important to confirm diagnosis and to establish genotype/phenotype correlations, and improve genetic counseling.CONTEXTO: Síndrome de Rett (RS é doença pan-étnica de fenótipo bastante variado desde que foram identificadas mutações no gene MECP2 e um número maior de pacientes tem sido diagnosticadas. Existe uma demanda por estudos que investiguem a relação genótipo-fenotipo. OBJETIVO: Descrever dois casos brasileiros de RS com mutações identificadas. MÉTODO: Duas pacientes brasileiras com diagnóstico clínico-molecular de RS foram descritas buscando-se correlacionar genótipo-fenótipo. RESULTADOS: Ambas pacientes apresentaram regressão aos 2-3 anos de idade, movimentos esteriotipados de mãos, retraimento social e desaceleração do crescimento encefálico. Ambas apresentaram déficit de comunicação verbal. Caso 1 também apresentou perda dos movimentos manuais intencionados e crises convulsivas graves. Caso 2 apresentou-se com comprometimento parcial dos movimentos manuais e sem história de crise

  12. The differential diagnosis of familial lentiginosis syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2011-09-01

    Cutaneous markers of systemic disease are vital for clinicians to recognize. This chapter outlines familial lentiginosis syndromes that include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Carney Complex, the PTEN hamartomatous syndromes, and LEOPARD/Noonan syndrome. The inheritance of these syndromes is autosomal dominant; they also share characteristic skin findings that offer a clue to their recognition and treatment. We will discuss the clinical presentation of these disorders, with a focus on the dermatological manifestations, and will provide an update on the molecular mechanisms involved. Recognition of cutaneous markers associated with these rare familial cancer syndromes provides the opportunity to pursue early surveillance for malignancies, as well as genetic counseling.

  13. Clinical, cytogenetic and molecular analysis of androgen insensitivity syndromes from south Indian cohort and detection and in-silico characterization of androgen receptor gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V G, Abilash; S, Radha; K M, Marimuthu; K, Thangaraj; S, Arun; S, Nishu; A, Mohana Priya; J, Meena; D, Anuradha

    2016-01-30

    Rare cases of 9 complete androgen insensitivity syndromes, 9 cases of partial androgen insensitivity syndromes and equal number of male control samples were selected for this study. Few strong variations in clinical features were noticed; Giemsa banded metaphase revealed a 46,XY karyotype and the frequency of chromosome aberrations were significantly higher when compared with control samples. DNA sequence analysis of the androgen receptor gene of androgen insensitivity syndromes revealed three missense mutations - c.C1713>G resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved histidine residue with glutamine p.(His571Glu) in DNA-binding domain, c.A1715>G resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved tyrosine residue with cysteine p.(Tyr572Cys) in DNA-binding domain and c.G2599>A resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved valine residue with methionine p.(Val867Met) in ligand-binding domain of androgen receptor gene respectively. The heterozygous type of mutations c.C1713>G and c.G2599>A observed in mothers of the patients for familial cases concluding that the mutation was inherited from the mother. The novel mutation c.C1713>G is reported first time in androgen insensitivity syndrome. In-silico analysis of mutations observed in androgen receptor gene of androgen insensitivity syndrome predicted that the substitution at Y572C and V867M could probably disrupt the protein structure and function. PMID:26688387

  14. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome are cancer syndromes which affect multiple organs and lead to significant decline in quality of life in affected patients. These syndromes are rare and typically affect the adolescent and young adult population, resulting in greater cumulative years of life lost. Improved understanding of the underpinnings of the genetic pathways underlying these syndromes and the rapid evolution of targeted therapies in general have made it possible to develop therapeutic options for these patients and other genetic cancer syndromes. Targeted therapies especially antiangiogenics and inhibitors of the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway have shown activity in selected group of patients affected by these syndromes or in patients harboring specific sporadic mutations which are otherwise characteristic of these syndromes. Unfortunately due to the rare nature, patients with these syndromes are not the focus of clinical trials and unique results seen in these patients can easily go unnoticed. Most of the data suggesting benefits of targeted therapies are either case reports or small case series. Thus, a literature review was indicated. In this review we explore the use of molecularly targeted therapy options in Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome. PMID:25725225

  15. Clinical and molecular analysis of two Chinese siblings with Cockayne syndrome%Cockayne综合征两例临床特征与基因突变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周知子; 刘丽; 吴莫龄; 刘鸿圣; 蔡燕娜; 盛慧英; 李秀珍; 程静; 李端

    2016-01-01

    目的 分析Cockayne综合征患儿临床特征及基因突变.方法 分析归纳2013年7月至2014年11月广州妇女儿童医疗中心收治的一对同胞兄弟共患经典型Cockayne综合征的临床特点;提取患儿及其血缘父母外周血全基因组DNA,用PCR方法扩增ERCC6基因全部外显子及与其相连的内含子区,扩增产物行双向测序,查找突变位点.结果 患儿为同胞两兄弟,分别为4岁8月龄和7岁5月龄.均因"生长和智力落后数年"就诊,母孕产史均无异常.1岁前,患儿身高、体重均在正常范围内.1岁半后均出现身高、体重增长缓慢,运动发育落后,眼、皮肤光敏感,听力及视神经损害,小头、眼窝深邃.例1(先证者)就诊时身高90.8 cm,体重9.1kg,头围41 cm,胸围44 cm;例2(先证者胞兄)就诊时身高92 cm,体重11.2 kg,头围41 cm,胸围46 cm.例1在4岁半,例2在7岁时头颅MRI检查提示全脑萎缩,脑室扩大,髓鞘形成不良.头颅磁共振波谱分析(氢谱)-MR成像提示左右两侧背侧丘脑、岛叶及左侧半卵圆中心神经元损伤.头颅CT提示双侧基底节对称性钙化.ERCC6基因突变分析提示兄弟俩ERCC6基因均存在c.1357C>T(p.Arg453Ter)与c.1607T>G(p.Leu536Trp)复合杂合致病突变,突变分别遗传自患儿母亲和父亲.结论 Cockayne综合征患儿具有出生时正常,生后逐渐出现生长发育迟缓,语言、智力落后,脑损伤、小头畸形,眼窝深邃,皮肤光敏感等临床特征,存在ERCC6基因突变,易误诊为脑瘫、先天性小头畸形等.%Objective Cockayne syndrome is a rare disease and difficult to be recognized.This study aimed to expand the knowledge of the clinical and molecular characteristics of the children with Cockayne syndrome (CS).Method Clinical data of two siblings with classic CS of Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center from July 2013 to November 2014 were obtained and analyzed.The whole DNA of peripheral blood was collected from two CS siblings and

  16. Molecular Screening of "MECP2" Gene in a Cohort of Lebanese Patients Suspected with Rett Syndrome: Report on a Mild Case with a Novel Indel Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbani, S.; Chouery, E.; Fayyad, J.; Fawaz, A.; El Tourjuman, O.; Badens, C.; Lacoste, C.; Delague, V.; Megarbane, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked, dominant, neurodevelopment disorder represents 10% of female subjects with profound intellectual disability. Mutations in the "MECP2" gene are responsible for up to 95% of the classical RTT cases, and nearly 500 different mutations distributed throughout the gene have been reported. Methods: We report…

  17. Is there an influence of X-chromosomal imprinting on the phenotype in Klinefelter syndrome? A clinical and molecular genetic study of 61 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stemkens, D; Roza, T; Verrij, L; Swaab, H; van Werkhoven, MK; Alizadeh, BZ; Sinke, RJ; Giltay, JC

    2006-01-01

    Studies on Turner syndrome suggested the presence of X-chromosomal-imprinted genes involved in social and verbal cognition. Imprinted genes on autosomes were shown to affect growth. Could imprinting of such genes on the X chromosome also influence psychomotor development and growth in men with Kline

  18. The pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease II; viral pathways in swine, small ruminants, and wildlife, myotropism, chronic syndromes, and molecular virus-host interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigation of the pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) has focused on study of the disease in cattle with less emphasis on pigs, small ruminants, and wildlife. “Atypical” FMD-associated syndromes such as myocarditis, reproductive losses, and chronic heat-intolerance have also received lit...

  19. Epidermal nevus syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Sarah; Sugarman, Jeffrey L

    2015-01-01

    The term epidermal nevus syndrome (ENS) has been used to describe the association of epidermal hamartomas and extracutaneous abnormalities. Although many continue to use the term "ENS," it is now understood that this is not one disease, but rather a heterogeneous group with distinct genetic profiles defined by a common cutaneous phenotype: the presence of epidermal and adnexal hamartomas that are associated with other organ system involvement. One commonality is that epidermal nevi often follow the lines of Blaschko and it appears the more widespread the cutaneous manifestations, the greater the risk for extracutaneous manifestations. The majority of the extracutaneous manifestations involve the brain, eye, and skeletal systems. The CNS involvement is wide ranging and involves both clinical manifestations such as intellectual disability and seizures, as well as structural anomalies. Several subsets of ENS with characteristic features have been delineated including the nevus sebaceus syndrome, Proteus syndrome, CHILD syndrome, Becker's nevus syndrome, nevus comedonicus syndrome, and phakomatosis pigmentokeratotica. Advances in molecular biology have revealed that the manifestations of ENS are due to genomic mosaicism. It is likely that the varied clinical manifestations of ENS are due in great part to the functional effects of specific genetic defects. Optimal management of the patient with ENS involves an interdisciplinary approach given the potential for multisystem involvement. Of note, epidermal nevi have been associated with both benign and malignant neoplasms, and thus ongoing clinical follow-up is required.

  20. 46,XX Male Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Uçan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available 46, XX male syndrome – testicular disorder of sexual differentiation (DSD is a rare condition characterized by a spectrum of clinical presentations, ranging from ambiguous to normal male genitalia. These cases are diagnosed more easily in childhood. In adults, the diagnosis can be difficult due to the current normal gender development. Here, we report hormonal, molecular and cytogenetic results in an adult male patient with primary hypogonadism who was diagnosed with 46, XX male syndrome in our clinic. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 46-8

  1. Heritable Gastrointestinal Cancer Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M

    2016-09-01

    Although almost all gastrointestinal cancers develop from sporadic genomic events, approximately 5% arise from germline mutations in genes associated with cancer predisposition. The number of these genes continues to increase. Tumor phenotypes and family history provide the framework for identifying at-risk individuals. The diagnosis of a hereditary cancer syndrome has implications for management of patients and their families. Systematic approaches that integrate family history and molecular characterization of tumors and polyps facilitate identification of individuals with this genetic predisposition. This article summarizes diagnosis and management of hereditary cancer syndromes associated with gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:27546846

  2. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  3. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone ... cause your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  4. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism , is a rare endocrine disorder caused by chronic exposure of the body's tissues ... removing the tumor while minimizing the chance of endocrine deficiency or long-term ... for Cushing's Syndrome Clinical Trials ...

  5. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of ...

  6. National Down Syndrome Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... info@ndss.org Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... More » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  7. Learning about Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Marfan Syndrome What is Marfan syndrome? What are the ... Syndrome Additional Resources for Marfan Syndrome What is Marfan syndrome? Marfan syndrome is one of the most ...

  8. The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biesecker Leslie G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS is a pleiotropic, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. It is rare, but precise estimates of incidence are difficult to determine, as ascertainment is erratic (estimated range 1–9/1,000,000. The primary findings include hypertelorism, macrocephaly with frontal bossing, and polysyndactyly. The polydactyly is most commonly preaxial of the feet and postaxial in the hands, with variable cutaneous syndactyly, but the limb findings vary significantly. Other low frequency findings include central nervous system (CNS anomalies, hernias, and cognitive impairment. GCPS is caused by loss of function mutations in the GLI3 transcription factor gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The disorder is allelic to the Pallister-Hall syndrome and one form of the acrocallosal syndrome. Clinical diagnosis is challenging because the findings of GCPS are relatively non-specific, and no specific and sensitive clinical have been delineated. For this reason, we have proposed a combined clinical-molecular definition for the syndrome. A presumptive diagnosis of GCPS can be made if the patient has the classic triad of preaxial polydactyly with cutaneous syndactyly of at least one limb, hypertelorism, and macrocephaly. Patients with a phenotype consistent with GCPS (but which may not manifest all three attributes listed above and a GLI3 mutation may be diagnosed definitively with GCPS. In addition, persons with a GCPS-consistent phenotype who are related to a definitively diagnosed family member in a pattern consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance may be diagnosed definitively as well. Antenatal molecular diagnosis is technically straightforward to perform. Differential diagnoses include preaxial polydactyly type 4, the GCPS contiguous gene syndrome, acrocallosal syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Teebi syndrome. Treatment of the disorder is symptomatic, with plastic or

  9. Analysis of Disease Progression-Associated Gene Expression Profile in Fibrillin-1 Mutant Mice: New Insight into Molecular Pathogenesis of Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Koung Li; Choi, Chanmi; Suh, Wonhee

    2014-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1) and is characterized by aortic dilatation and dissection, which is the primary cause of death in untreated MFS patients. However, disease progression-associated changes in gene expression in the aortic lesions of MFS patients remained unknown. Using a mouse model of MFS, FBN1 hypomorphic mouse (mgR/mgR), we characterized the aortic gene expression profiles dur...

  10. Molecular Study of Three Lebanese and Syrian Patients with Waardenburg Syndrome and Report of Novel Mutations in the EDNRB and MITF Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad, N M; Ente, D.; Chouery, E.; Jalkh, N.; Mehawej, C.; Khoueir, Z; PINGAULT, V.; Mégarbané, A.

    2011-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder characterized primarily by depigmentation of the skin and hair, heterochromia of the irides, sensorineural deafness, and sometimes by dystopia canthorum, and Hirschsprung disease. WS presents a large clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Four different types have been individualized and linked to 5 different genes. We report 2 cases of WS type II and 1 case of WS type IV from Lebanon and Syria. The genetic studies revealed 2 novel mutations in the...

  11. Molecular signature of adipose tissue in patients with both Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

    OpenAIRE

    Baranova, Ancha; Tran, Thuy Phuong; Afendy, Arian; Wang, Lei; Shamsaddini, Amirhossein; Mehta, Rohini; Chandhoke, Vikas; Birerdinc, Aybike; Younossi, Zobair M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common reproductive disorders with strong association with both insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). To untangle the complex relationship between PCOS and NAFLD, we analyzed serum biomarkers of apoptosis, some adipokines and mRNA profiles in the visceral adipose tissue of obese patients with NAFLD who were also diagnosed with PCOS and compared to a group with NAFLD only. Methods We included patients ...

  12. Clinical and molecular characterization of 40 patients with classic Ehlers–Danlos syndrome: identification of 18 COL5A1 and 2 COL5A2 novel mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Ritelli, Marco; Dordoni, Chiara; Venturini, Marina; Chiarelli, Nicola; Quinzani, Stefano; Traversa, Michele; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Vascellaro, Annalisa; Wischmeijer, Anita; Manfredini, Emanuela; Garavelli, Livia; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Colombi, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Background Classic Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (cEDS) is a rare autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder that is primarily characterized by skin hyperextensibility, abnormal wound healing/atrophic scars, and joint hypermobility. A recent study demonstrated that more than 90% of patients who satisfy all of these major criteria harbor a type V collagen (COLLV) defect. Methods This cohort included 40 patients with cEDS who were clinically diagnosed according to the Villefranche nosology. The flo...

  13. Mutation in type II procollagen (COL2A1) that substitutes aspartate for glycine alpha 1-67 and that causes cataracts and retinal detachment: evidence for molecular heterogeneity in the Wagner syndrome and the Stickler syndrome (arthro-ophthalmopathy)

    OpenAIRE

    Körkkö, J; Ritvaniemi, P; Haataja, L; Kääriäinen, H; Kivirikko, K I; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1993-01-01

    A search for mutations in the gene for type II procollagen (COL2A1) was carried out in affected members of a family with early-onset cataracts, lattice degeneration of the retina, and retinal detachment. They had no symptoms suggestive of involvement of nonocular tissues, as is typically found in the Stickler syndrome. The COL2A1 gene was amplified with PCR, and the products were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The results suggested a mutation in one allele for exon 10. S...

  14. Avian influenza virus, Streptococcus suis serotype 2, severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus and beyond: molecular epidemiology, ecology and the situation in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying; Feng, Youjun; Liu, Di; Gao, George F

    2009-09-27

    The outbreak and spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus and the subsequent identification of its animal origin study have heightened the world's awareness of animal-borne or zoonotic pathogens. In addition to SARS, the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (AIV), H5N1, and the lower pathogenicity H9N2 AIV have expanded their host ranges to infect human beings and other mammalian species as well as birds. Even the 'well-known' reservoir animals for influenza virus, migratory birds, became victims of the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus. Not only the viruses, but bacteria can also expand their host range: a new disease, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, caused by human Streptococcus suis serotype 2 infection, has been observed in China with 52 human fatalities in two separate outbreaks (1998 and 2005, respectively). Additionally, enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection has increased worldwide with severe disease. Several outbreaks and sporadic isolations of this pathogen in China have made it an important target for disease control. A new highly pathogenic variant of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been isolated in both China and Vietnam recently; although PRRSV is not a zoonotic human pathogen, its severe outbreaks have implications for food safety. All of these pathogens occur in Southeast Asia, including China, with severe consequences; therefore, we discuss the issues in this article by addressing the situation of the zoonotic threat in China. PMID:19687041

  15. Identification of novel mutations in the SLC25A15 gene in hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome: a clinical, molecular, and functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessa, Alessandra; Fiermonte, Giuseppe; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Paradies, Eleonora; Baumgartner, Matthias R; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Loguercio, Carmela; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Nassogne, Marie-Cecile; Schiff, Manuel; Deodato, Federica; Parenti, Giancarlo; Rutledge, S Lane; Vilaseca, M Antonia; Melone, Mariarosa A B; Scarano, Gioacchino; Aldamiz-Echevarría, Luiz; Besley, Guy; Walter, John; Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Hernandez, Jose M; Pierri, Ciro L; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Santorelli, Filippo M

    2009-05-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder of the urea cycle. With the exception of the French-Canadian founder effect, no common mutation has been detected in other populations. In this study, we collected 16 additional HHH cases and expanded the spectrum of SLC25A15/ORC1 mutations. Eleven novel mutations were identified including six new missense and one microrearrangement. We also measured the transport properties of the recombinant purified proteins in reconstituted liposomes for four new and two previously reported missense mutations and proved that the transport activities of these mutant forms of ORC1 were reduced as compared with the wild-type protein; residual activity ranged between 4% and 19%. Furthermore, we designed three-dimensional (3D)-modeling of mutant ORC1 proteins. While modeling the changes in silico allowed us to obtain new information on the pathomechanisms underlying HHH syndrome, we found no clear-cut genotype-phenotype correlations. Although patient metabolic alterations responded well to low-protein therapy, predictions concerning the long-term evolution of HHH syndrome remain uncertain. The preference for a hepatic rather than a neurological presentation at onset also continues, largely, to elude us. Neither modifications in oxidative metabolism-related energy, such as those expected in different mtDNA haplogroups, nor sequence variants in SLC25A2/ORC2 seem to be crucial. Other factors, including protein stability and function, and ORC1-ORC2 structural interactions should be further investigated.

  16. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Dumping Syndrome Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ...

  17. Striatal neurodevelopment is dysregulated in purine metabolism deficiency and impacts DARPP-32, BDNF/TrkB expression and signaling: new insights on the molecular and cellular basis of Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiabe-Henri Guibinga

    Full Text Available Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome (LNS is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the purine metabolic enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT. This syndrome is characterized by an array of severe neurological impairments that in part originate from striatal dysfunctions. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these dysfunctions remain largely unidentified. In this report, we demonstrate that HPRT-deficiency causes dysregulated expression of key genes essential for striatal patterning, most notably the striatally-enriched transcription factor B-cell leukemia 11b (Bcl11b. The data also reveal that the down-regulated expression of Bcl11b in HPRT-deficient immortalized mouse striatal (STHdh neural stem cells is accompanied by aberrant expression of some of its transcriptional partners and other striatally-enriched genes, including the gene encoding dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32, (DARPP-32. Furthermore, we demonstrate that components of the BDNF/TrkB signaling, a known activator of DARPP-32 striatal expression and effector of Bcl11b transcriptional activation are markedly increased in HPRT-deficient cells and in the striatum of HPRT knockout mouse. Consequently, the HPRT-deficient cells display superior protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated cell death upon exposure to hydrogen peroxide. These findings suggest that the purine metabolic defect caused by HPRT-deficiency, while it may provide neuroprotection to striatal neurons, affects key genes and signaling pathways that may underlie the neuropathogenesis of LNS.

  18. Refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández López, M T; López Otero, M J; Alvarez Vázquez, P; Arias Delgado, J; Varela Correa, J J

    2009-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a complex syndrome that occurs as a result of reintroducing nutrition (oral, enteral or parenteral) to patients who are starved or malnourished. Patients can develop fluid-balance abnormalities, electrolyte disorders (hypophosphataemia, hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia), abnormal glucose metabolism and certain vitamin deficiencies. Refeeding syndrome encompasses abnormalities affecting multiple organ systems, including neurological, pulmonary, cardiac, neuromuscular and haematological functions. Pathogenic mechanisms involved in the refeeding syndrome and clinical manifestations have been reviewed. We provide suggestions for the prevention and treatment of refeeding syndrome. The most important steps are to identify patients at risk, reintroduce nutrition cautiously and correct electrolyte and vitamin deficiencies properly.

  19. Genetic syndromes associated with overgrowth in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min

    2013-09-01

    Overgrowth syndromes comprise a diverse group of conditions with unique clinical, behavioral and molecular genetic features. While considerable overlap in presentation sometimes exists, advances in identification of the precise etiology of specific overgrowth disorders continue to improve clinicians' ability to make an accurate diagnosis. Among them, this paper introduces two classic genetic overgrowth syndromes: Sotos syndrome and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Historically, the diagnosis was based entirely on clinical findings. However, it is now understood that Sotos syndrome is caused by a variety of molecular genetic alterations resulting in haploinsufficiency of the NSD1 gene at chromosome 5q35 and that Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is caused by heterogeneous abnormalities in the imprinting of a number of growth regulatory genes within chromosome 11p15 in the majority of cases. Interestingly, the 11p15 imprinting region is also associated with Russell-Silver syndrome which is a typical growth retardation syndrome. Opposite epigenetic alterations in 11p15 result in opposite clinical features shown in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and Russell-Silver syndrome. Although the exact functions of the causing genes have not yet been completely understood, these overgrowth syndromes can be good models to clarify the complex basis of human growth and help to develop better-directed therapies in the future.

  20. Rapid molecular diagnosis on 21-trisomy syndrome by fluorescent PCR%荧光PCR快速诊断21-三体综合征的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田娟; 张元珍; 郑芳; 宋贵波

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical feasibility of fluorescent PCR method on the detection of 21-trisomy syndrome by D21S1919,D21S263,D21S1914,D21S1255 locusand make a foundation for rapid diagnosis of 21-trisomy syndrom.Methods About 100 normal controls and 6 patients with 21-trisomy syndrome were tested using fluorescent PCR by amplification of DNA fragments on the four loci.The results were compared with conventional cytogenetic analysis to confirm the utility of this method.Results Innormal controls,the flurescent intensity ratios of peak heights of PRC products amplified from two alleles were about 1:1 in heterozygous controls;however,the intensity ratios were about 2:1 or 1:1:1 in the patients.Conclusions Fluorescent PCR was a accurate ,rapid method ,and only small amount of starting material was needed ,it could be applied in rapid prenatal diagnosis of 21-trisomy syndrome.%目的 探讨用D21S1919、D21S263、D21S1914、D21S1255等4个杂合度较高的STR位点的荧光PCR诊断21-三体综合征的可行性.方法 用荧光PCR扩增4个STR位点的DNA片段,分别检测了100例正常对照和6例患者,并将结果与传统的细胞遗传学方法进行对比.以验证该方法的有效性.结果 在正常对照杂合子样本中,两个等位基冈的峰高比值接近于1:1;在21-三体患者杂合子样本中,等位基因的峰高比值接近于2:1或1:1:1.结论 荧光PCR是一种快速、准确的检测方法,而且只需要极少量的模板原料.这种方法可以用于21-三体综合征的无创、快速分子诊断.

  1. Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lodewijk AA Brosens; Danielle Langeveld; W Arnout van Hattem; Francis M Giardiello; G Johan A Offerhaus

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple distinct juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer.The cumulative life-time risk of colorectal cancer is 39% and the relative risk is 34.Juvenile polyps have a distinctive histology characterized by an abundance of edematous lamina propria with inflammatory cells and cystically dilated glands lined by cuboidal to columnar epithelium with reactive changes.Clinically, juvenile polyposis syndrome is defined by the presence of 5 or more juvenile polyps in the colorectum,juvenile polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract or any number of juvenile polyps and a positive family history of juvenile polyposis.In about 50%-60% of patients diagnosed with juvenile polyposis syndrome a germline mutation in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A gene is found.Both genes play a role in the BMP/TGF-beta signalling pathway.It has been suggested that cancer in juvenile polyposis may develop through the so-alled "landscaper mechanism" where an abnormal stromal environment leads to neoplastic transformation of the adjacent epithelium and in the end invasive carcinoma.Recognition of this rare disorder is important for patients and their families with regard to treatment,follow-up and screening of at risk individuals.Each clinician confronted with the diagnosis of a juvenile polyp should therefore consider the possibility of juvenile polyposis syndrome.In addition, juvenile polyposis syndrome provides a unique model to study colorectal cancer pathogenesis in general and gives insight in the molecular genetic basis of cancer. This review discusses clinical manifestations, genetics, pathogenesis and management of juvenile polyposis syndrome.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Transcriptome-wide Interactions between Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus and Porcine Alveolar Macrophages in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhou, Shanli Zhai, Xiang Zhou, Ping Lin, Tengfei Jiang, Xueying Hu, Yunbo Jiang, Bin Wu, Qingde Zhang, Xuewen Xu, Jin-ping Li, Bang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infects mainly the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs and causes porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS. Previous studies have analyzed the global gene expression profiles of lung tissue in vivo and PAMs in vitro following infection with PRRSV, however, transcriptome-wide understanding of the interaction between highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV and PAMs in vivo has not yet been established. In this study, we employed Affymetrix microarrays to investigate the gene expression patterns of PAMs isolated from Tongcheng piglets (a Chinese indigenous breed after infection with HP-PRRSV. During the infection, Tongcheng piglets exhibited typical clinical signs, e.g. fever, asthma, coughing, anorexia, lethargy and convulsion, but displayed mild regional lung damage at 5 and 7 dpi. Microarray analysis revealed that HP-PRRSV infection has affected PAMs in expression of the important genes involved in cytoskeleton and exocytosis organization, protein degradation and folding, intracellular calcium and zinc homeostasis. Several potential antiviral strategies might be employed in PAMs, including upregulating IFN-induced genes and increasing intracellular zinc ion concentration. And inhibition of the complement system likely attenuated the lung damage during HP-PRRSV infection. Transcriptomic analysis of PAMs in vivo could lead to a better understanding of the HP-PRRSV-host interaction, and to the identification of novel antiviral therapies and genetic components of swine tolerance/susceptibility to HP-PRRS.

  3. Isolation, Characterization, and Molecular Modeling of a Rheumatoid Factor from a Hepatitis C Virus Infected Patient with Sjögren’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ching Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously isolated several IgG rheumatoid factors (RFs from patients with both rheumatoid arthritis and idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura using phage display system. To study IgG RFs in patients with other autoimmune diseases, phage display antibody libraries from a hepatitis C virus infected patient with Sjögren’s syndrome were constructed. After panning, a specific clone RFL11 was isolated for characterization in advance. The binding activity and specificity of RFL11 to IgG Fc fragment were comparable to those of RFs previously isolated. The analysis with existed RF-Fc complex structures indicated the homology model of RFL11 is similar to IgM RF61 complex with high binding affinity of about 6×10-8 M. This effect resulted from longer complementarity-determining region (CDR combining key somatic mutations. In the RFL11-Fc interfaces, the CDR-H3 loop forms a finger-like structure extending into the bottom of Fc pocket and resulting in strong ion and cation-pi interactions. Moreover, a process of antigen-driven maturation was proven by somatically mutated VH residues on H2 and H3 CDR loops in the interfaces. Taken together, these results suggested that high affinity IgG RFs can be generated in patients with Sjögren’s syndrome and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease.

  4. Molecular cytogenetic determination of a deletion/duplication of 1q that results in a trisomy 18 syndrome-like phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Weaver, D.D.; Palmer, C.; Davee, M.A.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-08-15

    We report on an infant who presented at birth with some characteristics of trisomy 18 syndrome, including low birth weight, facial abnormalities, overlapping fingers, and congenital heart defects. On chromosome analysis, no additional chromosome 18 was observed and both chromosome 18 homologues appeared normal. However, a small piece of chromosomal material of unknown origin was detected at the tip of the long arm of chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using whole chromosome 18 painting probes disclosed no additional hybridization at the telomere of 1q, suggesting that the material was derived from another chromosome. Further chromosome painting experiments suggested that the telomeric addition was of chromosome 1 origin. To identify subchromosomal regions involved in the rearrangement, additional FISH analyses were performed using single copy and repetitive DNA probes mapping different portions of chromosome 1. The analyses showed that probes mapping to 1q34-43 were duplicated in the derivative chromosome 1. In addition, a DNA probe mapping to 1q44 was found to be deleted from the derivative chromosome 1. Our composite analysis suggests that a deletion and a duplication of chromosome 1q can result in some of the clinical findings usually associated with trisomy 16 syndrome. These results demonstrate the usefulness of FISH analysis when karyotype analysis is not consistent with the clinical description. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Urinary Metabolomics Identifies a Molecular Correlate of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome in a Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP Research Network Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveri S. Parker

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS is a poorly understood syndrome affecting up to 6.5% of adult women in the U.S. The lack of broadly accepted objective laboratory markers for this condition hampers efforts to diagnose and treat this condition. To identify biochemical markers for IC/BPS, we applied mass spectrometry-based global metabolite profiling to urine specimens from a cohort of female IC/BPS subjects from the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP Research Network. These analyses identified multiple metabolites capable of discriminating IC/BPS and control subjects. Of these candidate markers, etiocholan-3α-ol-17-one sulfate (Etio-S, a sulfoconjugated 5-β reduced isomer of testosterone, distinguished female IC/BPS and control subjects with a sensitivity and specificity >90%. Among IC/BPS subjects, urinary Etio-S levels are correlated with elevated symptom scores (symptoms, pelvic pain, and number of painful body sites and could resolve high- from low-symptom IC/BPS subgroups. Etio-S-associated biochemical changes persisted through 3–6 months of longitudinal follow up. These results raise the possibility that an underlying biochemical abnormality contributes to symptoms in patients with severe IC/BPS.

  6. Skin symptoms in four ectodermal dysplasia syndromes including two case reports of Rapp-Hodgkin-Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaudt, Björn; Volz, Thomas; Krug, Markus; Burgdorf, Walter; Röcken, Martin; Berneburg, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The skin, hair and nail changes in four distinct ectodermal dysplasia syndromes are compared and reviewed. These syndromes comprise Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome; ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate syndrome; ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome and Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome. A comprehensive overview of the dermatological signs and symptoms in these syndromes was generated from the database of the Ectodermal Dysplasia Network Germany, the clinical findings in the patients seen in our department and an extensive review of the literature. The findings included abnormalities of skin, sweating, hair and nails. These clinical findings are discussed in relation to the underlying molecular defects known to play a role in these four ectodermal dysplasia syndromes. PMID:22759387

  7. Waardenburg syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Read, A P; Newton, V E

    1997-01-01

    Auditory-pigmentary syndromes are caused by physical absence of melanocytes from the skin, hair, eyes, or the stria vascularis of the cochlea. Dominantly inherited examples with patchy depigmentation are usually labelled Waardenburg syndrome (WS). Type I WS, characterised by dystopia canthorum, is caused by loss of function mutations in the PAX3 gene. Type III WS (Klein-Waardenburg syndrome, with abnormalities of the arms) is an extreme presentation of type I; some but not all patients are ho...

  8. Metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia Atul

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The Metabolic syndrome is a widely prevalent and multi-factorial disorder. The syndrome has been given several names, including- the metabolic syndrome, the insulin resistance syndrome, the plurimetabolic syndrome, and the deadly quartet. With the formulation of NCEP/ATP III guidelines, some uniformity and standardization has occurred in the definition of metabolic syndrome and has been very useful for epidemiological purposes. The mechanisms underlying the metabolic syndrome are not fully known; however resistance to insulin stimulated glucose uptake seems to modify biochemical responses in a way that predisposes to metabolic risk factors. The clinical relevance of the metabolic syndrome is related to its role in the development of cardiovascular disease. Management of the metabolic syndrome involves patient-education and intervention at various levels. Weight reduction is one of the main stays of treatment. In this article we comprehensively discuss this syndrome- the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical relevance and management. The need to do a comprehensive review of this particular syndrome has arisen in view of the ever increasing incidence of this entitiy. Soon, metabolic syndrome will overtake cigarette smoking as the number one risk factor for heart disease among the US population. Hardly any issue of any primary care medical journal can be opened without encountering an article on type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia or hypertension. It is rare to see type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity or hypertension in isolation. Insulin resistance and resulting hyperinsulinemia have been implicated in the development of glucose intolerance (and progression to type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, polycystic ovary yndrome, hypercoagulability and vascular inflammation, as well as the eventual development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease manifested as myocardial infarction, stroke and myriad end organ diseases. Conversely

  9. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  10. Sweet Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Sever, Lale; Çalışkan, Salim; Kodakoğlu, Ramazan; Mat, Cem; Kaner, Gültekin; Arısoy, Nil

    1996-01-01

    Sweet syndrome is a vasculitis characterized with fever leucocytosis neutrophilia and dermal neutrophilic infiltration In children Sweet syndrome usually occurs with secondary to infection and in adults to malignancy We report a Sweet syndrome in a five years old girl with respiratory infections otitis dactylitis long lasting fever and cutaneous rash A neutrophilic dermal infiltration is noted in cutaneous biopsy These signs have disappeared with corticosteroid treatment In conclusion Sweet s...

  11. Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockeria O.L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is characterized by sudden death associated with one of several ECG patterns including incomplete right bundle-branch block and ST-segment elevation in the anterior precordial leads. According to the ECG patterns there are three types of Brugada syndrome. Brugada syndrome is genetically determined and has an autosomal dominant pattern of transmission in about 50% of familial cases. Nowadays implantation of cardioverter-defibrillator is the only proven method of sudden cardiac death prevention.

  12. A molecular clock dates the common ancestor of European-type porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus at more than 10 years before the emergence of disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Roald; Oleksiewicz, Martin B.; Krabbe Petersen, Anne Mette;

    2001-01-01

    an accurate molecular clock for the European PRRSV ORF 3 gene, place the root in the genealogy, estimate the rate of nucleotide substitution, and date the most recent common viral ancestor of the data set to 1979; more than 10 years before the onset of the European epidemic. Based on these findings, we...

  13. Marfan Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Marfan Syndrome KidsHealth > For Teens > Marfan Syndrome Print A ... a genetic disorder called Marfan syndrome. What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is named after Antoine Marfan, ...

  14. What Is Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NDSS Home » Down Syndrome » What Is Down Syndrome? What Is Down Syndrome? In every cell in the ... chromosome 21 causes the characteristics of Down syndrome. What Causes Down Syndrome? Regardless of the type of ...

  15. Molecular cloning and recombinant expression of the VP28 carboxyl-terminal hydrophilic region from a brazilian white spot syndrome virus isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Braunig

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a fragment of the VP28 coding sequence from a Brazilian WSSV isolate (BrVP28 was cloned, sequenced and expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3 pLysS strain in order to produce the VP28 carboxyl-terminal hydrophilic region. The expression resulted in a protein of about 21 kDa, which was purified under denaturing conditions, resulting in a final highly purified BrVP28 preparation. The recombinant protein obtained can be used in several biotechnology applications, such as the production of monoclonal antibodies which could be used in the development of diagnostic tools as well as in the studies on the characterization of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV isolated in Brazil.

  16. Structural modeling of HLA-B*1502/peptide/carbamazepine/T-cell receptor complex architecture: implication for the molecular mechanism of carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Zhang, Shilei; Wang, Yewang; Yang, Chao; Huang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Drug-induced adverse reactions are a significant problem in healthcare worldwide and are estimated to cost billions of dollars annually in the United States. A portion of such reactions is observed to strongly associate with certain human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles; one of the strongest associations is the HLA-B*1502 protein with carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) - the odds ratio value can even be higher than one thousand. The particularly strong association in CBZ-induced SJS/TEN suggests that the HLA-B*1502 is not only a genetic marker but also a participant in the pathogenesis of the disease. In the current study, we attempt to computationally model the atomic-level structure of the complete HLA-B*1502/peptide/CBZ/T-cell receptor (TCR) complex architecture based on prior knowledge obtained from epidemiological investigations as well as in vitro and in vivo assays. The model tells a different story about the molecular mechanism of CBZ-induced SJS/TEN from that previously reported for abacavir (ABC)-induced hypersensitivity (HSR); the CBZ molecule is located at the interface between HLA-B*1502/peptide and TCR, directly contacts the P3-P6 residues of antigen peptide, and bound within a pocket region encompassed by two TCR CDR3 fingers. Molecular dynamics simulation and binding energy analysis further reveal that the CBZ shows considerably high affinity to TCR over HLA-B*1502/peptide, which can tightly interact with the former rather than the latter. From the model, two hypotheses are proposed that can well explain most previous observations and are expected to guide next wet-lab experiments. This study could help to promote our understanding of the molecular mechanism and pathological implication underlying CBZ-induced SJS/TEN. PMID:26488421

  17. Transcriptional changes in response to X chromosome dosage in the mouse: implications for X inactivation and the molecular basis of Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sargent Carole A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X monosomic mice (39,XO have a remarkably mild phenotype when compared to women with Turner syndrome (45,XO. The generally accepted hypothesis to explain this discrepancy is that the number of genes on the mouse X chromosome which escape X inactivation, and thus are expressed at higher levels in females, is very small. However this hypothesis has never been tested and only a small number of genes have been assayed for their X-inactivation status in the mouse. We performed a global expression analysis in four somatic tissues (brain, liver, kidney and muscle of adult 40,XX and 39,XO mice using the Illumina Mouse WG-6 v1_1 Expression BeadChip and an extensive validation by quantitative real time PCR, in order to identify which genes are expressed from both X chromosomes. Results We identified several genes on the X chromosome which are overexpressed in XX females, including those previously reported as escaping X inactivation, as well as new candidates. However, the results obtained by microarray and qPCR were not fully concordant, illustrating the difficulty in ascertaining modest fold changes, such as those expected for genes escaping X inactivation. Remarkably, considerable variation was observed between tissues, suggesting that inactivation patterns may be tissue-dependent. Our analysis also exposed several autosomal genes involved in mitochondrial metabolism and in protein translation which are differentially expressed between XX and XO mice, revealing secondary transcriptional changes to the alteration in X chromosome dosage. Conclusions Our results support the prediction that the mouse inactive X chromosome is largely silent, while providing a list of the genes potentially escaping X inactivation in rodents. Although the lower expression of X-linked genes in XO mice may not be relevant in the particular tissues/systems which are affected in human X chromosome monosomy, genes deregulated in XO mice are good candidates for

  18. Rare hereditary COL4A3/COL4A4 variants may be mistaken for familial focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Andrew F; Phelan, Paul J; Hall, Gentzon; Cetincelik, Umran; Homstad, Alison; Alonso, Andrea; Jiang, Ruiji; Lindsey, Thomas; Wu, Guanghong; Sparks, Matthew A; Smith, Stephen R; Webb, Nicholas J A; Kalra, Philip; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Shaw, Andrey S; Conlon, Peter J; Jennette, J Charles; Howell, David N; Winn, Michelle P; Gbadegesin, Rasheed A

    2014-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a histological lesion with many causes including inherited genetic defects with significant proteinuria being the predominant clinical finding at presentation. Mutations in COL4A3 and COL4A4 are known to cause Alport syndrome, thin basement membrane nephropathy, and to result in pathognomonic glomerular basement membrane findings. Secondary FSGS is known to develop in classic Alport Syndrome at later stages of the disease. Here, we present seven families with rare or novel variants in COL4A3 or COL4A4 (six with single and one with two heterozygous variants) from a cohort of 70 families with a diagnosis of hereditary FSGS. The predominant clinical findings at diagnosis were proteinuria associated with hematuria. In all seven families, there were individuals with nephrotic range proteinuria with histologic features of FSGS by light microscopy. In one family, electron microscopy showed thin glomerular basement membrane, but four other families had variable findings inconsistent with classical Alport nephritis. There was no recurrence of disease after kidney transplantation. Families with COL4A3 and COL4A4 variants that segregated with disease represent 10% of our cohort. Thus, COL4A3 and COL4A4 variants should be considered in the interpretation of next-generation sequencing data from such patients. Furthermore, this study illustrates the power of molecular genetic diagnostics in the clarification of renal phenotypes. PMID:25229338

  19. Complex morphological and molecular genetic examination of amelogenesis imperfecta: a case presentation of two Czech siblings with a non-syndrome form of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripnerova, Tereza; Krulisova, Veronika; Ptakova, Nikola; Macek, Milan; Dostalova, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is an overarching term for a group of rare inherited disorders of hard tooth tissues. It is characterized by various defects in proper enamel formation. AI is a severe disorder that affects both the aesthetics and function of the dentition, with affected teeth increasingly suffering from dental caries. Therefore, early diagnosis and lifelong stomatological interventions are important. Due to the complex nature of AI family history, stomatological, radiographic, and molecular genetic examinations should be part of the diagnostic portfolio. Additionally, we utilized new visualization methods for the assessment of teeth demineralization. We present a case report of two affected Czech sisters (6 and 8 years old) with clinically defined AI. These are the first Czech cases in which comprehensive clinical and genetic analysis had been carried out and reflect the complex clinical nature, positive treatment options, and limitations of candidate-gene molecular genetic testing.

  20. Genetic Counseling and Testing for Common Hereditary Breast Cancer Syndromes: A Paper from the 2007 William Beaumont Hospital Symposium on Molecular Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Allain, Dawn C.

    2008-01-01

    Throughout the past 15 years, the identification of several genes associated with hereditary breast cancer has fueled the growth of clinical genetic counseling and testing services. In addition, increased knowledge of the genetic and molecular pathways of the known hereditary breast cancer genes, as well as an increased understanding of the impact of testing on individuals has added to the ability to identify, manage, and provide psychosocial support for mutation carriers. This review provide...

  1. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder K. Gupta, Ritu Gupta, Sunil Dutt Sharma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Turner Syndrome is one of the important chromosomal disorders characterised by loss (total or part ofsex chromosome. The manifestations being peripheral edema, short stature, extra skin fold, webbing ofneck, renal and cardiovascular anomalies, sexual infantilism, learning disability etc. We present here aone month female baby who had classical features of Turner Syndrome. The karyotape analysis wasconsistent with the diagnosis.

  2. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep;

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  3. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body, the white blood cells that fight infections, and the platelets that help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy blood cells. ... anemia, or easy bleeding. Myelodysplastic syndromes often do ...

  4. Bloom's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Niemann-Pick Disease, Type A Spinal Muscular Atrophy Tay-Sachs Disease Usher Syndrome, Type 1F and Type III ... Niemann-Pick Disease, Type A Spinal Muscular Atrophy Tay-Sachs Disease Usher Syndrome, Type 1F and Type III ...

  5. Poland syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Madhur Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poland′s syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  6. Franceschetti syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikrant Kasat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Franceschetti syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with variable expressivity. It is commonly known as Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS. It is named after E. Treacher Collins who described the essential components of the condition. It affects both genders equally. This article reports a case of TCS in an 18-year-old female.

  7. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akcan AB.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is an important cause of short stature in girls and primer amenorrhea in young women that is usually caused by loss of part or all of an X chromosome. This topic will review the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of Turner syndrome.

  8. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Renu

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of proteus syndrome in a 20 year old male is repoted. Hemihypertrophy, asymmetric megalodactyly, linear epidermal naevus, naevus flammeus, angiokeratoma, lymphangioma circumscriptum, thickening of the palms and soles, scoliosis and varicose veins were present. There are only few reports of these cases in adults. The syndrome has not been reported from India.

  9. Burnout Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Panova, Gordana; Panov, Nenad; Stojanov, H; Sumanov, Gorgi; Panova, Blagica; Stojanovski, Angel; Nikolovska, Lence; Jovevska, Svetlana; Trajanovski, D; Asanova, D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing work responsibilities, allocation of duties, loss of energy and motivation in everyday activities, emotional exhaustion, lack of time for themselves, insuffi cient time for rest and recreation, dissatisfaction in private life. All these symptoms can be cause of Burnout Syndrome. Aim: To see the importance of this syndrome, the consequences of job dissatisfaction, the environment, family and expression in drastic chan...

  10. Noonan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev K. Digra, Deep Aman Singh, Vikram Gupta, Ghanshyam Saini

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a 11 year old boy and his father both Noonan’s. Noonan syndrome occurs in 1 out of 2000live births. Short stature, webbing of neck, pectus carinatum or pectus excavatum, hypertelorismcubitus valgus, epicanthus, downward slanted palpebral fissures, ptosis, microganthia and earabnormalities are the common features of Noonan syndrome.

  11. Guillain-Barré syndrome- and Miller Fisher syndrome-associated Campylobacter jejuni lipopolysaccharides induce anti-GM1 and anti-GQ1b Antibodies in rabbits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. de Klerk; H.P. Endtz (Hubert); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); J.D. Laman (Jon); F.G.A. van der Meché; P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); C.W. Ang (Wim)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractCampylobacter jejuni infections are thought to induce antiganglioside antibodies in patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) and Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) by molecular mimicry between C. jejuni lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and gangliosides. We used purifi

  12. Improved molecular diagnosis of unparental disomy 15 in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes utilizing new short tandem repeats (STRs) mapped to chromosome 15q11.2-q12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, S.L.; Kubota, T.; Ledbetter, D.H. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct mental retardation disorders caused by paternal (PWS) or maternal (AS) deficiencies of chromosome 15q11.2-q12. Three STRs (D15S11, GABRB3, and D15S113) were previously developed utilizing YACs from this region as a molecular diagnostic test for PWS/AS. Since then twenty-three new STRs have been developed by several groups which map to 15q11.2-q12. Fine mapping of some of these markers was accomplished utilizing a 3.5 Mb YAC contig of this region. Three new CEPH-Genethon markers, D15S122, D15S128, and D15S210 were mapped within the smallest PWS/AS critical regions. D15S122 mapped to YACs 230H12 and 132D4, D15S128 mapped to YACs 457B4, 11H11, and B58C7, and D15S210 mapped to 132D4 and B230E3. To improve molecular diagnosis of uniparental disomy in PWS/AS, D15S122 and D15S128 with >70% hetrozygosities were placed in a new multiplex PCR reaction with D15S11. Additionally, three CEPH-Genethon markers with high heterozygosities from distal 15q, D15S123, D15S125, and D15S131, were used establish a second multiplex to increase the total number of markers analyzed to six. Twenty-three patients with uniparental disomy 15 were compared using the original multiplex and the two new multiplexes. The results indicated that 16/23 had at least one fully informative marker with the original multiplex and 23/23 using the two new multiplexes. Using a more rigorous diagnostic criterion of two fully informative markers, only 8/23 were informative with the original multiplex and 21/23 with the two new multiplexes. These results demonstrate that these two new multiplexes composed of a total of six polymorphic STRs provide an improved diagnostic test for uniparental disomy 15.

  13. The Research Advance of Molecular Genetics of Marfan Syndrome%Marfan综合征分子遗传学研究新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈喜军; 伍严安

    2006-01-01

    Marfan综合征(Marfan syndrome,MFS)是一种常染色体显性遗传性结缔组织病,其病变的微纤维主要牵累3个组织器官系统:骨骼、眼和心血管.1991年,研究发现FBN1突变能导致MFS;2004年,转化生长因子-β受体2(TGFBR2)被认定为MFSⅡ基因;2005年,研究报道TGFBR2突变或TGFBR1突变能够导致一种新的动脉瘤综合征.研究表明,在细胞外基质中,原纤维蛋白-1(fibilllin-1)与转化生长因子β(TGF-β)信号有功能上的相关性.MFS的病理机制可能与TGF-β信号异常有关.

  14. Identification of a Novel De Novo Variant in the PAX3 Gene in Waardenburg Syndrome by Diagnostic Exome Sequencing: The First Molecular Diagnosis in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mi-Ae; Lee, Taeheon; Lee, Junnam; Cho, Eun-Hae; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2015-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous hereditary auditory pigmentary disorder characterized by congenital sensorineural hearing loss and iris discoloration. Many genes have been linked to WS, including PAX3, MITF, SNAI2, EDNRB, EDN3, and SOX10, and many additional genes have been associated with disorders with phenotypic overlap with WS. To screen all possible genes associated with WS and congenital deafness simultaneously, we performed diagnostic exome sequencing (DES) in a male patient with clinical features consistent with WS. Using DES, we identified a novel missense variant (c.220C>G; p.Arg74Gly) in exon 2 of the PAX3 gene in the patient. Further analysis by Sanger sequencing of the patient and his parents revealed a de novo occurrence of the variant. Our findings show that DES can be a useful tool for the identification of pathogenic gene variants in WS patients and for differentiation between WS and similar disorders. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of genetically confirmed WS in Korea. PMID:25932447

  15. A molecular deletion of distal chromosome 4p in two families with a satellited chromosome 4 lacking the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrooks, L L; Lamb, A N; Kirkman, H N; Callanan, N P; Rao, K W

    1992-11-01

    We report two families with a satellited chromosome 4 short arm (4ps). Satellites and stalks normally occur on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes; however, the literature cites several reports of satellited nonacrocentric chromosomes, which presumably result from a translocation with an acrocentric chromosome. This is the first report of 4ps chromosomes. Our families are remarkable in that both unaffected and affected individuals carry the 4ps chromosome. The phenotypes observed in affected individuals, although dissimilar, were sufficient to encourage a search for a deletion of chromosome 4p. By Southern blot analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization, a deletion of material mapping approximately 150 kb from chromosome 4pter was discovered. This deletion is notable because it does not result in the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and can result in an apparently normal phenotype. We speculate that homology between subterminal repeat sequences on 4p and sequences on the acrocentric short arms may explain the origin of the rearrangement and that position effect may play a role in the expression of the abnormal phenotype.

  16. Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome): part I. Diagnosis: clinical and histopathologic features and new molecular and biologic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawed, Sarah I; Myskowski, Patricia L; Horwitz, Steven; Moskowitz, Alison; Querfeld, Christiane

    2014-02-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS) comprise approximately 53% of cutaneous lymphomas. Both MF and SS may clinically and histologically mimic benign skin conditions, posing a diagnostic challenge to the dermatologist. Precise clinicopathologic correlation is necessary to support a diagnosis, especially in the early stages of disease. In addition to the identification of histopathologic criteria, ancillary studies, including the identification of CD4(+) T cells with aberrant immunophenotypes and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements within skin lesions and peripheral blood are used to support the diagnosis. Recent studies evaluating the pathogenesis of MF have found that the skin microenvironment, including immune cells, such as dendritic cells and reactive cytotoxic and regulatory T cells, plays a crucial supporting role in MF. The skin-homing ability of malignant T cells is the result of chemokines, cytokines, adhesion molecules, and defective apoptosis, and is believed to play a role in disease pathogenesis and progression. In addition, recent studies have also suggested that MF and SS arise from distinct memory T cell subsets and advanced/erythrodermic MF and SS may be distinguished by identification of certain molecules, including Programmed-Death-1.

  17. Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, French Guiana.

    OpenAIRE

    Matheus, Séverine; Djossou, Félix; Moua, David; Bourbigot, Anne Marie; Hommel, Didier; Lacoste, Vincent; Dussart, Philippe; Lavergne, Anne

    2010-01-01

    A systematic serological survey of patients suffering from symptoms suggestive of Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome allowed us to identify a native case in French Guiana. Partial molecular characterization of the implicated hantavirus revealed its close relationship with the Bolivian Rio Mamore virus. We tentatively named it Maripa virus.

  18. An unusual presentation of Kabuki syndrome: clinical overlap with CHARGE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Judith M A; Oostdijk, Wilma; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Cecilia E J; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E; van Bever, Yolande

    2014-09-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by intellectual disability and multiple congenital anomalies, including short stature, peculiar facial appearance, skeletal anomalies, a variety of visceral malformations and abnormal dermatoglyphic patterns. We describe a case of Kabuki syndrome presenting with atypical features, consisting of bilateral microphthalmia, coloboma, anal atresia and panhypopituitarism, showing considerable phenotypic overlap with CHARGE syndrome. This report demonstrates that clinical follow-up and molecular genetic testing can be useful for establishing the correct diagnosis. PMID:24862881

  19. Kounis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntuli, P M; Makambwa, E

    2015-10-01

    Kounis syndrome is characterised by a group of symptoms that manifest as unstable vasospastic or non-vasospastic angina secondary to a hypersensitivity reaction. It was first described by Kounis and Zavras in 1991 as the concurrence of an allergic response with an anaphylactoid or anaphylactic reaction and coronary artery spasm or even myocardial infarction. Since then, this condition has evolved to include a number of mast cell activation disorders associated with acute coronary syndrome. There are many triggering factors, including reactions to multiple medications, exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome comprises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral circulation resulting in ischaemia/infarction of the vital organs. The incidence of this condition is difficult to establish owing to the number of potential instigating factors and its relatively infrequent documentation in the literature.We report the case of an HIV-negative 39-year-old man with no coronary risk factors or family history of premature coronary artery disease, who developed Kounis syndrome after the administration of fluoroquinolone for dysuria. However, to the best of our knowledge,no data on the incidence and prevalence of Kounis syndrome in South Africa have ever been reported in the literature. The recent understanding of Kounis syndrome has led to the condition being classified into three syndrome variants. PMID:26636160

  20. HYDROLETHALUS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aradhana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hydrolethalus Syndrome (HLS is a rare lethal genetic syndrome, recognized as a consequence of a study on Meckle syndrome in Finland .1 HLS is characterized by multiple developmental defects of fetus which include fetal hydrocephalus, agenesis of corpus callosum, absent midline structures of brain, Cleft lip and cleft palate, defective lobulation of lungs, micrognathia and very characteristic abnormality of polydactyly. About 80% of patients have polydactyly, in hands it is postaxial and preaxial in feet with duplicated big toe. A highly characteristic hallux duplex is seen in almost no other situation .2 Club feet is also common.

  1. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  2. Hubris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, David

    2008-08-01

    Hubris syndrome is associated with power, more likely to manifest itself the longer the person exercises power and the greater the power they exercise. A syndrome not to be applied to anyone with existing mental illness or brain damage. Usually symptoms abate when the person no longer exercises power. It is less likely to develop in people who retain a personal modesty, remain open to criticism, have a degree of cynicism or well developed sense of humour. Four heads of government in the last 100 years are singled out as having developed hubris syndrome: David Lloyd George, Margaret Thatcher, George W Bush and Tony Blair.

  3. Schnitzler syndrome: clinical features and histopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingli D

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available David Dingli,1,2 Michael J Camilleri3 1Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Molecular Medicine, 3Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Schnitzler syndrome is a rare and underrecognized syndrome characterized by chronic urticaria, a monoclonal protein, and a variety of other symptoms, including fever, bone pain, organomegaly, and evidence of an acute phase response. Biopsy of an involved area of the skin shows a neutrophilic infiltrate without evidence of vasculitis or hemorrhage. Although the etiology of the syndrome is unknown, current evidence suggests this is an autoinflammatory syndrome. Recognition of this syndrome is critical since it is highly responsive to anakinra. Keywords: neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis, autoinflammatory syndrome, monoclonal gammopathy, neutrophilic dermatosis, anakinra 

  4. [Mobius syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladuţiu, Cristina; Duma, Ionela

    2012-01-01

    Mobius syndrom, an anomaly in cranial nerve developement, presents with a remarkable clinical polymorphism. The rare occurence of this pathology and the questions raised by the diagnosis and treatment determined us to make this presentation.

  5. Gardner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndromes. For more information, talk with an assisted reproduction specialist at a fertility clinic. How common is ... detected X-ray or computed tomography (CT or CAT) scan of the small bowel if adenomas are ...

  6. [Heptopulmonary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Antonio; Díaz, Ainhoa; Iruzubieta, Paula; Salcines, José Ramón; Crespo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome is characterized by the presence of liver disease, pulmonary vascular dilatations, and arterial hypoxemia. It is usually associated with cirrhosis of any origin, but has been described in other liver diseases, both acute and chronic, and not always associated with portal hypertension. The gold standard method to detect pulmonary vascular dilations is contrast enhancement echocardiography with saline and is essential for the diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome. These dilatations reflect changes in the pulmonary microvasculature (vasodilatation, intravascular monocyte accumulation, and angiogenesis) and induce a ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or even true intrapulmonary shunts, which eventually trigger hypoxemia. This syndrome worsens patients' prognosis and impairs their quality of life and may lead to the need for liver transplantation, which is the only effective and definitive treatment. In this article, we review the etiological, pathophysiological, clinical and therapeutic features of this syndrome. PMID:25840463

  7. Piriformis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wallet sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis ... medical help immediately if: You have sudden severe pain in your lower back or legs, along with muscle weakness or numbness ...

  8. Potter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter phenotype ... In Potter syndrome, the primary problem is kidney failure. The kidneys fail to develop properly as the baby is ... kidneys normally produce the amniotic fluid (as urine). Potter phenotype refers to a typical facial appearance that ...

  9. Pendred Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health Search Search form Search A–Z Index Español Menu Home ... children, the thyroid is important for normal growth and development. Children with Pendred syndrome, however, rarely have problems ...

  10. [Refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it.

  11. Turner Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandran Sudarshan; G Sree Vijayabala; KS Prem Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate th...

  12. Pendred's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes Pendred's syndrome in three siblings of a consanguineous marriage, belonging to Rahimyar Khan. The children presented with deafmutism and goiters. The investigations included scintigram, perchlorate discharge test and audiometery. The perchlorate discharge was positive in index case. Bilateral sensorineural hearing defect was detected on Pure Tone Average (PTA) audiometry. Meticulous clinical and laboratory evaluation is mandatory for the detection of rare disorders like Pendred's syndrome. (author)

  13. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OralHealth > Topics > Burning Mouth Syndrome > Burning Mouth Syndrome Burning Mouth Syndrome Main Content Key Points Symptoms Diagnosis Primary and Secondary BMS Treatment Helpful Tips Key Points Burning mouth syndrome is burning pain in the mouth that may ...

  14. Learning about Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Learning About Down Syndrome What is Down syndrome? What ... Down syndrome? People who have Down syndrome have learning difficulties, mental retardation, a characteristic facial appearance, and ...

  15. Exogenous Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing syndrome - corticosteroid induced; Corticosteroid-induced Cushing syndrome; Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome ... Cushing syndrome is a disorder that occurs when your body has a higher than normal level of the ...

  16. Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs Skip sharing on social media links ... been diagnosed with Turner syndrome. Now what? Is Turner syndrome inherited? Turner syndrome is usually not inherited, but ...

  17. Homozygosity for Waardenburg syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Zlotogora, J; Lerer, I; Bar-David, S; Ergaz, Z; Abeliovich, D

    1995-01-01

    In a large kindred including many individuals affected with Waardenburg (WS) type 1 (WS1) syndrome, a child affected with a very severe form of WS type 3 was born. This child presented with dystopia canthorum, partial albinism, and very severe upper-limb defects. His parents were first cousins, both affected with a mild form of WS1. Molecular analysis of PAX3, the gene that was determined by linkage to cause the disorder in the family, demonstrated a novel missense mutation (S84F) in exon 2 o...

  18. S267P mutation in FGFR2: first report in a patient with Crouzon syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Ronghu; Yang, Xianxian; Ge, Min; Cai, Tianyi; Lei, Jiaqi; Mu, Xiongzheng

    2015-03-01

    It has been known for several years that mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR2) result in syndromic craniosynostosis including Apert, Crouzon, or Pfeiffer syndromes. Here, we report on a child with a clinically diagnosed Crouzon syndrome that shows the missense point mutation S267P in FGFR2 gene. The mutation is firstly identified in Crouzon syndrome. Our observations expand the molecular spectrum of FGFR2 mutations in the syndrome. PMID:25759927

  19. Clinical and Molecular Diagnosis in a Big Chinese Family with Pendred Syndrome%一个Pendred综合征家系的临床及SLC26A4基因检测分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶峥; 柴永川; 李磊; 李晓华; 杨涛; 吴皓

    2012-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the clinical diagnosis and molecular pathogenesis of Pendred syndrome in a big Chinese family. Methods Clinical materials and DNA sample were obtained from the Pendred syndrome family. The exons and the flanking splicing sites of SLC26A4 were screened in the 4 major patients in this family by nested PCR and direct sequencing. Results The clinical characterizations of patients in this family included the prelingual sensorineural hearing loss, dysphonia, goiter, normal thyroid function and enlarged vestibular aqueduct. A total of 4 different types of SLC26A4 mutations were identified in the family. The proband , his father, his mother and his sister were carried with different SLC26A4 biallelic mutations which were p. Q514P and p. H723R,p. N392Y and p. H723R,c. 1548insC and p. Q514P,p. N392Y and c. 1548insC, respectively. Conclusion The proband, his father, his mother and his sister with Pendred syndrome were caused by different biallelic mutations of SLC26A4. In the 4 types of SLC26A4 mutations, p. Q514P is novel, which has not been yet reported in the previous literatures.%目的 探讨Pendred综合征的临床表现及SLC26A4基因检测特点.方法 对一个多人患病的Pendred综合征家系进行详尽的临床表型分析,并对其中4例耳聋患者进行SLC26A4基因全编码序列及侧翼序列的检测.结果 该家系共三代15人,其中6人(40.0%)为耳聋患者,6例均为语前感音神经性聋,2例(Ⅰ-3和Ⅱ-7)表现为言语障碍,5例(Ⅱ-4、Ⅱ-5、Ⅱ-7、Ⅲ-1、Ⅲ-2)伴单纯甲状腺肿大、3例(Ⅱ-5、Ⅲ-1、Ⅲ-2)伴前庭水管扩大.Ⅱ-4、Ⅱ-5、Ⅲ-1和Ⅲ-2这4例耳聋患者中共发现SLC26A4基因四种不同的突变,患病成员中先证者(Ⅲ-1)及其父亲(Ⅱ-4)、母亲(Ⅱ-5)和妹妹(Ⅲ-2)分别具有p.Q514P和p.H723R、p.N392Y和p.H723R、c.1548insC和p.Q514P、p.N392Y和c.1548ins C双等位基因突变.结论 该家系先证者及其父母、妹妹分别由SLC26A4基因不同复合杂

  20. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Crowther, Mark; Branch, Ware; Khamashta, Munther A

    2010-10-30

    The antiphospholipid syndrome causes venous, arterial, and small-vessel thrombosis; pregnancy loss; and preterm delivery for patients with severe pre-eclampsia or placental insufficiency. Other clinical manifestations are cardiac valvular disease, renal thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, haemolytic anaemia, and cognitive impairment. Antiphospholipid antibodies promote activation of endothelial cells, monocytes, and platelets; and overproduction of tissue factor and thromboxane A2. Complement activation might have a central pathogenetic role. Of the different antiphospholipid antibodies, lupus anticoagulant is the strongest predictor of features related to antiphospholipid syndrome. Therapy of thrombosis is based on long-term oral anticoagulation and patients with arterial events should be treated aggressively. Primary thromboprophylaxis is recommended in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and probably in purely obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome. Obstetric care is based on combined medical-obstetric high-risk management and treatment with aspirin and heparin. Hydroxychloroquine is a potential additional treatment for this syndrome. Possible future therapies for non-pregnant patients with antiphospholipid syndrome are statins, rituximab, and new anticoagulant drugs. PMID:20822807

  1. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  2. Microcephaly syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, Dianne

    2007-09-01

    The objective of this article is to review microcephaly from a genetics point of view, especially with regard to the process of identification of syndromes in which small head circumference occurs. Microcephaly can be due to either genetic or environmental causes. It can be the only positive finding or may be part of a syndrome of congenital anomalies. The genetic etiology can be caused by autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked genes or various types of chromosome anomalies. Some of the gene mutations have been identified recently. Syndromic microcephaly is associated with a large number of conditions. Some can be diagnosed, or at least suspected, based on their characteristic facial dysmorphism, and others can be searched for using databases of genetic disorders.

  3. Refeeding syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathy Swagata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a fifty-year-old male who was admitted with a three month history of increasing weakness, prostration, decreasing appetite and inability to swallow. The patient was a chronic alcoholic, unemployed, and of very poor socioeconomic background. The patient was initially investigated for upper GI malignancy, Addisons disease, bulbar palsy and other endocrinopathies. Concurrent management was started for severe electrolyte abnormalities and enteral nutritional supplementation was begun. By the fourth day of feeding patient developed severe hypophosphatemia and other life-threatening features suggesting refeeding syndrome. The patient was managed for the manifestations of refeeding syndrome. A final diagnosis of chronic alcoholic malnutrition with refeeding syndrome was made. Refeeding of previously starving patients may lead to a variety of complications including sudden death.

  4. Molecular epidemiology analyze of a hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome case%1例肾综合征出血热死亡病例分子流行病学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘远; 蒋力云; 丁鹏; 王大虎; 肖新才

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析2011年广州市1例肾综合征出血热重症死亡病例的发病原因,并对其进行分子流行病学分析.方法 将患者血清以及居住地周围人群、老鼠标本进行抗体检测和PCR检测,将获得的序列与NCBI上的序列进行比对.结果 鼠血IgG抗体检测阳性率为33.33%,人群血清IgG抗体检测阳性率为5.66%,均高于检测的阳性率.患者血清中汉坦病毒基因不存在大的变异.结论 加强HFRS的日常监测,扩大监测范围和数量,认真做好防鼠灭鼠工作,减少传染源,切断传播途径,有利于HFRS的防治.%Objective To find out the cause of a hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome case, and carry out molecular epidemiology analyze. Method The serum samples were developed antibody and PCR detection among the patient, surround people and rat Acquired sequence compare with the sequences in the Genbank. Results The positive rate of IgG in the sera of rats and people were 33. 33% and 5. 66% , respectively, they were higher than the positive rate we survey in these years. Hantavirus was not big mutation in the patient's serum. Conclusions We need to enhance the daily surveillance, expand the monitoring circumsciption and quantity, do well the deratization work, reduce the infection sources, cut down the transmission routes, those were profit for HFRS.

  5. Molecular etiology of non-syndromic hearing impairment in a Chinese family%非综合征性耳聋一家系分子病因学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙勍; 单希征; 马丽涛; 康东洋; 张昕; 刘新; 王国建; 袁慧军; 韩东一

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the molecular etiology of non-syndromic hearing impairment in two patients in a maternal inherited deafness Chinese family. Methods Peripheral blood specimens were collected and DNA templates extracted. The complete mitochondrial genomes and GJB2 geoe were sequenced in an ABI 3100 Avant sequencer. Results The proband(Ⅲ-5) and her elder sister(Ⅲ-1) were found to carry the mtDNA 12SrRNA C1494T mutation. The GJB2 gene showed no mutations. The proband had the history of using aminoglycosides before hearing loss, and exhibited severe sensorineural hearing impairment; the proband's sister had no history of using aminoglycosides, and showed moderate sensorineural hearing impairment. Conclusion The molecular etiology of each individual patient in a family yaries with individual genetic background.%目的 从分子病因学角度分析一具有母系遗传特性的非综合征性耳聋家系耳聋原因.方法 对该家系成员进行线粒体基因全序列及缝隙连接蛋白26编码基因(GJB2)全序列分析.结果 接受检测的该家系先证者(Ⅲ-5)及另一母系成员(Ⅲ-1)均携带线粒体DNA 12SrRNA C1494T突变;先证者聋前有氨基糖苷类抗生素应用史,表现为双侧重度感音神经性耳聋,携带线粒体DNA12SrRNA C1494T突变的另一母系成员(Ⅲ-1)聋前无氨基糖苷类抗生素应用史,表现为双侧中度感音神经性耳聋.GJB2基因检测未发现致病突变.结论 线粒体DNA 12SrRNA C1494T突变是氨基糖苷类抗生素致聋的原因之一,该突变致聋程度的不一致性可能与个体遗传背景不同有关.

  6. Comparison of molecular and biological characteristics of a modified live porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccine (ingelvac PRRS MLV), the parent strain of the vaccine (ATCC VR2332), ATCC VR2385, and two recent field isolates of PRRSV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opriessnig, T; Halbur, P G; Yoon, K-J; Pogranichniy, R M; Harmon, K M; Evans, R; Key, K F; Pallares, F J; Thomas, P; Meng, X J

    2002-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the molecular and biological characteristics of recent porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) field isolates to those of a modified live virus (MLV) PRRS vaccine and its parent strain. One hundred seventeen, 4-week-old pigs were randomly assigned to six groups. Group 1 (n = 20) served as sham-inoculated negative controls, group 2 (n = 19) was inoculated with Ingelvac PRRS MLV vaccine, group 3 (n = 20) was inoculated with the parent strain of the vaccine (ATCC VR2332), group 4 (n = 19) was inoculated with vaccine-like PRRSV field isolate 98-38803, group 5 (n = 19) was inoculated with PRRSV field isolate 98-37120, and group 6 (n = 20) was inoculated with known high-virulence PRRSV isolate ATCC VR2385. The levels of severity of gross lung lesions (0 to 100%) among the groups were significantly different at both 10 (P < 0.0001) and 28 days postinoculation (p.i.) (P = 0.002). At 10 days p.i., VR2332 (26.5% +/- 4.64%) and VR2385 (36.4% +/- 6.51%) induced gross lesions of significantly greater severity than 98-38803 (0.0% +/- 0.0%), 98-37120 (0.8% +/- 0.42%), Ingelvac PRRS MLV (0.9% +/- 0.46%), and negative controls (2.3% +/- 1.26%). At 28 days p.i., 98-37120 (17.2% +/- 6.51%) induced gross lesions of significantly greater severity than any of the other viruses. Analyses of the microscopic-interstitial-pneumonia-lesion scores (0 to 6) revealed that VR2332 (2.9 +/- 0.23) and VR2385 (3.1 +/- 0.35) induced significantly more severe lesions at 10 days p.i. At 28 days p.i., VR2385 (2.5 +/- 0.27), VR2332 (2.3 +/- 0.21), 98-38803 (2.6 +/- 0.29), and 98-37120 (3.0 +/- 0.41) induced significantly more severe lesions than Ingelvac PRRS MLV (0.7 +/- 0.17) and controls (0.7 +/- 0.15). The molecular analyses and biological characterizations suggest that the vaccine-like isolate 98-38803 (99.5% amino acid homology based on the ORF5 gene) induces microscopic pneumonia lesions similar in type to, but different in severity

  7. The ROS-sensitive microRNA-9/9* controls the expression of mitochondrial tRNA-modifying enzymes and is involved in the molecular mechanism of MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, Salvador; Martínez-Zamora, Ana; García-Arumí, Elena; Andreu, Antonio L; Armengod, M-Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction activates mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling pathways whose components are mostly unknown. Identification of these components is important to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying mitochondrial diseases and to discover putative therapeutic targets. MELAS syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in mitochondrial (mt) DNA affecting mt-tRNA(Leu(UUR)). Patient and cybrid cells exhibit elevated oxidative stress. Moreover, mutant mt-tRNAs(Leu(UUR)) lack the taurine-containing modification normally present at the wobble uridine (U34) of wild-type mt-tRNA(Leu(UUR)), which is considered an etiology of MELAS. However, the molecular mechanism is still unclear. We found that MELAS cybrids exhibit a significant decrease in the steady-state levels of several mt-tRNA-modification enzymes, which is not due to transcriptional regulation. We demonstrated that oxidative stress mediates an NFkB-dependent induction of microRNA-9/9*, which acts as a post-transcriptional negative regulator of the mt-tRNA-modification enzymes GTPBP3, MTO1 and TRMU. Down-regulation of these enzymes by microRNA-9/9* affects the U34 modification status of non-mutant tRNAs and contributes to the MELAS phenotype. Anti-microRNA-9 treatments of MELAS cybrids reverse the phenotype, whereas miR-9 transfection of wild-type cells mimics the effects of siRNA-mediated down-regulation of GTPBP3, MTO1 and TRMU. Our data represent the first evidence that an mt-DNA disease can directly affect microRNA expression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the modification status of mt-tRNAs is dynamic and that cells respond to stress by modulating the expression of mt-tRNA-modifying enzymes. microRNA-9/9* is a crucial player in mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling as it regulates expression of nuclear genes in response to changes in the functional state of mitochondria.

  8. Eisenmengers syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G;

    2009-01-01

    -to-left shunt and cyanosis. Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome suffer a high risk of complications in connection with acute medical conditions, extra-cardiac surgery and pregnancy. This article describes the precautions that should be taken to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. Udgivelsesdato......Congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunt can induce proliferation, vasoconstriction and thrombosis in the pulmonary vascular bed. Eventually, the patient may develop Eisenmenger syndrome defined as pulmonary arterial hypertension caused by high pulmonary vascular resistance with right...

  9. Morbihan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Veraldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks.

  10. Rapunzel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An 18-year-old single female patient, presented with non specific gastrointestinal symptoms of anorexia, abdominal pain, and change in bowel habit. Clinically she was anemic, cachectic, and depressed. Abdominal examination revealed mobile epigastric mass. The scalp alopecia and endoscopy coupled by computed tomography scan, confirmed the diagnoses of trichobezoar, but it was not diagnosed as Rapunzel syndrome except after laparotomy, gastrotomy, and enterotomy. There are less than 16 cases of Rapunzel syndrome described worldwide, and this is the first case to be described in the middle east. (author)

  11. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  12. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  13. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  14. Eagle syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagle syndrome occurs due to elongation of the styloid process or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament, which then may produce a pain sensation due the pressure exerted on various structures in the head and neck. When suspected, imaging helps in identifying the abnormally elongated styloid process or the calcified ligament. In recent years, three-dimensional CT (3DCT) has proved to be valuable in these cases. We report the case of a 62-year-old man with this syndrome in whom imaging with 3DCT conclusively established the diagnosis

  15. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  16. Morbihan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraldi, Stefano; Persico, Maria Chiara; Francia, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face) in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks).

  17. Gorlin Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siroos Risbaf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome is a dominant autosomal familial disorder. The manifestations begin at an early age and a combination of phenotypic abnormalities such special facial appearance, jaw cysts and skeletal anomalies are seen in this disease. A 22-year-old woman referred to Zahedan Dental School complaining of pain on the left cheek. During the examination, several cutaneous lesions in the neck, pits in palm and sole and multiple jaw cysts were observed. According to the clinical symptoms, lesion biopsy and reports of Gorlin syndrome radiography were presented.

  18. Burnout syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bábská, Simona

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the so-called burnout syndrome, which, as I believe, is getting to be a serious problem in today´s busy world. This issue deserves a full attention especially from those concerned – workers in assisting professions. What usually precedes the burnout syndrome is a big enthusiasm and motivation for work in which a potential patient can help other people and get them out of their troubles, sometimes he /she feels even like having a mission. However, without kno...

  19. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Vis; K. van Engelen; J. Timmermans; B.C. Hamel; B.J.M. Mulder

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome. Althou

  20. Schnitzler syndrome: clinical features and histopathology

    OpenAIRE

    Dingli, David

    2015-01-01

    David Dingli,1,2 Michael J Camilleri3 1Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Molecular Medicine, 3Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Schnitzler syndrome is a rare and underrecognized syndrome characterized by chronic urticaria, a monoclonal protein, and a variety of other symptoms, including fever, bone pain, organomegaly, and evidence of an acute phase response. Biopsy of an involved area of the skin shows a neutrophilic in...

  1. Contemporary management of acute coronary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Large, G

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on the modern management of the non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (unstable angina and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction). Patients with these syndromes are at varying degrees of risk of (re)infarction and death. This risk can be reliably predicted by clinical, electrocardiographic, and biochemical markers. Aspirin, clopidogrel, heparin (unfractionated or low molecular weight), and anti-ischaemic drugs should be offered to all patients, irrespective of the pre...

  2. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Mulder, B. J.; van Engelen, K.; Vis, J.C.; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B C J

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome. Although variable expression is known to be present in Marfan syndrome, phenotypic expression of Marfan syndrome in our patient might be masked by the co-occurrence of Down syndrome. (Neth Heart J 2009;1...

  3. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you already have metabolic syndrome, making these healthy lifestyle choices can help reduce your risk of heart disease and other health problems. If lifestyle changes alone can’t control your ... to help. Maintain a healthy weight Your doctor can measure your body mass ...

  4. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  5. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debi Basanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a variable and complex disorder characterized by multifocal overgrowths affecting any tissue or structure of the body. We present a girl aged 3 years and 8 months with an epidermal nevus, port-wine stain, macrodactyly with gigantism of the feet, lymphohemagiomas and multiple lipomas.

  6. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  7. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... writing, painting, or making music help focus the mind on other things. There's speculation that the composer Mozart had TS. Find support. The Tourette Syndrome Association sponsors support groups with others who understand the challenges of TS. Take control. People with TS can feel more in control ...

  8. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    a variety of infectious complications. Rapid diagnosis and treatment is necessary to avoid severe complications or death. Close collaboration with local microbiologist is pivotal. Treatment consists of longterm treatment with penicillin and metronidazole. This is a case report of Lemierre's syndrome....

  9. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of their hearing within the first year of life. Progressive vision loss caused by retinitis pigmentosa becomes occurs in childhood. ... type III have progressive hearing loss and vision loss beginning in the first few decades of life. Unlike the other forms of Usher syndrome, infants ...

  10. Robinow Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Gökalp

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Robinow syndrome is characterized by dwarfism demonstrating short-limbed extremities, vertebral malsegmentation/malformation (hemivertebra, costal dysplasia, genital hypoplasia, and fetal facial appearance (wide and prominent forehead, hypertelorism, small and wide nose, molar hypoplasia, and retrognathia. It is a rare genetic disease which may present with either mild autosomal dominant form or severe recessive form. Vertebral and costal abnormalities are common diagnostic signs that may be severe. The disease presents with kyphoscoliosis and chest abnormalities along with thoracic vertebral fusion and hemivertebral appearance. Ribs may demonstrate fusion. Based on those involvements, the disease can be categorized as spondylothoracic, spondylocostal, ischiovertebral dysplasia, and cervicofaciothoracic syndrome.Diagnosis is established by the help of clinical characteristics. Radiography might contribute to the diagnosis by revealing changes in the skeletal system. Case Report: A three-year-old male patient presented with operated left undescendent testis and buried penis. On physical examination, he also had a dysmorphic face characterized by macrocephaly, hypertelorism, prominent eyes, a flattened nasal bridge, triangular-fish mouth, gingival hypertrophy and left hand clinodactyly. Radiographic examination documented mesomelic shortening of the radius-ulna, malsegmentation of the thoracal spine and the ribs fusion.Conclusion: Robinow syndrome is a rare syndrome which can be diagnosed by typical facial appearance and radiologic findings. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2010; 8: 44-7

  11. Metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles Shaeffer

    2004-01-01

    @@ The emergence of cardiac disease as the number one world-wide cause of death justifies efforts to identify individuals at higher risk for preventive therapy. The metabolic syndrome, originally described by Reaven, 1 has been associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk. 2 Type Ⅱ diabetes is also a frequent sequela. 3

  12. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions are High blood pressure High blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels High levels of triglycerides, a type of fat, in your blood Low ...

  13. [Refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it. PMID:27088791

  14. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  15. Noonan syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, I. van der

    2007-01-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set

  16. J Wave Syndromes: A Decade of Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Liang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to provide a brief history of J wave syndromes and to summarize our current understanding of their molecular, ionic, cellular mechanisms, and clinical features. We will also discuss the existing debates and further direction in basic and clinical research for J wave syndromes. Data Sources: The publications on key words of "J wave syndromes", "early repolarization syndrome (ERS", "Brugada syndrome (BrS" and "ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI" were comprehensively reviewed through search of the PubMed literatures without restriction on the publication date. Study Selection: Original articles, reviews and other literatures concerning J wave syndromes, ERS, BrS and STEMI were selected. Results: J wave syndromes were firstly defined by Yan et al. in a Chinese journal a decade ago, which represent a spectrum of variable phenotypes characterized by appearance of prominent electrocardiographic J wave including ERS, BrS and ventricular fibrillation (VF associated with hypothermia and acute STEMI. J wave syndromes can be inherited or acquired and are mechanistically linked to amplification of the transient outward current (I to -mediated J waves that can lead to phase 2 reentry capable of initiating VF. Conclusions: J wave syndromes are a group of newly highlighted clinical entities that share similar molecular, ionic and cellular mechanism and marked by amplified J wave on the electrocardiogram and a risk of VF. The clinical challenge ahead is to identify the patients with J wave syndromes who are at risk for sudden cardiac death and determine the alternative therapeutic strategies to reduce mortality.

  17. J Wave Syndromes: A Decade of Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Liang Li; Lin Yang; Chang-Cong Cui; Chao-Feng Sun; Gan-Xin Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective:The objective was to provide a brief history of J wave syndromes and to summarize our current understanding of their molecular,ionic,cellular mechanisms,and clinical features.We will also discuss the existing debates and further direction in basic and clinical research for J wave syndromes.Data Sources:The publications on key words of"J wave syndromes","early repolarization syndrome (ERS)","Brugada syndrome (BrS)" and "ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)" were comprehensively reviewed through search of the PubMed literatures without restriction on the publication date.Study Selection:Original articles,reviews and other literatures concerning J wave syndromes,ERS,BrS and STEMI were selected.Results:J wave syndromes were firstly defined by Yan et al.in a Chinese journal a decade ago,which represent a spectrum of variable phenotypes characterized by appearance of prominent electrocardiographic J wave including ERS,BrS and ventricular fibrillation (VF) associated with hypothermia and acute STEMI.J wave syndromes can be inherited or acquired and are mechanistically linked to amplification of the transient outward current (Ito)-mediated J waves that can lead to phase 2 reentry capable of initiating VF.Conclusions:J wave syndromes are a group of newly highlighted clinical entities that share similar molecular,ionic and cellular mechanism and marked by amplified J wave on the electrocardiogram and a risk of VF.The clinical challenge ahead is to identify the patients with J wave syndromes who are at risk for sudden cardiac death and determine the alternative therapeutic strategies to reduce mortality.

  18. The Source for Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  19. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  20. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  1. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sharon Turban; Paul J Thuluvath; Mohamed G Atta

    2007-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a "functional" and reversible form of renal failure that occurs in patients with advanced chronic liver disease. The distinctive hallmark feature of HRS is the intense renal vasoconstriction caused by interactions between systemic and portal hemodynamics. This results in activation of vasoconstrictors and suppression of vasodilators in the renal circulation. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, as well as current and emerging therapies of HRS are discussed in this review.

  2. Marfan syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Eesha; Pandey, Ramesh Kumar

    1997-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of the connective tissue, with skeletal, ligamentous, orooculofacial, pulmonary, abdominal, neurological and the most fatal, cardiovascular manifestations. It has no cure but early diagnosis, regular monitoring and preventive lifestyle regimen ensure a good prognosis. However, the diagnosis can be difficult as it is essentially a clinical one, relying on family history, meticulous physical examination and investigation of involved organ sy...

  3. Waardenburg syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Manish; Kavadu, Paresh; Chougule, Sachin

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of Waardenburg syndrome in a female child aged 2yrs. Petrus Johannes Waardenburg(1) , a Dutch Ophthalmologist in 1951 described individuals with retinal pigmentary differences who had varying degrees of hearing loss and dystopia canthorum (i.e., latral displacement of inner canthi of eyes). The disease runs in families with a dominant inheritance pattern with varying degree of clinical presentation. Patient usually present with heterochromic iris, pigmentary abnormalities of ...

  4. Waardenburg syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tagra Sunita; Talwar Amrita; Walia Rattan Lal; Sidhu Puneet

    2006-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features ...

  5. Turner Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Akcan AB.

    2007-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by partial or complete monosomy-X. TS is associated with certain physical and medical features including estrogen deficiency, short stature and increased risk for several diseases with cardiac conditions being among the most serious. Girls with TS are typically treated with growth hormone and estrogen replacement therapies to address short stature and estrogen deficiency. The cognitive-behavioral phenotype associated with TS includ...

  6. Robinow Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gökhan Gökalp; Erdal Eren; Zeynep Yazıcı; Halil Sağlam

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Robinow syndrome is characterized by dwarfism demonstrating short-limbed extremities, vertebral malsegmentation/malformation (hemivertebra), costal dysplasia, genital hypoplasia, and fetal facial appearance (wide and prominent forehead, hypertelorism, small and wide nose, molar hypoplasia, and retrognathia). It is a rare genetic disease which may present with either mild autosomal dominant form or severe recessive form. Vertebral and costal abnormalities are common diagnostic si...

  7. Apert's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Gudipaneni Ravi; Jyothsna, Mandapati; Ahmed, Syed Basheer; Sree Lakshmi, Ketham Reddy

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apert's syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, midfacial malforma­tion and symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. Craniofacial deformities include cone-shaped calvarium, fat forehead, prop-tosis, hypertelorism and short nose with a bulbous tip. Intraoral findings include high arched palate with pseudocleft, maxillary transverse and sagittal hypoplasia with concomitant dental crowding, skeletal and dental anterior open bite...

  8. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  9. Asperger syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Woodbury-Smith, Marc R.; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Asperger syndrome (AS) is a chronic neurodevelopmental disorder of social interaction, communication, and a restricted range of behaviors or interests. Although not generally associated with intellectual disability, the severe social disability and, in many cases, associated mental health and other medical problems, result in disability throughout life. The diagnosis is often delayed, sometimes into adulthood, which is unfortunate because there are now a range...

  10. Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Bastiaenen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Brugada syndrome demonstrates characteristic electrocardiogram features and is a significant cause of sudden death in young adults with overtly normal cardiac structure and function. The genetic basis has not yet been fully elucidated but our understanding of the causative mutations and modifiers of arrhythmic events is advancing rapidly alongside sequencing technologies. We expect that the future will include risk stratification according to genotype and management tailored to the genetic diagnosis.

  11. [Fibromyalgia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo Hernández, A; Rodríguez Lozano, C; Ojeda Bruno, S

    1992-02-01

    The Fibromialgia Syndrome (FS) is a common clinical entity which may produce symtoms and signs related to multiple fields of Medicine. Typical clinical characteristics of FS include extensive pain, presence of sensitive points during exploration, morning stiffness, asthenia and non-refresing sleep. Frequently, associated rheumatologic diseases are observed, as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis and vertebral disorders. In FS, complementary tests are usually normal. The most widely accepted hypothesis suggests that this is a disorder affecting modulation of pain sensitivity.

  12. The Membrane Protein of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Functions as a Novel Cytosolic Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern To Promote Beta Interferon Induction via a Toll-Like-Receptor-Related TRAF3-Independent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most of the intracellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs reside in either the endolysosome or the cytoplasm to sense pathogen-derived RNAs, DNAs, or synthetic analogs of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA, such as poly(I:C. However, it remains elusive whether or not a pathogen-derived protein can function as a cytosolic pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP. In this study, we demonstrate that delivering the membrane gene of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV into HEK293T, HEK293ET, and immobilized murine bone marrow-derived macrophage (J2-Mφ cells significantly upregulates beta interferon (IFN-β production. Both NF-κB and TBK1-IRF3 signaling cascades are activated by M gene products. M protein rather than M mRNA is responsible for M-mediated IFN-β induction that is preferentially associated with the activation of the Toll-like receptor (TLR adaptor proteins MyD88, TIRAP, and TICAM2 but not the RIG-I signaling cascade. Blocking the secretion of M protein by brefeldin A (BFA failed to reverse the M-mediated IFN-β induction. The antagonist of both TLR2 and TLR4 did not impede M-mediated IFN-β induction, indicating that the driving force for the activation of IFN-β production was generated from inside the cells. Inhibition of TRAF3 expression by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA did not prevent M-mediated IFN-β induction. SARS-CoV pseudovirus could induce IFN-β production in an M rather than M(V68A dependent manner, since the valine-to-alanine alteration at residue 68 in M protein markedly inhibited IFN-β production. Overall, our study indicates for the first time that a pathogen-derived protein is able to function as a cytosolic PAMP to stimulate type I interferon production by activating a noncanonical TLR signaling cascade in a TRAF3-independent manner.

  13. MOMO syndrome associated with autism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunco, C T; Moretti-Ferreira, D; Silva, A E; Rocha, S S; Fett-Conte, A C

    2008-11-04

    This is a case report of macrosomia, obesity, macrocephaly and ocular abnormalities (MOMO syndrome) associated with autism. Studies on genetic or environmental syndromes associated with autism can provide genetic markers or uncover relevant events, and are very important for the definition of autism subgroups in future molecular research.

  14. Uncovering a Role for SK2 in Angelman Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia B. Lizarraga

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Angelman syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in UBE3A. Sun et al. (2015 report SK2 as a UBE3A substrate and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that might underlie impaired neuronal function in individuals affected by Angelman syndrome.

  15. Uncovering a Role for SK2 in Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarraga, Sofia B; Morrow, Eric M

    2015-07-21

    Angelman syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in UBE3A. Sun et al. (2015) report SK2 as a UBE3A substrate and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that might underlie impaired neuronal function in individuals affected by Angelman syndrome. PMID:26200312

  16. Molecular pathology of colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puijenbroek, Marjo van

    2008-01-01

    Each year, approximately eleven thousand new colorectal cancer (CRC) patients are registered in the Netherlands. Half of these patients will eventually die of this disease. Consequently, it is of great importance to identify individuals with an increased risk for CRC. In this thesis, we evaluate the

  17. J Wave Syndromes: Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Antzelevitch, Charles

    2013-01-01

    An early repolarization (ER) pattern in the ECG, consisting of J point elevation, distinct J wave with or without ST segment elevation or slurring of the terminal part of the QRS, was long considered a benign electrocardiographic manifestation. Experimental studies a dozen years ago suggested that an ER is not always benign, but may be associated with malignant arrhythmias. Validation of this hypothesis derives from recent case-control and population-based studies showing that an ER pattern i...

  18. Reye syndrome - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - Reye syndrome ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Reye Syndrome : National Reye's Syndrome Foundation, Inc. -- www.reyessyndrome.org National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...

  19. Narcotic Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intolerance Malabsorption Narcotic Bowel Syndrome Radiation Therapy Injury Short Bowel Syndrome Symptoms & Causes Treatments Nutrition and Diet Managing Secondary Effects Medications Surgery Daily Living with SBS Resources SMA Syndrome Volvulus ...

  20. Iliotibial band syndrome - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    IT band syndrome - aftercare; Iliotibial band friction syndrome - aftercare ... If you have iliotibial band syndrome you may notice: Mild pain on the outside of your knee when you begin to exercise, which goes ...

  1. Sexuality and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NDSS Home » Resources » Wellness » Sexuality » Sexuality & Down Syndrome Sexuality & Down Syndrome Human sexuality encompasses an individual's self- ... community standards for adult behavior. How Can Healthy Sexuality be Encouraged for Individuals with Down Syndrome? Creating ...

  2. Central Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Central Pain Syndrome? Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition ...

  3. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Dragan M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disease with recurrent thromboses and pregnancy complications (90% are female patients that can be primary and secondary (with concomitant autoimmune disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies are prothrombotic but also act directly with brain tissue. One clinical and one laboratory criterion is necessary for the diagnosis of APS. Positive serological tests have to be confirmed after at least 12 weeks. Clinical picture consists of thromboses in many organs and spontaneous miscarriages, sometimes thrombocytopaenia and haemolytic anaemia, but neurological cases are the most frequent: headaches, stroke, encephalopathy, seizures, visual disturbances, Sneddon syndrome, dementia, vertigo, chorea, balism, transitory global amnesia, psychosis, transversal myelopathy and Guillain-Barre syndrome. About 50% of strokes below 50 years of age are caused by APS. The first line of therapy in stroke is anticoagulation: intravenous heparin or low-weight heparins. In chronic treatment, oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy are used, warfarin and aspirin, mostly for life. In resistant cases, corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis are necessary. Prognosis is good in most patients but some are treatment-resistant with recurrent thrombotic events and eventually death.

  4. CREST Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğçe Köksüz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of CREST syndrome (calsinosis cutis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia with all of the five major symptoms. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of erythema, rigidity and pain on the plantar surface of the feet. She had had Raynaud’s phenomenon for 20 years and oesophageal reflux for five years. Her face had become masklike and there was prominent telangiectasies on her face and hands. Sclerosis were confined to the fingers (sclerodactyly. Direct X-ray graphy demonstrated calcinosis cutis on the left hand and suprapatellar region. She was treated with nifedipine 30 mg/day, acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg/day for Raynaud’s phenomenon and famotidine 40 mg/day, metoclopramide HCL 30 mg/day for oesophageal dysmotility. Her complaints were partially relieved after the treatment. This case had all of the five major symptoms of CREST syndrome, and we aimed to emphasize the major symptoms and complications of CREST syndrome. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 48-50

  5. Chronic radiation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akleyev, Alexander V. [Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation). Clinical Dept.

    2014-04-01

    Comprehensive analysis of chronic radiation syndrome, covering epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathoanatomy, diagnosis and treatment. Based on observations in a unique sample of exposed residents of the Techa riverside villages in the Urals. Casts new light on the condition. Of value for all practitioners and researchers with an interest in chronic radiation syndrome. This book covers all aspects of chronic radiation syndrome (CRS) based on observations in a unique sample of residents of the Techa riverside villages in the southern Urals who were exposed to radioactive contamination in the 1950s owing to releases of liquid radioactive wastes from Mayak Production Association, which produced plutonium for weapons. In total, 940 cases of CRS were diagnosed in this population and these patients were subjected to detailed analysis. The opening chapters address the definition and classification of CRS, epidemiology and pathogenesis, covering molecular and cellular mechanisms, radioadaptation, and the role of tissue reactions. The pathoanatomy of CRS during the development and recovery stages is discussed for all organ systems. Clinical manifestations of CRS at the different stages are then described in detail and the dynamics of hematopoietic changes are thoroughly examined. In the following chapters, principles of diagnosis (including assessment of the exposure doses to critical organs) and differential diagnosis from a wide range of other conditions are discussed and current and potential treatment options, described. The medical and social rehabilitation of persons with CRS is also covered. This book, which casts new light on the condition, will be of value for all practitioners and researchers with an interest in CRS.

  6. Molecular physics

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Dudley

    2013-01-01

    Methods of Experimental Physics, Volume 3: Molecular Physics focuses on molecular theory, spectroscopy, resonance, molecular beams, and electric and thermodynamic properties. The manuscript first considers the origins of molecular theory, molecular physics, and molecular spectroscopy, as well as microwave spectroscopy, electronic spectra, and Raman effect. The text then ponders on diffraction methods of molecular structure determination and resonance studies. Topics include techniques of electron, neutron, and x-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic, nuclear quadropole, and electron spin reson

  7. Fragile X Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilmar Saldarriaga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X Syndrome (FXS is a genetic disease due to a CGG trinucleotide expansion, named full mutation (greater than 200 CGG repeats, in the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene locus Xq27.3; which leads to an hypermethylated region in the gene promoter therefore silencing it and lowering the expression levels of the fragile X mental retardation 1, a protein involved in synaptic plasticity and maturation.  Individuals with FXS present with intellectual disability, autism, hyperactivity, long face, large or prominent ears and macroorchidism at puberty and thereafter. Most of the young children with FXS will present with language delay, sensory hyper arousal and anxiety. Girls are less affected than boys, only 25% have intellectual disability. Given the genomic features of the syndrome, there are patients with a number of triplet repeats between 55 and 200, known as premutation carriers. Most carriers have a normal IQ but some have developmental problems. The diagnosis of FXS has evolved from karyotype with special culture medium, to molecular techniques that are more sensitive and specific including PCR and Southern Blot. During the last decade, the advances in the knowledge of FXS, has led to the development of investigations on pharmaceutical management or targeted treatments for FXS. Minocycline and sertraline have shown efficacy in children.

  8. Morvan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  9. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Lata

    2012-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is defined as a functional renal failure in patients with liver disease with portal hypertension and it constitutes the climax of systemic circulatory changes associated with portal hypertension.This term refers to a precisely specified syndrome featuring in particular morphologically intact kidneys,where regulatory mechanisms have minimised glomerular filtration and maximised tubular resorption and urine concentration,which ultimately results in uraemia.The syndrome occurs almost exclusively in patients with ascites.Type 1 HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume due to both an extreme splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and a reduction of cardiac output.Type 2 HRS is characterised by a stable or slowly progressive renal failure so that its main clinical consequence is not acute renal failure,but refractory ascites,and its impact on prognosis is less negative.Liver transplantation is the most appropriate therapeutic method,nevertheless,only a few patients can receive it.The most suitable "bridge treatments" or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin.Terlipressin is at an initial dose of 0.5-1 mg every 4 h by intravenous bolus to 3 mg every 4 h in cases when there is no response.Renal function recovery can be achieved in less than 50% of patients and a considerable decrease in renal function may reoccur even in patients who have been responding to therapy over the short term.Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt plays only a marginal role in the treatment of HRS.

  10. Polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aziz, M; Naver, Klara; Wissing, Marie Louise Muff;

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The primary objective of this multicenter study is to evaluate the relative impact of insulin resistance (IR) and body mass index (BMI) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) on (1) Key hemodynamic/thrombogenic variables, (2) Oocyte quality and early embryo development, (3......) Fetal growth, placental function and adverse obstetric outcome. Secondary objective: To establish a PCOS database and biobank facilitating future basic and interventional research related to PCOS. Design: A cross-sectional and longitudinal cohort study at four University Hospitals in Denmark. Population...... inclusion: About 200 women fulfilling the Rotterdam Criteria and 100 women without PCOS recruited from 2010 to 2012. Methods: The impact of PCOS, as well as the impact of IR and BMI on the hormonal, metabolic and hemostatic key variables will be analyzed combining conventional, molecular techniques...

  11. Rett Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sitholey, Prabhat; Agarwal, Vivek; Srivastava, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome is one of the most common causes of complex disability in girls. It is characterized by early neurological regression that severely affects motor, cognitive and communication skills, by autonomic dysfunction and often a seizure disorder. It is a monogenic X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder related to mutation in MECP2, which encodes the methyl-CpG-binding protein MeCP2. There are several mouse models either based on conditional knocking out of the Mecp2 gene or on a t...

  12. [Ascher's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halling, F; Sandrock, D; Merten, H A; Hönig, J F

    1991-01-01

    Ascher's syndrome is composed of the triad blepharochalasis, double lip and goitre. In many of the cases reported in the literature this typical constellation of symptoms is not complete; particularly the struma is not mandatorily involved. A 58-year-old patient with this rare disease who exhibited blepharochalasis and double upper and lower lip is presented. Additionally, subclinical hypothyroidism and alopecia areata totalis were found. In differential diagnosis other causes of double lips or enlargement of the lips must be considered. PMID:1817784

  13. [Piriformis syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erauso, Thomas; Pégorie, Anne; Gaveau, Yves-Marie; Tardy, Dominique

    2010-09-20

    Sciatic pain is often misleading and establishing the link with a local muscular cause can be difficult and lead to errors, especially when faced with a young sportsman, with typical discogenic pain. Simple, specific and reproducible tests enable a better identification and treatment of a muscular cause or canal syndrome. Physiotherapy, or local infiltrations are generally very efficient, and sufficient. Surgery may be considered only in a very limited number of cases, lack of response to the first line treatment and then only if it is the absolute diagnosis, diagnosis which must remain a diagnosis of exception, more so of exclusion. PMID:21033479

  14. Griscelli syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariffin, H; Geikowski, A; Chin, T F; Chau, D; Arshad, A; Abu Bakar, K; Krishnan, S

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of Griscelli Syndrome (GS). Our patient initially presented with a diagnosis of haemophagocytic lymphistiocytosis (HLH). Subsequent microscopic analysis of the patient's hair follicle revealed abnormal distribution of melanosomes in the shaft, which is a hallmark for GS. Analysis of RAB27A gene in this patient revealed a homozygous mutation in exon 6, c.550C>T, p.R184X . This nonsense mutation causes premature truncation of the protein resulting in a dysfunctional RAB27A. Recognition of GS allows appropriate institution of therapy namely chemotherapy for HLH and curative haemotopoeitic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25500851

  15. Olmsted Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirka C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old Sikh man had palmoplantar keratoderma, flexion deformity of digits, universal alopecia, keratotic plaques at the angles of mouth, gluteal cleft, knees and dorsal aspects of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the hand; features of Olmsted syndrome. He had normal nails, teeth, oral mucosa and normal joint movements. Treatment with acitretin, 25mg/day for three and a half months, followed by 25mg once daily alternating with 50mg once daily for 3 months resulted in significant improvement.

  16. Jacobsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossfeld Paul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears. Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from ~7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be

  17. CREST Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tuğçe Köksüz; Zeynep Nurhan Saraçoğlu; Ayşe Esra Koku-Aksu; İlham Sabuncu; Cengiz Korkmaz

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of CREST syndrome (calsinosis cutis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia) with all of the five major symptoms. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of erythema, rigidity and pain on the plantar surface of the feet. She had had Raynaud’s phenomenon for 20 years and oesophageal reflux for five years. Her face had become masklike and there was prominent telangiectasies on her face and hands. Sclerosis were ...

  18. Refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentebella, Judy; Kerner, John A

    2009-10-01

    Refeeding syndrome (RFS) is the result of aggressive enteral or parenteral feeding in a malnourished patient, with hypophosphatemia being the hallmark of this phenomenon. Other metabolic abnormalities, such as hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia, may also occur, along with sodium and fluid retention. The metabolic changes that occur in RFS can be severe enough to cause cardiorespiratory failure and death. This article reviews the pathophysiology, the clinical manifestations, and the management of RFS. The key to prevention is identifying patients at risk and being aware of the potential complications involved in rapidly reintroducing feeds to a malnourished patient.

  19. Myofascial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Carli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Myofascial pain syndrome is common cause one of musculoskeletal pain and it is characterized by trigger points (TP, limited range of motion in joints and local twitch response (LTR during mechanical stimulation of the TP. Trigger point is a hyperirritable spot in skeletal muscle that is associated with a hypersensitive palpable nodule in a taut band. The spot is tender when pressed and can give rise to characteristic referred pain, motor dysfunction and autonomic phenomena. Palpation is reliable diagnostic criterion for locating TP in patients. Treatment is based on anesthetise TP, stretch and spray, local pression and physical activity.

  20. OCULO-CEREBRO-RENAL SYNDROME (LOWE'S SYNDROME)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Oculo-cerebro-renal syndrome (Lowe's syndrome) is characterized by mental and motor retardation, cataract, glaucoma and renal abnormalities. It is an X-linked recessive metabolic disease. Two brothers suffering from Lowe's syndrome are reported. Their mother with lenticular opacities and peculiar facial appearance is in concordance with the obligate carrier. The ocular changes and heridity are discussed.

  1. Accelerated epigenetic aging in Down syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Horvath, Steve; Garagnani, Paolo; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Pirazzini, Chiara; Salvioli, Stefano; Gentilini, Davide; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Giuliani, Cristina; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V.; Franceschi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) entails an increased risk of many chronic diseases that are typically associated with older age. The clinical manifestations of accelerated aging suggest that trisomy 21 increases the biological age of tissues, but molecular evidence for this hypothesis has been sparse. Here, we utilize a quantitative molecular marker of aging (known as the epigenetic clock) to demonstrate that trisomy 21 significantly increases the age of blood and brain tissue (on average by 6.6 years, P ...

  2. 大前庭水管综合征的相关研究进展%The research progress of large vestibular aqueduct syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阿布利克木·依明; 唐亮

    2012-01-01

    Large vestibuiar aqueduc syndrome (LVAS) is one of common non-syndromic hearing disorders. With the rapid development of medical imaging, audiology, molecular biology , genetics, cochlear implant surgery, we have made remarkable achievements in the diagnosis and treatment of large vestibular aqueduct syndrome. This article reviewed related researches of the large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

  3. Applying molecular epidemiology in pediatric leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Molecular epidemiology is the study of genetic and environmental risk for disease, with much effort centered on cancer. Childhood leukemia occurs in nearly a third of all patients newly diagnosed with pediatric cancer. only a small percentage of these new cases of childhood leukemia are associated with high penetrant hereditary cancer syndromes. Childhood leukemia, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been associated with a dysregulated immune system due to delayed infectious exposure at a young age. Identical twins with childhood leukemia suggest that acute lymphoblastic leukemia begins in utero and that the concordant presentation is due to a shared preleukemia subclone via placental transfer. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphisms within candidate genes find that leukemia risk may be attributed to population-based polymorphisms affecting folate metabolism, xenobiotic metabolism, DNA repair, immunity, and B-cell development. More recently, genome-wide association studies for leukemia risk has led investigators to genes associated with B-cell development. When describing leukemia predisposition due to hereditary cancer syndromes, the following 6 categories become apparent on the basis of biology and clinical presentation: (1) genetic instability/DNA repair syndromes, (2) cell cycle/differentiation syndromes, (3) bone marrow failure syndromes, (4) telomere maintenance syndromes, (5) immunodeficiency syndromes, and (6) transcription factor syndromes and pure familial leukemia. understanding the molecular epidemiology of childhood leukemia can affect the treatment and tumor surveillance strategies for these high risk patients and their family members.

  4. KBG syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brancati Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG anomalies (with or without seizures and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  5. Myasthenic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, M E

    2011-03-01

    The neuromuscular junction is vulnerable to autoimmune attack both at the pre-synaptic nerve terminal and at the post-synaptic muscle membrane. Antibodies directed to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the muscle surface are the cause of myasthenia gravis in the majority of cases. Myasthenia gravis is an acquired condition, characterised by weakness and fatigability of the skeletal muscles. The ocular muscles are commonly affected first, but the disease often generalises. Treatment includes symptom control and immunosuppression. The thymus gland plays an important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis and thymectomy is indicated in certain subgroups. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is associated with antibodies directed to the voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies at the pre-synaptic nerve terminal. It is an acquired condition and, in some cases, may be paraneoplastic, often secondary to underlying small cell lung carcinoma. Clinical presentation is distinct from myasthenia gravis, with patients often first presenting with lower limb muscle fatigability and autonomic symptoms. Congenital myasthenic syndromes are inherited neuromuscular disorders due to mutations in proteins at the neuromuscular junction. Various phenotypes exist depending on the protein mutation. Treatment is directed towards symptom control and immunosuppression is not indicated. PMID:21365067

  6. Sotos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier-Daire Valérie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC, advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (

  7. Marfan Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Marfan Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Marfan Syndrome Print A ... the Doctor en español Síndrome de Marfan About Marfan Syndrome Marfan syndrome is a progressive genetic disorder ...

  8. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2015-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. PMID:27207564

  9. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus;

    2014-01-01

    -intestinal symptoms and types of cancers differs.Clinical awareness and early diagnosis of HPS is important, as affected patients and at-risk family members should be offered genetic counselling and surveillance. Surveillance in children with HPS might prevent or detect intestinal or extra-intestinal complications......Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as......-intestinal cancer. The syndromes are rare and inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.The diagnosis of HPS has traditionally been based on clinical criteria, but can sometimes be difficult as the severity of symptoms range considerably from only a few symptoms to very severe cases - even within the same family...

  10. Leopard syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallapiccola Bruno

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract LEOPARD syndrome (LS, OMIM 151100 is a rare multiple congenital anomalies condition, mainly characterized by skin, facial and cardiac anomalies. LEOPARD is an acronym for the major features of this disorder, including multiple Lentigines, ECG conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonic stenosis, Abnormal genitalia, Retardation of growth, and sensorineural Deafness. About 200 patients have been reported worldwide but the real incidence of LS has not been assessed. Facial dysmorphism includes ocular hypertelorism, palpebral ptosis and low-set ears. Stature is usually below the 25th centile. Cardiac defects, in particular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mostly involving the left ventricle, and ECG anomalies are common. The lentigines may be congenital, although more frequently manifest by the age of 4–5 years and increase throughout puberty. Additional common features are café-au-lait spots (CLS, chest anomalies, cryptorchidism, delayed puberty, hypotonia, mild developmental delay, sensorineural deafness and learning difficulties. In about 85% of the cases, a heterozygous missense mutation is detected in exons 7, 12 or 13 of the PTPN11 gene. Recently, missense mutations in the RAF1 gene have been found in two out of six PTPN11-negative LS patients. Mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. LS is largely overlapping Noonan syndrome and, during childhood, Neurofibromatosis type 1-Noonan syndrome. Diagnostic clues of LS are multiple lentigines and CLS, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and deafness. Mutation-based differential diagnosis in patients with borderline clinical manifestations is warranted. LS is an autosomal dominant condition, with full penetrance and variable expressivity. If one parent is affected, a 50% recurrence risk is appropriate. LS should be suspected in foetuses with severe cardiac hypertrophy and prenatal DNA test may be performed. Clinical management should

  11. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy. PMID:26280343

  12. Syndromes with supernumerary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinsky, Mark; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2016-10-01

    While most supernumerary teeth are idiopathic, they can be associated with a number of Mendelian syndromes. However, this can also be a coincidental finding, since supernumerary teeth occur in 6% or more of the normal population. To better define this relationship, we analyzed the evidence for specific associations. We excluded conditions with a single affected patient reported, supernumerary teeth adjacent to clefts or other forms of alveolar disruption (as secondary rather than primary findings), and natal teeth, which can involve premature eruption of a normal tooth. Since, the cause of supernumerary teeth shows considerable heterogeneity, certain findings are less likely to be coincidental, such as five or more supernumerary teeth in a single patient, or locations outside of the premaxilla. We found only eight genetic syndromes with strong evidence for an association: cleidocranial dysplasia; familial adenomatous polyposis; trichorhinophalangeal syndrome, type I; Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome; Nance-Horan syndrome; Opitz BBB/G syndrome; oculofaciocardiodental syndrome; and autosomal dominant Robinow syndrome. There is also suggestive evidence of an association with two uncommon disorders, Kreiborg-Pakistani syndrome (craniosynostosis and dental anomalies), and insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosisnigricans. An association of a Mendelian disorder with a low frequency manifestation of supernumerary teeth is difficult to exclude without large numbers, but several commonly cited syndromes lacked evidence for clear association, including Hallermann-Streiff syndrome, Fabry disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Apert and Crouzon syndromes, Zimmermann-Laband syndrome, and Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27250821

  13. [Hepatopulmonary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenot, Thierry; Weil, Delphine; Garioud, Armand; Lison, Hortensia; Cadranel, Jean-François; Degano, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is defined by the association of portal hypertension, increased alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient and intrapulmonary vascular dilations. Pathophysiological mechanisms of hypoxemia are characterized by ventilation-perfusion mismatch, oxygen diffusion limitation between alveolus and the centre of the dilated capillary, and right-to-left shunting. An excess of vasodilator molecules (like nitric monoxide) and proangiogenic factors (like VEGF) play an important role in the occurrence of HPS. Symptoms of HPS are not specific and dominated by a progressive dyspnea in upright position. Pulse oximetry is a simple non-invasive screening test but only detect the most severe forms of HPS. Medical treatment is disappointing and only liver transplantation may lead to resolution of HPS. Survival following liver transplantation is promising when hypoxemia is not severely decreased. PMID:27021476

  14. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Diane; Erkan, Doruk

    2009-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune systemic disease that is diagnosed when there is vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity occurring with persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) (lupus anticoagulant test, anticardiolipin antibodies, and/or anti-beta(2)-glycoprotein I antibodies). Although International APS Classification Criteria have been formulated to provide a uniform approach to APS research, aPL may cause a spectrum of clinical manifestations, some of which are not included in these criteria. The main aPL-related cardiac manifestations include valve abnormalities (vegetations and/or thickening), myocardial infarction (MI), intracardiac thrombi, and myocardial microthrombosis. In this article, we will review the definition, etiopathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of aPL-related clinical events with emphasis on cardiac manifestations. PMID:19732604

  15. Fragile X syndrome: Current insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Delsa Dean

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is a multigenerational disorder having massive adverse effect not only on the individuals but also on their families. It is the most common type of intellectual disability after Down’s syndrome. Over two decades have passed since the discovery of FMR1, the causal gene for FXS, but still little is known about the pathophysiology of this disease. This lack of knowledge presents the major barrier encountered by the scientific community for early diagnosis and effective treatment. Since early diagnosis has important implication in determining the disease status among members of the family tree so the genetic counseling and supportive therapy get hampered in larger perspective. The present review emphasizes on the recent findings in FXS pathophysiology, therapeutics and technical challenges in molecular diagnosis.

  16. Griscelli Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ebrahim MANSOURI NEJAD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Mansouri Nejad SE, Yazdan panah MJ, Tayyebi Meibodi N, Ashrafzadeh F, Akhondian J, BeiraghiToosi M, Eslamieh H. Griscelli Syndrome: A Case Report. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Autumn;8(4: 72-75.ObjectiveGriscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive immune deficiency disorder that presents with pigmentary dilution of the skin and hair, recurrent skin and pulmonary infections, neurologic problems, hypogammaglobulinemia, and variable cellular immunodeficiency. Three mutations have been described in different phenotypes of the disease. In most of cases, GS leads to death in the first decade of life. In this article, we report a one-year-old child with type 2 GS who suffers from pigmentation disorder and hypogammaglobulinemia.ReferencesKharkar V, Pande S, Mahajan S, Dwiwedi R, Khopkar U. Griscelli syndrome: a new phenotype with circumscribed pigment loss? Dermatol Online J 2007 1;13(2:17.Sheela SR, Latha M, Susy JI. Griscelli syndrome: Rab 27a mutation. Indian Pediatrics 2004; 41:944-947.González Carretero P, Noguera Julian A, Ricart Campos S, Fortuny Guasch C, Martorell Sampol L. Griscelli-Prunieras syndrome: report of two cases. An Pediatr (Barc 2009 ; 70(2:164-7.Szczawinska-Poplonyk A, Kycler Z, Breborowicz A, Klaudel-Dreszler M, Pac M, Zegadlo-Mylik M, et al. Pulmonary lymphomatoid granulomatosis in Griscelli syndrome type 2. Viral Immunol 2011 Dec;24(6:471-3.Durmaz A, Ozkinay F, Onay H, Tombuloglu M, Atay A, Gursel O, et al. Molecular analysis and clinical findings of Griscelli syndrome patients. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2012 Oct;34(7:541-4.Reddy RR, Babu BM, Venkateshwaramma B, Hymavathi Ch. Silvery hair syndrome in two cousins: Chediak-Higashi syndrome vs Griscelli syndrome, with rare associations. Int J Trichology 2011; 3(2:107-11.Sahana M, Sacchidanand S, Hiremagalore R, Asha G. Silvery grey hair: clue to diagnose immunodeficiency. Int J Trichology 2012;4(2:83-5.Mahalingashetti PB, Krishnappa MH, Kalyan PS

  17. Noonan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Burgt Ineke

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Noonan Syndrome (NS is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set posteriorly rotated ears with a thickened helix. The cardiovascular defects most commonly associated with this condition are pulmonary stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Other associated features are webbed neck, chest deformity, mild intellectual deficit, cryptorchidism, poor feeding in infancy, bleeding tendency and lymphatic dysplasias. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Recently, mutations in the KRAS gene have been identified in a small proportion of patients with NS. A DNA test for mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. NS should be considered in all foetuses with polyhydramnion, pleural effusions, oedema and increased nuchal fluid with a normal karyotype. With special care and counselling, the majority of children with NS will grow up and function normally in the adult world. Management should address feeding problems in early childhood, evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of growth and motor development. Physiotherapy and/or speech therapy should be offered if indicated. A complete eye examination and hearing evaluation should be performed during the first few years of schooling. Preoperative coagulation studies are indicated. Signs and symptoms lessen with age and most adults with NS do not require special medical care.

  18. Research on Molecular Mechanism of “Yin Asthenia with Internal Heat” in Asthenia Hot Syndrome Rats by Gene Chip Technology%基因芯片技术研究虚热证大鼠阴虚内热的分子机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩冰冰; 王世军

    2013-01-01

    目的:通过基因芯片技术研究虚热证大鼠肝全基因表达谱的改变,阐释虚热证大鼠“阴虚内热”的分子机制.方法:使用中药复方附子、肉桂、干姜建立虚热证大鼠模型,应用基因芯片检测各组大鼠肝脏基因表达,筛选差异表达基因,进行基因功能分类注释,荧光定量PCR验证芯片结果.结果:虚热模型组与空白对照组比较有99条基因差异表达,主要涉及防御应答,固醇代谢等功能.结论:虚热证阴虚内热的分子机制可能与刺激应答相关基因及固醇代谢相关基因两类基因的异常表达相关.%To explain molecular mechanism of “Yin Asthenia with Internal Heat” in asthenia hot syndrome rats by analysis the whole gene expression profile of the hver in rats with asthenia hot syndrome.Methods:The Asthenia hot syndrome rats models were induced by compound preparation of Traditional Chinese Medicine of Aconitum carmichaeli,Cinnamomi Cortex,Rhizoma Zingiberis.The liver gene expression in each group was detected by gene chip.We selected the differential expression genes and conducted the significant analysis on the genetic function of differential genes.A part of genes were selected to test the accuracy of results by RT-PCR.Results:As compared to the control group,in asthenia hot model group there were 99 strips of differential expression gene,mainly about function of defense response and sterol metabolic process.Conclusion:The abnormal expression of genes about defense response and sterol metabolic process in asthenia hot syndrome rats is possibly related to the substance foundation of asthenia hot syndrome.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Rett syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Rett syndrome Rett syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... autism-dementia-ataxia-loss of purposeful hand use syndrome Rett disorder Rett's disorder Rett's syndrome RTS RTT Related ...

  20. Prenatal Tests for Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME S HARE W ITH W OMEN PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME What Is Down Syndrome? ... suggests that you consult your health care provider. PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME 256 Volume 50, No. ...

  1. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Request Permissions Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 04/2016 What is Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome? Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is ...

  2. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome. PMID:27209717

  3. Mobbing syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakoula Z.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The term mobbing comes from the English word mob, meaning attack, Compass bother. Today is the systematic psychological attack and a strategic marginalization accepted at the workplace from their superiors or colleagues unwanted, for various reasons, employees. The term was used in 1800 by British biology, description of aggressive behavior in flight, certain species of migratory birds. In 1900, ethologist Konrad Lorenz uses it to interpret the hostility of the majority of the herd, compared to lean animals of the same breed. The German psychologist Heinz Leyman, is the first, which is in the 80s, attributes the condition in human society, describing all the negative health effects of mobbing in the workplace as a "syndrome mobbing». Purpose: To work is to illustrate the phenomenon mobbing, which can appear as a problem in the relationship of the perpetrator to the victim, but also implies the presence of such conditions to occur and flourish. Literature Review: searched the literature, internet, Keyword: Work or Employee Abuse, Mistreatment, Emotional Abuse, Bossing, Victimization, Intimidation, Psychological terrorization, Psychological violence. The mobbing syndrome is defined as "repeated abusive behavior, manifested through actions, words, intimidation, acts, gestures, ways of organizing work and have the character or purpose to offend the personality, dignity or physical or mental integrity of the worker in the performance of his work, to jeopardize the employment status or to create a hostile, intimidating, degrading, humiliating or offensive working environment. According to the French psychiatrist Marie France Hirigoyen, the "offender" is a personality that satisfied 'hurting' his fellows and develops self-esteem, conveying to others the "pain" that cannot feel, but also the internal contradictions that refuses edited. Conclusions: the mobbing is the reason for the development of mental and physical diseases as an

  4. Molecular and cellular analysis of the DNA repair defect in a patient in xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D who has the clinical features of xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Broughton, B.C.; Thompson, A F; Harcourt, S A; Vermeulen, Wim; Hoeijmakers, Jan; Botta, Elena; Stefanini, Miria; King, M.D.; Weber, Christine; Cole, J.; Arlett, C F; Lehmann, Alan

    1995-01-01

    textabstractXeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) are quite distinct genetic disorders that are associated with defects in excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage. A few patients have been described previously with the clinical features of both disorders. In this paper we describe an individual in this category who has unusual cellular responses to UV light. We show that his cultured fibroblasts and lymphocytes are extremely sensitive to irradiation with UV-C, despite a level...

  5. Leigh syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A male infant developed hypotonia at 5 months, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, generalized clonic convulsion, tonic spasm and periodical opisthotonus at 8 months, swallowing difficulty at 10 months, pes equinovarus and optic atrophy at 11 months, and then tachypnea, and died at 14 months of age. Parents were consanguinous. Laboratory studies revealed elevated serum LDH, CPK, lactate and Pyruvate. TPP-ATP phosphoryl transferase inhibitor was negative in urine. EEG showed irregular and diffuse slow waves and periodic diffuse spike and waves. CT scan at 9 months of age showed slightly low attenuation areas in the putamen bilaterally. At 11 months, a diffuse cerebral atrophy was found, and the low attenuation of the basal ganglia became more definite. No enhanced lesion was seen at 13 months of age. Thiamine tetra-hydrofurfuryl disulfide and lipoic acid were tried without success. The pathological findings of the brain were astrogliosis and proliferation of capillaries in putamen, thalamus, caudate neucleus, substantia nigra, pontine brachium and cerebral cortex, which were symmetrically involved. The symmetrical cavitation was found in putamen. Optic nerve and mamillary body were spared. CT scan findings corresponded well with the pathology of the necrotic lesions of the brain. It was concluded that these CT scan pictures described above may be diagnostic of Leigh syndrome. (author)

  6. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Zeyneloğlu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is a common major complication in patients with advanced cirrhosis and generally indicates a poor prognosis when combined with liver failure. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is characterised by a combination of disturbances in circulatory and kidney function. Arterial pressure is decreased in the systemic circulation due to reduced total systemic vascular resistance. Kidney dysfunction is caused by reduction in renal blood flow. The diagnosis of HRS is based on exclusion of other disorders that cause acute kidney injury in cirrhosis as there are no specific tests. There are two types of HRS with different characteristics and prognostics. Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for all patients without contraindication. The best approach to the pharmacologic management is the administration vasoconstrictor drugs based on the pathogenesis. Many vasoconstrictors including vasopressin analogues (terlipressin, ornipressin and vasopressin, somatostatin analogues (octreotide and alpha-adrenergic analogues (midodrine and norepinephrine have been studied. In most of the studies intravenous albumin therapy was coadministered with vasoconstrictor drugs and suggested that albumin should be considered as the component of pharmacologic intervention in patients with HRS. Renal replacement therapy in the form of hemodialysis or continuous venovenous hemofiltration has been used in the management of HRS patients awaiting transplantation or in those with acute potentially reversible conditions. The artificial hepatic support systems require further investigation. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 37-44

  7. Magnetismo Molecular (Molecular Magentism)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Mario S [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brasil; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL

    2010-07-01

    The new synthesis processes in chemistry open a new world of research, new and surprising materials never before found in nature can now be synthesized and, as a wonderful result, observed a series of physical phenomena never before imagined. Among these are many new materials the molecular magnets, the subject of this book and magnetic properties that are often reflections of the quantum behavior of these materials. Aside from the wonderful experience of exploring something new, the theoretical models that describe the behavior these magnetic materials are, in most cases, soluble analytically, which allows us to know in detail the physical mechanisms governing these materials. Still, the academic interest in parallel this subject, these materials have a number of properties that are promising to be used in technological devices, such as in computers quantum magnetic recording, magnetocaloric effect, spintronics and many other devices. This volume will journey through the world of molecular magnets, from the structural description of these materials to state of the art research.

  8. Neuroimmunological mechanisms of chronic pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vyshlova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the mechanisms of chronic low back pain. Three pathophysiological mechanisms: nociceptive, neurogenic (neuropathic, and psychogenic are noted to be involved in the development of pain syndrome. The role of cellular and molecular changes in the posterior horn and in the somatosensory dysregulated mechanism of neuropathic pain is shown. Immunological processes, including neurohumoral (serotoninergic and hormonal (sex hormones and specific proteins ones, play an important role in the development of pain. The generalization and further study of these mechanisms are embodied in approaches to therapy for pain syndromes and hence these require analysis and further investigation. 

  9. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: neurofibromatosis type 1, neurofibromatosis type 2, and Gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary cancer syndromes are well known in the oncology community, typically affecting children, adolescents, and young adults and thereby resulting in great cumulative morbidity and mortality. These syndromes often lag behind their de novo counterparts in the development of approved novel treatment options due to their rarity in the general population. Recent work has allowed the identification of molecular aberrations and associated targeted therapies that may effectively treat these conditions. In this review, we seek to characterize some of the involved aberrations and associated targeted therapies for several germline malignancies, including neurofibromatosis types 1 and 2, and Gorlin syndrome. Though patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may be too rare to effectively include in large clinical trials, by understanding the pathophysiology of these diseases, clinicians can attain insights into the use of targeted therapies in their own practice when treating affected individuals. PMID:25549703

  10. Myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeffler, H P

    1996-04-01

    These two issues of the Seminars in Hematology will provide the physician the necessary knowledge to help make sense of this somewhat confusing array of diseases. The subdivisions of MDS reflect the precision of our techniques of dissection, with morphological and histochemical analyses forming the foundation to identify and subdivide MDS. Although steady refinement has occurred over the last half-century, the basic morphologic technique is unchanged. Cytogenetic analysis, which has been possible since the 1960s and 1970s, should be done at least at initial presentation in all patients to provide refinement of diagnosis and prognosis. FISH is not, at this time, useful as a screening technique. Although the 1990s is an era of rapidly growing knowledge and technical abilities in molecular biology, the use of these techniques in MDS is in its infancy. Very few genes have been identified which are altered in MDS, although many must exist. The molecular assays continue to be cumbersome and impractical to use in the clinical laboratory and remain the domain of the research scientist. Nevertheless, in the future, molecular biology will enable the internist to give each individual a clearer diagnosis and prognosis and may even provide targetted therapies of patients with MDS. At this time the center of management is good supportive care. Some patients, however, will benefit from special interventions, which include the use of growth factors, BMT, and in selected patients, aggressive chemotherapy. Induction of differentiation of the abnormal hematopoietic clone remains only a dream, although some of the differentiation agents may have applicability for their ability to induce apoptosis and prevent growth of the MDS clone of cells. Many of the major advances in our knowledge of cancer developed through the study of hematopoietic malignancy. A lot of these advances are due to the ease of obtaining the abnormal cells. MDS provides an excellent model for studying the

  11. Myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeffler, H P

    1996-04-01

    These two issues of the Seminars in Hematology will provide the physician the necessary knowledge to help make sense of this somewhat confusing array of diseases. The subdivisions of MDS reflect the precision of our techniques of dissection, with morphological and histochemical analyses forming the foundation to identify and subdivide MDS. Although steady refinement has occurred over the last half-century, the basic morphologic technique is unchanged. Cytogenetic analysis, which has been possible since the 1960s and 1970s, should be done at least at initial presentation in all patients to provide refinement of diagnosis and prognosis. FISH is not, at this time, useful as a screening technique. Although the 1990s is an era of rapidly growing knowledge and technical abilities in molecular biology, the use of these techniques in MDS is in its infancy. Very few genes have been identified which are altered in MDS, although many must exist. The molecular assays continue to be cumbersome and impractical to use in the clinical laboratory and remain the domain of the research scientist. Nevertheless, in the future, molecular biology will enable the internist to give each individual a clearer diagnosis and prognosis and may even provide targetted therapies of patients with MDS. At this time the center of management is good supportive care. Some patients, however, will benefit from special interventions, which include the use of growth factors, BMT, and in selected patients, aggressive chemotherapy. Induction of differentiation of the abnormal hematopoietic clone remains only a dream, although some of the differentiation agents may have applicability for their ability to induce apoptosis and prevent growth of the MDS clone of cells. Many of the major advances in our knowledge of cancer developed through the study of hematopoietic malignancy. A lot of these advances are due to the ease of obtaining the abnormal cells. MDS provides an excellent model for studying the

  12. 应用实时荧光定量PCR快速分子诊断唐氏综合征%Application of real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR to rapid molecular detection of Down's syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄以宁; 廖灿; 涂新枝; 杨昕; 易翠兴; 黎丽仙

    2005-01-01

    目的探讨一种快速、准确诊断唐氏综合征的方法.方法采用实时荧光定量PCR技术,对25例唐氏患者、50名正常人外周血标本,扩增21号及1号、19号染色体上的多态位点,定量分析比较正常组及唐氏患者组的4对△Ct值.结果唐氏患者组△Ct值明显低于正常组,两组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.001).初步建立了临床应用的参考值范围,可以有效区分出唐氏样本和正常样本.结论应用实时荧光定量PCR技术可快速、准确诊断唐氏综合征,为唐氏综合征的快速产前诊断开辟了新的途径.%Objective To develop a rapid and reliable technique for the detection of Down's syndrome. Methods The peripheral blood samples were collected from twenty-five Down's syndrome patients and fifty normal individuals. Four polymorphic loci on chromosomes 21, 1, 19 were anplified by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR, and then four pairs of △Ct values were analytically compared between the two groups. Results The △Ct values of Down's syndrome patients were significantly lower than those of normal individuals, and the reference ranges for clinical applica tion were primarily established. The difference between the two groups was highly significant ( P < 0.001 ), and the ref erence ranges between the two groups were not overlapped. Real-time quantitative PCR technique can effectively differentiates Down's syndrome samples from the normal fetuses; furthermore, the results were consistent with those of the karyotype analysis. Conclusion Real-time quantitative PCR is a fast and reliable method that may provide a new approach for rapid detection of Down's syndrome.

  13. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  14. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Rett syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... as bad for development as too little. Is Rett syndrome passed from one generation to the next? In ...

  15. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000304.htm Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS) is a complication of ...

  16. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reality Donate to Research Reality Fund October is Rett Syndrome Awareness Month Rettsyndrome.org is excited to provide ... Website What’s in Your State? For Families: Find Rett syndrome related resources in your state! State Resources Rettsyndrome. ...

  17. Androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001180.htm Androgen insensitivity syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is when a person who ...

  18. Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Into Relieved Are you experiencing symptoms linked to restless legs syndrome (RLS)? Find tools and support to help get ... I couldn’t sleep. Fortunately, I found the Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation and learned what type of doctor to ...

  19. Learning about Klinefelter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Learning About Klinefelter Syndrome What is Klinefelter syndrome? What ... they are referred to a doctor to evaluate learning disabilities. The diagnosis may also be considered in ...

  20. Munchausen syndrome by proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001555.htm Munchausen syndrome by proxy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Munchausen syndrome by proxy is a mental illness and a form of ...

  1. Down Syndrome: Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kit Financials Newsroom Shop NDSS Home » Resources » Education Education This section includes information about inclusion, elementary and ... and postsecondary options for students with Down syndrome. Education & Down Syndrome This section provides an overview and ...

  2. What Is Marfan Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11:11 Size: 10.5 MB November 2014 What Is Marfan Syndrome? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Being Done on Marfan Syndrome? For More Information What Is Connective Tissue? Connective tissue supports many parts ...

  3. Treacher Collins syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandibulofacial dysostosis; Treacher Collins-Franceschetti syndrome ... genes, TCOF1 , POLR1C , or POLR1D , can lead to Treacher Collins syndrome. The condition can be passed down through families ( ...

  4. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Movie: Digestive System Winter Sports: Sledding, ... people who have it. What's Life Like for Kids With Down Syndrome? Many kids with Down syndrome ...

  5. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000085.htm Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a condition in some ...

  6. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inspection of a drop of urine), and urine culture for bacterial infection. Stools can be analyzed for ... Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome Obesity Digestive Health Topics Abdominal Pain Syndrome Belching, Bloating, ...

  7. Chinese restaurant syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinese restaurant syndrome is a set of symptoms that some people have after eating Chinese food. A food additive ... Chinese restaurant syndrome is most often diagnosed based on the symptoms. The health care provider may ask the following ...

  8. Turner Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... special blood test that looks at chromosomes — a karyotype — is used to diagnose Turner syndrome. Several physical ... and prompt him or her to order a karyotype. Results that indicate Turner syndrome show 45 chromosomes ...

  9. The obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, R. H. W. M.; de Grootb, Ph. G.

    2008-01-01

    The association of persistent presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies and thromboembolic events, (recurrent) pregnancy loss or both is termed antiphospholipid syndrome. Pregnancies in women with the syndrome should be regarded as at high-risk for complications. Optimal management consist

  10. Overgrowth of the indigenous gut microbiome and irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bye, William; Ishaq, Naveed; Bolin, Terry D; Duncombe, Vic M; Stephen M Riordan

    2014-01-01

    Culture-independent molecular techniques have demonstrated that the majority of the gut microbiota is uncultivable. Application of these molecular techniques to more accurately identify the indigenous gut microbiome has moved with great pace over recent years, leading to a substantial increase in understanding of gut microbial communities in both health and a number of disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Use of culture-independent molecular techniques already employed to char...

  11. Metabolic Syndrome and Migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Sachdev, Amit; Marmura, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Migraine and metabolic syndrome are highly prevalent and costly conditions. The two conditions coexist, but it is unclear what relationship may exist between the two processes. Metabolic syndrome involves a number of findings, including insulin resistance, systemic hypertension, obesity, a proinflammatory state, and a prothrombotic state. Only one study addresses migraine in metabolic syndrome, finding significant differences in the presentation of metabolic syndrome in migraineurs. However, ...

  12. PRES syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological entity characterized by headache, confusion, visual disturbances, seizures and posterior transient changes on neuroimaging. PRES has been described in several conditions including hypertensive encephalopathy, preeclampsia, eclampsia, infections, electrolyte imbalance, hypercalcaemia and use of several drugs. It occurs due to elevated blood pressure which exceeds the autoregulatory capacity of brain vasculature. The posterior circulation supplied by vertibro-basilar system has poor sympathetic innervation and, therefore, is frequently involved. The role of neuroimaging is to establish the initial diagnosis and to exclude other causes of neurological symptoms and signs. NCCT is sufficient to make the diagnosis in a proper clinical setting. MRI features are characteristic and has diagnostic and prognostic value. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) can differentiate this condition from ischemia/cytotoxic edema. Differential diagnosis of PRES includes PCA territory infarcts, venous thrombosis, demyelinating disorders, vasculitis and encephalitis. The diagnosis has important implications because the reversibility of the clinico-radiological abnormalities is contingent on the prompt control of blood pressure and/or withdrawing of the offending drug. We describe here a case of PRES in a 12 years old girl with acute lymphoblasts leukaemia, treated with cytostatics-vincristine, pharmorubycin and methotrexate. After 39 days from the beginning of the treatment there are good results in the myelogram and the flowcytometric examination, but the patient made two tonic-clonic seizures. CT and MRI were made and signs of leucoencephalopathy were diagnosed. Several control MRI examinations after cessation of the therapy and disappearance of the neurologic symptoms were made. The normal findings and the clinical course were the reasons for the PRES diagnosis

  13. Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priori Silvia G

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A novel clinical entity characterized by ST segment elevation in right precordial leads (V1 to V3, incomplete or complete right bundle branch block, and susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden cardiac death has been described by Brugada et al. in 1992. This disease is now frequently called "Brugada syndrome" (BrS. The prevalence of BrS in the general population is unknown. The suggested prevalence ranges from 5/1,000 (Caucasians to 14/1,000 (Japanese. Syncope, typically occurring at rest or during sleep (in individuals in their third or fourth decades of life is a common presentation of BrS. In some cases, tachycardia does not terminate spontaneously and it may degenerate into ventricular fibrillation and lead to sudden death. Both sporadic and familial cases have been reported and pedigree analysis suggests an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. In approximately 20% of the cases BrS is caused by mutations in the SCN5A gene on chromosome 3p21-23, encoding the cardiac sodium channel, a protein involved in the control of myocardial excitability. Since the use of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD is the only therapeutic option of proven efficacy for primary and secondary prophylaxis of cardiac arrest, the identification of high-risk subjects is one of the major goals in the clinical decision-making process. Quinidine may be regarded as an adjunctive therapy for patients at higher risk and may reduce the number of cases of ICD shock in patients with multiple recurrences.

  14. Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrzanowska Krystyna H

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome of chromosomal instability mainly characterized by microcephaly at birth, combined immunodeficiency and predisposition to malignancies. Due to a founder mutation in the underlying NBN gene (c.657_661del5 the disease is encountered most frequently among Slavic populations. The principal clinical manifestations of the syndrome are: microcephaly, present at birth and progressive with age, dysmorphic facial features, mild growth retardation, mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, and, in females, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Combined cellular and humoral immunodeficiency with recurrent sinopulmonary infections, a strong predisposition to develop malignancies (predominantly of lymphoid origin and radiosensitivity are other integral manifestations of the syndrome. The NBN gene codes for nibrin which, as part of a DNA repair complex, plays a critical nuclear role wherever double-stranded DNA ends occur, either physiologically or as a result of mutagenic exposure. Laboratory findings include: (1 spontaneous chromosomal breakage in peripheral T lymphocytes with rearrangements preferentially involving chromosomes 7 and 14, (2 sensitivity to ionizing radiation or radiomimetics as demonstrated in vitro by cytogenetic methods or by colony survival assay, (3 radioresistant DNA synthesis, (4 biallelic hypomorphic mutations in the NBN gene, and (5 absence of full-length nibrin protein. Microcephaly and immunodeficiency are common to DNA ligase IV deficiency (LIG4 syndrome and severe combined immunodeficiency with microcephaly, growth retardation, and sensitivity to ionizing radiation due to NHEJ1 deficiency (NHEJ1 syndrome. In fact, NBS was most commonly confused with Fanconi anaemia and LIG4 syndrome. Genetic counselling should inform parents of an affected child of the 25% risk for further children to be affected. Prenatal molecular genetic diagnosis is possible if disease

  15. Familial Crouzon syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Samatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Crouzon syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition of the craniosynostotic syndromes without syndactyly and with various dentofacial anomalies. Craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, shallow orbits, ocular proptosis and hypertelorism are the characteristic features of Crouzon syndrome. This report describes the variable clinical features in affected individuals over two generations of a family with dentofacial deformities and review of literature.

  16. Familial Crouzon syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Y Samatha; T Harsha Vardhan; A Ravi Kiran; A J Sai Sankar; B Ramakrishna

    2010-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition of the craniosynostotic syndromes without syndactyly and with various dentofacial anomalies. Craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, shallow orbits, ocular proptosis and hypertelorism are the characteristic features of Crouzon syndrome. This report describes the variable clinical features in affected individuals over two generations of a family with dentofacial deformities and review of literature.

  17. The acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symptoms and signs from medical aspects resulting from whole body exposure, or in the main part, to ionizing radiation are described. The dose-response relationship is studied and the exposure is divided in three parts: central nervous system syndrome, gastrointestinal syndrome and hematopoietic syndrome. Brief comments about the treatment are reported. (M.A.C.)

  18. What Is Usher Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... into electrical impulses that transfer messages to the brain. How is Usher syndrome inherited? Usher syndrome is ... required for the child to be affected. A person with only one copy of the gene is a ... in deafness and deaf-blindness, but are not related to Usher syndrome. ...

  19. Stiff skin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, S; Lei, X; Toyohara, J P; Zhan, P; Wang, J; Tan, S

    2006-07-01

    Stiff skin syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by pronounced skin induration, mild hypertrichosis and limited joint mobility, predominantly on the buttocks and thighs. Many heterogeneous cases have been reported under the name of stiff skin syndrome. We present a case of stiff skin syndrome from China, the diagnosis based on the patient's typical clinical and histopathological features. PMID:16836505

  20. Fragile X Syndrome Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Fragile X Syndrome: Overview Skip sharing on social media links Share ... menu on the left. ​ Common Name Fragile X syndrome or Fragile X Medical or Scientific Names Martin-Bell syndrome Last ...

  1. Harmful molecular mechanisms in sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Rittirsch, Daniel; Flierl, Michael A; Ward, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Sepsis and sepsis-associated multi-organ failure are major challenges for scientists and clinicians and are a tremendous burden for health-care systems. Despite extensive basic research and clinical studies, the pathophysiology of sepsis is still poorly understood. We are now beginning to understand that sepsis is a heterogeneous, dynamic syndrome caused by imbalances in the ‘inflammatory network’. In this Review, we highlight recent insights into the molecular interactions that occur during ...

  2. The Change-Over of Yin-yang and Gene Regulation in Kidney Deficiency Syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Fei-xia; HE Li-qun

    2009-01-01

    The present paper studies gene regulation in kidney deficiency syndromes from the simple Nephrotic Syndrome and with the principle of positive-negative regulation to control the change-over ofyin-yang, the modern molecular biological techniques can be used, such as gene chip, representational difference analysis (RDA) and gene sequence analysis, so as to investigate the inner relationship between the genes and kidney deficiency syndromes and prove the effect given by these genes on the pathophysiological status of change-over ofyin-yang in kidney deficiency syndromes.This philosophical approach and method can also be adopted for studies of the related genes in other TCM syndromes.

  3. CANDLE syndrome: a recently described autoinflammatory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüfekçi, Özlem; Bengoa, ŞebnemYilmaz; Karapinar, Tuba Hilkay; Ataseven, Eda Büke; İrken, Gülersu; Ören, Hale

    2015-05-01

    CANDLE syndrome (chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature) is a recently described autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by early onset, recurrent fever, skin lesions, and multisystemic inflammatory manifestations. Most of the patients have been shown to have mutation in PSMB8 gene. Herein, we report a 2-year-old patient with young onset recurrent fever, atypical facies, widespread skin lesions, generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, joint contractures, hypertrglyceridemia, lipodystrophy, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Clinical features together with the skin biopsy findings were consistent with the CANDLE syndrome. The pathogenesis and treatment of this syndrome have not been fully understood. Increased awareness of this recently described syndrome may lead to recognition of new cases and better understanding of its pathogenesis which in turn may help for development of an effective treatment. PMID:25036278

  4. Molecular Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Heath, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular electronics describes the field in which molecules are utilized as the active (switching, sensing, etc.) or passive (current rectifiers, surface passivants) elements in electronic devices. This review focuses on experimental aspects of molecular electronics that researchers have elucidated over the past decade or so and that relate to the fabrication of molecular electronic devices in which the molecular components are readily distinguished within the electronic properties of the de...

  5. Periodontal disease in individuals with Down Syndrome: genetic focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lícia Bezerra Cavalcante

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental concepts of etiology, inheritance and clinical characteristics of Down syndrome are used in this review as a basis for submission of studies that focus on periodontal disease in individuals with Down syndrome, since almost 100% of them develop the disease in adult life. It is believed that in association with environmental and cultural factors related to hygiene and disabilities of coordination, the immunological characteristics that are found altered in individuals with Down syndrome, such as deficient neutrophil chemotaxis and reduced number of mature T lymphocytes, may contribute to the greater prevalence and severity of periodontal involvement in patients with Down syndrome. Moreover, the pattern of periodontal destruction observed in individuals with Down syndrome is consistent with aggressive periodontitis, with a predominance of periodontopathogens such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythensis during childhood and adolescence of Down’s syndrome patients. It is possible to note a relationship between the development of molecular techniques and the evolution of knowledge about Down syndrome, for example: identification of the trisomy syndrome by observing only part of chromosome 21 (distal long arm; identification of genes in this trisomic region and the pattern of superexpression (or not of these genes. Moreover, in this review future perspectives are presented with regard to better understanding Down syndrome in the genetic context, which will reflect in more individualized and effective clinical treatments that will provide these patients with a better quality of life.

  6. Autoantibodies to HLA B27 in the sera of HLA B27 patients with ankylosing spondylitis and Reiter's syndrome. Molecular mimicry with Klebsiella pneumoniae as potential mechanism of autoimmune disease

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and Reiter's syndrome (RS) both show a strong correlation with the HLA B27 haplotype. We studied whether sharing of homologous amino acid sequences in the HLA B27 antigen with an invading microbe might occur, and if so, what is the biological significance of such homology. In a computer search of the Dayhoff data bank, we found a homology of six consecutive amino acids between HLA B27.1 antigen residues 72-77 and Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase residues 188-193. ...

  7. Down syndrome: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Otabor Wajuihian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Optometrists as primary eye care providers examine patients from diverse populations, including those with special needs such as Down syndrome. Down syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality associated with several health conditions including vision anomalies such as refractive, accommodative and vergence anomalies, as well as ocular pathology. In this article, a narrative review of Down syndrome including the background, historical perspective, aetiology and genetic mechanisms, types, epidemiology, as well as the physical and medical profile of Down syndrome is presented.Keywords: Down syndrome review; Trisomy 21; historical perspective; etiology; types and epidemiology; features; Optometrist

  8. Barth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Sarah LN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract First described in 1983, Barth syndrome (BTHS is widely regarded as a rare X-linked genetic disease characterised by cardiomyopathy (CM, skeletal myopathy, growth delay, neutropenia and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGCA. Fewer than 200 living males are known worldwide, but evidence is accumulating that the disorder is substantially under-diagnosed. Clinical features include variable combinations of the following wide spectrum: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE, left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC, ventricular arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, prolonged QTc interval, delayed motor milestones, proximal myopathy, lethargy and fatigue, neutropenia (absent to severe; persistent, intermittent or perfectly cyclical, compensatory monocytosis, recurrent bacterial infection, hypoglycaemia, lactic acidosis, growth and pubertal delay, feeding problems, failure to thrive, episodic diarrhoea, characteristic facies, and X-linked family history. Historically regarded as a cardiac disease, BTHS is now considered a multi-system disorder which may be first seen by many different specialists or generalists. Phenotypic breadth and variability present a major challenge to the diagnostician: some children with BTHS have never been neutropenic, whereas others lack increased 3-MGCA and a minority has occult or absent CM. Furthermore, BTHS was first described in 2010 as an unrecognised cause of fetal death. Disabling mutations or deletions of the tafazzin (TAZ gene, located at Xq28, cause the disorder by reducing remodeling of cardiolipin, a principal phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane. A definitive biochemical test, based on detecting abnormal ratios of different cardiolipin species, was first described in 2008. Key areas of differential diagnosis include metabolic and viral cardiomyopathies, mitochondrial diseases, and many causes of neutropenia and

  9. Hypereosinophilic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldman Michel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HES constitute a rare and heterogeneous group of disorders, defined as persistent and marked blood eosinophilia (> 1.5 × 109/L for more than six consecutive months associated with evidence of eosinophil-induced organ damage, where other causes of hypereosinophilia such as allergic, parasitic, and malignant disorders have been excluded. Prevalence is unknown. HES occur most frequently in young to middle-aged patients, but may concern any age group. Male predominance (4–9:1 ratio has been reported in historic series but this is likely to reflect the quasi-exclusive male distribution of a sporadic hematopoietic stem cell mutation found in a recently characterized disease variant. Target-organ damage mediated by eosinophils is highly variable among patients, with involvement of skin, heart, lungs, and central and peripheral nervous systems in more than 50% of cases. Other frequently observed complications include hepato- and/or splenomegaly, eosinophilic gastroenteritis, and coagulation disorders. Recent advances in underlying pathogenesis have established that hypereosinophilia may be due either to primitive involvement of myeloid cells, essentially due to occurrence of an interstitial chromosomal deletion on 4q12 leading to creation of the FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene (F/P+ variant, or to increased interleukin (IL-5 production by a clonally expanded T cell population (lymphocytic variant, most frequently characterized by a CD3-CD4+ phenotype. Diagnosis of HES relies on observation of persistent and marked hypereosinophilia responsible for target-organ damage, and exclusion of underlying causes of hypereosinophilia, including allergic and parasitic disorders, solid and hematological malignancies, Churg-Strauss disease, and HTLV infection. Once these criteria are fulfilled, further testing for eventual pathogenic classification is warranted using appropriate cytogenetic and functional approaches. Therapeutic

  10. Poland-Möbius syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, D. L.; Mitchell, P. R.; Holmes, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    A patient with stigmata of both the Möbius syndrome and the Poland syndrome is presented. This is now the twelfth well-documented patient with a combination of the two syndromes. The association of the Poland syndrome and the Möbius syndrome occurs with sufficient frequency that the combination probably represents a formal genesis malformation syndrome of unknown aetiology that should be designated the Poland-Möbius syndrome.

  11. Progress in the study of molecular mechanisms in thyroid hormone insensitive syndrome%甲状腺激素不敏感综合征分子机制的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘靖芳; 施秉银

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid hormone insensitive syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by decreased target tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormone. Most cases are due to thyroid hormone receptor β gene mutation. Two novel types of thyroid hormone insensitive syndrome were recently identified, which are caused by gene mutations of MCT8, a specific thyroid hormone transporter, and SBP2 in the synthesis of deiodinase.%甲状腺激素不敏感综合征是由于靶器官对甲状腺激素的反应性降低而引起的一种遗传性疾病.大多数甲状腺激素不敏感综合征与甲状腺激素受体B基因突变有关.近年来研究发现甲状腺激素特异性转运体--MCT8基因突变、碘化甲状腺原氨酸脱碘酶合成过程中SBP2基因突变也可引起两种特殊类型的甲状腺激素不敏感综合征.3种分子机制导致的甲状腺激素不敏感综合征临床表现和甲状腺功能改变截然不同.

  12. Molecular Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Willets, Katherine A.

    2016-06-01

    In this review, we survey recent advances in the field of molecular plasmonics beyond the traditional sensing modality. Molecular plasmonics is explored in the context of the complex interaction between plasmon resonances and molecules and the ability of molecules to support plasmons self-consistently. First, spectroscopic changes induced by the interaction between molecular and plasmonic resonances are discussed, followed by examples of how tuning molecular properties leads to active molecular plasmonic systems. Next, the role of the position and polarizability of a molecular adsorbate on surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals is examined experimentally and theoretically. Finally, we introduce recent research focused on using molecules as plasmonic materials. Each of these examples is intended to highlight the role of molecules as integral components in coupled molecule-plasmon systems, as well as to show the diversity of applications in molecular plasmonics.

  13. ORAL ALLERGY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sergeev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS is defined as a set of clinical manifestations caused by IgE-mediated allergic  reactions  that  occur  at  oral  and  pharyngeal  mucosae  in  the  patients  with  pollen  sensitization  after ingestion of certain fruits, vegetables, nuts and spices. OAS arises from cross-reactivity between specific pollen and food allergens, due to similarity of a configuration and amino acid sequence of allergenic molecules. OAS is considered as class II food allergy, being caused by thermo- and chemolabile allergens, and it is rarely combined with generalized manifestations of food allergy. Prevalence and spectrum of the causal allergens depend on a kind of pollen sensitization. In Moscow region, as well as in Northern Europe, allergic sensitization most commonly occurs to the pollen of leaf trees, whereas OAS is mostly connected with ingestion of fruits from Rosaceae family and nuts. Since last years, a newly developed technique of component-resolved molecular diagnosis (CR diagnostics allows of more precise detection of OAS-causing allergen molecules. These data are of extreme importance for administration of adequate nutritional therapy and prediction of SIT efficiency. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 1, pp 17-28

  14. Thrombosis in nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbano, Biagio; Gigante, Antonietta; Amoroso, Antonio; Cianci, Rosario

    2013-07-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is characterized by heavy proteinuria, edema, hypoalbuminemia, and hyperlipidemia and the most frequent causes are glomerular diseases. An uncommon presentation is iatrogenic NS, an adverse effect of some drugs administration. In the clinical course of NS, a typical feature is dysregulated coagulation state, promoted by the breakdown of permselectivity barrier of the glomerular capillary wall, resulting in the leakage of high-molecular-mass proteins, at least the size of albumin. This hypercoagulable condition is supported by several factors, such as abnormalities in platelet activation and an imbalance between anticoagulation/antithrombosis and procoagulant/prothrombotic mechanisms. Thus, NS and the risk of developing thromboses are strictly related. Thrombotic events affect the venous system rather than arterial vessels with different features and frequencies. Deep venous system of the lower extremities and renal veins are the most frequent source of pulmonary embolism, the most dangerous NS complication. Prophylactic anticoagulation and thrombosis treatment are not clearly established because large randomized trials and guidelines are lacking. The management of NS and the decision of when and how to anticoagulate the patient represent a teamwork challenge for physicians.

  15. Walker-Warburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schachter Harry

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Walker-Warburg Syndrome (WWS is a rare form of autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy associated with brain and eye abnormalities. WWS has a worldwide distribution. The overall incidence is unknown but a survey in North-eastern Italy has reported an incidence rate of 1.2 per 100,000 live births. It is the most severe form of congenital muscular dystrophy with most children dying before the age of three years. WWS presents at birth with generalized hypotonia, muscle weakness, developmental delay with mental retardation and occasional seizures. It is associated with type II cobblestone lissencephaly, hydrocephalus, cerebellar malformations, eye abnormalities and congenital muscular dystrophy characterized by hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan. Several genes have been implicated in the etiology of WWS, and others are as yet unknown. Several mutations were found in the Protein O-Mannosyltransferase 1 and 2 (POMT1 and POMT2 genes, and one mutation was found in each of the fukutin and fukutin-related protein (FKRP genes. Laboratory investigations usually show elevated creatine kinase, myopathic/dystrophic muscle pathology and altered α-dystroglycan. Antenatal diagnosis is possible in families with known mutations. Prenatal ultrasound may be helpful for diagnosis in families where the molecular defect is unknown. No specific treatment is available. Management is only supportive and preventive.

  16. At-Risk Populations for Osteosarcoma: The Syndromes and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George T. Calvert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone. Most cases are sporadic without a known genetic or environmental cause. Heritable genetic predisposition syndromes are associated with a small percentage of osteosarcomas. Study of these rare disorders has provided insight into the molecular pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. Screening of at-risk families and surveillance of affected individuals for these syndromes may permit earlier diagnosis and more effective treatment of osteosarcoma in these populations. This paper reviews the genetic and clinical features of the known osteosarcoma predisposition syndromes.

  17. The Molecular Era of Surfactant Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey A Whitsett

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the physiology, biochemistry, molecular and cell biology of the pulmonary surfactant system transformed the clinical care and outcome of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. The molecular era of surfactant biology provided genetic insights into the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders, previously termed “idiopathic” that affect newborn infants, children and adults. Knowledge related to the structure and function of the surfactant proteins and their roles in alveolar ...

  18. Familial cryptic translocation in Angelman syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyerts, L.K.; Wiley, J.E.; Loud, K.M. [ECU School of Medicine, Greenville, NC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The majority of patients with Angelman syndrome have been shown to have a cytogenetic or molecular deletion on the maternally derived chromosome 15. We report on a case of Angelman syndrome in which this deletion occurs as an unbalanced cryptic translocation involving chromosomes 14 and 15. The proband was diagnosed clinically as having Angelman syndrome. Multiple cytogenetic studies were done without detecting any deletion. When DNA probes (Oncor) specific for the Prader Willi/Angelman locus became available, the patient was restudied and found to be deleted for {open_quotes}region A{close_quotes} (D15S11) but not for {open_quotes}region B{close_quotes} (GABRB3). No other abnormality was detected. The proband`s mother was then studied. The chromosome 15 marker probe and D15S11 were detected on different chromosomes. Using alpha-satellite probes, a cryptic 14;15 translocation was uncovered. This balanced translocation was also found to be carried by the sister of the proband. This case, along with a case presented at the 1993 ASHG meeting, illustrates the need for using acrocentric probes when studying Angelman syndrome patients. The proband was studied using additional probes specific for this region and found to be deleted for SNRPN but not for D15S10. The breakpoint of the translocation in this patient delineates the smallest deletion of the Angelman syndrome region reported to date and therefore may represent the specific gene involved.

  19. Glucagonoma syndrome demonstrating giant duodenal villi.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, F M; Flanagan, R W; O'Gorman, D; Buchanan, K D

    1984-01-01

    A 39 year old man developed an itchy bullous rash in the perineum and on the extremities. Six years later, after giant intestinal villi had been noted at endoscopy, a diagnosis of the glucagonoma syndrome was made. Investigation revealed a large tumour of the pancreatic body and tail. The molecular species of glucagon secreted by the tumour were characterised using the combined purification procedures of immunoaffinity chromatography followed by gel filtration.

  20. Turner syndrome and meningioma: support for a possible increased risk of neoplasia in Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pier, Danielle B; Nunes, Fabio P; Plotkin, Scott R; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Kim, James C; Shih, Helen A; Brastianos, Priscilla; Lin, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Neoplasia is uncommon in Turner syndrome, although there is some evidence that brain tumors are more common in Turner syndrome patients than in the general population. We describe a woman with Turner syndrome (45,X) with a meningioma, in whom a second neoplasia, basal cell carcinomas of the scalp and nose, developed five years later in the absence of therapeutic radiation. Together with 7 cases of Turner syndrome with meningioma from a population-based survey in the United Kingdom, and 3 other isolated cases in the literature, we review this small number of patients for evidence of risk factors related to Turner syndrome, such as associated structural anomalies or prior treatment. We performed histological and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of 22q (NF2 locus) analyses of the meningeal tumor to search for possible molecular determinants. We are not able to prove causation between these two entities, but suggest that neoplasia may be a rare associated medical problem in Turner syndrome. Additional case reports and extension of population-based studies are needed.