WorldWideScience

Sample records for alport syndrome molecular

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Alport syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Registry: Alport syndrome, X-linked recessive Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (3 links) GeneReview: Alport Syndrome and Thin Basement Membrane Nephropathy MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Alport Syndrome MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: End-Stage ...

  2. Alport's Syndrome in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Suchita Mehta; Chadi Saifan; Marie Abdellah; Rita Choueiry; Rabih Nasr; Suzanne El-Sayegh

    2013-01-01

    Background. Alport's syndrome is an X-linked hereditary disorder affecting the glomerular basement membrane associated with ocular and hearing defects. In women, the disease is much less severe compared to that in men. However, women with Alport's syndrome can have an accelerated form of their disease during pregnancy with worsening of kidney function and can also develop preeclampsia. There are only four described cases of Alport's syndrome in pregnancy. Case Presentation. 20-year-old woman ...

  3. Alport's Syndrome in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchita Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Alport's syndrome is an X-linked hereditary disorder affecting the glomerular basement membrane associated with ocular and hearing defects. In women, the disease is much less severe compared to that in men. However, women with Alport's syndrome can have an accelerated form of their disease during pregnancy with worsening of kidney function and can also develop preeclampsia. There are only four described cases of Alport's syndrome in pregnancy. Case Presentation. 20-year-old woman with a history of Alport's syndrome, which during pregnancy worsened resulting in hypertension, proteinuria, and acute kidney injury. Fortunately, there was complete resolution of the proteinuria and kidney injury with delivery, and the patient did not require any renal replacement therapy. Conclusion. One of the four reported cases had an accelerated form of the disease during pregnancy with rapid progression of kidney injury and end-stage renal disease. There are no definite guidelines to monitor these patients during pregnancy. Further studies are required to understand the exact pathophysiology of kidney damage that occurs in pregnant women with Alport's syndrome. This may give us some insight into the prognostic predictors, so that we can monitor these women more thoroughly and prevent adverse outcomes.

  4. X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jais, Jean Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Giatras, Iannis

    2003-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a type IV collagen hereditary disease characterized by progressive hematuric nephritis, hearing loss, and ocular changes. Mutations in the COL4A5 collagen gene are responsible for the more common X-linked dominant form of the disease characterized by much less severe disease...... in girls and women. A "European Community Alport Syndrome Concerted Action" (ECASCA) group was established to delineate the Alport syndrome phenotype in each gender and to determine genotype-phenotype correlations in a large number of families. Data concerning 329 families, 250 of them with an X...... to increase after the age of 60 yr in women. Because of the absence of genotype-phenotype correlation and the large intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity, early prognosis of the disease in X-linked Alport syndrome carriers remains moot. Risk factors for developing renal failure have been identified...

  5. Alport syndrome in southern Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, U; Hertz, Jens Michael; Wieslander, J

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to study the epidemiology of Alport syndrome in southern Sweden, to search for mutations in the COL4A5 gene and to estimate the mutation frequency.......The aim of the present investigation is to study the epidemiology of Alport syndrome in southern Sweden, to search for mutations in the COL4A5 gene and to estimate the mutation frequency....

  6. X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jais, J P; Knebelmann, B; Giatras, I

    2000-01-01

    . Considerable allelic heterogeneity has been observed. A "European Community Alport Syndrome Concerted Action" has been established to delineate accurately the AS phenotype and to determine genotype-phenotype correlations in a large number of families. Data concerning 329 families, 250 of them with an X......-linked transmission, were collected. Characteristics of the 401 male patients belonging to the 195 families with COL4A5 mutation are presented. All male patients were hematuric, and the rate of progression to end-stage renal failure and deafness was mutation-dependent. Large deletions, non-sense mutations, or small...... mutations changing the reading frame conferred to affected male patients a 90% probability of developing end-stage renal failure before 30 yr of age, whereas the same risk was of 50 and 70%, respectively, in patients with missense or splice site mutation. The risk of developing hearing loss before 30 yr...

  7. Alport Syndrome in Women and Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savige, Judy; Colville, Deb; Rheault, Michelle; Gear, Susie; Lennon, Rachel; Lagas, Sharon; Finlay, Moira; Flinter, Frances

    2016-09-07

    Alport syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by progressive renal failure, hearing loss, and ocular abnormalities. Inheritance is X-linked (85%) or autosomal recessive (15%). Many renal physicians think of Alport syndrome as primarily affecting men. However, twice as many women are affected by the X-linked diseases. Affected women are commonly undiagnosed, but 15%-30% develop renal failure by 60 years and often hearing loss by middle age. Half of their sons and daughters are also affected. Autosomal recessive Alport syndrome is less common, but is often mistaken for X-linked disease. Recessive inheritance is suspected where women develop early-onset renal failure or lenticonus. Their family may be consanguineous. The prognosis for other family members is very different from X-linked disease. Other generations, including parents and offspring, are not affected, and on average only one in four of their siblings inherit the disease. All women with Alport syndrome should have their diagnosis confirmed with genetic testing, even if their renal function is normal, because of their own risk of renal failure and the risk to their offspring. Their mutations indicate the mode of inheritance and the likelihood of disease transmission to their children, and the mutation type suggests the renal prognosis for both X-linked and recessive disease. Women with X-linked Alport syndrome should be tested at least annually for albuminuria and hypertension. The "Expert guidelines for the diagnosis and management of Alport syndrome" recommend treating those with albuminuria with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade (and adequate birth control because of the teratogenic risks of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors), believing that this will delay renal failure. Current recommendations are that women with autosomal recessive Alport syndrome should be treated with RAAS blockade from the time of diagnosis. In addition, women should be offered genetic counseling

  8. The 2014International Workshop on Alport Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Jeffrey H; Baigent, Colin; Flinter, Frances; Gross, Oliver; Judge, Parminder; Kashtan, Clifford E; Lagas, Sharon; Savige, Judith; Blatt, Dave; Ding, Jie; Gale, Daniel P; Midgley, Julian P; Povey, Sue; Prunotto, Marco; Renault, Daniel; Skelding, Jules; Turner, A Neil; Gear, Susie

    2014-10-01

    Alport syndrome, historically referred to as hereditary glomerulonephritis with sensorineural deafness and anterior lenticonus, is a genetic disease of collagen α3α4α5(IV) resulting in renal failure. The collagen α3α4α5(IV) heterotrimer forms a network that is a major component of the kidney glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and basement membranes in the cochlea and eye. Alport syndrome, estimated to affect 1 in 5000-10,000 individuals, is caused by mutations in any one of the three genes that encode the α chain components of the collagen α3α4α5(IV) heterotrimer: COL4A3, COL4A4, and COL4A5. Although angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition is effective in Alport syndrome patients for slowing progression to end-stage renal disease, it is neither a cure nor an adequate long-term protector. The 2014 International Workshop on Alport Syndrome, held in Oxford, UK, from January 3-5, was organized by individuals and families living with Alport syndrome, in concert with international experts in the clinical, genetic, and basic science aspects of the disease. Stakeholders from diverse communities-patient families, physicians, geneticists, researchers, Pharma, and funding organizations-were brought together so that they could meet and learn from each other and establish strategies and collaborations for the future, with the overall aim of discovering much needed new treatments to prolong kidney function.

  9. Combined Alport syndrome and Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masashi; Hashimoto, Fusako; Kaito, Hiroshi; Nozu, Kandai; Iijima, Kazumoto; Asada, Dai; Hamaoka, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    To date, there have been a very limited number of case reports on combined Alport syndrome (AS) and Klinefelter syndrome (KS). We herein describe the case of a 9-month-old boy diagnosed with concomitant AS and KS. KS was detected on chromosomal analysis of the amniotic fluid, and hematuria/proteinuria was identified in urinary screening at 6 months of age. Renal biopsy indicated AS, with complete deficit of the α5 chain of type IV collagen in the glomerular basement membranes. On genetic analysis for AS, de novo homozygote mutation (c.3605-2a > c) was seen in the gene encoding α5 chain of type IV collagen (COL4A5) on the X chromosomes of maternal origin. This is the first case report of combined AS and KS diagnosed during infancy, and it indicates the need to consider the concurrent existence of these two disorders in infants with urine abnormalities, even in the absence of a family history.

  10. Association of Alport's syndrome with HLA-DR2 antigen in a group of unrelated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Donadi

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available A few family studies have evaluated HLA antigens in Alport's syndrome; however, there are no large population studies. In the present report, we studied 40 unrelated white patients with Alport's syndrome seen at the Unit of Renal Transplantation, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil. HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were typed using a complement-dependent microlymphocytotoxicity assay. A control white population (N = 403 from the same geographical area was also typed for HLA antigens. Although the frequencies of HLA-A and -B antigens of patients were not statistically different from controls, the frequency of HLA-DR2 antigen observed in patients (65% was significantly increased in relation to controls (26%; P<0.001. The relative risk and etiologic fraction for HLA-DR2 antigen were 5.2 and 0.525, respectively. Although few immunological abnormalities have been shown in Alport's syndrome, in this report we emphasize the association of HLA molecules and Alport's syndrome. Besides the well-known inherited molecular defects encoded by type IV collagen genes in Alport's syndrome, the major histocompatibility alleles may be in linkage disequilibrium with these defective collagen genes

  11. X-Linked and Autosomal Recessive Alport Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savige, Judith; Storey, Helen; Il Cheong, Hae

    2016-01-01

    Alport syndrome results from mutations in the COL4A5 (X-linked) or COL4A3/COL4A4 (recessive) genes. This study examined 754 previously- unpublished variants in these genes from individuals referred for genetic testing in 12 accredited diagnostic laboratories worldwide, in addition to all publishe...

  12. Diffuse esophageal leiomyomatosis in a child with alport syndrome: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Hong Seok; Goo, Hyun Woo; Yoon, Chong Hyun [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-05-01

    Diffuse esophageal leiomyomatosis is an exceedingly rare, benign, neoplastic condition occurring predominantly in children and young adults. This condition may occur as an isolated finding, or it may be associated with Alport syndrome. We report a case of diffuse esophageal leiomyomatosis with Alport syndrome in a 5-year-old girl who had presented with recurrent pneumonia, and present a review of the literature. We suspected Alport syndrome in the patient because she had a clinical history of congenital cataracts and hematuria, as well as imaging findings of diffuse esophageal leiomyomatosis. Alport syndrome was subsequently confirmed by electron microscopy of the kidney.

  13. Two Pregnancies with a Different Outcome in a Patient with Alport Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Gerasimovska Kitanovska

    2016-07-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Pre-pregnancy counselling and frequent controls during pregnancy are necessary for women with Alport syndrome, as well as regular monitoring after delivery. Recent reports are more in favour of good pregnancy and nephrological outcomes in women with Alport syndrome when renal disease is not advanced.

  14. Outcomes of male patients with Alport syndrome undergoing renal replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Temme, Johanna; Kramer, Anneke; Jager, Kitty J;

    2012-01-01

    Patients with the hereditary disease Alport syndrome commonly require renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the second or third decade of life. This study compared age at onset of RRT, renal allograft, and patient survival in men with Alport syndrome receiving various forms of RRT (peritoneal dialys...

  15. Síndrome de Alport: estudo de uma família Alport's syndrome: a family study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Antônio de Macedo Leal

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: A síndrome de Alport caracteriza-se por nefropatia hereditária, geralmente associada à surdez neurossensorial (Alport, 1927 e alterações oculares (Sohar, 1954. Estudaram-se as manifestações da síndrome em membros de uma mesma família, considerando aspectos clínicos e genéticos. Pacientes e Método: Foram submetidos a exame oftalmológico quinze indivíduos de uma família, dos quais quatro apresentavam síndrome de Alport. Os exames foram realizados na Clínica Oftalmológica do Hospital Getúlio Vargas - Universidade Federal do Piauí (HGV/UFPI. Resultados: Revelaram-se quatro indivíduos afetados pela síndrome de Alport, dos quais três apresentavam surdez moderada, lenticone anterior bilateral e nefropatia crônica, e um tinha manifestação renal isolada. Todos os pacientes eram brancos, do sexo masculino, com idade entre 12 e 25 anos. A acuidade visual dos olhos com lenticone variou de 20/50 a 20/100. Conclusões: A análise da família identificou três casos confirmados e um suspeito, sugerindo padrão de herança recessiva ligada ao X, não sendo possível afastar a herança autossômica dominante com penetrância incompleta.Purpose: Alport's Syndrome is characterized by hereditary nephritis, usually associated with neurosensitve deafness (Alport, 1927 and ocular disease (Sohar, 1954. Thus we intended to analize manifestations of the syndrome in a family, regarding clinical and genetical aspects. Patients and method: Fifteen patients of the same family of which four had Alport´s syndrome were submitted to ophthalmologic examination. The examinations were performed at the Ophthalmologic Clinic of HGV/UFPI. Results: Four patients with Alport´s syndrome were revealed, of which three had moderate deafness, anterior lenticonus and chronic nephropathy, and one of them had renal disease alone. All the patients were white, male aged 12 to 25 years. The visual acuity of eyes with lenticonus varied between 20/50 and 20

  16. Ocular, Ear and Renal Manifestations of Alport Syndrome in Three Iranian Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Davari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alport syndrome is a genetic disorder of basement membranes caused by mutations in type IV collagen network. It was first identified by Dr. Alport in 1927. Its major clinical manifestations are included: glomerulopathy, sensory hearing loss, anterior lenticonus, and the prevalence of Alports’ gene in general population is about 1 in 5000 and the disease prevalence is 1 in 10000 [1-3]. Here we report ocular, ear and renal manifestations of Alport syndrome in 3 families that living in the east city of Iran, Birjand, and we have followed all of this family for 6 years so far.

  17. Alport syndrome. Molecular genetic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael

    2009-01-01

    of AS is caused by mutation in the COL4A5 gene located at Xq22, and encoding the alpha 5-chain of type IV-collagen. The COL4A5 gene is a very large gene spanning 257 kb with a transcript of 6.5 kb distributed on 51 exons. In addition, two alternatively transcribed exons have been identified. In the second part...... 41A and 41B were directly sequenced. The PCR-SSCP method was compared to direct sequencing in 15 of the cases. No difference in mutation detection rates were found. Finally, a method based on RT-PCR analysis of mRNA extracted from cultured skin fibroblasts was established. A mutation in a patient...... a diagnosis of X-linked AS. A total of 64 different and putative disease causing mutations were found in 72 of the families. Half of the mutations identified were missense mutations. The most frequent mutations in AS were glycine substitutions in the Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeat sequence in the collagenous domain...

  18. Alport syndrome. Molecular genetic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael

    2009-01-01

    41A and 41B were directly sequenced. The PCR-SSCP method was compared to direct sequencing in 15 of the cases. No difference in mutation detection rates were found. Finally, a method based on RT-PCR analysis of mRNA extracted from cultured skin fibroblasts was established. A mutation in a patient...... previously screened by PCR-SSCP analysis with normal result, was detected. Another advantage of analysing a skin biopsy is that it is also possible to perform immunostaining for the alpha 5(IV)-chain in the epidermal basement membrane on sections from the biopsy. Absence of the alpha 5(IV)-chain support......-linked dominant in about 85% of the families. The autosomal recessive and dominant forms constitute about 15% of the cases. In the first part of the study is a multipoint linkage analysis of 12 families suspected of X-linked AS. The aim of that part of the study was to map a number of X-chromosomal polymorphic...

  19. A Novel Mutation in a Kazakh Family with X-Linked Alport Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barshagul T Baikara

    Full Text Available Alport syndrome is a genetic condition that results in hematuria, progressive renal impairment, hearing loss, and occasionally lenticonus and retinopathy. Approximately 80% of Alport syndrome cases are caused by X-linked mutations in the COL4A5 gene encoding type IV collagen. The objective of this study was to define the SNP profiles for COL4A5 in patients with hereditary nephritis and hematuria. For this, we examined four subjects from one Kazakh family clinically affected with X-linked Alport syndrome due to COL4A5 gene mutations. All 51 exons of the COL4A5 gene were screened by linkage analysis and direct DNA sequencing, resulting in the identification of a novel mutation (G641E in exon 25. The mutation was found only in two affected family individuals but was not present in healthy family members or 200 unrelated healthy controls. This result demonstrates that this novel mutation is pathogenic and has meaningful implications for the diagnosis of patients with Alport syndrome.

  20. Cataract in a patient with the Alport syndrome and diffuse Leiomyomatosis Catarata em paciente com sindrome de alport e leiomiomatose difusa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Santiago - Cabán

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of painless progressive loss of vision in a 15 years old male patient with Alport syndrome and diffuse Leiomyomatosis. After a comprehensive history and ocular examination, a diagnosis of bilateral posterior subcapsular cataracts was given. Patient underwent cataract extraction. His best corrected post-operative visual acuity was 20/25 in both eyes. We conclude that posterior subcapsular cataracts may lead to painless and progressive loss of vision in patients with Alport syndrome and Diffuse Leiomyomatosis.Nós descrevemos o caso de perda visual progressiva indolor em um paciente de 15 anos, sexo masculino, com Síndrome de Alport e Leiomiomatose difusa. Após história completa e exame oftalmológico, foi feito o diagnóstico de catarata subcapsular posterior bilateral. O paciente foi submetido à cirurgia de catarata. Nós concluímos que cataratas subcapsulares posteriores podem levar a perda visual progressiva e indolor em pacientes com Síndrome de Alport e Leiomiomatose Difusa.

  1. Next generation sequencing as a useful tool in the diagnostics of mosaicism in Alport syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beicht, Sonja; Strobl-Wildemann, Gertrud; Rath, Sabine; Wachter, Oliver; Alberer, Martin; Kaminsky, Elke; Weber, Lutz T; Hinrichsen, Tanja; Klein, Hanns-Georg; Hoefele, Julia

    2013-09-10

    Alport syndrome (ATS) is a progressive hereditary nephropathy characterized by hematuria and/or proteinuria with structural defects of the glomerular basement membrane. It can be associated with extrarenal manifestations (high-tone sensorineural hearing loss and ocular abnormalities). Somatic mutations in COL4A5 (X-linked), COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes (both autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant) cause Alport syndrome. Somatic mosaicism in Alport patients is very rare. The reason for this may be due to the difficulty of detection. We report the case of a boy and his mother who presented with Alport syndrome. Mutational analysis showed the novel hemizygote pathogenic mutation c.2396-1G>A (IVS29-1G>A) at the splice acceptor site of the intron 29 exon 30 boundary of the COL4A5 gene in the boy. The mutation in the mother would not have been detected by Sanger sequencing without the knowledge of the mutational analysis result of her son. Further investigation of the mother using next generation sequencing showed somatic mosaicism and implied potential germ cell mosaicism. The mutation in the mother has most likely occurred during early embryogenesis. Analysis of tissue of different embryonic origin in the mother confirmed mosaicism in both mesoderm and ectoderm. Low grade mosaicism is very difficult to detect by Sanger sequencing. Next generation sequencing is increasingly used in the diagnostics and might improve the detection of mosaicism. In the case of definite clinical symptoms of ATS and missing detection of a mutation by Sanger sequencing, mutational analysis should be performed by next generation sequencing.

  2. Mutations in the codon for a conserved arginine-1563 in the COL4A5 collagen gene in Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J; Gregory, M C; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1993-01-01

    We have screened 110 unrelated Alport syndrome kindreds for mutations in the exon 48 region of the COL4A5 collagen gene. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the PCR-amplified region of exon 48 revealed sequence variants in DNA from affected males and carriers of three unrelated kind...

  3. Contact lens fitting in a patient with Alport syndrome and posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria da Silva Rosa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alport Syndrome is a hereditary disease that is caused by a gene mutation and affects the production of collagen in basement membranes; this condition causes hemorrhagic nephritis associated with deafness and ocular changes. The X-linked form of this disease is the most common and mainly affects males. Typical ocular findings are dot-and-fleck retinopathy, anterior lenticonus, and posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy. Some cases involving polymorphous corneal dystrophy and corneal ectasia have been previously described. Here we present a case report of a 33-year-old female with Alport syndrome, posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy, and irregular astigmatism, whose visual acuity improved with a rigid gas permeable contact lens.

  4. Alport syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereditary nephritis; Hematuria - nephropathy - deafness; Hemorrhagic familial nephritis; Hereditary deafness and nephropathy ... women have high blood pressure, swelling, and nerve deafness as a complication of pregnancy. In men, deafness, ...

  5. Alport syndrome: significance of gingival biopsy in the initial diagnosis and periodontal evaluation after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toygar, Hilal Uslu; Toygar, Okan; Guzeldemir, Esra; Cilasun, Ulkem; Nacar, Ahmet; Bal, Nebil

    2009-01-01

    Alport Syndrome (AS) is an important hereditary disorder affecting the glomerular basement membrane. Diagnosis of AS is based on the presence of hematuric nephropathy, renal failure, hearing loss, ocular abnormalities and changes in the glomerular basement membrane of the lamina densa. The aims of this case report were to show the changes in the gingival tissues in a patient with AS under therapy with cyclosporin-A after renal transplantation and to discuss the possible role of type IV collagen in gingival basal lamina as an alternative approach for the diagnosis of AS. A 20-year-old male patient with AS underwent periodontal therapy including a series of gingivectomy surgeries. Gingival samples obtained during the second surgery were examined histopathologically and by transmission electron microscopy for further pathological examination. Gingivectomy procedures have been performed every 6 months over the last 4 years. The excessive and fibrous gingival enlargements resulted in migration of the anterior teeth, but no alveolar bone loss occurred. This is the first report to demonstrate the possible changes in the gingival tissues caused by AS. It is suggested that gingival biopsy can be an initial diagnostic tool instead of renal or skin biopsies. Proper dental and periodontal care and regular visits to the dentist could provide limited gingival hyperplasia to patients with AS.

  6. Alport syndrome: significance of gingival biopsy in the initial diagnosis and periodontal evaluation after renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal Uslu Toygar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Alport Syndrome (AS is an important hereditary disorder affecting the glomerular basement membrane. Diagnosis of AS is based on the presence of hematuric nephropathy, renal failure, hearing loss, ocular abnormalities and changes in the glomerular basement membrane of the lamina densa. The aims of this case report were to show the changes in the gingival tissues in a patient with AS under therapy with cyclosporin-A after renal transplantation and to discuss the possible role of type IV collagen in gingival basal lamina as an alternative approach for the diagnosis of AS. A 20-year-old male patient with AS underwent periodontal therapy including a series of gingivectomy surgeries. Gingival samples obtained during the second surgery were examined histopathologically and by transmission electron microscopy for further pathological examination. Gingivectomy procedures have been performed every 6 months over the last 4 years. The excessive and fibrous gingival enlargements resulted in migration of the anterior teeth, but no alveolar bone loss occurred. This is the first report to demonstrate the possible changes in the gingival tissues caused by AS. It is suggested that gingival biopsy can be an initial diagnostic tool instead of renal or skin biopsies. Proper dental and periodontal care and regular visits to the dentist could provide limited gingival hyperplasia to patients with AS.

  7. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of Alport's syndrome in paraffin-embedded renal sections: antigen retrieval with autoclave heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Ichiro; Ninomiya, Yoshifumi; Nomura, Shinsuke

    2003-03-01

    Alport's syndrome (AS) is a hereditary renal disease caused by mutations in the genes encoding collagen type IV. Immunohistochemical analysis of the alpha chains of collagen type IV has been found to be useful for the diagnosis of this disease. The monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) generated by us recognize alpha 1(IV) through alpha 6(IV) chains of collagen type IV on fresh-frozen sections but not on paraffin-embedded sections. Antigen retrieval by autoclave heating has been found to restore the epitopes recognized by the mAbs; however the heating conditions had not been well established. In this study, the heating conditions were carefully examined using renal sections obtained from AS and non-AS patients. The heating was performed in an autoclave, at 105 degrees -127 degrees C for 6-8 min. During the heating, the sections were immersed in 0.2 N HCl solution (pH 0.9). Then, the mAbs were applied for 30 min, and the bound mAbs were detected using the LSAB kit. The optimal temperature for the antigen retrieval varied among specimens, and was dependent on the type of basement membrane examined. Thus, it was considered that heating at two or three different temperatures could be helpful for the precise diagnosis of AS. Adopting the antigen retrieval method could extend the possibility of immunohistochemical diagnosis of AS to cases without using fresh-frozen sections.

  8. Percepção auditiva em síndrome de Alport Auditory perception in Alport’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Mherlyn Viveiros

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Alport é caracterizada por comprometimentos auditivos, renal, e visual. Objetivo deste estudo é caracterizar as EOAT e a atividade do SOEM (efeito de supressão em indivíduos com Síndrome de Alport. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram avaliados dez indivíduos com diagnóstico de síndrome de Alport. Foi realizado estudo prospectivo. Foi realizado registro das EOAT na ausência e na presença de estimulação acústica contralateral com a utilização do programa de computador ILO 92 - Otodynamics. RESULTADOS: As amplitudes de resposta das EOAT foram presentes para a resposta global (A e por faixa de freqüência em 1000, 1500, 2000 e 3000 Hz, em 4 (40% dos indivíduos e ausentes em 6 (60% dos indivíduos com perda auditiva. Foram ausentes as respostas na freqüência de 4000 Hz, nas orelhas direita e esquerda. Esses achados são compatíveis com o nível de audição (em dBNA avaliados. Os indivíduos com resposta global presente em EOAT apresentaram supressão dessa resposta na presença de ruído. CONCLUSÃO: Indivíduos com síndrome de Alport apresentam resultados de EOAT compatíveis com a perda auditiva. Ocorreu o efeito de supressão, sugerindo que a perda auditiva é predominantemente originada por uma disfunção coclear.Alport’s Syndrome is characterized by the presence of renal, hearing and visual disorders. Objective: To characterize the TOAE and the MOES activity (suppression effect in individuals with Alport’s Syndrome. MATERIAL AND METHOD: This is a prospective study of a sample included ten individuals with a diagnosis of Alport’s Syndrome. MOES recording was made in the presence and absence of contralateral stimulation (CLS stimulation using the computer software ILO 92 - Otodynamics. RESULTS: TOAE was present in the global response (A and in frequency ranges of 1000, 1500, 2000 and 3000 Hz in 4 individuals (40%, and absent in 6 individuals (60% with hearing loss. We observed no responses at 4000 Hz in the right

  9. High mutation detection rate in the COL4A5 collagen gene in suspected Alport syndrome using PCR and direct DNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, P; Heiskari, N; Zhou, J

    1998-01-01

    Approximately 85% of patients with Alport syndrome (hereditary nephritis) have been estimated to have mutations in the X chromosomal COL4A5 collagen gene; the remaining cases are autosomal with mutations in the COL4A3 or COL4A4 genes located on chromosome 2. In the present work, the promoter...

  10. Mutation in the alpha 5(IV) collagen chain in juvenile-onset Alport syndrome without hearing loss or ocular lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J; Hertz, Jens Michael; Tryggvason, K

    1992-01-01

    -specific probes confirmed the inheritance of the mutation with the phenotype. The mutation changed the GGC codon for glycine-1143 to GAC for aspartate. Substitution of glycine-1143, located in the collagenous domain of the alpha 5(IV) chain, for any other amino acid can be expected to interfere......A single base mutation was identified in the type IV collagen alpha 5 chain gene (COL4A5) of a Danish kindred with Alport syndrome. The 27-year-old male proband developed hematuria in childhood and terminal renal failure at the age of 25 years. He has no hearing loss or ocular lesions. Electron...... gradient gel electrophoresis analysis suggested a sequence variant in the proband and his mother. This was confirmed by sequencing of the PCR-amplified exon 14 region of the hemizygous proband, which demonstrated the base change G----A abolishing an MspI restriction site. Hybridization analysis with allele...

  11. Prognostic Value of Glomerular Collagen IV Immunofluorescence Studies in Male Patients with X-Linked Alport Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangemi, Concetta; Giannakakis, Kostas; Crisafi, Antonella; Faraggiana, Tullio; Fallerini, Chiara; Renieri, Alessandra; Muda, Andrea Onetti; Emma, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives X-linked Alport syndrome (X-AS) is caused by mutations of the COL4A5 gene, which encodes for the collagen IV α5 chain (α5[COLIV]), resulting in structural and functional abnormalities of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and leading to CKD. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of residual collagen IV chain expression in the GBM of patients with X-AS. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The medical records of 22 patients with X-AS from 21 unrelated families collected between 1987 and 2009 were reviewed (median age at last follow-up, 19.9 years; range, 5.4–35.1 years); GBM expression of α1, α3, and α5(COLIV) chains was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results GBM distribution of the α5(COLIV) chain was diffuse in 1 and segmental or absent in 21 of the 22 patients; the expression of the α3(COLIV) chain was diffuse in 5 of 22 patients and segmental or absent in 17 of 22 patients. Patients with diffuse staining for the α3(COLIV) chain presented with proteinuria significantly later (median age, 16.9 versus 6.1 years; P=0.02) and reached an estimated GFR < 90 ml/min per 1.73 m2 at an older age (median age, 27.0 versus 14.9 years; P=0.01) compared with patients with segmental or absent staining. Two thirds of patients with abnormal α3(COLIV) expression by immunofluorescence studies had null or truncating COL4A5 mutations, as opposed to none of the 4 tested patients with diffuse α3(COLIV) chain glomerular distribution. Conclusions These results indicate that maintained expression of the α3(COLIV) chain is an early positive prognostic marker in patients with X-linked Alport symdrome. PMID:23371956

  12. X-Linked and Autosomal Recessive Alport Syndrome: Pathogenic Variant Features and Further Genotype-Phenotype Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savige, Judith; Storey, Helen; Il Cheong, Hae; Gyung Kang, Hee; Park, Eujin; Hilbert, Pascale; Persikov, Anton; Torres-Fernandez, Carmen; Ars, Elisabet; Torra, Roser; Hertz, Jens Michael; Thomassen, Mads; Shagam, Lev; Wang, Dongmao; Wang, Yanyan; Flinter, Frances; Nagel, Mato

    2016-01-01

    Alport syndrome results from mutations in the COL4A5 (X-linked) or COL4A3/COL4A4 (recessive) genes. This study examined 754 previously- unpublished variants in these genes from individuals referred for genetic testing in 12 accredited diagnostic laboratories worldwide, in addition to all published COL4A5, COL4A3 and COL4A4 variants in the LOVD databases. It also determined genotype-phenotype correlations for variants where clinical data were available. Individuals were referred for genetic testing where Alport syndrome was suspected clinically or on biopsy (renal failure, hearing loss, retinopathy, lamellated glomerular basement membrane), variant pathogenicity was assessed using currently-accepted criteria, and variants were examined for gene location, and age at renal failure onset. Results were compared using Fisher's exact test (DNA Stata). Altogether 754 new DNA variants were identified, an increase of 25%, predominantly in people of European background. Of the 1168 COL4A5 variants, 504 (43%) were missense mutations, 273 (23%) splicing variants, 73 (6%) nonsense mutations, 169 (14%) short deletions and 76 (7%) complex or large deletions. Only 135 of the 432 Gly residues in the collagenous sequence were substituted (31%), which means that fewer than 10% of all possible variants have been identified. Both missense and nonsense mutations in COL4A5 were not randomly distributed but more common at the 70 CpG sequences (pAla substitutions were underrepresented in all three genes (p< 0.0001) probably because of an association with a milder phenotype. The average age at end-stage renal failure was the same for all mutations in COL4A5 (24.4 ±7.8 years), COL4A3 (23.3 ± 9.3) and COL4A4 (25.4 ± 10.3) (COL4A5 and COL4A3, p = 0.45; COL4A5 and COL4A4, p = 0.55; COL4A3 and COL4A4, p = 0.41). For COL4A5, renal failure occurred sooner with non-missense than missense variants (p<0.01). For the COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes, age at renal failure occurred sooner with two non

  13. A nonsense mutation in the COL4A5 collagen gene in a family with X-linked juvenile Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Heiskari, N; Zhou, J;

    1995-01-01

    . The mutation was found to co-segregate with the disease in the family. The information of the sequence variation in this family was used to perform carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization analysis and direct sequencing of PCR amplified exon 47. Prenatal...... diagnosis on chorionic villi tissue, obtained from one of the female carriers in the family, revealed a male fetus hemizygous for the mutated allele. A subsequent prenatal test in her next pregnancy revealed a normal male fetus. Prenatal diagnosis of Alport syndrome has not previously been reported....

  14. Features of gene mutation and clinical phenotype in Alport syndrome%Alport 综合征家系的基因突变及临床表型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何威; 高春林; 夏正坤

    2016-01-01

    目的: Alport综合征( Alport syndrome,AS)是常见的遗传性肾小球疾病,且目前认为有3种遗传方式,文中分析AS家系的基因突变特征,总结临床表型特点。方法应用二代测序外显子序列捕获技术对30例确诊或疑似AS患儿的COL4A3、COL4A4、COL4A5基因进行测序,对其家系成员针对突变位点进行Sanger测序验证;并经Provean对基因突变进行蛋白功能预测。收集临床资料,并结合基因突变结果进行分析。结果30例患儿经基因测序后均可明确诊断为AS。其中常染色体隐性遗传4例,均为男性患儿;X连锁显性遗传26例,男性患儿16例,女性患儿10例。二代测序结果共检测出不同的COL4A3、COL4A4、COL4A5基因突变35个,其中包括错义突变19个、同义突变2个、剪切位点突变4个、无义突变3个、插入突变2个、缺失突变4个、复杂突变1个。通过Sanger测序对家系成员进行验证,结果发现20个突变来源于母亲、8个突变来源于父亲、8个为新生突变、1个先证者纯合基因突变分别来自父母双方、1个突变来源不详。30例患儿均以血尿和(或)蛋白尿起病,17例患儿合并阳性家族史,1例合并高频神经性耳聋,无患儿出现眼部病变及肾功能不全。23例患儿行肾穿刺活检,光镜可见肾小球微小病变为13例,系膜增生性病变10例。电镜下,仅9例表现为肾小球基膜致密层分层撕裂等AS典型改变。结论 AS以X连锁显性遗传多见,致病性突变以错义突变为主。 AS患儿病理多表现为肾小球轻微病变,电镜表现常不典型,肾外表现少见。%Objective The article was to analyze the features of gene mutation and clinical phenotype in Alport syndrome. Methods Next-generation sequencing was applied to capture the exons of COL4A3, COL4A4, COL4A5 genes in 30 cases of children with suspected or confirmed diagnosis of Alport syndrome and Sanger method

  15. Dados clínicos e da audição em indivíduos com Síndrome de Alport Clinical data and hearing of individuals with Alport syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Regina Abreu Alves

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A Síndrome de Alport (SA é uma desordem hereditária, caracterizada por nefropatia, muitas vezes, com perda auditiva sensorioneural e com defeitos oculares. OBJETIVO: Analisar os dados clínicos e da audição em indivíduos com SA, com ênfase na correlação entre alteração renal e perda auditiva (PA. FORMA DE ESTUDO: clínico prospectivo com coorte transversal. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODO: 37 indivíduos realizaram avaliação otorrinolaringológica e testes audiológicos. Foram considerados para a análise estatística da PA os resultados das audiometrias de tons puros. RESULTADOS: Nos 28 indivíduos que apresentavam alterações clínicas foram encontrados 46,4% de DLX e 53,6% de AD. A PA ocorreu em 46,1% dos avaliados. 12 pacientes tinham PA no exame audiométrico 11,5%, leve e 34,6%, moderada. Comparados os familiares normais aos que tinham alteração renal, todos os que apresentavam PA mostravam comprometimento renal. Em 30,8% a configuração era descendente suave em agudos e em 11,5% era plana. CONCLUSÕES: A distribuição dos padrões de herança não coincide com o descrito na literatura. A PA é um achado extra-renal freqüente. Existe associação entre acometimento renal e PA (p= 0,009. As configurações mais freqüentes foram: descendente suave em agudos e plana. Não há associação entre a PA e a idade. Não existe correlação entre PA e sexo neste grupo.Alport Syndrome (AS is a hereditary disease, characterized by nephropathy, often times with sensorineural hearing loss and ocular defects. AIM: to analyze the clinical and hearing information from individuals with AS, more specifically the correlation between renal disorder and hearing loss (HL. STUDY DESIGN: clinical prospective with cross-sectional cohort. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 37 individuals underwent otorhinolaryngological evaluation and were submitted to audiologic tests. For HL statistical analysis we considered only the results from the pure tone audiometries

  16. Alport Syndrome Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Groups Support ASF Donate Fundraising & Events Team ASF Online Shopping Annual Campaign Donors Annual Campaign for Healthy Kidneys ... Groups Support ASF Donate Fundraising & Events Team ASF Online Shopping Annual Campaign Donors Annual Campaign for Healthy Kidneys ...

  17. Alport Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Groups Support ASF Donate Fundraising & Events Team ASF Online Shopping Annual Campaign Donors Annual Campaign for Healthy Kidneys ... Groups Support ASF Donate Fundraising & Events Team ASF Online Shopping Annual Campaign Donors Annual Campaign for Healthy Kidneys ...

  18. 儿童Alport综合征的听力学特征多样性研究%Audiological features in children with alport syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王蓬鹏; 王华; 张亚梅; 刘世琳; 郑军; 刘海红; 张莉; 张杰

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess audiological features in children with Alport Syndrome and hearing loss prognosis. Methods Audiologic, nephrologic and opthalmologic findings in 43 cases of Alport syndrome be-tween 2007 and 2013 were reviewed. Their progress was followed up by telephone interview. Results For-ty-three individuals (36 males, 7 females, aged from 22 months to 13 years) underwent audiologic tests, which showed normal hearing in 33 and hearing loss in 10. Of these children with AS, 23.2%(all male) had sensori-neural hearing loss (70%at moderate hearing loss level). Audiometric configuration was“U”-shaped in 7, slop-ing in 2 or flat in 1 patient, respectively. Sensorineural hearing loss was asymmetric in 30%of these patients. For AS children with abnormal hearing, there were more severe podocyte injury as compared with those with normal hearing. Telephone follow-up found that one-third of AS children with normal hearing gradually devel-oped hearing loss, and hearing in those with abnormal hearing became progressively worse. One child with se-vere hearing loss developed end stage renal disease (ESRD). Conclusion Hearing loss is a common symptom of AS, which may reflect the severity of podocyte lesions. Audiometric configuration distribution in AS may vary and can be asymmetric. Children with AS all showed continuing progressive hearing loss.%目的:探讨儿童Alport综合征(Alport Syndrome AS)听力学特点多样性及预后。方法分析2007-2013年北京儿童医院确诊的43例AS患者的听力学特点,病理改变及临床特点并进行电话随访,并进行统计学分析。结果43例诊断为AS儿童中男性36例,女性7例,年龄22个月-13岁,中位数年龄8岁,听力正常组33例,听力异常组10例。①23.2%AS患儿合并感音神经性聋,并且全部为男性,中度聋最常见占70%;②听力曲线图包括谷型7例(70%)、陡降型2例(20%)、平坦型1例(10%);其中有30%听力曲线呈非对称分

  19. Podocyturia: A Clue for the Rational Use of Amiloride in Alport Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Trimarchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available No specific or efficient treatment exists for Alport syndrome, an X-linked hereditary disease caused by mutations in collagen type IV, a crucial component of the glomerular basement membrane. Kidney failure is usually a major complication of the disease, and patients require renal replacement therapy early in life. Microhematuria and subsequently proteinuria are hallmarks of kidney involvement, which are due to primary basement membrane alterations that mainly cause endothelial thrombosis and podocyte contraction and ulterior irreversible detachment. Commonly drug-based approaches include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers, which are employed to reduce proteinuria and thus retard kidney disease progression and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, as any hereditary disease, it is expressed as early as in the intrauterine life, and usually an index case is helpful to detect family-related cases. As no specific treatment exists, pathophysiologically based approaches are useful. The present case illustrates the reduction rate of urinary podocyte loss and proteinuria after amiloride administration and suggests the molecular pathways involved in Alport renal disease. Finally, podocyturia rather than proteinuria should be considered as an earlier biomarker of kidney involvement and disease progression in Alport disease.

  20. Podocyturia: A Clue for the Rational Use of Amiloride in Alport Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimarchi, H.; Canzonieri, R.; Muryan, A.; Schiel, A.; Araoz, A.; Paulero, M.; Andrews, J.; Rengel, T.; Forrester, M.; Lombi, F.; Pomeranz, V.; Iriarte, R.; Zotta, E.

    2016-01-01

    No specific or efficient treatment exists for Alport syndrome, an X-linked hereditary disease caused by mutations in collagen type IV, a crucial component of the glomerular basement membrane. Kidney failure is usually a major complication of the disease, and patients require renal replacement therapy early in life. Microhematuria and subsequently proteinuria are hallmarks of kidney involvement, which are due to primary basement membrane alterations that mainly cause endothelial thrombosis and podocyte contraction and ulterior irreversible detachment. Commonly drug-based approaches include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers, which are employed to reduce proteinuria and thus retard kidney disease progression and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, as any hereditary disease, it is expressed as early as in the intrauterine life, and usually an index case is helpful to detect family-related cases. As no specific treatment exists, pathophysiologically based approaches are useful. The present case illustrates the reduction rate of urinary podocyte loss and proteinuria after amiloride administration and suggests the molecular pathways involved in Alport renal disease. Finally, podocyturia rather than proteinuria should be considered as an earlier biomarker of kidney involvement and disease progression in Alport disease. PMID:26942026

  1. Comparative distribution of the alpha 1(IV), alpha 5(IV), and alpha 6(IV) collagen chains in normal human adult and fetal tissues and in kidneys from X-linked Alport syndrome patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Peissel, B; Geng, L.; Kalluri, R.; Kashtan, C; Rennke, H G; Gallo, G R; Yoshioka, K.; Sun, M J; Hudson, B.G.; Neilson, E. G.

    1995-01-01

    We have shown previously that the 5' ends of the genes for the alpha 5(IV) and alpha 6(IV) collagen chains lie head-to-head on Xq22 and are deleted in patients with Alport syndrome (AS)-associated diffuse leiomyomatosis. In this study, we raised a rabbit anti-human alpha 6(IV)chain antibody, demonstrated its specificity by the analysis of recombinant NC1 domains af all six type IV chains, and studied the distribution of the alpha 6(IV) chain in relation to the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 5(IV) chai...

  2. Visual outcome after phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in patients with anterior lenticonus due to Alport syndrome%超声乳化联合IOL植入治疗前圆锥晶状体伴有Alport综合征的视觉效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Ali Zare; Mohammad Taher Rajabi; Syed Jafar Oskouee; Mohammad Nili

    2006-01-01

    · AIM: We describe visual improvement after phacoemulsification with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation in 7 eyes with anterior lenticonus secondary to Alport syndrome.· METHODS: 7 eyes from 4 patients with Alport syndrome underwent phacoemulsification with IOL implantation due to anterior lenticonus.· RESULTS: All of the patients resumed excellent visual acuity after surgery.· CONCLUSION: We recommend the phacoemulsification with IOL implantation as a safe procedure in anterior lenticonus due to Alport syndrome.%目的:观察超声乳化联合IOL植入治疗7眼前圆锥晶状体伴有Alport综合征患者的手术效果.方法:Alport综合征患者4例,7眼因前圆锥晶状体行超声乳化联合IOL植入手术.结果:所有患者的术后视力均有明显提高.结论:我们认为对于前圆锥晶状体伴有Alport综合征患者采用超声乳化联合IOL植入手术治疗,是一种安全的疗法.

  3. Alport综合征患儿临床表型及基因型单中心分析%Features of clinical phenotype and genotype in Alport syndrome: a monocentric study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙蕾; 匡新宇; 郝胜; 王平; 钮小玲; 朱光华; 周君梅; 黄文彦

    2015-01-01

    目的 了解儿童Alport综合征(AS)临床表型及基因突变的特点.方法 回顾性分析2011年5月至2014年5月于上海交通大学附属儿童医院肾脏风湿科明确诊断并具有完整资料(临床、肾组织病理、基因检测结果)的AS患儿25例.采用外显子捕获-二代测序技术进行基因检测,包括COL4A3、COL4A4、COL4A5基因,并同时进行家系验证.结果 (1)25例患儿中X连锁AS(XL-AS)19例(76%),常染色体隐性遗传AS (AR-AS)6例(24%).25例患儿均以血尿和(或)蛋白尿起病,8例以上呼吸道感染为诱因.其中2例(8%)存在听力损伤,1例(4%)患儿存在眼部病变.(2)25例均行肾组织活检,光镜表现为:16例轻微病变,8例系膜增生,1例局灶节段硬化.电镜下仅2例(8%)见肾小球基底膜致密层撕裂分层等典型AS改变,另4例表现为薄基底膜病,8例系膜增生性改变,6例轻微病变,5例未见肾小球.肾组织Ⅳ型胶原α链间接免疫荧光检测中21例(84%)存在表达缺失.(3)对25例(来自23个家系)行COL4A3、COL4A4及COL4A5基因突变检查,发现突变类型24种(16种突变未见报道).其中COL4A3基因突变1种(4%),COL4A4基因突变5种(21%),COL4A5基因突变18种(75%).同时对25例患儿的直系家庭成员全部可疑致病突变进行了验证,结果发现13例突变遗传自母亲,3例遗传自父亲,2例(同胞姐妹)患儿的1种突变遗传自父亲、另一种遗传自母亲,7例为新生突变.结论 (1)AS以X连锁显性遗传为主,病理检查多表现为轻微病变或系膜增生性改变,电镜下少数患儿可表现为薄基底膜病.(2)25例患儿共检出24种COL4A3、COL4A4、COL4A5基因突变,其中16种未见报道.%Objective To analyze the clinical features and gene mutation of Chinese children with Alport syndrome (AS).Method From May 2011 to May 2014,clinical and pathological information gathered from 25 patients was retrospectively analyzed.COL4A5,COL4A4 and COL4A3 genes were analyzed using

  4. Progression of Alport Kidney Disease in Col4a3 Knock Out Mice Is Independent of Sex or Macrophage Depletion by Clodronate Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munkyung Kim

    Full Text Available Alport syndrome is a genetic disease of collagen IV (α3, 4, 5 resulting in renal failure. This study was designed to investigate sex-phenotype correlations and evaluate the contribution of macrophage infiltration to disease progression using Col4a3 knock out (Col4a3KO mice, an established genetic model of autosomal recessive Alport syndrome. No sex differences in the evolution of body mass loss, renal pathology, biomarkers of tubular damage KIM-1 and NGAL, or deterioration of kidney function were observed during the life span of Col4a3KO mice. These findings confirm that, similar to human autosomal recessive Alport syndrome, female and male Col4a3KO mice develop renal failure at the same age and with similar severity. The specific contribution of macrophage infiltration to Alport disease, one of the prominent features of the disease in human and Col4a3KO mice, remains unknown. This study shows that depletion of kidney macrophages in Col4a3KO male mice by administration of clodronate liposomes, prior to clinical onset of disease and throughout the study period, does not protect the mice from renal failure and interstitial fibrosis, nor delay disease progression. These results suggest that therapy targeting macrophage recruitment to kidney is unlikely to be effective as treatment of Alport syndrome.

  5. Quaternary epitopes of α345(IV) collagen initiate Alport post-transplant anti-GBM nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olaru, Florina; Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Alport post-transplant nephritis (APTN) is an aggressive form of anti-glomerular basement membrane disease that targets the allograft in transplanted patients with X-linked Alport syndrome. Alloantibodies develop against the NC1 domain of α5(IV) collagen, which occurs in normal kidneys, including...... of alloantibodies against allogeneic collagen IV. Some alloantibodies targeted alloepitopes within α5NC1 monomers, shared by α345NC1 and α1256NC1 hexamers. Other alloantibodies specifically targeted alloepitopes that depended on the quaternary structure of α345NC1 hexamers. In Col4a5-null mice, immunization...... with native forms of allogeneic collagen IV exclusively elicited antibodies to quaternary α345NC1 alloepitopes, whereas alloimmunogens lacking native quaternary structure elicited antibodies to shared α5NC1 alloepitopes. These results imply that quaternary epitopes within α345NC1 hexamers may initiate...

  6. Collagen alpha5 and alpha2(IV) chain coexpression: analysis of skin biopsies of Alport patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patey-Mariaud de Serre, N; Garfa, M; Bessiéres, B; Noël, L H; Knebelmann, B

    2007-08-01

    Alport syndrome is a collagen type IV disease caused by mutations in the COL4A5 gene with the X-linked form being most prevalent. The resultant alpha5(IV) collagen chain is a component of the glomerular and skin basement membranes (SBMs). Immunofluorescent determination of the alpha5(IV) chain in skin biopsies is the procedure of choice to identify patients. In 30% of patients, however, the mutant protein is still found in the SBM resulting in a normal staining pattern. In order to minimize or eliminate false results, we compared the distribution of the alpha2(IV) chain (another SBM component) and the alpha5(IV) chain by standard double label immunofluorescence (IF) and by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The study was performed on 55 skin biopsies of patients suspected of Alports and five normal control specimens. In normal skin, IF showed the classical linear pattern for both collagens along the basement membrane. Additionally, decreased alpha5(IV) was found in the bottom of the dermal papillary basement membrane. Confocal analysis confirmed the results and show alpha5(IV) focal interruptions. In suspected patients, both techniques showed the same rate of abnormal alpha5(IV) expression: segmental in women and absent in men. Our results show a physiological variation of alpha5(IV) location with focal interruptions and decreased expression in the bottom of the dermal basement membrane. Comparison of alpha5(IV) with alpha2(IV) expression is simple and eliminates technical artifacts.

  7. Molecular diagnosis of Down ' s syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王树玉; 贾婵维; 任国庆; 马延敏; 吕巍; 丁锋; 韩健

    2003-01-01

    Objective To establish a new diagnostic method for Down ' s syndrome using polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Methods DNA extracted from five healthy individuals and five Down ' s syndrome patients was amplified in six specific tetranucleotide repeat loci on chromosome 21 using PCR. An accurate diagnosis was made by analyzing allelic distribution at each locus. Results All Down ' s syndrome patients were identified as having at least two loci with three alleles, while none of the healthy individuals had three alleles. In addition, when two alleles were identified for a particular locus in the Down ' s syndrome samples, it was more likely that the intensity ratio between the two alleles was close to 2∶ 1.Conclusion The molecular method can provide a fast, accurate, and economical alternation for the traditional cytogenetic diagnostic method for Down ' s syndrome.

  8. Clinical and genetic features of X-linked Alport syndrome in men positive for the collagen Ⅳ a5 chain in epidermal basement membrane%皮肤基底膜Ⅳ型胶原α5链染色正常的男性X连锁Alport综合征基因型和表型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琰琴; 丁洁; 王芳; 张宏文; 肖慧捷; 姚勇; 钟旭辉; 管娜; 刘晓宇

    2016-01-01

    目的 分析皮肤基底膜Ⅳ型胶原α5[α5(Ⅳ)]链染色正常的男性x连锁Alport综合征(XLAS)的基因突变和临床特点.方法 回顾性分析1998年1月至2014年12月北京大学第一医院儿科诊断为Alport综合征的725个家系,其中男性XLAS患者450例,通过入选标准:(1)有皮肤基底膜Ⅳ型胶原α5链染色检查,(2)存在COI4A5基因突变,筛选出α5(Ⅳ)染色正常及α5(Ⅳ)染色阴性的男性XLAS患者,比较、分析两组基因突变和临床特点的差异.组间比较采用Mann-Whitney检验或x2检验.结果 共140例男性XLAS患者既进行了皮肤基底膜Ⅳ型胶原α5链染色检查又检测到了COI4A5基因突变.其中α5(Ⅳ)染色正常组18例,α5(Ⅳ)染色阴性组122例.两组患者就诊中位数年龄分别为11.0、7.2岁(Z=-1.839,P=0.066),就诊时24h尿蛋白定量中位数分别是1.50、0.57 g/d(Z=-1.212,P=0.226),合并听力减退28%、53%(x2=3.619,P=0.067),进展至终末期肾脏病(ESRD)的分别为4、12例(x2=2.377,P=0.128),ESRD发生的中位数年龄分别是31.0、16.6岁(Z=-2.554,P=0.011),COL4A5基因错义突变分别为12例(67%)、63例(52%)(x2=1.424,P=0.313).结论 皮肤基底膜α5(Ⅳ)染色正常的男性XLAS患者与α5(Ⅳ)染色阴性的男性XLAS患者在尿蛋白定量、听力减退发生率、COL4A5基因型差别不明显,但α5(Ⅳ)染色正常组患者发生ESRD的年龄明显较晚.%Objective To analyze the clinical and genetic features of X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) in men positive for the collagen α5 (Ⅳ) chain in epidermal basement membrane.Method This was a retrospective study.Totally 725 families were diagnosed as Alport syndrome in Department of Pediatrics of Peking University First Hospital during January 1998 to December 2014, among them 450 patients were males with XLAS.Patients who met both of the following two criteria were included in this study.(1) Patients underwent α5 (Ⅳ) chain staining in the epidermal basement membrane.(2

  9. X-Linked and Autosomal Recessive Alport Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savige, Judith; Storey, Helen; Il Cheong, Hae;

    2016-01-01

    , retinopathy, lamellated glomerular basement membrane), variant pathogenicity was assessed using currently-accepted criteria, and variants were examined for gene location, and age at renal failure onset. Results were compared using Fisher's exact test (DNA Stata). Altogether 754 new DNA variants were...

  10. X-连锁Alport综合征的听力表现与皮肤α5(Ⅳ)胶原表达的关系%Relationship between Hearing Phenotype and Collagen Type IVα5 Chain Expression in Skin in X-linked Alport Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董程; 陈斯琦; 张焱琴; 薛俊芳; 陈丽; 王芳; 刘玉和; 丁洁

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨中国人X连锁Alport综合征患者的听力表型与皮肤组织Ⅳ型胶原α5链表达的关系。方法收集2008年8月至2013年8月期间确诊为X连锁Alport综合征的31例患者临床资料,采用纯音听阈测试或ABR+40Hz相关电位检查+声导抗+耳声发射的方式进行听力评估,并采用免疫组化染色检测皮肤组织基膜Ⅳ型胶原α5链的表达,采用Pearson相关分析方法分析二者的关系。结果31例X连锁Alport综合征中听力下降患者均表现为轻、中度感音神经性聋。听觉损害共28例(90.3%),其中22例男性中中度12例,轻度5例,轻微损害5例;女性6例,轻度3例,轻微损害3例。按皮肤Ⅳ胶原α5链染色分级,阴性17例均为男性,其中听力正常4例(3例OAE异常),听力下降13例(轻度4例,中度9例);大部阴性与可疑阳性各1例,均为男性,分别为中度和轻度;连续±2例(男性),正常和中度各1例;间断阳性3例均为女性,均为正常或轻度;连续++7例(男3,女4),其中听力正常4例,听力下降3例(2例轻度,1例中度)。染色阴性的11例听力下降患者听阈与年龄呈正相关(P=0.043,r=0.616)。结论X连锁Alport综合征患者皮肤组织Ⅳ胶原α5链的表达男性低于女性,听力表现与皮肤组织Ⅳ胶原α5链的表达有一定的关系,其中Ⅳ胶原α5链表达阴性的患者听力下降程度与年龄存在相关性,但也存在听力正常的患者,说明还有其他因素影响患者的听力。皮肤组织中Ⅳ胶原α5链表达在一定程度上能反映耳蜗基底膜中Ⅳ胶原α5链的表达和功能。%Objective To study the relationship between the expression distribution of collagen typeⅣα5 chain (α5 (Ⅳchain) within the skin and hearing phenotype in Chinese individuals with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS). Methods The clinical data of 31 cases diagnosed with XLAS between 2008 August and 2013

  11. Clinical, Molecular, and Genetic Characteristics of PAPA Syndrome: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Elisabeth J; Allantaz, Florence; Bennett, Lynda; Zhang, Dongping; Gao, Xiaochong; Wood, Geryl; Kastner, Daniel L.; Punaro, Marilynn; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Pascual, Virginia; Wise, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    PAPA syndrome (Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum, and Acne) is an autosomal dominant, hereditary auto-inflammatory disease arising from mutations in the PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 gene on chromosome 15q. These mutations produce a hyper-phosphorylated PSTPIP1 protein and alter its participation in activation of the “inflammasome” involved in interleukin-1 (IL-1β) production. Overproduction of IL-1β is a clear molecular feature of PAPA syndrome. Ongoing research is implicating other biochemical path...

  12. ALPORT’S SYNDROME: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Alport's syndrome is considered to be a widespread di sorder of basement membrane, clinically characterised by haematuric ne phritis, sensorineural deafness and ocular manifestations. Here we report a case of Alport’s syn drome with all the characteristic features

  13. Laminin α2-mediated focal adhesion kinase activation triggers Alport glomerular pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delimont, Duane; Dufek, Brianna M; Meehan, Daniel T; Zallocchi, Marisa; Gratton, Michael Anne; Phillips, Grady; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for some time that laminins containing α1 and α2 chains, which are normally restricted to the mesangial matrix, accumulate in the glomerular basement membranes (GBM) of Alport mice, dogs, and humans. We show that laminins containing the α2 chain, but not those containing the α1 chain activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on glomerular podocytes in vitro and in vivo. CD151-null mice, which have weakened podocyte adhesion to the GBM rendering these mice more susceptible to biomechanical strain in the glomerulus, also show progressive accumulation of α2 laminins in the GBM, and podocyte FAK activation. Analysis of glomerular mRNA from both models demonstrates significant induction of MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12, MMPs linked to GBM destruction in Alport disease models, as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. SiRNA knockdown of FAK in cultured podocytes significantly reduced expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and IL-6, but not MMP-12. Treatment of Alport mice with TAE226, a small molecule inhibitor of FAK activation, ameliorated fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, significantly reduced proteinuria and blood urea nitrogen levels, and partially restored GBM ultrastructure. Glomerular expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-12 mRNAs was significantly reduced in TAE226 treated animals. Collectively, this work identifies laminin α2-mediated FAK activation in podocytes as an important early event in Alport glomerular pathogenesis and suggests that FAK inhibitors, if safe formulations can be developed, might be employed as a novel therapeutic approach for treating Alport renal disease in its early stages.

  14. Laminin α2-mediated focal adhesion kinase activation triggers Alport glomerular pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane Delimont

    Full Text Available It has been known for some time that laminins containing α1 and α2 chains, which are normally restricted to the mesangial matrix, accumulate in the glomerular basement membranes (GBM of Alport mice, dogs, and humans. We show that laminins containing the α2 chain, but not those containing the α1 chain activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK on glomerular podocytes in vitro and in vivo. CD151-null mice, which have weakened podocyte adhesion to the GBM rendering these mice more susceptible to biomechanical strain in the glomerulus, also show progressive accumulation of α2 laminins in the GBM, and podocyte FAK activation. Analysis of glomerular mRNA from both models demonstrates significant induction of MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12, MMPs linked to GBM destruction in Alport disease models, as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. SiRNA knockdown of FAK in cultured podocytes significantly reduced expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and IL-6, but not MMP-12. Treatment of Alport mice with TAE226, a small molecule inhibitor of FAK activation, ameliorated fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis, significantly reduced proteinuria and blood urea nitrogen levels, and partially restored GBM ultrastructure. Glomerular expression of MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-12 mRNAs was significantly reduced in TAE226 treated animals. Collectively, this work identifies laminin α2-mediated FAK activation in podocytes as an important early event in Alport glomerular pathogenesis and suggests that FAK inhibitors, if safe formulations can be developed, might be employed as a novel therapeutic approach for treating Alport renal disease in its early stages.

  15. Clinical, Molecular, and Genetic Characteristics of PAPA Syndrome: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elisabeth J; Allantaz, Florence; Bennett, Lynda; Zhang, Dongping; Gao, Xiaochong; Wood, Geryl; Kastner, Daniel L; Punaro, Marilynn; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Pascual, Virginia; Wise, Carol A

    2010-11-01

    PAPA syndrome (Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum, and Acne) is an autosomal dominant, hereditary auto-inflammatory disease arising from mutations in the PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 gene on chromosome 15q. These mutations produce a hyper-phosphorylated PSTPIP1 protein and alter its participation in activation of the "inflammasome" involved in interleukin-1 (IL-1β) production. Overproduction of IL-1β is a clear molecular feature of PAPA syndrome. Ongoing research is implicating other biochemical pathways that may be relevant to the distinct pyogenic inflammation of the skin and joints characteristic of this disease. This review summarizes the recent and rapidly accumulating knowledge on these molecular aspects of PAPA syndrome and related disorders.

  16. Rett syndrome molecular diagnosis and implications in genetic counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noruzinia M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome is a rare genetic X-linked dominant disorder. This syndrome is the most frequent cause of mental retardation in girls. In the classical form of the disease, the presenting signs and the course of development are characteristic. However clinical diagnosis can be very difficult when the expression is not in the classical form. Mutations in MeCP2 are responsible for 80% of cases. When MeCP2 mutation is found in an index case, genetic counseling is similar to that in other X-linked dominant genetic diseases. However, mutations in this gene can cause a spectrum of atypical forms. On the other hand, other genetic conditions like translocations, sex chromosome numerical anomalies, and mutations in other genes can complicate genetic counseling in this syndrome. We present the first case of molecular diagnosis of Rett syndrome in Iran and discuss the recent developments in its genetic counseling.

  17. The Molecular Genetics of Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, David B

    2015-09-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sensorimotor trait defined by symptoms that interfere with sleep onset and maintenance in a clinically meaningful way. Nonvolitional myoclonus while awake and asleep is a sign of the disorder and an informative endophenotype. The genetic contributions to RLS/periodic leg movements are substantial, are among the most robust defined to date for a common disease, and account for much of the variance in disease expressivity. The disorder is polygenic, as revealed by recent genome-wide association studies. Experimental studies are revealing mechanistic details of how these common variants might influence RLS expressivity.

  18. The molecular mechanisms between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Wen, Ya-yuan; Li, Zhi-rong; Luo, Dong-lin; Zhang, Xiao-hua

    2016-03-18

    Metabolic syndrome, which is extremely common in developed and some developing countries, is a clustering of at least three of five of the following medical conditions: abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated fasting plasma glucose, high serum triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein levels. It has been proved that there is a strong association between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer. Metabolic syndrome could increase the risk of breast cancer and influence the prognosis of the breast cancer patients. Some characteristic of metabolic syndrome such as obesity and lack of physical exercise are all risk factors for developing breast cancer. The metabolic syndrome mainly include obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and each of them impacts the risk of breast cancer and the prognosis of the breast cancer patients in different ways. In this Review, we focus on recently uncovered aspects of the immunological and molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the development of this highly prevalent and serious disease. These studies bring new insight into the complex associations between metabolic syndrome and breast cancer and have led to the development of novel therapeutic strategies that might enable a personalized approach in the management of this disease.

  19. Olmsted syndrome: clinical, molecular and therapeutic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchatelet, Sabine; Hovnanian, Alain

    2015-03-17

    Olmsted syndrome (OS) is a rare genodermatosis classically characterized by the combination of bilateral mutilating transgredient palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) and periorificial keratotic plaques, but which shows considerable clinical heterogeneity. The disease starts usually at birth or in early childhood. About 73 cases have been reported worldwide. OS is observed in both sexes, although male cases are more frequent. The most suggestive symptoms associate PPK with pseudoainhum and periorificial keratotic plaques. Frequently associated features include hair and nail abnormalities, leukokeratosis, corneal default and recurrent infections. Pain and itching are variable but can be severe. Most of reported OS cases are sporadic, although familial cases with different mode of inheritance were also described. Mutations in TRPV3 (Transient receptor potential vanilloid-3) gene have recently been identified as a cause of autosomal dominant (gain-of-function mutations) or recessive OS. Mutations in MBTPS2 (membrane-bound transcription factor protease, site 2) gene were identified in a recessive X-linked form. The diagnosis relies mainly on clinical features associating severe PPK and periorificial keratotic plaques, but can be challenging in patients with incomplete phenotype or atypical features. OS has to be differentiated from other severe forms of PPK including Vohwinkel, Clouston, Papillon-Lefèvre or Haim-Munk syndromes, Mal de Meleda, pachyonychia congenita, Tyrosinemia type II and acrodermatitis enteropathica. When differential diagnoses are difficult to exclude, genetic studies are essential to search for a TRPV3 or MBTPS2 mutation. However, additional genes remain to be identified. No specific and satisfactory therapy is currently available for OS. Current treatments of hyperkeratosis (mainly emollients, keratolytics, retinoids or corticosteroids), either topical or systemic, are symptomatic and offer only temporary partial relief. Specific management of pain and

  20. Molecular study of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bullich Vilanova, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Aquesta tesi és una contribució al coneixement de les bases moleculars de la síndrome nefròtica idiopàtica concretament, la nefropatia membranosa idiopàtica i la síndrome nefròtica córtico-resistent (SNCR) o glomeruloesclerosis segmentària i focal (GESF). La primera part d'aquesta tesi presenta l'associació de determinades variants genètiques tan amb el risc de desenvolupar nefropatia membranosa idiopàtica com amb el curs clínic de la malaltia, en població espanyola. Els nostres resultats mos...

  1. Muir-Torre Syndrome: case report and molecular characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Alejandra Rios

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Muir-Torre syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis caused by mutations in the mismatch repair genes. It is characterized by the presence of sebaceous skin tumors and internal malignancies, affecting mainly the colon, rectum and urogenital tract. Awareness of this syndrome among physicians can lead to early diagnosis of these malignancies and a better prognosis. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a Chilean patient who, over the course of several years, had multiple skin lesions, endometrial cancer and colon cancer. The syndrome was diagnosed using molecular techniques such as microsatellite instability analysis, immunohistochemistry and DNA sequencing, which allowed us to find the causative mutation. CONCLUSION: Molecular diagnostics is a highly useful tool, since it allows clinicians to confirm the presence of mutations causing Muir-Torre syndrome. It is complementary to the analysis of the clinical data, such as dermatological presentation, presence of visceral malignancies and family history of colorectal tumors, and it provides important knowledge to help physicians and patients choose between treatment options.

  2. Clinical and molecular characterisation of human syndromes with congenital patellar malformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, M.H.F.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the results are described of clinical and molecular investigation of human syndromes with congenital patellar malformations as a hallmark feature, with emphasis on nail patella syndrome, small patella syndrome, isolated patellar aplasia or hypoplasia, and Meier-Gorlin syndrome. The el

  3. [Molecular biology in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemias "smoldering"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Giovanni; Sartor, Chiara; Papayannidis, Cristina; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Paolini, Stefania; Clissa, Cristina; Ottaviani, Emanuela; Finelli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic disorders of the myeloid lineage characterized by peripheral cytopenias and frequent leukemic evolution. MDS differ for clinical presentation, disease behavior and progression and this is the reflection of remarkable variability at molecular level. To this moment disease diagnosis is still dependent on bone marrow morphology that, although high concordance rates among experts are reported, remains subjective. Karyotype analysis is mandatory but diagnosis may be difficult in presence of normal karyotype or non-informative cytogenetics. Standardized molecular markers are needed to better define diagnosis, prediction of disease progression and prognosis. Furthermore, a molecular biology analysis could provide an important therapeutic tool towards tailored therapy and new insights in the disease's biology.

  4. Badly engineered fibrillin lessons from molecular studies of marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantamäki, T; Karttunen, L; Peltonen, L

    1997-11-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is one of the most common inherited connective tissue disorders that severely affects the cardiovascular system. Mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1) have been shown to cause MFS as well as dominant ectopia lentis and neonatal Marfan syndrome. Fibrillin-1 is the major component of elastic fiber microfibrils in the extracellular matrix of connective tissue. Recent molecular studies have brought some light into understanding the pathogenesis of MFS, but the diagnostic problems still prevail, and targeted therapy of MFS must await better dissection of the role of fibrillin-1 in tissue phenotype using different experimental systems. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:282-288). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  5. Silver-Russell Syndrome and Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome: Opposite Phenotypes with Heterogeneous Molecular Etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Õunap, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) are 2 clinically opposite growth-affecting disorders belonging to the group of congenital imprinting disorders. The expression of both syndromes usually depends on the parental origin of the chromosome in which the imprinted genes reside. SRS is characterized by severe intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation with various additional clinical features such as hemihypertrophy, relative macrocephaly, fifth finger clinodactyly, and triangular facies. BWS is an overgrowth syndrome with many additional clinical features such as macroglossia, organomegaly, and an increased risk of childhood tumors. Both SRS and BWS are clinically and genetically heterogeneous, and for clinical diagnosis, different diagnostic scoring systems have been developed. Six diagnostic scoring systems for SRS and 4 for BWS have been previously published. However, neither syndrome has common consensus diagnostic criteria yet. Most cases of SRS and BWS are associated with opposite epigenetic or genetic abnormalities in the 11p15 chromosomal region leading to opposite imbalances in the expression of imprinted genes. SRS is also caused by maternal uniparental disomy 7, which is usually identified in 5-10% of the cases, and is therefore the first imprinting disorder that affects 2 different chromosomes. In this review, we describe in detail the clinical diagnostic criteria and scoring systems as well as molecular causes in both SRS and BWS. PMID:27587987

  6. Molecular characterization of Italian nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorino, L; Cusano, R; Nasti, S; Faravelli, F; Forzano, F; Baldo, C; Barile, M; Gliori, S; Muggianu, M; Ghigliotti, G; Lacaita, M G; Lo Muzio, L; Bianchi-Scarra, G

    2005-03-01

    Mutations in the PTCH gene, the human homolog of the Drosophila patched gene, have been found to lead to the autosomal dominant disorder termed Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS, also called Gorlin Syndrome). Patients display an array of developmental anomalies and are prone to develop a variety of tumors, with multiple Basal Cell Carcinomas occurring frequently. We provide here the results of molecular testing of a set of Italian Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome patients. Twelve familial patients belonging to 7 kindreds and 5 unaffected family members, 6 non-familial patients and an additional set of 7 patients with multiple Basal Cell Carcinoma but no other criteria for the disease were examined for mutations in the PTCH gene. All of the Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome patients were found to carry variants of the PTCH gene. We detected nine novel mutations (1 of which occurring twice): 1 missense mutation (c.1436T>G [p.L479R]), 1 nonsense mutation (c.1138G>T [p.E380X]), 6 frameshift mutations (c.323_324ins2, c.2011_2012dup, c.2535_2536dup, c.2577_2583del, c.3000_3005del, c.3050_3051del), 1 novel splicing variant (c.6552A>T) and 3 mutations that have been previously reported (c.3168+5G>A, c.1526G>T [p.G509V], and c.3499G>A [p.G1167R]). None of the patients with multiple Basal Cell Carcinoma but no other criteria for the syndrome, carried germline coding region mutations.

  7. The molecular genetics of Marfan syndrome and related disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P N; Arteaga‐Solis, E; Baldock, C; Collod‐Béroud, G; Booms, P; De Paepe, A; Dietz, H C; Guo, G; Handford, P A; Judge, D P; Kielty, C M; Loeys, B; Milewicz, D M; Ney, A; Ramirez, F; Reinhardt, D P; Tiedemann, K; Whiteman, P; Godfrey, M

    2006-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), a relatively common autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue with prominent manifestations in the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems, is caused by mutations in the gene for fibrillin‐1 (FBN1). The leading cause of premature death in untreated individuals with MFS is acute aortic dissection, which often follows a period of progressive dilatation of the ascending aorta. Recent research on the molecular physiology of fibrillin and the pathophysiology of MFS and related disorders has changed our understanding of this disorder by demonstrating changes in growth factor signalling and in matrix‐cell interactions. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent advances in the molecular biology of fibrillin and fibrillin‐rich microfibrils. Mutations in FBN1 and other genes found in MFS and related disorders will be discussed, and novel concepts concerning the complex and multiple mechanisms of the pathogenesis of MFS will be explained. PMID:16571647

  8. Molecular and clinical study of 61 Angelman syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Shinji; Harada, Naoki; Jinno, Yoshihiro; Niikawa, Norio [Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Imaizumi, Kiyoshi; Kuroki, Yoshikazu; Fukushima; Yoshimitsu; Sugimoto, Tateo; Renedo, Monica

    1994-08-15

    We analyzed 61 Angelman syndrome (AS) patients by cytogenetic and molecular techniques. On the basis of molecular findings, the patients were classified into the following 4 groups: familial cases without deletion, familial cases with submicroscopic deletion, sporadic cases with deletion, and sporadic cases without deletion. Among 53 sporadic cases, 37 (70%) had molecular deletion, which commonly extended from D15S9 to D15S12, although not all deletions were identical. Of 8 familial cases, 3 sibs from one family had a molecular deletion involving only 2 loci, D15S10 and GABRB3, which define the critical region for AS phenotypes. The parental origin of deletion, both in sporadic and familial cases, was exclusively maternal and consistent with a genomic imprinting hypothesis. Among sporadic and familial cases without deletion, no uniparental disomy was found and most of them were shown to inherit chromosomes 15 from both parents (biparental inheritance). A discrepancy between cytogenetic and molecular deletion was observed in 14 (26%) of 53 patients in whom cytogenetic analysis could be performed. Ten (43%) of 23 patients with a normal karyotype showed a molecular deletion, and 4 (13%) of 30 patients with cytogenetic deletion, del(15) (q11q13), showed no molecular deletion. Most clinical manifestations, including neurological signs and facial characteristics, were not distinct in each group except for hypopigmentation of skin or hair. Familial cases with submicroscopic deletion were not associated with hypopigmentation. These findings suggested that a gene for hypopigmentation is located outside the critical region of AS and is not imprinted. 37 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Fishing the molecular bases of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Andrea M J; Scampoli, Nadia L; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, and mutations in the TCOF1 gene are responsible for over 90% of TCS cases. The knowledge about the molecular mechanisms responsible for this syndrome is relatively scant, probably due to the difficulty of reproducing the pathology in experimental animals. Zebrafish is an emerging model for human disease studies, and we therefore assessed it as a model for studying TCS. We identified in silico the putative zebrafish TCOF1 ortholog and cloned the corresponding cDNA. The derived polypeptide shares the main structural domains found in mammals and amphibians. Tcof1 expression is restricted to the anterior-most regions of zebrafish developing embryos, similar to what happens in mouse embryos. Tcof1 loss-of-function resulted in fish showing phenotypes similar to those observed in TCS patients, and enabled a further characterization of the mechanisms underlying craniofacial malformation. Besides, we initiated the identification of potential molecular targets of treacle in zebrafish. We found that Tcof1 loss-of-function led to a decrease in the expression of cellular proliferation and craniofacial development. Together, results presented here strongly suggest that it is possible to achieve fish with TCS-like phenotype by knocking down the expression of the TCOF1 ortholog in zebrafish. This experimental condition may facilitate the study of the disease etiology during embryonic development.

  10. Fishing the molecular bases of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M J Weiner

    Full Text Available Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, and mutations in the TCOF1 gene are responsible for over 90% of TCS cases. The knowledge about the molecular mechanisms responsible for this syndrome is relatively scant, probably due to the difficulty of reproducing the pathology in experimental animals. Zebrafish is an emerging model for human disease studies, and we therefore assessed it as a model for studying TCS. We identified in silico the putative zebrafish TCOF1 ortholog and cloned the corresponding cDNA. The derived polypeptide shares the main structural domains found in mammals and amphibians. Tcof1 expression is restricted to the anterior-most regions of zebrafish developing embryos, similar to what happens in mouse embryos. Tcof1 loss-of-function resulted in fish showing phenotypes similar to those observed in TCS patients, and enabled a further characterization of the mechanisms underlying craniofacial malformation. Besides, we initiated the identification of potential molecular targets of treacle in zebrafish. We found that Tcof1 loss-of-function led to a decrease in the expression of cellular proliferation and craniofacial development. Together, results presented here strongly suggest that it is possible to achieve fish with TCS-like phenotype by knocking down the expression of the TCOF1 ortholog in zebrafish. This experimental condition may facilitate the study of the disease etiology during embryonic development.

  11. Overlap of PIV syndrome, VACTERL and Pallister-Hall syndrome: clinical and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoran, C E; Abbott, M; McKusick, V A; Biesecker, L G

    2000-07-01

    The polydactyly, imperforate anus, vertebral anomalies syndrome (PIV, OMIM 174100) was determined as a distinct syndrome by Say and Gerald in 1968 (Say B, Gerald PS. Lancet 1968: 2: 688). We noted that the features of PIV overlap with the VATER association and Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS, OMIM 146510), which includes polydactyly, (central or postaxial), shortened fingers, hypoplastic nails, renal anomalies, imperforate anus, and hypothalamic hamartoma. Truncation mutations in GL13, a zinc finger transcription factor gene, have been shown to cause PHS. We performed a molecular evaluation on a patient diagnosed with PIV, whose mother, grandfather, and maternal aunt had similar malformations. We sequenced the GLI3 gene in the patient to determine if she had a mutation. The patient was found to have a deletion in nucleotides 2188-2207 causing a frameshift mutation that predicts a truncated protein product of the gene. Later clinical studies demonstrated that the patient also has a hypothalamic hamartoma, a finding in PHS. We concluded that this family had atypical PHS and not PIV. This result has prompted us to re-evaluate the PIV literature to see if PIV is a valid entity. Based on these data and our examination of the literature, we conclude that PIV is not a valid diagnostic entity. We conclude that patients diagnosed with PIV should be reclassified as having VACTERL, or PHS, or another syndrome with overlapping malformations.

  12. Serrated polyposis syndrome: Molecular, pathological and clinical aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carla Guarinos; Cristina Sánchez-Fortún; María Rodríguez-Soler; Cristina Alenda; Artemio Payá; Rodrigo Jover

    2012-01-01

    Hyperplastic polyps have traditionally been considered not to have malignant potential.New pathological classification of serrated polyps and recent discoveries about the serrated pathway of carcinogenesis have revolutionized the concepts and revitalized the research in this area.Until recently,it has been thought that most colorectal cancers arise from conventional adenomas via the traditional tumor suppressor pathway initiated by a mutation of the APC gene,but it has been found that this pathway accounts for only approximately 70%-80%of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases.The majority of the remaining colorectal cancer cases follow an alternative pathway leading to CpG island methylator phenotype carcinoma with BRAF mutation and with or without microsatellite instability.The mechanism of carcinomas arising from this alternative pathway seems to begin with an activating mutation of the BRAF oncogene.Serrated polyposis syndrome is a relatively rare condition characterized by multiple and/or large serrated polyps of the colon.Clinical characteristics,etiology and relationship of serrated polyposis syndrome to CRC have not been clarified yet.Patients with this syndrome show a high risk of CRC and both sporadic and hereditary cases have been described.Clinical criteria have been used for diagnosis and frequent colonoscopy surveillance should be performed in order to prevent colorectal cancer.In this review,we try to gather new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of serrated polyps in order to understand their possible clinical implications and to make an approach to the management of this syndrome.

  13. Molecular bases of myelodysplastic syndromes: lessons from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeno, Yukiko; Kitaura, Jiro; Kitamura, Toshio

    2009-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal disorder of hematopietic stem cells characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral blood cytopenia, morphologic dysplasia, and susceptibility to acute myeloid leukemia. Several mechanisms have been suggested as causes of MDS: unbalanced chromosomal abnormalities reflecting a gain or loss of chromosomal material, point mutations of transcription factors, and inactivation of p53. However, appropriate animal models that mimic MDS have long been lacking. We recently reported a novel murine model of MDS that recapitulates trilineage dysplasia and transformation to AML. In this review, we summarize the animal models of MDS and discuss the molecular bases of MDS as well as those of leukemia and myeloproliferative disorders (MPD). J. Cell. Physiol. 219: 529-534, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Novel Implications in Molecular Diagnosis of Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Liccardo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available About 10% of total colorectal cancers are associated with known Mendelian inheritance, as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP and Lynch syndrome (LS. In these cancer types the clinical manifestations of disease are due to mutations in high-risk alleles, with a penetrance at least of 70%. The LS is associated with germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes. However, the mutation detection analysis of these genes does not always provide informative results for genetic counseling of LS patients. Very often, the molecular analysis reveals the presence of variants of unknown significance (VUSs whose interpretation is not easy and requires the combination of different analytical strategies to get a proper assessment of their pathogenicity. In some cases, these VUSs may make a more substantial overall contribution to cancer risk than the well-assessed severe Mendelian variants. Moreover, it could also be possible that the simultaneous presence of these genetic variants in several MMR genes that behave as low risk alleles might contribute in a cooperative manner to increase the risk of hereditary cancer. In this paper, through a review of the recent literature, we have speculated a novel inheritance model in the Lynch syndrome; this could pave the way toward new diagnostic perspectives.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Peroxisome Biogenesis Disorders with Zellweger Syndrome Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nassiri

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome biogenesis disorders, Zellweger syndrome spectrum (PBD, ZSS are constituted of three different phenotypically disorders: Zellweger syndrome (ZS, the most severe; neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD; and infantile refsum disease (IRD, the least severe, that have been originally described based on their biochemical and molecular bases of these disorders which had been fully determined. Individuals with PBD, ZSS usually come to clinical attention in the newborn period or later in childhood. The diagnosis of PBD, ZSS can be definitively determined by biochemical assays. Measurement of plasma very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA levels is the most commonly used and most informative initial screen. Mutations in thirteen different PEX genes - those that encode peroxins, the proteins required for normal peroxisome assembly - have been identified in PBD, ZSS. Mutations in PEX1, the most common cause of PBD, ZSS, are observed in about 68% of affected individuals. Sequence analysis is available clinically for the following seven genes: PEX1, PXMP3 (PEX2, PRXR1 (PEX5, PEX6, PEX10, PEX12, and PEX26.

  16. Clinical and molecular delineation of the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Koolen, D. A.; Sharp, A J; Hurst, J A; Firth, H. V.; Knight, S J L; Goldenberg, A.; Saugier--Veber, P.; Pfundt, R.; Vissers, L E L M; Destree, A; Grisart, B; Rooms, L; Aa, N. van der; Field, M.; Hackett, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The chromosome 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome is a novel genomic disorder that has originally been identified using high resolution genome analyses in patients with unexplained mental retardation. Aim: We report the molecular and/or clinical characterisation of 22 individuals with the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome. Results: We estimate the prevalence of the syndrome to be 1 in 16 000 and show that it is highly underdiagnosed. Extensive clinical examination reveals that de...

  17. Molecular-clinical spectrum of the ATR-X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, R J; Higgs, D R

    2000-01-01

    Since the identification of the ATRX gene (synonyms XNP, XH2) in 1995, it has been shown to be the disease gene for numerous forms of syndromal X-linked mental retardation [X-linked alpha thalassemia/mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, Juberg-Marsidi syndrome, Smith-Fineman-Myers syndrome, X-linked mental retardation with spastic paraplegia]. An attempt is made in this article to review the clinical spectrum associated with ATRX mutations and to analyse the evidence for any genotype/phenotype correlation.

  18. Tcof1-Related Molecular Networks in Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiewen; Si, Jiawen; Wang, Minjiao; Huang, Li; Fang, Bing; Shi, Jun; Wang, Xudong; Shen, Guofang

    2016-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a rare, autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by craniofacial deformities, and is primarily caused by mutations in the Tcof1 gene. This article was aimed to perform a comprehensive literature review and systematic bioinformatic analysis of Tcof1-related molecular networks in TCS. First, the up- and down-regulated genes in Tcof1 heterozygous haploinsufficient mutant mice embryos and Tcof1 knockdown and Tcof1 over-expressed neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells were obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. The GeneDecks database was used to calculate the 500 genes most closely related to Tcof1. Then, the relationships between 4 gene sets (a predicted set and sets comparing the wildtype with the 3 Gene Expression Omnibus datasets) were analyzed using the DAVID, GeneMANIA and STRING databases. The analysis results showed that the Tcof1-related genes were enriched in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, differentiation, and migration. They were also enriched in several signaling pathways, such as the ribosome, p53, cell cycle, and WNT signaling pathways. Additionally, these genes clearly had direct or indirect interactions with Tcof1 and between each other. Literature review and bioinformatic analysis finds imply that special attention should be given to these pathways, as they may offer target points for TCS therapies.

  19. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A; Brunner, Han G; Burke, Christopher J; Carr, Ian M; Carvalho, Daniel R; Chandler, Kate E; Christen, Hans-Jurgen; Corry, Peter C; Cowan, Frances M; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; De Laet, Corinne; De Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G M; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J; Guet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C J; Hayward, Bruce E; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D; Kingston, Helen M; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Kornberg, Andrew J; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J; Livingston, John H; Lourenco, Charles M; Lyall, E G Hermione; Lynch, Sally A; Lyons, Michael J; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B; Mewasingh, Leena D; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K; Ostergaard, John R; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Burgi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A; Corcoles, C Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B P; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy N A; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S H; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L; Willemsen, Michel A A; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J

    2007-10-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation-positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified.

  20. Molecular characterization of WFS1 in patients with Wolfram syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Ouweland, JMW; Cryns, K; Pennings, RJE; Walraven, [No Value; Janssen, GMC; Maassen, JA; Veldhuijzen, BFE; Arntzenius, AB; Lindhout, D; Cremers, CWRJ; Van Camp, G; Dikkeschei, LD

    2003-01-01

    Wolfram (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness) syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus, and sensorineural hearing impairment. A gene responsible for Wo

  1. Molecular characterization of WFS1 in patients with Wolfram syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweland, J.M.W. van den; Cryns, K.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Walraven, I.; Janssen, G.M.; Maassen, J.A.; Veldhuijzen, B.F.; Arntzenius, A.B.; Lindhout, D.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Camp, G. van; Dikkeschei, L.D.

    2003-01-01

    Wolfram (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness) syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus, and sensorineural hearing impairment. A gene responsible for Wo

  2. Molecular analysis for diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and Marfan-associated disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ling-gen; YAO Xiu-ping; ZHANG Lin; HUI Ru-tai; ZHOU Xian-liang

    2011-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a systemic disorder of connective tissue, caused by mutations in the FBN1, TGFBR1 or TGFBR2 genes. This syndrome is characterized by involvement of three major systems, skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular. The continuing improvements in molecular biology and increasing availability of molecular diagnosis in clinical practice allow recognition of Marfan syndrome in patients with incomplete phenotypes. Additionally, molecular analyses could also be used for preimplantation genetic diagnosis. The identification of a mutation allows for early diagnosis, prognosis, genetic counseling, preventive management of carriers and reassurance for unaffected relatives. The importance of knowing in advance the location of the putative family mutation is highlighted by its straightforward application to prenatal and postnatal screening.

  3. Next generation sequencing for molecular confirmation of hereditary sudden cardiac death syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Manlio F; Cruz-Robles, David; Ines-Real, Selene; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Cárdenas, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary sudden cardiac death syndromes comprise a wide range of diseases resulting from alteration in cardiac ion channels. Genes involved in these syndromes represent diverse mutations that cause the altered encoding of the diverse proteins constituting these channels, thus affecting directly the currents of the corresponding ions. In the present article we will briefly review how to arrive to a clinical diagnosis and we will present the results of molecular genetic studies made in Mexican subjects attending the SCD Syndromes Clinic of the National Institute of Cardiology of Mexico City.

  4. Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome: Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, E.A.; Grillo, A.; Ferrero, G.B.; Baldini, A.; Ballabio, A.; Zoghbi, H.Y.; Roth, E.J. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Magenis, E.; Grompe, M. [Oregon Health Science Univ., Portland, OR (United States); Hulten, M. [East Birmingham Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-01-15

    The microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome (MIM309801) is a severe developmental disorder observed in XX individuals with distal Xp segmental monosomy. The phenotype of this syndrome overlaps with that of both Aicardi (MIM 305050) and Goltz (MIM 305600) syndromes, two X-linked dominant, male-lethal disorders. Here the authors report the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization of 3 patients with this syndrome. Two of these patients are females with a terminal Xpter-p22.2 deletion. One of these 2 patients had an aborted fetus with anencephaly and the same chromosome abnormality. The third patient is an XX male with Xp/Yp exchange spanning the SRY gene which results in distal Xp monosomy. The extensive clinical variability observed in these patients and the results of the molecular analysis suggest that X-inactivation plays an important role in determining the phenotype of the MLS syndrome. The authors propose that the MLS, Aicardi, and Goltz syndromes are due to the involvement of the same gene(s), and that different patterns of X-inactivation are responsible for the phenotypic differences observed in these 3 disorders. However, they cannot rule out that each component of the MLS phenotype is caused by deletion of a different gene (a contiguous gene syndrome). 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Churg-Strauss vasculitis and idiopathic hypereosinophyl syndrome: role of molecular biology in the differential diagnosis of hypereosinophyl syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. d'Ascanio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hypereosinophilic syndromes are a heterogeneous group of uncommon disorders characterized by the presence of marked peripheral blood eosinophilia, tissue eosinophilia, or both, resulting in a wide variety of clinical manifestations, often without an identifiable cause. Churg-Strauss syndrome is a systemic vasculitis characterized by prominent peripheral eosinophilia, asthma and systemic involvement. The presence of mild to severe eosinophilia and systemic involvement raise the search of many trigger factor that need to be ruled out. Distinguishing CSS from idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome may be particularly challenging, especially in ANCA negative patients. Methods: The aim of the present study was to present a small case series of patients referred to a Rheumatology Unit for mild to severe eosinophilia and signs and symptoms of systemic involvement and to outline the clinical significance of molecular biology in the work-up of hypereosinophilia. Results: Eleven patients with moderate to severe peripheral eosinophylia, were referred to our Unit from 1996 to 2007. Female to male ratio was 7/4, mean age 40.54 (range 22-75. Three out of eleven patients resulted positive for molecular biology. The diagnosis of idiopathic hypereosinophylia was confirmed in one out of three on the basis of the clinical picture and bone marrow biopsy. Conclusions: Molecular biology may be useful in the screening and in the follow-up of a new hypereosinophylic patient.

  6. Phosphatidylinositide-3 kinase: a newer molecular target in metabolic and hormonal pathway of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, K N; Patel, S S

    2014-05-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is characterized by hyperandrogenemia, hyperinsulinemia and/or abnormal ovulation, which are the 3 main consequences of polycystic ovary syndrome. The occurrence of polycystic ovary syndrome is higher and 1 out of 45 women gets affected by this disorder. The pathophysiology of polycystic ovary syndrome is very unique, and many hormonal and metabolic changes occur at molecular level. Polycystic ovary syndrome is a hormonal disorder that affects multiple organ systems within the body, which is caused by insensitivity to the hormone insulin. The target organs of insulin action are skeletal muscles, adipose tissue, fibroblasts where metabolic actions of insulin take place. In polycystic ovary syndrome condition, due to insulin resistance, the actions like glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis gets declined along with exhibiting steroidogenic effect in ovaries. The action of phophatidylinositide-3 kinase varies in different tissues. It plays major role in several kinases. The inhibition and activation of phophatidylinositide-3 kinase in different tissues results in differential outcomes. The inhibition of phophatidylinositide-3 kinase in ovary leads to decreased androgen synthesis and the activation affects the positive actions of insulin like glucose uptake. Targeting the hyperandrogenemia of polycystic ovary syndrome, we can get more ameliorating action in polycystic ovary syndrome because glucose uptake, which is mediated by phophatidylinositide-3 kinase activation, is not much altered during polycystic ovary syndrome as much as the androgen levels in polycystic ovary syndrome. Therefore, it is beneficial to control the androgen level. Thus, phophatidylinositide-3 kinase inhibition can be a promising target in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome.

  7. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease...

  8. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F.; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A.; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S.; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M.; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T.; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A.; Brunner, Han G.; Burke, Christopher J.; Carr, Ian M.; Carvalho, Daniel R.; Chandler, Kate E.; Christen, Hans-Juergen; Corry, Peter C.; Cowan, Frances M.; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; De laet, Corinne; De Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D.; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G. M.; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J.; Gueet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Hayward, Bruce E.; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P.; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G.; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D.; Kingston, Helen M.; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Kornberg, Andrew J.; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J.; Livingston, John H.; Lourenco, Charles M.; Lyall, E. G. Hermione; Lynch, Sally A.; Lyons, Michael J.; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P.; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B.; Mewasingh, Leena D.; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K.; Ostergaard, John R.; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R. Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M.; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Buergi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A.; Corcoles, C. Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P.; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B. P.; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L.; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy N. A.; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L.; Willemsen, Michel A. A.; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J.

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-> 5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease comple

  9. Molecular ageing in progeroid syndromes: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Nóbrega Raphael

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a rare premature aging disorder that belongs to a group of conditions called laminopathies which affect nuclear lamins. Mutations in two genes, LMNA and ZMPSTE24, have been found in patients with HGPS. The p.G608G LMNA mutation is the most commonly reported mutation. The aim of this work was to compile a comprehensive literature review of the clinical features and genetic mutations and mechanisms of this syndrome as a contribution to health care workers. This review shows the necessity of a more detailed clinical identification of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and the need for more studies on the pharmacologic and pharmacogenomic approach to this syndrome.

  10. Unraveling the molecular effects of mutation L270P on Wiskkot-Aldrich syndrome protein: insights from molecular dynamics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Chandrasekaran; Rao, Sethumadhavan; Ramalingam, Rajasekaran

    2016-09-01

    Missense mutation L270P disrupts the auto-inhibited state of "Wiskkot-Aldrich syndrome protein" (WASP), thereby constitutively activating the mutant structure, a key event for pathogenesis of X-linked neutropenia (XLN). In this study, we comprehensively deciphered the molecular feature of activated mutant structure by all atom molecular dynamics (MD) approach. MD analysis revealed that mutant structure exposed a wide variation in the spatial environment of atoms, resulting in enhanced residue flexibility. The increased flexibility of residues favored to decrease the number of intra-molecular hydrogen bonding interactions in mutant structure. The reduction of hydrogen bonds in the mutant structure resulted to disrupt the local folding of secondary structural elements that eventually affect the proper folding of mutants. The unfolded state of mutant structure established more number of inter-molecular hydrogen bonding interaction at interface level due to the conformational variability, thus mediated high binding affinity with its interacting partner, Cdc42.

  11. Molecular and Genetic Basis of Inherited Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Gigante

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotic syndrome is an heterogeneous disease characterized by increased permeability of the glomerular filtration barrier for macromolecules. Podocytes, the visceral epithelial cells of glomerulus, play critical role in ultrafiltration of plasma and are involved in a wide number of inherited and acquired glomerular diseases. The identification of mutations in nephrin and other podocyte genes as causes of genetic forms of nephrotic syndrome has revealed new important aspects of the pathogenesis of proteinuric kidney diseases and expanded our knowledge of the glomerular biology. Moreover, a novel concept of a highly dynamic slit diaphragm proteins is emerging. The most significant discoveries in our understanding of the structure and function of the glomerular filtration barrier are reviewed in this paper.

  12. [Molecular genetic studies of mitochondrial ornithine transporter deficiency (HHH syndrome)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, S; Miyamoto, T; Kanazawa, N

    2001-11-01

    Mitochondrial ornithine transporter deficiency has been called HHH syndrome, because this disorder is characterized by three biochemical abnormalities; hyperornithinemia, hyperammonemia, and homocitrullinuria, and presents with various neurological symptoms; mental retardation, spastic paraparesis with pyramidal signs, cerebellar ataxia and episodic disturbance of consciousness or coma due to hyperammonemia. We identified four mutations in the mitochondrial ornithine transporter gene (ORNT1) of Japanese patients with HHH syndrome. These include a nonsense mutation (R179X), associated with exon skipping, missense mutations (G27E, P126R), and an insertion of AAC between codons 228 and 229, leading to an insertion of amino acid Asn. Especially, R179X was detected 4 of 7 Japanese patients (8 of 14 alleles), implying that this is a common mutation in Japanese population.

  13. Molecular analyses of neurogenic defects in a human pluripotent stem cell model of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Michael J; Nazor, Kristopher L; Tran, Ha T; Szücs, Attila; Lynch, Candace L; Paredes, Ryder; Tassone, Flora; Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Hagerman, Randi J; Loring, Jeanne F

    2017-01-29

    New research suggests that common pathways are altered in many neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorder; however, little is known about early molecular events that contribute to the pathology of these diseases. The study of monogenic, neurodevelopmental disorders with a high incidence of autistic behaviours, such as fragile X syndrome, has the potential to identify genes and pathways that are dysregulated in autism spectrum disorder as well as fragile X syndrome. In vitro generation of human disease-relevant cell types provides the ability to investigate aspects of disease that are impossible to study in patients or animal models. Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells recapitulates development of the neocortex, an area affected in both fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. We have generated induced human pluripotent stem cells from several individuals clinically diagnosed with fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. When differentiated to dorsal forebrain cell fates, our fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cell lines exhibited reproducible aberrant neurogenic phenotypes. Using global gene expression and DNA methylation profiling, we have analysed the early stages of neurogenesis in fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cells. We discovered aberrant DNA methylation patterns at specific genomic regions in fragile X syndrome cells, and identified dysregulated gene- and network-level correlates of fragile X syndrome that are associated with developmental signalling, cell migration, and neuronal maturation. Integration of our gene expression and epigenetic analysis identified altered epigenetic-mediated transcriptional regulation of a distinct set of genes in fragile X syndrome. These fragile X syndrome-aberrant networks are significantly enriched for genes associated with autism spectrum disorder, giving support to the idea that underlying similarities exist among these neurodevelopmental diseases.

  14. Molecular characterization of Blau syndrome: Genetic linkage to chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromp, G.; Duivaniemi, H.; Christiano, A. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Blau syndrome is an autosomal, dominantly-inherited disease characterized by multi-organ, tissue-specific inflammation. Its clinical phenotype includes granulomatous uveitis, arthritis and skin rash. The syndrome is unique in that it is the sole human model for a variety of multi-system inflammatory diseases that afflict a significant percentage of the population. Karyotypic analysis of the large, three generation kindred whose disease originally characterized the syndrome was unremarkable. Following exclusion of a number of extracellular matrix candidates genes, a genome-wide search was undertaken of the Blau susceptibility locus. Fifty-seven members of the family were genotyped for about 200 highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers. Linkage analysis was performed using the LINKAGE package of programs under a model of dominant inheritance with reduced penetrance. Five liability classes were used to specify penetrances and phenocopy rates for those affected the arthritis, uveitis, skin rash and combinations thererof. In addition, five age-dependent penetrance classes were used for unaffected individuals. The marker D16S298 gave a maximum lod score of 3.6 at {theta} = 0.05 with two-point analysis. Lod scores for flanking markers were consistent. These data provide convincing evidence that the Blau susceptibility locus is situated within the 16p12-q21 interval. Fine mapping of the candidate interval with additional families exhibiting the Blau phenotype, as well as with more polymorphic markers, is underway.

  15. [Molecular genetics of familial tumour syndromes of the central nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnyák, Balázs; Szepesi, Rita; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2015-02-01

    Although most of the central nervous system tumours are sporadic, rarely they are associated with familial tumour syndromes. These disorders usually present with an autosomal dominant inheritance and neoplasia develops at younger age than in sporadic cases. Most of these tumours are bilateral, multiplex or multifocal. The causative mutations occur in genes involved in cell cycle regulation, cell growth, differentiation and DNA repair. Studying these hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes associated with nervous system tumours can facilitate the deeper understanding of the molecular background of sporadic tumours and the development of novel therapeutic agents. This review is an update on hereditary tumour syndromes with nervous system involvement with emphasis on molecular genetic characteristics and their clinical implications.

  16. Shigatoxin-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome: current molecular mechanisms and future therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keir LS

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay S Keir,1 Stephen D Marks,2 Jon Jin Kim21Academic Renal Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol; 2Department of Paediatric Nephrology, Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United KingdomAbstract: Hemolytic uremic syndrome is the leading cause of acute kidney injury in childhood. Ninety percent of cases are secondary to gastrointestinal infection with shigatoxin-producing bacteria. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of shigatoxin leading to hemolytic uremic syndrome and the emerging role of the complement system and vascular endothelial growth factor in its pathogenesis. We also review the evidence for treatment options to date, in particular antibiotics, plasma exchange, and immunoadsorption, and link this to the molecular pathology. Finally, we discuss future avenues of treatment, including shigatoxin-binding agents and complement inhibitors, such as eculizumab.Keywords: hemolytic uremic syndrome, shigatoxin, diarrhea, Escherichia coli, complement, alternative pathway, eculizumab

  17. 22q13.3 Deletion Syndrome : Clinical and Molecular Analysis Using Array CGH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhar, S. U.; del Gaudio, D.; German, J. R.; Peters, S. U.; Ou, Z.; Bader, P. I.; Berg, J. S.; Blazo, M.; Brown, C. W.; Graham, B. H.; Grebe, T. A.; Lalani, S.; Irons, M.; Sparagana, S.; Williams, M.; Phillips, J. A.; Beaudet, A. L.; Stankiewicz, P.; Patel, A.; Cheung, S. W.; Sahoo, T.

    2010-01-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion syndrome results from loss of terminal segments of varying sizes at 22qter. Few genotype phenotype correlations have been found but all patients have mental retardation and severe delay, or absence of, expressive speech. We carried out clinical and molecular characterization of

  18. Clinical and molecular delineation of the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolen, D.A.; Sharp, A.J.; Hurst, J.A.; Firth, H.V.; Knight, S.J.; Goldenberg, A.; Saugier-Veber, P.; Pfundt, R.P.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Destree, A.; Grisart, B.; Rooms, L.; Aa, N. van der; Field, M.; Hackett, A.; Bell, K.; Nowaczyk, M.J.; Mancini, G.M.; Poddighe, P.J.; Schwartz, C.E.; Rossi, E.; Gregori, M. de; Antonacci-Fulton, L.L.; McLellan, MD2nd; Garrett, J.M.; Wiechert, M.A.; Miner, T.L.; Crosby, S.; Ciccone, R.; Willatt, L.; Rauch, A.; Zenker, M.; Aradhya, S.; Manning, M.A.; Strom, T.M.; Wagenstaller, J.; Krepischi-Santos, A.C.; Vianna-Morgante, A.M.; Rosenberg, C.; Price, S.M.; Stewart, H.; Shaw-Smith, C.; Brunner, H.G.; Wilkie, A.O.; Veltman, J.A.; Zuffardi, O.; Eichler, E.E.; Vries, L.B.A. de

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The chromosome 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome is a novel genomic disorder that has originally been identified using high resolution genome analyses in patients with unexplained mental retardation. AIM: We report the molecular and/or clinical characterisation of 22 individuals with the 1

  19. Adult respiratory distress syndrome complicating intravenous infusion of low-molecular weight dextran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M A; DiBlasi, S L; Bender, R M; Santoian, E C; Cha, S D; Dennis, C A

    1994-07-01

    Respiratory failure is one of the most uncommon and serious adverse drug reactions. Low-molecular-weight-dextran (Dextran-40) is a useful adjunctive anti-platelet agent in the setting of coronary angioplasty and intracoronary stent placement. We report the occurrence of the adult respiratory distress syndrome following intravenous infusion of Dextran-40.

  20. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: Clinical and molecular aspects of recently identified kidney cancer syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumi, Hisashi; Baba, Masaya; Hasumi, Yukiko; Furuya, Mitsuko; Yao, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease that predisposes patients to develop fibrofolliculoma, lung cysts and bilateral multifocal renal tumors, histologically hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma, oncocytoma, papillary renal cell carcinoma and clear cell renal cell carcinoma. The predominant forms of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome-associated renal tumors, hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma are typically less aggressive, and a therapeutic principle for these tumors is a surgical removal with nephron-sparing. The timing of surgery is the most critical element for postoperative renal function, which is one of the important prognostic factors for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome patients. The folliculin gene (FLCN) that is responsible for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome was isolated as a novel tumor suppressor for kidney cancer. Recent studies using murine models for FLCN, a protein encoded by the FLCN gene, and its two binding partners, folliculin-interacting protein 1 (FNIP1) and folliculin-interacting protein 2 (FNIP2), have uncovered important roles for FLCN, FNIP1 and FNIP2 in cell metabolism, which include AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated energy sensing, Ppargc1a-driven mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and mTORC1-dependent cell proliferation. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is a hereditary hamartoma syndrome, which is triggered by metabolic alterations under a functional loss of FLCN/FNIP1/FNIP2 complex, a critical regulator of kidney cell proliferation rate; a mechanistic insight into the FLCN/FNIP1/FNIP2 pathway could provide us a basis for developing new therapeutics for kidney cancer.

  1. Tetrasomy 21 pter {yields} q22.1 and Down syndrome: Molecular definition of the region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daumer-Haas, C.; Schuffenhauer, S.; Walther, J.U. [Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Portsmann, T. [Humboldt Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Korenberg, J.R.; Schipper, R.D. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Down syndrome is usually caused by complete trisomy 21. Rarely, it is due to partial trisomy of the segment 21q22. We report on a 33-month-old girl with tetrasomy 21 pter {yields} q22.1 resulting from an extra chromosome idic(21)(q22.1). She has craniofacial traits typical of Down syndrome, including brachycephaly, third fontanel, upward slanting palpebral fissures, round face, and protruding tongue. Speech development is quite delayed whereas motor development is only mildly retarded. The molecular content of the extra isodicentric chromosome was defined by molecular genetic investigations using 13 single copy probes unique to chromosome 21, and SOD1 expression studies. The child was found to have 4 copies of the region defined by D21S16 (21cen) through D21S93 on 21q22.1 and two copies of the remaining region defined by SOD1 {yields} D21S55 {yields} D21S123. In view of the recent assignment of Down syndrome facial characters to the 21q22 region, defined in part by D21S55, it is significant that this child shows a subset of Down syndrome facial manifestations, without duplication of this region. These results suggest that genes contributing to the facial and some of the hand manifestations of Down syndrome also exist in the chromosomal region proximal to D21S55 in band 21q22.1. 34 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. CHARGE syndrome as unusual cause of hypogonadism: endocrine and molecular evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppiani, Luca; Maffè, A; Forzano, F

    2010-10-01

    Coloboma, heart defect, atresia choanae, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear anomalies (CHARGE) syndrome is a genetic syndrome in which hypogonadism is a frequent feature. A causative mutation within the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein-7 gene, which plays an important role in the embryonic development, is present in 2/3 of affected patients. We describe the clinical, hormonal and molecular characteristics of a young man from Ecuador who was diagnosed as having CHARGE syndrome at an adult age. The patient showed several phenotypic features of the syndrome, associated with a prepubertal state and cryptorchidism; hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism with undetectable testosterone levels not responsive to hCG testing and severe osteoporosis were ascertained. Molecular evaluation of the CHD7 gene showed the novel frameshift truncating heterozygous mutation p.Tyr1046Glyfs*23 in exon 12. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed mild hypoplasia of the pituitary gland and hypoplasia of the posterior cranial fossa. Parenteral testosterone therapy led to sexual development over time and, in combination with diphophonate therapy and calcium-vitamin D supplementation, significantly improved bone mineralisation. Early proper hormonal treatment of hypogonadism in patients with complex genetic syndromes is important to achieve normal sexual maturation, improve quality of life and avoid significant comorbidities, such as osteoporosis.

  3. 3q29 microdeletion syndrome: clinical and molecular characterization of a new syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willatt, L.; Cox, J.; Barber, J.; Cabanas, E.D.; Collins, A.; Donnai, D.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Maher, E.R.; Martin, H.; Parnau, J.; Pindar, L.; Ramsay, J.; Shaw-Smith, C.; Sistermans, E.A.; Tettenborn, M.; Trump, D.; Vries, L.B.A. de; Walker, K.; Raymond, F.L.

    2005-01-01

    We report the identification of six patients with 3q29 microdeletion syndrome. The clinical phenotype is variable despite an almost identical deletion size. The phenotype includes mild-to-moderate mental retardation, with only slightly dysmorphic facial features that are similar in most patients: a

  4. Apert and Crouzon syndromes-Cognitive development, brain abnormalities, and molecular aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Marilyse B L; Maximino, Luciana P; Perosa, Gimol B; Abramides, Dagma V M; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Yacubian-Fernandes, Adriano

    2016-06-01

    Apert and Crouzon are the most common craniosynostosis syndromes associated with mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene. We conducted a study to examine the molecular biology, brain abnormalities, and cognitive development of individuals with these syndromes. A retrospective longitudinal review of 14 patients with Apert and Crouzon syndromes seen at the outpatient Craniofacial Surgery Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies in Brazil from January 1999 through August 2010 was performed. Patients between 11 and 36 years of age (mean 18.29 ± 5.80), received cognitive evaluations, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular DNA analyses. Eight patients with Apert syndrome (AS) had full scale intelligence quotients (FSIQs) that ranged from 47 to 108 (mean 76.9 ± 20.2), and structural brain abnormalities were identified in five of eight patients. Six patients presented with a gain-of-function mutation (p.Ser252Trp) in FGFR2 and FSIQs in those patients ranged from 47 to78 (mean 67.2 ± 10.7). One patient with a gain-of-function mutation (p.Pro253Arg) had a FSIQ of 108 and another patient with an atypical splice mutation (940-2A →G) had a FSIQ of 104. Six patients with Crouzon syndrome had with mutations in exons IIIa and IIIc of FGFR2 and their FSIQs ranged from 82 to 102 (mean 93.5 ± 6.7). These reveal that molecular aspects are another factor that can be considered in studies of global and cognitive development of patients with Apert and Crouzon syndrome (CS). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome: first molecular diagnosis in a Brazilian child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cresio Alves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein the first molecular diagnosis of a Brazilian child with Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome is reported. A 6-year-old boy was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis at the age of 15 months due to recurrent respiratory infections, diarrhea and therapeutic response to pancreatic enzymes. Three sweat tests were negative. At the age of 5 years, he began to experience pain in the lower limbs, laxity of joints, lameness and frequent falls. A radiological study revealed metaphyseal chondrodysplasia. A complete blood cell count showed leukopenia (leukocytes: 3.1-3.5 x 103/µL, neutropenia (segmented neutrophils: 15-22%, but normal hemoglobin, hematocrit and platelet count. A molecular study revealed biallelic mutations in the Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond Syndrome gene (183-184TA-CT K62X in exon 2 and a 258+2T-C transition confirming the diagnosis of Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome. A non-pathologic, silent nucleotide A to G transition at position 201 was also found in heterozygosis in the Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond Syndrome gene. This is the first report to describe a Brazilian child with molecular diagnosis of Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, intermittent or persistent neutropenia and skeletal changes. Other characteristics include immune system, hepatic and cardiac changes and predisposition to leukemia. Recurrent bacterial, viral and fungal infections are common. The possibility of Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome should be kept in mind when investigating children with a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and normal sweat tests.

  6. The RASopathies as an example of RAS/MAPK pathway disturbances - clinical presentation and molecular pathogenesis of selected syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezniakow, Natalia; Gos, Monika; Obersztyn, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    The RASopathies are a class of developmental syndromes. Each of them exhibits distinctive phenotypic features, although there are numerous overlapping clinical manifestations that include: dysmorphic craniofacial features, congenital cardiac defects, skin abnormalities, varying degrees of intellectual disability and increased risk of malignancies. These disorders include: Noonan syndrome, Costello syndrome, LEOPARD syndrome, cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFC), capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome (CM-AVM), Legius syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The RASopathies are associated with the presence of germline mutation in genes encoding specific proteins of the RAS/mitogen - activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that plays a crucial role in embryonic and postnatal development. In this review, we present the clinical and molecular features of selected syndromes from the RASopathies group.

  7. Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular diagnosis of Angelman syndrome: Estimated prevalence rate in a Danish country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, M.B.; Brondum-Nielsen, K.; Hansen, L.K.; Wulff, K.

    1995-06-19

    Angelman syndrome (AS) was initially considered a rather rare abnormality, but in later years, with the possibilities for cytogenetic and molecular diagnosis an increasing number of patients have been reported. The incidence is quoted to be around 1:20,000. The etiology of AS is associated with the lack of maternal allele(s) of one or more loci at 15q11-q13, and is considered an effect of parental imprinting of that region, since a similar deficiency of paternal alleles leads to Prader-Willi syndrome. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Silver-Russell syndrome: genetic basis and molecular genetic testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binder Gerhard

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Imprinted genes with a parent-of-origin specific expression are involved in various aspects of growth that are rooted in the prenatal period. Therefore it is predictable that many of the so far known congenital imprinting disorders (IDs are clinically characterised by growth disturbances. A noteable imprinting disorder is Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS, a congenital disease characterised by intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, relative macrocephaly, a typical triangular face, asymmetry and further less characteristic features. However, the clinical spectrum is broad and the clinical diagnosis often subjective. Genetic and epigenetic disturbances can meanwhile be detected in approximately 50% of patients with typical SRS features. Nearly one tenth of patients carry a maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (UPD(7mat, more than 38% show a hypomethylation in the imprinting control region 1 in 11p15. More than 1% of patients show (submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations. Interestingly, in ~7% of 11p15 hypomethylation carriers, demethylation of other imprinted loci can be detected. Clinically, these patients do not differ from those with isolated 11p15 hypomethylation whereas the UPD(7mat patients generally show a milder phenotype. However, an unambiguous (epigenotype-phenotype correlation can not be delineated. We therefore suggest a diagnostic algorithm focused on the 11p15 hypomethylation, UPD(7mat and cryptic chromosomal imbalances for patients with typical SRS phenotype, but also with milder clinical signs only reminiscent for the disease.

  9. Molecular genetic analysis of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokkonen, H.M.; Kahkonen, T.M.; Leisti, J. [Oulu Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)

    1994-09-01

    Angelman (AS) and Prader-Willi (PWS) syndromes are caused by the loss of either maternal (AS) or paternal (PWS) contributions to chromosome 15q11-q13 region, which is subject to genomic imprinting. DNA methylation has been postulated to play a crucial role in genomic imprinting and the diagnostic test used is based on the differential parental methylation of 15q11-q13. We report here the DNA studies of 39 classical PWS and 12 AS patients. For DNA polymorphism and dosage studies we used nine genomic probes and five microsatellite markers specific for chromosome 15. To study the methylation patterns the probes DN34 (D15S9) and PW71 (D15S63), which show a parental-specific DNA methylation imprint, were used. Among the PWS patients, 29 (77%) cases with a deletion belonging to four different size classes and 9 (23%) with maternal uniparental disomy were found, respectively. Of the AS patients, 8 (67%) had a deletion, 1 (8%) paternal uniparental disomy and 3 (25%) biparental inheritance, respectively. Two sibs with biparental disomy showed a typical methylation pattern for AS, indicating that the maternal chromosome 15 carried a paternal methylation imprint. In the DNA methylation analysis the probe PW71 was useful: in our study it detected all deletions and uniparental disomy patients as well as potential imprinting mutations. The probe DN34 couldn`t identify patients which have a deletion outside the D15S9 locus. In the diagnosis of AS and PWS, the differential methylation of the parental 15q11-q13 offers a rapid diagnostic test but does not distinguish between a deletion and uniparental disomy. In our material the probe 4a.1, which detects DNA sequences from both the locus SNRPN (15q12) and SNRPNP1 (6pter-p21), proved to be reliable detecting all deletions. For detection of parental origin of deletion or uniparental disomy, microsatellite markers proved useful.

  10. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  11. Molecular diagnostic testing for Klinefelter syndrome and other male sex chromosome aneuploidies

    OpenAIRE

    Hager Karl; Jennings Kori; Hosono Seiyu; Howell Susan; Gruen Jeffrey R; Rivkees Scott A; Tartaglia Nicole R; Rinder Henry M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Male sex chromosome aneuploidies are underdiagnosed despite concomitant physical and behavioral manifestations. Objective To develop a non-invasive, rapid and high-throughput molecular diagnostic assay for detection of male sex chromosome aneuploidies, including 47,XXY (Klinefelter), 47,XYY, 48,XXYY and 48,XXXY syndromes. Methods The assay utilizes three XYM and four XA markers to interrogate Y:X and X:autosome ratios, respectively. The seven markers were PCR amplified usi...

  12. Down syndrome: Molecular mapping of the congenital heart disease and duodenal stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenburg, J.R. (University of California, Los Angeles (United States)); Bradley, C.; Disteche, C.M. (University of Washington, Seattle (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of congenital heart and gut disease and mental retardation. DS individuals also have characteristic facies, hands, and dermatoglyphics, in addition to abnormalities of the immune system, and increased risk of leukemia, and an Alzheimer-like dementia. Although their molecular basis is unknown, recent work on patients with DS and partial duplications of chromosome 21 has suggested small chromosomal regions located in band q22 that are likely to contain the genes for some of these features. The authors now extend these analyses to define molecular markers for the congenital heart disease, the duodenal stenosis, and an 'overlap' region for the facial and some of the skeletal features. They report the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular analysis of two patients. These studies provide the molecular basis for the construction of a DS phenotypic map and focus the search for genes responsible for the physical features, congenital heart disease, and duodenal stenosis of DS.

  13. Pollen-food syndromes associated with weed pollinosis: an update from the molecular point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, M; Mutschlechner, S; Wopfner, N; Gadermaier, G; Briza, P; Ferreira, F

    2006-04-01

    Pollinosis patients often display adverse reactions upon the ingestion of plant-derived foods as a result of immunoglobulin E (IgE) cross-reactive structures shared by pollen and food allergen sources. The symptoms of such pollen-food syndromes (PFS) or class 2 food allergies range from local oral allergy syndrome to severe systemic anaphylaxis. Two clinical syndromes, the celery-mugwort-spice syndrome and the mugwort-mustard-allergy syndrome have been described in association with weed pollinosis. However, other associations between weed pollinosis and hypersensitivity to certain kinds of food have also been observed, like the mugwort-peach, the ragweed-melon-banana, the plantain-melon, the pellitory-pistachio, the goosefoot-fruit, the Russian thistle-saffron, and the hop-celery association. The number of allergen sources involved, the allergens, and influencing factors including geography, diet, and food preparation contribute to the high clinical complexity of PFS. So far, known causative cross-reactive allergens include profilins, lipid transfer proteins, and high-molecular weight allergens and/or glycoallergens. The current usage of nonstandardized allergen extracts poses additional problems for both diagnosis and therapy of PFS patients. Further identification and characterization of involved allergens is inescapable for better understanding of PFS and vaccine development. Panels of recombinant allergens and/or hypo-allergens are promising tools to improve both PFS diagnostics and therapy.

  14. Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome with stroke-like imaging presentation: clinical, biochemical and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Rashed, Mohamed S; Al-Dirbashi, Osama Y; Patay, Zoltan; Rahbeeni, Zuhair; Abu-Amero, Khaled K

    2008-01-15

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in ORNT1 gene that encodes a mitochondrial ornithine transporter. It has variable clinical presentations with episodic hyperammonemia, liver dysfunction, and chronic neurological manifestations. In this work, we report the findings of HHH syndrome in 3 Saudi siblings. The 4-year-old proband presented with recurrent Reye-like episodes, hypotonia, and multiple stroke-like lesions on brain MRI. Biochemical and molecular analysis confirmed that she had HHH syndrome. She significantly improved on protein restriction and sodium benzoate. Her two older siblings have milder phenotypes with protein intolerance and learning problems. In comparison to their sister, their homocitrulline and orotic acid were only mildly elevated even before treatment. The three patients were homozygous for a novel mutation in ORNT1 with a Gly220Arg change. In view of the CNS lesions, which initially were felt to be suggestive of MELAS, we sequenced the entire mtDNA genome and no potential pathogenic mutations were detected. Analysis of ORNT2 did not provide explanation of the clinical and biochemical variability. This work presents a yet unreported CNS involvement pattern, notably multiple supratentorial stroke-like lesions in association with HHH syndrome. Moreover, it illustrates considerable clinical/biochemical correlation, and describes a novel mutation. We suggest including HHH syndrome in the differential diagnosis of patients found to have stroke-like lesions on brain MRI.

  15. Clinical and molecular characterization of two patients with palmoplantar keratoderma-congenital alopecia syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, M; Morlino, S; Sana, M E; Paradisi, M; Tadini, G; Angioni, A; Malacarne, M; Grammatico, P; Iascone, M; Forzano, F

    2016-08-01

    Palmoplantar keratoderma-congenital alopecia (PPKCA) syndrome is a rare genodermatosis, with two clinically recognizable forms: dominant (Type 1) and recessive (Type 2). Reports of only 18 patients have been published to date, and the molecular basis of the condition is unknown. We describe two cases with PPKCA Type 2 (PPKCA2), comprising a novel patient, originally reported as an example of autosomal ichthyosis follicularis-atrichia-photophobia syndrome, and the 6-year follow-up of a previously published case. Extensive molecular studies of both patients excluded mutations in all the known genes associated with PPK and partially overlapping syndromes. The striking similarities between these two patients confirm PPKCA2 as a discrete genodermatosis, of which the main features are congenital and universal alopecia, diffuse keratosis pilaris, facial erythema, and a specific PPK with predominant involvement of the fingertips and borders of the hands and feet, with evolution of sclerodactyly, contractures and constrictions. Clinical follow-up of these patients has demonstrated progressive worsening of the hand involvement and attenuation of facial erythema.

  16. Molecular genetics and clinical features of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Laura S; Linehan, W Marston

    2015-10-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an inherited renal cancer syndrome in which affected individuals are at risk of developing benign cutaneous fibrofolliculomas, bilateral pulmonary cysts and spontaneous pneumothoraces, and kidney tumours. Bilateral multifocal renal tumours that develop in BHD syndrome are most frequently hybrid oncocytic tumours and chromophobe renal carcinoma, but can present with other histologies. Germline mutations in the FLCN gene on chromosome 17 are responsible for BHD syndrome--BHD-associated renal tumours display inactivation of the wild-type FLCN allele by somatic mutation or chromosomal loss, confirming that FLCN is a tumour suppressor gene that fits the classic two-hit model. FLCN interacts with two novel proteins, FNIP1 and FNIP2, and with AMPK, a negative regulator of mTOR. Studies with FLCN-deficient cell and animal models support a role for FLCN in modulating the AKT-mTOR pathway. Emerging evidence links FLCN with a number of other molecular pathways and cellular processes important for cell homeostasis that are frequently deregulated in cancer, including regulation of TFE3 and/or TFEB transcriptional activity, amino-acid-dependent mTOR activation through Rag GTPases, TGFβ signalling, PGC1α-driven mitochondrial biogenesis, and autophagy. Currently, surgical intervention is the only therapy available for BHD-associated renal tumours, but improved understanding of the FLCN pathway will hopefully lead to the development of effective forms of targeted systemic therapy for this disease.

  17. Craniofacial development: current concepts in the molecular basis of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gijn, Daniel Richard; Tucker, Abigail S; Cobourne, Martyn T

    2013-07-01

    The human face and skull are an elegant example of the anatomical sophistication that results from the interplay between the molecular cascades and the tissue interactions that are necessary for the proper development of the craniofacial complex. When it fails to develop normally the consequences can have life-long implications for the biological, psychological, and aesthetic wellbeing of an affected person. Among the many syndromes that affect the region, understanding of the biology that underlies Treacher Collins syndrome has advanced in the last decade, particularly concerning the causative TCOF1 gene that encodes TREACLE protein, a serine/alanine-rich nucleolar phosphoprotein with an essential function during ribosome biogenesis in cranial neural crest cells. Abnormal growth and differentiation of these cells affect much of the craniofacial skeleton.

  18. Molecular monitoring of 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyong W; Habeebu, Sultan; Sheehan, Andrea M; Naeem, Rizwan; Hernandez, Vivian S; Dreyer, Zoann E; López-Terrada, Dolores

    2009-11-01

    The 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome is a rare hematologic malignancy derived from a pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell associated with rearrangements involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene located on chromosome 8p11. The most common translocation, t(8;13) (p11;q13), results in a ZNF198-FGFR1 fusion gene and constitutively active FGFR1 tyrosine kinase activity. Typical pathologic findings include myeloid hyperplasia, lymphadenopathy, precursor T-lymphoblastic lymphoma, and eosinophilia. The disease is usually associated with an aggressive course and progression to acute myeloid leukemia is frequent. We report here the first case of 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome in an infant and demonstrate the value of molecular testing in the diagnosis and minimal disease monitoring of this rare disease.

  19. Blepharophimosis, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus syndrome: clinical and molecular analysis of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Francesca; Giachino, Daniela; Russo, Lucia; Pilia, Giuseppe; Ariani, Francesca; Scala, Elisa; Chiappe, Francesca; Sampieri, Katia; Caporossi, Aldo; Renieri, Alessandra; Lasorella, Giacomo

    2006-06-01

    Blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (OMIM #U10100) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder in which an eyelid malformation is associated (type I) or not (type H) with premature ovarian failure in the affected female. It is invariably characterized by 4 major features: (1) bilaterally shortened horizontal palpebral fissure (blepharophimosis); (2) severe impairment of the superior palpebral levator (ptosis); (3) a vertical skin fold arising from the lower eyelid, which inserts medially in the upper lid (epicanthus inversus) and (4) an increased inner can-thal distance with a normal outer canthal distance (telecanthus). The mutations causing this disorder are found in the FOXL2 gene, a forkhead transcription factor, located in 3q23. Although many patients with blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome have an affected parent, a conspicuous number of sporadic cases also have been reported. We describe here a sporadic case with a mutation in the FOXL2 gene that was well characterized both clinically and molecularly.

  20. Application of molecular biology at the approach of Bartter's syndrome: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Geisilaine Soares Dos; Miranda, Débora Marques de; Pereira, Paula Cristina de Barros; Sarubi, Helena Cunha; Rodrigues, Luciana Bastos; Marco, Luiz Armando Cunha de; Silva, Ana Cristina Simões E

    2012-03-01

    This paper aims to show the utility of molecular biology for diagnose Bartter syndrome (BS) by the case report of two sisters and to propose a diagram for the molecular approach of this syndrome. The two reported cases presented prematurity, pregnancy complicated with polyhydramnio and low birth weight. During the first year of life, children exhibited polyuria, polydipsia and failure to thrive, leading to the investigation of renal tubular diseases and innate errors of metabolism. The laboratorial exams suggested BS, but the definitive diagnostic was only obtained by the detection of homozygous mutation on the exon 5 of the gene KCNJ1, resulting in a substitution of the aminoacid alanin for valin on codon 214 (A214V) in both DNA stripes in the two sisters and a heterozygous mutation in their parents. The definitive diagnostic of BS is frequently very difficult to be obtained. Consequently, considering the reported cases, we showed the utility of molecular techniques for the definitive diagnostic of BS and we proposed a diagram for the rational use of these techniques.

  1. Molecular analyses of 17p11.2 deletions in 62 Smith-Magenis syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juyal, R.C.; Figuera, L.E.; Hauge, X. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable, multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome caused by an interstitial deletion involving band p11.2 of chromosome 17. Toward the molecular definition of the interval defining this microdeletion syndrome, 62 unrelated SMS patients in conjunction with 70 available unaffected parents were molecularly analyzed with respect to the presence or absence of 14 loci in the proximal region of the short arm of chromosome 17. A multifaceted approach was used to determine deletion status at the various loci that combined (1) FISH analysis, (2) PCR and Southern analysis of somatic cell hybrids retaining the deleted chromosome 17 from selected patients, and (3) genotype determination of patients for whom a parent(s) was available at four microsatellite marker loci and at four loci with associated RFLPs. The relative order of two novel anonymous markers and a new microsatellite marker was determined in 17p11.2. The results confirmed that the proximal deletion breakpoint in the majority of SMS patients is located between markers D17S58 (EW301) and D17S446 (FG1) within the 17p11.1-17p11.2 region. The common distal breakpoint was mapped between markers cCI17-638, which lies distal to D17S71, and cCI17-498, which lies proximal to the Charcot Marie-Tooth disease type 1A locus. The locus D17S258 was found to be deleted in all 62 patients, and probes from this region can be used for diagnosis of the SMS deletion by FISH. Ten patients demonstrated molecularly distinct deletions; of these, two patients had smaller deletions and will enable the definition of the critical interval for SMS. 49 refs.

  2. Malignant Tregs express low molecular splice forms of FOXP3 in Sézary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsgaard, T; Gjerdrum, L M; Ralfkiaer, E;

    2008-01-01

    Sézary syndrome (SS) is an aggressive variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. During disease progression, immunodeficiency develops; however, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we study the regulatory T cell (Treg) function and the expression of FOXP3...... different from wt FOXP3 and not involved in the execution of the suppressive function. Thus, this is the first description of FOXP3 splice forms in human disease.Leukemia advance online publication, 4 September 2008; doi:10.1038/leu.2008.224....

  3. [Recent advances of studies on abnormal HOX gene in myelodysplastic syndromes and its molecular mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xin-Yan; Shao, Zong-Hong

    2015-02-01

    HOX gene encodes a group of homeodomain transcription factors which are highly conserved. The caudal-type homeobox (CDX) , ten-eleven translocation (TET) genes and polycomb group (PcG) , trithorax group (TrxG) proteins act as upstream regulators of HOX genes that manipulate the targeted gene expression through genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The abnormal expression of HOX genes and their fusions contribute to myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) pathogenesis. Aberrant DNA methylation and NUP98-HOX translocation serve as molecular mediators of dysfunction in MDS which can be used for the evaluation of biology and therapy. This article provides an overview of recent advances of studies on HOX gene and its abnormal molecular mechanisms, as well as potential correlation with MDS.

  4. Conservation of nucleotide sequences for molecular diagnosis of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Yuki; Okamoto, Michiko; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    Infection due to the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is widespread. The present study was performed to assess the protocols used for the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV by analyzing the nucleotide sequences of viruses detected between 2012 and 2015, including sequences from the large outbreak in eastern Asia in 2015. Although the diagnostic protocols were established only 2 years ago, mismatches between the sequences of primers/probes and viruses were found for several of the assays. Such mismatches could lead to a lower sensitivity of the assay, thereby leading to false-negative diagnosis. A slight modification in the primer design is suggested. Protocols for the molecular diagnosis of viral infections should be reviewed regularly after they are established, particularly for viruses that pose a great threat to public health such as MERS-CoV.

  5. Conservation of nucleotide sequences for molecular diagnosis of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Furuse

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection due to the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV is widespread. The present study was performed to assess the protocols used for the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV by analyzing the nucleotide sequences of viruses detected between 2012 and 2015, including sequences from the large outbreak in eastern Asia in 2015. Although the diagnostic protocols were established only 2 years ago, mismatches between the sequences of primers/probes and viruses were found for several of the assays. Such mismatches could lead to a lower sensitivity of the assay, thereby leading to false-negative diagnosis. A slight modification in the primer design is suggested. Protocols for the molecular diagnosis of viral infections should be reviewed regularly after they are established, particularly for viruses that pose a great threat to public health such as MERS-CoV.

  6. Molecular biological analysis of genotyping and phylogeny of severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志刚; 李兰娟; 罗芸; 张俊彦; 王敏雅; 程苏云; 张严峻; 王晓萌; 卢亦愚; 吴南屏; 梅玲玲; 王赞信

    2004-01-01

    Background SARS-CoV is the causative agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) which has been associated with outbreaks of SARS in Guangdong, Hong Kong and Beijing of China, and other regions worldwide. SARS-CoV from human has shown some variations but its origin is still unknown. The genotyping and phylogeny of SARS-CoV were analyzed and reported in this paper. Methods Full or partial genomes of 44 SARS-CoV strains were collected from GenBank. The genotype, single nucleotide polymorphism and phylogeny of these SARS-CoV strains were analyzed by molecular biological, bioinformatic and epidemiological methods. Conclusion The results mentioned above suggest that SARS-CoV is responding to host immunological pressures and experiencing variation which provide clues, information and evidence of molecular biology for the clinical pathology, vaccine developing and epidemic investigation.

  7. Guillain-Barré Syndrome Animal Model: The First Proof of Molecular Mimicry in Human Autoimmune Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Molecular mimicry between self and microbial components has been proposed as the pathogenic mechanism of autoimmune diseases, and this hypothesis is proven in Guillain-Barré syndrome. Guillain-Barré syndrome, the most frequent cause of acute neuromuscular paralysis, sometimes occurs after Campylobacter jejuni enteritis. Gangliosides are predominantly cell-surface glycolipids highly expressed in nervous tissue, whilst lipo-oligosaccharides are major components of the Gram-negative bacterium C....

  8. Molecular profile of the Lynch Syndrome in the Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Hiljadnikova-Bajro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent type of hereditary colorectal cancer, the one occurring in the setting of the Lynch syndrome (LS is considered a phenotypic manifestation of a germline defect in the mismatch repair mechanism i.e. in the MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 gene. Aiming towards establishment of a standardized protocol involving molecular analyses for diagnosis of this syndrome and developing a unique national register of families with hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in the Republic of Macedonia, we began a prospective study to reveal the genetic defects among Macedonian patients with colorectal cancer (CRC and identifying families with hereditary CRC. A total of 53 patients fulfilling the revised Bethesda criteria for MSI-genetic testing were compared to 350 patients with sporadic CRC. The results reveal significant differences in age at diagnosis (p=0.03, involvement of microsatellite instability (pG nonsense mutation with a possible founder effect in the Macedonian population, the MLH1 ex.3-12 deletion, as well as the c.244A>G mutation, IVS14- 19A>G and IVS4+65A>C changes in MLH1 without confirmed pathological significance. The observed high frequency (87.5% of the Ile219Val (c.655A>G variant in MLH1 among the LS suspects prompts further analyses to evaluate its involvement in the development of hereditary CRC by itself or as a risk modifying factor among the patients from the Republic of Macedonia.

  9. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of human microtia via a pig model of HOXA1 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Ruimin; He, Yuyong; Pan, Bo; Xiao, Shijun; Zhang, Xufei; Li, Jing; Zhang, Zhiyan; Hong, Yuan; Xing, Yuyun; Ren, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Microtia is a congenital malformation of the outer ears. Although both genetic and environmental components have been implicated in microtia, the genetic causes of this innate disorder are poorly understood. Pigs have naturally occurring diseases comparable to those in humans, providing exceptional opportunity to dissect the molecular mechanism of human inherited diseases. Here we first demonstrated that a truncating mutation in HOXA1 causes a monogenic disorder of microtia in pigs. We further performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis on affected and healthy pig embryos (day 14.25). We identified a list of 337 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the normal and mutant samples, shedding light on the transcriptional network involving HOXA1. The DEGs are enriched in biological processes related to cardiovascular system and embryonic development, and neurological, renal and urological diseases. Aberrant expressions of many DEGs have been implicated in human innate deformities corresponding to microtia-associated syndromes. After applying three prioritizing algorithms, we highlighted appealing candidate genes for human microtia from the 337 DEGs. We searched for coding variants of functional significance within six candidate genes in 147 microtia-affected individuals. Of note, we identified one EVC2 non-synonymous mutation (p.Asp1174Asn) as a potential disease-implicating variant for a human microtia-associated syndrome. The findings advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human microtia, and provide an interesting example of the characterization of human disease-predisposing variants using pig models.

  10. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of human microtia via a pig model of HOXA1 syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruimin Qiao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microtia is a congenital malformation of the outer ears. Although both genetic and environmental components have been implicated in microtia, the genetic causes of this innate disorder are poorly understood. Pigs have naturally occurring diseases comparable to those in humans, providing exceptional opportunity to dissect the molecular mechanism of human inherited diseases. Here we first demonstrated that a truncating mutation in HOXA1 causes a monogenic disorder of microtia in pigs. We further performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq analysis on affected and healthy pig embryos (day 14.25. We identified a list of 337 differentially expressed genes (DEGs between the normal and mutant samples, shedding light on the transcriptional network involving HOXA1. The DEGs are enriched in biological processes related to cardiovascular system and embryonic development, and neurological, renal and urological diseases. Aberrant expressions of many DEGs have been implicated in human innate deformities corresponding to microtia-associated syndromes. After applying three prioritizing algorithms, we highlighted appealing candidate genes for human microtia from the 337 DEGs. We searched for coding variants of functional significance within six candidate genes in 147 microtia-affected individuals. Of note, we identified one EVC2 non-synonymous mutation (p.Asp1174Asn as a potential disease-implicating variant for a human microtia-associated syndrome. The findings advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human microtia, and provide an interesting example of the characterization of human disease-predisposing variants using pig models.

  11. Clinical and molecular analysis of Noonan syndrome in Indonesia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iffa Mutmainah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome (NS; OMIM#163950 is a relatively common autosomal dominant disorder with a worldwide prevalence of approximately 1:1,000 to 1:2,500. The syndrome is characterized by distinctive facial features, congenital heart defects (CHD, and short stature. Distinctive facial features consist of a broad and high forehead, hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, a high arched palate, low set and posteriorly rotated ears with a thick helix, and a short neck with excess nuchal skin and low posterior hairline. Additional relatively frequent features include chest deformities, cryptorchidism in males, mild intellectual disability, and bleeding diathesis.1,2 In 2001, missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene were reported in about 50% of NS cases. This gene encodes the tyrosine protein phosphatase non-receptor SHP2, which is involved in ERK activation via RAS-MAPK pathway.3 Later, several other genes involved in the RAS-MAPK pathway were found to be mutated in NS individuals without PTPN11 mutations, including KRAS, SOS1, RAF1, NRAS, BRAF, MAP2K1, and RIT1, as well as mutations in SHOC2 and CBL causing an NS-like disorder (�Noo-Noonan syndrome-like disorder with loose anagen hair/NSLH and Noonan syndrome-like disorder with or without juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia/NSLL, respectively.2,4,5 The involvement of two other genes, A2ML1 and RRAS is still unclear.6,7 Despite the relatively high frequency of NS in the general population, no Indonesian patients have been reported. Here, we report the first Indonesian case with a confirmed molecular diagnosis of NS.

  12. Molecular diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome: Comparison of cytogenetic and molecular genetic data including parent of origin dependent methylation DNA patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.G. [Vanderbilt Univ. Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States)

    1996-01-11

    This letter to the editor discusses a recent study concerning the parent-of-origin methylation site at D15S63 and its application in molecular diagnostics confirming Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). It concludes that more research is needed to clear up questions which remain regarding the causation of PWS. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  13. The molecular basis of variable phenotypic severity among common missense mutations causing Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyla; Selfridge, Jim; Lagger, Sabine; Connelly, John; De Sousa, Dina; Kerr, Alastair; Webb, Shaun; Guy, Jacky; Merusi, Cara; Koerner, Martha V; Bird, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene, which encodes a chromosomal protein that binds to methylated DNA. Mouse models mirror the human disorder and therefore allow investigation of phenotypes at a molecular level. We describe an Mecp2 allelic series representing the three most common missense Rett syndrome (RTT) mutations, including first reports of Mecp2[R133C] and Mecp2[T158M] knock-in mice, in addition to Mecp2[R306C] mutant mice. Together these three alleles comprise ∼25% of all RTT mutations in humans, but they vary significantly in average severity. This spectrum is mimicked in the mouse models; R133C being least severe, T158M most severe and R306C of intermediate severity. Both R133C and T158M mutations cause compound phenotypes at the molecular level, combining compromised DNA binding with reduced stability, the destabilizing effect of T158M being more severe. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that the R133C mutation exclusively abolishes binding to hydroxymethylated DNA, as interactions with DNA containing methyl-CG, methyl-CA and hydroxymethyl-CA are all reduced in vivo. We find that MeCP2[T158M] is significantly less stable than MeCP2[R133C], which may account for the divergent clinical impact of the mutations. Overall, this allelic series recapitulates human RTT severity, reveals compound molecular aetiologies and provides a valuable resource in the search for personalized therapeutic interventions.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection and Perspectives on Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Bas; Bickley, Lisa K; van Aerle, Ronny; Bateman, Kelly S; Stentiford, Grant D; Santos, Eduarda M; Tyler, Charles R

    2016-01-18

    Since its emergence in the 1990s, White Spot Disease (WSD) has had major economic and societal impact in the crustacean aquaculture sector. Over the years shrimp farming alone has experienced billion dollar losses through WSD. The disease is caused by the White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV), a large dsDNA virus and the only member of the Nimaviridae family. Susceptibility to WSSV in a wide range of crustacean hosts makes it a major risk factor in the translocation of live animals and in commodity products. Currently there are no effective treatments for this disease. Understanding the molecular basis of disease processes has contributed significantly to the treatment of many human and animal pathogens, and with a similar aim considerable efforts have been directed towards understanding host-pathogen molecular interactions for WSD. Work on the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis in aquatic crustaceans has been restricted by a lack of sequenced and annotated genomes for host species. Nevertheless, some of the key host-pathogen interactions have been established: between viral envelope proteins and host cell receptors at initiation of infection, involvement of various immune system pathways in response to WSSV, and the roles of various host and virus miRNAs in mitigation or progression of disease. Despite these advances, many fundamental knowledge gaps remain; for example, the roles of the majority of WSSV proteins are still unknown. In this review we assess current knowledge of how WSSV infects and replicates in its host, and critique strategies for WSD treatment.

  15. Molecular basis for the Kallmann syndrome-linked fibroblast growth factor receptor mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, Ryan D.; Kathir, Karuppanan Muthusamy; Rajalingam, Dakshinamurthy [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Kumar, Thallapuranam K. Suresh, E-mail: sthalla@uark.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural basis of the Kallmann syndrome is elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann syndrome mutation (A168S) induces a subtle conformational change(s). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural interactions mediated by beta-sheet G are most perturbed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ligand (FGF)-receptor interaction(s) is completely abolished by Kallmann mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann mutation directly affects the FGF signaling process. -- Abstract: Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a developmental disease that expresses in patients as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. KS is commonly associated with mutations in the extracellular D2 domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). In this study, for the first time, the molecular basis for the FGFR associated KS mutation (A168S) is elucidated using a variety of biophysical experiments, including multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Secondary and tertiary structural analysis using far UV circular dichroism, fluorescence and limited trypsin digestion assays suggest that the KS mutation induces subtle tertiary structure change in the D2 domain of FGFR. Results of isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show the KS mutation causes a 10-fold decrease in heparin binding affinity and also a complete loss in ligand (FGF-1) binding. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N chemical perturbation data suggest that complete loss in the ligand (FGF) binding affinity is triggered by a subtle conformational change that disrupts crucial structural interactions in both the heparin and the FGF binding sites in the D2 domain of FGFR. The novel findings reported in this study are expected to provide valuable clues toward a complete understanding of the other genetic diseases linked to mutations in the FGFR.

  16. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome in Grey Alpine Cattle: Morphologic, Immunophenotypic, and Molecular Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, L V; Benazzi, C; Dittmer, K E; Thompson, K G; Murgiano, L; Drögemüller, C; Avallone, G; Gentile, A; Edwards, J F; Piffer, C; Bolcato, M; Brunetti, B

    2015-09-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by a mutation in either the EVC or EVC2 gene, and presents with short limbs, polydactyly, and ectodermal and heart defects. The aim of this study was to understand the pathologic basis by which deletions in the EVC2 gene lead to chondrodysplastic dwarfism and to describe the morphologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular hallmarks of EvC syndrome in cattle. Five Grey Alpine calves, with a known mutation in the EVC2 gene, were autopsied. Immunohistochemistry was performed on bone using antibodies to collagen II, collagen X, sonic hedgehog, fibroblast growth factor 2, and Ki67. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to analyze EVC1 and EVC2 gene expression. Autopsy revealed long bones that were severely reduced in length, as well as genital and heart defects. Collagen II was detected in control calves in the resting, proliferative, and hypertrophic zones and in the primary and secondary spongiosa, with a loss of labeling in the resting zone of 2 dwarfs. Collagen X was expressed in hypertrophic zone in the controls but was absent in the EvC cases. In affected calves and controls, sonic hedgehog labeled hypertrophic chondrocytes and primary and secondary spongiosa similarly. FGF2 was expressed in chondrocytes of all growth plate zones in the control calves but was lost in most EvC cases. The Ki67 index was lower in cases compared with controls. EVC and EVC2 transcripts were detected. Our data suggest that EvC syndrome of Grey Alpine cattle is a disorder of chondrocyte differentiation, with accelerated differentiation and premature hypertrophy of chondrocytes, and could be a spontaneous model for the equivalent human disease.

  17. Phenotypic and molecular assessment of seven patients with 6p25 deletion syndrome: Relevance to ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritch Robert

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thirty-nine patients have been described with deletions involving chromosome 6p25. However, relatively few of these deletions have had molecular characterization. Common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome patients include hydrocephalus, hearing loss, and ocular, craniofacial, skeletal, cardiac, and renal malformations. Molecular characterization of deletions can identify genes that are responsible for these phenotypes. Methods We report the clinical phenotype of seven patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6p25 and compare them to previously reported patients. Molecular characterization of the deletions was performed using polymorphic marker analysis to determine the extents of the deletions in these seven 6p25 deletion syndrome patients. Results Our results, and previous data, show that ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most highly penetrant phenotypes of the 6p25 deletion syndrome. While deletion of the forkhead box C1 gene (FOXC1 probably underlies the ocular dysgenesis, no gene in this region is known to be involved in hearing impairment. Conclusions Ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome. We conclude that a locus for dominant hearing loss is present at 6p25 and that this locus is restricted to a region distal to D6S1617. Molecular characterization of more 6p25 deletion patients will aid in refinement of this locus and the identification of a gene involved in dominant hearing loss.

  18. Molecular analysis of genes on Xp controlling Turner syndrome and premature ovarian failure (POF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, A R; Ross, J L

    2001-06-01

    Monosomy X has been known to be the chromosomal basis of Turner syndrome (TS) for more than four decades. A large body of cytogenetic data indicates that most TS features are due to reduced dosage of genes on the short arm of the X chromosome (Xp). Phenotype mapping studies using molecular cytogenetic and genetic techniques are beginning to localize the Xp genes that are important for various TS features, and a comprehensive catalog of candidate genes is becoming available through the Human Genome Project and related research. It is now possible to assess the contributions of individual genes to the TS phenotype by mutational analysis of karyotypically normal persons with specific TS features. This strategy has succeeded in identifying a gene involved in short stature and is being applied to premature ovarian failure and other TS phenotypes.

  19. Unambiguous molecular detections with multiple genetic approach for the complicated chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Lung-Huang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS causes a developmental disorder during the embryonic stage, usually because of hemizygous deletions. The clinical pictures of patients with 22q11DS vary because of polymorphisms: on average, approximately 93% of affected individuals have a de novo deletion of 22q11, and the rest have inherited the same deletion from a parent. Methods using multiple genetic markers are thus important for the accurate detection of these microdeletions. Methods We studied 12 babies suspected to carry 22q11DS and 18 age-matched healthy controls from unrelated Taiwanese families. We determined genomic variance using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. Results Changes in genomic copy number were significantly associated with clinical manifestations for the classical criteria of 22q11DS using MPLA and qPCR (p Conclusion Both MLPA and qPCR could produce a clearly defined range of deleted genomic DNA, whereas there must be a deleted genome that is not distinguishable using MLPA. These data demonstrate that such multiple genetic approaches are necessary for the unambiguous molecular detection of these types of complicated genomic syndromes.

  20. Molecular and clinical analysis of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmani Aiman

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ellis-van Creveld (EvC syndrome is an autosomal recessive chondrodysplastic condition with clinical manifestations that include short-limbs and ribs, postaxial polydactyly and dysplastic nails and teeth. In about two thirds of patients, mutations in either EVC or EVC2 genes have been found to be the underlying cause. Methods In this paper, we describe the molecular (DNA sequencing and clinical analysis of six children diagnosed with EvC from four different families from the United Arab Emirates (UAE. Results All the children had the common clinical and radiological features of this syndrome. However, DNA sequence analysis of the genes shown to be involved (EVC and EVC2 revealed a novel splice site mutation (c.2047-1G>T in intron 13 of EVC2 gene in one family. In addition, we confirm previous mutational analyses that showed a truncating mutation in exon 13 of EVC gene (c.1813C>T; p.Q605X in the second family and a single nucleotide deletion (c.981delG; p.K327fs in exon 8 of EVC2 gene in the third family. No mutations in the exons, splice sites or the promoter regions of either gene have been found in the index case of the fourth family who exhibited "EvC-like" features. Conclusions Given the small population size of UAE, our data illustrates further the molecular heterogeneity observed in EvC patients and excludes the possibility of a common founder effect for this condition in the UAE reflecting the current ethnic diversity of the country.

  1. Phenotypic and Molecular Convergence of 2q23.1 Deletion Syndrome with Other Neurodevelopmental Syndromes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sureni V. Mullegama

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Roughly 20% of autism spectrum disorders (ASD are syndromic with a well-established genetic cause. Studying the genes involved can provide insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ASD. 2q23.1 deletion syndrome (causative gene, MBD5 is a recently identified genetic neurodevelopmental disorder associated with ASD. Mutations in MBD5 have been found in ASD cohorts. In this study, we provide a phenotypic update on the prevalent features of 2q23.1 deletion syndrome, which include severe intellectual disability, seizures, significant speech impairment, sleep disturbance, and autistic-like behavioral problems. Next, we examined the phenotypic, molecular, and network/pathway relationships between nine neurodevelopmental disorders associated with ASD: 2q23.1 deletion Rett, Angelman, Pitt-Hopkins, 2q23.1 duplication, 5q14.3 deletion, Kleefstra, Kabuki make-up, and Smith-Magenis syndromes. We show phenotypic overlaps consisting of intellectual disability, speech delay, seizures, sleep disturbance, hypotonia, and autistic-like behaviors. Molecularly, MBD5 possibly regulates the expression of UBE3A, TCF4, MEF2C, EHMT1 and RAI1. Network analysis reveals that there could be indirect protein interactions, further implicating function for these genes in common pathways. Further, we show that when MBD5 and RAI1 are haploinsufficient, they perturb several common pathways that are linked to neuronal and behavioral development. These findings support further investigations into the molecular and pathway relationships among genes linked to neurodevelopmental disorders and ASD, which will hopefully lead to common points of regulation that may be targeted toward therapeutic intervention.

  2. Screening white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-resistant molecular markers from Fenneropenaeus chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingying; Meng, Xianhong; Kong, Jie; Luan, Sheng; Luo, Kun; Wang, Qingyin; Zheng, Yongyun

    2017-02-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-resistant molecular markers were screened from the selectively bred new variety `Huanghai No. 2' of Fenneropenaeus chinensis using unlabeled-probe high-resolution melting (HRM) technique. After the artificial infection with WSSV, the first 96 dead shrimps and the last 96 surviving shrimps were collected, representing WSSV-susceptible and -resistant populations, respectively. The genotypes at well-developed 39 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) loci were obtained. As revealed in the Chi-square test, 3 SNPs, genotype A/A of contig C364-89AT, genotype A/A of C2635-527CA and genotype C/T of contig C12355-592CT, were positively correlated with disease-resistance traits. Other 2 SNPs, genotype G/G of contig C283-145AG and genotype C/C of contig C12355-592CT, were negatively correlated. Moreover, analysis with BlastX program for disease-resistant SNPs indicated that 3 contigs, Contig283, Contig364 and Contig12355, matched to the functional genes of effector caspase of Penaeus monodon, peptide transporter family 1-like protein, and 40S ribosomal protein S2 of Perca flavescens with high sequence similarity. The results will be helpful to provide theoretical and technical supports for molecular marker-assisted selective breeding of F. chinensis.

  3. Molecular evidence of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Ureaplasma parvum colonization in preterm infants during respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germani Rossella

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ureaplasma urealyticum and U. parvum have been associated with respiratory diseases in premature newborns, but their role in the pathogenesis of the respiratory distress syndrome (RDS is unclear. The aim of this study was to detect, using molecular techniques, the role of Mycoplasma spp. and Ureaplasma spp. in respiratory secretion and blood specimens of preterm newborns with or without RDS and to evaluate the prevalence of perinatal U. urealyticum or U. parvum infection. The influence of chemotherapy on the clinical course was also evaluated. Methods Tracheal aspirate or nasopharingeal fluid samples from 50 preterm babies with (24 or without RDS (26 were analysed for detection of U. urealyticum and U. parvum by culture identification assay and PCR. Sequencing analysis of amplicons allowed us to verify the specificity of methods. Clarithromycin (10 mg kg-1 twice a day was administered in ureaplasma-positive patients who presented clinical signs of RDS. Results 15/24 neonates with RDS (p U. urealyticum or U. parvum. Culture identification assay was positive in 5/50 newborns, three of which with RDS. Sequencing analyses confirmed the specificity of these methods. Association of patent ductus arteriosus with ureaplasma colonization was more statistically significant (p = 0.0004 in patients with RDS than in those without RDS. Conclusion Colonization of the lower respiratory tract by Ureaplasma spp. and particularly by U. parvum in preterm newborns was related to RDS. The routine use of molecular methods could be useful to screen candidate babies for etiologic therapy.

  4. Molecular and Neural Functions of Rai1, the Causal Gene for Smith-Magenis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Hsiang; Guenthner, Casey J; Xu, Jin; Nguyen, Tiffany; Schwarz, Lindsay A; Wilkinson, Alex W; Gozani, Or; Chang, Howard Y; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Luo, Liqun

    2016-10-19

    Haploinsufficiency of Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1) causes Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), which is associated with diverse neurodevelopmental and behavioral symptoms as well as obesity. RAI1 encodes a nuclear protein but little is known about its molecular function or the cell types responsible for SMS symptoms. Using genetically engineered mice, we found that Rai1 preferentially occupies DNA regions near active promoters and promotes the expression of a group of genes involved in circuit assembly and neuronal communication. Behavioral analyses demonstrated that pan-neural loss of Rai1 causes deficits in motor function, learning, and food intake. These SMS-like phenotypes are produced by loss of Rai1 function in distinct neuronal types: Rai1 loss in inhibitory neurons or subcortical glutamatergic neurons causes learning deficits, while Rai1 loss in Sim1(+) or SF1(+) cells causes obesity. By integrating molecular and organismal analyses, our study suggests potential therapeutic avenues for a complex neurodevelopmental disorder.

  5. Prenatal molecular testing for Beckwith-Wiedemann and Silver-Russell syndromes: a challenge for molecular analysis and genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Brioude, Frédéric; Russo, Silvia; Lombardi, Maria P; Bliek, Jet; Maher, Eamonn R; Larizza, Lidia; Prawitt, Dirk; Netchine, Irène; Gonzales, Marie; Grønskov, Karen; Tümer, Zeynep; Monk, David; Mannens, Marcel; Chrzanowska, Krystyna; Walasek, Malgorzata K; Begemann, Matthias; Soellner, Lukas; Eggermann, Katja; Tenorio, Jair; Nevado, Julián; Moore, Gudrun E; Mackay, Deborah Jg; Temple, Karen; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Ogata, Tsutomu; Weksberg, Rosanna; Algar, Elizabeth; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann and Silver-Russell syndromes (BWS/SRS) are two imprinting disorders (IDs) associated with disturbances of the 11p15.5 chromosomal region. In BWS, epimutations and genomic alterations within 11p15.5 are observed in >70% of patients, whereas in SRS they are observed in about 60% of the cases. In addition, 10% of the SRS patients carry a maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 11p15.5. There is an increasing demand for prenatal testing of these disorders owing to family history, indicative prenatal ultrasound findings or aberrations involving chromosomes 7 and 11. The complex molecular findings underlying these disorders are a challenge not only for laboratories offering these tests but also for geneticists counseling affected families. The scope of counseling must consider the range of detectable disturbances and their origin, the lack of precise quantitative knowledge concerning the inheritance and recurrence risks for the epigenetic abnormalities, which are hallmarks of these developmental disorders. In this paper, experts in the field of BWS and SRS, including members of the European network of congenital IDs (EUCID.net; www.imprinting-disorders.eu), put together their experience and work in the field of 11p15.5-associated IDs with a focus on prenatal testing. Altogether, prenatal tests of 160 fetuses (122 referred for BWS, 38 for SRS testing) from 5 centers were analyzed and reviewed. We summarize the current knowledge on BWS and SRS with respect to diagnostic testing, the consequences for prenatal genetic testing and counseling and our cumulative experience in dealing with these disorders.

  6. Clinical spectrum and molecular diagnosis of Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients with an imprinting mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, S.; Cassidy, S.B.; Conroy, J.M. [Univ. of Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-20

    Recent studies have identified a new class of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) patients who have biparental inheritance, but neither the typical deletion nor uniparental disomy (UPD) or translocation. However, these patients have uniparental DNA methylation throughout 15q11-q13, and thus appear to have a mutation in the imprinting process for this region. Here we describe detailed clinical findings of five AS imprinting mutation patients (three families) and two PWS imprinting mutation patients (one new family). All these patients have essentially the classical clinical phenotype for the respective syndrome, except that the incidence of microcephaly is lower in imprinting mutation AS patients than in deletion AS patients. Furthermore, imprinting mutation AS and PWS patients do not typically have hypopigmentation, which is commonly found in patients with the usual large deletion. Molecular diagnosis of these cases is initially achieved by DNA methylation analyses of the DN34/ZNF127, PW71 (D15S63), and SNRPN loci. The latter two probes have clear advantages in the simple molecular diagnostic analysis of PWS and AS patients with an imprinting mutation, as has been found for typical deletion or UPD PWS and AS cases. With the recent finding of inherited microdeletions in PWS and AS imprinting mutation families, our studies define a new class of these two syndromes. The clinical and molecular identification of these PWS and AS patients has important genetic counseling consequences. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Detection of mutations in the COL4A5 gene by SSCP in X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Juncker, I; Persson, U

    2001-01-01

    , three in-frame deletions, four nonsense mutations, and six splice site mutations. Twenty-two of the mutations have not previously been reported. Furthermore, we found one non-pathogenic amino acid substitution, one rare variant in a non-coding region, and one polymorphism with a heterozygosity of 28...

  8. Molecular diagnostic testing for Klinefelter syndrome and other male sex chromosome aneuploidies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hager Karl

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male sex chromosome aneuploidies are underdiagnosed despite concomitant physical and behavioral manifestations. Objective To develop a non-invasive, rapid and high-throughput molecular diagnostic assay for detection of male sex chromosome aneuploidies, including 47,XXY (Klinefelter, 47,XYY, 48,XXYY and 48,XXXY syndromes. Methods The assay utilizes three XYM and four XA markers to interrogate Y:X and X:autosome ratios, respectively. The seven markers were PCR amplified using genomic DNA isolated from a cohort of 323 males with aneuploid (n = 117 and 46,XY (n = 206 karyotypes. The resulting PCR products were subjected to Pyrosequencing, a quantitative DNA sequencing method. Results Receiver operator characteristic (ROC curves were used to establish thresholds for the discrimination of aneuploid from normal samples. The XYM markers permitted the identification of 47,XXY, 48,XXXY and 47,XYY syndromes with 100% sensitivity and specificity in both purified DNA and buccal swab samples. The 48,XXYY karyotype was delineated by XA marker data from 46,XY; an X allele threshold of 43% also permitted detection of 48,XXYY with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Analysis of X chromosome-specific biallelic SNPs demonstrated that 43 of 45 individuals (96% with 48,XXYY karyotype had two distinct X chromosomes, while 2 (4% had a duplicate X, providing evidence that 48,XXYY may result from nondisjunction during early mitotic divisions of a 46,XY embryo. Conclusions Quantitative Pyrosequencing, with high-throughput potential, can detect male sex chromosome aneuploidies with 100% sensitivity.

  9. Myhre and LAPS syndromes : clinical and molecular review of 32 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michot, Caroline; Le Goff, Carine; Mahaut, Clementine; Afenjar, Alexandra; Brooks, Alice S.; Campeau, Philippe M.; Destree, Anne; Di Rocco, Maja; Donnai, Dian; Hennekam, Raoul; Heron, Delphine; Jacquemont, Sebastien; Kannu, Peter; Lin, Angela E.; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Mansour, Sahar; Marlin, Sandrine; McGowan, Ruth; Murphy, Helen; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Rio, Marlene; Simon, Marleen; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Stone, James R.; Sznajer, Yves; Tolmie, John; Touraine, Renaud; van den Ende, Jenneke; Van der Aa, Nathalie; van Essen, Ton; Verloes, Alain; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Myhre syndrome is characterized by short stature, brachydactyly, facial features, pseudomuscular hypertrophy, joint limitation and hearing loss. We identified SMAD4 mutations as the cause of Myhre syndrome. SMAD4 mutations have also been identified in laryngotracheal stenosis, arthropathy, prognathi

  10. Importance of molecular cell biology investigations in human medicine in the story of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raška, Ivan

    2010-09-01

    Ranged among laminopathies, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a syndrome that involves premature aging, leading usually to death at the age between 10 to 14 years predominatly due to a myocardial infarction or a stroke. In the lecture I shall overview the importance of molecular cell biology investigations that led to the discovery of the basic mechanism standing behind this rare syndrome. The genetic basis in most cases is a mutation at the nucleotide position 1824 of the lamin A gene. At this position, cytosine is substituted for thymine so that a cryptic splice site within the precursor mRNA for lamin A is generated. This results in a production of abnormal lamin A, termed progerin, its presence in cells having a deleterious dominant effect. Depending on the cell type and tissue, progerin induces a pleiotropy of defects that vary in different tissues. The present endeavour how to challenge this terrible disease will be also mentioned.

  11. Yield of molecular and clinical testing for arrhythmia syndromes: Report of 15 years' experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Nynke; Tan, Hanno L.; Alders, Mariëlle; Kolder, Iris; De Haij, Simone; Mannens, Marcel M.A.M.; Lombardi, Maria Paola; Dit Deprez, Ronald H. Lekanne; Van Langen, Irene; Wilde, Arthur A.M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND-: Sudden cardiac death is often caused by inherited arrhythmia syndromes, particularly if it occurs at a young age. In 1996, we started a cardiogenetics clinic aimed at diagnosing such syndromes and providing timely (often presymptomatic) treatment to families in which such syndromes or s

  12. Clinical and molecular findings in 39 patients with KBG syndrome caused by deletion or mutation of ANKRD11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Alice; Riccardi, Florence; Tessier, Aude; Pfundt, Rolph; Busa, Tiffany; Cacciagli, Pierre; Capri, Yline; Coutton, Charles; Delahaye-Duriez, Andree; Frebourg, Thierry; Gatinois, Vincent; Guerrot, Anne-Marie; Genevieve, David; Lecoquierre, Francois; Jacquette, Aurélia; Khau Van Kien, Philippe; Leheup, Bruno; Marlin, Sandrine; Verloes, Alain; Michaud, Vincent; Nadeau, Gwenael; Mignot, Cyril; Parent, Philippe; Rossi, Massimiliano; Toutain, Annick; Schaefer, Elise; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Thevenon, Julien; Satre, Véronique; Perrin, Laurence; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Sorlin, Arthur; Missirian, Chantal; Villard, Laurent; Mancini, Julien; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Philip, Nicole

    2016-11-01

    KBG syndrome, due to ANKRD11 alteration is characterized by developmental delay, short stature, dysmorphic facial features, and skeletal anomalies. We report a clinical and molecular study of 39 patients affected by KBG syndrome. Among them, 19 were diagnosed after the detection of a 16q24.3 deletion encompassing the ANKRD11 gene by array CGH. In the 20 remaining patients, the clinical suspicion was confirmed by the identification of an ANKRD11 mutation by direct sequencing. We present arguments to modulate the previously reported diagnostic criteria. Macrodontia should no longer be considered a mandatory feature. KBG syndrome is compatible with autonomous life in adulthood. Autism is less frequent than previously reported. We also describe new clinical findings with a potential impact on the follow-up of patients, such as precocious puberty and a case of malignancy. Most deletions remove the 5'end or the entire coding region but never extend toward 16q telomere suggesting that distal 16q deletion could be lethal. Although ANKRD11 appears to be a major gene associated with intellectual disability, KBG syndrome remains under-diagnosed. NGS-based approaches for sequencing will improve the detection of point mutations in this gene. Broad knowledge of the clinical phenotype is essential for a correct interpretation of the molecular results. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Complete exon sequencing of all known Usher syndrome genes greatly improves molecular diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacombe Didier

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Usher syndrome (USH combines sensorineural deafness with blindness. It is inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Early diagnosis is critical for adapted educational and patient management choices, and for genetic counseling. To date, nine causative genes have been identified for the three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2 and USH3. Current diagnostic strategies make use of a genotyping microarray that is based on the previously reported mutations. The purpose of this study was to design a more accurate molecular diagnosis tool. Methods We sequenced the 366 coding exons and flanking regions of the nine known USH genes, in 54 USH patients (27 USH1, 21 USH2 and 6 USH3. Results Biallelic mutations were detected in 39 patients (72% and monoallelic mutations in an additional 10 patients (18.5%. In addition to biallelic mutations in one of the USH genes, presumably pathogenic mutations in another USH gene were detected in seven patients (13%, and another patient carried monoallelic mutations in three different USH genes. Notably, none of the USH3 patients carried detectable mutations in the only known USH3 gene, whereas they all carried mutations in USH2 genes. Most importantly, the currently used microarray would have detected only 30 of the 81 different mutations that we found, of which 39 (48% were novel. Conclusions Based on these results, complete exon sequencing of the currently known USH genes stands as a definite improvement for molecular diagnosis of this disease, which is of utmost importance in the perspective of gene therapy.

  14. Clinical and Molecular Assessment in a Female with Fragile X Syndrome and Tuberous Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yrigollen, Carolyn M; Pacini, Laura; Nobile, Veronica; Lozano, Reymundo; Hagerman, Randi J.; Bagni, Claudia; Tassone, Flora

    2017-01-01

    Objective Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and tuberous sclerosis (TSC) are genetic disorders that result in intellectual disability and an increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). While the clinical presentation of each disorder is distinct, the molecular causes are linked to a disruption in the mTORC1 (mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1) and ERK1/2 (Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinase) signaling pathways. Methods We assessed the clinical and molecular characteristics of an individual seen at the UC Davis MIND Institute with a diagnosis of FXS and TSC. Clinical evaluation of physical, behavioral, and cognitive impairments were performed. Additionally, total and phosphorylated proteins along the mTORC1 and ERK1/2 pathways were measured in primary fibroblast cell lines from the proband. Results In this case the phenotypic effects that result in a human with both FXS and TSC are shown to be severe. Changes in mTORC1 and ERK1/2 signaling proteins and global protein synthesis were not found to be noticeably different between four cohorts (typically developing, FMR1 full mutation, FMR1 full mutation and TSC1 loss of function mutation, and TSC1 loss of function mutation); however cohort sizes prevented stringent comparisons. Conclusion It has previously been suggested that disruption of the mTORC1 pathway was reciprocal in TSC and FXS double knock-out mouse models so that the regulation of these pathways were more similar to wild-type mice compared to mice harboring a Fmr1−/y or Tsc2−/+ mutation alone. However, in this first reported case of a human with a diagnosis of both FXS and TSC, substantial clinical impairments, as a result of these two disorders were observed. Differences in the mTORC and ERK1/2 pathways were not clearly established when compared between individuals with either disorder, or both.

  15. Alterações moleculares em síndrome mielodisplásica Molecular abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes L. F. Chauffaille

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome mielodisplásica (SMD representa um grupo heterogêneo de doenças hematopoéticas clonais. As alterações cromossômicas observadas em SMD foram o ponto de partida para uma série de estudos para a caracterização da patogênese molecular nessa doença. A perda de material genético leva à hipótese de inativação de genes supressores tumorais (GST, mas essa teoria não explica o evento inicial desencadeador da vantagem de crescimento das células progenitoras hematopoéticas, estando outros mecanismos envolvidos, dos quais sobressaem a ativação de oncogenes, alteração de vias de sinalização e fatores de transcrição. Mutações de oncogenes, como RAS, P53, PDGF, FLT3 e MLL, dentre outros, podem contribuir para o desenvolvimento da SMD. A mutação em tandem do FLT3 é evento genético tardio no curso da doença e os pacientes portadores da mesma tendem a apresentar prognóstico desfavorável e transformação iminente para leucemia aguda. Tanto aberrações qualitativas como quantitativas de fatores de transcrição induzem o desequilíbrio ou bloqueio de diferenciação da célula hematopoética, que, por sua vez, se traduz em hematopoese ineficaz. Alterações epigenéticas são caracterizadas por metilação de DNA que tem papel no controle da expressão gênica. Hipermetilação e inativação de genes reguladores exercem função no desenvolvimento da doença. SMD de alto risco está associada à elevada prevalência de inativação do gene supressor tumoral p15INK4B por hipermetilação do promotor. Encurtamento do telômero correlaciona-se a cariótipos complexos, indicando instabilidade genômica e pior prognóstico.Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is a heterogenous group of clonal hematopoietic disorders. Chromosomal abnormalities detected in this disease were the start to many studies in order to characterize molecular pathogenesis. The loss of genetic material observed in most patients with MDS leads to the

  16. Molecular Characterization of Three Canine Models of Human Rare Bone Diseases: Caffey, van den Ende-Gupta, and Raine Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hytönen, Marjo K; Arumilli, Meharji; Lappalainen, Anu K; Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Hundi, Sruthi; Salmela, Elina; Venta, Patrick; Sarkiala, Eva; Jokinen, Tarja; Gorgas, Daniela; Kere, Juha; Nieminen, Pekka; Drögemüller, Cord; Lohi, Hannes

    2016-05-01

    One to two percent of all children are born with a developmental disorder requiring pediatric hospital admissions. For many such syndromes, the molecular pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. Parallel developmental disorders in other species could provide complementary models for human rare diseases by uncovering new candidate genes, improving the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and opening possibilities for therapeutic trials. We performed various experiments, e.g. combined genome-wide association and next generation sequencing, to investigate the clinico-pathological features and genetic causes of three developmental syndromes in dogs, including craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO), a previously undescribed skeletal syndrome, and dental hypomineralization, for which we identified pathogenic variants in the canine SLC37A2 (truncating splicing enhancer variant), SCARF2 (truncating 2-bp deletion) and FAM20C (missense variant) genes, respectively. CMO is a clinical equivalent to an infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease), for which SLC37A2 is a new candidate gene. SLC37A2 is a poorly characterized member of a glucose-phosphate transporter family without previous disease associations. It is expressed in many tissues, including cells of the macrophage lineage, e.g. osteoclasts, and suggests a disease mechanism, in which an impaired glucose homeostasis in osteoclasts compromises their function in the developing bone, leading to hyperostosis. Mutations in SCARF2 and FAM20C have been associated with the human van den Ende-Gupta and Raine syndromes that include numerous features similar to the affected dogs. Given the growing interest in the molecular characterization and treatment of human rare diseases, our study presents three novel physiologically relevant models for further research and therapy approaches, while providing the molecular identity for the canine conditions.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Impaired Neurogenesis of Fragile X Syndrome Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telias, Michael; Mayshar, Yoav; Amit, Ami

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited cognitive impairment. It is caused by developmental inactivation of the FMR1 gene and the absence of its encoded protein FMRP, which plays pivotal roles in brain development and function. In FXS embryos with full FMR1 mutation, FMRP is expressed during early embryogenesis and is gradually downregulated at the third trimester of pregnancy. FX-human embryonic stem cells (FX-hESCs), derived from FX human blastocysts, demonstrate the same pattern of developmentally regulated FMR1 inactivation when subjected to in vitro neural differentiation (IVND). In this study, we used this in vitro human platform to explore the molecular mechanisms downstream to FMRP in the context of early human embryonic neurogenesis. Our results show a novel role for the SOX superfamily of transcription factors, specifically for SOX2 and SOX9, which could explain the reduced and delayed neurogenesis observed in FX cells. In addition, we assess in this study the “GSK3β theory of FXS” for the first time in a human-based model. We found no evidence for a pathological increase in GSK3β protein levels upon cellular loss of FMRP, in contrast to what was found in the brain of Fmr1 knockout mice. Our study adds novel data on potential downstream targets of FMRP and highlights the importance of the FX-hESC IVND system. PMID:26393806

  18. Trapped neutrophil syndrome in a Border Collie dog: clinical, clinico-pathologic, and molecular findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Shoubudani, Tomoaki; Nishimoto, Seira; Kawamura, Ryuta; Yabuki, Akira; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-06-01

    Trapped neutrophil syndrome (TNS) is an autosomal recessive inherited neutropenia known in Border Collies since the 1990's. Recently, the causative mutation has been identified in the canine VPS13B gene and a DNA-based diagnosis has now become available. The present paper describes clinical and clinico-pathologic findings in a Border Collie with TNS that was molecularly diagnosed for the first time in Japan. In a 10-week-old male Border Collie with microgenesis and symptoms related to recurrent infections, a hematological examination revealed severe leukopenia due to neutropenia, suggesting the dog to be affected by inherited neutropenic immunodeficiency. Direct DNA sequencing demonstrated that the dog was homozygous for the causative mutation of TNS and both its parents were heterozygous carriers. In addition, a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction-based length polymorphism analysis coupled with microchip electrophoresis was developed for the genotyping of TNS. This assay could discriminate clearly all genotypes, suggesting that it was suitable for both individual diagnosis and large-scale surveys for prevention.

  19. Novel molecular variants of the Na-Cl cotransporter gene are responsible for Gitelman syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastroianni, N.; De Fusco, M.; Casari, G. [Univsersita` di Milano (Italy)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    A hereditary defect of the distal tubule accounts for the clinical features of Gitelman syndrome (GS), an autosomal recessive disease characterized by hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, metabolic alkalosis, and hypocalciuria. Recently, we cloned the cDNA coding for the human Na-Cl thiazide-sensitive cotransporter (TSC; also known as {open_quotes}NCCT{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}SLC12A3{close_quotes}) as a possible candidate for GS, and Simon et al., independently, described rotation in patients with GS. Now, we show 12 additional mutations consistent with a loss of function of the Na-Cl cotransporter in GS. Two missense replacements, R09W and P349L, are common to both studies and could represent ancient mutations. The other mutations include three deletions, two insertions, and six missense mutations. When all mutations from both studies are considered, missense mutations seem to be more frequently localized within the intracellular domains of the molecule, rather than in transmembrane or extracellular domains. One family, previously reported as a GS form with dominant inheritance, has proved to be recessive, with the affected child being a compound heterozygote. A highly informative intragenic tetranucleotide marker, useful for molecular diagnostic studies, has been identified at the acceptor splice site of exon 9. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Impact of next-generation sequencing on molecular diagnosis of inherited non-syndromic hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Gao; Pu Dai

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most common birth defects, with inherited genetic defects play an important role, contributing to about 60% of deafness occurring in infants. However, hearing impairment is genetically heterogeneous, with both common and rare forms occurring due to mutations in estimated 500 genes. Due to the large number and presumably low mutation frequencies of those genes, it would be highly expensive and time-consuming to address this issue by conventional gene-by-gene Sanger sequencing. Next-generation sequencing is a revo-lutionary technology that allows the simultaneous screening of mutations in a large number of genes. It is cost effective compared to classical strategies of linkage analysis and direct sequencing when the number or size of genes is large, and thus has become a highly efficient strategy for identifying novel causative genes and mutations involved in heritable disease. In this review, we describe major NGS methodologies currently used for genetic disorders and highlight applications of these technologies in studies of molecular diagnosis and the discovery of genes implicated in non-syndromic hearing loss.

  1. Premature ovarian failure (POF) syndrome: towards the molecular clinical analysis of its genetic complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassnacht, W; Mempel, A; Strowitzki, T; Vogt, P H

    2006-01-01

    The Premature Ovarian Failure (POF) syndrome is a very heterogeneous clinical disorder due probably to the complex genetic networks controlling human folliculogenesis. Clinical subgroups of POF patients whose aetiology of ovarian failure is based on the same genetic factors are therefore difficult to establish. Some experimental evidence suggests that these genes might be clustered on the female sex chromosome in the POF1 and POF2 loci. This review is aimed to present an overview of the actual structural changes of the X chromosome causing POF, and to present a number of X and autosomal female fertility genes which are probably key genes in human folliculogenesis and are therefore prominent POF candidate genes. Towards the molecular analysis of their functional contribution to the genetic aetiology of POF in the clinic, an interdisciplinary scheme for their diagnostic analysis is presented in a pilot study focussed on chromosome analyses and the expression analysis of some major POF candidate genes (DAZL, DBX, FOXL2, INHalpha, GDF9, USP9X) in the leukocytes of 101 POF patients. It starts with a comprehensive and significantly improved clinical diagnostic program for this large and heterogeneous patient group.

  2. Susceptibility to DNA damage as a molecular mechanism for non-syndromic cleft lip and palate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Shigeru Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Non-syndromic cleft lip/palate (NSCL/P is a complex, frequent congenital malformation, determined by the interplay between genetic and environmental factors during embryonic development. Previous findings have appointed an aetiological overlap between NSCL/P and cancer, and alterations in similar biological pathways may underpin both conditions. Here, using a combination of transcriptomic profiling and functional approaches, we report that NSCL/P dental pulp stem cells exhibit dysregulation of a co-expressed gene network mainly associated with DNA double-strand break repair and cell cycle control (p = 2.88×10(-2-5.02×10(-9. This network included important genes for these cellular processes, such as BRCA1, RAD51, and MSH2, which are predicted to be regulated by transcription factor E2F1. Functional assays support these findings, revealing that NSCL/P cells accumulate DNA double-strand breaks upon exposure to H2O2. Furthermore, we show that E2f1, Brca1 and Rad51 are co-expressed in the developing embryonic orofacial primordia, and may act as a molecular hub playing a role in lip and palate morphogenesis. In conclusion, we show for the first time that cellular defences against DNA damage may take part in determining the susceptibility to NSCL/P. These results are in accordance with the hypothesis of aetiological overlap between this malformation and cancer, and suggest a new pathogenic mechanism for the disease.

  3. TBX3 regulates splicing in vivo: a novel molecular mechanism for Ulnar-mammary syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan Kumar P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available TBX3 is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors with critical roles in development, oncogenesis, cell fate, and tissue homeostasis. TBX3 mutations in humans cause complex congenital malformations and Ulnar-mammary syndrome. Previous investigations into TBX3 function focused on its activity as a transcriptional repressor. We used an unbiased proteomic approach to identify TBX3 interacting proteins in vivo and discovered that TBX3 interacts with multiple mRNA splicing factors and RNA metabolic proteins. We discovered that TBX3 regulates alternative splicing in vivo and can promote or inhibit splicing depending on context and transcript. TBX3 associates with alternatively spliced mRNAs and binds RNA directly. TBX3 binds RNAs containing TBX binding motifs, and these motifs are required for regulation of splicing. Our study reveals that TBX3 mutations seen in humans with UMS disrupt its splicing regulatory function. The pleiotropic effects of TBX3 mutations in humans and mice likely result from disrupting at least two molecular functions of this protein: transcriptional regulation and pre-mRNA splicing.

  4. Clinical and molecular analyses of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome: Comparison between spontaneous conception and assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Jair; Romanelli, Valeria; Martin-Trujillo, Alex; Fernández, García-Moya; Segovia, Mabel; Perandones, Claudia; Pérez Jurado, Luis A; Esteller, Manel; Fraga, Mario; Arias, Pedro; Gordo, Gema; Dapía, Irene; Mena, Rocío; Palomares, María; Pérez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Nevado, Julián; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; Martinez-Glez, Víctor; Vallespín, Elena; Monk, David; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth syndrome characterized by an excessive prenatal and postnatal growth, macrosomia, macroglossia, and hemihyperplasia. The molecular basis of this syndrome is complex and heterogeneous, involving genes located at 11p15.5. BWS is correlated with assisted reproductive techniques. BWS in individuals born following assisted reproductive techniques has been found to occur four to nine times higher compared to children with to BWS born after spontaneous conception. Here, we report a series of 187 patients with to BWS born either after assisted reproductive techniques or conceived naturally. Eighty-eight percent of BWS patients born via assisted reproductive techniques had hypomethylation of KCNQ1OT1:TSS-DMR in comparison with 49% for patients with BWS conceived naturally. None of the patients with BWS born via assisted reproductive techniques had hypermethylation of H19/IGF2:IG-DMR, neither CDKN1 C mutations nor patUPD11. We did not find differences in the frequency of multi-locus imprinting disturbances between groups. Patients with BWS born via assisted reproductive techniques had an increased frequency of advanced bone age, congenital heart disease, and decreased frequency of earlobe anomalies but these differences may be explained by the different molecular background compared to those with BWS and spontaneous fertilization. We conclude there is a correlation of the molecular etiology of BWS with the type of conception. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: toward improving early molecular diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deaf-blindness cases. The most severe form of this syndrome, Usher syndrome type I (USH1), is characterized by profound congenital sensorineural deafness, vestibular dysfunction, and retinitis pigmentosa. Six USH1 genes have been identified, MYO7A, CDH23, PCDH15, USH1C, SANS, and CIB2, encoding myosin VIIA, cadherin-23, protocadherin-15, harmonin, scaffold protein containing ankyrin repeats and a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain,...

  6. Molecular matching for Rh and K reduces red blood cell alloimmunisation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelsin, Gláucia A.S.; Rodrigues, Camila; Visentainer, Jeane E.L.; de Melo Campos, Paula; Traina, Fabíola; Gilli, Simone C.O.; Saad, Sara T.O.; Castilho, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Background Matching for Rh and K antigens has been used in an attempt to reduce antibody formation in patients receiving chronic transfusions but an extended phenotype matching including Fya and Jka antigens has also been recommended. The aim of this study was to identify an efficient transfusion protocol of genotype matching for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia. We also examined a possible association of HLA class II alleles with red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunisation. Materials and methods We evaluated 43 patients with MDS undergoing transfusion therapy with and without antibody formation. We investigated antigen-matched RBC units for ABO, D, C, c, E, e, K, Fya, Fyb, Jka, Jkb, S, s, Doa, Dob and Dia on the patients’ samples and on the donor units serologically matched for them based on their ABO, Rh and K phenotypes and presence of antibodies. We also determined the frequencies of HLA-DRB1 alleles in the alloimmunised and non-alloimmunised patients. Results Seventeen of the 43 patients had discrepancies or mismatches for multiple antigens between their genotype-predicted profile and the antigen profile of the units of blood serologically matched for them. We verified that 36.8% of patients had more than one RBC alloantibody and 10.5% of patients had autoantibodies. Although we were able to find a better match for the patients in our extended genotyped/phenotyped units, we verified that matching for Rh and K would be sufficient for most of the patients. We also observed an over-representation of the HLA-DRB1*13 allele in the non-alloimmunised group of patients with MDS. Discussion In our population molecular matching for C, c, E, e, K was able to reduce RBC alloimmunisation in MDS patients. An association of HLA-DRB1*13 and protection from RBC alloimmunisation should be confirmed. PMID:24960644

  7. Reduced circulating oxytocin and High-Molecular-Weight adiponectin are risk factors for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guoyue; Qian, Weiyun; Pan, Ruirong; Jia, Jue; Jiang, Dan; Yang, Qichao; Wang, Su; Liu, Yuanxin; Yu, Shuqin; Hu, Hao; Sun, Wenjun; Ye, Jingjing; Mao, Chaoming; Zhuang, Ruo; Zhou, Libin

    2016-07-30

    The neurohypophysial hormone, oxytocin, is involved in the regulation of energy metabolism. Adiponectin (APN) is an adipose tissue-specific serum protein that inversely associates with metabolic syndrome (MetS). High-molecular-weight adiponectin (HMW APN) is considered the active form. In the present study, we aimed to determine the relationships of oxytocin and HMW APN to MetS and investigate whether or not the combination of oxytocin and HMW APN is associated with further metabolic abnormalities compared to each of them alone. A total of 170 subjects (75 with MetS and 95 non-MetS) were enrolled. Anthropometric parameters, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), blood lipids, hs-CRP, oxytocin and HMW APN levels were measured. Compared with non-MetS subjects, serum oxytocin and HMW APN levels were significantly lower in subjects with MetS (Poxytocin and high HMW APN levels (high score group), low oxytocin and low HMW APN levels (low score group) and others. Participants in low score group showed the worst metabolic profiles and were more likely to have MetS compared to the other two group. In Spearman rank correlation coefficient, the classification by the combination of oxytocin and HMW APN was significantly correlated with a larger number of metabolic risk factors compared with classification by each of them alone. Individuals with low circulating oxytocin levels coupled with low HMW APN levels were at significantly increased risk of MetS. The combination of both markers would be useful for identifying MetS high risk patients.

  8. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta ; Blair, Edward M. ; Blau, Nenad ; Bonthron, David T. ; Briggs, Tracy ; Brueton, Louise A. ; Brunner, Han G. ; Burke, Christopher J. ; Carr, Ian M. ; Carvalho, Daniel R. ; Chandler, Kate E. ; Christen, Hans-Jürgen ; Corry, Peter C. ; Cowan, Frances M. ; Cox, Helen ; D’Arrigo, Stefano ; Dean, John ; De Laet, Corinne ; De Praeter, Claudine ; Déry, Catherine ; Ferrie, Colin D. ; Flintoff, Kim ; Frints, Suzanna G. M. ; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels ; Gener, Blanca ; Goizet, Cyril ; Goutières, Françoise ; Green, Andrew J. ; Guët, Agnès ; Hamel, Ben C. J. ; Hayward, Bruce E. ; Heiberg, Arvid ; Hennekam, Raoul C. ; Husson, Marie ; Jackson, Andrew P. ; Jayatunga, Rasieka ; Jiang, Yong-Hui ; Kant, Sarina G. ; Kao, Amy ; King, Mary D. ; Kingston, Helen M. ; Klepper, Joerg ; van der Knaap, Marjo S. ; Kornberg, Andrew J. ; Kotzot, Dieter ; Kratzer, Wilfried ; Lacombe, Didier ; Lagae, Lieven ; Landrieu, Pierre Georges ; Lanzi, Giovanni ; Leitch, Andrea ; Lim, Ming J. ; Livingston, John H. ; Lourenco, Charles M. ; Lyall, E. G. Hermione ; Lynch, Sally A. ; Lyons, Michael J. ; Marom, Daphna ; McClure, John P. ; McWilliam, Robert ; Melancon, Serge B. ; Mewasingh, Leena D. ; Moutard, Marie-Laure ; Nischal, Ken K. ; Østergaard, John R. ; Prendiville, Julie ; Rasmussen, Magnhild ; Rogers, R. Curtis ; Roland, Dominique ; Rosser, Elisabeth M. ; Rostasy, Kevin ; Roubertie, Agathe ; Sanchis, Amparo ; Schiffmann, Raphael ; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine ; Seal, Sunita ; Shalev, Stavit A. ; Corcoles, C. Sierra ; Sinha, Gyan P. ; Soler, Doriette ; Spiegel, Ronen ; Stephenson, John B. P. ; Tacke, Uta ; Tan, Tiong Yang ; Till, Marianne ; Tolmie, John L. ; Tomlin, Pam ; Vagnarelli, Federica ; Valente, Enza Maria ; Van Coster, Rudy N. A. ; Van der Aa, Nathalie ; Vanderver, Adeline ; Vles, Johannes S. H. ; Voit, Thomas ; Wassmer, Evangeline ; Weschke, Bernhard ; Whiteford, Margo L. ; Willemsen, Michel A. A. ; Zankl, Andreas ; Zuberi, Sameer M. ; Orcesi, Simona ; Fazzi, Elisa ; Lebon, Pierre ; Crow, Yanick J. 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation–positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified. PMID:17846997

  9. Molecular and clinical studies in 138 Japanese patients with Silver-Russell syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Fuke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have revealed relative frequency and characteristic phenotype of two major causative factors for Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS, i.e. epimutation of the H19-differentially methylated region (DMR and uniparental maternal disomy 7 (upd(7mat, as well as multilocus methylation abnormalities and positive correlation between methylation index and body and placental sizes in H19-DMR epimutation. Furthermore, rare genomic alterations have been found in a few of patients with idiopathic SRS. Here, we performed molecular and clinical findings in 138 Japanese SRS patients, and examined these matters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified H19-DMR epimutation in cases 1-43 (group 1, upd(7mat in cases 44-52 (group 2, and neither H19-DMR epimutation nor upd(7mat in cases 53-138 (group 3. Multilocus analysis revealed hyper- or hypomethylated DMRs in 2.4% of examined DMRs in group 1; in particular, an extremely hypomethylated ARHI-DMR was identified in case 13. Oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization identified a ∼3.86 Mb deletion at chromosome 17q24 in case 73. Epigenotype-phenotype analysis revealed that group 1 had more reduced birth length and weight, more preserved birth occipitofrontal circumference (OFC, more frequent body asymmetry and brachydactyly, and less frequent speech delay than group 2. The degree of placental hypoplasia was similar between the two groups. In group 1, the methylation index for the H19-DMR was positively correlated with birth length and weight, present height and weight, and placental weight, but with neither birth nor present OFC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results are grossly consistent with the previously reported data, although the frequency of epimutations is lower in the Japanese SRS patients than in the Western European SRS patients. Furthermore, the results provide useful information regarding placental hypoplasia in SRS, clinical phenotypes of the hypomethylated ARHI

  10. Defining the molecular interface that connects the Fanconi anemia protein FANCM to the Bloom syndrome dissolvasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Kelly A; Xue, Yutong; Ling, Chen; Takata, Minoru; Wang, Weidong; Keck, James L

    2012-03-20

    The RMI subcomplex (RMI1/RMI2) functions with the BLM helicase and topoisomerase IIIα in a complex called the "dissolvasome," which separates double-Holliday junction DNA structures that can arise during DNA repair. This activity suppresses potentially harmful sister chromatid exchange (SCE) events in wild-type cells but not in cells derived from Bloom syndrome patients with inactivating BLM mutations. The RMI subcomplex also associates with FANCM, a component of the Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex that is important for repair of stalled DNA replication forks. The RMI/FANCM interface appears to help coordinate dissolvasome and FA core complex activities, but its precise role remains poorly understood. Here, we define the structure of the RMI/FANCM interface and investigate its roles in coordinating cellular DNA-repair activities. The X-ray crystal structure of the RMI core complex bound to a well-conserved peptide from FANCM shows that FANCM binds to both RMI proteins through a hydrophobic "knobs-into-holes" packing arrangement. The RMI/FANCM interface is shown to be critical for interaction between the components of the dissolvasome and the FA core complex. FANCM variants that substitute alanine for key interface residues strongly destabilize the complex in solution and lead to increased SCE levels in cells that are similar to those observed in blm- or fancm-deficient cells. This study provides a molecular view of the RMI/FANCM complex and highlights a key interface utilized in coordinating the activities of two critical eukaryotic DNA-damage repair machines.

  11. Carney complex and McCune Albright syndrome: an overview of clinical manifestations and human molecular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salpea, Paraskevi; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2014-04-05

    Endocrine neoplasia syndromes feature a wide spectrum of benign and malignant tumors of endocrine and non-endocrine organs associated with other clinical manifestations. This study outlines the main clinical features, genetic basis, and molecular mechanisms behind two multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes that share quite a bit of similarities, but one can be inherited whereas the other is always sporadic, Carney complex (CNC) and McCune-Albright (MAS), respectively. Spotty skin pigmentation, cardiac and other myxomas, and different types of endocrine tumors and other characterize Carney complex, which is caused largely by inactivating Protein kinase A, regulatory subunit, type I, Alpha (PRKAR1A) gene mutations. The main features of McCune-Albright are fibrous dysplasia of bone (FD), café-au-lait macules and precocious puberty; the disease is caused by activating mutations in the Guanine Nucleotide-binding protein, Alpha-stimulating activity polypeptide (GNAS) gene which are always somatic. We review the clinical manifestations of the two syndromes and provide an update on their molecular genetics.

  12. Molecular analysis of the HPJ-JT syndrome and sporadic parathyroid carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haven, Carola José

    2008-01-01

    HPT-JT syndrome is a rare disease characterized by parathyroid tumours (with a high percentage of carcinomas), jaw and kidney tumours. In this thesis, the clinical and genetic features of the HPT-JT syndrome and the relationship between the HRPT2 gene and parathyroid tumours were investigated. We

  13. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  14. Antiviral activity and underlying molecular mechanisms of Matrine against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Na; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Cai-Hong; Li, E; He, Jun-Ping; Wang, Shao-Yu; Hu, Yuan-Liang; Lei, Hai-Min; Li, Hong-Quan

    2014-04-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), caused by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), is an acute infectious disease. The prevalence of PRRS has made swine industry suffered huge financial losses. Matrine, a natural compound, has been demonstrated to possess anti-PRRSV activity in Marc-145 cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms were still unknown. The main objective of our study was to discuss the effect of Matrine on PRRSV N protein expression and PRRSV induced apoptosis. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blot were used to assess the effect of Matrine on N protein expression. Apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence staining. In addition, the effect of Matrine on caspase-3 activation was investigated by Western blot. Indirect immunofluorescence assay and Western blot analysis demonstrated that Matrine could inhibit N protein expression in Marc-145 cells. And Matrine was found to be able to impair PRRSV-induced apoptosis by inhibiting caspase-3 activation.

  15. A de novo germline MLH1 mutation in a Lynch syndrome patient with discordant immunohistochemical and molecular biology test results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabrice Airaud; Sébastien Küry; Isabelle Valo; Ingrid Maury; Dominique Bonneau; Olivier Ingster; Stéphane Bezieau

    2012-01-01

    We describe a patient with a Homo sapiens mutL homolog 1 (MLH1)-associated Lynch syndrome with previous diagnoses of two distinct primary cancers:a sigmoid colon cancer at the age of 39 years,and a right colon cancer at the age of 50 years.The mutation identified in his blood and buccal cells,c.1771delG,p.Asp591Ilefs*25,appears to be a de novo event,as it was not transmitted by either of his parents.This type of de novo event is rare in MLH1 as only three cases have been reported in the literature so far.Furthermore,the discordant results observed between replication error phenotyping and immunohistochemistry highlight the importance of the systematic use of both pre-screening tests in the molecular diagnosis of Lynch syndrome.

  16. Preliminary molecular basis of Danggui-buxue-tang on Qi deficiency and blood stasis syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ya; LI Xiao-hui

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the molecular biology mechanism of Danggui-buxue-tang on tonifying Qi and controlling blood circulation through modulation the immune functional genes. Methods Rats were randomly divided into control group, model group, and Danggui-buxue-tang group. Effect of Dang-guibuxue-tang on mRNA expressions of IL-1β, TNF-α, HSP-70, NF-kB, p38MAPK and JNK in blood cells of rats with Qi deficiency and blood stasis were measured with real-time fluorescent quantitative-PCR at 5th, 14th and 28th day. And that in artery wall were determined at the 28th day. NF-kB/p65 and p-c-jun protein expressions in rat artery wall were detected by western blotting as well. Results In model group, TNF-α, IL-1β, NF-kB, HSP-70, p38MAPK and JNK mRNA expression in blood cell increased significantly compared with control group. Compared with model group, mRNA expression of IL-1βand JNK decreased significantly; TNF-α decreased at 5th, 14th day;HSP-70, p38MAPK decreased at 14th, 28th day; NF-kB decreased at 28th day. In model group, TNF-α, IL-1β, NF-kB, p38MAPK and JNK mRNA expression in artery increased compared with control group, excluded HSP-70, and that in Danggui-buxue-tang group decreased significantly. In model group, NF-kB/p65 and p-c-jun protein expression in artery increased compared with control group, and that in Danggui-buxue-tang group decreased significantly. Conclusions The effects of Dang-guibuxuetang on Qi deficiency and blood stasis syndrome was brought from the regulating of cytokine network at multi-link and multi-target, NF-kB, p38MAPK and JNK signal transduction pathways included. Through which the immune system and whole body reached to a functional balance status.

  17. Clinical and molecular characteristics of East Asian patients with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meihua Wong; YingHsia Chu; Hwei Ling Tan; Hideharu Bessho; Joanne Ngeow; Tiffany Tang; MinHan Tan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) syndrome is a dominantly inherited multisystem cancer syndrome caused by a heterozygous mutation in the VHL tumor suppressor gene. Previous studies suggested that similar populations of Caucasian and Japanese patients have similar genotype or phenotype characteristics. In this comprehensive study of East Asian patients, we investigated the genetic and clinical characteristics of patients with VHL syndrome. Methods: To create a registry of clinical characteristics and mutations reported in East Asian patients with VHL syndrome, we conducted a comprehensive review of English language and non‑English language articles identi‑fied through a literature search. Publications in Japanese or Chinese language were read by native speakers of the language, who then performed the data extraction. Results: Of 237 East Asian patients with VHL syndrome, 154 unique kindreds were identified for analysis. Analyzed by kindred, missense mutations were the most common (40.9%, 63/154), followed by large/complete deletions (32.5%, 50/154) and nonsense mutations (11.7%, 18/154). Compared with a previously reported study of both East Asian and non‑East Asian patients, we found several key differences. First, missense and frameshift mutations in the VHL gene occurred less commonly in our population of East Asian patients (40.9% vs. 52.0%; P = 0.012 and 8.4% vs.13.0%; P < 0.001, respectively). Second, large/complete deletions were more common in our population of East Asian patients (32.5% vs. 10.5%; P < 0.001). Third, phenotypically, we observed that, in our population of East Asian patients with VHL syndrome, the incidence of retinal capillary hemangioblastoma was lower, whereas the incidence of renal cell carcinoma was higher. Conclusions: Evidence suggests that the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of East Asian patients with VHL syndrome differ from other populations. This should be considered when making screening recommendations for

  18. Novel Pathogenic Variant in TGFBR2 Confirmed by Molecular Modeling Is a Rare Cause of Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Michael T.; Urrutia, Raul A.; Blackburn, Patrick R.; Cousin, Margot A.; Boczek, Nicole J.; Klee, Eric W.; Macmurdo, Colleen

    2017-01-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by vascular findings of aneurysm and/or dissection of cerebral, thoracic, or abdominal arteries and skeletal findings. We report a case of a novel pathogenic variant in TGFBR2 and phenotype consistent with classic LDS. The proband was a 10-year-old presenting to the genetics clinic with an enlarged aortic root (Z-scores 5-6), pectus excavatum, and congenital contractures of the right 2nd and 3rd digit. Molecular testing of TGFBR2 was sent to a commercial laboratory and demonstrated a novel, likely pathogenic, variant in exon 4, c.1061T>C, p.(L354P). Molecular modeling reveals alteration of local protein structure as a result of this pathogenic variant. This pathogenic variant has not been previously reported in LDS and thus expands the pathogenic variant spectrum of this condition. PMID:28163941

  19. Novel Pathogenic Variant in TGFBR2 Confirmed by Molecular Modeling Is a Rare Cause of Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Zimmermann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS is a connective tissue disorder characterized by vascular findings of aneurysm and/or dissection of cerebral, thoracic, or abdominal arteries and skeletal findings. We report a case of a novel pathogenic variant in TGFBR2 and phenotype consistent with classic LDS. The proband was a 10-year-old presenting to the genetics clinic with an enlarged aortic root (Z-scores 5-6, pectus excavatum, and congenital contractures of the right 2nd and 3rd digit. Molecular testing of TGFBR2 was sent to a commercial laboratory and demonstrated a novel, likely pathogenic, variant in exon 4, c.1061T>C, p.(L354P. Molecular modeling reveals alteration of local protein structure as a result of this pathogenic variant. This pathogenic variant has not been previously reported in LDS and thus expands the pathogenic variant spectrum of this condition.

  20. A genetic and molecular update on adrenocortical causes of Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-05-01

    Primary adrenal Cushing syndrome is the result of cortisol hypersecretion mainly by adenomas and, rarely, by bilateral micronodular or macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia. cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signalling is the major activator of cortisol secretion in the adrenal cortex. Many adenomas and hyperplasias associated with primary hypercortisolism carry somatic or germline mutations in genes that encode constituents of the cAMP-PKA pathway. In this Review, we discuss Cushing syndrome and its linkage to dysregulated cAMP-PKA signalling, with a focus on genetic findings in the past few years. In addition, we discuss the presence of germline inactivating mutations in ARMC5 in patients with primary bilateral macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia. This finding has implications for genetic counselling of affected patients; hitherto, most patients with this form of adrenal hyperplasia and Cushing syndrome were thought to have a sporadic and not a familial disorder.

  1. Clinical and Molecular Features of Laron Syndrome, A Genetic Disorder Protecting from Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, Anna; Kołodziej-Rzepa, Marta; Biesaga, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a rare, genetic disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The disease is caused by mutations of the growth hormone (GH) gene, leading to GH/insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF1) signalling pathway defect. Patients with LS have characteristic biochemical features, such as a high serum level of GH and low IGF1 concentration. Laron syndrome was first described by the Israeli physician Zvi Laron in 1966. Globally, around 350 people are affected by this syndrome and there are two large groups living in separate geographic regions: Israel (69 individuals) and Ecuador (90 individuals). They are all characterized by typical appearance such as dwarfism, facial phenotype, obesity and hypogenitalism. Additionally, they suffer from hypoglycemia, hypercholesterolemia and sleep disorders, but surprisingly have a very low cancer risk. Therefore, studies on LS offer a unique opportunity to better understand carcinogenesis and develop new strategies of cancer treatment.

  2. Clinical, biochemical and molecular investigations of three Taiwanese children with Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Chen, Julia Yi-Ru; Lai, Chien-Cherng; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Yeh, Geng-Chang; Hsu, Hsun-Hui

    2004-02-01

    Three children of two Taiwanese families were diagnosed with Laron syndrome, two sisters and one boy. Both sets of parents were consanguineous. Clinically, all three presented with the typical craniofacies of Laron syndrome, consisting of prominent forehead and hypoplastic nasal bridge, high-pitched voice, short stature, and central obesity. Biochemically, their levels of serum IGF-I were less than 5 microg/ml before and after an IGF-I generation test, and levels of IGFBP-3 were reduced in all three patients. Sequence analysis of the growth hormone receptor gene revealed that all three carried a homozygous missense D152G mutation in exon 6.

  3. Bosma arrhinia microphthalmia syndrome in a Mexican patient with a molecular analysis of PAX6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Solano, Luis E; Chacón, Liliana; Morales-Mata, Dinorah; Zenteno, Juan C; Ramírez-Dueñas, Maria L; García-Ortiz, Jose E

    2016-01-01

    The association of anophthalmia, arrhinia, and hypogonadism constitutes the major clinical features for Bosma arrhinia microphthalmia syndrome. However, there is variability in the presentation of this disease; arrhinia is the most constant clinical feature, which is then combined with a spectrum of anophthalmia/microphthalmia and/or hypogonadism. This rare entity is not associated with any specific genes, but the genes that are related to arrhinia and anophthalmia have been studied in an attempt to explain this phenomenon. We analyzed the PAX6 gene in a Bosma arrhinia microphthalmia syndrome patient but found no variation or mutation that could constitute or establish a causal association in our patient.

  4. Arterial tortuosity syndrome : Clinical and molecular findings in 12 newly identified families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callewaert, B. L.; Willaert, A.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, W. S.; De Backer, J.; Devriendt, K.; Albrecht, B.; Ramos-Arroyo, M. A.; Doco-Fenzy, M.; Hennekam, R. C. M.; Pyeritz, R. E.; Krogmann, O. N.; Gillessen-kaesbach, G.; Wakeling, E. L.; Nik-zainal, S.; Francannet, C.; Mauran, P.; Booth, C.; Barrow, M.; Dekens, R.; Loeys, B. L.; Coucke, P. J.; De Paepe, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Arterial tortuosity syndrome (ATS) is a rare autosomal recessive connective tissue disease, characterized by widespread arterial involvement with elongation, tortuosity, and aneurysms of the large and middle-sized arteries. Recently, SLC2A10 mutations were identified in this condition. This gene enc

  5. Improving molecular diagnosis of aniridia and WAGR syndrome using customized targeted array-based CGH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallespín, Elena; Villaverde, Cristina; Martín-Arenas, Rubén; Vélez-Monsalve, Camilo; Lorda-Sánchez, Isabel; Nevado, Julián; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José; Lapunzina, Pablo; Ayuso, Carmen; Corton, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Chromosomal deletions at 11p13 are a frequent cause of congenital Aniridia, a rare pan-ocular genetic disease, and of WAGR syndrome, accounting up to 30% of cases. First-tier genetic testing for newborn with aniridia, to detect 11p13 rearrangements, includes Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) and karyotyping. However, neither of these approaches allow obtaining a complete picture of the high complexity of chromosomal deletions and breakpoints in aniridia. Here, we report the development and validation of a customized targeted array-based comparative genomic hybridization, so called WAGR-array, for comprehensive high-resolution analysis of CNV in the WAGR locus. Our approach increased the detection rate in a Spanish cohort of 38 patients with aniridia, WAGR syndrome and other related ocular malformations, allowing to characterize four undiagnosed aniridia cases, and to confirm MLPA findings in four additional patients. For all patients, breakpoints were accurately established and a contiguous deletion syndrome, involving a large number of genes, was identified in three patients. Moreover, we identified novel microdeletions affecting 3' PAX6 regulatory regions in three families with isolated aniridia. This tool represents a good strategy for the genetic diagnosis of aniridia and associated syndromes, allowing for a more accurate CNVs detection, as well as a better delineation of breakpoints. Our results underline the clinical importance of performing exhaustive and accurate analysis of chromosomal rearrangements for patients with aniridia, especially newborns and those without defects in PAX6 after diagnostic screening. PMID:28231309

  6. Prenatal molecular testing for Beckwith-Wiedemann and Silver-Russell syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Brioude, Frédéric; Russo, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann and Silver-Russell syndromes (BWS/SRS) are two imprinting disorders (IDs) associated with disturbances of the 11p15.5 chromosomal region. In BWS, epimutations and genomic alterations within 11p15.5 are observed in >70% of patients, whereas in SRS they are observed in about 60...

  7. A molecular analysis of fecal and mucosal bacterial communities in irritable bowel syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Codling, Caroline

    2010-02-01

    The objectives of this study were, firstly, to determine the diversity of the host\\'s gut microbiota in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) using a culture-independent method (DGGE of the 16S rRNA gene) and, secondly, to examine mucosal biopsies of IBS patients and compare them to their own fecal microbiota.

  8. Scientific statement on the diagnostic criteria, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and molecular genetics of polycystic ovary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Dumesic (Daniel); S.E. Oberfield (Sharon E.); E. Stener-Victorin (Elisabet); J.C. Marshall (John C.); J.S.E. Laven (Joop); R.S. Legro (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPolycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous and complex disorder that has both adverse reproductive and metabolic implications for affected women. However, there is generally poor understanding of its etiology. Varying expert-based diagnostic criteria utilize some combination of

  9. Identification of molecular alterations in gastrointestinal carcinomas and dysplastic hamartomas in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korsse, Susanne E.; Biermann, Katharina; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Wagner, Anja; Dekker, Evelien; Mathus-Vliegen, Elisabeth M. H.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; van Leerdam, Monique E.; van Veelen, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is caused by mutations in the LKB1 gene. It is characterized by gastrointestinal polyposis and an increased cancer risk, mainly in the gastrointestinal tract. Mechanisms of PJS-associated carcinogenesis are unclear. We investigated the involvement of candidate genes and

  10. Gastrointestinal Polyposis Syndromes : Clinical and molecular aspects of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis and Juvenile Polyposis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, L.A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important cause death. In the Netherlands, approximately 10.000 patients are diagnosed with CRC each year. Rare hereditary gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes predisposing to CRC, including familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), juvenile polyposis (JPS) and Peutz-Jegher

  11. Mowat-Wilson syndrome: the first clinical and molecular report of an indonesian patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mundhofir, F.E.; Yntema, H.G.; Burgt, I. van der; Hamel, B.C.; Faradz, S.M.; Bon, B.W. van

    2012-01-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (OMIM 235730) is a genetic condition characterized by moderate-to-severe intellectual disability, a recognizable facial phenotype, and multiple congenital anomalies. The striking facial phenotype in addition to other features such as severely impaired speech, hypotonia, microce

  12. Molecular analysis of the Smith-Magenis syndrome: a possible contiguous-gene syndrome associated with del(17)(p11.2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, F; Guzzetta, V; Montes de Oca-Luna, R; Magenis, R E; Smith, A C; Richter, S F; Kondo, I; Dobyns, W B; Patel, P I; Lupski, J R

    1991-12-01

    We undertook clinical evaluation (32 cases) and molecular evaluation (31 cases) of unrelated patients affected with Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) associated with an interstitial deletion of band p11.2 of chromosome 17. Patients were evaluated both clinically and electrophysiologically for peripheral neuropathy, since markers showing close linkage to one form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1A) map to this chromosomal region. The common clinical findings were broad flat midface with brachycephaly, broad nasal bridge, brachydactyly, speech delay, and hoarse, deep voice. Fifty-five percent of the patients showed clinical signs (e.g., decreased or absent deep tendon reflexes, pes planus or pes cavus, decreased sensitivity to pain, and decreased leg muscle mass) suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. However, unlike patients with CMT1A, these patients demonstrated normal nerve conduction velocities. Self-destructive behaviors, primarily onychotillomania and polyembolokoilamania, were observed in 67% of the patients, and significant symptoms of sleep disturbance were observed in 62%. The absence of REM sleep was demonstrated by polysomnography in two patients. Southern analysis indicated that most patients were deleted for five 17p11.2 markers--FG1 (D17S446), 1516 (D17S258), pYNM67-R5 (D17S29), pA10-41 (D17S71), and pS6.1-HB2 (D17S445)--thus defining a region which appears to be critical to SMS. The deletion was determined to be of paternal origin in nine patients and of maternal origin in six patients. The apparent random parental origin of deletion documented in 15 patients suggests that genomic imprinting does not play a role in the expression of the SMS clinical phenotype. Our findings suggest that SMS is likely a contiguous-gene deletion syndrome which comprises characteristic clinical features, developmental delay, clinical signs of peripheral neuropathy, abnormal sleep function, and specific behavioral anomalies.

  13. Molecular characterization of Salmonella strains in individuals with acute diarrhea syndrome in the State of Sucre, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hectorina Rodulfo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION:In Venezuela, acute diarrheic syndrome (ADS is a primary cause of morbi-mortality, often involving the Salmonella genus. Salmonella infections are associated with acute gastroenteritis, one of the most common alimentary intoxications, and caused by the consumption of contaminated water and food, especially meat. METHODS: Conventional and molecular methods were used to detect Salmonella strains from 330 fecal samples from individuals of different ages and both sexes with ADS. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used for the molecular characterization of Salmonella, using invA, sefA, and fliC genes for the identification of this genus and the serotypes Enteritidis and Typhimurium, respectively. RESULTS: The highest frequency of individuals with ADS was found in children 0-2 years old (39.4%, and the overall frequency of positive coprocultures was 76.9%. A total of 14 (4.2% strains were biochemically and immunologically identified as Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, of which 7 were classified as belonging to the Enteritidis serotype, 4 to the Typhimurium serotype, and 3 to other serotypes. The S. enterica strains were distributed more frequently in the age groups 3-4 and 9-10 years old. CONCLUSIONS: The molecular characterization method used proved to be highly specific for the typing of S. enterica strains using DNA extracted from both the isolated colonies and selective enrichment broths directly inoculated with fecal samples, thus representing a complementary tool for the detection and identification of ADS-causing bacteria.

  14. Scientific Statement on the Diagnostic Criteria, Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Molecular Genetics of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumesic, Daniel A; Oberfield, Sharon E; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Marshall, John C; Laven, Joop S; Legro, Richard S

    2015-10-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous and complex disorder that has both adverse reproductive and metabolic implications for affected women. However, there is generally poor understanding of its etiology. Varying expert-based diagnostic criteria utilize some combination of oligo-ovulation, hyperandrogenism, and the presence of polycystic ovaries. Criteria that require hyperandrogenism tend to identify a more severe reproductive and metabolic phenotype. The phenotype can vary by race and ethnicity, is difficult to define in the perimenarchal and perimenopausal period, and is exacerbated by obesity. The pathophysiology involves abnormal gonadotropin secretion from a reduced hypothalamic feedback response to circulating sex steroids, altered ovarian morphology and functional changes, and disordered insulin action in a variety of target tissues. PCOS clusters in families and both female and male relatives can show stigmata of the syndrome, including metabolic abnormalities. Genome-wide association studies have identified a number of candidate regions, although their role in contributing to PCOS is still largely unknown.

  15. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R.M.; Zackai, E.H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-09-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, the authors have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. The authors have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Molecular analysis of FGFR 2 and associated clinical observations in two Chinese families with Crouzon syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying; Gao, Hongbin; Ai, Siming; Eswarakumar, Jacob V P; Li, Tao; Liu, Bingqian; Jiang, Hongye; Liu, Yuhua; Liu, Xialin; Li, Yonghao; Ni, Yao; Chen, Jiangna; Lin, Zhuoling; Liang, Xiaoling; Jin, Chenjin; Huang, Xinhua; Lu, Lin; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-09-01

    Crouzon syndrome, a dominantly inherited disorder and the most common type of craniosynostosis syndrome, is caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR 2) gene, and characterized by craniosynostosis, shallow orbits, ocular proptosis, midface hypoplasia and a curved, beak‑like nose. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR 2) gene in two Chinese families with Crouzon syndrome and to characterize the associated clinical features. Two families underwent complete ophthalmic examination, and three patients in two families were diagnosed with Crouzon syndrome. Genomic DNA was extracted from leukocytes of peripheral blood samples, which were collected from the family members and 200 unrelated control subjects from the same population. Exons 8 and 10 of the FGFR 2 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction analysis and were directly sequenced. Ophthalmic examinations, including best‑corrected visual acuity, slit‑lamp examination, fundus examination and Computerized Tomography scans, and physical examinations were performed to exclude systemic diseases. These patients were affected with shallow orbits and ocular proptosis, accompanied by midface hypoplasia, craniosynostosis, strabismus or papilloedema, with clinically normal hands and feet. A heterozygous FGFR 2 missense mutation, c.811‑812insGAG (p.273insGlu) in exon 8 was identified in the affected individual, but not in the unaffected family members or the normal control individuals in family 1. In family 2, another heterozygous FGFR 2 missense mutation, c.842A>G (P.Tyr281Cys or Y281C), in exon 8 was identified in the affected boy and his mother, but not in the unaffected family members or the normal control individuals. Although FGFR 2 gene mutations and polymorphisms have been reported in various ethnic groups, particularly in the area of osteology, the present study reported for the first time, to the best of

  17. Molecular and cellular aspects of mental retardation in the Fragile X syndrome: from gene mutation/s to spine dysmorphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rubeis, Silvia; Fernández, Esperanza; Buzzi, Andrea; Di Marino, Daniele; Bagni, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most frequent form of inherited mental retardation and also considered a monogenic cause of Autism Spectrum Disorder. FXS symptoms include neurodevelopmental delay, anxiety, hyperactivity, and autistic-like behavior. The disease is due to mutations or loss of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein abundant in the brain and gonads, the two organs mainly affected in FXS patients. FMRP has multiple functions in RNA metabolism, including mRNA decay, dendritic targeting of mRNAs, and protein synthesis. In neurons lacking FMRP, a wide array of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in synaptic structure and function are altered. As a result of this complex dysregulation, in the absence of FMRP, spine morphology and functioning is impaired. Consistently, model organisms for the study of the syndrome recapitulate the phenotype observed in FXS patients, such as dendritic spine anomalies and defects in learning. Here, we review the fundamentals of genetic and clinical aspects of FXS, devoting a specific attention to ASD comorbidity and FXS-related diseases. We also review the current knowledge on FMRP functions through structural, molecular, and cellular findings. Finally, we discuss the neuroanatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral defects caused by FMRP loss, as well as the current treatments able to partially revert some of the FXS abnormalities.

  18. Molecular biology and cellular mechanisms of Brugada and long QT syndromes in infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antzelevitch, C

    2001-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death accounts for 19% of sudden deaths in children between 1 and 13 years of age and 30% of sudden deaths that occur between 14 and 21 years of age. The incidence of sudden cardiac death displays 2 peaks: one between 45 and 75 years of age, as a result of coronary artery disease, and the other between birth and 6 months of age, caused by sudden infant death syndrome. The role of cardiac arrhythmias in sudden infant death syndrome has long been a matter of debate and the role of cardiac arrhythmias in children in general is not well defined. Recent findings point to a contribution of primary electrical diseases of the heart including the Brugada and long QT syndromes to sudden death in infants and children. Mutations in SCN5A and HERG and KvLQT1 have been shown to be associated with life-threatening arrhythmias and long QT intervals in young infants. These mutations cause changes in sodium and potassium currents that amplify intrinsic electrical heterogeneities within the heart, thus providing a substrate as well as a trigger for the development of reentrant arrhythmias, including Torsade de Pointes (TdP), commonly associated with the long QT syndrome (LQTS). Mutations in SCN5A have also been shown to cause the sodium channel to turn off prematurely and thus to set the stage for the development of a rapid polymorphic ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation in patients with the Brugada Syndrome. In LQTS, ion channel mutations cause a preferential prolongation of the M cell action potential that contributes to the development of long QT intervals, wide-based or notched T waves, and a large transmural dispersion of repolarization, which provides the substrate for the development of TdP. An early afterdepolarization-induced triggered beat is thought to provide the extrasystole that precipitates TdP. In the Brugada syndrome, mutations in SCN5A reduce sodium current density, causing premature repolarization of the epicardial action potential due

  19. Psychiatric illness and intellectual disability in the Prader-Willi syndrome with different molecular defects--a meta analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Several studies have suggested a difference in clinical features of intellectual ability and psychiatric illness in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS with the 15q11-q13 paternal deletion and maternal uniparental disomy (mUPD. Our objective was to appraise evidence on this association through a meta-analysis. METHODS: The electronic records PubMed and EMBASE from 1956 to 2012 were extracted for meta-analysis. Meta-analyses were performed by using fixed effect model. Mean difference, odds ratio, and 95% confidence interval were calculated. RESULTS: We retrieved a total of 744 PWS cases from 13 studies. These include 423 cases with paternal 15q11-q13 deletions and 318 cases of mUPD. Compare to the PWS cases with mUPD, PWS patients with the paternal 15q11-q13 deletion associated with significantly lower full scale IQ (FSIQ [mean difference (MD, -2.69; 95%CI, -4.86 to -0.52; p=0.02] and verbal IQ (VIQ (MD, -7.5; 95%CI, -9.75 to -5.26; p<0.00001 but higher performance IQ (PIQ (MD, 4.02; 95%CI, 1.13 to 6.91; p=0.006. In contrast, PWS patients with mUPD are associated with significantly higher risk of psychiatric illness [odds rate (OR, 0.14; 95%CI, 0.08 to 0.23; p<0.00001] and higher risk of bipolar disorder (OR, 0.04; 95%CI, 0.01 to 0.23; p=0.0002. CONCLUSIONS: Significant different clinical features of cognitive development and psychiatric illness are associated with PWS with different molecular defects. These findings provide support for evidence based practice to evaluate and manage the PWS syndrome with different molecular defects.

  20. Molecular analysis of T-B-NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency and Omenn syndrome cases in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Children with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) lack autologous T lymphocytes and present with multiple infections early in infancy. Omenn syndrome is characterized by the sole emergence of oligoclonal auto-reactive T lymphocytes, resulting in erythroderma and enteropathy. Omenn syndrome (OS) shares the genetic aetiology of T-B-NK+ SCID, with mutations in RAG1, RAG2, or DCLRE1C. Methods Patients diagnosed with T-B-NK+ SCID or phenotypes suggestive of Omenn syndrome were investigated by molecular genetic studies using gene tightly linked microsatellite markers followed by direct sequencing of the coding regions and splice sites of the respective candidate genes. Results We report the molecular genetic basis of T-B-NK+ SCID in 22 patients and of OS in seven patients all of Arab descent from Saudi Arabia. Among the SCID patients, six (from four families) displayed four homozygous missense mutations in RAG1 including V433M, R624H, R394W, and R559S. Another four patients (from three familes) showed 3 novel homozygous RAG2 mutations including K127X, S18X, and Q4X; all of which predict unique premature truncations of RAG2 protein. Among Omenn patients, four (from two families) have S401P and R396H mutations in RAG1, and a fifth patient has a novel I444M mutation in RAG2. Seven other patients (six SCID and one OS) showed a gross deletion in exons 1-3 in DCLRE1C. Altogether, mutations in RAG1/2 and DCLRE1C account for around 50% and 25%, respectively, in our study cohort, a proportion much higher than in previous reported series. Seven (24%) patients lack a known genetic aetiology, strongly suggesting that they carry mutations in novel genes associated with SCID and Omenn disorders that are yet to be discovered in the Saudi population. Conclusion Mutation-free patients who lack a known genetic aetiology are likely to carry mutations in the regulatory elements in the SCID-causing genes or in novel genes that are yet to be discovered. Our efforts are underway

  1. Molecular analysis of T-B-NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency and Omenn syndrome cases in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Kayal Fadi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID lack autologous T lymphocytes and present with multiple infections early in infancy. Omenn syndrome is characterized by the sole emergence of oligoclonal auto-reactive T lymphocytes, resulting in erythroderma and enteropathy. Omenn syndrome (OS shares the genetic aetiology of T-B-NK+ SCID, with mutations in RAG1, RAG2, or DCLRE1C. Methods Patients diagnosed with T-B-NK+ SCID or phenotypes suggestive of Omenn syndrome were investigated by molecular genetic studies using gene tightly linked microsatellite markers followed by direct sequencing of the coding regions and splice sites of the respective candidate genes. Results We report the molecular genetic basis of T-B-NK+ SCID in 22 patients and of OS in seven patients all of Arab descent from Saudi Arabia. Among the SCID patients, six (from four families displayed four homozygous missense mutations in RAG1 including V433M, R624H, R394W, and R559S. Another four patients (from three familes showed 3 novel homozygous RAG2 mutations including K127X, S18X, and Q4X; all of which predict unique premature truncations of RAG2 protein. Among Omenn patients, four (from two families have S401P and R396H mutations in RAG1, and a fifth patient has a novel I444M mutation in RAG2. Seven other patients (six SCID and one OS showed a gross deletion in exons 1-3 in DCLRE1C. Altogether, mutations in RAG1/2 and DCLRE1C account for around 50% and 25%, respectively, in our study cohort, a proportion much higher than in previous reported series. Seven (24% patients lack a known genetic aetiology, strongly suggesting that they carry mutations in novel genes associated with SCID and Omenn disorders that are yet to be discovered in the Saudi population. Conclusion Mutation-free patients who lack a known genetic aetiology are likely to carry mutations in the regulatory elements in the SCID-causing genes or in novel genes that are yet to be discovered

  2. C-reactive protein, high-molecular-weight adiponectin and development of metabolic syndrome in the Japanese general population: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Saisho

    Full Text Available AIMS: To clarify predictive values of C-reactive protein (CRP and high-molecular-weight (HMW adiponectin for development of metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study of Japanese workers who had participated in an annual health checkup in 2007 and 2011. A total of 750 subjects (558 men and 192 women, age 46±8 years who had not met the criteria of metabolic syndrome and whose CRP and HMW-adiponectin levels had been measured in 2007 were enrolled in this study. Associations between CRP, HMW-adiponectin and development of metabolic syndrome after 4 years were assessed by logistic regression analysis and their predictive values were compared by receiver operating characteristic analysis. RESULTS: Among 750 subjects, 61 (8.1% developed metabolic syndrome defined by modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III criteria and 53 (7.1% developed metabolic syndrome defined by Japan Society for the Study of Obesity (JASSO in 2011. Although CRP and HMW-adiponectin were both significantly correlated with development of metabolic syndrome, multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that HMW-adiponectin but not CRP was associated with metabolic syndrome independently of BMI or waist circumference. Adding these biomarkers to BMI or waist circumference did not improve the predictive value for metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that the traditional markers of adiposity such as BMI or waist circumference remain superior markers for predicting metabolic syndrome compared to CRP, HMW-adiponectin, or the combination of both among the Japanese population.

  3. [Autoinflammatory syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2009-03-01

    The autoinflammatory syndromes include a group of inherited diseases that are characterized by 1) seemingly unprovoked episodes of systemic inflammations, 2) absence of high titer of autoantibody or auto-reactive T cell, and 3) inborn error of innate immunity. In this article, we will focus on the clinical features, the pathogenesis related the genetic defects, and the therapeutic strategies in the representative disorders including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), hyper-IgD with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS), syndrome of pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA), and Blau syndrome. Recent advances in genetics and molecular biology have proceeded our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory syndromes.

  4. Clinical and molecular characterization of Italian patients affected by Cohen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzaki, Eleni; Pescucci, Chiara; Uliana, Vera; Papa, Filomena Tiziana; Ariani, Francesca; Meloni, Ilaria; Priolo, Manuela; Selicorni, Angelo; Milani, Donatella; Fischetto, Rita; Celle, Maria Elena; Grasso, Rita; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Brancati, Francesco; Bordignon, Marta; Tenconi, Romano; Federico, Antonio; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra; Longo, Ilaria

    2007-01-01

    Cohen syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder with variability in the clinical manifestations, characterized by developmental delay, visual disability, facial dysmorphisms and intermittent neutropenia. We described a cohort of 10 patients affected by Cohen syndrome from nine Italian families ranging from 5 to 52 years at assessment. Characteristic age related facial changes were well documented. Visual anomalies, namely retinopathy and myopia, were present in 9/10 patients (retinopathy in 9/10 and myopia in 8/10). Truncal obesity has been described in all patients older than 6 years (8/8). DNA samples from all patients were analyzed for mutations in COH1 by DHPLC. We detected 15 COH1 alterations most of them were truncating mutations, only one being a missense change. Partial gene deletions have been found in two families. Most mutations were private. Two were already reported in the literature just once. A single base deletion leading to p.T3708fs3769, never reported before, was found in three apparently unrelated families deriving from a restricted area of the Veneto's lowland, between Padova town and Tagliamento river, in heterozygous state. Given the geographical conformation of this region, which is neither geographically or culturally isolated, a recent origin of the mutation could be hypothesized.

  5. Changes in the folding landscape of the WW domain provide a molecular mechanism for an inherited genetic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucheta-Martinez, Encarna; D’Amelio, Nicola; Lelli, Moreno; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Sudol, Marius; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-07-01

    WW domains are small domains present in many human proteins with a wide array of functions and acting through the recognition of proline-rich sequences. The WW domain belonging to polyglutamine tract-binding protein 1 (PQBP1) is of particular interest due to its direct involvement in several X chromosome-linked intellectual disabilities, including Golabi-Ito-Hall (GIH) syndrome, where a single point mutation (Y65C) correlates with the development of the disease. The mutant cannot bind to its natural ligand WBP11, which regulates mRNA processing. In this work we use high-field high-resolution NMR and enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the molecular causes the disease. We find that the wild type protein is partially unfolded exchanging among multiple beta-strand-like conformations in solution. The Y65C mutation further destabilizes the residual fold and primes the protein for the formation of a disulphide bridge, which could be at the origin of the loss of function.

  6. Mowat-Wilson syndrome: neurological and molecular study in seven patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Albino da Paz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To present a seven-cases serie of Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS. Method All patients with positive mutation for the ZEB2 were evaluated by a geneticist and a neurologist, with clinical and laboratorial characterization. Results A peculiar facies and mental retardation were present in all patients. The Denver II scale showed intense delay in all aspects, especially fine motor and adaptive. Acquired microcephaly was observed in five patients. Only one patient did not present epilepsy. Epilepsy was focal and predominating in sleep, with status epilepticus in three patients. The initial seizure was associated with fever in most patients (4/6. The EEG showed epileptic focal activity (5/7. The imaging studies revealed total agenesis (4/7 and partial agenesis of the corpus callosum (1/7. Conclusion Physicians who care for patients with mental retardation and epilepsy should be aware of SMW.

  7. Novel molecular pathways elicited by mutant FGFR2 may account for brain abnormalities in Apert syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Yeh

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (AS, the most severe form craniosynostosis, is characterized by premature fusion of coronal sutures. Approximately 70% of AS patients carry S252W gain-of-function mutation in FGFR2. Besides the cranial phenotype, brain dysmorphologies are present and are not seen in other FGFR2-asociated craniosynostosis, such as Crouzon syndrome (CS. Here, we hypothesized that S252W mutation leads not only to overstimulation of FGFR2 downstream pathway, but likewise induces novel pathological signaling. First, we profiled global gene expression of wild-type and S252W periosteal fibroblasts stimulated with FGF2 to activate FGFR2. The great majority (92% of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs were divergent between each group of cell populations and they were regulated by different transcription factors. We than compared gene expression profiles between AS and CS cell populations and did not observe correlations. Therefore, we show for the first time that S252W mutation in FGFR2 causes a unique cell response to FGF2 stimulation. Since our gene expression results suggested that novel signaling elicited by mutant FGFR2 might be associated with central nervous system (CNS development and maintenance, we next investigated if DEGs found in AS cells were also altered in the CNS of an AS mouse model. Strikingly, we validated Strc (stereocilin in newborn Fgfr2(S252W/+ mouse brain. Moreover, immunostaining experiments suggest a role for endothelial cells and cerebral vasculature in the establishment of characteristic CNS dysmorphologies in AS that has not been proposed by previous literature. Our approach thus led to the identification of new target genes directly or indirectly associated with FGFR2 which are contributing to the pathophysiology of AS.

  8. Inherited ichthyosis: Syndromic forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Kozo

    2016-03-01

    Among diseases that cause ichthyosis as one of the symptoms, there are some diseases that induce abnormalities in organs other than the skin. Of these, diseases with characteristic signs are regarded as syndromes. Although these syndromes are very rare, Netherton syndrome, Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome, and Refsum syndrome have been described in texts as representative ones. It is important to know the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms in order to establish an effective therapy and beneficial genetic counseling including a prenatal diagnosis.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Usher syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... T, Millán JM. Targeted next generation sequencing for molecular diagnosis of Usher syndrome. Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2014 ... Usher syndrome (sensorineural deafness and retinitis pigmentosa): pathogenesis, molecular diagnosis and therapeutic approaches. Curr Opin Neurol. 2012 Feb; ...

  10. Molecular and genomic studies of IMMP2L and mutation screening in autism and Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petek, Erwin; Schwarzbraun, Thomas; Noor, Abdul; Patel, Megha; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Choufani, Sanaa; Windpassinger, Christian; Stamenkovic, Mara; Robertson, Mary M; Aschauer, Harald N; Gurling, Hugh M D; Kroisel, Peter M; Wagner, Klaus; Scherer, Stephen W; Vincent, John B

    2007-01-01

    We recently reported the disruption of the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (IMMP2L) gene by a chromosomal breakpoint in a patient with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS). In the present study we sought to identify genetic variation in IMMP2L, which, through alteration of protein function or level of expression might contribute to the manifestation of GTS. We screened 39 GTS patients, and, due to the localization of IMMP2L in the critical region for the autistic disorder (AD) locus on chromosome 7q (AUTS1), 95 multiplex AD families; however, no coding mutations were found in either GTS or AD patients. In addition, no parental-specific expression of IMMP2L was detected in somatic cell hybrids containing human chromosome 7 and human cell lines carrying a maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 7 (mUPD7). Despite the fact that no deleterious mutations in IMMPL2 (other than the inverted duplication identified previously) were identified in either GTS or AD, this gene cannot be excluded as a possible rare cause of either disorder.

  11. Molecular characterization of a balanced rearrangement of chromosome 12 in two siblings with Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsenko, Svetlana A; del Valle Torrado, Maria; Fernandes, Priscilla H; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Gallego, Marta; Herrera, Jorge; Bacino, Carlos A

    2009-12-01

    The etiology of Noonan syndrome (NS) has been greatly elucidated with the discovery of the disease causative genes PTPN11, KRAS, SOS1, and RAF1, all involved in the RAS/MAPK-signaling cascade. Given that overall mutations are identified in about 70% of patients, identification of other NS associated genes remains a high priority to fully understand the etiopathogenesis of the condition. We report two affected siblings with an apparently balanced rearrangement of chromosome 12 ins(12)(q12p11.2p12.3) which segregates with the Noonan phenotype. The rearrangement was inherited from the phenotypically normal mother who had mosaicism for the derivative chromosome 12. There were no mutations of PTPN11, KRAS, SOS1, or RAF1 genes detected in the probands. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis we identified the three breakpoints involved at 12p12.3, 12p11.2, and 12q12. By microarray analysis, there were no gains or losses near the breakpoints. Neither, the PTPN11 or KRAS region on chromosome 12 was involved in the rearrangement. We hypothesize that other NS candidate gene(s) may be located in the breakpoint regions of chromosome 12 causing the Noonan phenotype in both of these children.

  12. Cellular and molecular defects in a patient with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Kevin J.; Nicoli, Elena-Raluca; Brooks, Brian P.; Huryn, Laryssa; Titus, Steven A.; Adams, David R.; Chen, Dong; Gahl, William A.; Gochuico, Bernadette R.

    2017-01-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders typically manifesting with tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism, bleeding diathesis, and pulmonary fibrosis, in some subtypes. Most HPS subtypes are associated with defects in Biogenesis of Lysosome-related Organelle Complexes (BLOCs), which are groups of proteins that function together in the formation and/or trafficking of lysosomal-related endosomal compartments. BLOC-2, for example, consists of the proteins HPS3, HPS5, and HPS6. Here we present an HPS patient with defective BLOC-2 due to a novel intronic mutation in HPS5 that activates a cryptic acceptor splice site. This mutation leads to the insertion of nine nucleotides in-frame and results in a reduced amount of HPS5 at the transcript and protein level. In studies using skin fibroblasts derived from the proband and two other individuals with HPS-5, we found a perinuclear distribution of acidified organelles in patient cells compared to controls. Our results suggest the role of HPS5 in the endo-lysosomal dynamics of skin fibroblasts. PMID:28296950

  13. Molecular screening of selected long QT syndrome (LQTS) mutations in 165 consecutive bodies found in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunetta, Philippe; Levo, Antti; Laitinen, Päivi J; Fodstad, Heidi; Kontula, Kimmo; Sajantila, Antti

    2003-04-01

    The association of the long QT-syndrome (LQTS) with single accidental drowning or near-drowning cases has been recently emphasised, but no data on the prevalence of LQTS among drowning victims are currently available. In this study, we have retrospectively screened specific founder mutations in KCNQ1 (KVLQT1) and KCNH2 (HERG) genes in 165 consecutive bodies found in water in Finland. We found a KCNH2-Fin mutation in a 44-year-old woman whose death was classified as suicidal drowning, whereas no other carriers of the two LQTS founder mutations were identified among the remaining 164 victims. This study provides the first estimate of the minimum prevalence of LQTS (0.61%, CI(95): 0.02-3.33) in such a setting and demonstrates the value of genetic analysis of LQTS in putative drownings. The detection of a LQTS founder mutation in a body found in water is a relatively rare event based on our study sample. This finding is, however, of utmost medico-legal importance, since it broadens the spectrum of potential causes and manners of death.

  14. Molecular immune response of the American lobster (Homarus americanus) to the White Spot Syndrome Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K Fraser; Greenwood, Spencer J; Acorn, Adam R; Byrne, Philip J

    2013-11-01

    The adult American lobster (Homarus americanus) is susceptible to few naturally occurring pathogens, and no viral pathogen is known to exist. Despite this, relatively little is known about the H. americanus immune system and nothing is known about its potential viral immune response. Hundreds of rural communities in Atlantic Canada rely on the lobster fishery for their economic sustainability and could be devastated by large-scale pathogen-mediated mortality events. The White Spot Syndrome Virus is the most economically devastating viral pathogen to global shrimp aquaculture production and has been proposed to be capable of infecting all decapod crustaceans including the European Lobster. An in vivo WSSV injection challenge was conducted in H. americanus and WSSV was found to be capable of infecting and replicating within lobsters held at 20°C. The in vivo WSSV challenge also generated the first viral disease model of H. americanus and allowed for the high-throughput examination of transcriptomic changes that occur during viral infection. Microarray analysis found 136 differentially expressed genes and the expression of a subset of these genes was verified using RT-qPCR. Anti-lipopolysaccharide isoforms and acute phase serum amyloid protein A expression did not change during WSSV infection, contrary to previous findings during bacterial and parasitic infection of H. americanus. This, along with the differential gene expression of thioredoxin and trypsin isoforms, provides compelling evidence that H. americanus is capable of mounting an immune response specific to infection by different pathogen classes.

  15. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinder Gill

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2, histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2, the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2, transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2, tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT, RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11, DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL, and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21. A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS.

  16. Clinical, neuroradiological and molecular characterization of cerebellar dysplasia with cysts (Poretti-Boltshauser syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Marta; Ginevrino, Monia; Mazza, Tommaso; Aiello, Chiara; Zanni, Ginevra; Baumgartner, Bastian; Borgatti, Renato; Brockmann, Knut; Camacho, Ana; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Haeusler, Martin; Hikel, Christiane; Klein, Andrea; Mandrile, Giorgia; Mercuri, Eugenio; Rating, Dietz; Romaniello, Romina; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Schimmel, Mareike; Spaccini, Luigina; Teber, Serap; von Moers, Arpad; Wente, Sarah; Ziegler, Andreas; Zonta, Andrea; Bertini, Enrico; Boltshauser, Eugen; Valente, Enza Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar dysplasia with cysts and abnormal shape of the fourth ventricle, in the absence of significant supratentorial anomalies and of muscular involvement, defines recessively inherited Poretti-Boltshauser syndrome (PBS). Clinical features comprise non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, intellectual disability of variable degree, language impairment, ocular motor apraxia and frequent occurrence of myopia or retinopathy. Recently, loss-of-function variants in the LAMA1 gene were identified in six probands with PBS. Here we report the detailed clinical, neuroimaging and genetic characterization of 18 PBS patients from 15 unrelated families. Biallelic LAMA1 variants were identified in 14 families (93%). The only non-mutated proband presented atypical clinical and neuroimaging features, challenging the diagnosis of PBS. Sixteen distinct variants were identified, which were all novel. In particular, the frameshift variant c.[2935delA] recurred in six unrelated families on a shared haplotype, suggesting a founder effect. No LAMA1 variants could be detected in 27 probands with different cerebellar dysplasias or non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, confirming the strong correlate between LAMA1 variants and PBS. PMID:26932191

  17. Molecular findings of Colombian patients with type VI mucopolysaccharidosis (Maroteaux–Lamy syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Gustavo Adolfo; Ayala-Ramírez, Paola; Prieto, Juan Carlos; García-Robles, Reggie; Acosta, Johanna Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maroteaux–Lamy syndrome, or mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VI, is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficient activity of the enzyme arylsulfatase B (ARSB), required to degrade dermatan sulfate. The onset and progression of the disease vary, producing a spectrum of clinical presentation. So far, 133 mutations have been reported. The aim of this study is to determine the mutations in the ARSB gene that are responsible for this disease in Colombian patients. Results Fourteen patients with clinical manifestations and biochemical diagnosis of MPS VI were studied, including two siblings. The 8 exons of the gene were directly sequenced from patients' DNA, and 14 mutations were found. 57% of these mutations had not been previously reported (p.H111P, p.C121R, p.G446S, p.*534W, p.S334I, p.H147P, c.900T > G, and c.1531_1553del) and 43% had been previously reported (p.G144R, p.W322*, p.G302R, p.C447F, p.L128del, and c.1143-1G > C). Of the previously reported mutations, 80% have been associated with severe phenotypes and 20% with intermediate-severe phenotypes. Bioinformatic predictions indicate that the new mutations reported in this paper are also highly deleterious. Conclusions Most of the Colombian patients in this study had private mutations. PMID:26909334

  18. Genetic obesity syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Anthony P; Beales, Philip L

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous reports of multi-system genetic disorders with obesity. Many have a characteristic presentation and several, an overlapping phenotype indicating the likelihood of a shared common underlying mechanism or pathway. By understanding the genetic causes and functional perturbations of such syndromes we stand to gain tremendous insight into obesogenic pathways. In this review we focus particularly on Bardet-Biedl syndrome, whose molecular genetics and cell biology has been elucidated recently, and Prader-Willi syndrome, the commonest obesity syndrome due to loss of imprinted genes on 15q11-13. We also discuss highlights of other genetic obesity syndromes including Alstrom syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (pseudohypoparathyroidism), Carpenter syndrome, MOMO syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, cases with deletions of 6q16, 1p36, 2q37 and 9q34, maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14, fragile X syndrome and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome.

  19. [Molecular characterization of Streptococcus pyogenes from invasive disease and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome episodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, F; Sparo, M; Rubio, V; Sáez Nieto, J A

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes a variety of common human diseases, including pharyngitis, scarlet fever and impetigo. Nevertheless, the past decades have witnessed a worldwide resurgence in invasive disease and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). The objective of the present study is to evaluate the genetic diversity, virulence gene distribution (spe, sme and ssa genes) and susceptibility pattern of 10 S. pyogenes isolates causing invasive disease and STSS. The isolates were recovered from blood cultures of hospitalized patients at Hospital Santamarina and Nueva Clínica Chacabuco, Tandil, Buenos Aires, Argentina between 12/2000-04/2005. Two pulse field gel electrophoretic patterns predominated. The most frequent one included 5 characteristic isolates of emm1-T1 type, toxin gene profile speA, speB, speF, speG and smeZ. The second pattern included 2 characteristic isolates of emm3-TNT type (speB, speF, speG). The other 3 isolates corresponded to types emm49-TNT (speB, speC, speF, speG), emm75-T25 (speB, speF, speG) and emm83-TNT (speB, speF, speG, ssa, smeZ). All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, erythromycin, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline and rifampicin. The data from the present study demonstrated genetic diversity among the strains. Types emm1 and emm3 were prevalent in invasive disease. The empirical treatment with the combination of penicillin and clindamicin is still valid.

  20. The molecular mechanism underlying Roberts syndrome involves loss of ESCO2 acetyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Miriam; Vega, Hugo; Trainer, Alison H; Hou, Fajian; Sakai, Norio; Luque, Ricardo; Kayserili, Hülya; Basaran, Seher; Skovby, Flemming; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Uzielli, Maria L Giovannucci; Schnur, Rhonda E; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Chang, Susan; Blair, Edward; Hurst, Jane A; Forzano, Francesca; Meins, Moritz; Simola, Kalle O J; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Schultz, Roger A; McDaniel, Lisa D; Ozono, Keiichi; Inui, Koji; Zou, Hui; Jabs, Ethylin Wang

    2008-07-15

    Roberts syndrome/SC phocomelia (RBS) is an autosomal recessive disorder with growth retardation, craniofacial abnormalities and limb reduction. Cellular alterations in RBS include lack of cohesion at the heterochromatic regions around centromeres and the long arm of the Y chromosome, reduced growth capacity, and hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents. RBS is caused by mutations in ESCO2, which encodes a protein belonging to the highly conserved Eco1/Ctf7 family of acetyltransferases that is involved in regulating sister chromatid cohesion. We identified 10 new mutations expanding the number to 26 known ESCO2 mutations. We observed that these mutations result in complete or partial loss of the acetyltransferase domain except for the only missense mutation that occurs in this domain (c.1615T>G, W539G). To investigate the mechanism underlying RBS, we analyzed ESCO2 mutations for their effect on enzymatic activity and cellular phenotype. We found that ESCO2 W539G results in loss of autoacetyltransferase activity. The cellular phenotype produced by this mutation causes cohesion defects, proliferation capacity reduction and mitomycin C sensitivity equivalent to those produced by frameshift and nonsense mutations associated with decreased levels of mRNA and absence of protein. We found decreased proliferation capacity in RBS cell lines associated with cell death, but not with increased cell cycle duration, which could be a factor in the development of phocomelia and cleft palate in RBS. In summary, we provide the first evidence that loss of acetyltransferase activity contributes to the pathogenesis of RBS, underscoring the essential role of the enzymatic activity of the Eco1p family of proteins.

  1. Subtelomeric deletions of chromosome 6p: molecular and cytogenetic characterization of three new cases with phenotypic overlap with Ritscher-Schinzel (3C) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descipio, Cheryl; Schneider, Lori; Young, Terri L; Wasserman, Nora; Yaeger, Dinah; Lu, Fengmin; Wheeler, Patricia G; Williams, Marc S; Bason, Lynn; Jukofsky, Lori; Menon, Ammini; Geschwindt, Ryan; Chudley, Albert E; Saraiva, Jorge; Schinzel, Albert A G L; Guichet, Agnes; Dobyns, William E; Toutain, Annick; Spinner, Nancy B; Krantz, Ian D

    2005-04-01

    We have identified six children in three families with subtelomeric deletions of 6p25 and a recognizable phenotype consisting of ptosis, posterior embryotoxon, optic nerve abnormalities, mild glaucoma, Dandy-Walker malformation, hydrocephalus, atrial septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, and mild mental retardation. There is considerable clinical overlap between these children and individuals with the Ritscher-Schinzel (or cranio-cerebello-cardiac (3C)) syndrome (OMIM #220210). Clinical features of 3C syndrome include craniofacial anomalies (macrocephaly, prominent forehead and occiput, foramina parietalia, hypertelorism, down-slanting palpebral fissures, ocular colobomas, depressed nasal bridge, narrow or cleft palate, and low-set ears), cerebellar malformations (variable manifestations of a Dandy-Walker malformation with moderate mental retardation), and cardiac defects (primarily septal defects). Since the original report, over 25 patients with 3C syndrome have been reported. Recessive inheritance has been postulated based on recurrence in siblings born to unaffected parents and parental consanguinity in two familial cases. Molecular and cytogenetic mapping of the 6p deletions in these three families with subtelomeric deletions of chromosome 6p have defined a 1.3 Mb minimally deleted critical region. To determine if 6p deletions are common in 3C syndrome, we analyzed seven unrelated individuals with 3C syndrome for deletions of this region. Three forkhead genes (FOXF1 and FOXQ1 from within the critical region, and FOXC1 proximal to this region) were evaluated as potential candidate disease genes for this disorder. No deletions or disease-causing mutations were identified.

  2. The role of p53 in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia: molecular aspects and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; McGraw, Kathy L; Sallman, David A; List, Alan F

    2017-08-01

    TP53 gene mutations occurring in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are associated with high-risk karyotypes including 17p abnormalities, monosomal and complex cytogenetics. TP53 mutations in these disorders portend rapid disease progression and resistance to conventional therapeutics. Notably, the size of the TP53 mutant clone as measured by mutation allele burden is directly linked to overall survival (OS) confirming the importance of p53 as a negative prognostic variable. In nucleolar stress-induced ribosomopathies, such as del(5q) MDS, disassociation of MDM2 and p53 results in p53 accumulation in erythroid precursors manifested as erythroid hypoplasia. P53 antagonism by lenalidomide or other therapeutics such as antisense oligonucleotides, repopulates erythroid precursors and enhances effective erythropoiesis. These findings demonstrate that p53 is an intriguing therapeutic target that is currently under investigation in MDS and AML. This study reviews molecular advances in understanding the role of p53 in MDS and AML, and explores potential therapeutic strategies in this era of personalized medicine.

  3. Molecular Origin of Gerstmann-Str ussler-Scheinker Syndrome: Insight from Computer Simulation of an Amyloidogenic Prion Peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diadone, Isabella [University of L' Aquila, L' Aquila, Italy; DiNola, Alfredo [University of Rome; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Prion proteins become pathogenic through misfolding. Here, we characterize the folding of a peptide consisting of residues 109 122 of the Syrian hamster prion protein (the H1 peptide) and of a more amyloidogenic A117V point mutant that leads in humans to an inheritable form of the Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker syndrome. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are performed for 2.5 s. Both peptides lose their -helical starting conformations and assume a -hairpin that is structurally similar in both systems. In each simulation several unfolding/refolding events occur, leading to convergence of the thermodynamics of the conformational states to within 1 kJ/mol. The similar stability of the -hairpin relative to the unfolded state is observed in the two peptides. However, substantial differences are found between the two unfolded states. A local minimum is found within the free energy unfolded basin of the A117V mutant populated by misfolded collapsed conformations of comparable stability to the -hairpin state, consistent with increased amyloidogenicity. This population, in which V117 stabilizes a hydrophobic core, is absent in the wild-type peptide. These results are supported by simulations of oligomers showing a slightly higher stability of the associated structures and a lower barrier to association for the mutated peptide. Hence, a single point mutation carrying only two additional methyl groups is here shown to be responsible for rather dramatic differences of structuring within the unfolded (misfolded) state.

  4. ISOLATION OF EGG DROP SYNDROME VIRUS AND ITS MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION USING SODIUM DODECYL SULPHATE POLYACRYLAMIDE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Rasool, S. U. Rahman and M. K. Mansoor

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Six isolates of egg drop syndrome (EDS virus were recovered from five different outbreaks of EDS in commercial laying hens in and around Faisalabad. The aberrant eggs were fed to the susceptible laying hens for experimental induction of infection. The samples from infected birds (egg washing, cloacal swabs, oviducts and spleens were collected, processed and inoculated into 11-day old duck embryos. The presence of virus in harvested allanto-amniotic fluid was monitored by spot and microhaemagglutination tests and confirmed by haemagglutination inhibition and agar gel precipitation tests. The EDS virus grew well in duck embryos and agglutinated only avian but not mammalian red blood cells. These isolates were purified through velocity density gradient centrifugation. Protein concentration was determined through Lowry method and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE was conducted by loading 300 µg protein concentration on 12.5% gel using discontinuous buffer system. All the six isolates showed 13 polypeptides, which were identical to those described in the referral EDS-76 virus (strain-127. The molecular weights of the polypeptides ranged from 6.5 KDa to 126 KDa.

  5. Virtual Screening and Molecular Docking Study of Bloom’s Syndrome Protein (BLM for Finding Potential Lead Drug Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Verma

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased levels of locus-specific mutations within the BLM result in development of Bloom Syndrome and patients are found to be immune deficient. HRDC domain amino acid Lys1270 is presumably to play role in mediating interactions with DNA. Single point mutation of Lys1270 (K1270V reduces the potency of Double Holliday junction (DHJ DNA unwinding so BLM lead to its functional loss. Quadruplex formation have role in immunoglobulin heavy chain switching and inhibiting RecQ helicases activity in-vitro in BLM. Variety of G-Quadruplex ligands are employed by molecular docking for arriving at lead compound identification. The scoring function of docking results describes protein-ligand interaction and it conjointly instructed that docking of ligand at mutational binding site shows some repressing function to make potential lead drug molecule. So as to know the elaborated purposeful functional mechanism of protein and to relate impact of mutation with function and activity; dock screening, hit identification and lead optimization facilitate in design of lead drug compound.

  6. Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome 2000-2006: epidemiology, clinical features, and molecular characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron S DeVries

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Circulating strains of Staphylococcus aureus (SA have changed in the last 30 years including the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant SA (MRSA. A report suggested staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS was increasing over 2000-2003. The last population-based assessment of TSS was 1986. METHODS: Population-based active surveillance for TSS meeting the CDC definition using ICD-9 codes was conducted in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area (population 2,642,056 from 2000-2006. Medical records of potential cases were reviewed for case criteria, antimicrobial susceptibility, risk factors, and outcome. Superantigen PCR testing and PFGE were performed on available isolates from probable and confirmed cases. RESULTS: Of 7,491 hospitalizations that received one of the ICD-9 study codes, 61 TSS cases (33 menstrual, 28 non-menstrual were identified. The average annual incidence per 100,000 of all, menstrual, and non-menstrual TSS was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.32-0.77, 0.69 (0.39-1.16, and 0.32 (0.12-0.67, respectively. Women 13-24 years had the highest incidence at 1.41 (0.63-2.61. No increase in incidence was observed from 2000-2006. MRSA was isolated in 1 menstrual and 3 non-menstrual cases (7% of TSS cases; 1 isolate was USA400. The superantigen gene tst-1 was identified in 20 (80% of isolates and was more common in menstrual compared to non-menstrual isolates (89% vs. 50%, p = 0.07. Superantigen genes sea, seb and sec were found more frequently among non-menstrual compared to menstrual isolates [100% vs 25% (p = 0.4, 60% vs 0% (p<0.01, and 25% vs 13% (p = 0.5, respectively]. DISCUSSION: TSS incidence remained stable across our surveillance period of 2000-2006 and compared to past population-based estimates in the 1980s. MRSA accounted for a small percentage of TSS cases. tst-1 continues to be the superantigen associated with the majority of menstrual cases. The CDC case definition identifies the most severe cases and has

  7. Inherited pancreatic endocrine tumor syndromes: advances in molecular pathogenesis, diagnosis, management and controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Robert T.; Berna, Marc J.; Bingham, David B; Norton, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) can occur in as part of four inherited disorders including: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL), neurofibromatosis 1(NF-1) [von Recklinghausen’s disease] and the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The relative frequency with which patients with these disorders develop PETs is MEN1>VHL>NF-1>TSC. Over the last few years there have been major advances in the understanding of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of these disorders as well in the localization, medical and surgical treatment of the PETs in these patients. The study of the PETs in these disorders has not only provided insights into the possible pathogenesis of sporadic PETs, but have also presented a number of unique management and treatment issues, some of which are applicable to patients with sporadic PETs. Therefore the study of PETs in these uncommon disorders has provided valuable insights that in many cases are applicable to the general group of patients with sporadic PETs. In this article these areas are briefly reviewed as well as the current state of knowledge of the PETs in these disorders and the controversies that exist in their management are briefly summarized and discussed. PMID:18798544

  8. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors: bridging metabolic syndrome with molecular nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri, Amir J; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2006-12-01

    Over recent years, obesity rates and the onset of obesity-induced chronic diseases have risen dramatically. The more we learn about the physiological and morphological changes that occur during obesity, the more it is becoming clear that obesity-related disorders can be traced back to adipocyte hypertrophy and inflammation at white adipose tissue (WAT). To combat this problem, the body has developed a regulatory system specifically designed at mediating the systemic response to obesity, utilizing free fatty acids (FFAs) and their metabolites as nutrient messengers to signal adaptations from peripheral tissues. These messages are predominantly interceded through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), a family of ligand-induced transcription factors that serve as a net of lipid sensors throughout the body. Understanding how and why nutrients, nutrient derivatives and metabolites exert their physiological effects are the key goals in the study of molecular nutrition. By learning about the mechanisms and tissue-specific effects of endogenous PPAR ligands and expanding our knowledge of the body's integrated homeostatic system, we will significantly increase our odds of designing safe and effective preventive and therapeutic interventions that keep us one step ahead of obesity-related diseases.

  9. Molecular genetic analysis of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froggatt, N.J. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)]|[Addenbrooke`s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Koch, D.J.; Barton, D.E. [Addenbrooke`s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    HNPCC is estimated to account for 5-10% of all cases of colorectal cancer. Recently genes for HNPCC have been mapped to chromosomes 2p and 3p and candidate genes (hMSH2 and hMLH1) have been identified. We have investigated the molecular pathology of HNPCC by linkage analysis and direct mutation analysis. 14 HNPCC families were investigated for linkage to hMSH2 and hMLH1 with microsatellite markers at D2S119, D2S123, D2S136, D2S391, D2S378 and D3S1007, D3S1029, D3S1076, D3S1298, D3S1611, respectively. Overall the only significant linkage was obtained with D2S123 (Zmax=3.77 at {theta}=0.0), but locus heterogeneity was confirmed: linkage to hMSH2 and hMLH1 was excluded in 6 and 5 families, respectively. 3 families were uniformative for linkage/exclusion to either candidate gene, but no evidence for a third HNPCC locus could be detected. There was no correlation between clinical phenotype (Lynch type I or II) and the results of linkage analysis. No individual family gave a lod score of >3 with any marker, and only a minority of our HNPCC families have been suitable for genetic linkage analysis. We therefore screened affected individuals from 37 unrelated kindreds for mutations in hMSH2 and exons 3 and 4 of the APC gene. Mutation screening was performed using exon specific primers and SSCP analysis. No abnormalities were found in the APC exons suggesting that mutations in these APC 5{prime} exons are not a common cause of HNPCC. hMSH2 screening is continuing, and one missense mutation in a highly conserved codon 322 in exon 6 has been identified.

  10. [Subchromosomal microdeletion identified by molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) in Rett syndrome girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorsanova, S G; Iurov, I Iu; Voinova, V Iu; Kurinnaia, O S; Zelenova, M A; Demidova, I A; Ulas, E V; Iurov, Iu B

    2013-01-01

    Molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) was applied for identification of subchromosomal microdeletions in a cohort of 12 girls with clinical features of RETT syndrome, but negative for MECP2 gene mutations. Recurrent microdeletions of MECP2 gene in chromosome X (locus Xq28) were identified in 5 girls of 12 studied. Probably RTT girls with subchromosomic microdeletions in Xq28 could represent a special subtype of the disease, which appears as clinically milder than the classic form of disease. In one case, an atypical form of RTT was associated with genomic abnormalities affecting CDKL5 gene and region critical for microdeletion Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes (15q11.2). In addition, data are presented for the first time that genetic variation in regions 3p13, 3q27.1, and 1q21.1-1q21.2 could associate with RTT-like clinical manifestations. Without application of molecular karyotyping technology and bioinformatic method of assessing the pathogenic significance of genomic rearrangements these RTT-like girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations were considered as cases of idiopathic mental retardation associated with autism. It should be noted that absence of intragenic mutations in MECP2 gene is not sufficient criteria to reject the clinical diagnosis of RTT. To avoid errors in the genetic diagnosis of this genetically heterogeneous brain disease molecular cytogenetic studies using high resolution oligonucleotide array CGH (molecular karyotyping) are needed.

  11. Molecular analysis of chromosome 21 in a patient with a phenotype of down syndrome and apparently normal karyotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlbom, B.E.; Wadelius, C.; Zech, L.; Anneren, G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1996-06-28

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused in most cases by the presence of an extra chromosome 21. It has been shown that the DS phenotype is produced by duplication of only a small part of the long arm of chromosome 21, the 21q22 region, including and distal to locus D21S55. We present molecular investigations on a woman with clinically typical DS but apparently normal chromosomes. Her parents were consanguineous and she had a sister with a DS phenotype, who died at the age of 15 days. Repeated cytogenetic investigations (G-banding and high resolution banding) on the patient and her parents showed apparently normal chromosomes. Autoradiographs of quantitative Southern blots of DNAs from the patient, her parents, trisomy 21 patients, and normal controls were analyzed after hybridization with unique DNA sequences regionally mapped on chromosome 21. Sequences D21S59, D21S1, D21S11, D21S8, D21S17, D21S55, ERG, D21S15, D21S112, and COL6A1 were all found in two copies. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with a chromosome 21-specific genomic library showed no abnormalities and only two copies of chromosome 21 were detected. Nineteen markers from the critical region studied with polymerase chain reaction amplification of di- and tetranucleotide repeats did not indicate any partial trisomy 21. From his study we conclude that the patient does not have any partial submicroscopic trisomy for any segment of chromosome 21. It seems reasonable to assume that she suffers from an autosomal recessive disorder which is phenotypically indistinguishable from DS. 23 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. An innovative strategy for the molecular diagnosis of Usher syndrome identifies causal biallelic mutations in 93% of European patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Crystel; Riahi, Zied; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Smagghe, Luce; Letexier, Mélanie; Marcaillou, Charles; Lefèvre, Gaëlle M; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Singh-Estivalet, Amrit; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Kohl, Susanne; Kurtenbach, Anne; Sliesoraityte, Ieva; Zobor, Ditta; Gherbi, Souad; Testa, Francesco; Simonelli, Francesca; Banfi, Sandro; Fakin, Ana; Glavač, Damjan; Jarc-Vidmar, Martina; Zupan, Andrej; Battelino, Saba; Martorell Sampol, Loreto; Claveria, Maria Antonia; Catala Mora, Jaume; Dad, Shzeena; Møller, Lisbeth B; Rodriguez Jorge, Jesus; Hawlina, Marko; Auricchio, Alberto; Sahel, José-Alain; Marlin, Sandrine; Zrenner, Eberhart; Audo, Isabelle; Petit, Christine

    2016-12-01

    Usher syndrome (USH), the most prevalent cause of hereditary deafness-blindness, is an autosomal recessive and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Three clinical subtypes (USH1-3) are distinguishable based on the severity of the sensorineural hearing impairment, the presence or absence of vestibular dysfunction, and the age of onset of the retinitis pigmentosa. A total of 10 causal genes, 6 for USH1, 3 for USH2, and 1 for USH3, and an USH2 modifier gene, have been identified. A robust molecular diagnosis is required not only to improve genetic counseling, but also to advance gene therapy in USH patients. Here, we present an improved diagnostic strategy that is both cost- and time-effective. It relies on the sequential use of three different techniques to analyze selected genomic regions: targeted exome sequencing, comparative genome hybridization, and quantitative exon amplification. We screened a large cohort of 427 patients (139 USH1, 282 USH2, and six of undefined clinical subtype) from various European medical centers for mutations in all USH genes and the modifier gene. We identified a total of 421 different sequence variants predicted to be pathogenic, about half of which had not been previously reported. Remarkably, we detected large genomic rearrangements, most of which were novel and unique, in 9% of the patients. Thus, our strategy led to the identification of biallelic and monoallelic mutations in 92.7% and 5.8% of the USH patients, respectively. With an overall 98.5% mutation characterization rate, the diagnosis efficiency was substantially improved compared with previously reported methods.

  13. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of chromosome 11p15 imprinting disorders: Silver–Russell and Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermann, Katja; Bliek, Jet; Brioude, Frédéric; Algar, Elizabeth; Buiting, Karin; Russo, Silvia; Tümer, Zeynep; Monk, David; Moore, Gudrun; Antoniadi, Thalia; Macdonald, Fiona; Netchine, Irène; Lombardi, Paolo; Soellner, Lukas; Begemann, Matthias; Prawitt, Dirk; Maher, Eamonn R; Mannens, Marcel; Riccio, Andrea; Weksberg, Rosanna; Lapunzina, Pablo; Grønskov, Karen; Mackay, Deborah JG; Eggermann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Molecular genetic testing for the 11p15-associated imprinting disorders Silver–Russell and Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (SRS, BWS) is challenging because of the molecular heterogeneity and complexity of the affected imprinted regions. With the growing knowledge on the molecular basis of these disorders and the demand for molecular testing, it turned out that there is an urgent need for a standardized molecular diagnostic testing and reporting strategy. Based on the results from the first external pilot quality assessment schemes organized by the European Molecular Quality Network (EMQN) in 2014 and in context with activities of the European Network of Imprinting Disorders (EUCID.net) towards a consensus in diagnostics and management of SRS and BWS, best practice guidelines have now been developed. Members of institutions working in the field of SRS and BWS diagnostics were invited to comment, and in the light of their feedback amendments were made. The final document was ratified in the course of an EMQN best practice guideline meeting and is in accordance with the general SRS and BWS consensus guidelines, which are in preparation. These guidelines are based on the knowledge acquired from peer-reviewed and published data, as well as observations of the authors in their practice. However, these guidelines can only provide a snapshot of current knowledge at the time of manuscript submission and readers are advised to keep up with the literature. PMID:27165005

  14. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of chromosome 11p15 imprinting disorders: Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermann, Katja; Bliek, Jet; Brioude, Frédéric; Algar, Elizabeth; Buiting, Karin; Russo, Silvia; Tümer, Zeynep; Monk, David; Moore, Gudrun; Antoniadi, Thalia; Macdonald, Fiona; Netchine, Irène; Lombardi, Paolo; Soellner, Lukas; Begemann, Matthias; Prawitt, Dirk; Maher, Eamonn R; Mannens, Marcel; Riccio, Andrea; Weksberg, Rosanna; Lapunzina, Pablo; Grønskov, Karen; Mackay, Deborah Jg; Eggermann, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Molecular genetic testing for the 11p15-associated imprinting disorders Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (SRS, BWS) is challenging because of the molecular heterogeneity and complexity of the affected imprinted regions. With the growing knowledge on the molecular basis of these disorders and the demand for molecular testing, it turned out that there is an urgent need for a standardized molecular diagnostic testing and reporting strategy. Based on the results from the first external pilot quality assessment schemes organized by the European Molecular Quality Network (EMQN) in 2014 and in context with activities of the European Network of Imprinting Disorders (EUCID.net) towards a consensus in diagnostics and management of SRS and BWS, best practice guidelines have now been developed. Members of institutions working in the field of SRS and BWS diagnostics were invited to comment, and in the light of their feedback amendments were made. The final document was ratified in the course of an EMQN best practice guideline meeting and is in accordance with the general SRS and BWS consensus guidelines, which are in preparation. These guidelines are based on the knowledge acquired from peer-reviewed and published data, as well as observations of the authors in their practice. However, these guidelines can only provide a snapshot of current knowledge at the time of manuscript submission and readers are advised to keep up with the literature.

  15. Molecular diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome: Parent-of-origin dependent methylation sites and non-isotopic detection of (CA){sub n} dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerer, I.; Meiner, V.; Pashut-Lavon, I.; Abeliovich, D.

    1994-08-01

    We describe our experience in the molecular diagnosis of 22 patients suspected of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) using a DNA probe PW71 (D15S63) which detects a parent-of-origin specific methylated site in the PWS critical region. The cause of the syndrome was determined as deletion or uniparental disomy according to the segregation of (CA){sub n} dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms of the PWS/AS region and more distal markers of chromosome 15. In 10 patients the clinical diagnosis was confirmed by the segregation of (CA){sub n}, probably due to paternal microdeletion in the PWs critical region which did not include the loci D15S97, D15S113, GABRB3, and GABRA5. This case demonstrates the advantage of the DNA probe PW71 in the diagnosis of PWS. 31 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. The genetic basis of inherited anomalies of the teeth. Part 1: clinical and molecular aspects of non-syndromic dental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Molla, Muriel; Verloes, Alain; Berdal, Ariane

    2008-01-01

    The genetic control of dental development represents a complex series of events, which can very schematically be divided in two pathways: specification of type, size and position of each dental organ, and specific processes for the formation of enamel and dentin. Several genes linked with early tooth positioning and development, belong to signalling pathways and have morphogenesis regulatory functions in morphogenesis of other organs where they are associated with the signalling pathways. Their mutations often show pleïotropic effects beyond dental morphogenesis resulting in syndromic developmental disorders. Some genes affecting early tooth development (MSX1, AXIN2) are associated with tooth agenesis and systemic features (cleft palate, colorectal cancer). By contrast, genes involved in enamel (AMELX, ENAM, MMP20, and KLK4) and dentin (DSPP) structures are highly specific for tooth. Mutations in these genes have been identified as causes of amelogenesis imperfecta, dentinogenesis imperfecta, dentin dysplasias and anomalies of teeth number (hypo-, oligo and anodontia), which only partially overlap with the classical phenotypic classifications of dental disorders. This review of genetic basis of inherited anomalies describes, in this first paper, the molecular bases and clinical features of inherited non-syndromic teeth disorders. And in a second part, the review focus on genetic syndromes with dental involvement.

  17. Antibody profile of pregnant women with antiphospholipid syndrome and pregnancy outcome after treatment with low dose aspirin and low-weight-molecular heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasnović, Marija; Bosnjak, Ivica; Vcev, Aleksandar; Soldo, Ivan; Kosuta, Maja; Lenz, Bahrija; Glasnović-Horvatić, Elizabeta; Soldo-Butković, Silva; Mićunović, Nikola

    2007-03-01

    The aim of the research was to show our diagnostic and therapeutic experience with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in pregnant women. 36 pregnant women suspect on APS were included in the study: 32 with primary antiphospholipd syndrome (PAPS) and 4 with secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (SAPS). All pregnant women received low-molecular-weight-heparin (LMWH) and low dose aspirin (LDA) therapy. Control group represented 26 women with SAPS and previous bad reproductive anamnesis. Average pregnancy lasted 37.06 +/- 0.707 weeks. LMWH and LDA therapy was successful in 97.22%. Lupus anticoagulant (LA) was found to be more frequent in PAPS group (71.87%). Anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) were found to be more frequent in SAPS (26.66%). For three patients (3.37%), PAPS was diagnosed due to a fact that they had positive antibeta2-glycoproteinl (antibeta-GP1). To make APS diagnosis, it is of great importance to search for all antiphospholipid antibodies. LMWH and low dose of acetylsalicylic acid should be the first choice therapy.

  18. Autoinflammatory syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, M; Gasbarrini, G; Ghirardello, A; Grandemange, S; Hoffman, H M; Manna, R; Podswiadek, M; Punzi, L; Sebastiani, G D; Touitou, I; Doria, A

    2006-01-01

    The autoinflammatory disorders are a new and expanding classification of inflammatory diseases characterized by recurrent episodes of systemic inflammation in the absence of pathogens, autoantibodies or antigen specific T cells. These disorders are caused by primary dysfunction of the innate immune system, without evidence of adaptive immune dysregulation. Innate immune abnormalities include aberrant responses to pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) like lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan, prominent neutrophilia in blood and tissues, and dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha) or their receptors. The autoinflammatory diseases comprise both hereditary (Familial Mediterranean Fever, FMF; Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency, MKD; TNF Receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome, TRAPS; Cryopyrin Associated Periodic Syndrome, CAPS; Blau syndrome; Pyogenic sterile Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum and Acne syndrome, PAPA; Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis, CRMO) and multifactorial (Crohn's and Behçet's diseases) disorders. Mutations responsible for FMF, TRAPS, CAPS, PAPA are in proteins involved in modulation of inflammation and apoptosis.

  19. Molecular typing of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1- and Enterotoxin A-producing methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus isolates from an outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, Franziska; Sanchini, Andrea; Strommenger, Birgit; Cuny, Christiane; Breier, Ann-Christin; Proquitté, Hans; Bührer, Christoph; Schenkel, Karl; Bätzing-Feigenbaum, Jörg; Greutelaers, Benedikt; Nübel, Ulrich; Gastmeier, Petra; Eckmanns, Tim; Werner, Guido

    2015-10-01

    Outbreaks of Staphylococcus aureus are common in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Usually they are documented for methicillin-resistant strains, while reports involving methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains are rare. In this study we report the epidemiological and molecular investigation of an MSSA outbreak in a NICU among preterm neonates. Infection control measures and interventions were commissioned by the Local Public Health Authority and supported by the Robert Koch Institute. To support epidemiological investigations molecular typing was done by spa-typing and Multilocus sequence typing; the relatedness of collected isolates was further elucidated by DNA SmaI-macrorestriction, microarray analysis and bacterial whole genome sequencing. A total of 213 neonates, 123 healthcare workers and 205 neonate parents were analyzed in the period November 2011 to November 2012. The outbreak strain was characterized as a MSSA spa-type t021, able to produce toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and Enterotoxin A. We identified seventeen neonates (of which two died from toxic shock syndrome), four healthcare workers and three parents putatively involved in the outbreak. Whole-genome sequencing permitted to exclude unrelated cases from the outbreak and to discuss the role of healthcare workers as a reservoir of S. aureus on the NICU. Genome comparisons also indicated the presence of the respective clone on the ward months before the first colonized/infected neonates were detected.

  20. Dental caries experience in relation to salivary findings and molecular identification of S. mutans and S. sobrinus in subjects with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castilho, Aline Rogéria Freire; Pardi, Vanessa; Pereira, Cássio Vicente

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the association between clinical and salivary or molecular parameters in Down syndrome subjects. Sixty individuals (1- to 48-year old) were clinically examined using DMFT/DMFS. Stimulated saliva was collected; salivary flow was calculated (mL/min), buffering capacity was measured using a standard pH tape. In addition, 25 μL of saliva was diluted using 10-fold-dilution method and then placed on Mitis-Salivarius-Bacitracin agar to count colony forming units (CFU/mL) of mutans streptococci. Polymerase chain reaction analysis identified species. Caries indexes were 0.65-13.5 (DMFT) and 0.65-26.0 (DMFS) according to groups. Ninety-four percent of subjects had low flow rate (0.7-1.0 mL/min) and 44% had low buffering capacity (pH S. mutans, and 41.4% had S. sobrinus. Caries indexes did not significantly correlate with flow rate, buffering capacity, CFU/mL by Pearson's correlation (p > 0.05), and showed no significant association with prevalence of species by Chi-square (p > 0.05). There is no association between clinical picture and salivary or molecular parameters in Down syndrome subjects.

  1. ADHD and genetic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo-Castro, Adriana; D'Agati, Elisa; Curatolo, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    A high rate of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)-like characteristics has been reported in a wide variety of disorders including syndromes with known genetic causes. In this article, we review the genetic and the neurobiological links between ADHD symptoms and some genetic syndromes such as: Fragile X Syndrome, Neurofibromatosis 1, DiGeorge Syndrome, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, Turner Syndrome, Williams Syndrome and Klinefelter Syndrome. Although each syndrome may arise from different genetic abnormalities with multiple molecular functions, the effects of these abnormalities may give rise to common effects downstream in the biological pathways or neural circuits, resulting in the presentation of ADHD symptoms. Early diagnosis of ADHD allows for earlier treatment, and has the potential for a better outcome in children with genetic syndromes.

  2. Molecular epidemiology and functional assessment of novel allelic variants of SLC26A4 in non-syndromic hearing loss patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyi Yuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in SLC26A4, which encodes pendrin, are a common cause of deafness. SLC26A4 mutations are responsible for Pendred syndrome and non-syndromic enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA. The mutation spectrum of SLC26A4 varies widely among ethnic groups. To investigate the incidence of EVA in Chinese population and to provide appropriate genetic testing and counseling to patients with SLC26A4 variants, we conducted a large-scale molecular epidemiological survey of SLC26A4. METHODS: A total of 2352 unrelated non-syndromic hearing loss patients from 27 different regions of China were included. Hot spot regions of SLC26A4, exons 8, 10 and 19 were sequenced. For patients with one allelic variant in the hot spot regions, the other exons were sequenced one by one until two mutant alleles had been identified. Patients with SLC26A4 variants were then examined by temporal bone computed tomography scan for radiological diagnosis of EVA. Ten SLC26A4 variants were cloned for functional study. Confocal microscopy and radioisotope techniques were used to examine the membrane expression of pendrin and transporter function. RESULTS: Of the 86 types of variants found, 47 have never been reported. The ratio of EVA in the Chinese deaf population was at least 11%, and that in patients of Han ethnicity reached at least 13%. The mutational spectrum and mutation detection rate of SLC26A4 are distinct among both ethnicities and regions of Mainland China. Most of the variants caused retention of pendrin in the intracellular region. All the mutant pendrins showed significantly reduced transport capability. CONCLUSION: An overall description of the molecular epidemiological findings of SLC26A4 in China is provided. The functional assessment procedure can be applied to identification of pathogenicity of variants. These findings are valuable for genetic diagnosis, genetic counseling, prenatal testing and pre-implantation diagnosis in EVA families.

  3. Serum high-molecular-weight adiponectin as a marker for the evaluation and care of subjects with metabolic syndrome and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yukihiro; Seino-Yoshihara, Yoshie; Kawabe, Hiroshi; Saito, Ikuo

    2010-12-26

    In 1996, adiponectin was reported to be the most abundant transcript in adipose tissue. Animal studies revealed that administering adiponectin improves insulin resistance and blood glucose levels and inhibits atherosclerosis. In the present article, we review the significance of measuring serum high-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin levels in human subjects. Our cross-sectional studies revealed that the serum HMW adiponectin concentration was 1.9 times higher in healthy Japanese females than males and had a strong positive correlation with HDL-cholesterol but a negative correlation with BMI and the homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR). They also indicated that the serum HMW adiponectin concentration had a stronger association with HOMA-IR and metabolic syndrome than the total adiponectin concentration. Our longitudinal study, a 6-year follow-up of Japanese men, suggested that a decreased level of HMW adiponectin is a predictor of progression to metabolic syndrome. In another intervention study, lifestyle modification for 3 months induced a decrease in BMI and waist circumference and an increase in serum HMW adiponectin but not the total adiponectin level in 16 Japanese males with metabolic syndrome. Administering thiazolidinediones to diabetic patients increased the serum HMW adiponectin concentration 3 fold and improved glucose and lipid profiles and blood pressure. Some people may inherit a lower serum concentration of adiponectin, and have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases.It is suggested that HMW adiponectin is a useful marker for the evaluation and care of subjects with metabolic syndrome and related disorders.

  4. Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular observations in a patient with Pallister-Killian-syndrome with an unusual karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leube, Barbara; Majewski, Frank; Gebauer, Jürgen; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2003-12-15

    Pallister-Killian syndrome is a clinically recognizable syndrome, usually due to a tissue-limited mosaicism for a supernumary 12p isochromosome (i12p). Here we report an unusual case with tetrasomy/trisomy/disomy 12p mosaic in fibroblasts and trisomy/disomy 12p mosaic in lymphocytes. The tetrasomy 12p was due to an i12p, the trisomy 12p to a single 12p marker. Both marker chromosomes were investigated with conventional cytogenetic techniques and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Stability under culturing conditions was studied. DNA-analysis revealed prezygotic maternal origin of the extra 12p material. Clinically, the patient seems to have less retardation than most patients with Pallister-Killian syndrome.

  5. The intellectual capacity of patients with Laron syndrome (LS) differs with various molecular defects of the growth hormone receptor gene. Correlation with CNS abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevah, O; Kornreich, L; Galatzer, A; Laron, Z

    2005-12-01

    The correlation between the molecular defects of the GH receptor (R), psychosocial development and brain abnormalities were evaluated in 10 patients with Laron syndrome (LS), in whom all data were available. The findings revealed that the intelligence quotient (IQ) and abnormalities in the brain of the patients with LS differ with various molecular defects of the GH-receptor. The most severe mental deficits and brain pathology occurred in patients with 3, 5, 6 exon deletion. Patients with point mutations in exons 2, 4 and 7 presented various degrees of medium to mild CNS abnormalities that correlated with the IQ. Notably, the patient with the E180 splice mutation in exon 6 had a normal IQ, which fits the report on normal IQ in a large Ecuadorian cohort with the same mutation. This is the first report to support a correlation between IQ, brain abnormalities and localization of the molecular defects in the GH-R gene. As all patients with LS are IGF-I-deficient, it must be assumed that other as yet unknown factors related to the molecular defects in the GH-R are the major cause of the differences in intellect and brain abnormalities.

  6. 脆性X综合征(fragile X syndrome)的分子机理研究%Study of the molecular mechanism of fragile X syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖家鹏; 涂知明

    2013-01-01

    脆性X综合征(FraX)是一种常见遗传性智力低下的疾病,在我国人群的发病率仅次于Down氏综合征.细胞学上主要表现为Xq27.3处有一个脆性位点(FRAXA);分子水平上表现为FMR1基因5'端(CGG)n的异常扩增.从X脆性位点克隆到该病的致病基因FMR1,根据FMR1基因的特点,测定湖北人群中CGG重复序列,了解人群中FRA (X)位点(CGG)n的多态性,建立一种简便、快捷的检测方法.我们试图建立FMR-1基因超表达的细胞系和FMR-1基因表达被抑制的细胞系,确定FMRP功能.本研究对该病的筛查和诊断具有重要意义,也为阐明该病的发生机制和基因治疗提供依据.%Fragile X syndrome (FraX) is one of the most common hereditary diseases of mental retardation,its incidence rate just below Down's syndrome.Frax has a fragile sites (FRAXA) in Xq27.3 in cytology,represent a gene FMR1,which is (CGG)n island abnormal amplification.FMR1 gene was cloned from fragile sites (FRAXA),According to characterizaton of FMR1 gene,we measured the repeats of (CGG)n in Hubei human groups,to determine it's polymorphism and set up a simple and quick genetic detection.We are trying to establish a FMR-1 gene overexpressin cell line and a knockout cell line,to test the function of FMRP.This study is meaningful for the screen and diagnosis of Fragile X syndrome (FraX),and useful to understand its mechannism and supply a gene therapy foudation.

  7. Cellular and molecular deviations in bovine in vitro-produced embryos are related to the large offspring syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazzari, G.; Wrenzycki, C.; Herrmann, D.; Duchi, R.; Kruip, T.; Niemann, H.; Galli, C.

    2002-01-01

    The large offspring syndrome (LOS) is observed in bovine and ovine offspring following transfer of in vitro-produced (IVP) or cloned embryos and is characterized by a multitude of pathologic changes, of which extended gestation length and increased birthweight are predominant features. In the presen

  8. Histology and synchrotron radiation-based microtomography of the inner ear in a molecularly confirmed case of CHARGE syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glueckert, R.; Rask-Andersen, H.; Sergi, C.; Schmutzhard, J.; Mueller, B.; Beckmann, F.; Rittinger, O.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Schrott-Fischer, A.; Janecke, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    CHARGE (Coloboma of the iris or retina, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retardation of growth and/or development, genital anomalies, ear anomalies) syndrome (OMIM #214800) affects about 1 in 10,000 children and is most often caused by chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein-7 (CHD7) mutatio

  9. Clinical features and molecular genetic analysis of a boy with Prader-Willi syndrome caused by an imprinting defect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, A; Hansen, Claus; Baekgaard, P;

    1997-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neuroendocrine disorder caused by a non-functioning paternally derived gene(s) within the chromosome region 15q11-q13. Most cases result from microscopically visible deletions of paternal origin, or maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15. In both instances...

  10. Congenital Short Bowel Syndrome : from clinical and genetic diagnosis to the molecular mechanisms involved in intestinal elongation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Christine S.; Halim, Danny; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Alves, Maria M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital Short Bowel Syndrome (CSBS) is a rare gastrointestinal disorder in which the mean length of the small intestine is substantially reduced when compared to its normal counterpart. Families with several affected members have been described and CSBS has been suggested to have a genetic basis.

  11. Global and deep molecular analysis of microbiota signatures in fecal samples from patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajilic-Stojanovic, M.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Kajander, K.; Kekkonen, R.A.; Tims, S.; Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been associated with disruptions to the intestinal microbiota, but studies have had limited power, coverage, and depth of analysis. We aimed to define microbial populations that can be used discriminate the fecal microbiota of patients with I

  12. Diagnosis of Japanese patients with HHH syndrome by molecular genetic analysis: a common mutation, R179X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, T; Kanazawa, N; Kato, S; Kawakami, M; Inoue, Y; Kuhara, T; Inoue, T; Takeshita, K; Tsujino, S

    2001-01-01

    Patients with mitochondrial ornithine transporter deficiency (or HHH syndrome) present with various neurological symptoms, including mental retardation, spastic paraparesis with pyramidal signs, cerebellar ataxia, and episodic disturbance of consciousness or coma due to hyperammonemia. We previously described three novel mutations in the ORNT1 gene in Japanese patients with HHH syndrome. In this article, we report a new patient with HHH syndrome, a 52-year-old woman, who had the typical clinical features, except for an absence of mental retardation. When we screened this patient, as well as a previously described Japanese patient, for mutations in the ORNT1 gene, we found that both were homozygous for a nonsense mutation (R179X). Furthermore, reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of fibroblast RNA from one patient showed exon 4 skipping, as had been observed in a previously reported patient with R179X. These results, together with the findings in our previous report, show that, in three of our five reported Japanese HHH patients (six of ten alleles), R179X is present, suggesting that this is a common mutation in Japanese patients with HHH syndrome.

  13. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  14. Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for the Molecular Diagnosis of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome During an Outbreak in Korea in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Chang Seok; Lee, Hyukmin; Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Sinyoung; Seong, Moon Woo; Yong, Dongeun; Kim, Jae Seok; Lee, Mi Kyung; Kim, Mi Na; Choi, Jong Rak; Kim, Jeong Ho

    2016-05-01

    For two months between May and July 2015, a nationwide outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) occurred in Korea. On June 3, 2015, the Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine (KSLM) launched a MERS-CoV Laboratory Response Task Force (LR-TF) to facilitate clinical laboratories to set up the diagnosis of MERS-CoV infection. Based on the WHO interim recommendations, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of United States guidelines for MERS-CoV laboratory testing, and other available resources, the KSLM MERS-CoV LR-TF provided the first version of the laboratory practice guidelines for the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV to the clinical laboratories on June 12, 2015. The guidelines described here are an updated version that includes case definition, indications for testing, specimen type and protocols for specimen collection, specimen packing and transport, specimen handling and nucleic acid extraction, molecular detection of MERS-CoV, interpretation of results and reporting, and laboratory safety. The KSLM guidelines mainly focus on the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV, reflecting the unique situation in Korea and the state of knowledge at the time of publication.

  15. Histology and synchrotron radiation-based microtomography of the inner ear in a molecularly confirmed case of CHARGE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glueckert, Rudolf; Rask-Andersen, Helge; Sergi, Consolato; Schmutzhard, Joachim; Mueller, Bert; Beckmann, Felix; Rittinger, Olaf; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese; Janecke, Andreas R

    2010-03-01

    CHARGE (Coloboma of the iris or retina, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retardation of growth and/or development, genital anomalies, ear anomalies) syndrome (OMIM #214800) affects about 1 in 10,000 children and is most often caused by chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein-7 (CHD7) mutations. Inner ear defects and vestibular abnormalities are particularly common. Specifically, semicircular canal (SCC) hypoplasia/aplasia and the presence of a Mondini malformation can be considered pathognomonic in the context of congenital malformations of the CHARGE syndrome. We obtained a temporal bone (TB) of a patient with CHARGE syndrome who died from bacteremia at 3 months of age. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed in the patient by direct DNA sequencing and the detection of a de novo, truncating CHD7 mutation, c.6169dup (p.R2057fs). We assessed changes of the TB and the degree of neural preservation, which may influence the potential benefit of cochlear implantation. The TB was analyzed using synchrotron radiation-based micro computed tomography, and by light microscopy. The vestibular partition consisted of a rudimentary vestibule with agenesis of the SCCs. The cochlea was hypoplastic with poor or deficient interscaling and shortened (Mondini dysplasia). The organ of Corti had near normal structure and innervation. Modiolus and Rosenthal's canal were hypoplastic with perikarya displaced along the axon bundles into the internal acoustic meatus, which may be explained by the arrest or limited migration and translocation of the cell nuclei into the cochlear tube during development.

  16. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of a recurrent unbalanced translocation (4;21) (p16.3;q22.1): Relevance to the Wolf-Hirschhorn and Down syndrome critical regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastio, G.; Perone, L.; Guzzetta, V. [Universita Federico II, Naples (Italy)] [and others

    1996-05-17

    We report on an aneuploidy syndrome due to the unbalanced segregation of a familial translocation (4;21)(p16.3;q22.1) causing a partial 4p monosomy and a partial 21q trisomy. The three affected children presented with severe failure to thrive, short stature, microcephaly, profound hypotonia, and mental retardation. The face, very similar in the three children, is characterized by frontal bossing, upslanting of the palpebral fissures, short nose, and deep set ears, giving the overall appearance of the Down syndrome. The molecular study has defined the aneuploid segment on both 4p and 21q. Most of the Down syndrome critical region was found to be trisomic, while only part of the candidate Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome critical region was deleted, suggesting that this region is not critical for the major malformations characteristic for WHS. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Total and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin levels and measures of glucose and lipid metabolism following pioglitazone treatment in a randomized placebo-controlled study in polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, D.; Frystyk, J.; Hojlund, K.;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent studies suggested that the effect of adiponectin on insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism is mediated primarily by the high molecular weight (HMW) form of adiponectin. In the present study we evaluated total and HMW adiponectin in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients...

  18. Genetic analysis of the pedigrees and molecular defects of the GH-receptor gene in the Israeli cohort of patients with Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevah, Orit; Laron, Zvi

    2006-08-01

    Out of the 63 patients with Laron Syndrome ( LS) followed in our clinic we were able to perform a genetic analysis on 43 patients belonging to 28 families. Twenty-seven patients were Jews, eight were Arabs, one was Druze, and six were Caucasians from countries other then Israel. Consanguinity was found in 11 families. Molecular analysis of the growth hormone receptor gene was performed in 32 patients and 32 family members. From the study of the pedigrees, as well as the GH receptor gene analysis, we confirmed an earlier report from our group that LS is a recessively inherited disease. One patient with a classical phenotype of LS had a non-classical pattern of inheritance: R43X heterozygosity together with a heterozygous polymorphism G168G; a condition which needs further exploration.

  19. A molecular clock dates the common ancestor of European-type porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus at more than 10 years before the emergence of disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Roald; Oleksiewicz, Martin B.; Krabbe Petersen, Anne Mette;

    2001-01-01

    The disease caused by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) emerged independently and almost simultaneously in Europe (1990) and North America (1987). The original reservoir of the virus and the date it entered the pig populations is not known. In this study, we demonstrate...... an accurate molecular clock for the European PRRSV ORF 3 gene, place the root in the genealogy, estimate the rate of nucleotide substitution, and date the most recent common viral ancestor of the data set to 1979; more than 10 years before the onset of the European epidemic. Based on these findings, we...... conclude that PRRSV virus most likely entered the pig population some time before the epidemic emergence of the virus, and hence, that emergence of European-type PRRSV is not the result of a recent species transmission event. Together, our results show that ORF3 sequencing is a valuable epidemiologic tool...

  20. Perspectives on craniosynostosis: sutural biology, some well-known syndromes, and some unusual syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M Michael

    2009-03-01

    Perspectives on craniosynostosis are discussed under the following headings: sutural biology (anatomic and genetic categories of synostosis; sutures, suture systems, and types of craniosynostosis; well-known syndromes (Muenke syndrome and Pfeiffer syndrome); and unusual syndromes (thanatophoric dysplasia, Beare-Stevenson cutis gyrata syndrome, Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, Elejalde syndrome, hypomandibular faciocranial syndrome, and craniorhiny). Five of these syndromes are caused by fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) mutations; one is caused by ras-like in rat brain 23 (RAB23) mutations; and three have Mendelian patterns of inheritance, but the molecular basis remains unknown to date.

  1. Vaccination and Infection as Causative Factors in Japanese Patients With Rasmussen Syndrome: Molecular Mimicry and HLA Class I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukitoshi Takahashi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasmussen syndrome is an intractable epilepsy with a putative causal relation with cellular and humoral autoimmunity. Almost half of the patients have some preceding causative factors, with infections found in 38.2%, vaccinations in 5.9% and head trauma in 8.9% of Japanese patients. In a patient with seizure onset after influenza A infections, cross-reaction of the patient's lymphocytes with GluRε2 and influenza vaccine components was demonstrated by lymphocyte stimulation test. Database analyses revealed that influenza A virus hemagglutinin and GluRε2 molecules contain peptides with the patient's HLA class I binding motif (HLA ࢤ A*0201. The relative risks of HLA class I genotypes for Rasmussen syndrome are 6.1 (A*2402, 6.4 (A*0201, 6.3 (A*2601 and 11.4 (B*4601. The relative risks of HLA class I-A and B haplotypes are infinity (A*2601+B*5401, 21.1 (A*2402+B*1501, 13.3 (A*2402+B*4801 and 5.1 (A*2402+B*5201. Some alleles and haplotypes of HLA class I may be the risk factors in Japanese patients. Cross-reactivity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes may contribute to the processes leading from infection to the involvement of CNS.

  2. Diagnosis of familial Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome due to a paternal cryptic chromosomal rearrangement by conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas-Vega, Carlos A; Fernández-Ramírez, Fernando; Zepeda, Luis M; Nieto-Martínez, Karem; Gómez-Laguna, Laura; Garduño-Zarazúa, Luz M; Berumen, Jaime; Kofman, Susana; Cervantes, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The use of conventional cytogenetic techniques in combination with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays is necessary for the identification of cryptic rearrangements in the diagnosis of chromosomal syndromes. We report two siblings, a boy of 9 years and 9 months of age and his 7-years- and 5-month-old sister, with the classic Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) phenotype. Using high-resolution GTG- and NOR-banding karyotypes, as well as FISH analysis, we characterized a pure 4p deletion in both sibs and a balanced rearrangement in their father, consisting in an insertion of 4p material within a nucleolar organizing region of chromosome 15. Copy number variant (CNV) analysis using SNP arrays showed that both siblings have a similar size of 4p deletion (~6.5 Mb). Our results strongly support the need for conventional cytogenetic and FISH analysis, as well as high-density microarray mapping for the optimal characterization of the genetic imbalance in patients with WHS; parents must always be studied for recognizing cryptic balanced chromosomal rearrangements for an adequate genetic counseling.

  3. Diagnosis of Familial Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome due to a Paternal Cryptic Chromosomal Rearrangement by Conventional and Molecular Cytogenetic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Venegas-Vega

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of conventional cytogenetic techniques in combination with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP microarrays is necessary for the identification of cryptic rearrangements in the diagnosis of chromosomal syndromes. We report two siblings, a boy of 9 years and 9 months of age and his 7-years- and 5-month-old sister, with the classic Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS phenotype. Using high-resolution GTG- and NOR-banding karyotypes, as well as FISH analysis, we characterized a pure 4p deletion in both sibs and a balanced rearrangement in their father, consisting in an insertion of 4p material within a nucleolar organizing region of chromosome 15. Copy number variant (CNV analysis using SNP arrays showed that both siblings have a similar size of 4p deletion (~6.5 Mb. Our results strongly support the need for conventional cytogenetic and FISH analysis, as well as high-density microarray mapping for the optimal characterization of the genetic imbalance in patients with WHS; parents must always be studied for recognizing cryptic balanced chromosomal rearrangements for an adequate genetic counseling.

  4. Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum ATPase is a molecular partner of Wolfram syndrome 1 protein, which negatively regulates its expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatyka, Malgorzata; Da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Bellomo, Elisa A; Leadbeater, Wendy; Astuti, Dewi; Smith, Joel; Michelangeli, Frank; Rutter, Guy A; Barrett, Timothy G

    2015-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neurodegeneration and diabetes mellitus. The gene responsible for the syndrome (WFS1) encodes an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident transmembrane protein that is involved in the regulation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), intracellular ion homeostasis, cyclic adenosine monophosphate production and regulation of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. In this study, single cell Ca(2+) imaging with fura-2 and direct measurements of free cytosolic ATP concentration ([ATP]CYT) with adenovirally expressed luciferase confirmed a reduced and delayed rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]CYT), and additionally, diminished [ATP]CYT rises in response to elevated glucose concentrations in WFS1-depleted MIN6 cells. We also observed that sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA) expression was elevated in several WFS1-depleted cell models and primary islets. We demonstrated a novel interaction between WFS1 and SERCA by co-immunoprecipitation in Cos7 cells and with endogenous proteins in human neuroblastoma cells. This interaction was reduced when cells were treated with the ER stress inducer dithiothreitol. Treatment of WFS1-depleted neuroblastoma cells with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 resulted in reduced accumulation of SERCA levels compared with wild-type cells. Together these results reveal a role for WFS1 in the negative regulation of SERCA and provide further insights into the function of WFS1 in calcium homeostasis.

  5. Prenatal diagnosis of chromosome 15 abnormalities in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region by traditional and molecular cytogenetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth-Fejel, S.; Magenis, R.E.; Leff, S. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-13

    With improvements in culturing and banding techniques, amniotic fluid studies now achieve a level of resolution at which the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) region may be questioned. Chromosome 15 heteromorphisms, detected with Q- and R-banding and used in conjunction with PWS/AS region-specific probes, can confirm a chromosome deletion and establish origin to predict the clinical outcome. We report four de novo cases of an abnormal-appearing chromosome 15 in amniotic fluid samples referred for advanced maternal age or a history of a previous chromosomally abnormal child. The chromosomes were characterized using G-, Q-, and R-banding, as well as isotopic and fluorescent in situ hybridization of DNA probes specific for the proximal chromosome 15 long arm. In two cases, one chromosome 15 homolog showed a consistent deletion of the ONCOR PWS/AS region A and B. In the other two cases, one of which involved an inversion with one breakpoint in the PWS/AS region, all of the proximal chromosome 15 long arm DNA probes used in the in situ hybridization were present on both homologs. Clinical follow-up was not available on these samples, as in all cases the parents chose to terminate the pregnancies. These cases demonstrate the ability to prenatally diagnose chromosome 15 abnormalities associated with PWS/AS. In addition, they highlight the need for a better understanding of this region for accurate prenatal diagnosis. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  6. An investigation of the molecular mechanisms engaged before and after the development of Alzheimer disease neuropathology in Down syndrome: a proteomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenini, Giovanna; Fiorini, Ada; Sultana, Rukhsana; Perluigi, Marzia; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Head, Elizabeth; Butterfield, D Allan

    2014-11-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the most common causes of intellectual disability, owing to trisomy of all or part of chromosome 21. DS is also associated with the development of Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology after the age of 40 years. To better clarify the cellular and metabolic pathways that could contribute to the differences in DS brain, in particular those involved in the onset of neurodegeneration, we analyzed the frontal cortex of DS subjects with or without significant AD pathology in comparison with age-matched controls, using a proteomics approach. Proteomics represents an advantageous tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. From these analyses, we investigated the effects that age, DS, and AD neuropathology could have on protein expression levels. Our results show overlapping and independent molecular pathways (including energy metabolism, oxidative damage, protein synthesis, and autophagy) contributing to DS, to aging, and to the presence of AD pathology in DS. Investigation of pathomechanisms involved in DS with AD may provide putative targets for therapeutic approaches to slow the development of AD.

  7. Molecular characterization of WFS1 in an Iranian family with Wolfram syndrome reveals a novel frameshift mutation associated with early symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Maryam; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Rajab, Asadollah; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2013-10-10

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder that represents a likely source of childhood diabetes especially among countries in the consanguinity belt. The main responsible gene is WFS1 for which over one hundred mutations have been reported from different ethnic groups. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular etiology of WS and to perform a possible genotype-phenotype correlation in Iranian kindred. An Iranian family with two patients was clinically studied and WS was suspected. Genetic linkage analysis via 5 STR markers was carried out. For identification of mutations, DNA sequencing of WFS1 including all the exons, exon-intron boundaries and the promoter was performed. Linkage analysis indicated linkage to the WFS1 region. After DNA sequencing of WFS1, one novel pathogenic mutation, which causes frameshift alteration c.2177_2178insTCTTC (or c.2173_2177dupTCTTC) in exon eight, was found. The genotype-phenotype correlation analysis suggests that the presence of the homozygous mutation may be associated with early onset of disease symptoms. This study stresses the necessity of considering the molecular analysis of WFS1 in childhood diabetes with some symptoms of WS.

  8. A novel mutation in KVLQT1 is the molecular basis of inherited long QT syndrome in a near-drowning patient's family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, M J; Schroeder, J J; Berry, R; Schaid, D J; Porter, C J; Michels, V V; Thibodeau, S N

    1998-08-01

    After identifying a 10-year-old boy with inherited long QT syndrome (LQTS) after a near-drowning that required defibrillation from torsades de pointes, evaluation of first degree relatives revealed a four-generation kindred comprising 26 individuals with four additional symptomatic and eight asymptomatic members harboring an abnormally prolonged QTc (defined as > or =0.46 s1/2). We set out to determine the molecular basis of their LQTS. The inherited LQTS represents a collection of genetically distinct ion channelopathies with over 40 mutations in four fundamental cardiac ion channels identified. Molecular studies, including linkage analysis and identification of the disease-associated mutation, were performed on genomic DNA isolated from peripheral blood samples from 29 available family members. Genetic linkage analysis excluded the regions for LQT2, LQT3, and LQT5. However, the chromosome 11p15.5 region (LQT1) showed evidence of linkage with a maximum lod score of 3.36. Examination of the KVLQT1 gene revealed a novel 3-bp deletion resulting in an in-frame deltaF339 (phenylalanine) deletion in the proband. This deltaF339 mutation was confirmed in nine additional family members who shared both an assigned affected phenotype and the disease-associated linked haplotype. Importantly, three asymptomatic family members, with a tentative clinical diagnosis based on their QTc, did not have this mutation and could be reclassified as unaffected. It is noteworthy that the proband's ECG suggested the sodium channel-based LQT3 genotype. These findings show the potential importance of establishing a molecular diagnosis rather than initiating genotype-specific interventions based upon inspection of a patient's ECG.

  9. Molecular and functional characterization of Kv 7 channels in penile arteries and corpus cavernosum of healthy and metabolic syndrome rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepps, T A; Olesen, S P; Greenwood, I A

    2016-01-01

    and spontaneously hypertensive, heart failure-prone (SHHF) rats - a rat model of human metabolic syndrome. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the expression of KCNQ isoforms in penile tissue. Isometric tension was measured in intracavernous arterial rings......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: KCNQ-encoded voltage-dependent potassium channels (Kv 7) are involved in the regulation of vascular tone. In this study we evaluated the influence of Kv 7 channel activation on smooth muscle relaxation in rat penile arteries and corpus cavernosum from normal...... and corpus cavernosum strips isolated from normal and SHHF rats. KEY RESULTS: Transcripts for KCNQ3, KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 were detected in penile arteries and corpus cavernosum. KCNQ1 was only found in corpus cavernosum. Immunofluorescence signals to Kv 7.4 and Kv 7.5 were found in penile arteries, penile veins...

  10. Molecular Characterization of Down Syndrome Embryonic Stem Cells Reveals a Role for RUNX1 in Neural Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer Halevy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is the leading genetic cause of mental retardation and is caused by a third copy of human chromosome 21. The different pathologies of DS involve many tissues with a distinct array of neural phenotypes. Here we characterize embryonic stem cell lines with DS (DS-ESCs, and focus on the neural aspects of the disease. Our results show that neural progenitor cells (NPCs differentiated from five independent DS-ESC lines display increased apoptosis and downregulation of forehead developmental genes. Analysis of differentially expressed genes suggested RUNX1 as a key transcription regulator in DS-NPCs. Using genome editing we were able to disrupt all three copies of RUNX1 in DS-ESCs, leading to downregulation of several RUNX1 target developmental genes accompanied by reduced apoptosis and neuron migration. Our work sheds light on the role of RUNX1 and the importance of dosage balance in the development of neural phenotypes in DS.

  11. 早老症的分子机制%Molecular mechanism of Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘新光; 赵炜; 周中军

    2010-01-01

    @@ 儿童早老症(Hutchinson Giford Progeria Syn-drome,HGPS)是由于基因突变导致的疾病,它的发病率很低,大概是八百万分之一,患者出生的早期就开始出现衰老的容貌"[1]. 这种疾病最早由Hutchins于1886年报道"[2],1904年Gilford报道了第二例,他在文章中使用了progeria(早老)这个词[3].1962年,DeBusk总结了60例病例,其中包括4例他本人报道的病人,他将这种疾病命名为Hutchinson-Giford Progefia Syndrome,HGPS.

  12. Comprehensive clinical studies in 34 patients with molecularly defined UPD(14)pat and related conditions (Kagami-Ogata syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagami, Masayo; Kurosawa, Kenji; Miyazaki, Osamu; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2015-11-01

    Paternal uniparental disomy 14 (UPD(14)pat) and epimutations and microdeletions affecting the maternally derived 14q32.2 imprinted region lead to a unique constellation of clinical features such as facial abnormalities, small bell-shaped thorax with a coat-hanger appearance of the ribs, abdominal wall defects, placentomegaly, and polyhydramnios. In this study, we performed comprehensive clinical studies in patients with UPD(14)pat (n=23), epimutations (n=5), and microdeletions (n=6), and revealed several notable findings. First, a unique facial appearance with full cheeks and a protruding philtrum and distinctive chest roentgenograms with increased coat-hanger angles to the ribs constituted the pathognomonic features from infancy through childhood. Second, birth size was well preserved, with a median birth length of ±0 SD (range, -1.7 to +3.0 SD) and a median birth weight of +2.3 SD (range, +0.1 to +8.8 SD). Third, developmental delay and/or intellectual disability was invariably present, with a median developmental/intellectual quotient of 55 (range, 29-70). Fourth, hepatoblastoma was identified in three infantile patients (8.8%), and histological examination in two patients showed a poorly differentiated embryonal hepatoblastoma with focal macrotrabecular lesions and well-differentiated hepatoblastoma, respectively. These findings suggest the necessity of an adequate support for developmental delay and periodical screening for hepatoblastoma in the affected patients, and some phenotypic overlap between UPD(14)pat and related conditions and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. On the basis of our previous and present studies that have made a significant contribution to the clarification of underlying (epi)genetic factors and the definition of clinical findings, we propose the name 'Kagami-Ogata syndrome' for UPD(14)pat and related conditions.

  13. New Lmna knock-in mice provide a molecular mechanism for the 'segmental aging' in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hea-Jin; Tu, Yiping; Yang, Shao H; Tatar, Angelica; Nobumori, Chika; Wu, Daniel; Young, Stephen G; Fong, Loren G

    2014-03-15

    Lamins A and C (products of the LMNA gene) are found in roughly equal amounts in peripheral tissues, but the brain produces mainly lamin C and little lamin A. In HeLa cells and fibroblasts, the expression of prelamin A (the precursor to lamin A) can be reduced by miR-9, but the relevance of those cell culture studies to lamin A regulation in the brain was unclear. To address this issue, we created two new Lmna knock-in alleles, one (Lmna(PLAO-5NT)) with a 5-bp mutation in a predicted miR-9 binding site in prelamin A's 3' UTR, and a second (Lmna(PLAO-UTR)) in which prelamin A's 3' UTR was replaced with lamin C's 3' UTR. Neither allele had significant effects on lamin A levels in peripheral tissues; however, both substantially increased prelamin A transcript levels and lamin A protein levels in the cerebral cortex and the cerebellum. The increase in lamin A expression in the brain was more pronounced with the Lmna(PLAO-UTR) allele than with the Lmna(PLAO-5NT) allele. With both alleles, the increased expression of prelamin A transcripts and lamin A protein was greater in the cerebral cortex than in the cerebellum. Our studies demonstrate the in vivo importance of prelamin A's 3' UTR and its miR-9 binding site in regulating lamin A expression in the brain. The reduced expression of prelamin A in the brain likely explains why children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (a progeroid syndrome caused by a mutant form of prelamin A) are spared from neurodegenerative disease.

  14. Molecular Signatures of Cardiac Defects in Down Syndrome Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines Suggest Altered Ciliome and Hedgehog Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, Clémentine; Rivals, Isabelle; Ait Yahya-Graison, Emilie; Dauphinot, Luce; Paly, Evelyne; Mircher, Clothilde; Ravel, Aimé; Grattau, Yann; Bléhaut, Henri; Mégarbane, André; Dembour, Guy; de Fréminville, Bénédicte; Touraine, Renaud; Créau, Nicole; Potier, Marie Claude; Delabar, Jean Maurice

    2012-01-01

    Forty percent of people with Down syndrome exhibit heart defects, most often an atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and less frequently a ventricular septal defect (VSD) or atrial septal defect (ASD). Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were established from lymphocytes of individuals with trisomy 21, the chromosomal abnormality causing Down syndrome. Gene expression profiles generated from DNA microarrays of LCLs from individuals without heart defects (CHD−; n = 22) were compared with those of LCLs from patients with cardiac malformations (CHD+; n = 21). After quantile normalization, principal component analysis revealed that AVSD carriers could be distinguished from a combined group of ASD or VSD (ASD+VSD) carriers. From 9,758 expressed genes, we identified 889 and 1,016 genes differentially expressed between CHD− and AVSD and CHD− and ASD+VSD, respectively, with only 119 genes in common. A specific chromosomal enrichment was found in each group of affected genes. Among the differentially expressed genes, more than 65% are expressed in human or mouse fetal heart tissues (GEO dataset). Additional LCLs from new groups of AVSD and ASD+VSD patients were analyzed by quantitative PCR; observed expression ratios were similar to microarray results. Analysis of GO categories revealed enrichment of genes from pathways regulating clathrin-mediated endocytosis in patients with AVSD and of genes involved in semaphorin-plexin-driven cardiogenesis and the formation of cytoplasmic microtubules in patients with ASD-VSD. A pathway-oriented search revealed enrichment in the ciliome for both groups and a specific enrichment in Hedgehog and Jak-stat pathways among ASD+VSD patients. These genes or related pathways are therefore potentially involved in normal cardiogenesis as well as in cardiac malformations observed in individuals with trisomy 21. PMID:22912673

  15. Molecular signatures of cardiac defects in Down syndrome lymphoblastoid cell lines suggest altered ciliome and Hedgehog pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémentine Ripoll

    Full Text Available Forty percent of people with Down syndrome exhibit heart defects, most often an atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD and less frequently a ventricular septal defect (VSD or atrial septal defect (ASD. Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs were established from lymphocytes of individuals with trisomy 21, the chromosomal abnormality causing Down syndrome. Gene expression profiles generated from DNA microarrays of LCLs from individuals without heart defects (CHD(-; n = 22 were compared with those of LCLs from patients with cardiac malformations (CHD(+; n = 21. After quantile normalization, principal component analysis revealed that AVSD carriers could be distinguished from a combined group of ASD or VSD (ASD+VSD carriers. From 9,758 expressed genes, we identified 889 and 1,016 genes differentially expressed between CHD(- and AVSD and CHD(- and ASD+VSD, respectively, with only 119 genes in common. A specific chromosomal enrichment was found in each group of affected genes. Among the differentially expressed genes, more than 65% are expressed in human or mouse fetal heart tissues (GEO dataset. Additional LCLs from new groups of AVSD and ASD+VSD patients were analyzed by quantitative PCR; observed expression ratios were similar to microarray results. Analysis of GO categories revealed enrichment of genes from pathways regulating clathrin-mediated endocytosis in patients with AVSD and of genes involved in semaphorin-plexin-driven cardiogenesis and the formation of cytoplasmic microtubules in patients with ASD-VSD. A pathway-oriented search revealed enrichment in the ciliome for both groups and a specific enrichment in Hedgehog and Jak-stat pathways among ASD+VSD patients. These genes or related pathways are therefore potentially involved in normal cardiogenesis as well as in cardiac malformations observed in individuals with trisomy 21.

  16. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... System & How it Works Digestive Diseases A-Z Dumping Syndrome What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ... the colon and rectum—and anus. What causes dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome is caused by problems with ...

  17. Identification of Ganglioside GM3 Molecular Species in Human Serum Associated with Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Veillon

    Full Text Available Serum GM3 molecular species were quantified in 125 Japanese residents using tandem mass spectrometry multiple reaction monitoring. Individuals were categorized by the presence or absence of metabolic disease risk factors including visceral fat accumulation, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. A total of 23 GM3 molecular species were measured, of these, eight were found to be significantly elevated in individuals with visceral fat accumulation and metabolic disease, defined as the presence of hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. All of the GM3 molecular species were composed of the sphingoid base sphingosine (d18:1 (Δ4 and, interestingly, six of the eight elevated GM3 molecular species contained a hydroxylated ceramide moiety. The hydroxylated GM3 species were, in order of decreasing abundance, d18:1-h24:0 ≈ d18:1-h24:1 > d18:1-h22:0 » d18:1-h20:0 > d18:1-h21:0 > d18:1-h18:1. Univariate and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted using a number of clinical health variables associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic disease, atherosclerosis and hypertension. GM3(d18:1-h24:1 was identified as the best candidate for metabolic screening, proving to be significantly correlated with intima-media thickness, used for the detection of atherosclerotic disease in humans, and a number of metabolic disease risk factors including autotaxin, LDL-c and homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR.

  18. Molecular-genetic risk assessement of determining angiotensin-converting enzyme hyperactivity in hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildar R. Minniakhmetov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate changes in angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE blood activity and angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene polymorphism as a possible disease predictor in hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS. Four hundred and nine patients (346 males and 63 females with HFRS serologic confirmation were enrolled in the study. Their age ranged from 15 to 65 years. ACE blood activity was assessed kinetically using the Bühlmann (Switzerland kit. Peripheral blood genomic DNA was isolated by a phenol-chloroform extraction. The genotyping of DNA loci was done using a polymerase chain reaction of DNA synthesis. Statistically, ACE blood activity was significantly higher throughout the entire HFRS course with diverse severity apart from the feverish phase of moderate-to-severe uncomplicated disease forms. *A1166 and *C1166 alleles, *A1166/*A1166 and *C1166/*C1166 genotypes of angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene were not associated with HFRS severity. The results of this study indicate that high ACE activity has not adaptive characteristics due to abnormalities in angiotensin II reception. It is an adequate metabolic response of the body to endotheliotropic virus activity.

  19. Molecular Epidemiological Investigation of Infectious Hypodermal and Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus and Taura Syndrome Virus in Penaeus Vannamei Cultured in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) and Taura syndrome virus (TSV) are two important shrimp viruses in cultured shrimp in America. These two viruses were transmitted to China at the beginning of the 21st century. In this study, 214 shrimp samples of Penaeus vannamei were collected from seven different areas of China and tested by PCR for IHHNV and TSV infection. The results showed that there were a high prevalence of IHHNV (65.42%) and low prevalence of TSV (3.27%) in the tested samples. Several samples were found to be co-infected with these two viruses. A 3 kb fragment of 7 positive IHHNV samples and a structure protein region (ORF2) of three TSV positive samples were amplified and sequenced. The sequence comparison indicated that both IHHNV and TSV sequenced in China have a low genetic variations compared with the prototype IHHNV and TSV from Hawaii. Phylogenetic analysis showed that TSV isolates were clustered into two groups, Asia and America group, which was genetically correlated to geographic distribution.

  20. Analysis of molecular variation in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in China between 2007 and 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhang Cao; Hongsheng Ouyang; Mingjun Zhang; Fuwang Chen; Xin Yang; Daxing Pang; Linzhu Ren

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, 89 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolates in China during 2007 to 2012 were randomly selected from the GenBank genetic sequence database. Evolutionary characteristics of these isolates were analyzed based on the sequences of non-struc-tural protein 2 (Nsp2) and glycoprotein 5 (GP5). The genetic variations of the isolates were also compared with six representative strains. The results showed that a high degree of genetic diversity exists among the PRRSV population in China. Highly pathogenic PRRSV isolates, with a discon-tinuous deletion of a 30 amino acid residue in the Nsp2 region, remained the most dominant virus throughout 2007-2012 in China. Owing to the extensive use of representative vaccine strains, natu-ral recombination events occurred between strains. Three isolates-HH08, DY, and YN-2011-were more closely related to vaccine strains than the other isolates. Both YN-2011 and DY were the evolu-tionary products of recombination events between strains SP and CH-1R. The results of the present study provide useful information for the epidemiology of PRRSV as well as for vaccine development.

  1. Clinical and molecular characterization of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome patients carrying distinct novel mutations of the EP300 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, G; Milani, D; Colapietro, P; Forzano, F; Della Monica, M; Rusconi, D; Consonni, L; Caffi, L G; Finelli, P; Scarano, G; Magnani, C; Selicorni, A; Spena, S; Larizza, L; Gervasini, C

    2015-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a rare congenital neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by postnatal growth deficiency, skeletal abnormalities, dysmorphic features and cognitive deficit. Mutations in two genes, CREBBP and EP300, encoding two homologous transcriptional co-activators, have been identified in ˜55% and ˜3-5% of affected individuals, respectively. To date, only eight EP300-mutated RSTS patients have been described and 12 additional mutations are reported in the database LOVD. In this study, EP300 analysis was performed on 33 CREBBP-negative RSTS patients leading to the identification of six unreported germline EP300 alterations comprising one deletion and five point mutations. All six patients showed a convincing, albeit mild, RSTS phenotype with minor skeletal anomalies, slight cognitive impairment and few major malformations. Beyond the expansion of the RSTS-EP300-mutated cohort, this study indicates that EP300-related RSTS cases occur more frequently than previously thought (˜8% vs 3-5%); furthermore, the characterization of novel EP300 mutations in RSTS patients will enhance the clinical practice and genotype-phenotype correlations.

  2. MOLECULAR DOCKING ANALYSES OF CYNODON DACTYLON DERIVED PHYTOCHEMICALS AGAINST WHITE SPOT SYNDROME VIRUS (WSSV STRUCTURAL PROTEIN VP26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damayanthi Devi.I

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available White spot disease is a major infectious disease of penaeid shrimps caused by the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV. The viral structural proteins are responsib le for binding virus to the cellular membranes of the host that is being systematically infected. An In silic o attempt was made to identify the potential drug to inhibit the WSSV spread of diseases. For that an effort , was made to deduce the antiviral potentiality of Cynodon dactylon derived phytochemicals with docking tec hnique. To stimulate the structure based drug design the, 3D structure of the VP26 (PDB-ID: 2EDM, a tegument protein thought to be i nvolved in the entry of WSSV nucleocapsid into the host nucleus, is retrieved from PDB datab ase and docking studies are carried out with the sketched phytochemical structures using GOLD software. Among the phytochemicals scr eened, luteolin and apigenin shows the best binding affinity with binding energies of 42.51 and 38.92 K.cal/m ol exhibiting the potential to block VP26 (2EDM protein of WSSV. This study will be helpful in developing novel antiviral drugs from plant sources against aquatic important pathogens.

  3. An innovative strategy for the molecular diagnosis of Usher syndrome identifies causal biallelic mutations in 93% of European patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Crystel; Riahi, Zied; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    of vestibular dysfunction, and the age of onset of the retinitis pigmentosa. A total of 10 causal genes, 6 for USH1, 3 for USH2, and 1 for USH3, and an USH2 modifier gene, have been identified. A robust molecular diagnosis is required not only to improve genetic counseling, but also to advance gene therapy.......5% mutation characterization rate, the diagnosis efficiency was substantially improved compared with previously reported methods.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 27 July 2016; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2016.99....

  4. Next generation syndromic surveillance: molecular epidemiology, electronic health records and the pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabadan, Raul; Calman, Neil; Hripcsak, George

    2009-08-22

    In the early phase of the 2009 A (H1N1) pandemic a marked increase in severity and a shift in the age distribution toward younger persons was found, with higher severity reported in patients with pre-existing medical conditions and pregnant women. Consistent with previous pandemics, the age and clinical history of the patients play a critical role in the morbidity and mortality associated with the pandemic virus. This is the first influenza pandemic in the information era, where enormous amounts of information will be available from the pathogen and the patient. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided an enormous amount of information about pathogens in near real time and at relatively low cost. Electronic Health Records (EHRs) provide another enormously rich set of information about patients, which include patient preconditions, previous exposures, immunization history, presenting complaints, duration and severity of illness, treatment history, and geographic location. An infectious disease is a complex interplay between host and pathogen. The morbidity and mortality of a virus depend on the virus, the patient, and the environment. To evaluate and understand the severity of the pandemic virus and to identify the populations at risk of mild or severe, life-threatening illness, it is compulsory to integrate viral and patient information in a fast and accurate way. Both advances in biomedical informatics with the creation of EHRs and molecular techniques provide the framework to achieve these aims.

  5. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  6. 多囊卵巢综合征胰岛素抵抗新进展%Molecular Mechanism and Management in Insulin Resistance in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈文娟; 匡洪影; 张跃辉

    2011-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)is one of the most common endocrine disorder with a variety of clinical manifestations among women of reproductive age. Its features include chronic anovulation, multicystic morphology of ovaries,hyperandrogenism. In recent years,insulin resistance (IR)has been regarded as one of the mechanisms of the development of PCOS,and is also associated with the hyperandrogenemia and dysfunction of ovaries. Many researches have been done on the molecular mechanism of IR in PCOS,which might provide a theory foundation for the treatment. This review thus focuses on the molecular mechanism and treatment of insulin resistance in patients with PCOS.%多囊卵巢综合征(PCOS)是一种常见的影响育龄期女性生殖和内分泌功能的特殊疾病,其临床表现异质性,以慢性无排卵、卵巢多囊样改变、高雄激素血症为主要临床表现.胰岛素抵抗是其发生、发展的重要病理生理机制之一,也是导致高雄激素血症和卵巢功能改变的重要原因.近年来,PCOS患者胰岛素抵抗的分子机制得到深入研究,为临床治疗提供了理论依据.综述PCOS胰岛素抵抗的分子机制研究和药物治疗进展.

  7. Molecular signature of clinical severity in recovering patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Ting-Shu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, a recent epidemic human disease, is caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV. First reported in Asia, SARS quickly spread worldwide through international travelling. As of July 2003, the World Health Organization reported a total of 8,437 people afflicted with SARS with a 9.6% mortality rate. Although immunopathological damages may account for the severity of respiratory distress, little is known about how the genome-wide gene expression of the host changes under the attack of SARS-CoV. Results Based on changes in gene expression of peripheral blood, we identified 52 signature genes that accurately discriminated acute SARS patients from non-SARS controls. While a general suppression of gene expression predominated in SARS-infected blood, several genes including those involved in innate immunity, such as defensins and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, were upregulated. Instead of employing clustering methods, we ranked the severity of recovering SARS patients by generalized associate plots (GAP according to the expression profiles of 52 signature genes. Through this method, we discovered a smooth transition pattern of severity from normal controls to acute SARS patients. The rank of SARS severity was significantly correlated with the recovery period (in days and with the clinical pulmonary infection score. Conclusion The use of the GAP approach has proved useful in analyzing the complexity and continuity of biological systems. The severity rank derived from the global expression profile of significantly regulated genes in patients may be useful for further elucidating the pathophysiology of their disease.

  8. Long-term running alleviates some behavioral and molecular abnormalities in Down syndrome mouse model Ts65Dn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Elizabeth; Rabe, Ausma; Walus, Marius; Albertini, Giorgio; Golabek, Adam A

    2013-02-01

    Running may affect the mood, behavior and neurochemistry of running animals. In the present study, we investigated whether voluntary daily running, sustained over several months, might improve cognition and motor function and modify the brain levels of selected proteins (SOD1, DYRK1A, MAP2, APP and synaptophysin) in Ts65Dn mice, a mouse model for Down syndrome (DS). Ts65Dn and age-matched wild-type mice, all females, had free access to a running wheel either from the time of weaning (post-weaning cohort) or from around 7 months of age (adult cohort). Sedentary female mice were housed in similar cages, without running wheels. Behavioral testing and evaluation of motor performance showed that running improved cognitive function and motor skills in Ts65Dn mice. However, while a dramatic improvement in the locomotor functions and learning of motor skills was observed in Ts65Dn mice from both post-weaning and adult cohorts, improved object memory was seen only in Ts65Dn mice that had free access to the wheel from weaning. The total levels of APP and MAP2ab were reduced and the levels of SOD1 were increased in the runners from the post-weaning cohort, while only the levels of MAP2ab and α-cleaved C-terminal fragments of APP were reduced in the adult group in comparison with sedentary trisomic mice. Hence, our study demonstrates that Ts65Dn females benefit from sustained voluntary physical exercise, more prominently if running starts early in life, providing further support to the idea that a properly designed physical exercise program could be a valuable adjuvant to future pharmacotherapy for DS.

  9. Molecular history of Richter syndrome: origin from a cell already present at the time of chronic lymphocytic leukemia diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Davide; Spina, Valeria; Forconi, Francesco; Capello, Daniela; Fangazio, Marco; Rasi, Silvia; Martini, Maurizio; Gattei, Valter; Ramponi, Antonio; Larocca, Luigi M; Bertoni, Francesco; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2012-06-15

    Richter syndrome (RS) represents the transformation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia to aggressive lymphoma. We explored intraclonal diversification (ID) of immunoglobulin genes in order to (i) follow the evolutionary history of the RS clone (ii) compare the role of ID in clonally related RS vs. clonally unrelated cases. Most (10/11, 90.9%) clonally related RS stem from the predominant clone observed at CLL diagnosis. One single RS had a transformation pattern compatible with sequential evolution from a secondary CLL subclone. Once RS transformation had occurred, all secondary CLL subclones disappeared and were substituted by the dominant RS clone with its own descendants. These observations suggest that genetic lesions associated with RS transformation are acquired by a cell belonging to the original CLL clone, rather than being progressively accumulated by later CLL subclones. Accordingly, most (9/11, 81.1%) clonally related RS harbored a genetic lesion disrupting TP53 that was already present, though at subclonal levels, in 5/11 (45.5%) samples of the paired CLL phase. A fraction of clonally related RS switched off ID (4/11, 36.4%) or reduced the levels of ID (5/11, 45.4%) at transformation. Conversely, all clonally unrelated RS harbored ID and were characterized by a significantly higher mutation frequency compared to clonally related RS (median: 1.18 × 10(-3) vs. 0.13 × 10(-3); p =0.002). These data indicate that (i) clonally related RS stems from a cell that is already present within the initial CLL clone and (ii) clonally unrelated and clonally related RS are biologically distinct disorders also in terms of antigen affinity maturation.

  10. Molecular Pathology of 6 Novel GJB2 Allelic Variants Detected in Familial and Sporadic Iranian Non Syndromic Hearing Loss Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hashemzadeh Chaleshtori

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Mutations of GJB2 gene encoding connexion 26 are the most common cause of hearing loss in many popula­tions. A very wide spectrum of GJB2 gene mutations associated with hearing loss have been detected but pathogenic role has been tested only for a part of them. In this study, we have provided genetic evidence on the pathogenicity of our previ­ously reported novel GJB2 allelic variants. "nMethods: The pathogenic role of GJB2 allelic variants were assessed using co segregation of each allelic variant with hear­ing loss in family members, absence of the allelic variants in control populations, coexistence with a second GJB2 mutation, na­ture of the amino acid substitution and evolutionary conservation of the appropriate amino acid. "nResults: The GJB2 allelic variants including 363delC, 327delGGinsA, H16R and G200R have been co segregated with auto­somal recessive non syndromic hearing loss in five families and are not found in control subjects. The G130V and K102Q were found in heterozygous state in two deaf individuals. G130V results in an exchange a residue highly conserved among all the connexins but was found with a rate of 1% in control subjects and K102Q results in an exchange a residue not con­served among all the connexins and not identified in control subjects. "nConclusion: We conclude that, 363delC, 327delGGinsA, H16R and G200R may be pathogenic. However, the pathogenic­ity and inheritance of K102Q and G130V can not be assessed clearly and remains to be identified.

  11. Molecular and clinical characterization of Waardenburg syndrome type I in an Iranian cohort with two novel PAX3 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Nazanin; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Farhadi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Tayeb; Emamdjomeh, Hesam; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-15

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a disease of abnormal neural-crest derived melanocyte development characterized by hearing loss and pigmentary disturbances in hair, eyes and skin. WS is subdivided into four major types, WS1-WS4, where WS1 is recognized by the presence of dystopia canthorum, with PAX3 being the only known gene involved. This study aimed at investigating PAX3 mutations and clinical characteristics of WS1 in a group of Iranian patients. A total of 12 WS1 patients from four unrelated Iranian families were enrolled. Waardenburg consortium guidelines were used for WS1 diagnosis. A detailed family history was traced and a thorough clinical examination was performed for all participants. Furthermore, WS1 patients underwent screening for PAX3 mutations using PCR-sequencing. Dystopia canthorum, broad high nasal root and synophrys were observed in all patients. Early graying, hair discoloration, hypoplastic blue eyes (characteristic brilliant blue iris) and hearing loss were the most common features observed, while heterochromia iridis was the least frequently observed sign among the studied Iranian WS1 patients. Genetic analysis of PAX3 revealed four mutations including c.667C>T, c.784C>T, c.951delT and c.451+3A>C. Two of the four mutations reported here (c.951delT and c.451+3A>C) are being reported for the first time in this study. Our data provide insight into genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of WS1 in an Iranian series of patients. Our results expand the spectrum of PAX3 mutations and may have implications for the genetic counseling of WS in Iran.

  12. Morphological and molecular characterizations of psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans from New York bats with White Nose Syndrome (WNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Chaturvedi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Massive die-offs of little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus have been occurring since 2006 in hibernation sites around Albany, New York, and this problem has spread to other States in the Northeastern United States. White cottony fungal growth is seen on the snouts of affected animals, a prominent sign of White Nose Syndrome (WNS. A previous report described the involvement of the fungus Geomyces destructans in WNS, but an identical fungus was recently isolated in France from a bat that was evidently healthy. The fungus has been recovered sparsely despite plentiful availability of afflicted animals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated 100 bat and environmental samples from eight affected sites in 2008. Our findings provide strong evidence for an etiologic role of G. destructans in bat WNS. (i Direct smears from bat snouts, Periodic Acid Schiff-stained tissue sections from infected tissues, and scanning electron micrographs of bat tissues all showed fungal structures similar to those of G. destructans. (ii G. destructans DNA was directly amplified from infected bat tissues, (iii Isolations of G. destructans in cultures from infected bat tissues showed 100% DNA match with the fungus present in positive tissue samples. (iv RAPD patterns for all G. destructans cultures isolated from two sites were indistinguishable. (v The fungal isolates showed psychrophilic growth. (vi We identified in vitro proteolytic activities suggestive of known fungal pathogenic traits in G. destructans. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Further studies are needed to understand whether G. destructans WNS is a symptom or a trigger for bat mass mortality. The availability of well-characterized G. destructans strains should promote an understanding of bat-fungus relationships, and should aid in the screening of biological and chemical control agents.

  13. Molecular Analysis of Collagen XVIII Reveals Novel Mutations, Presence of a Third Isoform, and Possible Genetic Heterogeneity in Knobloch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, O. T.; Sertié, A. L.; Der Kaloustian, V. M.; Kok, F.; Carpenter, M.; Murray, J.; Czeizel, A. E.; Kliemann, S. E.; Rosemberg, S.; Monteiro, M.; Olsen, B. R.; Passos-Bueno, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    Knobloch syndrome (KS) is a rare disease characterized by severe ocular alterations, including vitreoretinal degeneration associated with retinal detachment and occipital scalp defect. The responsible gene, COL18A1, has been mapped to 21q22.3, and, on the basis of the analysis of one family, we have demonstrated that a mutation affecting only one of the three COL18A1 isoforms causes this phenotype. We report here the results of the screening of both the entire coding region and the exon-intron boundaries of the COL18A1 gene (which includes 43 exons), in eight unrelated patients with KS. Besides 20 polymorphic changes, we identified 6 different pathogenic changes in both alleles of five unrelated patients with KS (three compound heterozygotes and two homozygotes). All are truncating mutations leading to deficiency of one or all collagen XVIII isoforms and endostatin. We have verified that, in exon 41, the deletion c3514-3515delCT, found in three unrelated alleles, is embedded in different haplotypes, suggesting that this mutation has occurred more than once. In addition, our results provide evidence of nonallelic genetic heterogeneity in KS. We also show that the longest human isoform (NC11-728) is expressed in several tissues (including the human eye) and that lack of either the short variant or all of the collagen XVIII isoforms causes similar phenotypes but that those patients who lack all forms present more-severe ocular alterations. Despite the small sample size, we found low endostatin plasma levels in those patients with mutations leading to deficiency of all isoforms; in addition, it seems that absence of all collagen XVIII isoforms causes predisposition to epilepsy. PMID:12415512

  14. Molecular dissection of a contiguous gene syndrome: Frequent submicroscopic deletions, evolutionarily conserved sequences, and a hypomethylated island in the Miller-Dieker chromosome region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledbetter, D.H.; Ledbetter, S.A.; vanTuinen, P.; Summers, K.M.; Robinson, T.J.; Nakamura, Yusuke; Wolff, R.; White, R.; Barker, D.F.; Wallace, M.R.; Collins, F.S.; Dobyns, W.B. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1989-07-01

    The Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS), composed of characteristic facial abnormalities and a severe neuronal migration disorder affecting the cerebral cortex, is caused by visible or submicroscopic deletions of chromosome band 17p13. Twelve anonymous DNA markers were tested against a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing 17p deletions from seven MDS patients. All patients, including three with normal karyotypes, are deleted for a variable set of 5-12 markers. Two highly polymorphic VNTR (variable number of tandem repeats) probes, YNZ22 and YNH37, are codeleted in all patients tested and make molecular diagnosis for this disorder feasible. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, YNZ22 and YNH37 were shown to be within 30 kilobases (kb) of each other. Cosmid clones containing both VNTR sequences were identified, and restriction mapping showed them to be <15 kb apart. Three overlapping cosmids spanning >100 kb were completely deleted in all patients, providing a minimum estimate of the size of the MDS critical region. A hypomethylated island and evolutionarily conserved sequences were identified within this 100-kb region, indications of the presence of one or more expressed sequences potentially involved in the pathophysiology of this disorder. The conserved sequences were mapped to mouse chromosome 11 by using mouse-rat somatic cell hybrids, extending the remarkable homology between human chromosome 17 and mouse chromosome 11 by 30 centimorgans, into the 17p telomere region.

  15. Impact of I30T and I30M substitution in MPZ gene associated with Dejerine-Sottas syndrome type B (DSSB): A molecular modeling and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrahari, Ashish; George Priya Doss, C

    2015-10-01

    Myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene encodes MPZ protein is a vital component of the myelin sheath. Mutationsassociated with MPZ gene leads to severe de-hypomyelination Dejerine-Sottas syndrome type B (DSSB) also termed as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 3. In this work, we employed a set of various in silico prediction methods to screen 97 nsSNPs associated with MPZ gene. Based on this, we identified the nsSNPs to be most deleterious and pathogenic associated with DSSB. To get more insight into the mutational effect at three-dimensional structural level, we modeled the homology structure of native type as well as I30T and I30M mutant of MPZ protein using Modeler 9.13 software. Molecular dynamics simulation was initiated to explain the impact of the mutation on its structure and function. The obtained results depict that the protein with I30T mutation had variable structural conformation and dynamic behavior than native and mutant I30M of MPZ protein. We hope our computational insight might be helpful in rationalizing the deleterious mutations in DSSB and the advancement of novel pharmacological strategy.

  16. From clinical suspect to molecular confirmation of noonan syndrome; contribution of “best practice” genetic counseling and new technical possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukvic Nenad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome (NS is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by variable expressivity of clinical features such as: postnatal growth reduction, congenital heart disease, characteristic facial dysmorphisms and development delay. In ~75% of all NS cases, germline mutations involving RAS-MAPK signaling pathway genes (PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, SHOC2, MEK1, CBL are causative. We reported a case of 13-year-old girl [born at 36w by CS (BW 3250 g (~95°, BL 48 cm (~75°] referred for genetic counseling due to growth retardation, facial dysmorphisms, development delay and learning disability. After birth she presented frequent vomiting, with failure to thrive and at 5 months of age underwent surgery for intestinal malrotation. Because of short stature, Growth Hormone (GH therapy have been introduced at age of 3yrs up to 11yrs. Negative molecular testing for PTPN11 and SOS1 genes, normal female karyotype and aCGH analysis were observed. Objective examination: H 138 cm, (A; p.Val14Ile has been identified. Even though KRAS mutations are usually associated with NS severe phenotype with cardiac involvement (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, this finding is not present in our patient.

  17. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... two medicines that affect the body's level of serotonin are taken together at the same time. The ...

  18. Current status of familial gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ioan; Jung; Simona; Gurzu; Gligore; Sabin; Turdean

    2015-01-01

    Because of the rarity of familial gastrointestinal cancerpredisposing syndromes,their exploration in literature is not extensive.In this review,an update of the clinicopathological and molecular criteria of gastrointestinal familial polyposis syndromes with potential malignant transformation is performed.In addition,a guide for screening and surveillance was synthesized and a distribution of gene mutations according to the specific syndromes and geographic distribution was included.The following inherited polyposes syndromes were analyzed: familial adenomatous polyposis,the hamartomatous familial polyposes(Juvenile polyposis,Peutz-Jeghers syndrome,Cowden syndrome,BannayanRiley-Ruvalcaba syndrome,hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome,Gorlin syndrome,Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome,neurofibromatosis type Ⅰand multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome 2B),Li-Fraumeni syndrome,and MUTYHassociated adenomatous polyposis.For proper medical care,subspecialization of gastroenterologists,pathologists,and genticists in the field of familial diseases should be introduced in the medical curriculum.

  19. Estudio anatomopatológico, citogenético y molecular del síndrome freemartin en el bovino doméstico (Bos taurus - (anatomopathologic, cytogenetic and molecular studies of the freemartin syndrome in cattle (bos taurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala-Valdovinos, Miguel Angel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available ResumenA través del análisis citogenético utilizando la presencia de los cromosomas sexuales como marcadores y mediante el análisis molecular (PCR-RFLP, utilizando oligonucleótidos iniciadores para los genes Zfx y Zfy del bovino, se diagnosticaron con la condición intersexual, síndrome freemartin, 19 individuos (Bos taurus procedentes de partos múltiples heterosexuales; asimismo, se estudiaron anatomopatológicamente cuatro de estos animales, enfatizando en las características del tejido gonadal (ovárico y/o testicular presente, procediendo a la identificación molecular (PCR-RFLP de células masculinas en este tejido. El quimerismo cromosómico hematopoyético (60,XX/60,XY caracterizó a los animales estudiados, excepcionalmente un individuo mostró complemento cromosómico 60,XY. Mediante la técnica de PCR, se amplificó un fragmento de 447 pb, del cual después de ser digerido con la enzima de restricción Pst I, se obtuvieron los RFLP de los animales estudiados, hembras normales (447 pb así como machos normales y animales freemartins (447, 344 y 103 pb. Los hallazgos anatomopatológicos de dos de los cuatro freemartins estudiados hasta su sacrificio mostraron pseudohermafroditismo masculino, de estos dos intersexos además se obtuvo ADN de tejido gonadal, del cual se identificó a nivel molecular (PCR la presencia de un patrón de RFLP específicos de freemartin. Los dos freemartins restantes presentaron una marcada hipoplasia del tracto reproductor sin gónadas diferenciadas como tales. AbstractBy means of the cytogenetic analysis using the presence of the sexual chromosomes as markers and through the molecular analysis (pcr-rflp, using primers for the zfx and zfy genes of the bovine, 19 individuals (bos taurus coming from heterosexual multiple parturitions, were diagnosed as syndrome freemartin intersexes; likewise, there were studied anatomopathologically four of these animals, emphasizing the characteristics of the gonadal

  20. 更年期综合征的分子机制及中医药治疗更年期综合征的特点%Molecular Mechanism and Features of Menopausal Syndrome Treated by Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于舒雁; 刘会丽; 苗明三

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To explore the modem molecular mechanism and features of menopausal syndrome treated by Traditional Chinese Medicine. Methods: Inductive analysis different pathogenesis and Chinese medicine treatment of menopausal syndrome to reveal the modern molecular mechanism of menopausal syndrome and features of menopausal syndrome treated by Chinese medicine. Results;The pathogenesis of menopausal syndrome mainly includes Endocrine theory,Immune theory,Cell apoptosis theory,Free radicals theory and so on. There are advantages of overall adjustment and long curative effects in the treatment of menopausal syndrome of Chinese medicine. Conclusion;The existing pathogenesis of menopausal syndrome crosses each other and reveals its' features by different aspects. There are obvious advantages in the treatment of menopausal syndrome Chinese medicine.%目的:探讨更年期综合征的现代分子机制及中医药治疗更年期综合征的特点.方法:通过对更年期综合征不同发病机制及相关中医药治疗的归纳分析,揭示更年期综合征的现代分子机制及中医药治疗的特点.结果:更年期综合征发病机制主要有内分泌学说、免疫学说、细胞凋亡学说和自由基学说等;中医药治疗更年期综合征具有整体调整、疗效长久的优势.结论:已有的更年期综合征发病机制学说相互交叉,从不同角度揭示更年期综合征的特点;中医药在治疗更年期综合征方面有很好的前景.

  1. Molecular diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis Type II (Hunter syndrome) by automated sequencing and computer-assisted interpretation: Toward mutation mapping of the Iduronate-2-sulfatase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, J.J.; Aronovich, E.L.; Braun, S.E.; Whitley, C.B. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Virtually all mutations causing Hunter syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type II) are expected to be new mutations. Therefore, as a means of molecular diagnosis, we developed a rapid method to sequence the entire iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) coding region. PCR amplicons representing the IDS cDNA were sequenced with an automatic instrument, and output was analyzed by computer-assisted interpretation of tracings, using Staden programs on a Sun computer. Mutations were found in 10 of 11 patients studied. Unique missense mutations were identified in five patients: H229Y (685{r_arrow}T, severe phenotype); P358R (1073C{r_arrow}G, severe); R468W (1402C{r_arrow}T, mild); P469H (1406C{r_arrow}A, mild); and Y523C (1568A{r_arrow}G, mild). Nonsense mutations were identified in two patients: R172X (514C{r_arrow}T, severe) and Q389X (1165C{r_arrow}T, severe). Two other patients with severe disease had insertions of 1 and 14 bp, in exons 3 and 6, respectively. In another patient with severe disease, the predominant (<95%) IDS message resulted from aberrant splicing, which skipped exon 3. In this last case, consensus sequences for splice sites in exon 3 were intact, but a 395C{r_arrow}G mutation was identified 24 bp upstream from the 3` splice of exon 3. This mutation created a cryptic 5` splice site with a better consensus sequence for 5` splice sites than the natural 5` splice site of intron 3. A minor population of the IDS message was processed by using this cryptic splice site; however, no correctly spliced message was detected in leukocytes from this patient. The mutational topology of the IDS gene is presented. 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. High-molecular-weight adiponectin is selectively reduced in women with polycystic ovary syndrome independent of body mass index and severity of insulin resistance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, A

    2010-03-01

    Context: High-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin contributes to insulin resistance (IR), which is closely associated with the pathophysiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Abnormalities in adipocyte function have been identified in PCOS and potentially contribute to lower adiponectin concentrations. Objective: Our objective was to determine which variables in plasma and adipose tissue influence HMW adiponectin in a well characterized cohort of women with PCOS. Design: This was a cross-sectional study. Settings and Participants: A teaching hospital. Women with PCOS (n = 98) and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls (n = 103) (including 68 age-, BMI-, and IR-matched pairs). Interventions: A standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was performed for each participant. Subcutaneous adipose tissue samples were taken by needle biopsy for a subset of PCOS women (n = 9) and controls (n = 8). Main Outcome Measures: Serum levels of HMW adiponectin and their relation to indices of insulin sensitivity, body composition, and circulating androgens as well as adipose tissue expression levels of ADIPOQ, TNFalpha, PPARgamma, and AR were assessed. Results: HMW adiponectin was significantly lower in women with PCOS compared with both BMI- and BMI- and IR-matched controls (P = 0.009 and P = 0.027, respectively). Although BMI and IR were the main predictors of HMW adiponectin, an interaction between waist to hip ratio and plasma testosterone contributed to its variance (P = 0.026). Adipose tissue gene expression analysis demonstrated that AR and TNFalpha (P = 0.008 and P = 0.035, respectively) but not ADIPOQ mRNA levels were increased in PCOS compared with controls. Conclusions: HMW adiponectin is selectively reduced in women with PCOS, independent of BMI and IR. Gene expression analysis suggests that posttranscriptional\\/translational modification contributes to reduced HMW adiponectin in PCOS.

  3. Molecular and clinical analyses of Greig cephalopolysyndactyly and Pallister-Hall syndromes: robust phenotype prediction from the type and position of GLI3 mutations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnston, J.J.; Olivos-Glander, I.; Killoran, C.; Elson, E.; Turner, J.T.; Peters, K.F.; Abbott, M.H.; Aughton, D.J.; Aylsworth, A.S.; Bamshad, M.; Booth, C.; Curry, C.J.; David, A.; Dinulos, M.B.; Flannery, D.B.; Fox, M.A.; Graham, J.M.; Grange, D.K.; Guttmacher, A.E.; Hannibal, M.C.; Henn, W.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Holmes, L.B.; Hoyme, H.E.; Leppig, K.A.; Lin, A.E.; Macleod, P.; Manchester, D.K.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Mazzanti, L.; McCann, E.; McDonald, M.T.; Mendelsohn, N.J.; Moeschler, J.B.; Moghaddam, B.; Neri, G.; Newbury-Ecob, R.; Pagon, R.A.; Phillips, J.A.; Sadler, L.S.; Stoler, J.M.; Tilstra, D.; Walsh Vockley, C.M.; Zackai, E.H.; Zadeh, T.M.; Brueton, L.; Black, G.C.M.; Biesecker, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the GLI3 zinc-finger transcription factor gene cause Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) and Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS), which are variable but distinct clinical entities. We hypothesized that GLI3 mutations that predict a truncated functional repressor protein cause PHS and

  4. Molecular cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, N J

    2001-09-01

    In the past decade, clinical cytogenetics has undergone remarkable advancement as molecular biology techniques have been applied to conventional chromosome analysis. The limitations of conventional banding analysis in the accurate diagnosis and interpretation of certain chromosome abnormalities have largely been overcome by these new technologies, which include fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and multicolor FISH (M-FISH, SKY, and Rx-FISH). Clinical applications include diagnosis of microdeletion and microduplication syndromes, detection of subtelomeric rearrangements in idiopathic mental retardation, identification of marker and derivative chromosomes, prenatal diagnosis of trisomy syndromes, and gene rearrangements and gene amplification in tumors. Molecular cytogenetic methods have expanded the possibilities for precise genetic diagnoses, which are extremely important for clinical management of patients and appropriate counseling of their families.

  5. Clinical-neurologic, cytogenetic and molecular aspects of the Prader-Willi and Angelman Syndromes Aspectos clínico-neurológicos, citogenéticos e moleculares das síndromes de Prader-Willi e Angelman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M. de Pina-Neto

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS and the Angelman syndrome (AS are human neurogenetic disorders involving the imprinting mechanism, at the 15q11-13 chromosome region. The predominant genetic defects in PW are 15q 11-13 deletions of paternal origin and maternal chromosome 15 uniparental disomy. In contrast, maternal deletions and paternal chromosome 15 uniparental disomy are associated with a different neurogenetic disorder, the AS. In both disorders, these mutations are associated with parent-of-origin specific methylation at several 15q 11-13 loci. We studied 5 patients suspect of PWS and 4 patients suspect of AS who were referred to the Medical Genetics Unit at the University Hospital of Medical School from Ribeirão Preto. Our objective was to establish the correct clinical and etiological diagnosis in these cases. We used conventional cytogenetics, methylation analysis with the probe KB 17 (CpG island of the SNRPN gene by Southern blotting after digestion with the Xba I and Not I restriction enzymes. We studied in patients and their parents the segregation of the (CAn repeats polymorphisms by PCR, using the primers 196 and IR4-3R. All the patients had normal conventional cytogenetical analysis. We confirmed 3 cases of PWS: one by de novo deletion, one by maternal chromosome 15 uniparental disomy and one case with no defined cause determined by the used primers. We confirmed 2 cases of AS, caused by de novo deletion at the 15q 11-13 region, and one case with normal molecular analysis but with strong clinical characteristics.A síndrome de Prader-Willi (SPW e a síndrome de Angelman (SA são doenças neurogenéticas consideradas como exemplos do fenômeno de imprinting em seres humanos, estando relacionadas com alterações envolvendo a região cromossômica 15q11-13. As alterações genéticas predominantes na SPW são deleções na região 15q 11-13 de origem paterna e dissomia uniparental materna. Na SA encontra-se deleções na região 15q

  6. West syndrome in a patient with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Fuyu; Kuroda, Yukiko; Naruto, Takuya; Ohashi, Ikuko; Takano, Kyoko; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Schinzel-Giedion syndrome is a rare recognizable malformation syndrome defined by characteristic facial features, profound developmental delay, severe growth failure, and multiple congenital anomalies. The causative gene of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome, SETBP1, has been identified, but limited cases have been confirmed by molecular analysis. We present a 9-month-old girl affected by West syndrome with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Congenital severe hydronephrosis, typical facial features, and multiple anomalies suggested a clinical diagnosis of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Hypsarrhythmia occurred at 7 months of age and was temporarily controlled by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy during 5 weeks. SETBP1 mutational analysis showed the presence of a recurrent mutation, p.Ile871Thr. The implications in management of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome are discussed.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Brugada syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rare variation in arrhythmia-susceptibility genes provides new insights into molecular diagnosis for Brugada syndrome. Hum Mol ... healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright ...

  8. Biophysical and Molecular Characterization of a Novel de novo KCNJ2 Mutation Associated with Andersen-Tawil Syndrome and CPVT Mimicry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-Martinez, Hector; Hu, Dan; Ontiveros, Gustavo; Caceres, Gabriel; Desai, Mayurika; Burashnikov, Elena; Scaglione, Jorge; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in KCNJ2, the gene encoding the human inward rectifier potassium channel Kir2.1 (IK1 or IKir2.1), have been identified in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS). ATS is a multisystem inherited disease exhibiting periodic paralysis, cardiac arrhythmias, and dysmorphic features at times mimicking catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). Methods and Results Our proband displayed dysmorphic features including micrognathia, clinodactyly and syndactyly, and exhibited multiform extrasystoles and bidirectional ventricular tachycardia both at rest and during exercise testing. The patient’s symptoms continued following administration of nadolol, but subsided after treatment with flecainide. Molecular genetic screening revealed a novel heterozygous mutation (c.779G>C/p.R260P) in KCNJ2. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies conducted in TSA201 cells transfected with wild type human KCNJ2 cDNA (WT-KCNJ2) yielded robust IKir2.1, but no measurable current in cells expressing the R260P mutant. Co-expression of WT and R260P-KCNJ2 (heterozygous expression) yielded a markedly reduced inward IKir2.1 compared with WT alone (−36.5±9.8 pA/pF vs. −143.5±11.4 pA/pF, n=8 for both, P<0.001, respectively at −90 mV) indicating a strong dominant negative effect of the mutant. The outward component of IKir2.1 measured at −50 mV was also markedly reduced with the heterozygous expression vs. WT (0.52±5.5 pA/pF vs. 23.4±6.7 pA/pF, n=8 for both, P<0.001, respectively). Immunocytochemical analysis indicates that impaired trafficking of R260P-KCNJ2 channels. Conclusions We report a novel de novo KCNJ2 mutation associated with classical phenotypic features of ATS and CPVT mimicry. The R260P mutation produces a strong dominant negative effect leading to marked suppression of IK1 secondary to a trafficking defect. PMID:21148745

  9. Molecular breakpoint cloning and gene expression studies of a novel translocation t(4;15(q27;q11.2 associated with Prader-Willi syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slater Howard R

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prader-Willi syndrome (MIM #176270; PWS is caused by lack of the paternally-derived copies, or their expression, of multiple genes in a 4 Mb region on chromosome 15q11.2. Known mechanisms include large deletions, maternal uniparental disomy or mutations involving the imprinting center. De novo balanced reciprocal translocations in 5 reported individuals had breakpoints clustering in SNRPN intron 2 or exon 20/intron 20. To further dissect the PWS phenotype and define the minimal critical region for PWS features, we have studied a 22 year old male with a milder PWS phenotype and a de novo translocation t(4;15(q27;q11.2. Methods We used metaphase FISH to narrow the breakpoint region and molecular analyses to map the breakpoints on both chromosomes at the nucleotide level. The expression of genes on chromosome 15 on both sides of the breakpoint was determined by RT-PCR analyses. Results Pertinent clinical features include neonatal hypotonia with feeding difficulties, hypogonadism, short stature, late-onset obesity, learning difficulties, abnormal social behavior and marked tolerance to pain, as well as sticky saliva and narcolepsy. Relative macrocephaly and facial features are not typical for PWS. The translocation breakpoints were identified within SNRPN intron 17 and intron 10 of a spliced non-coding transcript in band 4q27. LINE and SINE sequences at the exchange points may have contributed to the translocation event. By RT-PCR of lymphoblasts and fibroblasts, we find that upstream SNURF/SNRPN exons and snoRNAs HBII-437 and HBII-13 are expressed, but the downstream snoRNAs PWCR1/HBII-85 and HBII-438A/B snoRNAs are not. Conclusion As part of the PWCR1/HBII-85 snoRNA cluster is highly conserved between human and mice, while no copy of HBII-438 has been found in mouse, we conclude that PWCR1/HBII-85 snoRNAs is likely to play a major role in the PWS- phenotype.

  10. 剥脱综合征的分子遗传学研究进展%Advances in molecular genetics of exfoliation syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷燕

    2015-01-01

    剥脱综合征(XFS)是一种与年龄相关、多基因遗传的全球性眼病,是继发性青光眼常见的原因之一.XFS的发病与遗传和环境因素有关,其确切的致病原因、病理机制尚不完全清楚.本文对近年来XFS的分子遗传学方面的研究进展进行总结,从赖氨酰氧化酶样1(LOXL1)基因、簇蛋白(CLU)基因、接触素有关蛋白2(CNTNAP2)基因、载脂蛋白E(ApoE)基因、基质金属蛋白酶(MMPs)基因、谷胱甘肽转移酶(GST)基因、转化生长因子-β1(TGF-β1)基因、肿瘤坏死因子-α(TNF-α)基因等可能参与XFS的发生和发展方面逐一阐述,在分子遗传学水平加深对XFS的认识.%Exfoliation syndrome (XFS),one of the most common causes of glaucoma,represents an age related,complex,multifactorial and late-onset disease worldwide.The etiopathogenesis involves both genetic and environmental factor.However,the exact etiopathogenesis of XFS is still unclear.The purpose of this review was to discuss the recent research progress of the molecular genetics of XFS.Some candidate genes linked to XFS include lysyl oxidase-like 1 (LOXL1) gene,clusterin (CLU) gene,contactin associated protein-like 2 (CNTNAP2) gene,apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene,matrix metallo proteinases (MMPs) gene,glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene,transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) gene,tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-a) gene and so on.These genes may be modifying genes for the development of XFS.

  11. Molecular and genetic characterization, clinical evaluation and pilot study to assess the feasibility of a carrier screening for Crisponi syndrome in Sardinia

    OpenAIRE

    Piras, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    Crisponi syndrome (CS) and cold-induced sweating syndrome type 1 (CISS1) share clinical characteristics, such as dysmorphic features, muscle contractions, scoliosis and cold-induced sweating, with CS patients showing a severe clinical course in infancy involving hyperthermia, associated with death in most cases in the first years of life. Functional and clinical studies supported the fact that they represent manifestations of the same autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the...

  12. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min

    2016-05-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It leads not only to secondary distortion of skull shape but to various complications including neurologic, ophthalmic and respiratory dysfunction. Craniosynostosis is very heterogeneous in terms of its causes, presentation, and management. Both environmental factors and genetic factors are associated with development of craniosynostosis. Nonsyndromic craniosynostosis accounts for more than 70% of all cases. Syndromic craniosynostosis with a certain genetic cause is more likely to involve multiple sutures or bilateral coronal sutures. FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1 genes are major causative genes of genetic syndromes associated with craniosynostosis. Although most of syndromic craniosynostosis show autosomal dominant inheritance, approximately half of patients are de novo cases. Apert syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, and Antley-Bixler syndrome are related to mutations in FGFR family (especially in FGFR2), and mutations in FGFRs can be overlapped between different syndromes. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, Muenke syndrome, and craniofrontonasal syndrome are representative disorders showing isolated coronal suture involvement. Compared to the other types of craniosynostosis, single gene mutations can be more frequently detected, in one-third of coronal synostosis patients. Molecular diagnosis can be helpful to provide adequate genetic counseling and guidance for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis.

  13. Rett syndrome: clinical and molecular characterization of two Brazilian patients Síndrome de Rett: caracterização clínica e molecular de dois casos brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Stachon

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rett syndrome (RS is recognized as a pan-ethnic condition. Since the identification of mutations in the MECP2 gene, more patients have been diagnosed, and a broad spectrum of phenotypes has been reported. There is a lack of phenotype-genotype studies. OBJECTIVE: To describe two cases of Brazilian patients with identified MECP2 mutations. METHOD: We present two female Brazilian patients with RS. RESULTS: Both patients presented with regression at 2-3 years of age, when stereotypic hand movements, social withdrawal and postnatal deceleration of head growth rate were observed. Both patients presented verbal communication impairment. Case 1 had loss of purposeful hand movements, and severe seizure episodes. Case 2 had milder impairment of purposeful hand movements, and no seizures. They had different mutations, D97Y and R294X, found in exons 3 and 4 of MECP2 gene, respectively. CONCLUSION: Testing for MECP2 mutations is important to confirm diagnosis and to establish genotype/phenotype correlations, and improve genetic counseling.CONTEXTO: Síndrome de Rett (RS é doença pan-étnica de fenótipo bastante variado desde que foram identificadas mutações no gene MECP2 e um número maior de pacientes tem sido diagnosticadas. Existe uma demanda por estudos que investiguem a relação genótipo-fenotipo. OBJETIVO: Descrever dois casos brasileiros de RS com mutações identificadas. MÉTODO: Duas pacientes brasileiras com diagnóstico clínico-molecular de RS foram descritas buscando-se correlacionar genótipo-fenótipo. RESULTADOS: Ambas pacientes apresentaram regressão aos 2-3 anos de idade, movimentos esteriotipados de mãos, retraimento social e desaceleração do crescimento encefálico. Ambas apresentaram déficit de comunicação verbal. Caso 1 também apresentou perda dos movimentos manuais intencionados e crises convulsivas graves. Caso 2 apresentou-se com comprometimento parcial dos movimentos manuais e sem história de crise

  14. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, ...

  15. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance syndrome, low HDL cholesterol, Metabolic Syndrome, overweight, syndrome x, type 2 diabetes Family Health, Kids and Teens, Men, Women January 2005 Copyright © American Academy of Family PhysiciansThis ...

  16. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. Parents may not have any family history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the ...

  17. The differential diagnosis of familial lentiginosis syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2011-09-01

    Cutaneous markers of systemic disease are vital for clinicians to recognize. This chapter outlines familial lentiginosis syndromes that include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Carney Complex, the PTEN hamartomatous syndromes, and LEOPARD/Noonan syndrome. The inheritance of these syndromes is autosomal dominant; they also share characteristic skin findings that offer a clue to their recognition and treatment. We will discuss the clinical presentation of these disorders, with a focus on the dermatological manifestations, and will provide an update on the molecular mechanisms involved. Recognition of cutaneous markers associated with these rare familial cancer syndromes provides the opportunity to pursue early surveillance for malignancies, as well as genetic counseling.

  18. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome are cancer syndromes which affect multiple organs and lead to significant decline in quality of life in affected patients. These syndromes are rare and typically affect the adolescent and young adult population, resulting in greater cumulative years of life lost. Improved understanding of the underpinnings of the genetic pathways underlying these syndromes and the rapid evolution of targeted therapies in general have made it possible to develop therapeutic options for these patients and other genetic cancer syndromes. Targeted therapies especially antiangiogenics and inhibitors of the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway have shown activity in selected group of patients affected by these syndromes or in patients harboring specific sporadic mutations which are otherwise characteristic of these syndromes. Unfortunately due to the rare nature, patients with these syndromes are not the focus of clinical trials and unique results seen in these patients can easily go unnoticed. Most of the data suggesting benefits of targeted therapies are either case reports or small case series. Thus, a literature review was indicated. In this review we explore the use of molecularly targeted therapy options in Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome.

  19. Kindler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderma. The differential diagnosis of Kindler syndrome includes diseases like Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, epidermolysis bullosa, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. Our patient had classical cutaneous features of Kindler syndrome with phimosis as a complication.

  20. Is there an influence of X-chromosomal imprinting on the phenotype in Klinefelter syndrome? A clinical and molecular genetic study of 61 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stemkens, D; Roza, T; Verrij, L; Swaab, H; van Werkhoven, MK; Alizadeh, BZ; Sinke, RJ; Giltay, JC

    2006-01-01

    Studies on Turner syndrome suggested the presence of X-chromosomal-imprinted genes involved in social and verbal cognition. Imprinted genes on autosomes were shown to affect growth. Could imprinting of such genes on the X chromosome also influence psychomotor development and growth in men with Kline

  1. Molecular Screening of "MECP2" Gene in a Cohort of Lebanese Patients Suspected with Rett Syndrome: Report on a Mild Case with a Novel Indel Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbani, S.; Chouery, E.; Fayyad, J.; Fawaz, A.; El Tourjuman, O.; Badens, C.; Lacoste, C.; Delague, V.; Megarbane, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked, dominant, neurodevelopment disorder represents 10% of female subjects with profound intellectual disability. Mutations in the "MECP2" gene are responsible for up to 95% of the classical RTT cases, and nearly 500 different mutations distributed throughout the gene have been reported. Methods: We report…

  2. Molecular Screening of "MECP2" Gene in a Cohort of Lebanese Patients Suspected with Rett Syndrome: Report on a Mild Case with a Novel Indel Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbani, S.; Chouery, E.; Fayyad, J.; Fawaz, A.; El Tourjuman, O.; Badens, C.; Lacoste, C.; Delague, V.; Megarbane, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked, dominant, neurodevelopment disorder represents 10% of female subjects with profound intellectual disability. Mutations in the "MECP2" gene are responsible for up to 95% of the classical RTT cases, and nearly 500 different mutations distributed throughout the gene have been reported. Methods:…

  3. Meier-Gorlin syndrome genotype-phenotype studies: 35 individuals with pre-replication complex gene mutations and 10 without molecular diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnik, S.A. de; Bicknell, L.S.; Aftimos, S.; Al-Aama, J.Y.; Bever, Y. Van; Bober, M.B.; Clayton-Smith, J.; Edrees, A.Y.; Feingold, M.; Fryer, A.; Hagen, J.M. van; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Jansweijer, M.C.E.; Johnson, D.; Kant, S.G.; Opitz, J.M.; Ramadevi, A.R.; Reardon, W.; Ross, A.; Sarda, P.; Schrander-Stumpel, C.T.R.M.; Schoots, J.; Temple, I.K.; Terhal, P.A.; Toutain, A.; Wise, C.A.; Wright, M.; Skidmore, D.L.; Samuels, M.E.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Brunner, H.G.; Jackson, A.P.; Bongers, M.H.F.

    2012-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by microtia, patellar aplasia/hypoplasia, and short stature. Recently, mutations in five genes from the pre-replication complex (ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6), crucial in cell-cycle progression and growth, were identifi

  4. Transmission of white spot syndrome virus in improved-extensive and semi-intensive shrimp production systems: A molecular epidemiology study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyet Hoa, T.T.; Zwart, M.P.; Phuong, N.T.; Vlak, J.M.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) can be transmitted horizontally through water, via carrier organisms and/or by cannibalism of infected shrimp, but also vertically through infected broodstock. However the mode(s) of WSSV transmission in shrimp farming systems and

  5. Complete amino acid sequence of the human alpha 5 (IV) collagen chain and identification of a single-base mutation in exon 23 converting glycine 521 in the collagenous domain to cysteine in an Alport syndrome patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J; Hertz, Jens Michael; Leinonen, A;

    1992-01-01

    alleles. The mutation which was located to exon 23 was sequenced from a polymerase chain reaction-amplified product, and shown to be a G----T change in the coding strand. The mutation changed the GGT codon of glycine 521 to cysteine. The same mutation was found in one allele of the female cousin...

  6. Is there an influence of X-chromosomal imprinting on the phenotype in Klinefelter syndrome? A clinical and molecular genetic study of 61 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemkens, D; Roza, T; Verrij, L; Swaab, H; van Werkhoven, M K; Alizadeh, B Z; Sinke, R J; Giltay, J C

    2006-07-01

    Studies on Turner syndrome suggested the presence of X-chromosomal-imprinted genes involved in social and verbal cognition. Imprinted genes on autosomes were shown to affect growth. Could imprinting of such genes on the X chromosome also influence psychomotor development and growth in men with Klinefelter syndrome (KS), who have a supernumerary X? We recorded anthropometric and psychomotor development parameters for 61 males with KS (age range 2-56 years). In 54 cases, we were able to assess intelligence quotient (IQ) and found that impaired speech - and motor developmental problems were reported significantly more often in the paternal X - than in the maternal X group (P = 0.02). We found some significant (P < 0.05) increased body size parameters in the paternal X group, which concurs with data reporting a growth promoting influence of paternally derived genes. Our results suggest X-chromosomal imprinting occurs in males with KS.

  7. Usher syndrome in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dad, Shzeena; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Usher syndrome (USH) is a genetically heterogeneous deafness-blindness syndrome, divided into three clinical subtypes: USH1, USH2 and USH3. METHODS: Mutations in 21 out of 26 investigated Danish unrelated individuals with USH were identified, using a combination of molecular diagnostic...... methods. RESULTS: Before Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) became available mutations in nine individuals (1 USH1, 7 USH2, 1 USH3) were identified by Sanger sequencing of USH1C,USH2A or CLRN1 or by Arrayed Primer EXtension (APEX) method. Mutations in 12 individuals (7 USH1, 5 USH2) were found by targeted...

  8. Epidermal nevus syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Sarah; Sugarman, Jeffrey L

    2015-01-01

    The term epidermal nevus syndrome (ENS) has been used to describe the association of epidermal hamartomas and extracutaneous abnormalities. Although many continue to use the term "ENS," it is now understood that this is not one disease, but rather a heterogeneous group with distinct genetic profiles defined by a common cutaneous phenotype: the presence of epidermal and adnexal hamartomas that are associated with other organ system involvement. One commonality is that epidermal nevi often follow the lines of Blaschko and it appears the more widespread the cutaneous manifestations, the greater the risk for extracutaneous manifestations. The majority of the extracutaneous manifestations involve the brain, eye, and skeletal systems. The CNS involvement is wide ranging and involves both clinical manifestations such as intellectual disability and seizures, as well as structural anomalies. Several subsets of ENS with characteristic features have been delineated including the nevus sebaceus syndrome, Proteus syndrome, CHILD syndrome, Becker's nevus syndrome, nevus comedonicus syndrome, and phakomatosis pigmentokeratotica. Advances in molecular biology have revealed that the manifestations of ENS are due to genomic mosaicism. It is likely that the varied clinical manifestations of ENS are due in great part to the functional effects of specific genetic defects. Optimal management of the patient with ENS involves an interdisciplinary approach given the potential for multisystem involvement. Of note, epidermal nevi have been associated with both benign and malignant neoplasms, and thus ongoing clinical follow-up is required.

  9. Identification of novel mutations in the SLC25A15 gene in hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome: a clinical, molecular, and functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessa, Alessandra; Fiermonte, Giuseppe; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Paradies, Eleonora; Baumgartner, Matthias R; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Loguercio, Carmela; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Nassogne, Marie-Cecile; Schiff, Manuel; Deodato, Federica; Parenti, Giancarlo; Rutledge, S Lane; Vilaseca, M Antonia; Melone, Mariarosa A B; Scarano, Gioacchino; Aldamiz-Echevarría, Luiz; Besley, Guy; Walter, John; Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Hernandez, Jose M; Pierri, Ciro L; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Santorelli, Filippo M

    2009-05-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder of the urea cycle. With the exception of the French-Canadian founder effect, no common mutation has been detected in other populations. In this study, we collected 16 additional HHH cases and expanded the spectrum of SLC25A15/ORC1 mutations. Eleven novel mutations were identified including six new missense and one microrearrangement. We also measured the transport properties of the recombinant purified proteins in reconstituted liposomes for four new and two previously reported missense mutations and proved that the transport activities of these mutant forms of ORC1 were reduced as compared with the wild-type protein; residual activity ranged between 4% and 19%. Furthermore, we designed three-dimensional (3D)-modeling of mutant ORC1 proteins. While modeling the changes in silico allowed us to obtain new information on the pathomechanisms underlying HHH syndrome, we found no clear-cut genotype-phenotype correlations. Although patient metabolic alterations responded well to low-protein therapy, predictions concerning the long-term evolution of HHH syndrome remain uncertain. The preference for a hepatic rather than a neurological presentation at onset also continues, largely, to elude us. Neither modifications in oxidative metabolism-related energy, such as those expected in different mtDNA haplogroups, nor sequence variants in SLC25A2/ORC2 seem to be crucial. Other factors, including protein stability and function, and ORC1-ORC2 structural interactions should be further investigated.

  10. Total and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin levels and measures of glucose and lipid metabolism following pioglitazone treatment in a randomized placebo-controlled study in polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Frystyk, Jan; Højlund, Kurt;

    2008-01-01

    .89) and Delta-oxidative glucose metabolism (r = 0.71) and inversely with Delta-fasting free fatty acid (FFA) levels (r = -0.69) and Delta-lipid oxidation (r = -0.73) during insulin stimulation (all P ... and lipid metabolism during insulin stimulation than with Delta-total adiponectin. CONCLUSION: A close correlation between increased total adiponectin levels and increased insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism during pioglitzone treatment supports the hypothesis that the insulin-sensitizing effect......OBJECTIVE: Recent studies suggested that the effect of adiponectin on insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism is mediated primarily by the high molecular weight (HMW) form of adiponectin. In the present study we evaluated total and HMW adiponectin in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients...

  11. The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biesecker Leslie G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS is a pleiotropic, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. It is rare, but precise estimates of incidence are difficult to determine, as ascertainment is erratic (estimated range 1–9/1,000,000. The primary findings include hypertelorism, macrocephaly with frontal bossing, and polysyndactyly. The polydactyly is most commonly preaxial of the feet and postaxial in the hands, with variable cutaneous syndactyly, but the limb findings vary significantly. Other low frequency findings include central nervous system (CNS anomalies, hernias, and cognitive impairment. GCPS is caused by loss of function mutations in the GLI3 transcription factor gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The disorder is allelic to the Pallister-Hall syndrome and one form of the acrocallosal syndrome. Clinical diagnosis is challenging because the findings of GCPS are relatively non-specific, and no specific and sensitive clinical have been delineated. For this reason, we have proposed a combined clinical-molecular definition for the syndrome. A presumptive diagnosis of GCPS can be made if the patient has the classic triad of preaxial polydactyly with cutaneous syndactyly of at least one limb, hypertelorism, and macrocephaly. Patients with a phenotype consistent with GCPS (but which may not manifest all three attributes listed above and a GLI3 mutation may be diagnosed definitively with GCPS. In addition, persons with a GCPS-consistent phenotype who are related to a definitively diagnosed family member in a pattern consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance may be diagnosed definitively as well. Antenatal molecular diagnosis is technically straightforward to perform. Differential diagnoses include preaxial polydactyly type 4, the GCPS contiguous gene syndrome, acrocallosal syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Teebi syndrome. Treatment of the disorder is symptomatic, with plastic or

  12. The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesecker, Leslie G

    2008-04-24

    The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) is a pleiotropic, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. It is rare, but precise estimates of incidence are difficult to determine, as ascertainment is erratic (estimated range 1-9/1,000,000). The primary findings include hypertelorism, macrocephaly with frontal bossing, and polysyndactyly. The polydactyly is most commonly preaxial of the feet and postaxial in the hands, with variable cutaneous syndactyly, but the limb findings vary significantly. Other low frequency findings include central nervous system (CNS) anomalies, hernias, and cognitive impairment. GCPS is caused by loss of function mutations in the GLI3 transcription factor gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The disorder is allelic to the Pallister-Hall syndrome and one form of the acrocallosal syndrome. Clinical diagnosis is challenging because the findings of GCPS are relatively non-specific, and no specific and sensitive clinical have been delineated. For this reason, we have proposed a combined clinical-molecular definition for the syndrome. A presumptive diagnosis of GCPS can be made if the patient has the classic triad of preaxial polydactyly with cutaneous syndactyly of at least one limb, hypertelorism, and macrocephaly. Patients with a phenotype consistent with GCPS (but which may not manifest all three attributes listed above) and a GLI3 mutation may be diagnosed definitively with GCPS. In addition, persons with a GCPS-consistent phenotype who are related to a definitively diagnosed family member in a pattern consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance may be diagnosed definitively as well. Antenatal molecular diagnosis is technically straightforward to perform. Differential diagnoses include preaxial polydactyly type 4, the GCPS contiguous gene syndrome, acrocallosal syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Teebi syndrome. Treatment of the disorder is symptomatic, with plastic or orthopedic surgery indicated for

  13. Edwards' syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Doreen; Dearmun, Annette

    2016-12-08

    Edwards' syndrome is a serious genetic condition that affects fetal cellular functions, tissue development and organogenesis. Most infants with the syndrome are female, but there is no race predominance.

  14. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  15. Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this syndrome often display hyperactivity, small head size, sleep disorders, and movement and balance disorders that can cause ... this syndrome often display hyperactivity, small head size, sleep disorders, and movement and balance disorders that can cause ...

  16. Lynch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... colon cancer may include surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Cancer screening for people with Lynch syndrome If you ... et al. Milestones of Lynch syndrome: 1895-2015. Nature Reviews Cancer. http://www.nature.com/nrc/journal/vaop/ncurrent/ ...

  17. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone ... cause your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  18. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dementia, seizures, sensory loss in the limbs, and vertigo or dizziness. Paraneoplastic syndromes include Lambert-Eaton myasthenic ... dementia, seizures, sensory loss in the limbs, and vertigo or dizziness. Paraneoplastic syndromes include Lambert-Eaton myasthenic ...

  19. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  20. Dravet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  1. Apert Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Saikat; Saha, Sandip; Kar, Arnab; Mondal, Souvonik; Basu, Syamantak

    2014-09-01

    Apert syndrome is one of the craniosynostosis syndromes which, due to its association with other skeletal anomalies, is also known as acrocephalosyndactyly. It is a rare congenital anomaly which stands out from other craniosynostosis due to its characteristic skeletal presentations.

  2. Fraser syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Kumari M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Fraser syndrome or cryptophthalmos is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by major features such as cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and abnormal genitalia. The diagnosis of this syndrome can be made on clinical examination and perinatal autopsy. We present the autopsy findings of a rare case of Fraser syndrome in a male infant.

  3. Rowell syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Y Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rowell syndrome is a rare disease consisting of erythema multiforme-like lesions associated with lupus erythematosus. The syndrome occurs mostly in middle-aged women. The authors describe the syndrome in a 15-year-old boy who responded well to systemic steroids and hydroxychloroquine.

  4. Rapid molecular diagnosis on 21-trisomy syndrome by fluorescent PCR%荧光PCR快速诊断21-三体综合征的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田娟; 张元珍; 郑芳; 宋贵波

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical feasibility of fluorescent PCR method on the detection of 21-trisomy syndrome by D21S1919,D21S263,D21S1914,D21S1255 locusand make a foundation for rapid diagnosis of 21-trisomy syndrom.Methods About 100 normal controls and 6 patients with 21-trisomy syndrome were tested using fluorescent PCR by amplification of DNA fragments on the four loci.The results were compared with conventional cytogenetic analysis to confirm the utility of this method.Results Innormal controls,the flurescent intensity ratios of peak heights of PRC products amplified from two alleles were about 1:1 in heterozygous controls;however,the intensity ratios were about 2:1 or 1:1:1 in the patients.Conclusions Fluorescent PCR was a accurate ,rapid method ,and only small amount of starting material was needed ,it could be applied in rapid prenatal diagnosis of 21-trisomy syndrome.%目的 探讨用D21S1919、D21S263、D21S1914、D21S1255等4个杂合度较高的STR位点的荧光PCR诊断21-三体综合征的可行性.方法 用荧光PCR扩增4个STR位点的DNA片段,分别检测了100例正常对照和6例患者,并将结果与传统的细胞遗传学方法进行对比.以验证该方法的有效性.结果 在正常对照杂合子样本中,两个等位基冈的峰高比值接近于1:1;在21-三体患者杂合子样本中,等位基因的峰高比值接近于2:1或1:1:1.结论 荧光PCR是一种快速、准确的检测方法,而且只需要极少量的模板原料.这种方法可以用于21-三体综合征的无创、快速分子诊断.

  5. Intralymphatic granulomas as a pathogenic factor in cheilitis granulomatosa/Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome: report of a case with immunohistochemical and molecular studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-García, Carmen; Aguayo-Leiva, Ingrid; Pian, H; Fernández-Guarino, Montserrat; Jaén-Olasolo, Pedro

    2011-08-01

    Orofacial granulomatosis, an uncommon immunologically mediated disorder, includes cheilitis granulomatosa and Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome. It is clinically characterized by recurrent or persistent swelling of the orofacial tissues with a spectrum of other orofacial features and sometimes with neurological symptoms. The pathological findings are varied but are often characterized by the presence of noncaseating granuloma. We present a new case of orofacial granulomatosis with unusual histopathological findings, namely, intralymphatic granulomas. These may be the cause of the tissue edema. We demonstrated, by immunohistochemical studies, the lymphatic nature of the vessels affected by the granulomatous process.

  6. Alagille syndrome: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Maha Saleh,1 Binita M Kamath,2 David Chitayat1,3 1Division of Clinical and Metabolic Genetics, 2Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Prenatal Diagnosis and Medical Genetics Program, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Alagille syndrome is an autosomal dominant, complex multisystem disorder characterized by the presence of three out of five major clinical criteria: cholestasis with bile duct paucity on liver biopsy, congenital cardiac defects (with particular involvement of the pulmonary arteries, posterior embryotoxon in the eye, characteristic facial features, and butterfly vertebrae. Renal and vascular abnormalities can also occur. Inter- and intrafamilial variabilities in the clinical manifestations are common. We reviewed the clinical features and management as well as the molecular basis of Alagille syndrome. Keywords: Alagille syndrome, ALGS, genetics, liver 

  7. Refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández López, M T; López Otero, M J; Alvarez Vázquez, P; Arias Delgado, J; Varela Correa, J J

    2009-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a complex syndrome that occurs as a result of reintroducing nutrition (oral, enteral or parenteral) to patients who are starved or malnourished. Patients can develop fluid-balance abnormalities, electrolyte disorders (hypophosphataemia, hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia), abnormal glucose metabolism and certain vitamin deficiencies. Refeeding syndrome encompasses abnormalities affecting multiple organ systems, including neurological, pulmonary, cardiac, neuromuscular and haematological functions. Pathogenic mechanisms involved in the refeeding syndrome and clinical manifestations have been reviewed. We provide suggestions for the prevention and treatment of refeeding syndrome. The most important steps are to identify patients at risk, reintroduce nutrition cautiously and correct electrolyte and vitamin deficiencies properly.

  8. [Metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuishi, Masanori; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome, which is consisted of hypertension, dyslipidemia and impaired glucose tolerance, is one of the most significant lifestyle-related disorders that lead to cardiovascular diseases. Among many upstream factors that are related to metabolic syndrome, obesity, especially visceral obesity, plays an essential role in its pathogenesis. In recent studies, possible mechanisms which connect obesity to metabolic syndrome have been elucidated, such as inflammation, abnormal secretion of adipokines and mitochondrial dysfunction. In this review, we focus on the relationship between obesity and metabolic syndrome; and illustrate how visceral obesity contributes to, and how the treatments for obesity act on metabolic syndrome.

  9. Genetic syndromes associated with overgrowth in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min

    2013-09-01

    Overgrowth syndromes comprise a diverse group of conditions with unique clinical, behavioral and molecular genetic features. While considerable overlap in presentation sometimes exists, advances in identification of the precise etiology of specific overgrowth disorders continue to improve clinicians' ability to make an accurate diagnosis. Among them, this paper introduces two classic genetic overgrowth syndromes: Sotos syndrome and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Historically, the diagnosis was based entirely on clinical findings. However, it is now understood that Sotos syndrome is caused by a variety of molecular genetic alterations resulting in haploinsufficiency of the NSD1 gene at chromosome 5q35 and that Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is caused by heterogeneous abnormalities in the imprinting of a number of growth regulatory genes within chromosome 11p15 in the majority of cases. Interestingly, the 11p15 imprinting region is also associated with Russell-Silver syndrome which is a typical growth retardation syndrome. Opposite epigenetic alterations in 11p15 result in opposite clinical features shown in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and Russell-Silver syndrome. Although the exact functions of the causing genes have not yet been completely understood, these overgrowth syndromes can be good models to clarify the complex basis of human growth and help to develop better-directed therapies in the future.

  10. Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Seth S; Sell, Gabrielle L; Zbinden, Mark A; Bird, Lynne M

    2015-07-01

    In this review we summarize the clinical and genetic aspects of Angelman syndrome (AS), its molecular and cellular underpinnings, and current treatment strategies. AS is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive disability, motor dysfunction, speech impairment, hyperactivity, and frequent seizures. AS is caused by disruption of the maternally expressed and paternally imprinted UBE3A, which encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Four mechanisms that render the maternally inherited UBE3A nonfunctional are recognized, the most common of which is deletion of the maternal chromosomal region 15q11-q13. Remarkably, duplication of the same chromosomal region is one of the few characterized persistent genetic abnormalities associated with autistic spectrum disorder, occurring in >1-2% of all cases of autism spectrum disorder. While the overall morphology of the brain and connectivity of neural projections appear largely normal in AS mouse models, major functional defects are detected at the level of context-dependent learning, as well as impaired maturation of hippocampal and neocortical circuits. While these findings demonstrate a crucial role for ubiquitin protein ligase E3A in synaptic development, the mechanisms by which deficiency of ubiquitin protein ligase E3A leads to AS pathophysiology in humans remain poorly understood. However, recent efforts have shown promise in restoring functions disrupted in AS mice, renewing hope that an effective treatment strategy can be found.

  11. Isolation, Characterization, and Molecular Modeling of a Rheumatoid Factor from a Hepatitis C Virus Infected Patient with Sjögren’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ching Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously isolated several IgG rheumatoid factors (RFs from patients with both rheumatoid arthritis and idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura using phage display system. To study IgG RFs in patients with other autoimmune diseases, phage display antibody libraries from a hepatitis C virus infected patient with Sjögren’s syndrome were constructed. After panning, a specific clone RFL11 was isolated for characterization in advance. The binding activity and specificity of RFL11 to IgG Fc fragment were comparable to those of RFs previously isolated. The analysis with existed RF-Fc complex structures indicated the homology model of RFL11 is similar to IgM RF61 complex with high binding affinity of about 6×10-8 M. This effect resulted from longer complementarity-determining region (CDR combining key somatic mutations. In the RFL11-Fc interfaces, the CDR-H3 loop forms a finger-like structure extending into the bottom of Fc pocket and resulting in strong ion and cation-pi interactions. Moreover, a process of antigen-driven maturation was proven by somatically mutated VH residues on H2 and H3 CDR loops in the interfaces. Taken together, these results suggested that high affinity IgG RFs can be generated in patients with Sjögren’s syndrome and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease.

  12. Molecular characterization of transcriptome-wide interactions between highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine alveolar macrophages in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Zhai, Shanli; Zhou, Xiang; Lin, Ping; Jiang, Tengfei; Hu, Xueying; Jiang, Yunbo; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Qingde; Xu, Xuewen; Li, Jin-Ping; Liu, Bang

    2011-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infects mainly the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and causes porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). Previous studies have analyzed the global gene expression profiles of lung tissue in vivo and PAMs in vitro following infection with PRRSV, however, transcriptome-wide understanding of the interaction between highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) and PAMs in vivo has not yet been established. In this study, we employed Affymetrix microarrays to investigate the gene expression patterns of PAMs isolated from Tongcheng piglets (a Chinese indigenous breed) after infection with HP-PRRSV. During the infection, Tongcheng piglets exhibited typical clinical signs, e.g. fever, asthma, coughing, anorexia, lethargy and convulsion, but displayed mild regional lung damage at 5 and 7 dpi. Microarray analysis revealed that HP-PRRSV infection has affected PAMs in expression of the important genes involved in cytoskeleton and exocytosis organization, protein degradation and folding, intracellular calcium and zinc homeostasis. Several potential antiviral strategies might be employed in PAMs, including upregulating IFN-induced genes and increasing intracellular zinc ion concentration. And inhibition of the complement system likely attenuated the lung damage during HP-PRRSV infection. Transcriptomic analysis of PAMs in vivo could lead to a better understanding of the HP-PRRSV-host interaction, and to the identification of novel antiviral therapies and genetic components of swine tolerance/susceptibility to HP-PRRS.

  13. Molecular cytogenetic determination of a deletion/duplication of 1q that results in a trisomy 18 syndrome-like phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Weaver, D.D.; Palmer, C.; Davee, M.A.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-08-15

    We report on an infant who presented at birth with some characteristics of trisomy 18 syndrome, including low birth weight, facial abnormalities, overlapping fingers, and congenital heart defects. On chromosome analysis, no additional chromosome 18 was observed and both chromosome 18 homologues appeared normal. However, a small piece of chromosomal material of unknown origin was detected at the tip of the long arm of chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using whole chromosome 18 painting probes disclosed no additional hybridization at the telomere of 1q, suggesting that the material was derived from another chromosome. Further chromosome painting experiments suggested that the telomeric addition was of chromosome 1 origin. To identify subchromosomal regions involved in the rearrangement, additional FISH analyses were performed using single copy and repetitive DNA probes mapping different portions of chromosome 1. The analyses showed that probes mapping to 1q34-43 were duplicated in the derivative chromosome 1. In addition, a DNA probe mapping to 1q44 was found to be deleted from the derivative chromosome 1. Our composite analysis suggests that a deletion and a duplication of chromosome 1q can result in some of the clinical findings usually associated with trisomy 16 syndrome. These results demonstrate the usefulness of FISH analysis when karyotype analysis is not consistent with the clinical description. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Urinary Metabolomics Identifies a Molecular Correlate of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome in a Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP Research Network Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveri S. Parker

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS is a poorly understood syndrome affecting up to 6.5% of adult women in the U.S. The lack of broadly accepted objective laboratory markers for this condition hampers efforts to diagnose and treat this condition. To identify biochemical markers for IC/BPS, we applied mass spectrometry-based global metabolite profiling to urine specimens from a cohort of female IC/BPS subjects from the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP Research Network. These analyses identified multiple metabolites capable of discriminating IC/BPS and control subjects. Of these candidate markers, etiocholan-3α-ol-17-one sulfate (Etio-S, a sulfoconjugated 5-β reduced isomer of testosterone, distinguished female IC/BPS and control subjects with a sensitivity and specificity >90%. Among IC/BPS subjects, urinary Etio-S levels are correlated with elevated symptom scores (symptoms, pelvic pain, and number of painful body sites and could resolve high- from low-symptom IC/BPS subgroups. Etio-S-associated biochemical changes persisted through 3–6 months of longitudinal follow up. These results raise the possibility that an underlying biochemical abnormality contributes to symptoms in patients with severe IC/BPS.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Transcriptome-wide Interactions between Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus and Porcine Alveolar Macrophages in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhou, Shanli Zhai, Xiang Zhou, Ping Lin, Tengfei Jiang, Xueying Hu, Yunbo Jiang, Bin Wu, Qingde Zhang, Xuewen Xu, Jin-ping Li, Bang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infects mainly the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs and causes porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS. Previous studies have analyzed the global gene expression profiles of lung tissue in vivo and PAMs in vitro following infection with PRRSV, however, transcriptome-wide understanding of the interaction between highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV and PAMs in vivo has not yet been established. In this study, we employed Affymetrix microarrays to investigate the gene expression patterns of PAMs isolated from Tongcheng piglets (a Chinese indigenous breed after infection with HP-PRRSV. During the infection, Tongcheng piglets exhibited typical clinical signs, e.g. fever, asthma, coughing, anorexia, lethargy and convulsion, but displayed mild regional lung damage at 5 and 7 dpi. Microarray analysis revealed that HP-PRRSV infection has affected PAMs in expression of the important genes involved in cytoskeleton and exocytosis organization, protein degradation and folding, intracellular calcium and zinc homeostasis. Several potential antiviral strategies might be employed in PAMs, including upregulating IFN-induced genes and increasing intracellular zinc ion concentration. And inhibition of the complement system likely attenuated the lung damage during HP-PRRSV infection. Transcriptomic analysis of PAMs in vivo could lead to a better understanding of the HP-PRRSV-host interaction, and to the identification of novel antiviral therapies and genetic components of swine tolerance/susceptibility to HP-PRRS.

  16. Direct molecular detection of pathogens in blood as specific rule-in diagnostic biomarker in patients with presumed sepsis: our experience on a heterogeneous cohort of patients with signs of infective systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Manuela; Diamante, Paola; Modolo, Maria Luisa; De Rosa, Rita; Stano, Paola; Camporese, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    The practical value of blood cultures in the diagnosis of sepsis is impaired by a delay in the turnaround time to result and by the fact that blood culture positive can be found for only about 30% of these patients. Conventional laboratory signs of sepsis and acute phase protein biomarkers are sensitive and easy to use, but often also very nonspecific. Molecular diagnostic reflects currently the most promising avenue to decrease time to result and to influence decision making for antibiotic therapy in the septic host. In this study, we wish to highlight the impact of the LightCycler SeptiFast, a multipathogen probe-based real-time polymerase chain reaction, in the rapid etiological diagnosis of sepsis in patients with clinical and laboratory signs of bloodstream infections. We have evaluated prospectively 830 adult patients with suspected bloodstream infection and at least two criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In more than 50% of critically ill patients strongly suspected of having sepsis, we arrived to an etiological diagnosis only by the molecular method in a median time of 15 h, with specificity and predictive positive values of 96% and 94%, respectively. We highlight the role of DNAemia as time-critical, high-specificity, etiological, non-culture-based rule-in diagnostic biomarker in patients with presumed sepsis.

  17. Rare hereditary COL4A3/COL4A4 variants may be mistaken for familial focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Andrew F; Phelan, Paul J; Hall, Gentzon; Cetincelik, Umran; Homstad, Alison; Alonso, Andrea; Jiang, Ruiji; Lindsey, Thomas; Wu, Guanghong; Sparks, Matthew A; Smith, Stephen R; Webb, Nicholas J A; Kalra, Philip; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Shaw, Andrey S; Conlon, Peter J; Jennette, J Charles; Howell, David N; Winn, Michelle P; Gbadegesin, Rasheed A

    2014-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a histological lesion with many causes including inherited genetic defects with significant proteinuria being the predominant clinical finding at presentation. Mutations in COL4A3 and COL4A4 are known to cause Alport syndrome, thin basement membrane nephropathy, and to result in pathognomonic glomerular basement membrane findings. Secondary FSGS is known to develop in classic Alport Syndrome at later stages of the disease. Here, we present seven families with rare or novel variants in COL4A3 or COL4A4 (six with single and one with two heterozygous variants) from a cohort of 70 families with a diagnosis of hereditary FSGS. The predominant clinical findings at diagnosis were proteinuria associated with hematuria. In all seven families, there were individuals with nephrotic range proteinuria with histologic features of FSGS by light microscopy. In one family, electron microscopy showed thin glomerular basement membrane, but four other families had variable findings inconsistent with classical Alport nephritis. There was no recurrence of disease after kidney transplantation. Families with COL4A3 and COL4A4 variants that segregated with disease represent 10% of our cohort. Thus, COL4A3 and COL4A4 variants should be considered in the interpretation of next-generation sequencing data from such patients. Furthermore, this study illustrates the power of molecular genetic diagnostics in the clarification of renal phenotypes. PMID:25229338

  18. A comparative study on clinical phenotype and molecular cytogenetics in 46, XX male syndrome and Klinefelter's syndrome%46,XX男性综合征与Klinefelter综合征在临床表型和分子细胞遗传学比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沙艳伟; 宋岳强; 孔辉; 邱乒乒; 郑仁瑞; 韩斌

    2011-01-01

    Objective;To explore the differences of clinical phenotype, sexual hormone and molecular cytogenetics between 46, XX male syndrome and Klinefelter. Methods: We collected data of 3 46, XX male syndrome patients, 10 KS patients and 8 Normal Fertile Men include physical examination, semen analysis, sexual hormone, Y chromosome microdeletion detection and Fluorescence in situ hybridization, and compared the data. Results: 3 46, XX male syndrome patients were karyotype 46, xx, FISH showed the karytype t (X, Y) (p22. 3;pll. 3);The height and Weight of 3 46, XX male syndrome patients were similar to women's, and were significantly different to KS patients' and normal fertile men's ( P <0. 05 ). The testes of 46, XX male syndrome patients is softer than KS patients' (except those with AZFa, b, c microdeletions) ;The level of hormone LH of 46, XX male syndrome patients were significantly higher than KS group's (P <0. 05) ;The FSH and LH level of 46, XX male syndrome group and KS group were significantly higher than normal fertile group ( P < 0. 05 ) , but the T level were just on the contrary (P < 0. 05). Conclusions;FISH is a good method of differential diagnosis of 46, XX male syndrome. The clinical phenotype and physical characteristics of 46, XX male syndrome patients are obviously different to KS patients and normal fertile men. KS patients and 46, XX male syndrome patients both have the feature of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. With the low level of plasma T, the KS patients were obviously higher than 46, XX male syndrome patients, it shows that there may be growth related gene in Y chromosome.%目的 探讨46,XX男性综合征与Klinefeher综合征(Klinefelter's syndrome,KS)在临床特征、性激素、分子细胞遗传学特征区别.方法 收集3例46,XX男性综合征、10例KS患者和8例正常生育男性行体格检查、精液常规分析、性激素检测、Y染色体微缺失检查以及荧光原位杂交技术(FISH)

  19. [The Angelman's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurić-Nedeljković, M; Marjanović, B; Zamurović, D; Guć-Sćekić, M; Lejić, S; Zotović, M

    1994-01-01

    Distinction of patients with Angelman's syndrome in a group of mentally retarded patients is important even though the syndrome was rarely reported since the original description in 1965. Before that time these patients were thought to suffer from neurologic sequelae of perinatal asphyxia, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome or mental retardation of unknown origin. Diagnosis is based on the following criteria: developmental delay from early age, absent speech (or speech limited to less than six words), jerky movements with an ataxic gait if the patient is walking, paroxysm of inappropriate laughing, dysmorphic craniofacial features (brachycephaly, mid-facial hypoplasia, deep set eyes, macrostomia, prominent mandible). About 60% of patients have deletion of chromozome 15q11-13. Cytogenetic studies suggest that de novo deletion of chromozome 15 is connected with the low recurrence risk and that families with several members with Angelman's syndrome belong to the group without identifiable deletion on citogenetic or molecular level. The article deals with the diagnostic criteria, clinical features and electroencephalographic changes (after several years of followup) in seven children with Angelman's syndrome (four girls and three boys).

  20. Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lodewijk AA Brosens; Danielle Langeveld; W Arnout van Hattem; Francis M Giardiello; G Johan A Offerhaus

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple distinct juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer.The cumulative life-time risk of colorectal cancer is 39% and the relative risk is 34.Juvenile polyps have a distinctive histology characterized by an abundance of edematous lamina propria with inflammatory cells and cystically dilated glands lined by cuboidal to columnar epithelium with reactive changes.Clinically, juvenile polyposis syndrome is defined by the presence of 5 or more juvenile polyps in the colorectum,juvenile polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract or any number of juvenile polyps and a positive family history of juvenile polyposis.In about 50%-60% of patients diagnosed with juvenile polyposis syndrome a germline mutation in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A gene is found.Both genes play a role in the BMP/TGF-beta signalling pathway.It has been suggested that cancer in juvenile polyposis may develop through the so-alled "landscaper mechanism" where an abnormal stromal environment leads to neoplastic transformation of the adjacent epithelium and in the end invasive carcinoma.Recognition of this rare disorder is important for patients and their families with regard to treatment,follow-up and screening of at risk individuals.Each clinician confronted with the diagnosis of a juvenile polyp should therefore consider the possibility of juvenile polyposis syndrome.In addition, juvenile polyposis syndrome provides a unique model to study colorectal cancer pathogenesis in general and gives insight in the molecular genetic basis of cancer. This review discusses clinical manifestations, genetics, pathogenesis and management of juvenile polyposis syndrome.

  1. Molecular cloning and recombinant expression of the VP28 carboxyl-terminal hydrophilic region from a brazilian white spot syndrome virus isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Braunig

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a fragment of the VP28 coding sequence from a Brazilian WSSV isolate (BrVP28 was cloned, sequenced and expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3 pLysS strain in order to produce the VP28 carboxyl-terminal hydrophilic region. The expression resulted in a protein of about 21 kDa, which was purified under denaturing conditions, resulting in a final highly purified BrVP28 preparation. The recombinant protein obtained can be used in several biotechnology applications, such as the production of monoclonal antibodies which could be used in the development of diagnostic tools as well as in the studies on the characterization of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV isolated in Brazil.

  2. Transcriptional changes in response to X chromosome dosage in the mouse: implications for X inactivation and the molecular basis of Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sargent Carole A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X monosomic mice (39,XO have a remarkably mild phenotype when compared to women with Turner syndrome (45,XO. The generally accepted hypothesis to explain this discrepancy is that the number of genes on the mouse X chromosome which escape X inactivation, and thus are expressed at higher levels in females, is very small. However this hypothesis has never been tested and only a small number of genes have been assayed for their X-inactivation status in the mouse. We performed a global expression analysis in four somatic tissues (brain, liver, kidney and muscle of adult 40,XX and 39,XO mice using the Illumina Mouse WG-6 v1_1 Expression BeadChip and an extensive validation by quantitative real time PCR, in order to identify which genes are expressed from both X chromosomes. Results We identified several genes on the X chromosome which are overexpressed in XX females, including those previously reported as escaping X inactivation, as well as new candidates. However, the results obtained by microarray and qPCR were not fully concordant, illustrating the difficulty in ascertaining modest fold changes, such as those expected for genes escaping X inactivation. Remarkably, considerable variation was observed between tissues, suggesting that inactivation patterns may be tissue-dependent. Our analysis also exposed several autosomal genes involved in mitochondrial metabolism and in protein translation which are differentially expressed between XX and XO mice, revealing secondary transcriptional changes to the alteration in X chromosome dosage. Conclusions Our results support the prediction that the mouse inactive X chromosome is largely silent, while providing a list of the genes potentially escaping X inactivation in rodents. Although the lower expression of X-linked genes in XO mice may not be relevant in the particular tissues/systems which are affected in human X chromosome monosomy, genes deregulated in XO mice are good candidates for

  3. Molecular analysis of the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 gene (RAI1) in patients with suspected Smith-Magenis syndrome without the 17p11.2 deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilboux, Thierry; Ciccone, Carla; Blancato, Jan K; Cox, Gerald F; Deshpande, Charu; Introne, Wendy J; Gahl, William A; Smith, Ann C M; Huizing, Marjan

    2011-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex neurobehavioral disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies. The syndrome is primarily ascribed to a ∼3.7 Mb de novo deletion on chromosome 17p11.2. Haploinsufficiency of multiple genes likely underlies the complex clinical phenotype. RAI1 (Retinoic Acid Induced 1) is recognized as a major gene involved in the SMS phenotype. Extensive genetic and clinical analyses of 36 patients with SMS-like features, but without the 17p11.2 microdeletion, yielded 10 patients with RAI1 variants, including 4 with de novo deleterious mutations, and 6 with novel missense variants, 5 of which were familial. Haplotype analysis showed two major RAI1 haplotypes in our primarily Caucasian cohort; the novel RAI1 variants did not occur in a preferred haplotype. RNA analysis revealed that RAI1 mRNA expression was significantly decreased in cells of patients with the common 17p11.2 deletion, as well as in those with de novo RAI1 variants. Expression levels varied in patients with familial RAI1 variants and in non-17p11.2 deleted patients without identified RAI1 defects. No correlation between SNP haplotype and RAI1 expression was found. Two clinical features, ocular abnormalities and polyembolokoilomania (object insertion), were significantly correlated with decreased RAI1 expression. While not significantly correlated, the presence of hearing loss, seizures, hoarse voice, childhood onset of obesity and specific behavioral aspects and the absence of immunologic abnormalities and cardiovascular or renal structural anomalies, appeared to be specific for the de novo RAI1 subgroup. Recognition of the combination of these features will assist in referral for RAI1 analysis of patients with SMS-like features without detectable microdeletion of 17p11.2. Moreover, RAI1 expression emerged as a genetic target for development of therapeutic interventions for SMS.

  4. Molecular analysis of the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 gene (RAI1 in patients with suspected Smith-Magenis syndrome without the 17p11.2 deletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Vilboux

    Full Text Available Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS is a complex neurobehavioral disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies. The syndrome is primarily ascribed to a ∼3.7 Mb de novo deletion on chromosome 17p11.2. Haploinsufficiency of multiple genes likely underlies the complex clinical phenotype. RAI1 (Retinoic Acid Induced 1 is recognized as a major gene involved in the SMS phenotype. Extensive genetic and clinical analyses of 36 patients with SMS-like features, but without the 17p11.2 microdeletion, yielded 10 patients with RAI1 variants, including 4 with de novo deleterious mutations, and 6 with novel missense variants, 5 of which were familial. Haplotype analysis showed two major RAI1 haplotypes in our primarily Caucasian cohort; the novel RAI1 variants did not occur in a preferred haplotype. RNA analysis revealed that RAI1 mRNA expression was significantly decreased in cells of patients with the common 17p11.2 deletion, as well as in those with de novo RAI1 variants. Expression levels varied in patients with familial RAI1 variants and in non-17p11.2 deleted patients without identified RAI1 defects. No correlation between SNP haplotype and RAI1 expression was found. Two clinical features, ocular abnormalities and polyembolokoilomania (object insertion, were significantly correlated with decreased RAI1 expression. While not significantly correlated, the presence of hearing loss, seizures, hoarse voice, childhood onset of obesity and specific behavioral aspects and the absence of immunologic abnormalities and cardiovascular or renal structural anomalies, appeared to be specific for the de novo RAI1 subgroup. Recognition of the combination of these features will assist in referral for RAI1 analysis of patients with SMS-like features without detectable microdeletion of 17p11.2. Moreover, RAI1 expression emerged as a genetic target for development of therapeutic interventions for SMS.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: aromatase excess syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sources for This Page Fukami M, Shozu M, Ogata T. Molecular bases and phenotypic determinants of aromatase ... T, Nishigaki T, Yokoya S, Binder G, Horikawa R, Ogata T. Aromatase excess syndrome: identification of cryptic duplications ...

  6. Morphology and Molecular Biology of White Spot Syndrome Virus%白斑综合征病毒(White spot syndrome virus)的形态和分子生物学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王吉桥; 姜玉声; 张建

    2008-01-01

    白斑综合征病毒(white spot syndrome virus,WSSV)自1992年首次发现以来,已成为威胁对虾养殖业的最主要病原.10年中它迅速蔓延至世界各养虾区,造成直接经济损失达700多亿美元.WSSV属线头病毒科Nimaviridae,完整包膜的病毒体(粒子)长210~380 nm,最宽处70~167 nm,病毒体末端具尾状附器(tail-like appendage).WSSV被膜厚6~7 nm,为脂质三层膜结构,由不透明电子层分隔成两层透明层.核衣壳位于膜内,为弹簧体型结构,由直径10 nm的球形蛋白亚基构成.WSSV基因组为环状双链DNA分子,A+T含量占59%,分布均匀,发生分为六个时期.我国WSSV基因组有9.63 kbp的不稳定区,依寄主的不同发生了不同程度的却失,使致毒力发生了变化.

  7. Wellens' syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Lai

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of quite rare cause of thoracic pain suspected by emergency physician as Wellens’ syndrome. Wellens’ syndrome is a pattern of electrocardiographic T-wave changes associated with critical, proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD. This syndrome is about 10-15% of all unstable angina in emergency department (ED. The cardiologic consult was obtained in ED and it was not conclusive for a Wellens’ syndrome, so that the diagnostistic planning was wrong. The authors point out the importance of this syndrome in ED and the necessity of an urgent angiographic study as every acute coronary syndrome presented in ED. We remark the importance in ED to recognize these changes associated with critical LAD obstruction and the high risk for anterior wall myocardial infarction.

  8. [Autoinflammatory syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, P; Gross, W L

    2009-06-01

    In its strict sense, the term "autoinflammatory syndromes" comprises the hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPF), which are caused by mutations of pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) and perturbations of the cytokine balance. These include the crypyrinopathies, familial Mediterranean fever, TNF-receptor associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), hyper-IgD and periodic syndrome (HIDS), pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, NALP12-HPF, and the Blau syndrome. The diseases are characterized by spontaneous activation of cells of the innate immunity in the absence of ligands. Autoantibodies are usually not found. HPF clinically present with recurrent fever episodes and inflammation, especially of serosal and synovial interfaces and the skin. Intriguingly, PRR-mediated autoinflammtory mechanisms also play a role in a number of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  9. Complex morphological and molecular genetic examination of amelogenesis imperfecta: a case presentation of two Czech siblings with a non-syndrome form of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripnerova, Tereza; Krulisova, Veronika; Ptakova, Nikola; Macek, Milan; Dostalova, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is an overarching term for a group of rare inherited disorders of hard tooth tissues. It is characterized by various defects in proper enamel formation. AI is a severe disorder that affects both the aesthetics and function of the dentition, with affected teeth increasingly suffering from dental caries. Therefore, early diagnosis and lifelong stomatological interventions are important. Due to the complex nature of AI family history, stomatological, radiographic, and molecular genetic examinations should be part of the diagnostic portfolio. Additionally, we utilized new visualization methods for the assessment of teeth demineralization. We present a case report of two affected Czech sisters (6 and 8 years old) with clinically defined AI. These are the first Czech cases in which comprehensive clinical and genetic analysis had been carried out and reflect the complex clinical nature, positive treatment options, and limitations of candidate-gene molecular genetic testing.

  10. Metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia Atul

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The Metabolic syndrome is a widely prevalent and multi-factorial disorder. The syndrome has been given several names, including- the metabolic syndrome, the insulin resistance syndrome, the plurimetabolic syndrome, and the deadly quartet. With the formulation of NCEP/ATP III guidelines, some uniformity and standardization has occurred in the definition of metabolic syndrome and has been very useful for epidemiological purposes. The mechanisms underlying the metabolic syndrome are not fully known; however resistance to insulin stimulated glucose uptake seems to modify biochemical responses in a way that predisposes to metabolic risk factors. The clinical relevance of the metabolic syndrome is related to its role in the development of cardiovascular disease. Management of the metabolic syndrome involves patient-education and intervention at various levels. Weight reduction is one of the main stays of treatment. In this article we comprehensively discuss this syndrome- the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical relevance and management. The need to do a comprehensive review of this particular syndrome has arisen in view of the ever increasing incidence of this entitiy. Soon, metabolic syndrome will overtake cigarette smoking as the number one risk factor for heart disease among the US population. Hardly any issue of any primary care medical journal can be opened without encountering an article on type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia or hypertension. It is rare to see type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity or hypertension in isolation. Insulin resistance and resulting hyperinsulinemia have been implicated in the development of glucose intolerance (and progression to type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, polycystic ovary yndrome, hypercoagulability and vascular inflammation, as well as the eventual development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease manifested as myocardial infarction, stroke and myriad end organ diseases. Conversely

  11. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  12. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  13. Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basanti Devi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  14. Gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Basanti; Behera, Binodini; Patro, Sibasish; Pattnaik, Subhransu S; Puhan, Manas R

    2013-05-01

    Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  15. 卡托普利联合低分子肝素治疗肾病综合征的临床疗效分析%Analysis of nephrotic syndrome treatment by captopril combined with low molecular heparin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄恬

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the treatment effect of captopril combined low molecular heparin in nephrot-ic syndrome .Methods Sixty and eight patients with nephrotic syndrome were collected from Chongqing cancer hos-pital ,which were randomly divided into control group and observation group .Conventional treatment were used in the control group ,captopril combined with low molecular heparin were added in the observation group .cholesterol , triglyceride ,urine protein ,whole blood viscosity ,hematocrit ,fibrinogen ,hematocrit of pigeon before and after treat-ment were compared .Results Total effective rate of observation group was 92 .1% ,which was significantly higher than the control group′s 83 .3% ,the difference was statistically significant (P<0 .05) .The observation group′s cho-lesterol ,triglyceride ,urine protein ,whole blood viscosity ,hematocrit ,fibrinogen ,hematocrit of pigeon were significant lower than those of the control group (P<0 .05) .Conclusion On the basis of conventional treatment ,captopril and low molecular heparin could significantly improve curative effect ,renal function and high coagulation state on pa-tients with nephrotic syndrome .%目的:观察卡托普利联合低分子肝素治疗肾病综合征的临床效果。方法选择本院收治的68例肾病综合征患者为研究对象。对照组30例患者,给予常规治疗28 d;观察组38例患者,在常规治疗的基础上给予卡托普利联合低分子肝素治疗28 d。观察并比较两组患者治疗前后胆固醇、三酰甘油、肌酐、清蛋白、尿蛋白、全血高切黏度、全血低切黏度、血浆黏度、血浆纤维蛋白原、血细胞比容等指标变化情况。结果观察组治疗总有效率达92.1%,明显高于对照组的83.3%,比较差异有统计学意义( P<0.05)。治疗28 d后,观察组胆固醇、三酰甘油、尿蛋白、全血黏度、血浆黏度、血浆纤维蛋白原、血细胞比容等指标明显低于对照

  16. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En Español Read in Chinese What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a duplication of all ... in persons with Down syndrome. How common is Down syndrome? The frequency of Down syndrome is approximately 1 ...

  17. Facts about Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Down syndrome. View charts » What is Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is a condition in which a person ... in height as children and adults Types of Down Syndrome There are three types of Down syndrome. People ...

  18. Improved molecular diagnosis of unparental disomy 15 in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes utilizing new short tandem repeats (STRs) mapped to chromosome 15q11.2-q12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, S.L.; Kubota, T.; Ledbetter, D.H. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct mental retardation disorders caused by paternal (PWS) or maternal (AS) deficiencies of chromosome 15q11.2-q12. Three STRs (D15S11, GABRB3, and D15S113) were previously developed utilizing YACs from this region as a molecular diagnostic test for PWS/AS. Since then twenty-three new STRs have been developed by several groups which map to 15q11.2-q12. Fine mapping of some of these markers was accomplished utilizing a 3.5 Mb YAC contig of this region. Three new CEPH-Genethon markers, D15S122, D15S128, and D15S210 were mapped within the smallest PWS/AS critical regions. D15S122 mapped to YACs 230H12 and 132D4, D15S128 mapped to YACs 457B4, 11H11, and B58C7, and D15S210 mapped to 132D4 and B230E3. To improve molecular diagnosis of uniparental disomy in PWS/AS, D15S122 and D15S128 with >70% hetrozygosities were placed in a new multiplex PCR reaction with D15S11. Additionally, three CEPH-Genethon markers with high heterozygosities from distal 15q, D15S123, D15S125, and D15S131, were used establish a second multiplex to increase the total number of markers analyzed to six. Twenty-three patients with uniparental disomy 15 were compared using the original multiplex and the two new multiplexes. The results indicated that 16/23 had at least one fully informative marker with the original multiplex and 23/23 using the two new multiplexes. Using a more rigorous diagnostic criterion of two fully informative markers, only 8/23 were informative with the original multiplex and 21/23 with the two new multiplexes. These results demonstrate that these two new multiplexes composed of a total of six polymorphic STRs provide an improved diagnostic test for uniparental disomy 15.

  19. Guillain-Barré syndrome- and Miller Fisher syndrome-associated Campylobacter jejuni lipopolysaccharides induce anti-GM1 and anti-GQ1b Antibodies in rabbits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. de Klerk; H.P. Endtz (Hubert); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); J.D. Laman (Jon); F.G.A. van der Meché (Frans); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); C.W. Ang (Wim)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractCampylobacter jejuni infections are thought to induce antiganglioside antibodies in patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) and Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) by molecular mimicry between C. jejuni lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and gangliosides. We used purifi

  20. Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa, Carlos Andrés; Molina, Gustavo; Cock-Rada, Alicia María

    2016-06-03

    The Li-Fraumeni syndrome is characterized clinically by the appearance of tumors in multiple organs generally at an early age. This hereditary condition is caused by germinal mutations in the TP53 gene, which codifies for the tumoural suppressor gene p53. We present the case of a patient aged 31 with clinical and molecular diagnosis of Li-Fraumeni syndrome who presented two synchronous tumors: a leiomyosarcoma on the forearm and a phyllodes breast tumour. She had a family history of cancer, including a son diagnosed with a cortical adrenal carcinoma when he was three years old, who died at five from the disease. Furthermore, her maternal grandmother and great-grandmother died of stomach cancer at 56 and 60 years old, respectively, while her other great-grandmother and a great aunt presented with breast cancer at the ages of 60 and 40, respectively. After genetic counseling, complete sequencing and analysis of duplications and deletions in the TP53 gene were ordered prior to diagnosis. The molecular analysis of a DNA sample taken from peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed the germinal mutation c.527G>T (p.Cys176Phe) on exon 5 of the TP53 gene, a deleterious mutation described previously in tumoural tissues. To our knowledge, this is the first published case in Colombia of Li-Fraumeni syndrome with confirmed molecular diagnosis. The diagnosis and management of Li-Fraumeni syndrome should be performed by a multidisciplinary team, and genetic counselling should be offered to patients and their relatives.

  1. A molecular deletion of distal chromosome 4p in two families with a satellited chromosome 4 lacking the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrooks, L L; Lamb, A N; Kirkman, H N; Callanan, N P; Rao, K W

    1992-11-01

    We report two families with a satellited chromosome 4 short arm (4ps). Satellites and stalks normally occur on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes; however, the literature cites several reports of satellited nonacrocentric chromosomes, which presumably result from a translocation with an acrocentric chromosome. This is the first report of 4ps chromosomes. Our families are remarkable in that both unaffected and affected individuals carry the 4ps chromosome. The phenotypes observed in affected individuals, although dissimilar, were sufficient to encourage a search for a deletion of chromosome 4p. By Southern blot analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization, a deletion of material mapping approximately 150 kb from chromosome 4pter was discovered. This deletion is notable because it does not result in the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and can result in an apparently normal phenotype. We speculate that homology between subterminal repeat sequences on 4p and sequences on the acrocentric short arms may explain the origin of the rearrangement and that position effect may play a role in the expression of the abnormal phenotype.

  2. The Research Advance of Molecular Genetics of Marfan Syndrome%Marfan综合征分子遗传学研究新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈喜军; 伍严安

    2006-01-01

    Marfan综合征(Marfan syndrome,MFS)是一种常染色体显性遗传性结缔组织病,其病变的微纤维主要牵累3个组织器官系统:骨骼、眼和心血管.1991年,研究发现FBN1突变能导致MFS;2004年,转化生长因子-β受体2(TGFBR2)被认定为MFSⅡ基因;2005年,研究报道TGFBR2突变或TGFBR1突变能够导致一种新的动脉瘤综合征.研究表明,在细胞外基质中,原纤维蛋白-1(fibilllin-1)与转化生长因子β(TGF-β)信号有功能上的相关性.MFS的病理机制可能与TGF-β信号异常有关.

  3. Molecular characterization of a novel fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus pyogenes strains isolated from toxic shock-like syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, Yutaka; Kawabata, Shigetada; Nakata, Masanobu; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Hamada, Shigeyuki

    2002-12-06

    Group A Streptococcus pyogenes has surface-located fibronectin (Fn)-binding proteins known to be a major virulence factor, which adheres to and invades host cells. We present a novel Fn-binding protein of group A streptococcus serotype M3 and M18 strains isolated from patients with toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS). By searching the whole genome sequence of an M3 strain from a TSLS patient, an open reading frame was found among the putative surface proteins. It possessed an LPXTG motif and Fn-binding repeat domains in the C-terminal region and was designated as FbaB (Fn-binding protein of group A streptococci type B). The fbaB gene was found in all M3 and M18 strains examined, although not in other M serotypes. Furthermore, FbaB protein was expressed on the cell surface of TSLS strains but not on non-TSLS ones. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and ligand blotting revealed that recombinant FbaB exhibits a strong Fn-binding ability. An FbaB-deficient mutant strain showed 6-fold lower adhesion and invasion efficiencies to HEp-2 cells than the wild type. Moreover, mortality was decreased in mice infected with the mutant strain in comparison to the wild type. These data suggest that FbaB is etiologically involved in the development of invasive streptococcal diseases.

  4. Molecular characterization of LvAV in response to white spot syndrome virus infection in the Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shulin; Song, Lei; Qian, Zhaoying; Hou, Fujun; Liu, Yongjie; Wang, Xianzong; Peng, Zhangming; Sun, Chengbo; Liu, Xiaolin

    2015-07-01

    Litopenaeus vannamei is the most important farmed shrimp species globally, but its production is affected by several factors, including infectious disease. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV), in particular, causes significant shrimp losses. To understand the shrimp's immune response against WSSV, we cloned LvAV from L. vannamei and analyzed its expression pattern in different tissues, in addition to its expression following infection. We employed dsRNA and recombinant (r)LvAV to explore the potential role of LvAV in shrimp immunity when infected with WSSV. We find that LvAV is a C-type Lectin composed of 176 amino acids with a signal peptide and a specific C-type Lectin-type domain (CTLD). It shares 81% amino acid similarity with PmAV, an antiviral-like C-type Lectin from Penaeus monodom, and it is highly expressed in the hepatopancreas. Its expression is affected by infection with both WSSV and V. parahaemolyticus. Significantly, injection with rLvAV slowed WSSV replication, while injection with LvAV dsRNA initially led to enhanced virus propagation. Surprisingly, LvAV dsRNA subsequently led to a dramatic decrease in viral load in the later stages of infection, suggesting that LvAV may be subverted by WSSV to enhance viral replication or immune avoidance. Our results indicate that LvAV plays an important, but potentially complex role in the Pacific white shrimp's immune defense.

  5. Molecular and cytogenetic analysis of the fragile X syndrome in a series of 453 mentally retarded subjects: A study of 87 families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perroni, L.; Grasso, M.; Argusti, A. [Centro di Genetica Umana, E.O. Ospedali Galliera, Genova (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-07-12

    We report on a series of 453 mentally retarded subjects investigated for fragile X syndrome from 1982 to July 1995. The 22% rate of efficiency of FRAX positivity indicated a significant preselection by the clinicians. However, this rate dropped to 11% in the last year. Since 1992, Southern blot analysis was extended to include family members of the 87 positive subjects, for a total of 442 individuals examined with the probe StB12.3. In addition to premutated (118), fully mutated (148), and pre/full mutation mosaic subjects (27), 14 atypical cases were found. Some of these cases are described in more detail. In particular, we report on the hybridization and polymerase chain reaction data of 2 fragile X subjects with full mutation and a 2.8-kb allele and 1 with full mutation and a 2.4-kb allele. An intellectually normal male with 18% of fraXq27.3 and an unmethylated full mutation is also described. Finally, a mentally retarded child with only a lower allele of 2.7 kb is presented. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome): part I. Diagnosis: clinical and histopathologic features and new molecular and biologic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawed, Sarah I; Myskowski, Patricia L; Horwitz, Steven; Moskowitz, Alison; Querfeld, Christiane

    2014-02-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS) comprise approximately 53% of cutaneous lymphomas. Both MF and SS may clinically and histologically mimic benign skin conditions, posing a diagnostic challenge to the dermatologist. Precise clinicopathologic correlation is necessary to support a diagnosis, especially in the early stages of disease. In addition to the identification of histopathologic criteria, ancillary studies, including the identification of CD4(+) T cells with aberrant immunophenotypes and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements within skin lesions and peripheral blood are used to support the diagnosis. Recent studies evaluating the pathogenesis of MF have found that the skin microenvironment, including immune cells, such as dendritic cells and reactive cytotoxic and regulatory T cells, plays a crucial supporting role in MF. The skin-homing ability of malignant T cells is the result of chemokines, cytokines, adhesion molecules, and defective apoptosis, and is believed to play a role in disease pathogenesis and progression. In addition, recent studies have also suggested that MF and SS arise from distinct memory T cell subsets and advanced/erythrodermic MF and SS may be distinguished by identification of certain molecules, including Programmed-Death-1.

  7. Estudio anatomopatológico, citogenético y molecular del síndrome freemartin en el bovino doméstico (Bos taurus) - (anatomopathologic, cytogenetic and molecular studies of the freemartin syndrome in cattle (bos taurus))

    OpenAIRE

    Ayala-Valdovinos, Miguel Angel; Villagómez, Daniel; Galindo-García, Jorge; Sánchez-Chiprés, David; Avila-Figueroa,David; Taylor-Preciado, Juan de Jesús; Merlos-Barajas, Miguel; Guerrero-Quiroz Luis

    2007-01-01

    ResumenA través del análisis citogenético utilizando la presencia de los cromosomas sexuales como marcadores y mediante el análisis molecular (PCR-RFLP), utilizando oligonucleótidos iniciadores para los genes Zfx y Zfy del bovino, se diagnosticaron con la condición intersexual, síndrome freemartin, 19 individuos (Bos taurus) procedentes de partos múltiples heterosexuales; asimismo, se estudiaron anatomopatológicamente cuatro de estos animales, enfatizando en las características del tejido gon...

  8. Franceschetti syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikrant Kasat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Franceschetti syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with variable expressivity. It is commonly known as Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS. It is named after E. Treacher Collins who described the essential components of the condition. It affects both genders equally. This article reports a case of TCS in an 18-year-old female.

  9. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akcan AB.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is an important cause of short stature in girls and primer amenorrhea in young women that is usually caused by loss of part or all of an X chromosome. This topic will review the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of Turner syndrome.

  10. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Renu

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of proteus syndrome in a 20 year old male is repoted. Hemihypertrophy, asymmetric megalodactyly, linear epidermal naevus, naevus flammeus, angiokeratoma, lymphangioma circumscriptum, thickening of the palms and soles, scoliosis and varicose veins were present. There are only few reports of these cases in adults. The syndrome has not been reported from India.

  11. Poland syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra Madhur Sharma; Shrawan Kumar; Meghwani, Manoj K.; Agrawal, Ravi P.

    2014-01-01

    Poland′s syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  12. Poland syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Madhur Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poland′s syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  13. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body, the white blood cells that fight infections, and the platelets that help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy blood cells. ... anemia, or easy bleeding. Myelodysplastic syndromes often do ...

  14. LEOPARD syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... L, Strano S, Carbone A, Calvieri C, Giustini S. LEOPARD syndrome. Dermatol Online J . 2008;14(3):7. PMID: 18627709 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18627709 . Sarkozy A, Digilio MC, Dallapiccola B. LEOPARD syndrome. Orphanet J Rare Dis . 2008;3:13. PMID: ...

  15. Wallenberg's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... way, which makes it difficult to keep their balance when they walk. Treatment Treatment for Wallenberg's syndrome is symptomatic. A feeding ... way, which makes it difficult to keep their balance when they walk. Treatment Treatment for Wallenberg's syndrome is symptomatic. A feeding ...

  16. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder K. Gupta, Ritu Gupta, Sunil Dutt Sharma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Turner Syndrome is one of the important chromosomal disorders characterised by loss (total or part ofsex chromosome. The manifestations being peripheral edema, short stature, extra skin fold, webbing ofneck, renal and cardiovascular anomalies, sexual infantilism, learning disability etc. We present here aone month female baby who had classical features of Turner Syndrome. The karyotape analysis wasconsistent with the diagnosis.

  17. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  18. Molecular microbiological investigation of an outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome caused by dry fermented sausage contaminated with Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, A W; Ratcliff, R M; Doyle, R M; Seymour-Murray, J; Davos, D; Lanser, J A; Paton, J C

    1996-01-01

    Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli (SLTEC) strains are a diverse group of organisms which are known to cause diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis in humans. This can lead to potentially fatal systemic sequelae, such as hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). Strains belonging to more than 100 different O:H serotypes have been associated with severe SLTEC disease in humans, of which only O157 strains (which are uncommon in Australia) have a distinguishable cultural characteristic (sorbitol negative). During an outbreak of HUS in Adelaide, South Australia, a sensitive PCR assay specific for Shiga-like toxin genes (slt) was used to test cultures of feces and suspected foods. This enabled rapid confirmation of infection and identified a locally produced dry fermented sausage (mettwurst) as the source of infection. Cultures of feces from 19 of 21 HUS patients and 7 of 8 mettwurst samples collected from their homes were PCR positive for slt-I and slt-II genes. SLTEC isolates belonging to serotype O111:H- was subsequently isolated from 16 patients and 4 mettwurst samples. Subsequent restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of chromosomal DNA from these isolates with slt-specific probes indicated that at least three different O111:H- genotypes were associated with the outbreak. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA restricted with XbaI showed that two of these restriction fragment length polymorphism types were closely related, but the third was quite distinct. However, SLTEC strains of other serotypes, including O157:H-, were also isolated from some of the HUS patients. PMID:8784557

  19. Nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levtchenko, E.N.; Monnens, L.A.H.

    2010-01-01

    The nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD) is a rare, recently recognized disorder in water balance affecting not only infants but also adults. A new molecular mechanism responsible for NSIAD has recently been identified: a gain of function of the arginine vasopressin (AVP) recep

  20. Genomic characterization and molecular detection of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus%中东呼吸综合征冠状病毒基因组结构特征和分子检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵彦杰; 谭文杰

    2015-01-01

    Middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus(MERS-CoV)was recently identified as a novel human coronavirus known to infect human with high mortality. It belongs to C clade of the betacoronavirus shown the similar genomic structure as other human coronaviruses.To date, some different subtypes of the viral genome were identified but its origin was unclear. Some evidences indicated it maybe came from the bats or dromedary. And series of molecular detection methods have been established and applied in lab and clinic.%中东呼吸综合征冠状病毒是新近确定的新型冠状病毒,致病性强、病死率高,是β冠状病毒的C组中可感染人的病毒。该病毒基因组结构与其他已知人类冠状病毒基因组结构相似。至今已经发现该病毒具有不同亚型。但是对于该病毒溯源不是十分清楚,有证据指向可能来源于蝙蝠或单峰驼。一系列针对该病毒的分子检测方法已建立并应用于实验室与临床。

  1. Sheldon-Hall syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamshad Michael J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sheldon-Hall syndrome (SHS is a rare multiple congenital contracture syndrome characterized by contractures of the distal joints of the limbs, triangular face, downslanting palpebral fissures, small mouth, and high arched palate. Epidemiological data for the prevalence of SHS are not available, but less than 100 cases have been reported in the literature. Other common clinical features of SHS include prominent nasolabial folds, high arched palate, attached earlobes, mild cervical webbing, short stature, severe camptodactyly, ulnar deviation, and vertical talus and/or talipes equinovarus. Typically, the contractures are most severe at birth and non-progressive. SHS is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern but about half the cases are sporadic. Mutations in either MYH3, TNNI2, or TNNT3 have been found in about 50% of cases. These genes encode proteins of the contractile apparatus of fast twitch skeletal muscle fibers. The diagnosis of SHS is based on clinical criteria. Mutation analysis is useful to distinguish SHS from arthrogryposis syndromes with similar features (e.g. distal arthrogryposis 1 and Freeman-Sheldon syndrome. Prenatal diagnosis by ultrasonography is feasible at 18–24 weeks of gestation. If the family history is positive and the mutation is known in the family, prenatal molecular genetic diagnosis is possible. There is no specific therapy for SHS. However, patients benefit from early intervention with occupational and physical therapy, serial casting, and/or surgery. Life expectancy and cognitive abilities are normal.

  2. Antiphospohlipid syndrome in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Alvaro; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Khamashta, Munther

    2012-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterised by a variety of clinical and immunological manifestations. The clinical hallmarks of this syndrome are thrombosis and poor obstetric outcomes, including miscarriages, fetal loss and severe pre-eclampsia. The main antiphospholipid antibodies include lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin and anti-β2-glycoprotein I. The combination of aspirin and heparin is considered the standard of care for women with antiphospholipid syndrome and embryo-fetal losses; however, aspirin in monotherapy may have a place in women with recurrent early miscarriage. A good benefit-risk ratio of low-molecular-weight heparin in pregnancy thrombosis treatment has been reported. Warfarin must be avoided if possible throughout the first trimester of pregnancy. Adequate pregnancy management of women with antiphospholipid syndrome should include co-ordinated medical-obstetrical care, a close follow-up protocol and a good neonatal unit. Close blood pressure control and early detection of proteinuria, together with Doppler studies of the utero-placental circulation should be included in the management protocol.

  3. Skin manifestations in autoinflammatory syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun-Falco, Markus; Ruzicka, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases encompass a group of inflammatory diseases that are non-infectious, non-allergic, non-autoimmune and non-immunodeficient. The term was initially coined for a small group of familial periodic fever syndromes of which familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common and best known. Genetic and molecular analyses demonstrated for the majority of these diseases an impairment of inflammasomes to cause an increased activity of an interleukin-1-dependent inflammatory response. Over the last years an increasing number of either rare hereditary syndromes or acquired common diseases could be summarized under the designation of autoinflammatory disease, thus creating an emerging new rubric of inflammatory diseases. Many of them display cutaneous manifestations as both concomitant or more rarely main symptoms. To name some of them like erysipelas-like erythema in FMF; urticaria-like rashes in tumor necrosis factor receptor 1- or cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (TRAPS, CAPS), hyperimmunoglobulin D syndrome (HIDS) or Schnitzler syndrome; pyoderma gangrenosum and acne in PAPA syndrome; or behçetoid aphthous ulcerations in HIDS and PFAPA syndrome. Based on the new insights into pathogenesis one increasingly realizes the good response of these diseases to IL-1 antagonist therapies.

  4. Clinical management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Tomlinson, Ian; Castells, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary factors are involved in the development of a substantial proportion of all cases of colorectal cancer. Inherited forms of colorectal cancer are usually subdivided into polyposis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple colorectal polyps and nonpolyposis syndromes characterized by the development of few or no polyps. Timely identification of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes is vital because patient participation in early detection programmes prevents premature death due to cancer. Polyposis syndromes are fairly easy to recognize, but some patients might have characteristics that overlap with other clinically defined syndromes. Comprehensive analysis of the genes known to be associated with polyposis syndromes helps to establish the final diagnosis in these patients. Recognizing Lynch syndrome is more difficult than other polyposis syndromes owing to the absence of pathognomonic features. Most investigators therefore recommend performing systematic molecular analysis of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer using immunohistochemical methods. The implementation in clinical practice of new high-throughput methods for molecular analysis might further increase the identification of individuals at risk of hereditary colorectal cancer. This Review describes the clinical management of the various hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and demonstrates the advantage of using a classification based on the underlying gene defects.

  5. Severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in an adult patient with Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Y; Abadi, J; Lifschitz, A; Laron, Z

    2001-08-01

    A 68 year old patient with Laron syndrome (primary growth hormone (GH) resistance-insensitivity due to a molecular defect of the GH receptor) and severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome is described. Treatment with continuous positive air pressure therapy resulted in improved nocturnal sleep, daytime alertness and cognitive functions.

  6. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  7. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  8. HYDROLETHALUS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aradhana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hydrolethalus Syndrome (HLS is a rare lethal genetic syndrome, recognized as a consequence of a study on Meckle syndrome in Finland .1 HLS is characterized by multiple developmental defects of fetus which include fetal hydrocephalus, agenesis of corpus callosum, absent midline structures of brain, Cleft lip and cleft palate, defective lobulation of lungs, micrognathia and very characteristic abnormality of polydactyly. About 80% of patients have polydactyly, in hands it is postaxial and preaxial in feet with duplicated big toe. A highly characteristic hallux duplex is seen in almost no other situation .2 Club feet is also common.

  9. Hubris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, David

    2008-08-01

    Hubris syndrome is associated with power, more likely to manifest itself the longer the person exercises power and the greater the power they exercise. A syndrome not to be applied to anyone with existing mental illness or brain damage. Usually symptoms abate when the person no longer exercises power. It is less likely to develop in people who retain a personal modesty, remain open to criticism, have a degree of cynicism or well developed sense of humour. Four heads of government in the last 100 years are singled out as having developed hubris syndrome: David Lloyd George, Margaret Thatcher, George W Bush and Tony Blair.

  10. CLOVES syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jacob; Upton, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    A cohort of patients with overgrowth syndromes has been identified with congenital lipomatous overgrowth, dysregulated fat deposits, and mixed vascular malformations. The acronym CLOVES was given on a heuristic basis to stand for congenital lipomatous overgrowth (CLO), vascular malformation (V), epidermal nevi (E), and scoliosis and spinal deformities (S). These patients have upper limb anomalies with variable phenotypes. Although hand anomalies alone cannot make the diagnosis, the foot, truncal, cutaneous and spinal anomalies are particularly diagnostic. CLOVES syndrome has emerged as a distinct clinical entity diagnosed by clinical and radiographic examinations. The overgrowth pattern is now easily distinguished from other overgrowth syndromes.

  11. Johanson-Blizzard syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nabeel Almashraki; Mukarram Zainuddin Abdulnabee; Maja Sukalo; Abdullah Alrajoudi; Iman Sharafadeen; Martin Zenker

    2011-01-01

    Johanson-Blizzard syndrome (JBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, hypoplastic or aplastic nasal alae, cutis aplasia on the scalp, and other features including developmental delay, failure to thrive, hearing loss, mental retardation, hypothyroidism, dental abnormalities, and anomalies in cardiac and genitourinary systems. More than 60 cases of this syndrome have been reported to date. We describe the case of a male infant with typical symptoms of JBS. In addition, a new clinical feature which has not previously been documented, that is anemia requiring frequent blood transfusions and mild to moderate thrombocytopenia was observed. A molecular study was performed which revealed a novel homozygous UBR1 mutation. Possible explanations for this new association are discussed.

  12. [Autoinflammatory syndromes/fever syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedel, J; Bach, B; Kümmerle-Deschner, J B; Kötter, I

    2011-05-01

    Hereditary periodic (fever) syndromes, also called autoinflammatory syndromes, are characterized by relapsing fever and additional manifestations such as skin rashes, mucosal manifestations, or joint symptoms. Some of these disorders present with organ involvement and serological signs of inflammation without fever. There is a strong serological inflammatory response with an elevation of serum amyloid A (SAA), resulting in an increased risk of secondary amyloidosis. There are monogenic disorders (familial mediterranean fever (FMF), hyper-IgD-syndrome (HIDS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), "pyogenic arthritis, acne, pyoderma gangrenosum" (PAPA), and "pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA) where mutations in genes have been described, which in part by influencing the function of the inflammasome, in part by other means, lead to the induction of the production of IL-1β. In "early-onset of enterocolitis (IBD)", a functional IL-10 receptor is lacking. Therapeutically, above all, the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra is used. In case of TRAPS and PGA, TNF-antagonists (etanercept) may also be used; in FMF colchicine is first choice. As additional possible autoinflammatory syndromes, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis), Schnitzler syndrome, Still's disease of adult and pediatric onset, Behçet disease, gout, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and Crohn's disease also are mentioned.

  13. Noonan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chest shape (most often a sunken chest called pectus excavatum) Webbed and short-appearing neck Exams and Tests ... to consider genetic counseling before having children. Images Pectus excavatum References Ali O, Donohoue PA. Noonan syndrome. In: ...

  14. Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at least once every year. Alternative Names Aortic aneurysm - ... syndrome. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 702. ...

  15. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... optic nerve (arrow) looks very pale, the vessels (stars) are very thin and there is characteristic pigment, ... syndrome gene have a child together, with each birth there is a: 1-in-4 chance of ...

  16. Bart syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaikwad Anil

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available An infant presenting with extensive aplasia cutis on lower extremities later developed blisters on skin and mucous membrane. Clinical features and histopathological examination of skin favoured the diagnosis of Bart syndrome.

  17. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arachnoldactyly (CCA), which refers to the joint contractures (shortening) that are key features of the syndrome. How ... remain contracted for long periods of time, the muscles can become tight and short, restricting movement. When ...

  18. Isaac's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page NINDS Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page NINDS Infantile Spasms Information Page NINDS ... Support Library Clinical Research Next Steps Pre-Funding: After Review Terms of Award Pre-Award Start-up ...

  19. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page NINDS Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page NINDS Infantile Spasms Information Page NINDS ... Support Library Clinical Research Next Steps Pre-Funding: After Review Terms of Award Pre-Award Start-up ...

  20. Neurocutaneous Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect kids include: neurofibromatosis, types 1 and 2 (NF1 and NF2) Sturge-Weber syndrome tuberous sclerosis (TS) ... forms of this disorder are neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), and Schwannomatosis. NF1 is ...

  1. [Mobius syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladuţiu, Cristina; Duma, Ionela

    2012-01-01

    Mobius syndrom, an anomaly in cranial nerve developement, presents with a remarkable clinical polymorphism. The rare occurence of this pathology and the questions raised by the diagnosis and treatment determined us to make this presentation.

  2. [Refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it.

  3. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart,...

  4. Cockayne syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne;

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties...

  5. Gardner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or central nervous system tumor less than 1% Stomach cancer 0.5% Bile duct cancer small, but increased Adrenal gland cancer small, but increased What are the screening options for Gardner syndrome? The screening options for ...

  6. Metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... obesity ). This body type may be described as "apple-shaped." Insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone produced ... Syndrome Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  7. Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnostic tests that can identify Down syndrome include: Amniocentesis. A sample of the amniotic fluid surrounding the ... somewhat higher risk of miscarriage than second trimester amniocentesis. Cordocentesis. In this test, also known as percutaneous ...

  8. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the inner layer of the aorta (aortic dissection). A defect in the valve between the heart ... Turner syndrome are at increased risk of aortic dissection during pregnancy, they should be evaluated by a ...

  9. Eagle's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves; Soares,Vítor Yamashiro Rocha; Ferreira,Denise Bastos Lage; Raymundo,Igor Teixeira; Nascimento, Luiz Augusto; Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is diffic...

  10. SAPHO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Sueli; Sampaio-Barros, Percival D

    2013-05-01

    SAPHO syndrome is a disorder characterized by Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis, and Osteitis. As the osteoarticular and skin manifestations often do not occur simultaneously and there are no validated diagnostic criteria, the diagnosis can be difficult. Clinical and imaging investigation is necessary to establish the many differential diagnoses of SAPHO syndrome. The etiopathogenesis involves infectious (probably Propionibacterium acnes), immunologic, and genetic factors. Treatment is based on information gathered from case reports and small series, and is related to specific skin or articular symptoms.

  11. Carpenter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidestrand, Pip; Vasconez, Henry; Cottrill, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Carpenter syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that belongs to a group of rare craniosynostosis syndromes (Bull Soc Med Paris 1906;23:1310). Carpenter syndrome is the rarest, with only occasional patients seen. There are 3 common features in all of these syndromes: craniosynostosis (skull base abnormalities, with early fusion in different sutures), midface hypoplasia, and musculoskeletal abnormalities. Clinical features of Carpenter syndrome include peculiar facies, asymmetry of the skull, polydactyly, brachymesophalangy, mild soft tissue syndactyly, obesity, hypogenitalism, congenital heart disease, and mental retardation (J Pediatr 1966;69:1; Am J Roentgenol 1969;106). The brachycephaly is caused by early fusion in the coronal, sagittal, and lambdoidal sutures (Proc R Soc Med Sect Study Dis Child 1909). Most of the affected patients have a surgical procedure between 3 to 9 months of age to open the cranial vault to make space for the brain to grow (Plast Reconstr Surg 1978;62:335). We present a patient with Carpenter syndrome who is unusual in that she is an adult who has never had surgical intervention.

  12. Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types of Cancer > Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome Request Permissions Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 12/2015 What is juvenile polyposis syndrome? Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is a ...

  13. Cardiac Syndrome X

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kawasaki Disease Long Q-T Syndrome Marfan Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Mitral Valve Prolapse Myocardial Bridge Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pericarditis Peripheral Vascular Disease Rheumatic Fever Sick Sinus Syndrome Silent Ischemia Stroke Sudden ...

  14. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of ... that may play a role in causing metabolic syndrome. Outlook Metabolic syndrome is becoming more common due to a ...

  15. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... continue Do a Lot of People Have Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is not contagious , so you can't ... have it. What's Life Like for Kids With Down Syndrome? Many kids with Down syndrome go to regular ...

  16. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Metabolic Syndrome A A A ... this is a condition called metabolic syndrome . About Metabolic Syndrome Not to be confused with metabolic disease (which ...

  17. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Metabolic Syndrome Print A A ... this is a condition called metabolic syndrome . About Metabolic Syndrome Not to be confused with metabolic disease (which ...

  18. Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kosuke; Krantz, Ian D

    2014-12-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is characterized by craniofacial dysmorphism, pigmentary skin anomalies, congenital heart defects, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, hypotonia, intellectual disability, and epilepsy. PKS is caused by extra copies of chromosome 12p, most characteristically a marker isochromosome 12p that demonstrates tissue-limited mosaicism. The cytogenetic diagnosis of PKS is often cumbersome due to the absence of the isochromosome in lymphocytes requiring sampling of other tissues. The mechanism by which the isochromosome 12p results in the constellation of multiple congenital anomalies remains largely unknown. In this review, we summarize the background of, and recent advances in, the clinical and molecular understanding of PKS.

  19. Autoinflammatory syndromes behind the scenes of recurrent fevers in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigante, Donato

    2009-08-01

    Many children experience recurrent fevers with no easily identifiable source and only a careful follow-up helps in the early identification of other presenting symptoms of other defined conditions which require medical intervention. Autoinflammatory syndromes are rare childhood-onset disorders of the innate immunity in which recurrent flares of fever and inflammation affecting skin, joints, the gastrointestinal tube, or serous membranes are the most striking signs, without any evidence of autoantibody production or underlying infections. Among the pediatric conditions belonging to this group we can consider hereditary recurrent fevers (familial Mediterranean fever, mevalonate kinase deficiency syndrome, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes), pyogenic disorders (PAPA syndrome, CRMO syndrome, Majeed syndrome), immune-mediated granulomatous diseases (Blau syndrome, Crohn's disease), and idiopathic febrile syndromes (systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, PFAPA syndrome, Behçet syndrome). Their genetic background has only been partially elucidated and advances in their molecular pathogenesis are shedding new light on the innate immune system, whilst more and more diseases are being reconsidered at a pathogenetic level and included in this new chapter of postgenomic medicine. The diagnosis of most autoinflammatory syndromes relies on clinical history, demonstration of an increased acute-phase response during inflammatory attacks, and, possibly, genetic confirmation, which is still elusive especially for idiopathic febrile syndromes. This astonishing progress in the awareness and knowledge of autoinflammatory syndromes has anticipated the actual possibilities of medical intervention and rationalized treatment with targeted biologic agents.

  20. Molecular epidemiology analyze of a hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome case%1例肾综合征出血热死亡病例分子流行病学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘远; 蒋力云; 丁鹏; 王大虎; 肖新才

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析2011年广州市1例肾综合征出血热重症死亡病例的发病原因,并对其进行分子流行病学分析.方法 将患者血清以及居住地周围人群、老鼠标本进行抗体检测和PCR检测,将获得的序列与NCBI上的序列进行比对.结果 鼠血IgG抗体检测阳性率为33.33%,人群血清IgG抗体检测阳性率为5.66%,均高于检测的阳性率.患者血清中汉坦病毒基因不存在大的变异.结论 加强HFRS的日常监测,扩大监测范围和数量,认真做好防鼠灭鼠工作,减少传染源,切断传播途径,有利于HFRS的防治.%Objective To find out the cause of a hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome case, and carry out molecular epidemiology analyze. Method The serum samples were developed antibody and PCR detection among the patient, surround people and rat Acquired sequence compare with the sequences in the Genbank. Results The positive rate of IgG in the sera of rats and people were 33. 33% and 5. 66% , respectively, they were higher than the positive rate we survey in these years. Hantavirus was not big mutation in the patient's serum. Conclusions We need to enhance the daily surveillance, expand the monitoring circumsciption and quantity, do well the deratization work, reduce the infection sources, cut down the transmission routes, those were profit for HFRS.

  1. Whole-arm translocation of der(5;17)(p10;q10) with concurrent TP53 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS): A unique molecular-cytogenetic subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ming; Hao, Suyang; Patel, Keyur P; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Yin, C Cameron; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Lin, Pei; Lu, Xinyan

    2016-05-01

    Der(5;17)(p10;q10) is a recurrent but rare aberration reported in myeloid neoplasms (MNs). We report 48 such patients including 19 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 29 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), to characterize their clinicopathological features. There were 29 men and 19 women, with a median age of 61 years (range, 18-80). 62.5% patients had therapy-related diseases (t-MNs), 70.8% had multilineage dysplasia and 83.3% showed complex karyotypes. In 39 patients tested, FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, KIT were all wild type and NRAS, KRAS, IDH1, APC, TET2 mutations were detected in single case(s) respectively. TP53 mutations were identified in 8 of 10 cases (80%) tested. Median disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 3 and 10 months, respectively and did not differ between AML or MDS cases, or between de novo versus therapy-related cases, or between the groups with or without complex karyotypes. In 19 patients who achieved complete remission after chemotherapy, and in 9 patients who underwent stem cell transplantation, the OS was better (14 and 17.5 months, P = 0.0128 and P = 0.0086, respectively). The der(5;17)(p10;q10) represents a unique molecular-cytogenetic subgroup in t-MNs and, associated with complex karyotypes. TP53 inactivation, resulting from 17p deletion coupled with TP53 mutation, likely contributes to the poor clinical outcome of these patients.

  2. The ROS-sensitive microRNA-9/9* controls the expression of mitochondrial tRNA-modifying enzymes and is involved in the molecular mechanism of MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, Salvador; Martínez-Zamora, Ana; García-Arumí, Elena; Andreu, Antonio L; Armengod, M-Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction activates mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling pathways whose components are mostly unknown. Identification of these components is important to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying mitochondrial diseases and to discover putative therapeutic targets. MELAS syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in mitochondrial (mt) DNA affecting mt-tRNA(Leu(UUR)). Patient and cybrid cells exhibit elevated oxidative stress. Moreover, mutant mt-tRNAs(Leu(UUR)) lack the taurine-containing modification normally present at the wobble uridine (U34) of wild-type mt-tRNA(Leu(UUR)), which is considered an etiology of MELAS. However, the molecular mechanism is still unclear. We found that MELAS cybrids exhibit a significant decrease in the steady-state levels of several mt-tRNA-modification enzymes, which is not due to transcriptional regulation. We demonstrated that oxidative stress mediates an NFkB-dependent induction of microRNA-9/9*, which acts as a post-transcriptional negative regulator of the mt-tRNA-modification enzymes GTPBP3, MTO1 and TRMU. Down-regulation of these enzymes by microRNA-9/9* affects the U34 modification status of non-mutant tRNAs and contributes to the MELAS phenotype. Anti-microRNA-9 treatments of MELAS cybrids reverse the phenotype, whereas miR-9 transfection of wild-type cells mimics the effects of siRNA-mediated down-regulation of GTPBP3, MTO1 and TRMU. Our data represent the first evidence that an mt-DNA disease can directly affect microRNA expression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the modification status of mt-tRNAs is dynamic and that cells respond to stress by modulating the expression of mt-tRNA-modifying enzymes. microRNA-9/9* is a crucial player in mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling as it regulates expression of nuclear genes in response to changes in the functional state of mitochondria.

  3. Molecular etiology of non-syndromic hearing impairment in a Chinese family%非综合征性耳聋一家系分子病因学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙勍; 单希征; 马丽涛; 康东洋; 张昕; 刘新; 王国建; 袁慧军; 韩东一

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the molecular etiology of non-syndromic hearing impairment in two patients in a maternal inherited deafness Chinese family. Methods Peripheral blood specimens were collected and DNA templates extracted. The complete mitochondrial genomes and GJB2 geoe were sequenced in an ABI 3100 Avant sequencer. Results The proband(Ⅲ-5) and her elder sister(Ⅲ-1) were found to carry the mtDNA 12SrRNA C1494T mutation. The GJB2 gene showed no mutations. The proband had the history of using aminoglycosides before hearing loss, and exhibited severe sensorineural hearing impairment; the proband's sister had no history of using aminoglycosides, and showed moderate sensorineural hearing impairment. Conclusion The molecular etiology of each individual patient in a family yaries with individual genetic background.%目的 从分子病因学角度分析一具有母系遗传特性的非综合征性耳聋家系耳聋原因.方法 对该家系成员进行线粒体基因全序列及缝隙连接蛋白26编码基因(GJB2)全序列分析.结果 接受检测的该家系先证者(Ⅲ-5)及另一母系成员(Ⅲ-1)均携带线粒体DNA 12SrRNA C1494T突变;先证者聋前有氨基糖苷类抗生素应用史,表现为双侧重度感音神经性耳聋,携带线粒体DNA12SrRNA C1494T突变的另一母系成员(Ⅲ-1)聋前无氨基糖苷类抗生素应用史,表现为双侧中度感音神经性耳聋.GJB2基因检测未发现致病突变.结论 线粒体DNA 12SrRNA C1494T突变是氨基糖苷类抗生素致聋的原因之一,该突变致聋程度的不一致性可能与个体遗传背景不同有关.

  4. 灯盏细辛联合低分子肝素治疗肾病综合征的临床疗效观察%Clinical Effect of Herba Erigerontis Breviscapi Combined with Low Molecular Heparin on Nephrotic Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖家贤; 韦秋敏; 卢荣羡; 韦东艳

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical effect of Herba Erigerontis Breviscapi combined with low molecular heparin on nephrotic syndrome. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis on the clinical data of 78 patients with primary nephrotic syndrome patients in our hospital from January 2009 to December 2010. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: treatment group and control group, with 39 cases in each group. Patients in the control group were given conventional treatment. Patients in the treatment group were given Herba Erigerontis Breviscapi combined with low molecular heparin besides conventional treatment. The treatment period lasted for about two weeks. The levels of urine protein, serum triglyceride (TG) , total cholesterol (Choi) , serum albumin (ALB) and activation of blood coagulation enzyme time (APTT) , fibrinogen (FIB) of patients in two groups were tested and the clinical effect was compared between two groups. Results The curative effect of the treatment group was better than the control group, with the effective rate of 92.3% and 71.8% (P <0.05). Compared with the control group, the treatment group, there was a signinicant increase of 24 h urine protein, and a significant increase of serum albumin, serum triglyceride and total cholesterol in patients in treatment group. The active site blood coagulation time was significantly longer and the fibrinogen (FIB) was reduced in treatment group than control group. Conclusion Herba Erigerontis Breviscapi combined with low molecular heparin can improve the levels of urinary albumin, decrease the blood lipids levels, improve the high coagulative state and improve the serum albumin levels of primary nephrotic syndrome patients, so has good therapeutic effect.%目的 探讨灯盏细辛联合低分子肝素治疗肾病综合征的临床疗效.方法 回顾性分析2009年1月至2010年12月在河池市中医院治疗的78例原发性肾病综合征患者的临床资料,随机分为2组,对照组39

  5. The fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, B B; Halley, D J; Oostra, B A; Niermeijer, M F

    1998-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome is characterised by mental retardation, behavioural features, and physical features, such as a long face with large protruding ears and macro-orchidism. In 1991, after identification of the fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) gene, the cytogenetic marker (a fragile site at Xq27.3) became replaced by molecular diagnosis. The fragile X syndrome was one of the first examples of a "novel" class of disorders caused by a trinucleotide repeat expansion. In the normal population, the CGG repeat varies from six to 54 units. Affected subjects have expanded CGG repeats (>200) in the first exon of the FMR1 gene (the full mutation). Phenotypically normal carriers of the fragile X syndrome have a repeat in the 43 to 200 range (the premutation). The cloning of the FMR1 gene led to the characterisation of its protein product FMRP, encouraged further clinical studies, and opened up the possibility of more accurate family studies and fragile X screening programmes. Images PMID:9678703

  6. [Serotonin syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lheureux, P; Penaloza, A; De Cottenier, V; Ullmann, U; Gris, M

    2002-10-01

    The serotonin syndrome is a hyperserotoninergic state resulting from an excess of intrasynaptic 5-hydroxytryptamine, induced by multiple psychotropic agents, but also non psychiatric drugs. It is a potentially dangerous and sometimes lethal condition. The clinical manifestations usually include cognitive, neuromuscular and autonomic features and are mediated by the action of serotonin on various subtypes of receptors. The main differential diagnosis is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Treatment is mainly supportive. No pharmacological agent has been definitely demonstrated really effective. However, reports of cases treated with the 5-HT2 blockers, including cyproheptadine or chlorpromazine have suggested that these agents could have some efficacy. Serotonin syndrome is a toxic condition which requires heightened clinical awareness among physicians in order to prevent, recognize, and treat the condition promptly.

  7. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    necrophorum. We found a total of 137 cases of LS, of which 47 were infected with F. necrophorum and others with Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. Complications of this rare but severe disease included osteomyelitis, meningitis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mortality was extremely high in the pre....../or swelling in the throat or neck, as well as respiratory symptoms. Laboratory findings show elevated infectious parameters and radiological findings show thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and emboli in the lungs or other organs. The syndrome is often associated with an infection with Fusobacterium......This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and...

  8. Microcephaly syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, Dianne

    2007-09-01

    The objective of this article is to review microcephaly from a genetics point of view, especially with regard to the process of identification of syndromes in which small head circumference occurs. Microcephaly can be due to either genetic or environmental causes. It can be the only positive finding or may be part of a syndrome of congenital anomalies. The genetic etiology can be caused by autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked genes or various types of chromosome anomalies. Some of the gene mutations have been identified recently. Syndromic microcephaly is associated with a large number of conditions. Some can be diagnosed, or at least suspected, based on their characteristic facial dysmorphism, and others can be searched for using databases of genetic disorders.

  9. Postconcussional Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Keskin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Postconcussional syndrome is characterized by somatic, cognitive and psychiatric (emotional, behavioral symptoms that occurs after mild traumatic brain injury. It has been known that these symptoms recover fully within 3-6 months almost in 90% of patients. Although its etiology is still controversial, biological, psychological and social factors may account for the development and continuation of the symptoms. Diagnosis is based on the subjective complaints. To find out an objective method for definite diagnosis, trials searching for both neuroimaging and specific serum biomarkers stil continue. The treatment of the syndrome is mainly of palliative nature. Information, education, reassurance and multifaceted rehabilitation programmes can be beneficial. There are promising trials reporting the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of postconcussional syndrome. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 96-109

  10. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  11. Refeeding syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathy Swagata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a fifty-year-old male who was admitted with a three month history of increasing weakness, prostration, decreasing appetite and inability to swallow. The patient was a chronic alcoholic, unemployed, and of very poor socioeconomic background. The patient was initially investigated for upper GI malignancy, Addisons disease, bulbar palsy and other endocrinopathies. Concurrent management was started for severe electrolyte abnormalities and enteral nutritional supplementation was begun. By the fourth day of feeding patient developed severe hypophosphatemia and other life-threatening features suggesting refeeding syndrome. The patient was managed for the manifestations of refeeding syndrome. A final diagnosis of chronic alcoholic malnutrition with refeeding syndrome was made. Refeeding of previously starving patients may lead to a variety of complications including sudden death.

  12. Fraser syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal, and urogenital malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study using data provided by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network...... of birth defect registries. Between January 1990 and December 2008, we identified 26 cases of Fraser syndrome in the monitored population of 12,886,464 births (minimal estimated prevalence of 0.20 per 100,000 or 1:495,633 births). Most cases (18/26; 69%) were registered in the western part of Europe, where...... was particularly high (42%). Most cases of Fraser syndrome (85%) are suspected prenatally, often due to the presence of the association of renal agenesis and cryptophthalmos. In the European population, a high proportion (82%) of pregnancies is terminated, thus reducing the live birth prevalence to a third...

  13. Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Ikinci

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of risk factors including common etiopathogenesis. These risk factors play different roles in occurence of atherosclerotic diseases, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. Although a compromise can not be achieved on differential diagnosis for MS, the existence of any three criterias enable to diagnose MS. These are abdominal obesity, dislipidemia (hypertrigliceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and reduced high density lipoprotein hypertension, and elevated fasting blood glucose. According to the results of Metabolic Syndrome Research (METSAR, the overall prevalence of MS in Turkey is 34%; in females 40%, and in males it is 28%. As a result of “Western” diet, and increased frequency of obesity, MS is observed in children and in adolescents both in the world and in Turkey. Resulting in chronic diseases, it is thought that the syndrome can be prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviours. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 535-540

  14. RBC count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Failure of the right side of the heart ( cor pulmonale ) Dehydration (for example, from severe diarrhea) Kidney tumor ( ... Read More Alport syndrome Anemia CBC blood test Cor pulmonale Dehydration Erythropoietin test Folic acid in diet Glucose- ...

  15. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  16. [PFAPA syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Suzete Costa Anjos; Vales, Fernando; Cardoso, Eduardo; Santos, Margarida

    2009-01-01

    PFAPA syndrome is characterized by periodic fever, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis and aphthous stomatitis. The bouts of fever can last for days or even weeks. Between crises, patients remain asymptomatic for variable periods. It appears before the age of five and has limited duration (4-8 years). Its aetiopathogeny is unknown. Corticoids are the treatment of choice. Tonsillectomy has been proposed as a solution but remains controversial. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl with PFAPA syndrome who underwent tonsillectomy in January, 2008, and we review the literature.

  17. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  18. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  19. Eisenmengers syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G;

    2009-01-01

    Congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunt can induce proliferation, vasoconstriction and thrombosis in the pulmonary vascular bed. Eventually, the patient may develop Eisenmenger syndrome defined as pulmonary arterial hypertension caused by high pulmonary vascular resistance with right......-to-left shunt and cyanosis. Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome suffer a high risk of complications in connection with acute medical conditions, extra-cardiac surgery and pregnancy. This article describes the precautions that should be taken to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. Udgivelsesdato...

  20. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  1. [Wilkie's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognár, Gábor; Ledniczky, György; Palik, Eva; Zubek, László; Sugár, István; Ondrejka, Pál

    2008-10-01

    Loss of retroperitoneal fatty tissue as a result of a variety of debilitating conditions and noxa is believed to be the etiologic factor of superior mesenteric artery syndrome. A case of a 35 years old female patient with severe malnutrition and weight loss is presented, who developed superior mesenteric artery syndrome. Various theories of etiology, clinical course and treatment options of this uncommon disease are discussed. In our case, conservative management was inefficient, while surgical treatment aiming to bypass the obstruction by an anastomosis between the jejunum and the proximal duodenum (duodenojejunostomy) was successful. An interdisciplinary teamwork provides the most beneficial diagnostic and therapeutic result in this often underestimated disease.

  2. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  3. Gorlin Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siroos Risbaf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome is a dominant autosomal familial disorder. The manifestations begin at an early age and a combination of phenotypic abnormalities such special facial appearance, jaw cysts and skeletal anomalies are seen in this disease. A 22-year-old woman referred to Zahedan Dental School complaining of pain on the left cheek. During the examination, several cutaneous lesions in the neck, pits in palm and sole and multiple jaw cysts were observed. According to the clinical symptoms, lesion biopsy and reports of Gorlin syndrome radiography were presented.

  4. Morbihan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraldi, Stefano; Persico, Maria Chiara; Francia, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face) in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks).

  5. Morbihan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Veraldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks.

  6. Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shia, Jinru; Holck, Susanne; Depetris, Giovanni;

    2013-01-01

    of interacting developments from the disciplines of clinical oncology, pathology, and molecular genetics, with each development serving to guide or enhance the next. The advancement of our understanding about the pathology of Lynch syndrome associated tumors exemplifies such intimate interplay among disciplines....... Today, accumulative knowledge has enabled surgical pathologists to detect tumors that are likely to be associated with Lynch syndrome, and the pathologist is playing an increasingly more important role in the care of these patients. The pathologist's ability is afforded primarily by information gained...... of such information. This article provides an overview of the development of histopathology and immunohistochemistry in Lynch syndrome-associated tumors, particularly in colorectal and endometrial cancers, and outlines the issues and current status of these specific pathologic aspects in not only the major tumors...

  7. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Engelen, K. van; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome. Althou

  8. Rare hereditary COL4A3/COL4A4 variants may be mistaken for familial focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Malone, Andrew F.; Phelan, Paul J.; Hall, Gentzon; Cetincelik, Umran; Homstad, Alison; Alonso, Andrea; Jiang, Ruiji; Lindsey, Thomas; Wu, Guanghong; Sparks, Matthew A.; Smith, Stephen R.; Webb, Nicholas J. A.; Kalra, Philip; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Shaw, Andrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a histological lesion with many causes including inherited genetic defects with significant proteinuria being the predominant clinical finding at presentation. Mutations in COL4A3 and COL4A4 are known to cause Alport syndrome, thin basement membrane nephropathy, and to result in pathognomonic glomerular basement membrane findings. Secondary FSGS is known to develop in classic Alport Syndrome at later stages of the disease. Here, we present seven fa...

  9. Smith-Magenis Syndrome: Face Speaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rekha; Gupta, Neerja; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Mandal, Kausik; Kishore, Yougal; Sharma, Pankaj; Kabra, Madhulika; Phadke, Shubha R

    2016-06-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome is a well delineated microdeletion syndrome with characteristic facial and behavioral phenotype. With the availability of the multi-targeted molecular cytogenetic techniques like Multiplex Ligation Probe Amplification and cytogenetic microarray, the cases are diagnosed even without clinical suspicion. Here, the authors present clinical features of nine Indian cases of Smith-Magenis syndrome. Characteristic facial phenotype including tented upper lip, broad forehead, midface hypoplasia, short philtrum and upslant of palpebral fissure is obvious in the photographs. The behavioral variations were seen in some of the cases but were not the presenting features. The characteristic facial phenotype can be an important clinical guide to the diagnosis.

  10. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stomach move to your small intestine in an uncontrolled, abnormally fast manner. This is most often related to changes in your stomach associated with surgery. Dumping syndrome can occur after any stomach operation or removal of the esophagus (esophagectomy). Gastric bypass surgery for ...

  11. Sotos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 663-4637) Sotos Syndrome Support Association P.O. Box 4626 Wheaton IL Wheaton, IL 60189 info@sotossyndrome.org http://www.sotossyndrome.org/ Tel: 888-246-7772 The Arc of the United States 1825 K Street, NW ...

  12. Reifenstein syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androgens are most important during early development in the womb. People with Reifenstein syndrome can have a normal lifespan and be totally healthy, but they may have difficulty conceiving a child. In the most severe cases, boys with outer female genitals ...

  13. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  14. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    a variety of infectious complications. Rapid diagnosis and treatment is necessary to avoid severe complications or death. Close collaboration with local microbiologist is pivotal. Treatment consists of longterm treatment with penicillin and metronidazole. This is a case report of Lemierre's syndrome....

  15. [Waardenburg's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimñenez, F; Carbonell, R; Pérez, F; Lozano, I

    1994-01-01

    Reporting one case of this condition type-2 with heterochromia iridis and cochlear deafness. The AA. review the syndrome's components and it nomenclature as well. They discuss about the convenience of including this deviation in the chapter of "diseases of the embryonic neural crest". The specific place of the gene responsibly in the chromosome-2 and the possibilities of genetic counselling are considered.

  16. Waardenburg's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesudian, D P; Jayaraman, M; Janaki, V R; Yesudian, P

    1995-01-01

    Three children in a family of five presented with heterochromia iridis, lateral displacement of inner canthi and varying degrees of sensorineural deafness. All the 3 showed iris atrophy. The father of the children had only heterochromia iridis. A diagnosis of Waardenburg's syndrome Type I was made in the children with the father probably representing a forme fruste of the condition.

  17. Klinefelter Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Peynirci

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome disorder in males. Variation in clinical presentation and insufficient awareness of this syndrome among clinicians lead to fifty percent of patients remain undetected. Typical clinical features of Klinefelter syndrome are various degrees of hypogonadal symptoms, atrophic testes and gynaecomastia. However, these typical clinical symptoms may not be present in all patients. Even if serum testosterone levels are not markedly low, elevated serum follicle-stimulating hormone is a considerable laboratory finding. Definitive diagnosis is made by karyotype analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes. It must be kept in mind that this analysis may be normal in rare conditions. Early recognition of patients during puberty and handling them as soon as possible is important. Testosterone replacement therapy results in increased muscle mass, bone mineral density and libido. The patient’s mood and self-esteem improve significantly. In general, patients with Klinefelter syndrome are accepted as infertile, however, assisted reproductive techniques may provide fertilization. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 63-7

  18. Aicardi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as lower tone around the head and trunk, microcephaly (small head circumference), and spasticity in the limbs. Typical findings in the brain of girls with Aicardi syndrome include heterotopias , which are groups of brain cells that, during development, migrated to the wrong area ...

  19. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  20. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  1. Chylomicronemia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the blood. The disorder is passed down through families. Causes Chylomicronemia syndrome can occur due to a rare genetic disorder in which a protein (enzyme) called lipoprotein lipase (LpL) is broken or missing. LpL is normally found in fat and muscle. ...

  2. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debi Basanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a variable and complex disorder characterized by multifocal overgrowths affecting any tissue or structure of the body. We present a girl aged 3 years and 8 months with an epidermal nevus, port-wine stain, macrodactyly with gigantism of the feet, lymphohemagiomas and multiple lipomas.

  3. Metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles Shaeffer

    2004-01-01

    @@ The emergence of cardiac disease as the number one world-wide cause of death justifies efforts to identify individuals at higher risk for preventive therapy. The metabolic syndrome, originally described by Reaven, 1 has been associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk. 2 Type Ⅱ diabetes is also a frequent sequela. 3

  4. Troyer Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atrophy of the hand muscles, developmental delays, fluctuating emotions, and short stature. Onset is typically in early childhood, and symptoms gradually worsen over time. Troyer syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder (meaning that both parents must carry and pass on the defective gene ...

  5. Caplan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CT scan of the chest Joint x-rays Pulmonary function tests Rheumatoid factor test and other blood tests Treatment There is no specific treatment for Caplan syndrome, other than treating any lung and joint disease. ... MD, MHS, Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, ...

  6. Brugada Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to look at your heart's electrical activity (electrophysiology study), you'll need to fast for eight to 12 hours before your test. Write down any symptoms you're experiencing, including any that may seem unrelated to Brugada syndrome. Write down key personal information, especially any family ...

  7. [SAPHO syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldmann, F; Kiltz, U; Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2014-10-01

    The SAPHO syndrome, an acronym for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, is a rare disease which affects bones, joints and the skin. The main osteoarticular features are hyperostosis and osteitis. Osteoarticular symptoms predominantly occur on the anterior chest wall but the spine and the peripheral skeleton can also be involved. The most important skin affections are palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne. The etiology of this syndrome remains unclear but infectious, immunological and genetic factors are involved. The diagnostic features of SAPHO syndrome are clinical and radiological. The most important diagnostic procedure is Tc-99 m bone scintigraphy but conventional x-rays as well as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also contribute to the final diagnosis. Bone histology and positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) may help to differentiate SAPHO syndrome from malignancies and infectious osteomyelitis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of treatment. The results obtained using antibiotics and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate are inconsistent. Bisphosphonates and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs have shown promising results in small studies but further research is still necessary.

  8. Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Harleen; Chacon, Anna H; Choudhary, Sonal; McLeod, Michael P; Meshkov, Lauren; Nouri, Keyvan; Izakovic, Jan

    2014-07-01

    Bloom Syndrome (BS, MIM #210900) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the BLM gene, which codes for the DNA repair enzyme RecQL3 helicase. Without proper DNA repair mechanisms, abnormal DNA exchange takes place between sister chromatids and results in genetic instability that may lead to cancer, especially lymphoma and acute myelogenous leukemia, lower and upper gastrointestinal tract neoplasias, cutaneous tumors, and neoplasias in the genitalia and urinary tract. BS patients are usually of Ashkenazi Jewish descent and exhibit narrow facial features, elongated limbs, and several dermatologic complications including photosensitivity, poikiloderma, and telangiectatic erythema. The most concerning manifestation of BS is multiple malignancies, which require frequent screenings and strict vigilance by the physician. Therefore, distinguishing between BS and other dermatologic syndromes of similar presentation such as Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome, Erythropoietic Protoporphyria, and Cockayne Syndrome is paramount to disease management and to prolonging life. BS can be diagnosed through a variety of DNA sequencing methods, and genetic testing is available for high-risk populations. This review consolidates several sources on BS sequelae and aims to suggest the importance of differentiating BS from other dermatologic conditions. This paper also elucidates the recently discovered BRAFT and FANCM protein complexes that link BS and Fanconi anemia.

  9. J Wave Syndromes: A Decade of Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Liang Li; Lin Yang; Chang-Cong Cui; Chao-Feng Sun; Gan-Xin Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective:The objective was to provide a brief history of J wave syndromes and to summarize our current understanding of their molecular,ionic,cellular mechanisms,and clinical features.We will also discuss the existing debates and further direction in basic and clinical research for J wave syndromes.Data Sources:The publications on key words of"J wave syndromes","early repolarization syndrome (ERS)","Brugada syndrome (BrS)" and "ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)" were comprehensively reviewed through search of the PubMed literatures without restriction on the publication date.Study Selection:Original articles,reviews and other literatures concerning J wave syndromes,ERS,BrS and STEMI were selected.Results:J wave syndromes were firstly defined by Yan et al.in a Chinese journal a decade ago,which represent a spectrum of variable phenotypes characterized by appearance of prominent electrocardiographic J wave including ERS,BrS and ventricular fibrillation (VF) associated with hypothermia and acute STEMI.J wave syndromes can be inherited or acquired and are mechanistically linked to amplification of the transient outward current (Ito)-mediated J waves that can lead to phase 2 reentry capable of initiating VF.Conclusions:J wave syndromes are a group of newly highlighted clinical entities that share similar molecular,ionic and cellular mechanism and marked by amplified J wave on the electrocardiogram and a risk of VF.The clinical challenge ahead is to identify the patients with J wave syndromes who are at risk for sudden cardiac death and determine the alternative therapeutic strategies to reduce mortality.

  10. Medulloblastoma: Molecular Genetics and Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Raffel

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a primary brain tumor found in the cerebellum of children. The tumor occurs in association with two inherited cancer syndromes: Turcot syndrome and Gorlin syndrome. Insights into the molecular biology of the tumor have come from looking at alterations in the genes altered in these syndromes, PTC and APC, respectively. Murine models of medulloblastoma have been constructed based on these alterations. Additional murine models that, while mimicking the appearance of the human tumor, seem unrelated to the human tumor's molecular alterations have been made. In this review, the clinical picture, origin, molecular biology, murine models of medulloblastoma are discussed. Although a great deal has been discovered about this tumor, the genetic alterations responsible for tumor development in a majority of patients have yet to be described.

  11. Compartment syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aly Saber

    2014-01-01

    Body compartments bound by fascia and limited by bony backgrounds are found in the extremities, buttocks, abdomen and thoracic cavity; conditions that cause intracompartmental swelling and hypertension can lead to ischemia and limb loss.Although compartment syndromes are described in all body regions from head to toe, the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are best characterized for three key body regions: the first is extremity, the second is abdominal, and the third is thoracic compartment syndromes.Thoracic compartment syndrome usually occurs as a result of pathological accumulation of air, fluid or blood in the mediastinum and has traditionally been described in trauma.As the intracranial contents are confined within a rigid bony cage, any increase in volume within thiscompartment as a result of brain oedema or an expanding traumatic intracranial haematoma, leads to a reciprocal decrease in the volume of cerebrospinal fluid and intracranial venous blood volume.Limb compartment syndromes may present either in acute or chronic clinical forms.Intra-abdominal pressure can be measured by direct or indirect methods.While the direct methods are quite accurate, theyare impractical and not feasible for routine practice.Indirect measurement is done through inferior vena cava, gastric, rectal and urinary bladder.Indirect measurement through urinary bladder is the simplest and is considered the method of choice for intra-abdominal pressure measurement.The management of patients with intra-abdominal hypertension is based on four important principles: the first is related to the specific procedures aiming at lowering intra-abdominal pressure and the consequences of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome; the second is for general support and medical management of the critically ill patient; while the third is surgical decompression and the fourth is optimization after surgical decompression.

  12. The Membrane Protein of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Functions as a Novel Cytosolic Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern To Promote Beta Interferon Induction via a Toll-Like-Receptor-Related TRAF3-Independent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most of the intracellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs reside in either the endolysosome or the cytoplasm to sense pathogen-derived RNAs, DNAs, or synthetic analogs of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA, such as poly(I:C. However, it remains elusive whether or not a pathogen-derived protein can function as a cytosolic pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP. In this study, we demonstrate that delivering the membrane gene of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV into HEK293T, HEK293ET, and immobilized murine bone marrow-derived macrophage (J2-Mφ cells significantly upregulates beta interferon (IFN-β production. Both NF-κB and TBK1-IRF3 signaling cascades are activated by M gene products. M protein rather than M mRNA is responsible for M-mediated IFN-β induction that is preferentially associated with the activation of the Toll-like receptor (TLR adaptor proteins MyD88, TIRAP, and TICAM2 but not the RIG-I signaling cascade. Blocking the secretion of M protein by brefeldin A (BFA failed to reverse the M-mediated IFN-β induction. The antagonist of both TLR2 and TLR4 did not impede M-mediated IFN-β induction, indicating that the driving force for the activation of IFN-β production was generated from inside the cells. Inhibition of TRAF3 expression by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA did not prevent M-mediated IFN-β induction. SARS-CoV pseudovirus could induce IFN-β production in an M rather than M(V68A dependent manner, since the valine-to-alanine alteration at residue 68 in M protein markedly inhibited IFN-β production. Overall, our study indicates for the first time that a pathogen-derived protein is able to function as a cytosolic PAMP to stimulate type I interferon production by activating a noncanonical TLR signaling cascade in a TRAF3-independent manner.

  13. Prenatal diagnosis of Carpenter syndrome: looking beyond craniosynostosis and polysyndactyly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorine, Anna S; Weida, Jennifer; Hines, Karrie A; Robinson, Barrett; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo; Weaver, David D

    2014-03-01

    Carpenter syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder comprising craniosynostosis, polysyndactyly, and brachydactyly. It occurs in approximately 1 birth per million. We present a patient with Carpenter syndrome (confirmed by molecular diagnosis) who has several unique and previously unreported manifestations including a large ovarian cyst and heterotaxy with malrotation of stomach, intestine, and liver. These findings were first noted by prenatal ultrasound and may assist in prenatally diagnosing additional cases of Carpenter syndrome.

  14. Molecular physics

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Dudley

    2013-01-01

    Methods of Experimental Physics, Volume 3: Molecular Physics focuses on molecular theory, spectroscopy, resonance, molecular beams, and electric and thermodynamic properties. The manuscript first considers the origins of molecular theory, molecular physics, and molecular spectroscopy, as well as microwave spectroscopy, electronic spectra, and Raman effect. The text then ponders on diffraction methods of molecular structure determination and resonance studies. Topics include techniques of electron, neutron, and x-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic, nuclear quadropole, and electron spin reson

  15. Short Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... System & How it Works Digestive Diseases A-Z Short Bowel Syndrome What is Short Bowel Syndrome Short bowel syndrome is a group of problems ... between the stomach and large intestine. What causes Short Bowel Syndrome? The main cause of short bowel syndrome is ...

  16. MOMO syndrome associated with autism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunco, C T; Moretti-Ferreira, D; Silva, A E; Rocha, S S; Fett-Conte, A C

    2008-11-04

    This is a case report of macrosomia, obesity, macrocephaly and ocular abnormalities (MOMO syndrome) associated with autism. Studies on genetic or environmental syndromes associated with autism can provide genetic markers or uncover relevant events, and are very important for the definition of autism subgroups in future molecular research.

  17. MOMO syndrome associated with autism: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Giunco, C. T. [UNESP; D. Moretti-Ferreira; Silva, A.E.; Rocha, S. S.; Fett-Conte, A. C.

    2008-01-01

    This is a case report of macrosomia, obesity, macrocephaly and ocular abnormalities (MOMO syndrome) associated with autism. Studies on genetic or environmental syndromes associated with autism can provide genetic markers or uncover relevant events, and are very important for the definition of autism subgroups in future molecular research.

  18. Uncovering a Role for SK2 in Angelman Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia B. Lizarraga

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Angelman syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in UBE3A. Sun et al. (2015 report SK2 as a UBE3A substrate and provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that might underlie impaired neuronal function in individuals affected by Angelman syndrome.

  19. Klinefelter's综合征伴无精子症患者临床表型及分子细胞遗传学分析%Clinical feature and molecular cytogenetics analysis of Klinefelter's syndrome with azoospermic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沙艳伟; 宋岳强; 孔辉; 郭奇伟; 林津; 周裕林; 韩斌

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical phenotype and cytogenetic characteristic of Klinefelter's syndrome (KFS) with azoospermic. Methods: Clinical data of 9 Klinefelter's syndrome with azoospermic and 8 fertile males was collected, semen analysis was performed according to techniques described by the WHO current, and the chromosomal karyotypes were examined by G and Q banding technique. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to study the molecular cytogenetics of the KFS patient. 6 Y - specific sequence tagged sites which EAA and EMQN recommend were chosen to amplify AZFa, b and c regions of Y chromosome to confirm Y chromosome microdeletions. The plasma levels of follicle - stimulating hormone ( FSH ), luteinizing hormone ( LH ) and testosterone (T) were detected by chemoluminescence. Results: 9 patients all came to hospital for infertility, exhibited some clinical signs , including tallness,small Adams apple, sparse or normal body hair, small or normal penis. One patient with the Y chromosomen microdeletions exhibited soft testes, the other patients all exhibited firm testes, the volume of testes was below 4 ml, no sperm was found in the semen analysis. The plasma levels of FSH and LH were obviously higher than normal value among all 9 patients, the plasma T levels were on the low side. Chromosemal karyotyping revealed all 9 cases were 47, XXY genotype. One patient had a small Y chromosome, FISH result showed Y chromosome microdeletions and microdeletions were observed in AZFa, b and c, the microdeletions was not found in the other patienets, the total deletion rate was 11.11%. chromosomal karyotypes were normal and microdeletions had not been detected in 8 fertile males. Conclusion: KFS patients have feature of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. They may accompany with Y chromosome microdeletions, but microdeletion is not the main reason to cause azoospermic for KFS patients. But screening methods for Y chromosome microdeletions is necessary for KFS

  20. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients: genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, K.; Lee, L.; Leistritz, D.F.; Nurnberg, G.; Saha, B.; Hisama, F.M.; Eyman, D.K.; Lessel, D.; Nurnberg, P.; Li, C.; Garcia-F-Villalta, M.J.; Kets, C.M.; Schmidtke, J.; Cruz, V.T.; Akker, P.C. van den; Boak, J.; Peter, D.; Compoginis, G.; Cefle, K.; Ozturk, S.; Lopez, N.; Wessel, T. van; Poot, M.; Ippel, P.F.; Groff-Kellermann, B.; Hoehn, H.; Martin, G.M.; Kubisch, C.; Oshima, J.

    2010-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 11