WorldWideScience

Sample records for alphavirus-derived small rnas

  1. Plant Mobile Small RNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Dunoyer, Patrice; Melnyk, Charles; Molnar, Attila; Slotkin, R Keith

    2013-01-01

    In plants, RNA silencing is a fundamental regulator of gene expression, heterochromatin formation, suppression of transposable elements, and defense against viruses. The sequence specificity of these processes relies on small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules. Although the spreading of RNA silencing across the plant has been recognized for nearly two decades, only recently have sRNAs been formally demonstrated as the mobile silencing signals. Here, we discuss the various types of mobile sRNA mol...

  2. Plant Mobile Small RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunoyer, Patrice; Melnyk, Charles; Molnar, Attila; Slotkin, R. Keith

    2013-01-01

    In plants, RNA silencing is a fundamental regulator of gene expression, heterochromatin formation, suppression of transposable elements, and defense against viruses. The sequence specificity of these processes relies on small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules. Although the spreading of RNA silencing across the plant has been recognized for nearly two decades, only recently have sRNAs been formally demonstrated as the mobile silencing signals. Here, we discuss the various types of mobile sRNA molecules, their short- and long-range movement, and their function in recipient cells. PMID:23818501

  3. DASHR: database of small human noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yuk Yee; Kuksa, Pavel P; Amlie-Wolf, Alexandre; Valladares, Otto; Ungar, Lyle H; Kannan, Sampath; Gregory, Brian D; Wang, Li-San

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) are highly abundant RNAs, typically database provides searchable, unified annotation, and expression information for full sncRNA transcripts and mature RNA products derived from these larger RNAs. Here, we present the Database of small human noncoding RNAs (DASHR). DASHR contains the most comprehensive information to date on human sncRNA genes and mature sncRNA products. DASHR provides a simple user interface for researchers to view sequence and secondary structure, compare expression levels, and evidence of specific processing across all sncRNA genes and mature sncRNA products in various human tissues. DASHR annotation and expression data covers all major classes of sncRNAs including microRNAs (miRNAs), Piwi-interacting (piRNAs), small nuclear, nucleolar, cytoplasmic (sn-, sno-, scRNAs, respectively), transfer (tRNAs), and ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). Currently, DASHR (v1.0) integrates 187 smRNA high-throughput sequencing (smRNA-seq) datasets with over 2.5 billion reads and annotation data from multiple public sources. DASHR contains annotations for ∼ 48,000 human sncRNA genes and mature sncRNA products, 82% of which are expressed in one or more of the curated tissues. DASHR is available at http://lisanwanglab.org/DASHR.

  4. microRNAs-powerful repression comes from small RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) encode a novel class of small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-trancriptionally. miRNAs comprise one of the major non-coding RNA families, whose diverse bio- logical functions and unusual capacity for gene regulation have attracted enormous interests in the RNA world. Over the past 16 years, genetic, biochemical and computational approaches have greatly shaped the growth of the field, leading to the identification of thousands of miRNA genes in nearly all metazoans. The key molecular machinery for miRNA biogenesis and silencing has been identified, yet the precise biochemical and regulatory mechanisms still remain elusive. However, recent findings have shed new light on how miRNAs are generated and how they function to repress gene expression. miRNAs provide a paradigm for endogenous small RNAs that mediate gene silencing at a genome-wide level. The gene silencing mediated by these small RNAs constitutes a major component of gene regu- lation during various developmental and physiological processes. The accumulating knowledge about their biogenesis and gene silencing mechanism will add a new dimension to our understanding about the complex gene regulatory networks.

  5. microRNAs- powerful repression comes from small RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Cong; LIU YuFei; HE Lin

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) encode a novel class of small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-trancriptionally, miRNAs comprise one of the major non-coding RNA families, whose diverse bio-logical functions and unusual capacity for gene regulation have attracted enormous interests in the RNA world. Over the past 16 years, genetic, biochemical and computational approaches have greatly shaped the growth of the field, leading to the identification of thousands of miRNA genes in nearly all metazoans. The key molecular machinery for miRNA biogenesis and silencing has been identified, yet the precise biochemical and regulatory mechanisms still remain elusive. However, recent findings have shed new light on how miRNAs are generated and how they function to repress gene expression.miRNAs provide a paradigm for endogenous small RNAs that mediate gene silencing at a genome-wide level. The gene silencing mediated by these small RNAs constitutes a major component of gene regu-lation during various developmental and physiological processes. The accumulating knowledge about their biogenesis and gene silencing mechanism will add a now dimension to our understanding about the complex gene regulatory networks.

  6. Conversations between kingdoms: small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiberg, Arne; Bellinger, Marschal; Jin, Hailing

    2015-04-01

    Humans, animals, and plants are constantly under attack from pathogens and pests, resulting in severe consequences on global human health and crop production. Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) is a conserved regulatory mechanism that is involved in almost all eukaryotic cellular processes, including host immunity and pathogen virulence. Recent evidence supports the significant contribution of sRNAs and RNAi to the communication between hosts and some eukaryotic pathogens, pests, parasites, or symbiotic microorganisms. Mobile silencing signals—most likely sRNAs—are capable of translocating from the host to its interacting organism, and vice versa. In this review, we will provide an overview of sRNA communications between different kingdoms, with a primary focus on the advances in plant-pathogen interaction systems.

  7. Competition between small RNAs: a quantitative view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loinger, Adiel; Shemla, Yael; Simon, Itamar; Margalit, Hanah; Biham, Ofer

    2012-04-18

    Two major classes of small regulatory RNAs--small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNA (miRNAs)--are involved in a common RNA interference processing pathway. Small RNAs within each of these families were found to compete for limiting amounts of shared components, required for their biogenesis and processing. Association with Argonaute (Ago), the catalytic component of the RNA silencing complex, was suggested as the central mechanistic point in RNA interference machinery competition. Aiming to better understand the competition between small RNAs in the cell, we present a mathematical model and characterize a range of specific cell and experimental parameters affecting the competition. We apply the model to competition between miRNAs and study the change in the expression level of their target genes under a variety of conditions. We show quantitatively that the amount of Ago and miRNAs in the cell are dominant factors contributing greatly to the competition. Interestingly, we observe what to our knowledge is a novel type of competition that takes place when Ago is abundant, by which miRNAs with shared targets compete over them. Furthermore, we use the model to examine different interaction mechanisms that might operate in establishing the miRNA-Ago complexes, mainly those related to their stability and recycling. Our model provides a mathematical framework for future studies of competition effects in regulation mechanisms involving small RNAs.

  8. Hidden layers of human small RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaji, Hideya; Nakamura, Mari; Takahashi, Yukari;

    2008-01-01

    shows that well-characterized non-coding RNA, such as tRNA, snoRNA, and snRNA are cleaved at sites specific to the class of ncRNA. In particular, tRNA cleavage is regulated depending on tRNA type and tissue expression. We also found small RNAs mapped to genomic regions that are transcribed in both...... small RNA have focused on miRNA and/or siRNA rather than on the exploration of additional classes of RNAs. RESULTS: Here, we explored human small RNAs by unbiased sequencing of RNAs with sizes of 19-40 nt. We provide substantial evidences for the existence of independent classes of small RNAs. Our data...

  9. Small RNAs in the genus Clostridium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yili; Indurthi, Dinesh C; Jones, Shawn W; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2011-01-25

    The genus Clostridium includes major human pathogens and species important to cellulose degradation, the carbon cycle, and biotechnology. Small RNAs (sRNAs) are emerging as crucial regulatory molecules in all organisms, but they have not been investigated in clostridia. Research on sRNAs in clostridia is hindered by the absence of a systematic method to identify sRNA candidates, thus delegating clostridial sRNA research to a hit-and-miss process. Thus, we wanted to develop a method to identify potential sRNAs in the Clostridium genus to open up the field of sRNA research in clostridia. Using comparative genomics analyses combined with predictions of rho-independent terminators and promoters, we predicted sRNAs in 21 clostridial genomes: Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. beijerinckii, C. botulinum (eight strains), C. cellulolyticum, C. difficile, C. kluyveri (two strains), C. novyi, C. perfringens (three strains), C. phytofermentans, C. tetani, and C. thermocellum. Although more than one-third of predicted sRNAs have Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences, only one-sixth have a start codon downstream of SD sequences; thus, most of the predicted sRNAs are noncoding RNAs. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) and Northern analysis were employed to test the presence of a randomly chosen set of sRNAs in C. acetobutylicum and several C. botulinum strains, leading to the confirmation of a large fraction of the tested sRNAs. We identified a conserved, novel sRNA which, together with the downstream gene coding for an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene, responds to the antibiotic clindamycin. The number of predicted sRNAs correlated with the physiological function of the species (high for pathogens, low for cellulolytic, and intermediate for solventogenic), but not with 16S rRNA-based phylogeny.

  10. Transfection of small RNAs globally perturbs gene regulation by endogenous microRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Aly A; Betel, Doron; Miller, Martin L;

    2009-01-01

    Transfection of small RNAs (such as small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs)) into cells typically lowers expression of many genes. Unexpectedly, increased expression of genes also occurs. We investigated whether this upregulation results from a saturation effect--that is, competiti...

  11. Small RNAs controlling outer membrane porins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Johansen, Jesper; Rasmussen, Anders A

    2007-01-01

    Gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs has been recognized as an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism for several years. In Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella, these RNAs control stress response and translation of outer membrane proteins and therefore...... are key regulators of environmental stress. Recent work has revealed an intimate interplay between small RNA regulation of outer membrane proteins and the stress-induced sigmaE-signalling system, which has an essential role in the maintenance of the integrity of the outer membrane....

  12. High throughput sequencing of small RNAs in Potato Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the role of small RNAs (sRNAs) in gene regulation, function and development is a rapidly evolving field. sRNAs result from transcript degradation and to regulatory micro RNA (miRNA) and small inhibitory RNA (siRNA) classes involved in gene regulation. The sRNAs from potato leaves were...

  13. Small Regulatory RNAs of Rickettsia conorii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narra, Hema P.; Schroeder, Casey L. C.; Sahni, Abha; Rojas, Mark; Khanipov, Kamil; Fofanov, Yuriy; Sahni, Sanjeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs comprise critically important modulators of gene expression in bacteria, yet very little is known about their prevalence and functions in Rickettsia species. R. conorii, the causative agent of Mediterranean spotted fever, is a tick-borne pathogen that primarily infects microvascular endothelium in humans. We have determined the transcriptional landscape of R. conorii during infection of Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HMECs) by strand-specific RNA sequencing to identify 4 riboswitches, 13 trans-acting (intergenic), and 22 cis-acting (antisense) small RNAs (termed ‘Rc_sR’s). Independent expression of four novel trans-acting sRNAs (Rc_sR31, Rc_sR33, Rc_sR35, and Rc_sR42) and known bacterial sRNAs (6S, RNaseP_bact_a, ffs, and α-tmRNA) was next confirmed by Northern hybridization. Comparative analysis during infection of HMECs vis-à-vis tick AAE2 cells revealed significantly higher expression of Rc_sR35 and Rc_sR42 in HMECs, whereas Rc_sR31 and Rc_sR33 were expressed at similar levels in both cell types. We further predicted a total of 502 genes involved in all important biological processes as potential targets of Rc_sRs and validated the interaction of Rc_sR42 with cydA (cytochrome d ubiquinol oxidase subunit I). Our findings constitute the first evidence of the existence of post-transcriptional riboregulatory mechanisms in R. conorii and interactions between a novel Rc_sR and its target mRNA. PMID:27834404

  14. Horizontal Transfer of Small RNAs To and From Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu eHan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic information is traditionally thought to be transferred from parents to offspring. However, there is evidence indicating that gene transfer can also occur from microbes to higher species, such as plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. This horizontal transfer can be carried out by small RNAs (sRNAs. sRNAs have been recently reported to move across kingdoms as mobile signals, spreading silencing information toward targeted genes. sRNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, are non-coding molecules that control gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. Some sRNAs act in a cross-kingdom manner between animals and their parasites, but little is known about such sRNAs associated with plants. In this report, we provide a brief introduction to miRNAs that are transferred from plants to mammals/viruses and siRNAs that are transferred from microbes to plants. Both miRNAs and siRNAs can exert corresponding functions in the target organisms. Additionally, we provide information concerning a host-induced gene silencing (HIGS system as a potential application that utilizes the transgenic trafficking of RNA molecules to silence the genes of interacting organisms. Moreover, we lay out the controversial views regarding cross-kingdom miRNAs and call for better methodology and experimental design to confirm this unique function of miRNAs.

  15. Small RNAs break out: the molecular cell biology of mobile small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkies, Peter; Miska, Eric A

    2014-08-01

    Small RNAs that function in a non-cell autonomous manner are becoming increasingly recognized as regulatory molecules with the potential to transmit information between cells, organisms and species. In plants and nematodes, small RNA mobility can be genetically dissected to provide information about the nature of the mobile RNA species, their distribution in the organism and inside cells, as well as the cellular machinery required for mobility, including channel proteins and cellular trafficking factors. Mobile RNAs function in antiviral defence, cell signalling and gene expression regulation, and might also mediate transgenerational epigenetic inheritance.

  16. The mitochondrial genome encodes abundant small noncoding RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seungil Ro; Hsiu-Yen Ma; Chanjae Park; Nicole Ortogero; Rui Song; Grant W Hennig; Huili Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs identified thus far are all encoded by the nuclear genome.Here,we report that the murine and human mitochondriai genomes encode thousands of small noncoding RNAs,which are predominantly derived from the sense transcripts of the mitochondrial genes (host genes),and we termed these small RNAs mitochondrial genome-encoded small RNAs (mitosRNAs).DICER inactivation affected,but did not completely abolish mitosRNA production.MitosRNAs appear to be products of currently unidentified mitochondrial ribonucleases.Overexpression of mitosRNAs enhanced expression levels of their host genes in vitro,and dysregulated mitosRNA expression was generally associated with aberrant mitochondrial gene expression in vivo.Our data demonstrate that in addition to 37 known mitochondrial genes,the mammalian mitochondrial genome also encodes abundant mitosRNAs,which may play an important regulatory role in the control of mitochondrial gene expression in the cell.

  17. Identification of Bacterial Small RNAs by RNA Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Lozano, María; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molin, Søren;

    2014-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria are known to modulate gene expression and control a variety of processes including metabolic reactions, stress responses, and pathogenesis in response to environmental signals. A method to identify bacterial sRNAs on a genome-wide scale based on RNA seque...

  18. The biogenesis and function of small RNAs in C. elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tops, B.B.J.

    2007-01-01

    RNAi is the process by which double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) induces sequence-specific mRNA degradation. DsRNA is diced into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of ~21-23 nt by a complex containing the RNaseIII enzyme DICER. The mature siRNAs are subsequently bound by Argonaute proteins and incorporated int

  19. The role of RNases in the regulation of small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Dos Santos, Ricardo F; Silva, Inês J; Pobre, Vânia; Domingues, Susana; Andrade, José M; Viegas, Sandra C; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2014-04-01

    Ribonucleases (RNases) are key factors in the control of biological processes, since they modulate the processing, degradation and quality control of RNAs. This review gives many illustrative examples of the role of RNases in the regulation of small RNAs (sRNAs). RNase E and PNPase have been shown to degrade the free pool of sRNAs. RNase E can also be recruited to cleave mRNAs when they are interacting with sRNAs. RNase III cleaves double-stranded structures, and can cut both the sRNA and its RNA target when they are hybridized. Overall, ribonucleases act as conductors in the control of sRNAs. Therefore, it is very important to further understand their role in the post-transcriptional control of gene expression.

  20. Small RNAs as potential platelet therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Leonard C; Bray, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 21-23 nucleotide RNAs that regulate more than 60% of mammalian protein coding genes. miRNAs play critical roles in hematopoiesis and megakaryocyte function and development. Platelets, in addition to possessing functional miRNA processing machinery, have miRNA levels that have been correlated with platelet reactivity, and these miRNAs have been shown to target mRNAs that encode proteins that alter platelet function. There are potential uses of platelet miRNA as biomarkers and therapeutic agents. Due to the ability of platelets to release miRNA-containing microparticles at sites of activation, including angiogenic regions, tumors, and atherosclerotic plaques, there is the possibility of engineering platelets to deliver miRNA-based therapies to these sites. Cellpreferential expression of miRNAs could be exploited to restrict transgene expression in hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy to the desired lineage, including megakaryocytes and platelets. Finally, manipulation of gene expression in stored platelets may allow more effective platelet storage. Although much work remains to be done, there is great potential in miRNA-based platelet therapies.

  1. Argonaute and Argonaute-Bound Small RNAs in Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Zhai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Small RNAs are essential for a variety of cellular functions. Argonaute (AGO proteins are associated with all of the different classes of small RNAs, and are indispensable in small RNA-mediated regulatory pathways. AGO proteins have been identified in various types of stem cells in diverse species from plants and animals. This review article highlights recent progress on how AGO proteins and AGO-bound small RNAs regulate the self-renewal and differentiation of distinct stem cell types, including pluripotent, germline, somatic, and cancer stem cells.

  2. Diversity of small RNAs expressed in Pseudomonas species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez-Lozano, Mara; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molina-Santiago, Carlos;

    2015-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revealed several hundreds of previously undetected small RNAs (sRNAs) in all bacterial species investigated, including strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas syringae. Nonetheless, only little is known about the extent of conservation of...

  3. The emerging world of small silencing RNAs in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atayde, Vanessa D; Tschudi, Christian; Ullu, Elisabetta

    2011-07-01

    A new RNA world has emerged in the past 10 years with the discovery of a plethora of 20- to 30-nucleotide long small RNAs that are involved in various gene silencing mechanisms. These small RNAs have considerably changed our view of the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic organisms, with a major shift towards epigenetic and post-transcriptional mechanisms. In this article, we focus on the striking diversity of small silencing RNAs that have been identified in several protozoan parasites and their potential biological role.

  4. Transposable-element associated small RNAs in Bombyx mori genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimei Cai

    Full Text Available Small RNAs are a group of regulatory RNA molecules that control gene expression at transcriptional or post-transcriptional levels among eukaryotes. The silkworm, Bombyx mori L., genome harbors abundant repetitive sequences derived from families of retrotransposons and transposons, which together constitute almost half of the genome space and provide ample resource for biogenesis of the three major small RNA families. We systematically discovered transposable-element (TE-associated small RNAs in B. mori genome based on a deep RNA-sequencing strategy and the effort yielded 182, 788 and 4,990 TE-associated small RNAs in the miRNA, siRNA and piRNA species, respectively. Our analysis suggested that the three small RNA species preferentially associate with different TEs to create sequence and functional diversity, and we also show evidence that a Bombyx non-LTR retrotransposon, bm1645, alone contributes to the generation of TE-associated small RNAs in a very significant way. The fact that bm1645-associated small RNAs partially overlap with each other implies a possibility that this element may be modulated by different mechanisms to generate different products with diverse functions. Taken together, these discoveries expand the small RNA pool in B. mori genome and lead to new knowledge on the diversity and functional significance of TE-associated small RNAs.

  5. Regulatory Role of Small Nucleolar RNAs in Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigory A. Stepanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs are appreciable players in gene expression regulation in human cells. The canonical function of box C/D and box H/ACA snoRNAs is posttranscriptional modification of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs, namely, 2′-O-methylation and pseudouridylation, respectively. A series of independent studies demonstrated that snoRNAs, as well as other noncoding RNAs, serve as the source of various short regulatory RNAs. Some snoRNAs and their fragments can also participate in the regulation of alternative splicing and posttranscriptional modification of mRNA. Alterations in snoRNA expression in human cells can affect numerous vital cellular processes. SnoRNA level in human cells, blood serum, and plasma presents a promising target for diagnostics and treatment of human pathologies. Here we discuss the relation between snoRNAs and oncological, neurodegenerative, and viral diseases and also describe changes in snoRNA level in response to artificial stress and some drugs.

  6. RNA sequencing uncovers antisense RNAs and novel small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rhun, Anaïs; Beer, Yan Yan; Reimegård, Johan; Chylinski, Krzysztof; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild to life-threatening infections. During the infectious process, the temporal and spatial expression of pathogenicity factors is tightly controlled by a complex network of protein and RNA regulators acting in response to various environmental signals. Here, we focus on the class of small RNA regulators (sRNAs) and present the first complete analysis of sRNA sequencing data in S. pyogenes. In the SF370 clinical isolate (M1 serotype), we identified 197 and 428 putative regulatory RNAs by visual inspection and bioinformatics screening of the sequencing data, respectively. Only 35 from the 197 candidates identified by visual screening were assigned a predicted function (T-boxes, ribosomal protein leaders, characterized riboswitches or sRNAs), indicating how little is known about sRNA regulation in S. pyogenes. By comparing our list of predicted sRNAs with previous S. pyogenes sRNA screens using bioinformatics or microarrays, 92 novel sRNAs were revealed, including antisense RNAs that are for the first time shown to be expressed in this pathogen. We experimentally validated the expression of 30 novel sRNAs and antisense RNAs. We show that the expression profile of 9 sRNAs including 2 predicted regulatory elements is affected by the endoribonucleases RNase III and/or RNase Y, highlighting the critical role of these enzymes in sRNA regulation.

  7. Small RNAs tell big stories in Whistler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seila, Amy C; Sharp, Phillip A

    2008-06-01

    The Keystone Symposium on RNAi, microRNA and non-coding RNA convened on March 25-30 at Whistler Resort in Whistler, British Columbia, Canada. Researchers with backgrounds in different biochemical disciplines came together to exchange ideas on short RNAs and their roles in a host of biological processes.

  8. Delivery of Small Interfering RNAs to Cells via Exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Jessica; Statello, Luisa; Skogberg, Gabriel; Telemo, Esbjörn; Valadi, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane bound vesicles between 30 and 100 nm in diameter of endocytic origin that are secreted into the extracellular environment by many different cell types. Exosomes play a role in intercellular communication by transferring proteins, lipids, and RNAs to recipient cells.Exosomes from human cells could be used as vectors to provide cells with therapeutic RNAs. Here we describe how exogenous small interfering RNAs may successfully be introduced into various kinds of human exosomes using electroporation and subsequently delivered to recipient cells. Methods used to confirm the presence of siRNA inside exosomes and cells are presented, such as flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and Northern blot.

  9. Mammalian small nucleolar RNAs are mobile genetic elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel J Weber

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs of the H/ACA box and C/D box categories guide the pseudouridylation and the 2'-O-ribose methylation of ribosomal RNAs by forming short duplexes with their target. Similarly, small Cajal body-specific RNAs (scaRNAs guide modifications of spliceosomal RNAs. The vast majority of vertebrate sno/scaRNAs are located in introns of genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II and processed by exonucleolytic trimming after splicing. A bioinformatic search for orthologues of human sno/scaRNAs in sequenced mammalian genomes reveals the presence of species- or lineage-specific sno/scaRNA retroposons (sno/scaRTs characterized by an A-rich tail and an approximately 14-bp target site duplication that corresponds to their insertion site, as determined by interspecific genomic alignments. Three classes of snoRTs are defined based on the extent of intron and exon sequences from the snoRNA parental host gene they contain. SnoRTs frequently insert in gene introns in the sense orientation at genomic hot spots shared with other genetic mobile elements. Previously characterized human snoRNAs are encoded in retroposons whose parental copies can be identified by phylogenic analysis, showing that snoRTs can be faithfully processed. These results identify snoRNAs as a new family of mobile genetic elements. The insertion of new snoRNA copies might constitute a safeguard mechanism by which the biological activity of snoRNAs is maintained in spite of the risk of mutations in the parental copy. I furthermore propose that retroposition followed by genetic drift is a mechanism that increased snoRNA diversity during vertebrate evolution to eventually acquire new RNA-modification functions.

  10. Big impacts by small RNAs in plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuck, George; Candela, Héctor; Hake, Sarah

    2009-02-01

    The identification and study of small RNAs, including microRNAs and trans-acting small interfering RNAs, have added a layer of complexity to the many pathways that regulate plant development. These molecules, which function as negative regulators of gene expression, are now known to have greatly expanded roles in a variety of developmental processes affecting all major plant structures, including meristems, leaves, roots, and inflorescences. Mutants with specific developmental phenotypes have also advanced our knowledge of the biogenesis and mode of action of these diverse small RNAs. In addition, previous models on the cell autonomy of microRNAs may have to be revised as more data accumulate supporting their long distance transport. As many of these small RNAs appear to be conserved across different species, knowledge gained from one species is expected to have general application. However, a few surprising differences in small RNA function seem to exist between monocots and dicots regarding meristem initiation and sex determination. Integrating these unique functions into the overall scheme for plant growth will give a more complete picture of how they have evolved as unique developmental systems.

  11. The function of small RNAs in plant biotic stress response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Huang; Meiling Yang; Xiaoming Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) play essential roles in plants upon biotic stress. Plants utilize RNA silencing machinery to facilitate pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity and effector-triggered immunity to defend against pathogen attack or to facilitate defense against insect herbivores. Pathogens, on the other hand, are also able to generate effectors and sRNAs to counter the host immune response. The arms race between plants and pathogens/insect herbivores has triggered the evolution of sRNAs, RNA silencing machinery and pathogen effectors. A great number of studies have been performed to investigate the roles of sRNAs in plant defense, bringing in the opportunity to utilize sRNAs in plant protection. Transgenic plants with pathogen-derived resistance ability or trans-generational defense have been generated, which show promising potential as solutions for pathogen/insect herbi-vore problems in the field. Here we summarize the recent progress on the function of sRNAs in response to biotic stress, mainly in plant-pathogen/insect herbivore interaction, and the application of sRNAs in disease and insect herbivore control.

  12. MicroRNAs and other small RNAs enriched in the Arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA polymerase-2 mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng; Kulkarni, Karthik; Souret, Frédéric F.; MuthuValliappan, Ramesh; Tej, Shivakundan Singh; Poethig, R. Scott; Henderson, Ian R.; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Wang, Wenzhong; Green, Pamela J.; Meyers, Blake C.

    2006-01-01

    The Arabidopsis genome contains a highly complex and abundant population of small RNAs, and many of the endogenous siRNAs are dependent on RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase 2 (RDR2) for their biogenesis. By analyzing an rdr2 loss-of-function mutant using two different parallel sequencing technologies, MPSS and 454, we characterized the complement of miRNAs expressed in Arabidopsis inflorescence to considerable depth. Nearly all known miRNAs were enriched in this mutant and we identified 13 new miRNAs, all of which were relatively low abundance and constitute new families. Trans-acting siRNAs (ta-siRNAs) were even more highly enriched. Computational and gel blot analyses suggested that the minimal number of miRNAs in Arabidopsis is ∼155. The size profile of small RNAs in rdr2 reflected enrichment of 21-nt miRNAs and other classes of siRNAs like ta-siRNAs, and a significant reduction in 24-nt heterochromatic siRNAs. Other classes of small RNAs were found to be RDR2-independent, particularly those derived from long inverted repeats and a subset of tandem repeats. The small RNA populations in other Arabidopsis small RNA biogenesis mutants were also examined; a dcl2/3/4 triple mutant showed a similar pattern to rdr2, whereas dcl1–7 and rdr6 showed reductions in miRNAs and ta-siRNAs consistent with their activities in the biogenesis of these types of small RNAs. Deep sequencing of mutants provides a genetic approach for the dissection and characterization of diverse small RNA populations and the identification of low abundance miRNAs. PMID:16954541

  13. Molecular Basis for the Immunostimulatory Potency of Small Interfering RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouldy Sioud

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs represent a new class of antigene agents, which has emerged as a powerful tool for functional genomics and might serve as a potent therapeutic approach. However, several studies have showed that they could trigger several bystander effects, including immune activation and inhibition of unintended target genes. Although activation of innate immunity by siRNAs might be beneficial for therapy in some instances, uncontrolled activation can be toxic, and is therefore a major challenging problem. Interestingly, replacement of uridines in siRNA sequences with their 2′-modified counterparts abrogated siRNA bystander effects. Here we highlight these important findings that are expected to facilitate the rational design of siRNAs that avoid the induction of bystander effects.

  14. deepBase v2.0: identification, expression, evolution and function of small RNAs, LncRNAs and circular RNAs from deep-sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ling-Ling; Li, Jun-Hao; Wu, Jie; Sun, Wen-Ju; Liu, Shun; Wang, Ze-Lin; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2016-01-04

    Small non-coding RNAs (e.g. miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (e.g. lincRNAs and circRNAs) are emerging as key regulators of various cellular processes. However, only a very small fraction of these enigmatic RNAs have been well functionally characterized. In this study, we describe deepBase v2.0 (http://biocenter.sysu.edu.cn/deepBase/), an updated platform, to decode evolution, expression patterns and functions of diverse ncRNAs across 19 species. deepBase v2.0 has been updated to provide the most comprehensive collection of ncRNA-derived small RNAs generated from 588 sRNA-Seq datasets. Moreover, we developed a pipeline named lncSeeker to identify 176 680 high-confidence lncRNAs from 14 species. Temporal and spatial expression patterns of various ncRNAs were profiled. We identified approximately 24 280 primate-specific, 5193 rodent-specific lncRNAs, and 55 highly conserved lncRNA orthologs between human and zebrafish. We annotated 14 867 human circRNAs, 1260 of which are orthologous to mouse circRNAs. By combining expression profiles and functional genomic annotations, we developed lncFunction web-server to predict the function of lncRNAs based on protein-lncRNA co-expression networks. This study is expected to provide considerable resources to facilitate future experimental studies and to uncover ncRNA functions.

  15. Silencing by small RNAs is linked to endosomal trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Sik; Pressman, Sigal; Andress, Arlise P; Kim, Kevin; White, Jamie L; Cassidy, Justin J; Li, Xin; Lubell, Kim; Lim, Do Hwan; Cho, Ik Sang; Nakahara, Kenji; Preall, Jonathan B; Bellare, Priya; Sontheimer, Erik J; Carthew, Richard W

    2009-09-01

    Small RNAs direct RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) to regulate stability and translation of mRNAs. RISCs associated with target mRNAs often accumulate in discrete cytoplasmic foci known as GW-bodies. However, RISC proteins can associate with membrane compartments such as the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that GW-bodies are associated with late endosomes (multivesicular bodies, MVBs). Blocking the maturation of MVBs into lysosomes by loss of the tethering factor HPS4 (ref. 5) enhances short interfering RNA (siRNA)- and micro RNA (miRNA)-mediated silencing in Drosophila melanogaster and humans. It also triggers over-accumulation of GW-bodies. Blocking MVB formation by ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) depletion results in impaired miRNA silencing and loss of GW-bodies. These results indicate that active RISCs are physically and functionally coupled to MVBs. We further show that MVBs promote the competence of RISCs in loading small RNAs. We suggest that the recycling of RISCs is promoted by MVBs, resulting in RISCs more effectively engaging with small RNA effectors and possibly target RNAs. It may provide a means to enhance the dynamics of RNA silencing in the cytoplasm.

  16. Genome-wide analyses of small noncoding RNAs in streptococci

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    Nadja ePatenge

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococci represent a diverse group of Gram-positive bacteria, which colonize a wide range of hosts among animals and humans. Streptococcal species occur as commensal as well as pathogenic organisms. Many of the pathogenic species can cause severe, invasive infections in their hosts leading to a high morbidity and mortality. The consequence is a tremendous suffering on the part of men and livestock besides the significant financial burden in the agricultural and healthcare sectors. An environmentally stimulated and tightly controlled expression of virulence factor genes is of fundamental importance for streptococcal pathogenicity. Bacterial small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs modulate the expression of genes involved in stress response, sugar metabolism, surface composition, and other properties that are related to bacterial virulence. Even though the regulatory character is shared by this class of RNAs, variation on the molecular level results in a high diversity of functional mechanisms. The knowledge about the role of sRNAs in streptococci is still limited, but in recent years, genome-wide screens for sRNAs have been conducted in an increasing number of species. Bioinformatics prediction approaches have been employed as well as expression analyses by classical array techniques or next generation sequencing. This review will give an overview of whole genome screens for sRNAs in streptococci with a focus on describing the different methods and comparing their outcome considering sRNA conservation among species, functional similarities, and relevance for streptococcal infection.

  17. Sequence variation and selection of small RNAs in domesticated rice

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    Cai Daguang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endogenous non-coding small RNAs (21-24 nt play an important role in post-transcriptional gene regulation in plants. Domestication selection is the most important evolutionary force in shaping crop genomes. The extent of polymorphism at small RNA loci in domesticated rice and whether small RNA loci are targets of domestication selection have not yet been determined. Results A polymorphism survey of 94 small RNA loci (88 MIRNAs, four TAS3 loci and two miRNA-like long hairpins was conducted in domesticated rice, generating 2 Mb of sequence data. Many mutations (substitution or insertion/deletion were observed at small RNA loci in domesticated rice, e.g. 12 mutation sites were observed in the mature miRNA sequences of 11 MIRNAs (12.5% of the investigated MIRNAs. Several small RNA loci showed significant signals for positive selection and/or potential domestication selection. Conclusions Sequence variation at miRNAs and other small RNAs is higher than expected in domesticated rice. Like protein-coding genes, non-coding small RNA loci could be targets of domestication selection and play an important role in rice domestication and improvement.

  18. Deep sequencing of Brachypodium small RNAs at the global genome level identifies microRNAs involved in cold stress response

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    Chong Kang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous small RNAs having large-scale regulatory effects on plant development and stress responses. Extensive studies of miRNAs have only been performed in a few model plants. Although miRNAs are proved to be involved in plant cold stress responses, little is known for winter-habit monocots. Brachypodium distachyon, with close evolutionary relationship to cool-season cereals, has recently emerged as a novel model plant. There are few reports of Brachypodium miRNAs. Results High-throughput sequencing and whole-genome-wide data mining led to the identification of 27 conserved miRNAs, as well as 129 predicted miRNAs in Brachypodium. For multiple-member conserved miRNA families, their sizes in Brachypodium were much smaller than those in rice and Populus. The genome organization of miR395 family in Brachypodium was quite different from that in rice. The expression of 3 conserved miRNAs and 25 predicted miRNAs showed significant changes in response to cold stress. Among these miRNAs, some were cold-induced and some were cold-suppressed, but all the conserved miRNAs were up-regulated under cold stress condition. Conclusion Our results suggest that Brachypodium miRNAs are composed of a set of conserved miRNAs and a large proportion of non-conserved miRNAs with low expression levels. Both kinds of miRNAs were involved in cold stress response, but all the conserved miRNAs were up-regulated, implying an important role for cold-induced miRNAs. The different size and genome organization of miRNA families in Brachypodium and rice suggest that the frequency of duplication events or the selection pressure on duplicated miRNAs are different between these two closely related plant species.

  19. Phloem small RNAs, nutrient stress responses, and systemic mobility

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    Kehr Julia

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nutrient availabilities and needs have to be tightly coordinated between organs to ensure a balance between uptake and consumption for metabolism, growth, and defense reactions. Since plants often have to grow in environments with sub-optimal nutrient availability, a fine tuning is vital. To achieve this, information has to flow cell-to-cell and over long-distance via xylem and phloem. Recently, specific miRNAs emerged as a new type of regulating molecules during stress and nutrient deficiency responses, and miR399 was suggested to be a phloem-mobile long-distance signal involved in the phosphate starvation response. Results We used miRNA microarrays containing all known plant miRNAs and a set of unknown small (s RNAs earlier cloned from Brassica phloem sap 1, to comprehensively analyze the phloem response to nutrient deficiency by removing sulfate, copper or iron, respectively, from the growth medium. We show that phloem sap contains a specific set of sRNAs that is distinct from leaves and roots, and that the phloem also responds specifically to stress. Upon S and Cu deficiencies phloem sap reacts with an increase of the same miRNAs that were earlier characterized in other tissues, while no clear positive response to -Fe was observed. However, -Fe led to a reduction of Cu- and P-responsive miRNAs. We further demonstrate that under nutrient starvation miR399 and miR395 can be translocated through graft unions from wild type scions to rootstocks of the miRNA processing hen1-1 mutant. In contrast, miR171 was not transported. Translocation of miR395 led to a down-regulation of one of its targets in rootstocks, suggesting that this transport is of functional relevance, and that miR395, in addition to the well characterized miR399, could potentially act as a long-distance information transmitter. Conclusions Phloem sap contains a specific set of sRNAs, of which some specifically accumulate in response to nutrient deprivation. From

  20. Transposable elements and small RNAs: Genomic fuel for species diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Federico G; McGuire, Liam P; Counterman, Brian A; Ray, David A

    2015-01-01

    While transposable elements (TE) have long been suspected of involvement in species diversification, identifying specific roles has been difficult. We recently found evidence of TE-derived regulatory RNAs in a species-rich family of bats. The TE-derived small RNAs are temporally associated with the burst of species diversification, suggesting that they may have been involved in the processes that led to the diversification. In this commentary, we expand on the ideas that were briefly touched upon in that manuscript. Specifically, we suggest avenues of research that may help to identify the roles that TEs may play in perturbing regulatory pathways. Such research endeavors may serve to inform evolutionary biologists of the ways that TEs have influenced the genomic and taxonomic diversity around us.

  1. In plants, decapping prevents RDR6-dependent production of small interfering RNAs from endogenous mRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Alba, Angel Emilio; Moreno, Ana Beatriz; Gabriel, Marc; Mallory, Allison C.; Christ, Aurélie; Bounon, Rémi; Balzergue, Sandrine; Aubourg, Sebastien; Gautheret, Daniel; Crespi, Martin D.; Vaucheret, Hervé; Maizel, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic degradation of endogenous RNAs is an integral part of RNA quality control (RQC) and often relies on the removal of the 5′ cap structure and their subsequent 5′ to 3′ degradation in cytoplasmic processing (P-)bodies. In parallel, many eukaryotes degrade exogenous and selected endogenous RNAs through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). In plants, PTGS depends on small interfering (si)RNAs produced after the conversion of single-stranded RNAs to double-stranded RNAs by the cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) in cytoplasmic siRNA-bodies. PTGS and RQC compete for transgene-derived RNAs, but it is unknown whether this competition also occurs for endogenous transcripts. We show that the lethality of decapping mutants is suppressed by impairing RDR6 activity. We establish that upon decapping impairment hundreds of endogenous mRNAs give rise to a new class of rqc-siRNAs, that over-accumulate when RQC processes are impaired, a subset of which depending on RDR6 for their production. We observe that P- and siRNA-bodies often are dynamically juxtaposed, potentially allowing for cross-talk of the two machineries. Our results suggest that the decapping of endogenous RNA limits their entry into the PTGS pathway. We anticipate that the rqc-siRNAs identified in decapping mutants represent a subset of a larger ensemble of endogenous siRNAs. PMID:25694514

  2. Identification and Characterization of Small Noncoding RNAs in Genome Sequences of the Edible Fungus Pleurotus ostreatus

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    Jibin Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs have been identified in many fungi. However, no genome-scale identification of ncRNAs has been inventoried for basidiomycetes. In this research, we detected 254 small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs in a genome assembly of an isolate (CCEF00389 of Pleurotus ostreatus, which is a widely cultivated edible basidiomycetous fungus worldwide. The identified sncRNAs include snRNAs, snoRNAs, tRNAs, and miRNAs. SnRNA U1 was not found in CCEF00389 genome assembly and some other basidiomycetous genomes by BLASTn. This implies that if snRNA U1 of basidiomycetes exists, it has a sequence that varies significantly from other organisms. By analyzing the distribution of sncRNA loci, we found that snRNAs and most tRNAs (88.6% were located in pseudo-UTR regions, while miRNAs are commonly found in introns. To analyze the evolutionary conservation of the sncRNAs in P. ostreatus, we aligned all 254 sncRNAs to the genome assemblies of some other Agaricomycotina fungi. The results suggest that most sncRNAs (77.56% were highly conserved in P. ostreatus, and 20% were conserved in Agaricomycotina fungi. These findings indicate that most sncRNAs of P. ostreatus were not conserved across Agaricomycotina fungi.

  3. Identification and Characterization of Small Noncoding RNAs in Genome Sequences of the Edible Fungus Pleurotus ostreatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mengran; Hsiang, Tom; Feng, Xiaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been identified in many fungi. However, no genome-scale identification of ncRNAs has been inventoried for basidiomycetes. In this research, we detected 254 small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) in a genome assembly of an isolate (CCEF00389) of Pleurotus ostreatus, which is a widely cultivated edible basidiomycetous fungus worldwide. The identified sncRNAs include snRNAs, snoRNAs, tRNAs, and miRNAs. SnRNA U1 was not found in CCEF00389 genome assembly and some other basidiomycetous genomes by BLASTn. This implies that if snRNA U1 of basidiomycetes exists, it has a sequence that varies significantly from other organisms. By analyzing the distribution of sncRNA loci, we found that snRNAs and most tRNAs (88.6%) were located in pseudo-UTR regions, while miRNAs are commonly found in introns. To analyze the evolutionary conservation of the sncRNAs in P. ostreatus, we aligned all 254 sncRNAs to the genome assemblies of some other Agaricomycotina fungi. The results suggest that most sncRNAs (77.56%) were highly conserved in P. ostreatus, and 20% were conserved in Agaricomycotina fungi. These findings indicate that most sncRNAs of P. ostreatus were not conserved across Agaricomycotina fungi. PMID:27703969

  4. Exploration of small RNA-seq data for small non-coding RNAs in Human Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, Srinivas V; Tiwari, Amit K; Hazard, Sprague W; Mahajan, Milind; Ravnic, Dino J

    2017-01-01

    Background: Improved healthcare and recent breakthroughs in technology have substantially reduced cancer mortality rates worldwide. Recent advancements in next-generation sequencing (NGS) have allowed genomic analysis of the human transcriptome. Now, using NGS we can further look into small non-coding regions of RNAs (sncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs), Piwi-interacting-RNAs (piRNAs), long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs (sn/snoRNAs) among others. Recent studies looking at sncRNAs indicate their role in important biological processes such as cancer progression and predict their role as biomarkers for disease diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. Results: In the present study, we data mined publically available small RNA sequencing data from colorectal tissue samples of eight matched patients (benign, tumor, and metastasis) and remapped the data for various small RNA annotations. We identified aberrant expression of 13 miRNAs in tumor and metastasis specimens [tumor vs benign group (19 miRNAs) and metastasis vs benign group (38 miRNAs)] of which five were upregulated, and eight were downregulated, during disease progression. Pathway analysis of aberrantly expressed miRNAs showed that the majority of miRNAs involved in colon cancer were also involved in other cancers. Analysis of piRNAs revealed six to be over-expressed in the tumor vs benign cohort and 24 in the metastasis vs benign group. Only two piRNAs were shared between the two cohorts. Examining other types of small RNAs [sn/snoRNAs, mt_rRNA, miscRNA, nonsense mediated decay (NMD), and rRNAs] identified 15 sncRNAs in the tumor vs benign group and 104 in the metastasis vs benign group, with only four others being commonly expressed. Conclusion: In summary, our comprehensive analysis on publicly available small RNA-seq data identified multiple differentially expressed sncRNAs during colorectal cancer progression at different stages compared to normal colon tissue. We speculate that

  5. Small RNA profiling of Xenopus embryos reveals novel miRNAs and a new class of small RNAs derived from intronic transposable elements.

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    Harding, Joanne L; Horswell, Stuart; Heliot, Claire; Armisen, Javier; Zimmerman, Lyle B; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Miska, Eric A; Hill, Caroline S

    2014-01-01

    Small RNA control of gene expression is critical for developmental processes in vertebrate embryos. To determine the dynamics of small RNA expression and to uncover novel small RNAs in the early vertebrate embryo, we performed high-throughput sequencing of all small RNAs in Xenopus tropicalis embryos at three developmental time points and in dissected halves of gastrula embryos. This analysis allowed us to identify novel microRNAs and we show that microRNA expression is highly dynamic and spatially localized in early embryos. In addition, we have developed a microRNA prediction pipeline and demonstrate that it has the power to predict new miRNAs that are experimentally detectable in frogs, mice, and humans. By combining the small RNA sequencing with mRNA profiling at the different developmental stages, we identify a new class of small noncoding RNAs that we name siteRNAs, which align in clusters to introns of protein-coding genes. We show that siteRNAs are derived from remnants of transposable elements present in the introns. We find that genes containing clusters of siteRNAs are transcriptionally repressed as compared with all genes. Furthermore, we show that this is true for individual genes containing siteRNA clusters, and that these genes are enriched in specific repressive histone modifications. Our data thus suggest a new mechanism of siteRNA-mediated gene silencing in vertebrates, and provide an example of how mobile elements can affect gene regulation.

  6. Expression Analysis of miRNAs and Highly-expressed Small RNAs in Two Rice Subspecies and their Reciprocal Hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fangfang Chen; Guangming He; Hang He; Wei Chen; Xiaopeng Zhu; Manzhong Liang; Liangbi Chen; Xing Wang Deng

    2010-01-01

    Heterosis,or hybrid vigor,is the phenomenon whereby progeny of two inbred lines exhibit superior agronomic performance compared with either parent.We analyzed the expression of miRNAs and highly expressed small RNAs(defined according to Solexa sequencing results)in two rice(Oryza sativa)subspecies(japonica cv.Nipponbare and indica cv.93-11)and their reciprocal hybrids using microarrays.We found that of all the 1141 small RNAs tested,140(12%,140 of 1141)and 157(13%,157 of 1141)were identified being significantly differentially expressed in two reciprocal hybrids,respectively.All possible modes of action,including additive,high- and low- parent,above high- and below low-parent modes were exhibited.Both F1 hybrids showed non-additive expression patterns,with downregulation predominating.Interestingly,15 miRNAs displayed stark opposite expression trends relative to midparent in reciprocal hybrids.Computational prediction of targets of differentially expressed miRNAs showed that they participated in multifaceted developmental pathways,and were not distinguishable from the targets of non-differentially expressed miRNAs.Together,our findings reveal that small RNAs play roles in heterosis and add a new layer in the understanding and exploitation of molecular mechanisms of heterosis.

  7. Small Cajal body-specific RNAs of Drosophila function in the absence of Cajal bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gall, Joseph G

    2009-12-01

    During their biogenesis small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) undergo multiple covalent modifications that require guide RNAs to direct methylase and pseudouridylase enzymes to the appropriate nucleotides. Because of their localization in the nuclear Cajal body (CB), these guide RNAs are known as small CB-specific RNAs (scaRNAs). Using a fluorescent primer extension technique, we mapped the modified nucleotides in Drosophila U1, U2, U4, and U5 snRNAs. By fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) we showed that seven Drosophila scaRNAs are concentrated in easily detectable CBs. We used two assays based on Xenopus oocyte nuclei to demonstrate that three of these Drosophila scaRNAs do, in fact, function as guide RNAs. In flies null for the CB marker protein coilin, CBs are absent and there are no localized FISH signals for the scaRNAs. Nevertheless, biochemical experiments show that scaRNAs are present at normal levels and snRNAs are properly modified. Our experiments demonstrate that several scaRNAs are concentrated as expected in the CBs of wild-type Drosophila, but they function equally well in the nucleoplasm of mutant flies that lack CBs. We propose that the snRNA modification machinery is not limited to CBs, but is dispersed throughout the nucleoplasm of cells in general.

  8. Cloning of the quail PIWI gene and characterization of PIWI binding to small RNAs.

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    Rong Chen

    Full Text Available The PIWI protein regulates gene expression at the epigenetic and post-transcriptional level with a variety of endogenous small non-coding RNAs. In poultry, the biological function of the PIWI protein and PIWI binding to small RNAs had not been determined. The present study cloned and analyzed the sequences of the PIWIL1 protein. We also characterized PIWIL1 binding to small RNAs from adult quail testis, where the PIWIL1 protein is specifically expressed. Small RNAs showed a strong peak at 24-27 nt in the testicular RNA library, mapped primarily to repeat sequences and were similar to rasiRNAs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs were abundant in the ovarian RNA library at a peak of 22 nt.

  9. Roles of small RNAs in soybean defense against Phytophthora sojae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, James; Gao, Lei; Yang, Yang; Zhai, Jixian; Arikit, Siwaret; Yu, Yu; Duan, Shuyi; Chan, Vicky; Xiong, Qin; Yan, Jun; Li, Shengben; Liu, Renyi; Wang, Yuanchao; Tang, Guiliang; Meyers, Blake C; Chen, Xuemei; Ma, Wenbo

    2014-09-01

    The genus Phytophthora consists of many notorious pathogens of crops and forestry trees. At present, battling Phytophthora diseases is challenging due to a lack of understanding of their pathogenesis. We investigated the role of small RNAs in regulating soybean defense in response to infection by Phytophthora sojae, the second most destructive pathogen of soybean. Small RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), are universal regulators that repress target gene expression in eukaryotes. We identified known and novel small RNAs that differentially accumulated during P. sojae infection in soybean roots. Among them, miR393 and miR166 were induced by heat-inactivated P. sojae hyphae, indicating that they may be involved in soybean basal defense. Indeed, knocking down the level of mature miR393 led to enhanced susceptibility of soybean to P. sojae; furthermore, the expression of isoflavonoid biosynthetic genes was drastically reduced in miR393 knockdown roots. These data suggest that miR393 promotes soybean defense against P. sojae. In addition to miRNAs, P. sojae infection also resulted in increased accumulation of phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs) that are predominantly generated from canonical resistance genes encoding nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat proteins and genes encoding pentatricopeptide repeat-containing proteins. This work identifies specific miRNAs and phasiRNAs that regulate defense-associated genes in soybean during Phytophthora infection.

  10. Effect of small interfering RNAs on matrix metalloproteinase 1 expression

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    Gen-Hung Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Three small double strand siRNAs (506-MMP1, 859-MMP1 and 891-MMP1, each contains 25–26 nucleotides, with high specific to human MMP1 were designed according to mRNA sequence of human MMP1 (NCBI, NM_002421. To monitor the MMP1 gene expression, the total RNAs of human skin fibroblast (Detroit 551, BCRC 60118 were extracted. One human matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1 partial sequence cDNA, included all the three siRNA target sequences, amplified specifically via RT-PCR and PCR reactions, and three synthesized siRNA target DNAs were cloned individually into pAcGFP1-N3 with green fluorescent protein (GFP. These reporter plasmids were then transfected individually into malignant melanoma (MeWo, BCRC 60540 and the GFP was detected after 48 h. Fluorescence results indicated that the 859 siRNA revealed highest inhibitory ability (almost 90%, and was, accordingly, transfected into MeWo cells. According to the real-time quantitative PCR and western blot, the exhibition ability to silence MMP1 gene expression was 85–89%.

  11. Small RNAs and heritable epigenetic variation in plants.

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    Bond, Donna M; Baulcombe, David C

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that inheritance of phenotypes in plants is more likely to involve epigenetics than in mammals. There are two reasons for this difference. First, there is a RNA-based system in plants involving small (s)RNAs that influences de novo establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation at many sites in plant genomes. These regions of methylated DNA are epigenetic marks with the potential to affect gene expression that are transmitted between dividing cells of the same generation. Second, unlike mammals, DNA methyltransferases in plants are active during gametogenesis and embryogenesis so that patterns of DNA methylation can persist from parent to progeny and do not need to be reset. We discuss how the effects of stress and genome interactions in hybrid plants are two systems that illustrate how RNA-based mechanisms can influence heritable phenotypes in plants.

  12. A role for small RNAs in DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, W.; Ba, Z.; Wu, Y.;

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved complex mechanisms to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through coordinated actions of protein sensors, transducers, and effectors. Here we show that ∼21-nucleotide small RNAs are produced from the sequences in the vicinity of DSB sites in Arabidopsis and in human cells....... We refer to these as diRNAs for DSB-induced small RNAs. In Arabidopsis, the biogenesis of diRNAs requires the PI3 kinase ATR, RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), and Dicer-like proteins. Mutations in these proteins as well as in Pol V cause significant reduction in DSB repair efficiency. In Arabidopsis, di......RNAs are recruited by Argonaute 2 (AGO2) to mediate DSB repair. Knock down of Dicer or Ago2 in human cells reduces DSB repair. Our findings reveal a conserved function for small RNAs in the DSB repair pathway. We propose that diRNAs may function as guide molecules directing chromatin modifications or the recruitment...

  13. Characterization of Sus scrofa small non-coding RNAs present in both female and male gonads.

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    Dorota Kowalczykiewicz

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs are indispensable for proper germ cell development, emphasizing the need for greater elucidation of the mechanisms of germline development and regulation of this process by sncRNAs. We used deep sequencing to characterize three families of small non-coding RNAs (piRNAs, miRNAs, and tRFs present in Sus scrofa gonads and focused on the small RNA fraction present in both male and female gonads. Although similar numbers of reads were obtained from both types of gonads, the number of unique RNA sequences in the ovaries was several times lower. Of the sequences detected in the testes, 2.6% of piRNAs, 9% of miRNAs, and 10% of tRFs were also present in the ovaries. Notably, the majority of the shared piRNAs mapped to ribosomal RNAs and were derived from clustered loci. In addition, the most abundant miRNAs present in the ovaries and testes are conserved and are involved in many biological processes such as the regulation of homeobox genes, the control of cell proliferation, and carcinogenesis. Unexpectedly, we detected a novel sncRNA type, the tRFs, which are 30-36-nt RNA fragments derived from tRNA molecules, in gonads. Analysis of S. scrofa piRNAs show that testes specific piRNAs are biased for 5' uracil but both testes and ovaries specific piRNAs are not biased for adenine at the 10th nucleotide position. These observations indicate that adult porcine piRNAs are predominantly produced by a primary processing pathway or other mechanisms and secondary piRNAs generated by ping-pong mechanism are absent.

  14. Characterization of Sus scrofa small non-coding RNAs present in both female and male gonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczykiewicz, Dorota; Świercz, Aleksandra; Handschuh, Luiza; Leśniak, Katarzyna; Figlerowicz, Marek; Wrzesinski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) are indispensable for proper germ cell development, emphasizing the need for greater elucidation of the mechanisms of germline development and regulation of this process by sncRNAs. We used deep sequencing to characterize three families of small non-coding RNAs (piRNAs, miRNAs, and tRFs) present in Sus scrofa gonads and focused on the small RNA fraction present in both male and female gonads. Although similar numbers of reads were obtained from both types of gonads, the number of unique RNA sequences in the ovaries was several times lower. Of the sequences detected in the testes, 2.6% of piRNAs, 9% of miRNAs, and 10% of tRFs were also present in the ovaries. Notably, the majority of the shared piRNAs mapped to ribosomal RNAs and were derived from clustered loci. In addition, the most abundant miRNAs present in the ovaries and testes are conserved and are involved in many biological processes such as the regulation of homeobox genes, the control of cell proliferation, and carcinogenesis. Unexpectedly, we detected a novel sncRNA type, the tRFs, which are 30-36-nt RNA fragments derived from tRNA molecules, in gonads. Analysis of S. scrofa piRNAs show that testes specific piRNAs are biased for 5' uracil but both testes and ovaries specific piRNAs are not biased for adenine at the 10th nucleotide position. These observations indicate that adult porcine piRNAs are predominantly produced by a primary processing pathway or other mechanisms and secondary piRNAs generated by ping-pong mechanism are absent.

  15. Cloning of Novel Repeat-associated Small RNAs Derived from Hairpin Precursors in Oryza sativa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengguo YAO; Botao ZHAO; Wei LI; Yang LI; Wenming QIN; Bing HUANG; Youxin JIN

    2007-01-01

    Plant small non-coding RNAs including microRNAs (miRNAs), small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and trans-acting siRNAs, play important roles in modulating gene expression in cells. Here we isolated 21 novel endogenous small RNA molecules, ranging from 18 to 24 nucleotides, in Oryza sativa that can be mapped to 111 hairpin precursors. Further analysis indicated that most of these hairpin sequences originated from putative miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements, a major type of DNA transposon.Considering that miRNA is characteristic of hairpin-like precursor and plant endogenous siRNAs are often located at transposon regions, we hypothesized that our cloned small RNAs might represent the intermediate product in the evolutionary process between siRNAs and miRNAs. Northern blot analysis indicated that five of them were much more abundantly expressed in flower compared to other tissues, implying their potential function in inflorescence. In conclusion, our results enrich rice small RNA data and provide a meaningful perspective for small RNA annotation in plants.

  16. Identification of small RNAs in late developmental stage of rice anthers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Tomoaki; Kaneko, Fumi; Kazama, Tomohiko; Suwabe, Keita; Suzuki, Go; Makino, Amane; Mae, Tadahiko; Endo, Makoto; Kawagishi-Kobayashi, Makiko; Watanabe, Masao

    2008-06-01

    Small RNAs including microRNA (miRNA) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) are known as repressors of gene expression. There are many plant proteins involved in small RNA-mediated gene silencing, such as Dicer ribonucleases and RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. However, most of these proteins have been reported to be absent in the late developmental stage of the plant male gamete, pollen. In order to clarify the existence of the small RNAs during maturation of pollen, we cloned and sequenced small RNAs from rice anthers including tricellular pollen. From fifty six candidates of small RNAs, we identified two known miRNAs (miR166 and miR167), eight potential miRNAs, and ten putative heterochromatic siRNAs (hc-siRNAs). RNA gel blot analyses clearly showed that miR166 and miR167 were accumulated in the uninuclear pollen stage of anther development and remained until the tricellular pollen stage. Our cloning and RNA gel blot analyses of small RNAs led us to propose a possible function of small RNA-mediated gene regulation for the development of male gametes in rice.

  17. Genome‐wide identification of novel small RNAs in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Lozano, María; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molin, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) function in post‐transcriptional control of gene expression and control a variety of processes including metabolic reactions, stress responses and pathogenesis in response to environmental signals. A variety of approaches have been used previously to identify...... 44 sRNAs in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, RNA sequencing (RNA‐seq) is used to identify novel transcripts in P. aeruginosa involving a combination of three different sequencing libraries. Almost all known sRNAs and over 500 novel intergenic sRNAs are identified....... Nearly 90% of the novel sRNAs have no orthologous bacterial sequences outside of P. aeruginosa, supporting a limited degree of sequence conservation and rapid evolution of sRNAs at the species level. We anticipate that the data will be useful for the study of regulatory sRNAs in bacteria...

  18. Novel microRNA-like viral small regulatory RNAs arising during human hepatitis A virus infection.

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    Shi, Jiandong; Sun, Jing; Wang, Bin; Wu, Meini; Zhang, Jing; Duan, Zhiqing; Wang, Haixuan; Hu, Ningzhu; Hu, Yunzhang

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), including host miRNAs and viral miRNAs, play vital roles in regulating host-virus interactions. DNA viruses encode miRNAs that regulate the viral life cycle. However, it is generally believed that cytoplasmic RNA viruses do not encode miRNAs, owing to inaccessible cellular miRNA processing machinery. Here, we provide a comprehensive genome-wide analysis and identification of miRNAs that were derived from hepatitis A virus (HAV; Hu/China/H2/1982), which is a typical cytoplasmic RNA virus. Using deep-sequencing and in silico approaches, we identified 2 novel virally encoded miRNAs, named hav-miR-1-5p and hav-miR-2-5p. Both of the novel virally encoded miRNAs were clearly detected in infected cells. Analysis of Dicer enzyme silencing demonstrated that HAV-derived miRNA biogenesis is Dicer dependent. Furthermore, we confirmed that HAV mature miRNAs were generated from viral miRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs) in host cells. Notably, naturally derived HAV miRNAs were biologically and functionally active and induced post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Genomic location analysis revealed novel miRNAs located in the coding region of the viral genome. Overall, our results show that HAV naturally generates functional miRNA-like small regulatory RNAs during infection. This is the first report of miRNAs derived from the coding region of genomic RNA of a cytoplasmic RNA virus. These observations demonstrate that a cytoplasmic RNA virus can naturally generate functional miRNAs, as DNA viruses do. These findings also contribute to improved understanding of host-RNA virus interactions mediated by RNA virus-derived miRNAs.

  19. RNA-Seq of the nucleolus reveals abundant SNORD44-derived small RNAs.

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    Baoyan Bai

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs represent RNA species that are not translated to proteins, but which have diverse and broad functional activities in physiological and pathophysiological states. The knowledge of these small RNAs is rapidly expanding in part through the use of massive parallel (deep sequencing efforts. We present here the first deep sequencing of small RNomes in subcellular compartments with particular emphasis on small RNAs (sRNA associated with the nucleolus. The vast majority of the cellular, cytoplasmic and nuclear sRNAs were identified as miRNAs. In contrast, the nucleolar sRNAs had a unique size distribution consisting of 19-20 and 25 nt RNAs, which were predominantly composed of small snoRNA-derived box C/D RNAs (termed as sdRNA. Sequences from 47 sdRNAs were identified, which mapped to both 5' and 3' ends of the snoRNAs, and retained conserved box C or D motifs. SdRNA reads mapping to SNORD44 comprised 74% of all nucleolar sdRNAs, and were confirmed by Northern blotting as comprising both 20 and 25 nt RNAs. A novel 120 nt SNORD44 form was also identified. The expression of the SNORD44 sdRNA and 120 nt form was independent of Dicer/Drosha-mediated processing pathways but was dependent on the box C/D snoRNP proteins/sno-ribonucleoproteins fibrillarin and NOP58. The 120 nt SNORD44-derived RNA bound to fibrillarin suggesting that C/D sno-ribonucleoproteins are involved in regulating the stability or processing of SNORD44. This study reveals sRNA cell-compartment specific expression and the distinctive unique composition of the nucleolar sRNAs.

  20. RNA-Seq of the nucleolus reveals abundant SNORD44-derived small RNAs.

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    Bai, Baoyan; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Wheelan, Sarah J; Laiho, Marikki

    2014-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs represent RNA species that are not translated to proteins, but which have diverse and broad functional activities in physiological and pathophysiological states. The knowledge of these small RNAs is rapidly expanding in part through the use of massive parallel (deep) sequencing efforts. We present here the first deep sequencing of small RNomes in subcellular compartments with particular emphasis on small RNAs (sRNA) associated with the nucleolus. The vast majority of the cellular, cytoplasmic and nuclear sRNAs were identified as miRNAs. In contrast, the nucleolar sRNAs had a unique size distribution consisting of 19-20 and 25 nt RNAs, which were predominantly composed of small snoRNA-derived box C/D RNAs (termed as sdRNA). Sequences from 47 sdRNAs were identified, which mapped to both 5' and 3' ends of the snoRNAs, and retained conserved box C or D motifs. SdRNA reads mapping to SNORD44 comprised 74% of all nucleolar sdRNAs, and were confirmed by Northern blotting as comprising both 20 and 25 nt RNAs. A novel 120 nt SNORD44 form was also identified. The expression of the SNORD44 sdRNA and 120 nt form was independent of Dicer/Drosha-mediated processing pathways but was dependent on the box C/D snoRNP proteins/sno-ribonucleoproteins fibrillarin and NOP58. The 120 nt SNORD44-derived RNA bound to fibrillarin suggesting that C/D sno-ribonucleoproteins are involved in regulating the stability or processing of SNORD44. This study reveals sRNA cell-compartment specific expression and the distinctive unique composition of the nucleolar sRNAs.

  1. New and emerging roles of small RNAs in neurodegeneration, muscle, cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases.

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    Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Li, Bei; Kyburz, Diego; Krützfeld, Jan; Landmesser, Ulf; Aguzzi, Adriano; Polymenidou, Magdalini

    2015-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs (snRNAs) were discovered more than two decades ago, yet it was not until relatively recently that their important role in genome regulation was recognised. With such a substantial role in genome regulation, it is not surprising that snRNAs are crucial contributors to an ever-increasing number of diseases, as evidenced by the long list of published studies. Currently, microRNAs (miRNAs) represent the most intensively studied snRNAs. Dysregulation of miRNAs has been confirmed in numerous diseases, and changes in their levels could play an essential role in disease onset and progression and could be used for prognosis and potential therapy. Indeed, disease-altered miRNAs may either signify a direct trigger or a consequence of the disease. Therefore, miRNAs represent unique targets for disease intervention through their down- or up-regulation. Importantly, miRNAs may facilitate disease monitoring by detection of disease-altered miRNAs in easily accessible bodily fluids, such as blood or cerebrospinal fluid. Therefore, study of these events is of utmost importance for understanding the molecular mechanisms that drive disease, as well as for diagnosis and therapy. Here we attempted to synthesise a large number of studies to highlight the crucial role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative, muscle, cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases.

  2. Differential and coherent processing patterns from small RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pundhir, Sachin; Gorodkin, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional processing events related to short RNAs are often reflected in their read profile patterns emerging from high-throughput sequencing data. MicroRNA arm switching across different tissues is a well-known example of what we define as differential processing. Here, short RNAs fro...

  3. Micro RNAs AS BIOMARKERS FOR ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION - SMALL MOLECULES WITH A HUGE POTENTIAL

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    Miskowiec Dawid

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a conserved class of small, 17-25 nucleotides long, noncoding RNAs. They act as controllers of gene expression patterns, either by blocking translation or inducing miRNA degradation by sequence-specific hybridization. Several miRNAs have been proposed as potential disease-specific biomarker in cardiovascular diseases. The diagnostic value of assessing circulating miRNAs levels has been evaluated in numerous studies, mainly regarding acute myocardial infarction. Initial promising results from preclinical studies suggest the potential for future miRNA-based therapies. In our review, we focus on the current developments showing the role of miRNAs in the acute myocardial infarction, emphasizing diagnostic utility of miRNAs as promising new biomarkers of AMI and their therapeutic potential.

  4. Transcriptome of small regulatory RNAs in the development of the zoonotic parasite Trichinella spiralis.

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    Xiaolei Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trichinella spiralis is a parasite with unique features. It is a multicellular organism but with an intracellular parasitization and development stage. T. spiralis is the helminthic pathogen that causes zoonotic trichinellosis and afflicts more than 10 million people worldwide, whereas the parasite's biology, especially the developmental regulation is largely unknown. In other organisms, small non-coding RNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNA and small interfering RNAs (siRNA execute post-transcriptional regulation by translational repression or mRNA degradation, and a large number of miRNAs have been identified in diverse species. In T. spiralis, the profile of small non-coding RNAs and their function remains poorly understood. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, the transcriptional profiles of miRNA and siRNA in three developmental stages of T. spiralis in the rat host were investigated, and compared by high-throughput cDNA sequencing technique ("RNA-seq". 5,443,641 unique sequence tags were obtained. Of these, 21 represented conserved miRNAs related to 13 previously identified metazoan miRNA families and 213 were novel miRNAs so far unique to T. spiralis. Some of these miRNAs exhibited stage-specific expression. Expression of miRNAs was confirmed in three stages of the life cycle by qRT-PCR and northern blot analysis. In addition, endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs were found mainly derived from natural antisense transcripts (NAT and transposable elements (TE in the parasite. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We provide evidence for the presence of miRNAs and endo-siRNAs in T. spiralis. The miRNAs accounted for the major proportion of the small regulatory RNA population of T. spiralis, while fewer endogenous siRNAs were found. The finding of stage-specific expression patterns of the miRNAs in different developmental stages of T. spiralis suggests that miRNAs may play important roles in parasite development. Our data provide a basis for

  5. Differential and coherent processing patterns from small RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pundhir, Sachin; Gorodkin, Jan

    2015-01-01

    the nine cell lines of the ENCODE project, irrespective of their annotation status, were analyzed for genomic loci representing differential or coherent processing. We observed differential processing predominantly in RNAs annotated as miRNA, snoRNA or tRNA. Four out of five known cases of differentially...... processed miRNAs that were in the input dataset were recovered and several novel cases were discovered. In contrast to differential processing, coherent processing is observed widespread in both annotated and unannotated regions. While the annotated loci predominantly consist of ~24nt short RNAs...

  6. Introduction: MicroRNAs in human reproduction: small molecules with crucial regulatory roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbar, Tal; Galliano, Daniela; Pellicer, Antonio; Laufer, Neri

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs constitute a large family of approximately 21-nucleotide-long, noncoding RNAs. They emerged more than 20 years ago as key posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. The regulatory role of these small RNA molecules has recently begun to be explored in the human reproductive system. In this issue's Views and Reviews, the authors present the current knowledge regarding the involvement of microRNAs in several aspects of human reproduction and discuss its future implications for clinical practice.

  7. Both endo-siRNAs and tRNA-derived small RNAs are involved in the differentiation of primitive eukaryote Giardia lamblia.

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    Liao, Jian-You; Guo, Yan-Hua; Zheng, Ling-Ling; Li, Yan; Xu, Wen-Li; Zhang, Yu-Chan; Zhou, Hui; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Ayala, Francisco J; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2014-09-30

    Small RNAs (sRNAs), including microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs), regulate most important biologic processes in eukaryotes, such as cell division and differentiation. Although sRNAs have been extensively studied in various eukaryotes, the role of sRNAs in the early emergence of eukaryotes is unclear. To address these questions, we deep sequenced the sRNA transcriptome of four different stages in the differentiation of Giardia lamblia, one of the most primitive eukaryotes. We identified a large number of endo-siRNAs in this fascinating parasitic protozoan and found that they were produced from live telomeric retrotransposons and three genomic regions (i.e., endo-siRNA generating regions [eSGRs]). eSGR-derived endo-siRNAs were proven to target mRNAs in trans. Gradual up-regulation of endo-siRNAs in the differentiation of Giardia suggested that they might be involved in the regulation of this process. This hypothesis was supported by the impairment of the differentiation ability of Giardia when GLDICER, essential for the biogenesis of endo-siRNAs, was knocked down. Endo-siRNAs are not the only sRNA regulators in Giardia differentiation, because a great number of tRNAs-derived sRNAs showed more dramatic expression changes than endo-siRNAs in this process. We totally identified five novel kinds of tRNAs-derived sRNAs and found that the biogenesis in four of them might be correlated with that of stress-induced tRNA-derived RNA (sitRNA), which was discovered in our previous studies. Our studies reveal an unexpected complex panorama of sRNA in G. lamblia and shed light on the origin and functional evolution of eukaryotic sRNAs.

  8. Identification and characterization of small RNAs in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus.

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    Ning Xu

    Full Text Available The term RNA silencing (RNA interference, RNAi describes a set of mechanisms that regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. Small interfering RNAs (siRNA and microRNAs (miRNAs are two major types of RNAi-associated small RNAs (smRNAs found in most eukaryotic organisms. Despite the presence of a plethora of non-coding RNAs longer than 50-nucleotide (nt in length in various species of Archaea, little is known about smRNAs in archaea that resemble the 20-24-nt long smRNAs found in eukaryotes, which have been implicated in the post-transcriptional control of gene expression. Here, we report the finding of a large number of smRNAs approximatelly 20-nt in length, including phased smRNAs and potential miRNAs, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus p2 (Ssp2 based on deep sequencing. The expression of some of the miRNA candidates in Ssp2 was confirmed. Consistent with the Ssp2 hyperthermophilic properties, we found that higher temperatures more efficiently induced the production of the miRNA candidates in an in vitro system using the putative foldback precursor transcripts incubated with Ssp2 extract. Although we initially predicted putative target genes of some miRNA candidates, further analysis mapped the cleavage sites downstream of the miRNA candidate complementary regions, similar to those involved in plant miRNA-mediated TAS transcript cleavage. We also identified smRNAs from clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR loci, which play important roles in prokaryotic microbial defense systems. Archaea represent a unique life form next to Bacteria and Eukarya, and our results may provide a useful resource for further in-depth study on the regulation and evolution of smRNAs in this special organism.

  9. Viral small RNAs reveal the genomic variations of three grapevine vein clearing virus quasispecies populations.

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    Howard, Susanne; Qiu, Wenping

    2017-02-02

    Viral small RNAs (vsRNAs) include viral small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) that are initiators and products of RNA silencing, and small RNAs that are derived from viral RNAs with function still unknown. Sequencing of vsRNAs allows assembling of viral genomes and revelation of viral population variations at genomic levels. Grapevine vein clearing virus (GVCV) is a new member of the family Caulimoviridae whose DNA genome is replicated by reverse transcription of pre-genomic RNA molecules. In this short report, three genomic sequences of GVCV were assembled from vsRNAs that were isolated and sequenced from three individual grapevines in commercial vineyards and compared to the GVCV-CHA reference genome. Profiles of single nucleotide polymorphism among three viral populations indicated a closer relatedness between two populations in different grape cultivars at the same location than those in the same grape cultivar at different locations, suggesting the spread of GVCV populations among vineyards of close proximity. Classic types of vsiRNAs (21-nt, 22-nt, and 24-nt) were found in the three GVCV vsiRNA populations, but these did not produce alignment hotspots on the GVCV-CHA reference genome. The number of 36-nt reads is the highest among vsRNAs, the role of these vsRNAs remains unclear. The analysis of vsRNAs provides a first holistic picture of genomic variations among GVCV viral quasispecies populations that help monitor epidemics and evolution of GVCV populations, an emerging virus that is becoming a threat to grape production in the Midwest region of the USA.

  10. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs.

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    Noah Fahlgren

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work.

  11. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs.

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    Fahlgren, Noah; Bollmann, Stephanie R; Kasschau, Kristin D; Cuperus, Josh T; Press, Caroline M; Sullivan, Christopher M; Chapman, Elisabeth J; Hoyer, J Steen; Gilbert, Kerrigan B; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Carrington, James C

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work.

  12. The coilin interactome identifies hundreds of small noncoding RNAs that traffic through Cajal bodies.

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    Machyna, Martin; Kehr, Stephanie; Straube, Korinna; Kappei, Dennis; Buchholz, Frank; Butter, Falk; Ule, Jernej; Hertel, Jana; Stadler, Peter F; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2014-11-06

    Coilin protein scaffolds Cajal bodies (CBs)-subnuclear compartments enriched in small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs)-and promotes efficient spliceosomal snRNP assembly. The molecular function of coilin, which is intrinsically disordered with no defined motifs, is poorly understood. We use UV crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) to determine whether mammalian coilin binds RNA in vivo and to identify targets. Robust detection of snRNA transcripts correlated with coilin ChIP-seq peaks on snRNA genes, indicating that coilin binding to nascent snRNAs is a site-specific CB nucleator. Surprisingly, several hundred small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) were identified as coilin interactors, including numerous unannotated mouse and human snoRNAs. We show that all classes of snoRNAs concentrate in CBs. Moreover, snoRNAs lacking specific CB retention signals traffic through CBs en route to nucleoli, consistent with the role of CBs in small RNP assembly. Thus, coilin couples snRNA and snoRNA biogenesis, making CBs the cellular hub of small ncRNA metabolism.

  13. Modulation of Gene Expression by Polymer Nanocapsule Delivery of DNA Cassettes Encoding Small RNAs.

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    Ming Yan

    Full Text Available Small RNAs, including siRNAs, gRNAs and miRNAs, modulate gene expression and serve as potential therapies for human diseases. Delivery to target cells remains the fundamental limitation for use of these RNAs in humans. To address this challenge, we have developed a nanocapsule delivery technology that encapsulates small DNA molecules encoding RNAs into a small (30 nm polymer nanocapsule. For proof of concept, we transduced DNA expression cassettes for three small RNAs. In one application, the DNA cassette encodes an shRNA transcriptional unit that downregulates CCR5 and protects from HIV-1 infection. The DNA cassette nanocapsules were further engineered for timed release of the DNA cargo for prolonged knockdown of CCR5. Secondly, the nanocapsules provide an efficient means for delivery of gRNAs in the CRISPR/Cas9 system to mutate integrated HIV-1. Finally, delivery of microRNA-125b to mobilized human CD34+ cells enhances survival and expansion of the CD34+ cells in culture.

  14. Identification of MicroRNA-like small RNAs from fungus parasite Nosema ceranae

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    We previously found transcripts encoding Dicer and Argonaute in the honey bee parasite Nosema ceranae. Since these proteins are involved in the production of regulatory microRNAs we carried out controlled infections and genetic screens in order to identify microRNAs in Nosema . We sequenced small R...

  15. Biogenic mechanisms and utilization of small RNAs derived from human protein-coding genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind; Preker, Pascal; Andersen, Peter Refsing;

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to catalog eukaryotic transcripts have uncovered many small RNAs (sRNAs) derived from gene termini and splice sites. Their biogenesis pathways are largely unknown, but a mechanism based on backtracking of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) has been suggested. By sequencing transcripts 12...

  16. Global small RNA chaperone Hfq and regulatory small RNAs are important virulence regulators in Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Quan; McNally, R Ryan; Sundin, George W

    2013-04-01

    Hfq is a global small RNA (sRNA) chaperone that interacts with Hfq-regulated sRNAs and functions in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. In this work, we identified Hfq to be a virulence regulator in the Gram-negative fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Deletion of hfq in E. amylovora Ea1189 significantly reduced bacterial virulence in both immature pear fruits and apple shoots. Analysis of virulence determinants in strain Ea1189Δhfq showed that Hfq exerts pleiotropic regulation of amylovoran exopolysaccharide production, biofilm formation, motility, and the type III secretion system (T3SS). Further characterization of biofilm regulation by Hfq demonstrated that Hfq limits bacterial attachment to solid surfaces while promoting biofilm maturation. Characterization of T3SS regulation by Hfq revealed that Hfq positively regulates the translocation and secretion of the major type III effector DspE and negatively controls the secretion of the putative translocator HrpK and the type III effector Eop1. Lastly, 10 Hfq-regulated sRNAs were identified using a computational method, and two of these sRNAs, RprA and RyhA, were found to be required for the full virulence of E. amylovora.

  17. Novel modulators of senescence, aging, and longevity: Small non-coding RNAs enter the stage.

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    Grillari, Johannes; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina

    2010-04-01

    During the last decade evidence has accumulated that the aging process is driven by limited allocation of energy to somatic maintenance resulting in accumulation of stochastic damage. This damage, affecting molecules, cells, and tissues, is counteracted by genetically programmed repair, the efficiency of which thus importantly determines the life and 'health span' of organisms. Therefore, understanding the regulation of gene expression during cellular and organismal aging as well as upon exposure to various damaging events is important to understand the biology of aging and to positively influence the health span. The recent identification of small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), has added an additional layer of complexity to the regulation of gene expression with the classes of endogenous small inhibitory RNAs (siRNAs), PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), QDE1-interacting RNAs (qiRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). Some of these ncRNAs have not yet been identified in mammalian cells and are dependent on RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. The first mammalian enzyme with such activity has only now emerged and surprisingly consists of the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT) together with RMPR, an alternative RNA component. The so far most studied small non-coding RNAs, miRNAs, however, are now increasingly found to operate in the complex network of cellular aging. Recent findings show that (i) miRNAs are regulated during cellular senescence in vitro, (ii) they contribute to tissue regeneration by regulation of stem cell function, and (iii) at least one miRNA modulates the life span of the model organism C. elegans. Additionally, (iv) they act as inhibitors of proteins mediating the insulin/IGF1 and target of rapamycin (TOR) signalling, both of which are conserved modulators of organism life span. Here we will give an overview on the current status of these topics. Since little is so far known on the functions of small ncRNAs in the context of aging and longevity, the entry of the

  18. A simple and efficient method for isolating small RNAs from different plant species

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    de Folter Stefan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small RNAs emerged over the last decade as key regulators in diverse biological processes in eukaryotic organisms. To identify and study small RNAs, good and efficient protocols are necessary to isolate them, which sometimes may be challenging due to the composition of specific tissues of certain plant species. Here we describe a simple and efficient method to isolate small RNAs from different plant species. Results We developed a simple and efficient method to isolate small RNAs from different plant species by first comparing different total RNA extraction protocols, followed by streamlining the best one, finally resulting in a small RNA extraction method that has no need of first total RNA extraction and is not based on the commercially available TRIzol® Reagent or columns. This small RNA extraction method not only works well for plant tissues with high polysaccharide content, like cactus, agave, banana, and tomato, but also for plant species like Arabidopsis or tobacco. Furthermore, the obtained small RNA samples were successfully used in northern blot assays. Conclusion Here we provide a simple and efficient method to isolate small RNAs from different plant species, such as cactus, agave, banana, tomato, Arabidopsis, and tobacco, and the small RNAs from this simplified and low cost method is suitable for downstream handling like northern blot assays.

  19. Expression of microRNAs and other small RNAs in prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depressed subjects.

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    Neil R Smalheiser

    Full Text Available Because of the role played by miRNAs in post-transcriptional regulation of an array of genes, their impact in neuropsychiatric disease pathophysiology has increasingly been evident. In the present study, we assessed microRNA expression in prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 10 of a well-characterized cohort of major depressed, bipolar, and schizophrenia subjects (obtained from Stanley Neuropathology Consortium; n = 15 in each group, using high throughput RT-PCR plates. Discrete miRNA alterations were observed in all disorders, as well as in suicide subjects (pooled across diagnostic categories compared to all non-suicide subjects. The changes in the schizophrenia group were partially similar to those in the bipolar group, but distinct from changes in depression and suicide. Intriguingly, those miRNAs which were down-regulated in the schizophrenia group tended to be synaptically enriched, whereas up-regulated miRNAs tended not to be. To follow this up, we purified synaptosomes from pooled samples of the schizophrenia vs. control groups and subjected them to Illumina deep sequencing. There was a significant loss of small RNA expression in schizophrenia synaptosomes only for certain sequence lengths within the miRNA range. Moreover, 73 miRNAs were significantly down-regulated whereas only one was up-regulated. Strikingly, across all expressed miRNAs in synaptosomes, there was a significant inverse correlation between the fold-change of a given miRNA seen in schizophrenia and its synaptic enrichment ratio observed in controls. Thus, synaptic miRNAs tended to be down-regulated in schizophrenia, and the more highly synaptically enriched miRNAs tended to show greater down-regulation. These findings point to some deficit in miRNA biogenesis, transport, processing or turnover in schizophrenia that is selective for the synaptic compartment. A novel class of ncRNA-derived small RNAs, shown to be strongly induced during an early phase of learning in mouse

  20. Expression of microRNAs and other small RNAs in prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depressed subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalheiser, Neil R; Lugli, Giovanni; Zhang, Hui; Rizavi, Hooriyah; Cook, Edwin H; Dwivedi, Yogesh

    2014-01-01

    Because of the role played by miRNAs in post-transcriptional regulation of an array of genes, their impact in neuropsychiatric disease pathophysiology has increasingly been evident. In the present study, we assessed microRNA expression in prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 10) of a well-characterized cohort of major depressed, bipolar, and schizophrenia subjects (obtained from Stanley Neuropathology Consortium; n = 15 in each group), using high throughput RT-PCR plates. Discrete miRNA alterations were observed in all disorders, as well as in suicide subjects (pooled across diagnostic categories) compared to all non-suicide subjects. The changes in the schizophrenia group were partially similar to those in the bipolar group, but distinct from changes in depression and suicide. Intriguingly, those miRNAs which were down-regulated in the schizophrenia group tended to be synaptically enriched, whereas up-regulated miRNAs tended not to be. To follow this up, we purified synaptosomes from pooled samples of the schizophrenia vs. control groups and subjected them to Illumina deep sequencing. There was a significant loss of small RNA expression in schizophrenia synaptosomes only for certain sequence lengths within the miRNA range. Moreover, 73 miRNAs were significantly down-regulated whereas only one was up-regulated. Strikingly, across all expressed miRNAs in synaptosomes, there was a significant inverse correlation between the fold-change of a given miRNA seen in schizophrenia and its synaptic enrichment ratio observed in controls. Thus, synaptic miRNAs tended to be down-regulated in schizophrenia, and the more highly synaptically enriched miRNAs tended to show greater down-regulation. These findings point to some deficit in miRNA biogenesis, transport, processing or turnover in schizophrenia that is selective for the synaptic compartment. A novel class of ncRNA-derived small RNAs, shown to be strongly induced during an early phase of learning in mouse, is also

  1. Therapeutic potential of small interfering RNAs/micro interfering RNA in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Mario; Grassi, Gabriele; Dapas, Barbara

    2015-08-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the predominant form of primary liver cancer and represents the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Current available therapeutic approaches are poorly effective, especially for the advanced forms of the disease. In the last year, short double stranded RNA molecules termed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro interfering RNAs (miRNA), emerged as interesting molecules with potential therapeutic value for HCC. The practical use of these molecules is however limited by the identification of optimal molecular targets and especially by the lack of effective and targeted HCC delivery systems. Here we focus our discussion on the most recent advances in the identification of siRNAs/miRNAs molecular targets and on the development of suitable siRNA/miRNAs delivery systems.

  2. The Complexity of Posttranscriptional Small RNA Regulatory Networks Revealed by In Silico Analysis of Gossypium arboreum L. Leaf, Flower and Boll Small Regulatory RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Hu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs and secondary small interfering RNAs (principally phased siRNAs or trans-acting siRNAs are two distinct subfamilies of small RNAs (sRNAs that are emerging as key regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression in plants. Both miRNAs and secondary-siRNAs (sec-siRNAs are processed from longer RNA precursors by DICER-LIKE proteins (DCLs. Gossypium arboreum L., also known as tree cotton or Asian cotton, is a diploid, possibly ancestral relative of tetraploid Gossypium hirsutum L., the predominant type of commercially grown cotton worldwide known as upland cotton. To understand the biological significance of these gene regulators in G. arboreum, a bioinformatics analysis was performed on G. arboreum small RNAs produced from G. arboreum leaf, flower, and boll tissues. Consequently, 263 miRNAs derived from 353 precursors, including 155 conserved miRNAs (cs-miRNAs and 108 novel lineage-specific miRNAs (ls-miRNAs. Along with miRNAs, 2,033 miRNA variants (isomiRNAs were identified as well. Those isomiRNAs with variation at the 3'-miRNA end were expressed at the highest levels, compared to other types of variants. In addition, 755 pha-siRNAs derived 319 pha-siRNA gene transcripts (PGTs were identified, and the potential pha-siRNA initiators were predicted. Also, 2,251 non-phased siRNAs were found as well, of which 1,088 appeared to be produced by so-called cis- or trans-cleavage of the PGTs observed at positions differing from pha-siRNAs. Of those sRNAs, 148 miRNAs/isomiRNAs and 274 phased/non-phased siRNAs were differentially expressed in one or more pairs of tissues examined. Target analysis revealed that target genes for both miRNAs and pha-siRNAs are involved a broad range of metabolic and enzymatic activities. We demonstrate that secondary siRNA production could result from initial cleavage of precursors by both miRNAs or isomiRNAs, and that subsequently produced phased and unphased siRNAs could result that also serve as triggers

  3. Long Non-coding RNAs and Their Roles in Non-small-cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Ming Wei; Guang-Biao Zhou

    2016-01-01

    As a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, lung cancer is a collection of diseases with diverse etiologies which can be broadly classified into small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Lung cancer is characterized by genomic and epigenomic alter-ations; however, mechanisms underlying lung tumorigenesis remain to be elucidated. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a group of non-coding RNAs that consist of P200 nucleotides but possess low or no protein-coding potential. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal expres-sion of lncRNAs is associated with tumorigenesis of various cancers, including lung cancer, through multiple biological mechanisms involving epigenetic, transcriptional, and post-transcriptional alter-ations. In this review, we highlight the expression and roles of lncRNAs in NSCLC and discuss their potential clinical applications as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers, as well as therapeutic targets.

  4. Rapid and efficient isolation of high-quality small RNAs from recalcitrant plant species rich in polyphenols and polysaccharides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Peng

    Full Text Available Small RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, are important regulators of plant development and gene expression. The acquisition of high-quality small RNAs is the first step in the study of its expression and function analysis, yet the extraction method of small RNAs in recalcitrant plant tissues with various secondary metabolites is not well established, especially for tropical and subtropical plant species rich in polysaccharides and polyphenols. Here, we developed a simple and efficient method for high quality small RNAs extraction from recalcitrant plant species. Prior to RNA isolation, a precursory step with a CTAB-PVPP buffer system could efficiently remove compounds and secondary metabolites interfering with RNAs from homogenized lysates. Then, total RNAs were extracted by Trizol reagents followed by a differential precipitation of high-molecular-weight (HMW RNAs using polyethylene glycol (PEG 8000. Finally, small RNAs could be easily recovered from supernatant by ethanol precipitation without extra elimination steps. The isolated small RNAs from papaya showed high quality through a clear background on gel and a distinct northern blotting signal with miR159a probe, compared with other published protocols. Additionally, the small RNAs extracted from papaya were successfully used for validation of both predicted miRNAs and the putative conserved tasiARFs. Furthermore, the extraction method described here was also tested with several other subtropical and tropical plant tissues. The purity of the isolated small RNAs was sufficient for such applications as end-point stem-loop RT-PCR and northern blotting analysis, respectively. The simple and feasible extraction method reported here is expected to have excellent potential for isolation of small RNAs from recalcitrant plant tissues rich in polyphenols and polysaccharides.

  5. Engineering artificial small RNAs for conditional gene silencing in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vandana; Yamamura, Asami; Yokobayashi, Yohei

    2012-01-20

    It has become increasingly evident that noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs) play a significant and global role in bacterial gene regulation. A majority of the trans-acting sRNAs in bacteria interact with the 5' untranslated region (UTR) and/or the translation initiation region of the targeted mRNAs via imperfect base pairing, resulting in reduced translation efficiency and/or mRNA stability. Additionally, bacterial sRNAs often contain distinct scaffolds that recruit RNA chaperones such as Hfq to facilitate gene regulation. In this study, we describe a strategy to engineer artificial sRNAs that can regulate desired endogenous genes in Escherichia coli. Using a fluorescent reporter gene that was translationally fused to a native 5' mRNA leader sequence, active artificial sRNAs were screened from libraries in which natural sRNA scaffolds were fused to a randomized antisense domain. Artificial sRNAs that posttranscriptionally repress two endogenous genes ompF and fliC were isolated and characterized. We anticipate that the artificial sRNAs will be useful for dynamic control and fine-tuning of endogenous gene expression in bacteria for applications in synthetic biology.

  6. Roles for small noncoding RNAs in silencing of retrotransposons in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sayan; Chandramohan, Dhruva; Fioriti, Luana; Melnick, Ari M; Hébert, Jean M; Mason, Christopher E; Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Kandel, Eric R

    2016-10-24

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), long thought to be restricted to germline, have recently been discovered in neurons of Aplysia, with a role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression underlying long-term memory. We here ask whether piwi/piRNAs are also expressed and have functional roles in the mammalian brain. Large-scale RNA sequencing and subsequent analysis of protein expression revealed the presence in brain of several piRNA biogenesis factors including a mouse piwi (Mili), as well as small RNAs, albeit at low levels, resembling conserved piRNAs in mouse testes [primarily LINE1 (long interspersed nuclear element1) retrotransposon-derived]. Despite the seeming low expression of these putative piRNAs, single-base pair CpG methylation analyses across the genome of Mili/piRNA-deficient (Mili(-/-)) mice demonstrate that brain genomic DNA is preferentially hypomethylated within intergenic areas and LINE1 promoter areas of the genome. Furthermore, Mili mutant mice exhibit behavioral deficits such as hyperactivity and reduced anxiety. These results suggest that putative piRNAs exist in mammalian brain, and similar to the role of piRNAs in testes, they may be involved in the silencing of retrotransposons, which in brain have critical roles in contributing to genomic heterogeneity underlying adaptation, stress response, and brain pathology. We also describe the presence of another class of small RNAs in the brain, with features of endogenous siRNAs, which may have taken over the role of invertebrate piRNAs in their capacity to target both transposons, as well as protein-coding genes. Thus, RNA interference through gene and retrotransposon silencing previously encountered in Aplysia may also have potential roles in the mammalian brain.

  7. A computational strategy for the search of regulatory small RNAs in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ciro C.; Bossé, Janine T.; Li, Yanwen; Witney, Adam A.; Gould, Kate A.; Langford, Paul R.; Bazzolli, Denise M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) play important roles in gene regulation and are frequently connected to the expression of virulence factors in diverse bacteria. Only a few sRNAs have been described for Pasteurellaceae pathogens and no in-depth analysis of sRNAs has been described for Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, responsible for considerable losses in the swine industry. To search for sRNAs in A. pleuropneumoniae, we developed a strategy for the computational analysis of the bacterial genome by using four algorithms with different approaches, followed by experimental validation. The coding strand and expression of 17 out of 23 RNA candidates were confirmed by Northern blotting, RT-PCR, and RNA sequencing. Among them, two are likely riboswitches, three are housekeeping regulatory RNAs, two are the widely studied GcvB and 6S sRNAs, and 10 are putative novel trans-acting sRNAs, never before described for any bacteria. The latter group has several potential mRNA targets, many of which are involved with virulence, stress resistance, or metabolism, and connect the sRNAs in a complex gene regulatory network. The sRNAs identified are well conserved among the Pasteurellaceae that are evolutionarily closer to A. pleuropneumoniae and/or share the same host. Our results show that the combination of newly developed computational programs can be successfully utilized for the discovery of novel sRNAs and indicate an intricate system of gene regulation through sRNAs in A. pleuropneumoniae and in other Pasteurellaceae, thus providing clues for novel aspects of virulence that will be explored in further studies. PMID:27402897

  8. The Mechanisms of Virulence Regulation by Small Noncoding RNAs in Low GC Gram-Positive Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Pitman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of small noncoding regulatory RNAs (sRNAs in bacteria has grown tremendously recently, giving new insights into gene regulation. The implementation of computational analysis and RNA sequencing has provided new tools to discover and analyze potential sRNAs. Small regulatory RNAs that act by base-pairing to target mRNAs have been found to be ubiquitous and are the most abundant class of post-transcriptional regulators in bacteria. The majority of sRNA studies has been limited to E. coli and other gram-negative bacteria. However, examples of sRNAs in gram-positive bacteria are still plentiful although the detailed gene regulation mechanisms behind them are not as well understood. Strict virulence control is critical for a pathogen’s survival and many sRNAs have been found to be involved in that process. This review outlines the targets and currently known mechanisms of trans-acting sRNAs involved in virulence regulation in various gram-positive pathogens. In addition, their shared characteristics such as CU interaction motifs, the role of Hfq, and involvement in two-component regulators, riboswitches, quorum sensing, or toxin/antitoxin systems are described.

  9. The small RNA content of human sperm reveals pseudogene-derived piRNAs complementary to protein-coding genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantano, Lorena; Jodar, Meritxell; Bak, Mads; Ballescà, Josep Lluís; Tommerup, Niels; Oliva, Rafael; Vavouri, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    At the end of mammalian sperm development, sperm cells expel most of their cytoplasm and dispose of the majority of their RNA. Yet, hundreds of RNA molecules remain in mature sperm. The biological significance of the vast majority of these molecules is unclear. To better understand the processes that generate sperm small RNAs and what roles they may have, we sequenced and characterized the small RNA content of sperm samples from two human fertile individuals. We detected 182 microRNAs, some of which are highly abundant. The most abundant microRNA in sperm is miR-1246 with predicted targets among sperm-specific genes. The most abundant class of small noncoding RNAs in sperm are PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Surprisingly, we found that human sperm cells contain piRNAs processed from pseudogenes. Clusters of piRNAs from human testes contain pseudogenes transcribed in the antisense strand and processed into small RNAs. Several human protein-coding genes contain antisense predicted targets of pseudogene-derived piRNAs in the male germline and these piRNAs are still found in mature sperm. Our study provides the most extensive data set and annotation of human sperm small RNAs to date and is a resource for further functional studies on the roles of sperm small RNAs. In addition, we propose that some of the pseudogene-derived human piRNAs may regulate expression of their parent gene in the male germline. PMID:25904136

  10. Regulation of cytokines by small RNAs during skin inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkelsen Jacob G

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intercellular signaling by cytokines is a vital feature of the innate immune system. In skin, an inflammatory response is mediated by cytokines and an entwined network of cellular communication between T-cells and epidermal keratinocytes. Dysregulated cytokine production, orchestrated by activated T-cells homing to the skin, is believed to be the main cause of psoriasis, a common inflammatory skin disorder. Cytokines are heavily regulated at the transcriptional level, but emerging evidence suggests that regulatory mechanisms that operate after transcription play a key role in balancing the production of cytokines. Herein, we review the nature of cytokine signaling in psoriasis with particular emphasis on regulation by mRNA destabilizing elements and the potential targeting of cytokine-encoding mRNAs by miRNAs. The proposed linkage between mRNA decay mediated by AU-rich elements and miRNA association is described and discussed as a possible general feature of cytokine regulation in skin. Moreover, we describe the latest attempts to therapeutically target cytokines at the RNA level in psoriasis by exploiting the cellular RNA interference machinery. The applicability of cytokine-encoding mRNAs as future clinical drug targets is evaluated, and advances and obstacles related to topical administration of RNA-based drugs targeting the cytokine circuit in psoriasis are described.

  11. A comparative study of small RNAs in Toxoplasma gondii of distinct genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jielin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite with a significant impact on human health. Inside the mammalian and avian hosts, the parasite can undergo rapid development or remain inactive in the cysts. The mechanism that regulates parasite proliferation has not been fully understood. Small noncoding RNAs (sncRNA such as microRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous regulatory factors that can modulate cell differentiation and development. It is anticipated that hundreds of miRNAs regulate the expression of thousands of genes in a single organism. SncRNAs have been identified in T. gondii, however the profiles of sncRNAs expression and their potential regulatory function in parasites of distinct genotypes has largely been unknown. Methods The transcription profiles of miRNAs in the two genetically distinct strains, RH and ME49, of T. gondii were investigated and compared by a high-through-put RNA sequencing technique and systematic bioinformatics analysis. The expression of some of the miRNAs was confirmed by Northern blot analysis. Results 1,083,320 unique sequences were obtained. Of which, 17 conserved miRNAs related to 2 metazoan miRNA families and 339 novel miRNAs were identified. A total of 175 miRNAs showed strain-specific expression, of which 155 miRNAs were up-regulated in RH strain and 20 miRNAs were up-regulated in ME49 strain. Strain-specific expression of miRNAs in T. gondii could be due to activation of specific genes at different genomic loci or due to arm-switching of the same pre-miRNA duplex. Conclusions Evidence for the differential expression of miRNAs in the two genetically distinct strains of T. gondii has been identified and defined. MiRNAs of T. gondii are more species-specific as compared to other organisms, which can be developed as diagnostic biomarkers for toxoplasmosis. The data also provide a framework for future studies on RNAi-dependent regulatory mechanisms in the zoonotic parasite.

  12. Identification of Conserved and Potentially Regulatory Small RNAs in Heterocystous Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eBrenes-Álvarez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Small RNAs (sRNAs are a growing class of non-protein-coding transcripts that participate in the regulation of virtually every aspect of bacterial physiology. Heterocystous cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic organisms that exhibit multicellular behaviour and developmental alternatives involving specific transcriptomes exclusive of a given physiological condition or even a cell type. In the context of our ongoing effort to understand developmental decisions in these organisms we have undertaken an approach to the global identification of sRNAs. Using differential RNA-Seq we have previously identified transcriptional start sites for the model heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Here we combine this dataset with a prediction of Rho-independent transcriptional terminators and an analysis of phylogenetic conservation of potential sRNAs among 89 available cyanobacterial genomes. In contrast to predictive genome-wide approaches, the use of an experimental dataset comprising all active transcriptional start sites (differential RNA-Seq facilitates the identification of bona fide sRNAs. The output of our approach is a dataset of predicted potential sRNAs in Nostoc sp. PCC 7120, with different degrees of phylogenetic conservation across the 89 cyanobacterial genomes analyzed. Previously described sRNAs appear among the predicted sRNAs, demonstrating the performance of the algorithm. In addition, new predicted sRNAs are now identified that can be involved in regulation of different aspects of cyanobacterial physiology, including adaptation to nitrogen stress, the condition that triggers differentiation of heterocysts (specialized nitrogen-fixing cells. Transcription of several predicted sRNAs that appear exclusively in the genomes of heterocystous cyanobacteria is experimentally verified by Northern blot. Cell-specific transcription of one of these sRNAs, NsiR8 (nitrogen stress-induced RNA 8, in developing heterocysts is also

  13. Wolbachia small noncoding RNAs and their role in cross-kingdom communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral, Jaime G; Hussain, Mazhar; Joubert, D Albert; Iturbe-Ormaetxe, Iñaki; O'Neill, Scott L; Asgari, Sassan

    2014-12-30

    In prokaryotes, small noncoding RNAs (snRNAs) of 50-500 nt are produced that are important in bacterial virulence and response to environmental stimuli. Here, we identified and characterized snRNAs from the endosymbiotic bacteria, Wolbachia, which are widespread in invertebrates and cause reproductive manipulations. Most importantly, some strains of Wolbachia inhibit replication of several vector-borne pathogens in insects. We demonstrate that two abundant snRNAs, WsnRNA-46 and WsnRNA-49, are expressed in Wolbachia from noncoding RNA transcripts that contain precursors with stem-loop structures. WsnRNAs were detected in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infected with the wMelPop-CLA strain of Wolbachia and in Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans infected with wMelPop and wAu strains, respectively, indicating that the WsnRNAs are conserved across species and strains. In addition, we show that the WsnRNAs may potentially regulate host genes and Wolbachia genes. Our findings provide evidence for the production of functional snRNAs by Wolbachia that play roles in cross-kingdom communication between the endosymbiont and the host.

  14. Synaptic vesicles contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs) including transfer RNA fragments (trfRNA) and microRNAs (miRNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huinan; Wu, Cheng; Aramayo, Rodolfo; Sachs, Matthew S; Harlow, Mark L

    2015-10-08

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are neuronal presynaptic organelles that load and release neurotransmitter at chemical synapses. In addition to classic neurotransmitters, we have found that synaptic vesicles isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo californica, a model cholinergic synapse, contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs), primarily the 5' ends of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) termed tRNA fragments (trfRNAs). To test the evolutionary conservation of SV sRNAs we examined isolated SVs from the mouse central nervous system (CNS). We found abundant levels of sRNAs in mouse SVs, including trfRNAs and micro RNAs (miRNAs) known to be involved in transcriptional and translational regulation. This discovery suggests that, in addition to inducing changes in local dendritic excitability through the release of neurotransmitters, SVs may, through the release of specific trfRNAs and miRNAs, directly regulate local protein synthesis. We believe these findings have broad implications for the study of chemical synaptic transmission.

  15. Biogenesis and Mechanism of Action of Small Non-Coding RNAs: Insights from the Point of View of Structural Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marina C.; Leitão, Ana Lúcia; Enguita, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs are dominant in the genomic output of the higher organisms being not simply occasional transcripts with idiosyncratic functions, but constituting an extensive regulatory network. Among all the species of non-coding RNAs, small non-coding RNAs (miRNAs, siRNAs and piRNAs) have been shown to be in the core of the regulatory machinery of all the genomic output in eukaryotic cells. Small non-coding RNAs are produced by several pathways containing specialized enzymes that process RNA transcripts. The mechanism of action of these molecules is also ensured by a group of effector proteins that are commonly engaged within high molecular weight protein-RNA complexes. In the last decade, the contribution of structural biology has been essential to the dissection of the molecular mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis and function of small non-coding RNAs. PMID:22949860

  16. Dicer-Dependent Biogenesis of Small RNAs and Evidence for MicroRNA-Like RNAs in the Penicillin Producing Fungus Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlmann, Tim A; Kück, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs) that regulate gene expression in a wide range of eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed regulatory sRNAs in Penicillium chrysogenum, the industrial producer of the β-lactam antibiotic penicillin. To identify sRNAs and microRNA-like RNAs (milRNAs) on a global approach, two sRNA sequencing libraries were constructed. One library was created with pooled total RNA, obtained from twelve differently grown cultures (RNA Mix), and the other with total RNA from a single submerged cultivation (∆ku70FRT2). Illumina sequencing of both RNA libraries produced 84,322,825 mapped reads. To distinguish between Dicer-dependent and independent sRNA formation, we further constructed two single dicer gene mutants (∆dcl2 and ∆dcl1) and a dicer double mutant (∆dcl2∆dcl1) and analyzed an sRNA library from the Dicer-deficient double-mutant. We identified 661 Dicer-dependent loci and in silico prediction revealed 34 milRNAs. Northern blot hybridization of two milRNAs provided evidence for mature milRNAs that are processed either in a complete or partial Dicer-dependent manner from an RNA precursor. Identified milRNAs share typical characteristics of previously discovered fungal milRNAs, like a strong preference for a 5' uracil and the typical length distribution. The detection of potential milRNA target sites in the genome suggests that milRNAs might play a role in posttranscriptional gene regulation. Our data will further increase our knowledge of sRNA dependent gene regulation processes, which is an important prerequisite to develop more effective strategies for improving industrial fermentations with P. chrysogenum.

  17. Dicer-Dependent Biogenesis of Small RNAs and Evidence for MicroRNA-Like RNAs in the Penicillin Producing Fungus Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim A Dahlmann

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs that regulate gene expression in a wide range of eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed regulatory sRNAs in Penicillium chrysogenum, the industrial producer of the β-lactam antibiotic penicillin. To identify sRNAs and microRNA-like RNAs (milRNAs on a global approach, two sRNA sequencing libraries were constructed. One library was created with pooled total RNA, obtained from twelve differently grown cultures (RNA Mix, and the other with total RNA from a single submerged cultivation (∆ku70FRT2. Illumina sequencing of both RNA libraries produced 84,322,825 mapped reads. To distinguish between Dicer-dependent and independent sRNA formation, we further constructed two single dicer gene mutants (∆dcl2 and ∆dcl1 and a dicer double mutant (∆dcl2∆dcl1 and analyzed an sRNA library from the Dicer-deficient double-mutant. We identified 661 Dicer-dependent loci and in silico prediction revealed 34 milRNAs. Northern blot hybridization of two milRNAs provided evidence for mature milRNAs that are processed either in a complete or partial Dicer-dependent manner from an RNA precursor. Identified milRNAs share typical characteristics of previously discovered fungal milRNAs, like a strong preference for a 5' uracil and the typical length distribution. The detection of potential milRNA target sites in the genome suggests that milRNAs might play a role in posttranscriptional gene regulation. Our data will further increase our knowledge of sRNA dependent gene regulation processes, which is an important prerequisite to develop more effective strategies for improving industrial fermentations with P. chrysogenum.

  18. Transfer and Expression of Small Interfering RNAs in Mammalian Cells Using Lentiviral Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, T D; Spirin, P V; Prassolov, V S

    2013-04-01

    RNA interference is a convenient tool for modulating gene expression. The widespread application of RNA interference is made difficult because of the imperfections of the methods used for efficient target cell delivery of whatever genes are under study. One of the most convenient and efficient gene transfer and expression systems is based on the use of lentiviral vectors, which direct the synthesis of small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), the precursors of siRNAs. The application of these systems enables one to achieve sustainable and long-term shRNA expression in cells. This review considers the adaptation of the processing of artificial shRNA to the mechanisms used by cellular microRNAs and simultaneous expression of several shRNAs as potential approaches for producing lentiviral vectors that direct shRNA synthesis. Approaches to using RNA interference for the treatment of cancer, as well as hereditary and viral diseases, are under active development today. The improvement made to the methods for constructing lentiviral vectors and the investigation into the mechanisms of processing of small interfering RNA allow one to now consider lentiviral vectors that direct shRNA synthesis as one of the most promising tools for delivering small interfering RNAs.

  19. Roles of small RNAs in plant disease resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yang; Hai Huang

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between plants and pathogens represents a dynamic competition between a robust immune system and efficient infectious strategies. Plant innate immunity is composed of complex and highly regulated molecular networks, which can be triggered by the perception of either conserved or race-specific pathogenic molecular signatures. Smal RNAs are emerging as versatile regulators of plant development, growth and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. They act in different tiers of plant immunity, including the pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered and the effector-triggered immunity. On the other hand, pathogens have evolved effector molecules to suppress or hijack the host smal RNA pathways. This leads to an arms race between plants and pathogens at the level of smal RNA-mediated defense. Here, we review recent advances in smal RNA-mediated defense responses and discuss the chal enging questions in this area.

  20. Monitoring the Spatiotemporal Activities of miRNAs in Small Animal Models Using Molecular Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Baril

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding mRNA targets via sequence complementary inducing translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. A current challenge in the field of miRNA biology is to understand the functionality of miRNAs under physiopathological conditions. Recent evidence indicates that miRNA expression is more complex than simple regulation at the transcriptional level. MiRNAs undergo complex post-transcriptional regulations such miRNA processing, editing, accumulation and re-cycling within P-bodies. They are dynamically regulated and have a well-orchestrated spatiotemporal localization pattern. Real-time and spatio-temporal analyses of miRNA expression are difficult to evaluate and often underestimated. Therefore, important information connecting miRNA expression and function can be lost. Conventional miRNA profiling methods such as Northern blot, real-time PCR, microarray, in situ hybridization and deep sequencing continue to contribute to our knowledge of miRNA biology. However, these methods can seldom shed light on the spatiotemporal organization and function of miRNAs in real-time. Non-invasive molecular imaging methods have the potential to address these issues and are thus attracting increasing attention. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of methods used to detect miRNAs and discusses their contribution in the emerging field of miRNA biology and therapy.

  1. Discovery of putative small non-coding RNAs from the obligate intracellular bacterium Wolbachia pipientis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Woolfit

    Full Text Available Wolbachia pipientis is an endosymbiotic bacterium that induces a wide range of effects in its insect hosts, including manipulation of reproduction and protection against pathogens. Little is known of the molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-Wolbachia interaction, though it is likely to be mediated via the secretion of proteins or other factors. There is an increasing amount of evidence that bacteria regulate many cellular processes, including secretion of virulence factors, using small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs, but sRNAs have not previously been described from Wolbachia. We have used two independent approaches, one based on comparative genomics and the other using RNA-Seq data generated for gene expression studies, to identify candidate sRNAs in Wolbachia. We experimentally characterized the expression of one of these candidates in four Wolbachia strains, and showed that it is differentially regulated in different host tissues and sexes. Given the roles played by sRNAs in other host-associated bacteria, the conservation of the candidate sRNAs between different Wolbachia strains, and the sex- and tissue-specific differential regulation we have identified, we hypothesise that sRNAs may play a significant role in the biology of Wolbachia, and in particular in its interactions with its host.

  2. miRNAs: small genes with big potential in metazoan phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, James E; Sperling, Erik A; Nailor, Audrey; Heimberg, Alysha M; Robinson, Jeffrey M; King, Benjamin L; Pisani, Davide; Donoghue, Philip C J; Peterson, Kevin J

    2013-11-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a key component of gene regulatory networks and have been implicated in the regulation of virtually every biological process found in multicellular eukaryotes. What makes them interesting from a phylogenetic perspective is the high conservation of primary sequence between taxa, their accrual in metazoan genomes through evolutionary time, and the rarity of secondary loss in most metazoan taxa. Despite these properties, the use of miRNAs as phylogenetic markers has not yet been discussed within a clear conceptual framework. Here we highlight five properties of miRNAs that underlie their utility in phylogenetics: 1) The processes of miRNA biogenesis enable the identification of novel miRNAs without prior knowledge of sequence; 2) The continuous addition of miRNA families to metazoan genomes through evolutionary time; 3) The low level of secondary gene loss in most metazoan taxa; 4) The low substitution rate in the mature miRNA sequence; and 5) The small probability of convergent evolution of two miRNAs. Phylogenetic analyses using both Bayesian and parsimony methods on a eumetazoan miRNA data set highlight the potential of miRNAs to become an invaluable new tool, especially when used as an additional line of evidence, to resolve previously intractable nodes within the tree of life.

  3. Monitoring the Spatiotemporal Activities of miRNAs in Small Animal Models Using Molecular Imaging Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Patrick; Ezzine, Safia; Pichon, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding mRNA targets via sequence complementary inducing translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. A current challenge in the field of miRNA biology is to understand the functionality of miRNAs under physiopathological conditions. Recent evidence indicates that miRNA expression is more complex than simple regulation at the transcriptional level. MiRNAs undergo complex post-transcriptional regulations such miRNA processing, editing, accumulation and re-cycling within P-bodies. They are dynamically regulated and have a well-orchestrated spatiotemporal localization pattern. Real-time and spatio-temporal analyses of miRNA expression are difficult to evaluate and often underestimated. Therefore, important information connecting miRNA expression and function can be lost. Conventional miRNA profiling methods such as Northern blot, real-time PCR, microarray, in situ hybridization and deep sequencing continue to contribute to our knowledge of miRNA biology. However, these methods can seldom shed light on the spatiotemporal organization and function of miRNAs in real-time. Non-invasive molecular imaging methods have the potential to address these issues and are thus attracting increasing attention. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of methods used to detect miRNAs and discusses their contribution in the emerging field of miRNA biology and therapy. PMID:25749473

  4. Discovery of putative small non-coding RNAs from the obligate intracellular bacterium Wolbachia pipientis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfit, Megan; Algama, Manjula; Keith, Jonathan M; McGraw, Elizabeth A; Popovici, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is an endosymbiotic bacterium that induces a wide range of effects in its insect hosts, including manipulation of reproduction and protection against pathogens. Little is known of the molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-Wolbachia interaction, though it is likely to be mediated via the secretion of proteins or other factors. There is an increasing amount of evidence that bacteria regulate many cellular processes, including secretion of virulence factors, using small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), but sRNAs have not previously been described from Wolbachia. We have used two independent approaches, one based on comparative genomics and the other using RNA-Seq data generated for gene expression studies, to identify candidate sRNAs in Wolbachia. We experimentally characterized the expression of one of these candidates in four Wolbachia strains, and showed that it is differentially regulated in different host tissues and sexes. Given the roles played by sRNAs in other host-associated bacteria, the conservation of the candidate sRNAs between different Wolbachia strains, and the sex- and tissue-specific differential regulation we have identified, we hypothesise that sRNAs may play a significant role in the biology of Wolbachia, and in particular in its interactions with its host.

  5. Small regulatory RNAs of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway as a prophylactic treatment against fish pathogenic viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Hajiabadi, Seyed Amir Hossein Jalali; Kristensen, Lasse Bøgelund Juel;

    2011-01-01

    . The mechanism can be programmed with several types of small double stranded RNAs - the type of which defines the destiny of the target. One such class of regulatory RNAs called microRNAs are upregulated due to various physiological responses of the cell and they suppress many genes simultaneously believed...

  6. Differential Expression Of Small Rnas Under Chemical Stress And Fed-batch Fermentation In Escherichia Coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rau, Martin Holm; Bojanovic, Klara; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard;

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) are often expressed in response to changing environmental conditions and function to modulate gene expression. Although chemical stress is routinely encountered in microbial processing applications, the cellular response and the involvement of sRNAs in t...

  7. Spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs of Tetrahymena thermophila and some possible snRNA-snRNA base-pairing interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orum, H; Nielsen, Henrik; Engberg, J

    1991-01-01

    We have identified and characterized the full set of spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs; U1, U2, U4, U5 and U6) from the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. With the exception of U4 snRNA, the sizes of the T. thermophila snRNAs are closely similar to their metazoan homologues. The T...

  8. Undesired small RNAs originate from an artificial microRNA precursor in transgenic petunia (Petunia hybrida.

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    Yulong Guo

    Full Text Available Although artificial microRNA (amiRNA technology has been used frequently in gene silencing in plants, little research has been devoted to investigating the accuracy of amiRNA precursor processing. In this work, amiRNAchs1 (amiRchs1, based on the Arabidopsis miR319a precursor, was expressed in order to suppress the expression of CHS genes in petunia. The transgenic plants showed the CHS gene-silencing phenotype. A modified 5' RACE technique was used to map small-RNA-directed cleavage sites and to detect processing intermediates of the amiRchs1 precursor. The results showed that the target CHS mRNAs were cut at the expected sites and that the amiRchs1 precursor was processed from loop to base. The accumulation of small RNAs in amiRchs1 transgenic petunia petals was analyzed using the deep-sequencing technique. The results showed that, alongside the accumulation of the desired artificial microRNAs, additional small RNAs that originated from other regions of the amiRNA precursor were also accumulated at high frequency. Some of these had previously been found to be accumulated at low frequency in the products of ath-miR319a precursor processing and some of them were accompanied by 3'-tailing variant. Potential targets of the undesired small RNAs were discovered in petunia and other Solanaceae plants. The findings draw attention to the potential occurrence of undesired target silencing induced by such additional small RNAs when amiRNA technology is used. No appreciable production of secondary small RNAs occurred, despite the fact that amiRchs1 was designed to have perfect complementarity to its CHS-J target. This confirmed that perfect pairing between an amiRNA and its targets is not the trigger for secondary small RNA production. In conjunction with the observation that amiRNAs with perfect complementarity to their target genes show high efficiency and specificity in gene silencing, this finding has an important bearing on future applications of amiRNAs

  9. Metatranscriptomic analysis of small RNAs present in soybean deep sequencing libraries

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    Lorrayne Gomes Molina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of small RNAs unrelated to the soybean genome were identified after deep sequencing of soybean small RNA libraries. A metatranscriptomic analysis was carried out to identify the origin of these sequences. Comparative analyses of small interference RNAs (siRNAs present in samples collected in open areas corresponding to soybean field plantations and samples from soybean cultivated in greenhouses under a controlled environment were made. Different pathogenic, symbiotic and free-living organisms were identified from samples of both growth systems. They included viruses, bacteria and different groups of fungi. This approach can be useful not only to identify potentially unknown pathogens and pests, but also to understand the relations that soybean plants establish with microorganisms that may affect, directly or indirectly, plant health and crop production.

  10. Identification of four novel small non-coding RNAs from Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris

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    Lu Guang-Tao

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs have been recognized as important regulators of various cellular processes. Approximately 200 bacterial sRNAs in total have been reported. However, very few sRNAs have been identified from phytopathogenic bacteria. Results Xanthomons campestris pathovar campestris (Xcc is the causal agent of black rot disease of cruciferous crops. In this study, a cDNA library was constructed from the low-molecular weight RNA isolated from the Xcc strain 8004 grown to exponential phase in the minimal medium XVM2. Seven sRNA candidates were obtained by sequencing screen of 2,500 clones from the library and four of them were confirmed to be sRNAs by Northern hybridization, which were named sRNA-Xcc1, sRNA-Xcc2, sRNA-Xcc3, and sRNA-Xcc4. The transcription start and stop sites of these sRNAs were further determined. BLAST analysis revealed that the four sRNAs are novel. Bioinformatics prediction showed that a large number of genes with various known or unknown functions in Xcc 8004 are potential targets of sRNA-Xcc1, sRNA-Xcc3 and sRNA-Xcc4. In contrast, only a few genes were predicted to be potential targets of sRNA-Xcc2. Conclusion We have identified four novel sRNAs from Xcc by a large-scale screen. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that they may perform various functions. This work provides the first step toward understanding the role of sRNAs in the molecular mechanisms of Xanthomonas campestris pathogenesis.

  11. A genome-wide analysis of small regulatory RNAs in the human pathogen group A Streptococcus.

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    Nataly Perez

    Full Text Available The coordinated regulation of gene expression is essential for pathogens to infect and cause disease. A recently appreciated mechanism of regulation is that afforded by small regulatory RNA (sRNA molecules. Here, we set out to assess the prevalence of sRNAs in the human bacterial pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS. Genome-wide identification of candidate GAS sRNAs was performed through a tiling Affymetrix microarray approach and identified 40 candidate sRNAs within the M1T1 GAS strain MGAS2221. Together with a previous bioinformatic approach this brings the number of novel candidate sRNAs in GAS to 75, a number that approximates the number of GAS transcription factors. Transcripts were confirmed by Northern blot analysis for 16 of 32 candidate sRNAs tested, and the abundance of several of these sRNAs were shown to be temporally regulated. Six sRNAs were selected for further study and the promoter, transcriptional start site, and Rho-independent terminator identified for each. Significant variation was observed between the six sRNAs with respect to their stability during growth, and with respect to their inter- and/or intra-serotype-specific levels of abundance. To start to assess the contribution of sRNAs to gene regulation in M1T1 GAS we deleted the previously described sRNA PEL from four clinical isolates. Data from genome-wide expression microarray, quantitative RT-PCR, and Western blot analyses are consistent with PEL having no regulatory function in M1T1 GAS. The finding that candidate sRNA molecules are prevalent throughout the GAS genome provides significant impetus to the study of this fundamental gene-regulatory mechanism in an important human pathogen.

  12. Detection of small RNAs in Bordetella pertussis and identification of a novel repeated genetic element

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    Wulbrecht Bérénice

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small bacterial RNAs (sRNAs have been shown to participate in the regulation of gene expression and have been identified in numerous prokaryotic species. Some of them are involved in the regulation of virulence in pathogenic bacteria. So far, little is known about sRNAs in Bordetella, and only very few sRNAs have been identified in the genome of Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. Results An in silico approach was used to predict sRNAs genes in intergenic regions of the B. pertussis genome. The genome sequences of B. pertussis, Bordetella parapertussis, Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella avium were compared using a Blast, and significant hits were analyzed using RNAz. Twenty-three candidate regions were obtained, including regions encoding the already documented 6S RNA, and the GCVT and FMN riboswitches. The existence of sRNAs was verified by Northern blot analyses, and transcripts were detected for 13 out of the 20 additional candidates. These new sRNAs were named Bordetella pertussis RNAs, bpr. The expression of 4 of them differed between the early, exponential and late growth phases, and one of them, bprJ2, was found to be under the control of BvgA/BvgS two-component regulatory system of Bordetella virulence. A phylogenetic study of the bprJ sequence revealed a novel, so far undocumented repeat of ~90 bp, found in numerous copies in the Bordetella genomes and in that of other Betaproteobacteria. This repeat exhibits certain features of mobile elements. Conclusion We shown here that B. pertussis, like other pathogens, expresses sRNAs, and that the expression of one of them is controlled by the BvgA/BvgS system, similarly to most virulence genes, suggesting that it is involved in virulence of B. pertussis.

  13. Differential expression of small non-coding RNAs in serum from cattle challenged with viruses causing bovine respiratory disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    MicroRNAs and tRNA-derived RNA fragments (tRFs) are the two most abundant groups of small non-coding RNAs. The potential for microRNAs and tRFs to be used as pathogen exposure indicators is yet to be fully explored. Our objective was to identify microRNAs and tRFs in cattle challenged with a non-cy...

  14. A novel class of heat-responsive small RNAs derived from the chloroplast genome of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa

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    de Ruiter Marjo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-coding small RNAs play critical roles in various cellular processes in a wide spectrum of eukaryotic organisms. Their responses to abiotic stress have become a popular topic of economic and scientific importance in biological research. Several studies in recent years have reported a small number of non-coding small RNAs that map to chloroplast genomes. However, it remains uncertain whether small RNAs are generated from chloroplast genome and how they respond to environmental stress, such as high temperature. Chinese cabbage is an important vegetable crop, and heat stress usually causes great losses in yields and quality. Under heat stress, the leaves become etiolated due to the disruption and disassembly of chloroplasts. In an attempt to determine the heat-responsive small RNAs in chloroplast genome of Chinese cabbage, we carried out deep sequencing, using heat-treated samples, and analysed the proportion of small RNAs that were matched to chloroplast genome. Results Deep sequencing provided evidence that a novel subset of small RNAs were derived from the chloroplast genome of Chinese cabbage. The chloroplast small RNAs (csRNAs include those derived from mRNA, rRNA, tRNA and intergenic RNA. The rRNA-derived csRNAs were preferentially located at the 3'-ends of the rRNAs, while the tRNA-derived csRNAs were mainly located at 5'-termini of the tRNAs. After heat treatment, the abundance of csRNAs decreased in seedlings, except those of 24 nt in length. The novel heat-responsive csRNAs and their locations in the chloroplast were verified by Northern blotting. The regulation of some csRNAs to the putative target genes were identified by real-time PCR. Our results reveal that high temperature suppresses the production of some csRNAs, which have potential roles in transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation. Conclusions In addition to nucleus, the chloroplast is another important organelle that generates a number of small

  15. The small RNA content of human sperm reveals pseudogene-derived piRNAs complementary to protein-coding genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantano, Lorena; Jodar, Meritxell; Bak, Mads

    2015-01-01

    At the end of mammalian sperm development, sperm cells expel most of their cytoplasm and dispose of the majority of their RNA. Yet, hundreds of RNA molecules remain in mature sperm. The biological significance of the vast majority of these molecules is unclear. To better understand the processes......-specific genes. The most abundant class of small noncoding RNAs in sperm are PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Surprisingly, we found that human sperm cells contain piRNAs processed from pseudogenes. Clusters of piRNAs from human testes contain pseudogenes transcribed in the antisense strand and processed...... that generate sperm small RNAs and what roles they may have, we sequenced and characterized the small RNA content of sperm samples from two human fertile individuals. We detected 182 microRNAs, some of which are highly abundant. The most abundant microRNA in sperm is miR-1246 with predicted targets among sperm...

  16. Global Analysis of Non-coding Small RNAs in Arabidopsis in Response to Jasmonate Treatment by Deep Sequencing Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bosen Zhang; Zhiping Jin; Daoxin Xie

    2012-01-01

    In plants,non-coding small RNAs play a vital role in plant development and stress responses.To explore the possible role of non-coding small RNAs in the regulation of the jasmonate (JA) pathway,we compared the non-coding small RNAs between the JA-deficient aos mutant and the JA-treated wild type Arabidopsis via high-throughput sequencing.Thirty new miRNAs and 27 new miRNA candidates were identified through bioinformatics approach.Forty-nine known miRNAs (belonging to 24 families),15 new miRNAs and new miRNA candidates (belonging to 11 families) and 3 tasiRNA families were induced by JA,whereas 1 new miRNA,1 tasiRNA family and 22 known miRNAs (belonging to 9 families) were repressed by JA.

  17. Design of functional small interfering RNAs targeting amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-associated mutant alleles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Chang-ming; DING Hong-liu

    2011-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is a potential cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) caused by dominant,gain-of-function superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations. The success of such therapy relies on the functional small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that can effectively deliver RNAi. This study aimed to design the functional siRNAs targeting ALS-associated mutant alleles.Methods A modified dual luciferase system containing human SOD1 mRNA target was established to quantify siRNA efficacy. Coupled with validated siRNAs identified in the literature, we analyzed the rationale of siRNA design and subsequently developed an asymmetry rule-based strategy for designing siRNA. We then further tested the effectiveness of this design strategy in converting a naturally symmetric siRNA into functional siRNAs with favorable asymmetry for gene silencing of SOD1 alleles.Results The efficacies of siRNAs could vary tremendously by one base-pair position change. Functional siRNAs could target the whole span of SOD1 mRNA coding sequence as well as non-coding region. While there is no distinguishable pattern of the distribution of nucleobases in these validated siRNAs, the high percent of GC count at the last two positions of siRNAs (P18 and P19) indicated a strong effect of asymmetry rule. Introducing a mismatch at position 1 of the 5' of antisense strand of siRNA successfully converted the inactive siRNA into functional siRNAs that silence SOD1 with desired efficacy.Conclusions Asymmetry rule-based strategy that incorporates a mismatch into siRNA most consistently enhances RNAi efficacy and guarantees producing functional siRNAs that successfully silence ALS-associated SOD1 mutant alleles regardless target positions. This strategy could also be useful to design siRNAs for silencing other disease-associated dominant, gain-of-function mutant genes.

  18. Small RNA Sequencing Uncovers New miRNAs and moRNAs Differentially Expressed in Normal and Primary Myelofibrosis CD34+ Cells.

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    Paola Guglielmelli

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN are chronic myeloid cancers thought to arise at the level of CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. They include essential thrombocythemia (ET, polycythemia vera (PV and primary myelofibrosis (PMF. All can progress to acute leukemia, but PMF carries the worst prognosis. Increasing evidences indicate that deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs might plays an important role in hematologic malignancies, including MPN. To attain deeper knowledge of short RNAs (sRNAs expression pattern in CD34+ cells and of their possible role in mediating post-transcriptional regulation in PMF, we sequenced with Illumina HiSeq2000 technology CD34+ cells from healthy subjects and PMF patients. We detected the expression of 784 known miRNAs, with a prevalence of miRNA up-regulation in PMF samples, and discovered 34 new miRNAs and 99 new miRNA-offset RNAs (moRNAs, in CD34+ cells. Thirty-seven small RNAs were differentially expressed in PMF patients compared with healthy subjects, according to microRNA sequencing data. Five miRNAs (miR-10b-5p, miR-19b-3p, miR-29a-3p, miR-379-5p, and miR-543 were deregulated also in PMF granulocytes. Moreover, 3'-moR-128-2 resulted consistently downregulated in PMF according to RNA-seq and qRT-PCR data both in CD34+ cells and granulocytes. Target predictions of these validated small RNAs de-regulated in PMF and functional enrichment analyses highlighted many interesting pathways involved in tumor development and progression, such as signaling by FGFR and DAP12 and Oncogene Induced Senescence. As a whole, data obtained in this study deepened the knowledge of miRNAs and moRNAs altered expression in PMF CD34+ cells and allowed to identify and validate a specific small RNA profile that distinguishes PMF granulocytes from those of normal subjects. We thus provided new information regarding the possible role of miRNAs and, specifically, of new moRNAs in this disease.

  19. High Throughput Sequencing of Small RNAs in the Two Cucurbita Germplasm with Different Sodium Accumulation Patterns Identifies Novel MicroRNAs Involved in Salt Stress Response.

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    Junjun Xie

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs, a class of small non-coding RNAs, recognize their mRNA targets based on perfect sequence complementarity. MiRNAs lead to broader changes in gene expression after plants are exposed to stress. High-throughput sequencing is an effective method to identify and profile small RNA populations in non-model plants under salt stresses, significantly improving our knowledge regarding miRNA functions in salt tolerance. Cucurbits are sensitive to soil salinity, and the Cucurbita genus is used as the rootstock of other cucurbits to enhance salt tolerance. Several cucurbit crops have been used for miRNA sequencing but salt stress-related miRNAs in cucurbit species have not been reported. In this study, we subjected two Cucurbita germplasm, namely, N12 (Cucurbita. maxima Duch. and N15 (Cucurbita. moschata Duch., with different sodium accumulation patterns, to Illumina sequencing to determine small RNA populations in root tissues after 4 h of salt treatment and control. A total of 21,548,326 and 19,394,108 reads were generated from the control and salt-treated N12 root tissues, respectively. By contrast, 19,108,240 and 20,546,052 reads were obtained from the control and salt-treated N15 root tissues, respectively. Fifty-eight conserved miRNA families and 33 novel miRNAs were identified in the two Cucurbita germplasm. Seven miRNAs (six conserved miRNAs and one novel miRNAs were up-regulated in salt-treated N12 and N15 samples. Most target genes of differentially expressed novel miRNAs were transcription factors and salt stress-responsive proteins, including dehydration-induced protein, cation/H+ antiporter 18, and CBL-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase. The differential expression of miRNAs between the two Cucurbita germplasm under salt stress conditions and their target genes demonstrated that novel miRNAs play an important role in the response of the two Cucurbita germplasm to salt stress. The present study initially explored small

  20. High Throughput Sequencing of Small RNAs in the Two Cucurbita Germplasm with Different Sodium Accumulation Patterns Identifies Novel MicroRNAs Involved in Salt Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Junjun; Lei, Bo; Niu, Mengliang; Huang, Yuan; Kong, Qiusheng; Bie, Zhilong

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs, recognize their mRNA targets based on perfect sequence complementarity. MiRNAs lead to broader changes in gene expression after plants are exposed to stress. High-throughput sequencing is an effective method to identify and profile small RNA populations in non-model plants under salt stresses, significantly improving our knowledge regarding miRNA functions in salt tolerance. Cucurbits are sensitive to soil salinity, and the Cucurbita genus is used as the rootstock of other cucurbits to enhance salt tolerance. Several cucurbit crops have been used for miRNA sequencing but salt stress-related miRNAs in cucurbit species have not been reported. In this study, we subjected two Cucurbita germplasm, namely, N12 (Cucurbita. maxima Duch.) and N15 (Cucurbita. moschata Duch.), with different sodium accumulation patterns, to Illumina sequencing to determine small RNA populations in root tissues after 4 h of salt treatment and control. A total of 21,548,326 and 19,394,108 reads were generated from the control and salt-treated N12 root tissues, respectively. By contrast, 19,108,240 and 20,546,052 reads were obtained from the control and salt-treated N15 root tissues, respectively. Fifty-eight conserved miRNA families and 33 novel miRNAs were identified in the two Cucurbita germplasm. Seven miRNAs (six conserved miRNAs and one novel miRNAs) were up-regulated in salt-treated N12 and N15 samples. Most target genes of differentially expressed novel miRNAs were transcription factors and salt stress-responsive proteins, including dehydration-induced protein, cation/H+ antiporter 18, and CBL-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase. The differential expression of miRNAs between the two Cucurbita germplasm under salt stress conditions and their target genes demonstrated that novel miRNAs play an important role in the response of the two Cucurbita germplasm to salt stress. The present study initially explored small RNAs in the

  1. microRNAs: a small molecule but an important role in tumor%microRNAs:小分子在肿瘤中的重要作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊术道; 储以微

    2010-01-01

    microRNAs是一类新型保守的微小非编码单链RNA,成熟的microRNAs通过与靶基因mRNA碱基形成不完全配对,引起mRNA降解及转录抑制.研究表明,microRNAs对细胞增殖、细胞分化和细胞凋亡具有重要的调控作用,microRNAs的表达异常与肿瘤的发生发展密切相关,肿瘤中既存在肿瘤抑制作用的microRNAs,也存在肿瘤促进作用的microRNAs.因此,microRNAs分子虽小,却在肿瘤发生、发展的过程中作用重大.%microRNAs are a new/class of small, evolutionarily conserved, non-protein-coding RNA molecules. Mature microRNAs exert their gene regulatory activity primarily by imperfectly base pairing to their target mRNAs, leading to mRNA degradation or translational inhibition. Recent studies have verified that microRNAs play a key role in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation and differentiation as well as apoptosis. Further studies showed that microRNAs as oncogenes and tumor suppressors are involved in the tumor formation and development. Accordingly, microRNAs as a kind of small RNA molecules play an important role in tumorigenesis.

  2. High-Level Accumulation of Exogenous Small RNAs Not Affecting Endogenous Small RNA Biogenesis and Function in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wan-xia; Neil A Smith; ZHOU Chang-yong; WANG Ming-bo

    2014-01-01

    RNA silencing is a fundamental plant defence and gene control mechanism in plants that are directed by 20-24 nucleotide (nt) small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA). Infection of plants with viral pathogens or transformation of plants with RNA interference (RNAi) constructs is usually associated with high levels of exogenous siRNAs, but it is unclear if these siRNAs interfere with endogenous small RNA pathways and hence affect plant development. Here we provide evidence that viral satellite RNA (satRNA) infection does not affect siRNA and miRNA biogenesis or plant growth despite the extremely high level of satRNA-derived siRNAs. We generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants that no longer develop the speciifc yellowing symptoms generally associated with infection by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) Y-satellite RNA (Y-Sat). We then used these plants to show that CMV Y-Sat infection did not cause any visible phenotypic changes in comparison to uninfected plants, despite the presence of high-level Y-Sat siRNAs. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of hairpin RNA (hpRNA)-derived siRNAs or miRNAs, and the level of siRNA-directed transgene silencing, are not signiifcantly affected by CMV Y-Sat infection. Taken together, our results suggest that the high levels of exogenous siRNAs associated with viral infection or RNAi-inducing transgenes do not saturate the endogenous RNA silencing machineries and have no signiifcant impact on normal plant development.

  3. Deep sequencing-based identification of small regulatory RNAs in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

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    Wen Xu

    Full Text Available Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a genetically tractable model organism for photosynthesis research. The genome of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 consists of a circular chromosome and seven plasmids. The importance of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs as mediators of a number of cellular processes in bacteria has begun to be recognized. However, little is known regarding sRNAs in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. To provide a comprehensive overview of sRNAs in this model organism, the sRNAs of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were analyzed using deep sequencing, and 7,951,189 reads were obtained. High quality mapping reads (6,127,890 were mapped onto the genome and assembled into 16,192 transcribed regions (clusters based on read overlap. A total number of 5211 putative sRNAs were revealed from the genome and the 4 megaplasmids, and 27 of these molecules, including four from plasmids, were confirmed by RT-PCR. In addition, possible target genes regulated by all of the putative sRNAs identified in this study were predicted by IntaRNA and analyzed for functional categorization and biological pathways, which provided evidence that sRNAs are indeed involved in many different metabolic pathways, including basic metabolic pathways, such as glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, the citrate cycle, fatty acid metabolism and adaptations to environmentally stress-induced changes. The information from this study provides a valuable reservoir for understanding the sRNA-mediated regulation of the complex physiology and metabolic processes of cyanobacteria.

  4. Small RNAs of the Bradyrhizobium/Rhodopseudomonas lineage and their analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhugiri, Ramakanth; Pessi, Gabriella; Voss, Björn; Hahn, Julia; Sharma, Cynthia M; Reinhardt, Richard; Vogel, Jörg; Hess, Wolfgang R; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) play a pivotal role in bacterial gene regulation. However, the sRNAs of the vast majority of bacteria with sequenced genomes still remain unknown since sRNA genes are usually difficult to recognize and thus not annotated. Here, expression of seven sRNAs (BjrC2a, BjrC2b, BjrC2c, BjrC68, BjrC80, BjrC174 and BjrC1505) predicted by genome comparison of Bradyrhizobium and Rhodopseudomonas members, was verified by RNA gel blot hybridization, microarray and deep sequencing analyses of RNA from the soybean symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110. BjrC2a, BjrC2b and BjrC2c belong to the RNA family RF00519, while the other sRNAs are novel. For some of the sRNAs we observed expression differences between free-living bacteria and bacteroids in root nodules. The amount of BjrC1505 was decreased in nodules. By contrast, the amount of BjrC2a, BjrC68, BjrC80, BjrC174 and the previously described 6S RNA was increased in nodules, and accumulation of truncated forms of these sRNAs was observed. Comparative genomics and deep sequencing suggest that BjrC2a is an antisense RNA regulating the expression of inositol-monophosphatase. The analyzed sRNAs show a different degree of conservation in Rhizobiales, and expression of homologs of BjrC2, BjrC68, BjrC1505, and 6S RNA was confirmed in the free-living purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris 5D.

  5. Small RNAs: essential regulators of gene expression and defenses against environmental stresses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiao-Lin V; Chekanova, Julia A

    2016-05-01

    Eukaryotic genomes produce thousands of diverse small RNAs (smRNAs), which play vital roles in regulating gene expression in all conditions, including in survival of biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. SmRNA pathways intersect with most of the pathways regulating different steps in the life of a messenger RNA (mRNA), starting from transcription and ending at mRNA decay. SmRNAs function in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments; the regulation of mRNA stability and translation in the cytoplasm and the epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the nucleus are the main and best-known modes of smRNA action. However, recent evidence from animal systems indicates that smRNAs and RNA interference (RNAi) also participate in the regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing, one of the most crucial steps in the fast, efficient global reprogramming of gene expression required for survival under stress. Emerging evidence from bioinformatics studies indicates that a specific class of plant smRNAs, induced by various abiotic stresses, the sutr-siRNAs, has the potential to target regulatory regions within introns and thus may act in the regulation of splicing in response to stresses. This review summarizes the major types of plant smRNAs in the context of their mechanisms of action and also provides examples of their involvement in regulation of gene expression in response to environmental cues and developmental stresses. In addition, we describe current advances in our understanding of how smRNAs function in the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:356-381. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1340 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  6. Characterisation of the small RNAs in the biomedically important green-bottle blowfly Lucilia sericata.

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    Cherie Blenkiron

    Full Text Available The green bottle fly maggot, Lucilia sericata, is a species with importance in medicine, agriculture and forensics. Improved understanding of this species' biology is of great potential benefit to many research communities. MicroRNAs (miRNA are a short non-protein coding regulatory RNA, which directly regulate a host of protein coding genes at the translational level. They have been shown to have developmental and tissue specific distributions where they impact directly on gene regulation. In order to improve understanding of the biology of L. sericata maggots we have performed small RNA-sequencing of their secretions and tissue at different developmental stages.We have successfully isolated RNA from the secretions of L. sericata maggots. Illumina small RNA-sequencing of these secretions and the three tissues (crop, salivary gland, gut revealed that the most common small RNA fragments were derived from ribosomal RNA and transfer RNAs of both insect and bacterial origins. These RNA fragments were highly specific, with the most common tRNAs, such as GlyGCC, predominantly represented by reads derived from the 5' end of the mature maggot tRNA. Each library also had a unique profile of miRNAs with a high abundance of miR-10-5p in the maggot secretions and gut and miR-8 in the food storage organ the crop and salivary glands. The pattern of small RNAs in the bioactive maggot secretions suggests they originate from a combination of saliva, foregut and hindgut tissues. Droplet digital RT-PCR validation of the RNA-sequencing data shows that not only are there differences in the tissue profiles for miRNAs and small RNA fragments but that these are also modulated through developmental stages of the insect.We have identified the small-RNAome of the medicinal maggots L. sericata and shown that there are distinct subsets of miRNAs expressed in specific tissues that also alter during the development of the insect. Furthermore there are very specific RNA

  7. Transcription of the major neurospora crassa microRNA-like small RNAs relies on RNA polymerase III.

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    Qiuying Yang

    Full Text Available Most plant and animal microRNAs (miRNAs are transcribed by RNA polymerase II. We previously discovered miRNA-like small RNAs (milRNAs in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa and uncovered at least four different pathways for milRNA production. To understand the evolutionary origin of milRNAs, we determined the roles of polymerases II and III (Pol II and Pol III in milRNA transcription. Our results show that Pol III is responsible for the transcription of the major milRNAs produced in this organism. The inhibition of Pol III activity by an inhibitor or by gene silencing abolishes the production of most abundant milRNAs and pri-milRNAs. In addition, Pol III associates with these milRNA producing loci. Even though silencing of Pol II does not affect the synthesis of the most abundant milRNAs, Pol II or both Pol II and Pol III are associated with some milRNA-producing loci, suggesting a regulatory interaction between the two polymerases for some milRNA transcription. Furthermore, we show that one of the Pol III-transcribed milRNAs is derived from a tRNA precursor, and its biogenesis requires RNase Z, which cleaves the tRNA moiety to generate pre-milRNA. Our study identifies the transcriptional machinery responsible for the synthesis of fungal milRNAs and sheds light on the evolutionary origin of eukaryotic small RNAs.

  8. Conditional Dicer substrate formation via shape and sequence transduction with small conditional RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochrein, Lisa M; Schwarzkopf, Maayan; Shahgholi, Mona; Yin, Peng; Pierce, Niles A

    2013-11-20

    RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) enables knockdown of a gene of choice, executing the logical operation: silence gene Y. The fact that the siRNA is constitutively active is a significant limitation, making it difficult to confine knockdown to a specific locus and time. To achieve spatiotemporal control over silencing, we seek to engineer small conditional RNAs (scRNAs) that mediate 'conditional RNAi' corresponding to the logical operation: if gene X is transcribed, silence independent gene Y. By appropriately selecting gene X, knockdown of gene Y could then be restricted in a tissue- and time-specific manner. To implement the logic of conditional RNAi, our approach is to engineer scRNAs that, upon binding to mRNA 'detection target' X, perform shape and sequence transduction to form a Dicer substrate targeting independent mRNA 'silencing target' Y, with subsequent Dicer processing yielding an siRNA targeting mRNA Y for destruction. Toward this end, here we design and experimentally validate diverse scRNA mechanisms for conditional Dicer substrate formation. Test tube studies demonstrate strong OFF/ON conditional response, with at least an order of magnitude increase in Dicer substrate production in the presence of the cognate mRNA detection target. By appropriately dimensioning and/or chemically modifying the scRNAs, only the product of signal transduction, and not the reactants or intermediates, is efficiently processed by Dicer, yielding siRNAs. These mechanism studies explore diverse design principles for engineering scRNA signal transduction cascades including reactant stability vs metastability, catalytic vs noncatalytic transduction, pre- vs post-transcriptional transduction, reactant and product molecularity, and modes of molecular self-assembly and disassembly.

  9. Small RNAs, RNAi and the Inheritance of Gene Silencing in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuezhu Feng; Shouhong Guang

    2013-01-01

    Invasive nucleic acids such as transposons and viruses usually exhibit aberrant characteristics,e.g.,unpaired DNA or abnormal doublestranded RNA.Organisms employ a variety of strategies to defend themselves by distinguishing self and nonself substances and disabling these invasive nucleic acids.Furthermore,they have developed ways to remember this exposure to invaders and transmit the experience to their descendants.The mechanism underlying this inheritance has remained elusive.Recent research has shed light on the initiation and maintenance of RNA-mediated inherited gene silencing.Small regulatory RNAs play a variety of crucial roles in organisms,including gene regulation,developmental timing,antiviral defense,and genome integrity,via a process termed as RNA interference (RNAi).Recent research has revealed that small RNAs and the RNAi machinery are engaged in establishing and promoting transgenerational gene silencing.Small RNAs direct the RNAi and chromatin modification machinery to the cognate nucleic acids to regulate gene expression and epigenetic alterations.Notably,these acquired small RNAs and epigenetic changes persist and are transmitted from parents to offspring for multiple generations.Thus,RNAi is a vital determinant of the inheritance of gene silencing and acts as a driving force of evolution.

  10. Psmir: a database of potential associations between small molecules and miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanlin; Wang, Jing; Dai, Enyu; Yang, Feng; Chen, Xiaowen; Wang, Shuyuan; Yu, Xuexin; Liu, Dianming; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-13

    miRNAs are key post-transcriptional regulators of many essential biological processes, and their dysregulation has been validated in almost all human cancers. Restoring aberrantly expressed miRNAs might be a novel therapeutics. Recently, many studies have demonstrated that small molecular compounds can affect miRNA expression. Thus, prediction of associations between small molecules and miRNAs is important for investigation of miRNA-targeted drugs. Here, we analyzed 39 miRNA-perturbed gene expression profiles, and then calculated the similarity of transcription responses between miRNA perturbation and drug treatment to predict drug-miRNA associations. At the significance level of 0.05, we obtained 6501 candidate associations between 1295 small molecules and 25 miRNAs, which included 624 FDA approved drugs. Finally, we constructed the Psmir database to store all potential associations and the related materials. In a word, Psmir served as a valuable resource for dissecting the biological significance in small molecules' effects on miRNA expression, which will facilitate developing novel potential therapeutic targets or treatments for human cancers. Psmir is supported by all major browsers, and is freely available at http://www.bio-bigdata.com/Psmir/.

  11. CRISPR transcript processing: a mechanism for generating a large number of small interfering RNAs

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    Djordjevic Marko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CRISPR/Cas (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/CRISPR associated sequences is a recently discovered prokaryotic defense system against foreign DNA, including viruses and plasmids. CRISPR cassette is transcribed as a continuous transcript (pre-crRNA, which is processed by Cas proteins into small RNA molecules (crRNAs that are responsible for defense against invading viruses. Experiments in E. coli report that overexpression of cas genes generates a large number of crRNAs, from only few pre-crRNAs. Results We here develop a minimal model of CRISPR processing, which we parameterize based on available experimental data. From the model, we show that the system can generate a large amount of crRNAs, based on only a small decrease in the amount of pre-crRNAs. The relationship between the decrease of pre-crRNAs and the increase of crRNAs corresponds to strong linear amplification. Interestingly, this strong amplification crucially depends on fast non-specific degradation of pre-crRNA by an unidentified nuclease. We show that overexpression of cas genes above a certain level does not result in further increase of crRNA, but that this saturation can be relieved if the rate of CRISPR transcription is increased. We furthermore show that a small increase of CRISPR transcription rate can substantially decrease the extent of cas gene activation necessary to achieve a desired amount of crRNA. Conclusions The simple mathematical model developed here is able to explain existing experimental observations on CRISPR transcript processing in Escherichia coli. The model shows that a competition between specific pre-crRNA processing and non-specific degradation determines the steady-state levels of crRNA and is responsible for strong linear amplification of crRNAs when cas genes are overexpressed. The model further shows how disappearance of only a few pre-crRNA molecules normally present in the cell can lead to a large (two

  12. Genome-wide identification of small RNAs in the opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis V583.

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    Kouki Shioya

    Full Text Available Small RNA molecules (sRNAs are key mediators of virulence and stress inducible gene expressions in some pathogens. In this work we identify sRNAs in the gram positive opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. We characterized 11 sRNAs by tiling microarray analysis, 5' and 3' RACE-PCR, and Northern blot analysis. Six sRNAs were specifically expressed at exponential phase, two sRNAs were observed at stationary phase, and three were detected during both phases. Searches of putative functions revealed that three of them (EFA0080_EFA0081 and EFB0062_EFB0063 on pTF1 and pTF2 plasmids, respectively, and EF0408_EF04092 located on the chromosome are similar to antisense RNA involved in plasmid addiction modules. Moreover, EF1097_EF1098 shares strong homologies with tmRNA (bi-functional RNA acting as both a tRNA and an mRNA and EF2205_EF2206 appears homologous to 4.5S RNA member of the Signal Recognition Particle (SRP ribonucleoprotein complex. In addition, proteomic analysis of the ΔEF3314_EF3315 sRNA mutant suggests that it may be involved in the turnover of some abundant proteins. The expression patterns of these transcripts were evaluated by tiling array hybridizations performed with samples from cells grown under eleven different conditions some of which may be encountered during infection. Finally, distribution of these sRNAs among genome sequences of 54 E. faecalis strains was assessed. This is the first experimental genome-wide identification of sRNAs in E. faecalis and provides impetus to the understanding of gene regulation in this important human pathogen.

  13. Plasma and EBC microRNAs as early biomarkers of non-small-cell lung cancer.

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    Mozzoni, Paola; Banda, Iris; Goldoni, Matteo; Corradi, Massimo; Tiseo, Marcello; Acampa, Olga; Balestra, Valeria; Ampollini, Luca; Casalini, Angelo; Carbognani, Paolo; Mutti, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Lung cancer is a major cause of death in Western countries. Current screening methods are invasive and still lead to a high percentage of false positives. There is, therefore, a need to find biomarkers that increase the probability of detecting lung cancer early. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are stable molecules in blood plasma and exhaled breath condensate (EBC). We quantified miRNA-21 and miRNA-486 expression from plasma and EBC samples from patients with a diagnosis of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and controls. miRNA-21 was significantly higher in plasma and in EBC of the NSCLC patients and miRNA-486 was significantly lower. This difference indicates a significantly improved diagnostic value, and suggests that these miRNAs could be clinically used as a first-line screening test in high-risk subjects.

  14. Non-Viral Delivery and Therapeutic Application of Small Interfering RNAs.

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    Nikitenko, N A; Prassolov, V S

    2013-07-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful method used for gene expression regulation. The increasing knowledge about the molecular mechanism of this phenomenon creates new avenues for the application of the RNAi technology in the treatment of various human diseases. However, delivery of RNA interference mediators, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), to target cells is a major hurdle. Effective and safe pharmacological use of siRNAs requires carriers that can deliver siRNA to its target site and the development of methods for protection of these fragile molecules from in vivo degradation. This review summarizes various strategies for siRNA delivery, including chemical modification and non-viral approaches, such as the polymer-based, peptide-based, lipid-based techniques, and inorganic nanosystems. The advantages, disadvantages, and prospects for the therapeutic application of these methods are also examined in this paper.

  15. Quantification and accurate normalisation of small RNAs through new custom RT-qPCR arrays demonstrates Salmonella-induced microRNAs in human monocytes

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    Sharbati Soroush

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small interfering and non-coding RNAs regulate gene expression across all kingdoms of life. MicroRNAs constitute an important group of metazoan small RNAs regulating development but also disease. Accordingly, in functional genomics microRNA expression analysis sheds more and more light on the dynamic regulation of gene expression in various cellular processes. Results We have developed custom RT-qPCR arrays allowing for accurate quantification of 31 small RNAs in triplicate using a 96 well format. In parallel, we provide accurate normalisation of microRNA expression data based on the quantification of 5 reference snRNAs. We have successfully employed such arrays to study microRNA regulation during human monocyte differentiation as well as Salmonella infection. Besides well-known protagonists such as miR-146 or miR-155, we identified the up-regulation of miR-21, miR-222, miR-23b, miR-24, miR-27a as well as miR-29 upon monocyte differentiation or infection, respectively. Conclusions The provided protocol for RT-qPCR arrays enables straight-forward microRNA expression analysis. It is fully automatable, compliant with the MIQE guidelines and can be completed in only 1 day. The application of these arrays revealed microRNAs that may mediate monocyte host defence mechanisms by regulating the TGF-β signalling upon Salmonella infection. The introduced arrays are furthermore suited for customised quantification of any class of small non-coding RNAs as exemplified by snRNAs and thus provide a versatile tool for ubiquitous applications.

  16. Regulation of spermatogenesis by small non-coding RNAs: role of the germ granule.

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    de Mateo, Sara; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The spermatogenic process relays in highly regulated gene expression mechanisms at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels to generate the male gamete that is needed for the perpetuation of the species. Small non-coding RNA pathways have been determined to participate in the post-transcriptional regulatory processes of germ cells. The most important sncRNA molecules that are critically involved in spermatogenesis belong to the miRNA and piRNAs pathways as illustrated by animal models where ablation of specific protein components displays male infertility. Several elements of these regulatory pathways have been found in the nuage or germ granule, a non-membranous cytoplasmatic structure that can be seen in spermatocytes and spermatids. This notion suggests that germ granules may act as organizer centers for silencing pathways in the germline. In general, miRNAs regulate spermatogenesis through targeting and down-regulation of specific transcripts to eventually promote sperm development. However, piRNAs are powerful repressors of transposon elements expression in the spermatogenic process. Here we describe the suggested functions that miRNA and piRNAs pathways execute in the regulation of spermatogenesis and include some recent studies in the field. Despite major strides on the detailed molecular mechanisms of sncRNAs in relation to spermatogenesis, there is plenty to discover on this fascinating regulatory program.

  17. Small RNAs in plants: Recent development and application for crop improvement

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    Ayushi eKamthan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of RNA interference (RNAi which involves sequence specific gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs i.e small interfering RNA (siRNA and micro RNA (miRNA has emerged as one of most powerful approaches for crop improvement. RNAi based on siRNA is one of the widely used tools of reverse genetics which aid in revealing gene functions in many species. This technology has been extensively applied to alter the gene expression in plants with an aim to achieve desirable traits. RNAi has been used for enhancing the crop yield and productivity by manipulating the gene involved in biomass, grain yield and enhanced shelf life of fruits & vegetables. It has also been applied for developing resistance against various biotic (bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, insects and abiotic stresses (drought, salinity, cold etc.. Nutritional improvements of crops have also been achieved by enriching the crops with essential amino acids, fatty acids, antioxidants and other nutrients beneficial for human health or by reducing allergens or anti-nutrients. Micro RNAs are key regulators of important plant processes like growth, development and response to various stresses. In spite of similarity in size (20-24nt, miRNA differ from siRNA in precursor structures, pathway of biogenesis, and modes of action. This review also highlights the miRNA based genetic modification technology where various miRNAs/artificial miRNAs and their targets can be utilized for improving several desirable plant traits. Micro RNA based strategies are much efficient than siRNA-based RNAi strategies due to its specificity and less undesirable off target effects. As per the FDA guidelines, small RNA based transgenics are much safer for consumption than those over expressing proteins. This review thereby summarizes the emerging advances and achievement in the field of small RNAs and its application for crop improvement.

  18. Dynamics and Mechanism of A Quorum Sensing Network Regulated by Small RNAs in Vibrio Harveyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian-Wei

    2011-03-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) has attracted much interests and it is an important process of cell communication. Recently, Bassler et al. studied the phenomena of QS regulated by small RNAs and the experimental data showed that small RNAs played important role in the QS of Vibrio harveyi and it can permit the fine-tuning of gene regulation and maintenance of homeostasis. According to Michaelis—Menten kinetics and mass action law in this paper, we construct a mathematical model to investigate the mechanism induced QS by coexist of small RNA and signal molecular (AI) and show that there are periodic oscillation when the time delay and Hill coefficient exceed a critical value and the periodic oscillation produces the change of concentration and induces QS. These results are fit to the experimental results. In the meanwhile, we also get some theoretical value of Hopf Bifurcation on time deday. In addition, we also find this network is robust against noise.

  19. Identification and characterization of noncoding small RNAs in Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 2 strain D39.

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    Tsui, Ho-Ching Tiffany; Mukherjee, Dhriti; Ray, Valerie A; Sham, Lok-To; Feig, Andrew L; Winkler, Malcolm E

    2010-01-01

    We report a search for small RNAs (sRNAs) in the low-GC, gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Based on bioinformatic analyses by Livny et al. (J. Livny, A. Brencic, S. Lory, and M. K. Waldor, Nucleic Acids Res. 34:3484-3493, 2006), we tested 40 candidates by Northern blotting and confirmed the expression of nine new and one previously reported (CcnA) sRNAs in strain D39. CcnA is one of five redundant sRNAs reported by Halfmann et al. (A. Halfmann, M. Kovacs, R. Hakenbeck, and R. Bruckner, Mol. Microbiol. 66:110-126, 2007) that are positively controlled by the CiaR response regulator. We characterized 3 of these 14 sRNAs: Spd-sr17 (144 nucleotides [nt]; decreased in stationary phase), Spd-sr37 (80 nt; strongly expressed in all growth phases), and CcnA (93 nt; induced by competence stimulatory peptide). Spd-sr17 and CcnA likely fold into structures containing single-stranded regions between hairpin structures, whereas Spd-sr37 forms a base-paired structure. Primer extension mapping and ectopic expression in deletion/insertion mutants confirmed the independent expression of the three sRNAs. Microarray analyses indicated that insertion/deletion mutants in spd-sr37 and ccnA exerted strong cis-acting effects on the transcription of adjacent genes, indicating that these sRNA regions are also cotranscribed in operons. Deletion or overexpression of the three sRNAs did not cause changes in growth, certain stress responses, global transcription, or virulence. Constitutive ectopic expression of CcnA reversed some phenotypes of D39 Delta ciaR mutants, but attempts to link CcnA to -E to comC as a target were inconclusive in ciaR(+) strains. These results show that S. pneumoniae, which lacks known RNA chaperones, expresses numerous sRNAs, but three of these sRNAs do not strongly affect common phenotypes or transcription patterns.

  20. Identification and characterization of microRNAs in small brown planthopper (Laodephax striatellus by next-generation sequencing.

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    Guoyan Zhou

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous non-coding small RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and are thought to play critical roles in many metabolic activities in eukaryotes. The small brown planthopper (Laodephax striatellus Fallén, one of the most destructive agricultural pests, causes great damage to crops including rice, wheat, and maize. However, information about the genome of L. striatellus is limited. In this study, a small RNA library was constructed from a mixed L. striatellus population and sequenced by Solexa sequencing technology. A total of 501 mature miRNAs were identified, including 227 conserved and 274 novel miRNAs belonging to 125 and 250 families, respectively. Sixty-nine conserved miRNAs that are included in 38 families are predicted to have an RNA secondary structure typically found in miRNAs. Many miRNAs were validated by stem-loop RT-PCR. Comparison with the miRNAs in 84 animal species from miRBase showed that the conserved miRNA families we identified are highly conserved in the Arthropoda phylum. Furthermore, miRanda predicted 2701 target genes for 378 miRNAs, which could be categorized into 52 functional groups annotated by gene ontology. The function of miRNA target genes was found to be very similar between conserved and novel miRNAs. This study of miRNAs in L. striatellus will provide new information and enhance the understanding of the role of miRNAs in the regulation of L. striatellus metabolism and development.

  1. Small RNAs from Bemisia tabaci are transferred to Solanum lycopersicum phloem during feeding

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    Paula J.M. Van Kleeff

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The phloem-feeding whitefly Bemisia tabaci is a serious pest to a broad range of host plants, including many economically important crops such as tomato. These insects serve as a vector for various devastating plant viruses. It is known that whiteflies are capable of manipulating host-defense responses, potentially mediated by effector molecules in the whitefly saliva. We hypothesized that, beside putative effector proteins, small RNAs (sRNA are delivered by B. tabaci into the phloem, where they may play a role in manipulating host plant defenses. There is already evidence to suggest that sRNAs can mediate the host-pathogen dialogue. It has been shown that Botrytis cinerea, the causal agent of gray mold disease, takes advantage of the plant sRNA machinery to selectively silence host genes involved in defense signaling.Here we identified sRNAs originating from B. tabaci in the phloem of tomato plants on which they are feeding. sRNAs were isolated and sequenced from tomato phloem of whitefly-infested and control plants as well as from the nymphs themselves, control leaflets and from the infested leaflets. Using stem-loop RT-PCR, three whitefly sRNAs have been verified to be present in whitefly-infested leaflets that were also present in the whitefly-infested phloem sample. Our results show that whitefly sRNAs are indeed present in tomato tissues upon feeding, and they appear to be mobile in the phloem. Their role in the host-insect interaction can now be investigated.

  2. A sensitive non-radioactive northern blot method to detect small RNAs.

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    Kim, Sang Woo; Li, Zhihua; Moore, Patrick S; Monaghan, A Paula; Chang, Yuan; Nichols, Mark; John, Bino

    2010-04-01

    The continuing discoveries of potentially active small RNAs at an unprecedented rate using high-throughput sequencing have raised the need for methods that can reliably detect and quantitate the expression levels of small RNAs. Currently, northern blot is the most widely used method for validating small RNAs that are identified by methods such as high-throughput sequencing. We describe a new northern blot-based protocol (LED) for small RNA (approximately 15-40 bases) detection using digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled oligonucleotide probes containing locked nucleic acids (LNA) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide for cross-linking the RNA to the membrane. LED generates clearly visible signals for RNA amounts as low as 0.05 fmol. This method requires as little as a few seconds of membrane exposure to outperform the signal intensity using overnight exposure of isotope-based methods, corresponding to approximately 1000-fold improvement in exposure-time. In contrast to commonly used radioisotope-based methods, which require freshly prepared and hazardous probes, LED probes can be stored for at least 6 months, facilitate faster and more cost-effective experiments, and are more environmentally friendly. A detailed protocol of LED is provided in the Supplementary Data.

  3. Quorum regulatory small RNAs repress type VI secretion in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yi; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2014-06-01

    Type VI secretion is critical for Vibrio cholerae to successfully combat phagocytic eukaryotes and to survive in the presence of competing bacterial species. V. cholerae type VI secretion system genes are encoded in one large and two small clusters. In V. cholerae, type VI secretion is controlled by quorum sensing, the cell-cell communication process that enables bacteria to orchestrate group behaviours. The quorum-sensing response regulator LuxO represses type VI secretion genes at low cell density and the quorum-sensing regulator HapR activates type VI secretion genes at high cell density. We demonstrate that the quorum regulatory small RNAs (Qrr sRNAs) that function between LuxO and HapR in the quorum-sensing cascade are required for these regulatory effects. The Qrr sRNAs control type VI secretion via two mechanisms: they repress expression of the large type VI secretion system cluster through base pairing and they repress HapR, the activator of the two small type VI secretion clusters. This regulatory arrangement ensures that the large cluster encoding many components of the secretory machine is expressed prior to the two small clusters that encode the secreted effectors. Qrr sRNA-dependent regulation of the type VI secretion system is conserved in pandemic and non-pandemic V. cholerae strains.

  4. Identification and expression profiling of Vigna mungo microRNAs from leaf small RNA transcriptome by deep sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sujay Paul; Anirban Kundu; Amita Pal

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that play a crucial role in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Several conserved and species-specific miRNAs have been characterized to date, predominantly from the plant species whose genome is well characterized. However, information on the variability of these regulatory RNAs in economically important but genetically less characterized crop species are limited. Vigna mungo is an important grain legume, which is grown primarily for its protein-rich edible seeds. miRNAs from this species have not been identified to date due to lack of genome sequence information. To identify miRNAs from V. mungo, a small RNA library was constructed from young leaves. High-throughput Illumina sequencing technology and bioinformat-ic analysis of the small RNA reads led to the identification of 66 miRNA loci represented by 45 conserved miRNAs belonging to 19 families and eight non-conserved miRNAs belonging to seven families. Besides, 13 novel miRNA candidates in V. mungo were also identified. Expression patterns of selected conserved, non-conserved, and novel miRNA candidates have been demonstrated in leaf, stem, and root tissues by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and potential target genes were predicted for most of the conserved miRNAs. This information offers genomic resour-ces for better understanding of miRNA mediated post-transcriptional gene regulation.

  5. Identification and expression profiling of Vigna mungo microRNAs from leaf small RNA transcriptome by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sujay; Kundu, Anirban; Pal, Amita

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that play a crucial role in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Several conserved and species-specific miRNAs have been characterized to date, predominantly from the plant species whose genome is well characterized. However, information on the variability of these regulatory RNAs in economically important but genetically less characterized crop species are limited. Vigna mungo is an important grain legume, which is grown primarily for its protein-rich edible seeds. miRNAs from this species have not been identified to date due to lack of genome sequence information. To identify miRNAs from V. mungo, a small RNA library was constructed from young leaves. High-throughput Illumina sequencing technology and bioinformatic analysis of the small RNA reads led to the identification of 66 miRNA loci represented by 45 conserved miRNAs belonging to 19 families and eight non-conserved miRNAs belonging to seven families. Besides, 13 novel miRNA candidates in V. mungo were also identified. Expression patterns of selected conserved, non-conserved, and novel miRNA candidates have been demonstrated in leaf, stem, and root tissues by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and potential target genes were predicted for most of the conserved miRNAs. This information offers genomic resources for better understanding of miRNA mediated post-transcriptional gene regulation.

  6. Targeting of human interleukin-12B by small hairpin RNAs in xenografted psoriatic skin

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    Jakobsen Maria

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that shows as erythematous and scaly lesions. The pathogenesis of psoriasis is driven by a dysregulation of the immune system which leads to an altered cytokine production. Proinflammatory cytokines that are up-regulated in psoriasis include tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, interleukin-12 (IL-12, and IL-23 for which monoclonal antibodies have already been approved for clinical use. We have previously documented the therapeutic applicability of targeting TNFα mRNA for RNA interference-mediated down-regulation by anti-TNFα small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs delivered by lentiviral vectors to xenografted psoriatic skin. The present report aims at targeting mRNA encoding the shared p40 subunit (IL-12B of IL-12 and IL-23 by cellular transduction with lentiviral vectors encoding anti-IL12B shRNAs. Methods Effective anti-IL12B shRNAs are identified among a panel of shRNAs by potency measurements in cultured cells. The efficiency and persistency of lentiviral gene delivery to xenografted human skin are investigated by bioluminescence analysis of skin treated with lentiviral vectors encoding the luciferase gene. shRNA-expressing lentiviral vectors are intradermally injected in xenografted psoriatic skin and the effects of the treatment evaluated by clinical psoriasis scoring, by measurements of epidermal thickness, and IL-12B mRNA levels. Results Potent and persistent transgene expression following a single intradermal injection of lentiviral vectors in xenografted human skin is reported. Stable IL-12B mRNA knockdown and reduced epidermal thickness are achieved three weeks after treatment of xenografted psoriatic skin with lentivirus-encoded anti-IL12B shRNAs. These findings mimick the results obtained with anti-TNFα shRNAs but, in contrast to anti-TNFα treatment, anti-IL12B shRNAs do not ameliorate the psoriatic phenotype as evaluated by semi-quantitative clinical scoring and by

  7. Prediction and characterization of small non-coding RNAs related to secondary metabolites in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

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    Wei-Bing Liu

    Full Text Available Saccharopolyspora erythraea produces a large number of secondary metabolites with biological activities, including erythromycin. Elucidation of the mechanisms through which the production of these secondary metabolites is regulated may help to identify new strategies for improved biosynthesis of erythromycin. In this paper, we describe the systematic prediction and analysis of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs in S. erythraea, with the aim to elucidate sRNA-mediated regulation of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. In silico and deep-sequencing technologies were applied to predict sRNAs in S. erythraea. Six hundred and forty-seven potential sRNA loci were identified, of which 382 cis-encoded antisense RNA are complementary to protein-coding regions and 265 predicted transcripts are located in intergenic regions. Six candidate sRNAs (sernc292, sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, sernc361, and sernc389 belong to four gene clusters (tpc3, pke, pks6, and nrps5 that are involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Deep-sequencing data showed that the expression of all sRNAs in the strain HL3168 E3 (E3 was higher than that in NRRL23338 (M, except for sernc292 and sernc361 expression. The relative expression of six sRNAs in strain M and E3 were validated by qRT-PCR at three different time points (24, 48, and 72 h. The results showed that, at each time point, the transcription levels of sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, and sernc389 were higher in E3 than in M, with the largest difference observed at 72 h, whereas no signals for sernc292 and sernc361 were detected. sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, and sernc389 probably regulate iron transport, terpene metabolism, geosmin synthesis, and polyketide biosynthesis, respectively. The major significance of this study is the successful prediction and identification of sRNAs in genomic regions close to the secondary metabolism-related genes in S. erythraea. A better understanding of the sRNA-target interaction would help to

  8. Identification of Novel MicroRNAs in Primates by Using the Synteny Information and Small RNA Deep Sequencing Data

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    Xiao Sun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Current technologies that are used for genome-wide microRNA (miRNA prediction are mainly based on BLAST tool. They often produce a large number of false positives. Here, we describe an effective approach for identifying orthologous pre-miRNAs in several primates based on syntenic information. Some of them have been validated by small RNA high throughput sequencing data. This approach uses the synteny information and experimentally validated miRNAs of human, and incorporates currently available algorithms and tools to identify the pre-miRNAs in five other primates. First, we identified 929 potential pre-miRNAs in the marmoset in which miRNAs have not yet been reported. Then, we predicted the miRNAs in other primates, and we successfully re-identified most of the published miRNAs and found 721, 979, 650 and 639 new potential pre-miRNAs in chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan and rhesus macaque, respectively. Furthermore, the miRNA transcriptome in the four primates have been re-analyzed and some novel predicted miRNAs have been supported by the small RNA sequencing data. Finally, we analyzed the potential functions of those validated miRNAs and explored the regulatory elements and transcription factors of some validated miRNA genes of interest. The results show that our approach can effectively identify novel miRNAs and some miRNAs that supported by small RNA sequencing data maybe play roles in the nervous system.

  9. Rational Design of Small Molecules Targeting Oncogenic Noncoding RNAs from Sequence.

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    Disney, Matthew D; Angelbello, Alicia J

    2016-12-20

    The discovery of RNA catalysis in the 1980s and the dissemination of the human genome sequence at the start of this century inspired investigations of the regulatory roles of noncoding RNAs in biology. In fact, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has shown that only 1-2% of the human genome encodes protein, yet 75% is transcribed into RNA. Functional studies both preceding and following the ENCODE project have shown that these noncoding RNAs have important roles in regulating gene expression, developmental timing, and other critical functions. RNA's diverse roles are often a consequence of the various folds that it adopts. The single-stranded nature of the biopolymer enables it to adopt intramolecular folds with noncanonical pairings to lower its free energy. These folds can be scaffolds to bind proteins or to form frameworks to interact with other RNAs. Not surprisingly, dysregulation of certain noncoding RNAs has been shown to be causative of disease. Given this as the background, it is easy to see why it would be useful to develop methods that target RNA and manipulate its biology in rational and predictable ways. The antisense approach has afforded strategies to target RNAs via Watson-Crick base pairing and has typically focused on targeting partially unstructured regions of RNA. Small molecule strategies to target RNA would be desirable not only because compounds could be lead optimized via medicinal chemistry but also because structured regions within an RNA of interest could be targeted to directly interfere with RNA folds that contribute to disease. Additionally, small molecules have historically been the most successful drug candidates. Until recently, the ability to design small molecules that target non-ribosomal RNAs has been elusive, creating the perception that they are "undruggable". In this Account, approaches to demystify targeting RNA with small molecules are described. Rather than bulk screening for compounds that bind to singular

  10. Nicotine exposure and transgenerational impact: a prospective study on small regulatory microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Faten A; Pan, Xiaoping; Lee, Myon-Hee; Zhang, Baohong

    2014-12-17

    Early developmental stages are highly sensitive to stress and it has been reported that pre-conditioning with tobacco smoking during adolescence predisposes those youngsters to become smokers as adults. However, the molecular mechanisms of nicotine-induced transgenerational consequences are unknown. In this study, we genome-widely investigated the impact of nicotine exposure on small regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs) and its implication on health disorders at a transgenerational aspect. Our results demonstrate that nicotine exposure, even at the low dose, affected the global expression profiles of miRNAs not only in the treated worms (F0 parent generation) but also in two subsequent generations (F1 and F2, children and grandchildren). Some miRNAs were commonly affected by nicotine across two or more generations while others were specific to one. The general miRNA patterns followed a "two-hit" model as a function of nicotine exposure and abstinence. Target prediction and pathway enrichment analyses showed daf-4, daf-1, fos-1, cmk-1, and unc-30 to be potential effectors of nicotine addiction. These genes are involved in physiological states and phenotypes that paralleled previously published nicotine induced behavior. Our study offered new insights and further awareness on the transgenerational effects of nicotine exposed during the vulnerable post-embryonic stages, and identified new biomarkers for nicotine addiction.

  11. In vitro inhibition of feline coronavirus replication by small interfering RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, Phillip; Sheehy, Paul A; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2011-06-01

    Infection with virulent biotypes of feline coronavirus (FCoV) can result in the development of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a typically fatal immune mediated disease for which there is currently no effective antiviral treatment. In this study we demonstrate the ability of small interfering RNA (siRNA) mediated RNA interference (RNAi) to inhibit the replication of virulent FCoV strain FIPV WSU 79-1146 in an immortalised feline cell line. A panel of eight synthetic siRNAs targeting four different regions of the FCoV genome were tested for antiviral effects. Efficacy was determined by qRT-PCR of intracellular viral genomic and messenger RNA, TCID50 infectivity assay of extracellular virus, and direct IFA for viral protein expression. All siRNAs demonstrated an inhibitory effect on viral replication in vitro. The two most effective siRNAs, targeting the untranslated 5' leader sequence (L2) and the nucleocapsid gene (N1), resulted in a >95% reduction in extracellular viral titre. Further characterisation of these two siRNAs demonstrated their efficacy when used at low concentrations and in cells challenged with high viral loads. Taken together these findings provide important information for the potential therapeutic application of RNAi in treating FIP.

  12. Small regulatory RNAs in lambdoid bacteriophages and phage-derived plasmids: Not only antisense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Licznerska, Katarzyna; Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-03-01

    Until recently, only two small regulatory RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages were known. These transcripts are derived from paQ and pO promoters. The former one is supposed to act as an antisense RNA for expression of the Q gene, encoding a transcription antitermination protein. The latter transcript, called oop RNA, was initially proposed to have a double role, in establishing expression of the cI gene and in providing a primer for DNA replication. Although the initially proposed mechanisms by which oop RNA could influence the choice between two alternative developmental pathways of the phage and the initiation of phage DNA replication were found not true, the pO promoter has been demonstrated to be important for both regulation of phage development and control of DNA replication. Namely, the pO-derived transcript is an antisense RNA for expression of the cII gene, and pO is a part of a dual promoter system responsible for regulation of initiation of DNA synthesis from the oriλ region. Very recent studies identified a battery of small RNAs encoded by lambdoid bacteriophages existing as prophages in chromosomes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains. Some of them have very interesting functions, like anti-small RNAs.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Noncoding Small RNAs in Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 2 Strain D39 ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Tsui, Ho-Ching Tiffany; Mukherjee, Dhriti; Ray, Valerie A.; Sham, Lok-To; Andrew L Feig; Winkler, Malcolm E.

    2009-01-01

    We report a search for small RNAs (sRNAs) in the low-GC, Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Based on bioinformatic analyses by Livny et al. (J. Livny, A. Brencic, S. Lory, and M. K. Waldor, Nucleic Acids Res. 34:3484-3493, 2006), we tested 40 candidates by Northern blotting and confirmed the expression of nine new and one previously reported (CcnA) sRNAs in strain D39. CcnA is one of five redundant sRNAs reported by Halfmann et al. (A. Halfmann, M. Kovacs, R. Hakenbeck, an...

  14. Small RNAs regulate the biocontrol property of fluorescent Pseudomonas strain Psd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Anamika; Kochar, Mandira; Upadhyay, Ashutosh; Tripathy, Soumya; Rajam, Manchikatla Venkat; Srivastava, Sheela

    2017-03-01

    The production of biocontrol factors by Pseudomonads is reported to be controlled at the post-transcriptional level by the GacS/GacA signal transduction pathway. This involves RNA-binding translational repressor proteins, RsmA and RsmE, and the small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) RsmX, RsmY, and RsmZ. While the former represses genes involved in secondary metabolite production, the latter relieves this repression at the end of exponential growth. We have studied the fluorescent Pseudomonas strain Psd, possessing good biocontrol potential, and confirmed the presence of rsmY and rsmZ by PCR amplification. Gene constructs for all the three small RNAs (RsmX, RsmY and RsmZ) carried on broad host-range plasmid, pME6032 were mobilized into strain Psd. Expression analysis of gacA in the recombinant strains over-expressing rsmX (Psd-pME7320), rsmY (Psd-pME6359) and rsmZ (Psd-pME6918) revealed a significant upregulation of the response regulator. Besides, a remarkable down-regulation of rsmA was also reported in all the strains. The variant strains were found to produce comparatively higher levels of phenazines. Indole acetic acid levels were higher to some extent, and strain Psd-pME6918 also showed elevated production of HCN. The tomato seedlings infected with Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae in the presence of culture filtrate of the recombinant strains showed better plant protection response in comparison to the wild-type strain Psd. These results suggest that small RNAs are important determinants in regulation of the biocontrol property of strain Psd.

  15. Comparative analysis of virus-derived small RNAs within cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) infected with cassava brown streak viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogwok, Emmanuel; Ilyas, Muhammad; Alicai, Titus; Rey, Marie E C; Taylor, Nigel J

    2016-04-01

    Infection of plant cells by viral pathogens triggers RNA silencing, an innate antiviral defense mechanism. In response to infection, small RNAs (sRNAs) are produced that associate with Argonaute (AGO)-containing silencing complexes which act to inactivate viral genomes by posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Deep sequencing was used to compare virus-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs) in cassava genotypes NASE 3, TME 204 and 60444 infected with the positive sense single-stranded RNA (+ssRNA) viruses cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV), the causal agents of cassava brown streak disease (CBSD). An abundance of 21-24nt vsRNAs was detected and mapped, covering the entire CBSV and UCBSV genomes. The 21nt vsRNAs were most predominant, followed by the 22 nt class with a slight bias toward sense compared to antisense polarity, and a bias for adenine and uracil bases present at the 5'-terminus. Distribution and frequency of vsRNAs differed between cassava genotypes and viral genomes. In susceptible genotypes TME 204 and 60444, CBSV-derived sRNAs were seen in greater abundance than UCBSV-derived sRNAs. NASE 3, known to be resistant to UCBSV, accumulated negligible UCBSV-derived sRNAs but high populations of CBSV-derived sRNAs. Transcript levels of cassava homologues of AGO2, DCL2 and DCL4, which are central to the gene-silencing complex, were found to be differentially regulated in CBSV- and UCBSV-infected plants across genotypes, suggesting these proteins play a role in antiviral defense. Irrespective of genotype or viral pathogen, maximum populations of vsRNAs mapped to the cytoplasmic inclusion, P1 and P3 protein-encoding regions. Our results indicate disparity between CBSV and UCBSV host-virus interaction mechanisms, and provide insight into the role of virus-induced gene silencing as a mechanism of resistance to CBSD.

  16. Repertoire of bovine miRNA and miRNA-like small regulatory RNAs expressed upon viral infection.

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    Evgeny A Glazov

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA and other types of small regulatory RNAs play a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes. Several distinct classes of small regulatory RNAs have been discovered in recent years. To extend the repertoire of small RNAs characterized in mammals and to examine relationship between host miRNA expression and viral infection we used Illumina's ultrahigh throughput sequencing approach. We sequenced three small RNA libraries prepared from cell line derived from the adult bovine kidney under normal conditions and upon infection of the cell line with Bovine herpesvirus 1. We used a bioinformatics approach to distinguish authentic mature miRNA sequences from other classes of small RNAs and short RNA fragments represented in the sequencing data. Using this approach we detected 219 out of 356 known bovine miRNAs and 115 respective miRNA* sequences. In addition we identified five new bovine orthologs of known mammalian miRNAs and discovered 268 new cow miRNAs many of which are not identifiable in other mammalian genomes and thus might be specific to the ruminant lineage. In addition we found seven new bovine mirtron candidates. We also discovered 10 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA loci that give rise to small RNA with possible miRNA-like function. Results presented in this study extend our knowledge of the biology and evolution of small regulatory RNAs in mammals and illuminate mechanisms of small RNA biogenesis and function. New miRNA sequences and the original sequencing data have been submitted to miRNA repository (miRBase and NCBI GEO archive respectively. We envisage that these resources will facilitate functional annotation of the bovine genome and promote further functional and comparative genomics studies of small regulatory RNA in mammals.

  17. Genomic dissection of small RNAs in wild rice (Oryza rufipogon): lessons for rice domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Bai, Xuefei; Yan, Chenghai; Gui, Yiejie; Wei, Xinghua; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Guo, Longbiao; Fan, Longjiang

    2012-11-01

    The lack of a MIRNA set and genome sequence of wild rice (Oryza rufipogon) has prevented us from determining the role of MIRNA genes in rice domestication. In this study, a genome, three small RNA populations and a degradome of O. rufipogon were sequenced by Illumina platform and the expression levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) were investigated by miRNA chips. A de novo O. rufipogon genome was assembled using c. 55× coverage of raw sequencing data and a total of 387 MIRNAs were identified in the O. rufipogon genome based on c. 5.2 million unique small RNA reads from three different tissues of O. rufipogon. Of these, O. rufipogon MIRNAs, 259 were not found in the cultivated rice, suggesting a loss of these MIRNAs in the cultivated rice. We also found that 48 MIRNAs were novel in the cultivated rice, suggesting that they were potential targets of domestication selection. Some miRNAs showed significant expression differences between wild and cultivated rice, suggesting that expression of miRNA could also be a target of domestication, as demonstrated for the miR164 family. Our results illustrated that MIRNA genes, like protein-coding genes, might have been significantly shaped during rice domestication and could be one of the driving forces that contributed to rice domestication.

  18. Development of Therapeutic-Grade Small Interfering RNAs by Chemical Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramsen, Jesper B; Kjems, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Recent successes in clinical trials have provided important proof of concept that small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) indeed constitute a new promising class of therapeutics. Although great efforts are still needed to ensure efficient means of delivery in vivo, the siRNA molecule itself has been successfully engineered by chemical modification to meet initial challenges regarding specificity, stability, and immunogenicity. To date, a great wealth of siRNA architectures and types of chemical modification are available for promoting safe siRNA-mediated gene silencing in vivo and, consequently, the choice of design and modification types can be challenging to individual experimenters. Here we review the literature and devise how to improve siRNA performance by structural design and specific chemical modification to ensure potent and specific gene silencing without unwarranted side-effects and hereby complement the ongoing efforts to improve cell targeting and delivery by other carrier molecules.

  19. Analysis of Small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans under Acid Stress—A New Insight for Caries Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans is the major clinical pathogen responsible for dental caries. Its acid tolerance has been identified as a significant virulence factor for its survival and cariogenicity in acidic conditions. Small RNAs (sRNAs are recognized as key regulators of virulence and stress adaptation. Here, we constructed three libraries of sRNAs with small size exposed to acidic conditions for the first time, followed by verification using qRT-PCR. The levels of two sRNAs and target genes predicted to be bioinformatically related to acid tolerance were further evaluated under different acid stress conditions (pH 7.5, 6.5, 5.5, and 4.5 at three time points (0.5, 1, and 2 h. Meanwhile, bacterial growth characteristics and vitality were assessed. We obtained 1879 sRNAs with read counts of at least 100. One hundred and ten sRNAs were perfectly mapped to reported msRNAs in S. mutans. Ten out of 18 sRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. The survival of bacteria declined as the acid was increased from pH 7.5 to 4.5 at each time point. The bacteria can proliferate under each pH except pH 4.5 with time. The levels of sRNAs gradually decreased from pH 7.5 to 5.5, and slightly increased in pH 4.5; however, the expression levels of target mRNAs were up-regulated in acidic conditions than in pH 7.5. These results indicate that some sRNAs are specially induced at acid stress conditions, involving acid adaptation, and provide a new insight into exploring the complex acid tolerance for S. mutans.

  20. Deep sequencing uncovers numerous small RNAs on all four replicons of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, Ina; Overlöper, Aaron; Nowrousian, Minou; Sharma, Cynthia M; Narberhaus, Franz

    2012-04-01

    Agrobacterium species are capable of interkingdom gene transfer between bacteria and plants. The genome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens consists of a circular and a linear chromosome, the At-plasmid and the Ti-plasmid, which harbors bacterial virulence genes required for tumor formation in plants. Little is known about promoter sequences and the small RNA (sRNA) repertoire of this and other α-proteobacteria. We used a differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq) approach to map transcriptional start sites of 388 annotated genes and operons. In addition, a total number of 228 sRNAs was revealed from all four Agrobacterium replicons. Twenty-two of these were confirmed by independent RNA gel blot analysis and several sRNAs were differentially expressed in response to growth media, growth phase, temperature or pH. One sRNA from the Ti-plasmid was massively induced under virulence conditions. The presence of 76 cis-antisense sRNAs, two of them on the reverse strand of virulence genes, suggests considerable antisense transcription in Agrobacterium. The information gained from this study provides a valuable reservoir for an in-depth understanding of sRNA-mediated regulation of the complex physiology and infection process of Agrobacterium.

  1. Production of virus-derived ping-pong-dependent piRNA-like small RNAs in the mosquito soma.

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    Elaine M Morazzani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural maintenance cycles of many mosquito-borne pathogens require establishment of persistent non-lethal infections in the invertebrate host. The mechanism by which this occurs is not well understood, but we have previously shown that an antiviral response directed by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs is important in modulating the pathogenesis of alphavirus infections in the mosquito. However, we report here that infection of mosquitoes with an alphavirus also triggers the production of another class of virus-derived small RNAs that exhibit many similarities to ping-pong-dependent piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs. However, unlike ping-pong-dependent piRNAs that have been described previously from repetitive elements or piRNA clusters, our work suggests production in the soma. We also present evidence that suggests virus-derived piRNA-like small RNAs are capable of modulating the pathogenesis of alphavirus infections in dicer-2 null mutant mosquito cell lines defective in viral siRNA production. Overall, our results suggest that a non-canonical piRNA pathway is present in the soma of vector mosquitoes and may be acting redundantly to the siRNA pathway to target alphavirus replication.

  2. Dynamics and Mechanism of A Quorum Sensing Network Regulated by Small RNAs in Vibrio Harveyi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Jian-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) has attracted much interests and it is an important process of cell communication.Recently, Bassler et al.studied the phenomena of QS regulated by small RNAs and the experimental data showed that small RNAs played important role in the QS of Vibrio harveyi and it can permit the fine-tuning of gene regulation and maintenance of homeostasis.According to Michaelis-Menten kinetics and mass action law in this paper,we construct a mathematical model to investigate the mechanism induced QS by coexist of small RNA and signal molecular (Al) and show that there are periodic oscillation when the time delay and Hill coefficient exceed a critical value and the periodic oscillation produces the change of concentration and induces QS.These results are fit to the experimental results.In the meanwhile, we also get some theoretical value of Hopf Bifurcation on time deday.In addition, we also find this network is robust against noise.PACS numbers: 05.45.-a

  3. Combination of small interfering RNAs mediates greater inhibition of human hepatitis B virus replication and antigen expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhe; XU Ze-feng; YE Jing-jia; YAO Hang-ping; ZHENG Shu; DING Jia-yi

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the inhibitory effect mediated by combination of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting different sites of hepatitis B virus (HBV) transcripts on the viral replication and antigen expression in vitro. Methods: (1) Seven siRNAs targeting surface (S), polymerase (P) or precore (PreC) region ofHBV genome were designed and chemically synthesized.(2) HBV-producing HepG2.2.15 cells were treated with or without siRNAs for 72 h. (3) HBsAg and HBeAg in the cell culture medium were detected by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay. (4) Intracellular viral DNA was quantified by real-time PCR(Polymerase Chain Reaction). (5) HBV viral mRNA was reverse transcribed and quantified by real-time PCR. (6) The change of cell cycle and apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry. Results: Our data demonstrated that synthetic small interfering RNAs(siRNAs) targeting S and PreC gene could efficiently and specifically inhibit HBV replication and antigen expression. The expression of HBsAg and HBeAg and the replication of HBV could be specifically inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by siRNAs.Furthermore, our results showed that the combination of siRNAs targeting various regions could inhibit HBV replication and antigen expression in a more efficient way than the use of single siRNA at the same final concentration. No apoptotic change was observed in the cell after siRNA treatment. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that siRNAs exerted robust and specific inhibition on HBV replication and antigen expression in a cell culture system and combination of siRNAs targeting different regions exhibited more potency.

  4. Repertoire of virus-derived small RNAs produced by mosquito and mammalian cells in response to dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirtzinger, Erin E; Andrade, Christy C; Devitt, Nicholas; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Jacobi, Jennifer L; Schilkey, Faye; Hanley, Kathryn A

    2015-02-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is the major defense of many arthropods against arthropod-borne RNA viruses (arboviruses), but the role of RNAi in vertebrate immunity to arboviruses is not clear. RNA viruses can trigger RNAi in vertebrate cells, but the vertebrate interferon response may obscure this interaction. We quantified virus-derived small RNAs (vRNAs) generated by mosquito (U4.4) cells and interferon-deficient (Vero) and interferon-competent (HuH-7) mammalian cells infected with a single isolate of mosquito-borne dengue virus. Mosquito cells produced significantly more vRNAs than mammalian cells, and mosquito cell vRNAs were derived from both the positive- and negative-sense dengue genomes whereas mammalian cell vRNAs were derived primarily from positive-sense genome. Mosquito cell vRNAs were predominantly 21 nucleotides in length whereas mammalian cell vRNAs were between 12 and 36 nucleotides with a modest peak at 24 nucleotides. Hot-spots, regions of the virus genome that generated a disproportionate number of vRNAs, overlapped among the cell lines.

  5. Quantification of Small Non-Coding RNAs Allows an Accurate Comparison of miRNA Expression Profiles

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    Andrea Masotti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are highly conserved ∼22-mer RNA molecules, encoded by plants and animals that regulate the expression of genes binding to the 3′-UTR of specific target mRNAs. The amount of miRNAs in a total RNA sample depends on the recovery efficiency that may be significantly affected by the different purification methods employed. Traditional approaches may be inefficient at recovering small RNAs, and common spectrophotometric determination is not adequate to quantify selectively these low molecular weight (LMW species from total RNA samples. Here, we describe the use of qualitative and quantitative lab-on-a-chip tools for the analysis of these LMW RNA species. Our data emphasize the close correlation of LMW RNAs with the expression levels of some miRNAs. We therefore applied our result to the comparison of some miRNA expression profiles in different tissues. Finally, the methods we used in this paper allowed us to analyze the efficiency of extraction protocols, to study the small (but significant differences among various preparations and to allow a proper comparison of some miRNA expression profiles in various tissues.

  6. Delivery of small interfering RNAs in human cervical cancer cells by polyethylenimine-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan-Pin; Lin, I.-Jou; Chen, Chih-Chen; Hsu, Yi-Chiang; Chang, Chi-Chang; Lee, Mon-Juan

    2013-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes are capable of penetrating the cell membrane and are widely considered as potential carriers for gene or drug delivery. Because the C-C and C=C bonds in carbon nanotubes are nonpolar, functionalization is required for carbon nanotubes to interact with genes or drugs as well as to improve their biocompatibility. In this study, polyethylenimine (PEI)-functionalized single-wall (PEI-NH-SWNTs) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (PEI-NH-MWNTs) were produced by direct amination method. PEI functionalization increased the positive charge on the surface of SWNTs and MWNTs, allowing carbon nanotubes to interact electrostatically with the negatively charged small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and to serve as nonviral gene delivery reagents. PEI-NH-MWNTs and PEI-NH-SWNTs had a better solubility in water than pristine carbon nanotubes, and further removal of large aggregates by centrifugation produced a stable suspension of reduced particle size and improved homogeneity and dispersity. The amount of grafted PEI estimated by thermogravimetric analysis was 5.08% ( w/ w) and 5.28% ( w/ w) for PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs, respectively. For the assessment of cytotoxicity, various concentrations of PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs were incubated with human cervical cancer cells, HeLa-S3, for 48 h. PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs induced cell deaths in a dose-dependent manner but were less cytotoxic compared to pure PEI. As determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, siRNAs directed against glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (siGAPDH) were completely associated with PEI-NH-SWNTs or PEI-NH-MWNTs at a PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH or PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratio of 80:1 or 160:1, respectively. Furthermore, PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs successfully delivered siGAPDH into HeLa-S3 cells at PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH and PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratios of 1:1 to 20:1, resulting in suppression of the mRNA level of GAPDH to an extent similar to that of DharmaFECT, a common transfection

  7. Frequency modulation of stochastic gene expression bursts by strongly interacting small RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Niraj; Jia, Tao; Zarringhalam, Kourosh; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2016-10-01

    The sporadic nature of gene expression at the single-cell level—long periods of inactivity punctuated by bursts of mRNA or protein production—plays a critical role in diverse cellular processes. To elucidate the cellular role of bursting in gene expression, synthetic biology approaches have been used to design simple genetic circuits with bursty mRNA or protein production. Understanding how such genetic circuits can be designed with the ability to control burst-related parameters requires the development of quantitative stochastic models of gene expression. In this work, we analyze stochastic models for the regulation of gene expression bursts by strongly interacting small RNAs. For the parameter range considered, results based on mean-field approaches are significantly inaccurate and alternative analytical approaches are needed. Using simplifying approximations, we obtain analytical results for the corresponding steady-state distributions that are in agreement with results from stochastic simulations. These results indicate that regulation by small RNAs, in the strong interaction limit, can be used to effectively modulate the frequency of bursting. We explore the consequences of such regulation for simple genetic circuits involving feedback effects and switching between promoter states.

  8. Exosomal transfer of functional small RNAs mediates cancer-stroma communication in human endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, Yoshiko; Takakura, Masahiro; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Yoshimoto, Tanihiro; Kyo, Satoru

    2016-02-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles secreted from a variety of cell types. Recent evidence indicates that human cells communicate with each other by exchanging exosomes. Cancer cells closely interact with neighboring stromal cells, and together they cooperatively promote disease via bidirectional communication. Here, we investigated whether exosomes can play roles in intercellular communication between cancer cells and neighboring fibroblasts. Endometrial fibroblasts were isolated from normal endometrial tissues and from endometrial cancer tissues, and cell-to-cell transfer of endometrial cancer cell line Ishikawa-derived exosomes was examined. The isolated fibroblasts were cultured in conditioned media from CD63-GFP-expressing Ishikawa cells, and we found that GFP-positive exosomes were transferred from Ishikawa cells to the fibroblasts. Next, we introduced a shRNA for a luciferase gene into Ishikawa cells. This shRNA was encapsulated into exosomes, was transferred to the fibroblasts, and then downregulated luciferase expression in the fibroblasts. The mature microRNAs naturally expressed in Ishikawa-derived exosomes were also transported into the endometrial fibroblasts, and they altered the microRNA expression profiles of the fibroblasts. These results indicated that endometrial cancer cells could transmit small regulatory RNAs to endometrial fibroblasts via exosomes. Our findings document a previously unknown mode of intercellular communication between cancer cells and related fibroblasts in human endometrium.

  9. The labyrinth of interactions of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Waqar; Khan, Gulfaraz

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of human malignancies. However, the mechanism by which EBV leads to malignant transformation is not clear. A number of viral latent gene products, including non-protein coding small RNAs, are believed to be involved. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA 1 (EBER1) and EBER2 are two such RNA molecules that are abundantly expressed (up to 10(7) copies) in all EBV-infected cells, but their function remains poorly understood. These polymerase III transcripts have extensive secondary structure and exist as ribonucleoproteins. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that EBERs play an important role, directly or indirectly, in EBV-induced oncogenesis. Here, we summarize the current understanding of the complex interactions of EBERs with various cellular factors and the potential pathways by which these small RNAs are able to influence EBV-infected cells to proliferate and to induce tumorigenesis. The exosome pathway is probably involved in the cellular excretion of EBERs and facilitating some of their biological effects.

  10. Frequency modulation of stochastic gene expression bursts by strongly interacting small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Niraj; Jia, Tao; Zarringhalam, Kourosh; Kulkarni, Rahul V

    2016-10-01

    The sporadic nature of gene expression at the single-cell level-long periods of inactivity punctuated by bursts of mRNA or protein production-plays a critical role in diverse cellular processes. To elucidate the cellular role of bursting in gene expression, synthetic biology approaches have been used to design simple genetic circuits with bursty mRNA or protein production. Understanding how such genetic circuits can be designed with the ability to control burst-related parameters requires the development of quantitative stochastic models of gene expression. In this work, we analyze stochastic models for the regulation of gene expression bursts by strongly interacting small RNAs. For the parameter range considered, results based on mean-field approaches are significantly inaccurate and alternative analytical approaches are needed. Using simplifying approximations, we obtain analytical results for the corresponding steady-state distributions that are in agreement with results from stochastic simulations. These results indicate that regulation by small RNAs, in the strong interaction limit, can be used to effectively modulate the frequency of bursting. We explore the consequences of such regulation for simple genetic circuits involving feedback effects and switching between promoter states.

  11. Small RNAs derived from natural antisense transcripts%天然反义转录物(NAT)来源的小分子RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢兆辉

    2009-01-01

    天然反义转录物(natural antisense transcript,NAT)通常指自然情况下生物体内生成的内源RNA,它们可以与其他RNA部分或完全互补.NAT在生物中非常普遍,并且可以产生多种具有调节作用的小RNA,如天然反义转录干扰小RNA、天然反义微RNA、长的十扰短RNA、扫描RNA和与Piwi相互作用的RNA等.这些小RNA或许是NAT调节基因表达的重要物质分子之一.本文就NAT来源的小RNA及其功能作一慨述.%Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are endogenous RNA molecules that exhibit partial or complete complementarity to other RNAs. They are common in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and can produce some small regulatory RNAs. Such as nat-small interfering RNAs (nat-siRNAs), nat-microRNAs (nat-miRNAs), long short interfering RNAs (lsiRNAs), scan RNA (scnRNAs) and PIWl-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). These small RNAs may be involved in the gene regulation by NATs, In this paper, small RNAs derived from NATs and their mechanisms are discussed.

  12. Small RNA sequencing for profiling microRNAs in long-term preserved formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded non-small cell lung cancer tumor specimens.

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    Daniel H Buitrago

    Full Text Available The preservation of microRNAs in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue makes them particularly useful for biomarker studies. The utility of small RNA sequencing for microRNA expression profiling of FFPE samples has yet to be determined.Total RNA was extracted from de-paraffinized and proteinase K-treated FFPE specimens (15-20 years old of 8 human lung adenocarcinoma tumors by affinity chromatography on silica columns. MicroRNAs in the RNA preparations were quantified by the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform with sequencing libraries prepared with the TruSeq Small RNA Sample Preparation Kit (version 2.0 to obtain unpaired reads of 50 b for small RNA fragments. MicroRNAs were also quantified using Agilent Human miRNA (release 16.0 microarrays that can detect 1,205 mature microRNAs and by quantitative reverse transcription (RT-PCR assays.Between 9.1-16.9 million reads were obtained by small RNA sequencing of extracted RNA samples. Of these, only 0.6-2.3% (mean = 1.5% represented microRNAs. The sequencing method detected 454-625 microRNAs/sample (mean = 550 compared with 200-349 (mean = 286 microRNAs detected by microarray. In Spearman correlation analyses, the average correlation coefficient for the 126 microRNAs detected in all samples by both methods was 0.37, and >0.5 for 63 microRNAs. In correlation analyses of the sequencing- and RT-PCR-based measurements, the coefficients were 0.19-0.95 (mean = 0.73 and >0.7, respectively, for 7 of 9 examined microRNAs. The average inter-replicate Spearman correlation coefficient for the sequencing method was 0.81.Small RNA sequencing can be used to obtain microRNA profiles of FFPE tissue specimens with performance characteristics similar to those of microarrays, in spite of the fragmentation of ribosomal and messenger RNAs that reduces the method's informative capacity. The accuracy of the method can conceivably be improved by increasing sequencing depth and/or depleting FFPE tissue RNAs of

  13. Identification of chromosomal alpha-proteobacterial small RNAs by comparative genome analysis and detection in Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 1021

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    Barloy-Hubler Frédérique

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small untranslated RNAs (sRNAs seem to be far more abundant than previously believed. The number of sRNAs confirmed in E. coli through various approaches is above 70, with several hundred more sRNA candidate genes under biological validation. Although the total number of sRNAs in any one species is still unclear, their importance in cellular processes has been established. However, unlike protein genes, no simple feature enables the prediction of the location of the corresponding sequences in genomes. Several approaches, of variable usefulness, to identify genomic sequences encoding sRNA have been described in recent years. Results We used a combination of in silico comparative genomics and microarray-based transcriptional profiling. This approach to screening identified ~60 intergenic regions conserved between Sinorhizobium meliloti and related members of the alpha-proteobacteria sub-group 2. Of these, 14 appear to correspond to novel non-coding sRNAs and three are putative peptide-coding or 5' UTR RNAs (ORF smaller than 100 aa. The expression of each of these new small RNA genes was confirmed by Northern blot hybridization. Conclusion Small non coding RNA (sra genes can be found in the intergenic regions of alpha-proteobacteria genomes. Some of these sra genes are only present in S. meliloti, sometimes in genomic islands; homologues of others are present in related genomes including those of the pathogens Brucella and Agrobacterium.

  14. Modulating the bacterial surface with small RNAs: a new twist on PhoP/Q-mediated lipopolysaccharide modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Martin; Kallipolitis, Birgitte; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    Summary In recent years, small non-coding RNAs have emerged as important regulatory components in bacterial stress responses and in bacterial virulence. Many of these are conserved in related species and act on target mRNAs by sequence complementarity. They are tightly controlled...... of bacterial surface properties by regulating lipopolysaccharide modification. The small RNA is expressed as part of the PhoP/PhoQ two-component system that plays a major role in virulence of pathogenic species. This work expands the list of global regulators known to control small RNA expression...... at the transcription level, and are frequently elements of global regulatory systems. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella, almost one-third of the functional characterized small RNAs participate in control of outer membrane protein production. A subset of these genes is under the control of the sigma...

  15. Improving fold activation of small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) with rational RNA engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sarai; Chappell, James; Sankar, Sitara; Chew, Rebecca; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory RNAs have become integral components of the synthetic biology and bioengineering toolbox for controlling gene expression. We recently expanded this toolbox by creating small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) that act by disrupting the formation of a target transcriptional terminator hairpin placed upstream of a gene. While STARs are a promising addition to the repertoire of RNA regulators, much work remains to be done to optimize the fold activation of these systems. Here we apply rational RNA engineering strategies to improve the fold activation of two STAR regulators. We demonstrate that a combination of promoter strength tuning and multiple RNA engineering strategies can improve fold activation from 5.4-fold to 13.4-fold for a STAR regulator derived from the pbuE riboswitch terminator. We then validate the generality of our approach and show that these same strategies improve fold activation from 2.1-fold to 14.6-fold for an unrelated STAR regulator, opening the door to creating a range of additional STARs to use in a broad array of biotechnologies. We also establish that the optimizations preserve the orthogonality of these STARs between themselves and a set of RNA transcriptional repressors, enabling these optimized STARs to be used in sophisticated circuits.

  16. Genome-defence small RNAs exapted for epigenetic mating-type inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deepankar Pratap; Saudemont, Baptiste; Guglielmi, Gérard; Arnaiz, Olivier; Goût, Jean-François; Prajer, Malgorzata; Potekhin, Alexey; Przybòs, Ewa; Aubusson-Fleury, Anne; Bhullar, Simran; Bouhouche, Khaled; Lhuillier-Akakpo, Maoussi; Tanty, Véronique; Blugeon, Corinne; Alberti, Adriana; Labadie, Karine; Aury, Jean-Marc; Sperling, Linda; Duharcourt, Sandra; Meyer, Eric

    2014-05-22

    In the ciliate Paramecium, transposable elements and their single-copy remnants are deleted during the development of somatic macronuclei from germline micronuclei, at each sexual generation. Deletions are targeted by scnRNAs, small RNAs produced from the germ line during meiosis that first scan the maternal macronuclear genome to identify missing sequences, and then allow the zygotic macronucleus to reproduce the same deletions. Here we show that this process accounts for the maternal inheritance of mating types in Paramecium tetraurelia, a long-standing problem in epigenetics. Mating type E depends on expression of the transmembrane protein mtA, and the default type O is determined during development by scnRNA-dependent excision of the mtA promoter. In the sibling species Paramecium septaurelia, mating type O is determined by coding-sequence deletions in a different gene, mtB, which is specifically required for mtA expression. These independently evolved mechanisms suggest frequent exaptation of the scnRNA pathway to regulate cellular genes and mediate transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of essential phenotypic polymorphisms.

  17. Small RNAs Derived from the T-DNA of Agrobacterium rhizogenes in Hairy Roots of Phaseolus vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez, Pablo; Hernández-López, Alejandrina; Estrada-Navarrete, Georgina; Sanchez, Federico

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes is a pathogenic bacteria that causes hairy root disease by transferring bacterial DNA into the plant genome. It is an essential tool for industry and research due to its capacity to produce genetically modified roots and whole organisms. Here, we identified and characterized small RNAs generated from the transfer DNA (T-DNA) of A. rhizogenes in hairy roots of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Distinct abundant A. rhizogenes T-DNA-derived small RNAs (ArT-sRNAs) belonging to several oncogenes were detected in hairy roots using high-throughput sequencing. The most abundant and diverse species of ArT-sRNAs were those of 21- and 22-nucleotides in length. Many T-DNA encoded genes constituted phasiRNA producing loci (PHAS loci). Interestingly, degradome analysis revealed that ArT-sRNAs potentially target genes of P. vulgaris. In addition, we detected low levels of ArT-sRNAs in the A. rhizogenes-induced calli generated at the wound site before hairy root emergence. These results suggest that RNA silencing targets several genes from T-DNA of A. rhizogenes in hairy roots of common bean. Therefore, the role of RNA silencing observed in this study has implications in our understanding and usage of this unique plant-bacteria interaction. PMID:28203245

  18. In silico identification of plant miRNAs in mammalian breast milk exosomes--a small step forward?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lukasik

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression by inhibiting the protein translation or targeting the mRNA cleavage. They play many important roles in living organism cells; however, the knowledge on miRNAs functions has become more extensive upon their identification in biological fluids and recent reports on plant-origin miRNAs abundance in human plasma and serum. Considering these findings, we performed a rigorous bioinformatics analysis of publicly available, raw data from high-throughput sequencing studies on miRNAs composition in human and porcine breast milk exosomes to identify the fraction of food-derived miRNAs. Several processing and filtering steps were applied to increase the accuracy, and to avoid false positives. Through aforementioned analysis, 35 and 17 miRNA species, belonging to 25 and 11 MIR families, were identified, respectively. In the human samples the highest abundance levels yielded the ath-miR166a, pab-miR951, ptc-miR472a and bdi-miR168, while in the porcine breast milk exosomes, the zma-miR168a, zma-miR156a and ath-miR166a have been identified in the largest amounts. The consensus prediction and annotation of potential human targets for select plant miRNAs suggest that the aforementioned molecules may interact with mRNAs coding several transcription factors, protein receptors, transporters and immune-related proteins, thus potentially influencing human organism. Taken together, the presented analysis shows proof of abundant plant miRNAs in mammal breast milk exosomes, pointing at the same time to the new possibilities arising from this discovery.

  19. Structural organization of the genes encoding the small nuclear RNAs U1 to U6 of Tetrahymena thermophila is very similar to that of plant small nuclear RNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orum, H; Nielsen, Henrik; Engberg, J

    1992-01-01

    We report the sequences of the genes encoding the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) U1 to U6 of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. The genes of the individual snRNAs exist in two to six slightly different copies per haploid genome. Sequence analyses of the gene-flanking regions indicate that there ar......We report the sequences of the genes encoding the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) U1 to U6 of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. The genes of the individual snRNAs exist in two to six slightly different copies per haploid genome. Sequence analyses of the gene-flanking regions indicate...

  20. Identification of four novel small non-coding RNAs from Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Guang-Tao; Jiang Bo-Le; Feng Jia-Xun; He Yong-Qiang; Chen Xiao-Lin; Tang Dong-Jie; Jiang Rui-Ping; Lin Min; Tang Ji-Liang

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background In bacteria, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) have been recognized as important regulators of various cellular processes. Approximately 200 bacterial sRNAs in total have been reported. However, very few sRNAs have been identified from phytopathogenic bacteria. Results Xanthomons campestris pathovar campestris (Xcc) is the causal agent of black rot disease of cruciferous crops. In this study, a cDNA library was constructed from the low-molecular weight RNA isolated from the Xc...

  1. Comparison of dengue virus type 2-specific small RNAs from RNA interference-competent and -incompetent mosquito cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn C Scott

    Full Text Available The exogenous RNA interference (RNAi pathway is an important antiviral defense against arboviruses in mosquitoes, and virus-specific small interfering (siRNAs are key components of this pathway. Understanding the biogenesis of siRNAs in mosquitoes could have important ramifications in using RNAi to control arbovirus transmission. Using deep sequencing technology, we characterized dengue virus type 2 (DENV2-specific small RNAs produced during infection of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and A. aegypti Aag2 cell cultures and compared them to those produced in the C6/36 Aedes albopictus cell line. We show that the size and mixed polarity of virus-specific small RNAs from DENV-infected A. aegypti cells indicate that they are products of Dicer-2 (Dcr2 cleavage of long dsRNA, whereas C6/36 cells generate DENV2-specific small RNAs that are longer and predominantly positive polarity, suggesting that they originate from a different small RNA pathway. Examination of virus-specific small RNAs after infection of the two mosquito cell lines with the insect-only flavivirus cell fusing agent virus (CFAV corroborated these findings. An in vitro assay also showed that Aag2 A. aegypti cells are capable of siRNA production, while C6/36 A. albopictus cells exhibit inefficient Dcr2 cleavage of long dsRNA. Defective expression or function of Dcr2, the key initiator of the RNAi pathway, might explain the comparatively robust growth of arthropod-borne viruses in the C6/36 cell line, which has been used frequently as a surrogate for studying molecular interactions between arboviruses and cells of their mosquito hosts.

  2. Small regulatory RNAs control the multi-cellular adhesive lifestyle of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mikkel Girke; Nielsen, Jesper Sejrup; Boysen, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    . Our demonstration that basal expression of each of the three RNA species is sufficient to downregulate CsgD synthesis and prevent curli formation indicates that all play a prominent role in the curli regulatory network. Our findings provide the first clue as to how the Rcs signalling pathway...... and adhesive state that enables biofilm formation on surfaces. For this, the bacterium needs to reprogramme its gene expression, and in many E. coli and Salmonella strains the lifestyle shift relies on control cascades that inhibit flagellar expression and activate the synthesis of curli, extracellular...... adhesive fibres important for co-aggregation of cells and adhesion to biotic and abiotic surfaces. By combining bioinformatics, genetic and biochemical analysis we identified three small RNAs that act by an antisense mechanism to downregulate translation of CsgD, the master regulator of curli synthesis...

  3. A pathogenic mechanism in Huntington's disease involves small CAG-repeated RNAs with neurotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañez-Coronel, Mónica; Porta, Silvia; Kagerbauer, Birgit; Mateu-Huertas, Elisabet; Pantano, Lorena; Ferrer, Isidre; Guzmán, Manuel; Estivill, Xavier; Martí, Eulàlia

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder caused by the expansion of CAG repeats in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. The abnormally extended polyglutamine in the HTT protein encoded by the CAG repeats has toxic effects. Here, we provide evidence to support that the mutant HTT CAG repeats interfere with cell viability at the RNA level. In human neuronal cells, expanded HTT exon-1 mRNA with CAG repeat lengths above the threshold for complete penetrance (40 or greater) induced cell death and increased levels of small CAG-repeated RNAs (sCAGs), of ≈21 nucleotides in a Dicer-dependent manner. The severity of the toxic effect of HTT mRNA and sCAG generation correlated with CAG expansion length. Small RNAs obtained from cells expressing mutant HTT and from HD human brains significantly decreased neuronal viability, in an Ago2-dependent mechanism. In both cases, the use of anti-miRs specific for sCAGs efficiently blocked the toxic effect, supporting a key role of sCAGs in HTT-mediated toxicity. Luciferase-reporter assays showed that expanded HTT silences the expression of CTG-containing genes that are down-regulated in HD. These results suggest a possible link between HD and sCAG expression with an aberrant activation of the siRNA/miRNA gene silencing machinery, which may trigger a detrimental response. The identification of the specific cellular processes affected by sCAGs may provide insights into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying HD, offering opportunities to develop new therapeutic approaches.

  4. RNY (YRNA)-derived small RNAs regulate cell death and inflammation in monocytes/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizir, Zoheir; Bottini, Silvia; Grandjean, Valerie; Trabucchi, Michele; Repetto, Emanuela

    2017-01-05

    The recent discovery of new classes of small RNAs has opened unknown territories to explore new regulations of physiopathological events. We have recently demonstrated that RNY (or Y RNA)-derived small RNAs (referred to as s-RNYs) are an independent class of clinical biomarkers to detect coronary artery lesions and are associated with atherosclerosis burden. Here, we have studied the role of s-RNYs in human and mouse monocytes/macrophages and have shown that in lipid-laden monocytes/macrophages s-RNY expression is timely correlated to the activation of both NF-κB and caspase 3-dependent cell death pathways. Loss- or gain-of-function experiments demonstrated that s-RNYs activate caspase 3 and NF-κB signaling pathways ultimately promoting cell death and inflammatory responses. As, in atherosclerosis, Ro60-associated s-RNYs generated by apoptotic macrophages are released in the blood of patients, we have investigated the extracellular function of the s-RNY/Ro60 complex. Our data demonstrated that s-RNY/Ro60 complex induces caspase 3-dependent cell death and NF-κB-dependent inflammation, when added to the medium of cultured monocytes/macrophages. Finally, we have shown that s-RNY function is mediated by Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7). Indeed using chloroquine, which disrupts signaling of endosome-localized TLRs 3, 7, 8 and 9 or the more specific TLR7/9 antagonist, the phosphorothioated oligonucleotide IRS954, we blocked the effect of either intracellular or extracellular s-RNYs. These results position s-RNYs as relevant novel functional molecules that impacts on macrophage physiopathology, indicating their potential role as mediators of inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis.

  5. A particular set of small non-coding RNAs is bound to the distinctive Argonaute protein of Trypanosoma cruzi: insights from RNA-interference deficient organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Silva, Maria Rosa; Sanguinetti, Julia; Cabrera-Cabrera, Florencia; Franzén, Oscar; Cayota, Alfonso

    2014-04-01

    The study of small RNAs and Argonaute proteins in eukaryotes that are deficient in functional RNA interference could provide insights into novel functions of small RNAs. In this study we describe small non-coding RNAs bound to a distinctive Argonaute protein of Trypanosoma cruzi, TcPIWI-tryp. Co-immunoprecipitation of TcPIWI-tryp followed by deep sequencing of isolated RNA identified abundant small RNAs derived from rRNAs and tRNAs. The small RNA repertoire differed from that of the canonical Argonaute in organisms with functional RNA interference, which could indicate novel biological functions for TcPIWI-tryp in T. cruzi and other members of the trypanosomatid clade.

  6. A genome-wide identification analysis of small regulatory RNAs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by RNA-Seq and conservation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Pellin

    Full Text Available We propose a new method for smallRNAs (sRNAs identification. First we build an effective target genome (ETG by means of a strand-specific procedure. Then we propose a new bioinformatic pipeline based mainly on the combination of two types of information: the first provides an expression map based on RNA-seq data (Reads Map and the second applies principles of comparative genomics leading to a Conservation Map. By superimposing these two maps, a robust method for the search of sRNAs is obtained. We apply this methodology to investigate sRNAs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. This bioinformatic procedure leads to a total list of 1948 candidate sRNAs. The size of the candidate list is strictly related to the aim of the study and to the technology used during the verification process. We provide performance measures of the algorithm in identifying annotated sRNAs reported in three recent published studies.

  7. Phytophthora infestans Argonaute 1 binds microRNA and small RNAs from effector genes and transposable elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åsman, Anna K M; Fogelqvist, Johan; Vetukuri, Ramesh R; Dixelius, Christina

    2016-08-01

    Phytophthora spp. encode large sets of effector proteins and distinct populations of small RNAs (sRNAs). Recent evidence has suggested that pathogen-derived sRNAs can modulate the expression of plant defense genes. Here, we studied the sRNA classes and functions associated with Phytophthora infestans Argonaute (Ago) proteins. sRNAs were co-immunoprecipitated with three PiAgo proteins and deep sequenced. Twenty- to twenty-two-nucleotide (nt) sRNAs were identified as the main interaction partners of PiAgo1 and high enrichment of 24-26-nt sRNAs was seen in the PiAgo4-bound sample. The frequencies and sizes of transposable element (TE)-derived sRNAs in the different PiAgo libraries suggested diversified roles of the PiAgo proteins in the control of different TE classes. We further provide evidence for the involvement of PiAgo1 in the P. infestans microRNA (miRNA) pathway. Protein-coding genes are probably regulated by the shared action of PiAgo1 and PiAgo5, as demonstrated by analysis of differential expression. An abundance of sRNAs from genes encoding host cell death-inducing Crinkler (CRN) effectors was bound to PiAgo1, implicating this protein in the regulation of the expanded CRN gene family. The data suggest that PiAgo1 plays an essential role in gene regulation and that at least two RNA silencing pathways regulate TEs in the plant-pathogenic oomycete P. infestans.

  8. Diversity, evolution, and therapeutic applications of small RNAs in prokaryotic and eukaryotic immune systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Edwin L.; Overstreet, Nicola

    2014-03-01

    Recent evidence supports that prokaryotes exhibit adaptive immunity in the form of CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspersed Short Palindromic Repeats) and Cas (CRISPR associated proteins). The CRISPR-Cas system confers resistance to exogenous genetic elements such as phages and plasmids by allowing for the recognition and silencing of these genetic elements. Moreover, CRISPR-Cas serves as a memory of past exposures. This suggests that the evolution of the immune system has counterparts among the prokaryotes, not exclusively among eukaryotes. Mathematical models have been proposed which simulate the evolutionary patterns of CRISPR, however large gaps in our understanding of CRISPR-Cas function and evolution still exist. The CRISPR-Cas system is analogous to small RNAs involved in resistance mechanisms throughout the tree of life, and a deeper understanding of the evolution of small RNA pathways is necessary before the relationship between these convergent systems is to be determined. Presented in this review are novel RNAi therapies based on CRISPR-Cas analogs and the potential for future therapies based on CRISPR-Cas system components.

  9. Viral small interfering RNAs target host genes to mediate disease symptoms in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil A Smith

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV Y-satellite RNA (Y-Sat has a small non-protein-coding RNA genome that induces yellowing symptoms in infected Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco. How this RNA pathogen induces such symptoms has been a longstanding question. We show that the yellowing symptoms are a result of small interfering RNA (siRNA-directed RNA silencing of the chlorophyll biosynthetic gene, CHLI. The CHLI mRNA contains a 22-nucleotide (nt complementary sequence to the Y-Sat genome, and in Y-Sat-infected plants, CHLI expression is dramatically down-regulated. Small RNA sequencing and 5' RACE analyses confirmed that this 22-nt sequence was targeted for mRNA cleavage by Y-Sat-derived siRNAs. Transformation of tobacco with a RNA interference (RNAi vector targeting CHLI induced Y-Sat-like symptoms. In addition, the symptoms of Y-Sat infection can be completely prevented by transforming tobacco with a silencing-resistant variant of the CHLI gene. These results suggest that siRNA-directed silencing of CHLI is solely responsible for the Y-Sat-induced symptoms. Furthermore, we demonstrate that two Nicotiana species, which do not develop yellowing symptoms upon Y-Sat infection, contain a single nucleotide polymorphism within the siRNA-targeted CHLI sequence. This suggests that the previously observed species specificity of Y-Sat-induced symptoms is due to natural sequence variation in the CHLI gene, preventing CHLI silencing in species with a mismatch to the Y-Sat siRNA. Taken together, these findings provide the first demonstration of small RNA-mediated viral disease symptom production and offer an explanation of the species specificity of the viral disease.

  10. The sRNAome mining revealed existence of unique signature small RNAs derived from 5.8SrRNA from Piper nigrum and other plant lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, Srinivasan; Soniya, E V

    2017-02-01

    Small RNAs derived from ribosomal RNAs (srRNAs) are rarely explored in the high-throughput data of plant systems. Here, we analyzed srRNAs from the deep-sequenced small RNA libraries of Piper nigrum, a unique magnoliid plant. The 5' end of the putative long form of 5.8S rRNA (5.8SLrRNA) was identified as the site for biogenesis of highly abundant srRNAs that are unique among the Piperaceae family of plants. A subsequent comparative analysis of the ninety-seven sRNAomes of diverse plants successfully uncovered the abundant existence and precise cleavage of unique rRF signature small RNAs upstream of a novel 5' consensus sequence of the 5.8S rRNA. The major cleavage process mapped identically among the different tissues of the same plant. The differential expression and cleavage of 5'5.8S srRNAs in Phytophthora capsici infected P. nigrum tissues indicated the critical biological functions of these srRNAs during stress response. The non-canonical short hairpin precursor structure, the association with Argonaute proteins, and the potential targets of 5'5.8S srRNAs reinforced their regulatory role in the RNAi pathway in plants. In addition, this novel lineage specific small RNAs may have tremendous biological potential in the taxonomic profiling of plants.

  11. Differential expression of small RNAs under chemical stress and fed-batch fermentation in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rau, Martin Holm; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Long, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    applications, the involvement of sRNAs in this process is not well understood. We have used RNA sequencing to map sRNA expression in E. coli under chemical stress and high cell density fermentation conditions with the aim of identifying sRNAs involved in the transcriptional response and those with potential...

  12. Comparative genome‐wide analysis of small RNAs of major Gram‐positive pathogens: from identification to application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mraheil, Mobarak A.; Billion, André; Kuenne, Carsten; Pischimarov, Jordan; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Engelmann, Susanne; Hartke, Axel; Giard, Jean‐Christophe; Rupnik, Maja; Vorwerk, Sonja; Beier, Markus; Retey, Julia; Hartsch, Thomas; Jacob, Anette; Cemič, Franz; Hemberger, Jürgen; Chakraborty, Trinad; Hain, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    Summary In the recent years, the number of drug‐ and multi‐drug‐resistant microbial strains has increased rapidly. Therefore, the need to identify innovative approaches for development of novel anti‐infectives and new therapeutic targets is of high priority in global health care. The detection of small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria has attracted considerable attention as an emerging class of new gene expression regulators. Several experimental technologies to predict sRNA have been established for the Gram‐negative model organism Escherichia coli. In many respects, sRNA screens in this model system have set a blueprint for the global and functional identification of sRNAs for Gram‐positive microbes, but the functional role of sRNAs in colonization and pathogenicity for Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Enterococcus faecalis and Clostridium difficile is almost completely unknown. Here, we report the current knowledge about the sRNAs of these socioeconomically relevant Gram‐positive pathogens, overview the state‐of‐the‐art high‐throughput sRNA screening methods and summarize bioinformatics approaches for genome‐wide sRNA identification and target prediction. Finally, we discuss the use of modified peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) as a novel tool to inactivate potential sRNA and their applications in rapid and specific detection of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21255362

  13. Trans-kingdom cross-talk: small RNAs on the move.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn Knip

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the mobility of small RNA (sRNA molecules from the perspective of trans-kingdom gene silencing. Mobility of sRNA molecules within organisms is a well-known phenomenon, facilitating gene silencing between cells and tissues. sRNA signals are also transmitted between organisms of the same species and of different species. Remarkably, in recent years many examples of RNA-signal exchange have been described to occur between organisms of different kingdoms. These examples are predominantly found in interactions between hosts and their pathogens, parasites, and symbionts. However, they may only represent the tip of the iceberg, since the emerging picture suggests that organisms in biological niches commonly exchange RNA-silencing signals. In this case, we need to take this into account fully to understand how a given biological equilibrium is obtained. Despite many observations of trans-kingdom RNA signal transfer, several mechanistic aspects of these signals remain unknown. Such RNA signal transfer is already being exploited for practical purposes, though. Pathogen genes can be silenced by plant-produced sRNAs designed to affect these genes. This is also known as Host-Induced Genes Silencing (HIGS, and it has the potential to become an important disease-control method in the future.

  14. Cloning and molecular characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi U2, U4, U5, and U6 small nuclear RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DL Ambrósio

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs are important factors in the functioning of eukaryotic cells that form several small complexes with proteins; these ribonucleoprotein particles (U snRNPs have an essential role in the pre-mRNA processing, particularly in splicing, catalyzed by spliceosomes, large RNA-protein complexes composed of various snRNPs. Even though they are well defined in mammals, snRNPs are still not totally characterized in certain trypanosomatids as Trypanosoma cruzi. For this reason we subjected snRNAs (U2, U4, U5, and U6 from T. cruzi epimastigotes to molecular characterization by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and reverse transcription-PCR. These amplified sequences were cloned, sequenced, and compared with those other of trypanosomatids. Among these snRNAs, U5 was less conserved and U6 the most conserved. Their respective secondary structures were predicted and compared with known T. brucei structures. In addition, the copy number of each snRNA in the T. cruzi genome was characterized by Southern blotting.

  15. Sequencing illustrates the transcriptional response of Legionella pneumophila during infection and identifies seventy novel small non-coding RNAs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Weissenmayer, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    Second generation sequencing has prompted a number of groups to re-interrogate the transcriptomes of several bacterial and archaeal species. One of the central findings has been the identification of complex networks of small non-coding RNAs that play central roles in transcriptional regulation in all growth conditions and for the pathogen\\'s interaction with and survival within host cells. Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative facultative intracellular human pathogen with a distinct biphasic lifestyle. One of its primary environmental hosts in the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and its infection by L. pneumophila mimics that seen in human macrophages. Here we present analysis of strand specific sequencing of the transcriptional response of L. pneumophila during exponential and post-exponential broth growth and during the replicative and transmissive phase of infection inside A. castellanii. We extend previous microarray based studies as well as uncovering evidence of a complex regulatory architecture underpinned by numerous non-coding RNAs. Over seventy new non-coding RNAs could be identified; many of them appear to be strain specific and in configurations not previously reported. We discover a family of non-coding RNAs preferentially expressed during infection conditions and identify a second copy of 6S RNA in L. pneumophila. We show that the newly discovered putative 6S RNA as well as a number of other non-coding RNAs show evidence for antisense transcription. The nature and extent of the non-coding RNAs and their expression patterns suggests that these may well play central roles in the regulation of Legionella spp. specific traits and offer clues as to how L. pneumophila adapts to its intracellular niche. The expression profiles outlined in the study have been deposited into Genbank\\'s Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under the series accession GSE27232.

  16. Sequencing illustrates the transcriptional response of Legionella pneumophila during infection and identifies seventy novel small non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A Weissenmayer

    Full Text Available Second generation sequencing has prompted a number of groups to re-interrogate the transcriptomes of several bacterial and archaeal species. One of the central findings has been the identification of complex networks of small non-coding RNAs that play central roles in transcriptional regulation in all growth conditions and for the pathogen's interaction with and survival within host cells. Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative facultative intracellular human pathogen with a distinct biphasic lifestyle. One of its primary environmental hosts in the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and its infection by L. pneumophila mimics that seen in human macrophages. Here we present analysis of strand specific sequencing of the transcriptional response of L. pneumophila during exponential and post-exponential broth growth and during the replicative and transmissive phase of infection inside A. castellanii. We extend previous microarray based studies as well as uncovering evidence of a complex regulatory architecture underpinned by numerous non-coding RNAs. Over seventy new non-coding RNAs could be identified; many of them appear to be strain specific and in configurations not previously reported. We discover a family of non-coding RNAs preferentially expressed during infection conditions and identify a second copy of 6S RNA in L. pneumophila. We show that the newly discovered putative 6S RNA as well as a number of other non-coding RNAs show evidence for antisense transcription. The nature and extent of the non-coding RNAs and their expression patterns suggests that these may well play central roles in the regulation of Legionella spp. specific traits and offer clues as to how L. pneumophila adapts to its intracellular niche. The expression profiles outlined in the study have been deposited into Genbank's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database under the series accession GSE27232.

  17. Inforna 2.0: A Platform for the Sequence-Based Design of Small Molecules Targeting Structured RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, Matthew D; Winkelsas, Audrey M; Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Southern, Mark; Fallahi, Mohammad; Childs-Disney, Jessica L

    2016-06-17

    The development of small molecules that target RNA is challenging yet, if successful, could advance the development of chemical probes to study RNA function or precision therapeutics to treat RNA-mediated disease. Previously, we described Inforna, an approach that can mine motifs (secondary structures) within target RNAs, which is deduced from the RNA sequence, and compare them to a database of known RNA motif-small molecule binding partners. Output generated by Inforna includes the motif found in both the database and the desired RNA target, lead small molecules for that target, and other related meta-data. Lead small molecules can then be tested for binding and affecting cellular (dys)function. Herein, we describe Inforna 2.0, which incorporates all known RNA motif-small molecule binding partners reported in the scientific literature, a chemical similarity searching feature, and an improved user interface and is freely available via an online web server. By incorporation of interactions identified by other laboratories, the database has been doubled, containing 1936 RNA motif-small molecule interactions, including 244 unique small molecules and 1331 motifs. Interestingly, chemotype analysis of the compounds that bind RNA in the database reveals features in small molecule chemotypes that are privileged for binding. Further, this updated database expanded the number of cellular RNAs to which lead compounds can be identified.

  18. Molecular analysis of central feeding regulation by neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons with NPY receptor small interfering RNAs (siRNAs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Hypothalamic neuropeptides play important roles in central feeding behavior. Among them, neuropeptide Y (NPY) has the strongest orexigenic action. It is synthesized in NPY-expressing neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), which projects to other nuclei, mainly to the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). PVN, which possesses NPY-Y1, -Y2 and -Y4, -Y5 receptors, is considered as feeding center for central feeding behavior. Herein I review recent results on feeding behavior obtained by gene knockdown technologies. The small interfering RNA (siRNA) plasmid-based vectors, which drive transcription of siRNA by U6 RNA polymerase III promoter to produce knockdown of the NPY and its receptor (Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5) genes, were stereotaxically injected into mouse ARC and PVN. Feeding behaviors were measured for 6days after siRNA vector injection. NPY and its receptor mRNA levels were decreased, which were measured by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, and simultaneous decrease in their proteins was also detected in separate nuclei by immunohistochemistry. In the NPY system, decrease in NPY, Y1 and Y5 expressions in specialized nuclei diminished central feeding behavior, whereas decrease in Y2 or Y4 expression in both ARC or PVN did not affect feeding behavior. Thus, specialized change in expressions of NPY and its receptors (especially Y1 and Y5) are important for regulation of endogenous feeding behavior in central regulation. Further analysis of NPY receptors may provide better understanding of feeding behavior and of potential therapeutic targets.

  19. A genome-wide approach to discovery of small RNAs involved in regulation of virulence in Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan S Bradley

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Small RNAs (sRNAs are becoming increasingly recognized as important regulators in bacteria. To investigate the contribution of sRNA mediated regulation to virulence in Vibrio cholerae, we performed high throughput sequencing of cDNA generated from sRNA transcripts isolated from a strain ectopically expressing ToxT, the major transcriptional regulator within the virulence gene regulon. We compared this data set with ToxT binding sites determined by pulldown and deep sequencing to identify sRNA promoters directly controlled by ToxT. Analysis of the resulting transcripts with ToxT binding sites in cis revealed two sRNAs within the Vibrio Pathogenicity Island. When deletions of these sRNAs were made and the resulting strains were competed against the parental strain in the infant mouse model of V. cholerae colonization, one, TarB, displayed a variable colonization phenotype dependent on its physiological state at the time of inoculation. We identified a target of TarB as the mRNA for the secreted colonization factor, TcpF. We verified negative regulation of TcpF expression by TarB and, using point mutations that disrupted interaction between TarB and tpcF mRNA, showed that loss of this negative regulation was primarily responsible for the colonization phenotype observed in the TarB deletion mutant.

  20. Implications of MicroRNAs in the Treatment of Gefitinib-Resistant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Thomas K. Sin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents about 85% of the reported cases of lung cancer. Acquired resistance to targeted therapy with epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs, such as gefitinib, is not uncommon. It is thus vital to explore novel strategies to restore sensitivity to gefitinib. Provided that microRNAs (miRNAs negatively regulate their gene targets at the transcriptional level, it is speculated that miRNA mimetics may reduce the expression, activity and signal transduction of EGFR so that sensitization of tumour sites to gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity can be achieved. Indeed, a growing body of evidence has shown that the manipulation of endogenous levels of miRNA not only attenuates the EGFR/PI3K/Akt phosphorylation cascade, but also restores apoptotic cell death in in vitro models of experimentally-induced gefitinib resistance and provoked tumour regression/shrinkage in xenograft models. These data are in concordant with the clinical data showing that the differential expression profiles of miRNA in tumour tissues and blood associate strongly with drug response and overall survival. Furthermore, another line of studies indicate that the chemopreventive effects of a variety of natural compounds may involve miRNAs. The present review aims to discuss the therapeutic capacity of miRNAs in relation to recent discoveries on EGFR-TKI resistance, including chronic drug exposure and mutations.

  1. Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNA) regulate gene silencing and modify homeostatic status in animals faced with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been established that reduced susceptibility to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has a genetic component. This genetic component may take the form of small non-coding RNAs (sncRNA), which are molecules that function as regulators of gene expression. Various sncRNAs ...

  2. Antiviral activity of Small interfering RNAs: Specificity testing using heterologous virus reveals interferon-related effects overlooked by conventional mismatch controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is considered to be a highly specific method for knockdown of gene expression in eukaryotic cells via degradation of target mRNA. Mutated siRNA molecules with 1–4 mismatching nucleotides compared to the target mRNA are regularly used as specific...

  3. Small RNA deep sequencing identifies novel and salt-stress-regulated microRNAs from roots of Medicago sativa and Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Rui-Cai; Li, Ming-Na; Kang, Jun-Mei; Zhang, Tie-Jun; Sun, Yan; Yang, Qing-Chuan

    2015-05-01

    Small 21- to 24-nucleotide (nt) ribonucleic acids (RNAs), notably the microRNA (miRNA), are emerging as a posttranscriptional regulation mechanism. Salt stress is one of the primary abiotic stresses that cause the crop losses worldwide. In saline lands, root growth and function of plant are determined by the action of environmental salt stress through specific genes that adapt root development to the restrictive condition. To elucidate the role of miRNAs in salt stress regulation in Medicago, we used a high-throughput sequencing approach to analyze four small RNA libraries from roots of Zhongmu-1 (Medicago sativa) and Jemalong A17 (Medicago truncatula), which were treated with 300 mM NaCl for 0 and 8 h. Each library generated about 20 million short sequences and contained predominantly small RNAs of 24-nt length, followed by 21-nt and 22-nt small RNAs. Using sequence analysis, we identified 385 conserved miRNAs from 96 families, along with 68 novel candidate miRNAs. Of all the 68 predicted novel miRNAs, 15 miRNAs were identified to have miRNA*. Statistical analysis on abundance of sequencing read revealed specific miRNA showing contrasting expression patterns between M. sativa and M. truncatula roots, as well as between roots treated for 0 and 8 h. The expression of 10 conserved and novel miRNAs was also quantified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The miRNA precursor and target genes were predicted by bioinformatics analysis. We concluded that the salt stress related conserved and novel miRNAs may have a large variety of target mRNAs, some of which might play key roles in salt stress regulation of Medicago.

  4. Exosomes secreted by nematode parasites transfer small RNAs to mammalian cells and modulate innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Amy H; Coakley, Gillian; Simbari, Fabio; McSorley, Henry J; Quintana, Juan F; Le Bihan, Thierry; Kumar, Sujai; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Lear, Marissa; Harcus, Yvonne; Ceroni, Alessandro; Babayan, Simon A; Blaxter, Mark; Ivens, Alasdair; Maizels, Rick M

    2014-11-25

    In mammalian systems RNA can move between cells via vesicles. Here we demonstrate that the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus, which infects mice, secretes vesicles containing microRNAs (miRNAs) and Y RNAs as well as a nematode Argonaute protein. These vesicles are of intestinal origin and are enriched for homologues of mammalian exosome proteins. Administration of the nematode exosomes to mice suppresses Type 2 innate responses and eosinophilia induced by the allergen Alternaria. Microarray analysis of mouse cells incubated with nematode exosomes in vitro identifies Il33r and Dusp1 as suppressed genes, and Dusp1 can be repressed by nematode miRNAs based on a reporter assay. We further identify miRNAs from the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis in the serum of infected mice, suggesting that miRNA secretion into host tissues is conserved among parasitic nematodes. These results reveal exosomes as another mechanism by which helminths manipulate their hosts and provide a mechanistic framework for RNA transfer between animal species.

  5. The tRNA-Derived Small RNAs Regulate Gene Expression through Triggering Sequence-Specific Degradation of Target Transcripts in the Oomycete Pathogen Phytophthora sojae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinhu; Li, Tingting; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolong; Quan, Junli; Jin, Weibo; Zhang, Meixiang; Fan, Guangjin; Wang, Ming-Bo; Shan, Weixing

    2016-01-01

    Along with the well-studied microRNA (miRNA) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a new class of transfer RNA-derived small RNA (tsRNA), which has recently been detected in multiple organisms and is implicated in gene regulation. However, while miRNAs and siRNAs are known to repress gene expression through sequence-specific RNA cleavage or translational repression, how tsRNAs regulate gene expression remains unclear. Here we report the identification and functional characterization of tsRNAs in the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora sojae. We show that multiple tRNAs are processed into abundant tsRNAs, which accumulate in a similar developmental stage-specific manner and are negatively correlated with the expression of predicted target genes. Degradome sequencing and 5′ RLM RACE experiments indicate tsRNAs can trigger degradation of target transcripts. Transient expression assays using GUS sensor constructs confirmed the requirement of sequence complementarity in tsRNA-mediated RNA degradation in P. sojae. Our results show that the tsRNA are a class of functional endogenous sRNAs and suggest that tsRNA regulate gene expression through inducing sequence-specific degradation of target RNAs in oomycetes. PMID:28066490

  6. Targeting Nuclear Receptors with Lentivirus-Delivered Small RNAs in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: RNA interference (RNAi has tremendous potential for investigating gene function and for developing new therapies. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH are the “gold standard” for studying the regulation of hepatic metabolism in vitro. However, application of RNAi in PHH has some technical hurdles. The objective of this study was to develop effective and robust protocol for transduction of PHH with lentiviral vectors. Methods: We used lentiviral vectors to transduce PHH for introduction of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs targeting constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα, and microRNA, miR-143. Infection efficiency was quantitatively analyzed by flow cytometry and microscopy. Target gene expression was assessed using quantitative real-time (qRT-PCR method. Results: Lentiviral vector transduction resulted in ≥95% of infected cells at low multiplicity of infection (MOI of 3, which did not impair cellular viability. We demonstrated the feasibility of this technique in studies on targeting nuclear receptors, PPARα and CAR, with shRNAs as well as in lentivirus-mediated overexpression and knock-down of miRNA-143 experiments. Conclusions: We developed an efficient and robust protocol with standardized procedures for virus production, method of titer determination, and infection procedure for RNAi in primary human hepatocytes based on delivery of shRNAs, microRNAs or anti-microRNAs in different laboratory settings. This approach should be useful to study not only the regulation via nuclear receptors but also other biological, pharmacological, and toxicological aspects of drug metabolism.

  7. Circulating MicroRNAs as Non-Invasive Biomarkers for Early Detection of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena B Wozniak

    Full Text Available Detection of lung cancer at an early stage by sensitive screening tests could be an important strategy to improving prognosis. Our objective was to identify a panel of circulating microRNAs in plasma that will contribute to early detection of lung cancer.Plasma samples from 100 early stage (I to IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients and 100 non-cancer controls were screened for 754 circulating microRNAs via qRT-PCR, using TaqMan MicroRNA Arrays. Logistic regression with a lasso penalty was used to select a panel of microRNAs that discriminate between cases and controls. Internal validation of model discrimination was conducted by calculating the bootstrap optimism-corrected AUC for the selected model.We identified a panel of 24 microRNAs with optimum classification performance. The combination of these 24 microRNAs alone could discriminate lung cancer cases from non-cancer controls with an AUC of 0.92 (95% CI: 0.87-0.95. This classification improved to an AUC of 0.94 (95% CI: 0.90-0.97 following addition of sex, age and smoking status to the model. Internal validation of the model suggests that the discriminatory power of the panel will be high when applied to independent samples with a corrected AUC of 0.78 for the 24-miRNA panel alone.Our 24-microRNA predictor improves lung cancer prediction beyond that of known risk factors.

  8. Small transcriptome analysis indicates that the enzyme RppH influences both the quality and quantity of sRNAs in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Jenny; Hill, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotic mRNA turnover can be initiated by the removal of pyrophosphate from the 5′ end of a transcript using the RNA pyrophosphohydrolase enzyme RppH. Following the initial dephosphorylation step, RNaseE then degrades the message into small oligonucleotide segments. This study assessed the small RNA transcriptome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain MS11 in two genetic backgrounds; using wild type cells as well as cells carrying a rppH insertional mutation. It was found that the presence of the RppH enzyme affected both the quantity and length of small RNAs (sRNAs) in various chromosomal locations and involved sense transcripts (seRNAs), transcripts originating from the opposite strand (asRNAs) as well as inter-genic-derived RNAs (IGRs). In comparing the two transcriptomes, we found that not all small RNAs were expressed in both genetic backgrounds, suggesting that RppH apparently targets only a subset of transcripts. Overall, this study shows that small RNAs can be detected from the majority of genes within the chromosome, as well as from inter-genic regions, and that more sRNA transcripts are detected in the absence of the RppH enzyme. PMID:25688066

  9. Identification of novel small ncRNAs in pollen of tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokszczanin, Kamila Lucia; Krezdorn, Nicolas; Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Müller, Sören; Rycak, Lukas; Chen, Yuanyuan; Hoffmeier, Klaus; Kreutz, Jutta; Paupière, M.J.; Chaturvedi, Palak; Iannacone, Rina; Müller, Florian; Bostan, Hamed; Chiusano, Maria Luisa; Scharf, Klaus Dieter; Rotter, Björn; Schleiff, Enrico; Winter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background: The unprecedented role of sncRNAs in the regulation of pollen biogenesis on both transcriptional and epigenetic levels has been experimentally proven. However, little is known about their global regulation, especially under stress conditions. We used tomato pollen in order to identify

  10. Inhibition of Reporter Genes by Small Interfering RNAs in Cell Culture and Living Fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larashati, Sekar; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    of reporter gene expression was found between individual fish but it seems that in glass catfish, siRNAs are able to reduce reporter gene expression in the muscle showing that it is possible to use siRNA as technology to target genes locally in living fish. In parallel experiments, which will not be reported...

  11. Light-regulated mRNA condensation by a photosensitive surfactant works as a series photoswitch of translation activity in the presence of small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudiuk, Sergii; Saito, Hirohide; Hara, Tomoaki; Inoue, Tan; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Baigl, Damien

    2011-11-14

    AzoTAB, a photosensitive azobenzene cationic surfactant, which phototriggers translation activity through light-regulated condensation of mRNA, is added to a translation solution containing several mRNAs, which can be selectively silenced by specific small RNAs. We find that gene silencing by small RNAs remains functional regardless of AzoTAB concentration and UV illumination. In the absence of UV, the translation of all genes present in the medium is partially to fully inhibited depending on AzoTAB concentration. In contrast, the application of a short UV stimulus (365 nm for 1.5 min) results in the selective photoactivation of genes that are not silenced by small RNA. These results show that light-regulated condensation by AzoTAB works as a sequence-independent series photoswitch added to parallel sequence-specific regulation by small RNAs.

  12. Identification of a new enamovirus associated with citrus vein enation disease by deep sequencing of small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vives, Mari Carmen; Velázquez, Karelia; Pina, José Antonio; Moreno, Pedro; Guerri, José; Navarro, Luis

    2013-10-01

    To identify the causal agent of citrus vein enation disease, we examined by deep sequencing (Solexa-Illumina) the small RNA (sRNA) fraction from infected and healthy Etrog citron plants. Our results showed that virus-derived sRNAs (vsRNAs): (i) represent about 14.21% of the total sRNA population, (ii) are predominantly of 21 and 24 nucleotides with a biased distribution of their 5' nucleotide and with a clear prevalence of those of (+) polarity, and (iii) derive from all the viral genome, although a prominent hotspot is present at a 5'-proximal region. Contigs assembled from vsRNAs showed similarity with luteovirus sequences, particularly with Pea enation mosaic virus, the type member of the genus Enamovirus. The genomic RNA (gRNA) sequence of a new virus, provisionally named Citrus vein enation virus (CVEV), was completed and characterized. The CVEV gRNA was found to be single-stranded, positive-sense, with a size of 5,983 nucleotides and five open reading frames. Phylogenetic comparisons based on amino acid signatures of the RNA polymerase and the coat protein clearly classifies CVEV within the genus Enamovirus. Dot-blot hybridization and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction tests were developed to detect CVEV in plants affected by vein enation disease. CVEV detection by these methods has already been adopted for use in the Spanish citrus quarantine, sanitation, and certification programs.

  13. Nucleotide sequence of a crustacean 18S ribosomal RNA gene and secondary structure of eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelles, L; Fang, B L; Volckaert, G; Vandenberghe, A; De Wachter, R

    1984-12-11

    The primary structure of the gene for 18 S rRNA of the crustacean Artemia salina was determined. The sequence has been aligned with 13 other small ribosomal subunit RNA sequences of eukaryotic, archaebacterial, eubacterial, chloroplastic and plant mitochondrial origin. Secondary structure models for these RNAs were derived on the basis of previously proposed models and additional comparative evidence found in the alignment. Although there is a general similarity in the secondary structure models for eukaryotes and prokaryotes, the evidence seems to indicate a different topology in a central area of the structures.

  14. In silico genome wide mining of conserved and novel miRNAs in the brain and pineal gland of Danio rerio using small RNA sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Suyash; Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Srivastava, Prachi; Kushwaha, Basdeo; Kumar, Ravindra; Pandey, Manmohan; Srivastava, Shreya

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNA molecules that bind to the mRNA of the target genes and regulate the expression of the gene at the post-transcriptional level. Zebrafish is an economically important freshwater fish species globally considered as a good predictive model for studying human diseases and development. The present study focused on uncovering known as well as novel miRNAs, target prediction of the novel miRNAs and the differential expression of the known miRNA using the small RNA sequencing data of the brain and pineal gland (dark and light treatments) obtained from NCBI SRA. A total of 165, 151 and 145 known zebrafish miRNAs were found in the brain, pineal gland (dark treatment) and pineal gland (light treatment), respectively. Chromosomes 4 and 5 of zebrafish reference assembly GRCz10 were found to contain maximum number of miR genes. The miR-181a and miR-182 were found to be highly expressed in terms of number of reads in the brain and pineal gland, respectively. Other ncRNAs, such as tRNA, rRNA and snoRNA, were curated against Rfam. Using GRCz10 as reference, the subsequent bioinformatic analyses identified 25, 19 and 9 novel miRNAs from the brain, pineal gland (dark treatment) and pineal gland (light treatment), respectively. Targets of the novel miRNAs were identified, based on sequence complementarity between miRNAs and mRNA, by searching for antisense hits in the 3'-UTR of reference RNA sequences of the zebrafish. The discovery of novel miRNAs and their targets in the zebrafish genome can be a valuable scientific resource for further functional studies not only in zebrafish but also in other economically important fishes.

  15. Role of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi Fur regulator and small RNAs RfrA and RfrB in iron homeostasis and interaction with host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Jean-Mathieu; Dozois, Charles M; Daigle, France

    2013-03-01

    Iron is an essential element but can be toxic at high concentrations. Therefore, its acquisition and storage require tight control. Salmonella encodes the global regulator Fur (ferric uptake regulator) and the small regulatory non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) RfrA and RfrB, homologues of RyhB. The role of these iron homeostasis regulators was investigated in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi). Strains containing either single or combined deletions of these regulators were obtained. The mutants were tested for growth in low and high iron conditions, resistance to oxidative stress, expression and production of siderophores, and during interaction with host cells. The fur mutant showed a growth defect and was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide. The expression of the sRNAs was responsible for these defects. Siderophore expression by S. Typhi and both sRNAs were regulated by iron and by Fur. Fur contributed to invasion of epithelial cells, and was shown for the first time to play a role in phagocytosis and intracellular survival of S. Typhi in human macrophages. The sRNAs RfrA and RfrB were not required for interaction with epithelial cells, but both sRNAs were important for optimal intracellular replication in macrophages. In S. Typhi, Fur is a repressor of both sRNAs, and loss of either RfrA or RfrB resulted in distinct phenotypes, suggesting a non-redundant role for these regulatory RNAs.

  16. MISIS-2: A bioinformatics tool for in-depth analysis of small RNAs and representation of consensus master genome in viral quasispecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Jonathan; Otten, Patricia; Baerlocher, Loïc; Farinelli, Laurent; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2016-07-01

    In most eukaryotes, small RNA (sRNA) molecules such as miRNAs, siRNAs and piRNAs regulate gene expression and repress transposons and viruses. AGO/PIWI family proteins sort functional sRNAs based on size, 5'-nucleotide and other sequence features. In plants and some animals, viral sRNAs are extremely diverse and cover the entire viral genome sequences, which allows for de novo reconstruction of a complete viral genome by deep sequencing and bioinformatics analysis of viral sRNAs. Previously, we have developed a tool MISIS to view and analyze sRNA maps of viruses and cellular genome regions which spawn multiple sRNAs. Here we describe a new release of MISIS, MISIS-2, which enables to determine and visualize a consensus sequence and count sRNAs of any chosen sizes and 5'-terminal nucleotide identities. Furthermore we demonstrate the utility of MISIS-2 for identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at each position of a reference sequence and reconstruction of a consensus master genome in evolving viral quasispecies. MISIS-2 is a Java standalone program. It is freely available along with the source code at the website http://www.fasteris.com/apps.

  17. Experimental approaches to identify small RNAs and their diverse roles in bacteria--what we have learnt in one decade of MicA research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Puyvelde, Sandra; Vanderleyden, Jozef; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays the identification of small RNAs (sRNAs) and characterization of their role within regulatory networks takes a prominent place in deciphering complex bacterial phenotypes. Compared to the study of other components of bacterial cells, this is a relatively new but fast-growing research field. Although reports on new sRNAs appear regularly, some sRNAs are already subject of research for a longer time. One of such sRNAs is MicA, a sRNA best described for its role in outer membrane remodeling, but probably having a much broader function than anticipated. An overview of what we have learnt from MicA led to the conclusion that even for this well-described sRNA, we still do not have the overall picture. More general, the story of MicA might become an experimental lead for unraveling the many sRNAs with unknown functions. In this review, three important topics in the sRNA field are covered, exemplified from the perspective of MicA: (i) identification of new sRNAs, (ii) target identification and unraveling the biological function, (iii) structural analysis. The complex mechanisms of action of MicA deliver some original insights in the sRNA field which includes the existence of dimer formation or simultaneous cis and trans regulation, and might further inspire the understanding of the function of other sRNAs.

  18. Mating of the stichotrichous ciliate Oxytricha trifallax induces production of a class of 27 nt small RNAs derived from the parental macronucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M Zahler

    Full Text Available Ciliated protozoans possess two types of nuclei; a transcriptionally silent micronucleus, which serves as the germ line nucleus, and a transcriptionally active macronucleus, which serves as the somatic nucleus. The macronucleus is derived from a new diploid micronucleus after mating, with epigenetic information contributed by the parental macronucleus serving to guide the formation of the new macronucleus. In the stichotrichous ciliate Oxytricha trifallax, the macronuclear DNA is highly processed to yield gene-sized nanochromosomes with telomeres at each end. Here we report that soon after mating of Oxytricha trifallax, abundant 27 nt small RNAs are produced that are not present prior to mating. We performed next generation sequencing of Oxytricha small RNAs from vegetative and mating cells. Using sequence comparisons between macronuclear and micronuclear versions of genes, we found that the 27 nt RNA class derives from the parental macronucleus, not the developing macronucleus. These small RNAs are produced equally from both strands of macronuclear nanochromosomes, but in a highly non-uniform distribution along the length of the nanochromosome, and with a particular depletion in the 30 nt telomere-proximal positions. This production of small RNAs from the parental macronucleus during macronuclear development stands in contrast to the mechanism of epigenetic control in the distantly related ciliate Tetrahymena. In that species, 28-29 nt scanRNAs are produced from the micronucleus and these micronuclear-derived RNAs serve as epigenetic controllers of macronuclear development. Unlike the Tetrahymena scanRNAs, the Oxytricha macronuclear-derived 27 mers are not modified by 2'O-methylation at their 3' ends. We propose models for the role of these "27macRNAs" in macronuclear development.

  19. Caenorhabditis elegans RIG-I Homolog Mediates Antiviral RNA Interference Downstream of Dicer-Dependent Biogenesis of Viral Small Interfering RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Stephanie R.; Lu, Jinfeng; Guo, Xunyang; Zhong, Jing; Broitman-Maduro, Gina; Li, Wan-Xiang; Lu, Rui; Maduro, Morris

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dicer enzymes process virus-specific double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to initiate specific antiviral defense by related RNA interference (RNAi) pathways in plants, insects, nematodes, and mammals. Antiviral RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans requires Dicer-related helicase 1 (DRH-1), not found in plants and insects but highly homologous to mammalian retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), intracellular viral RNA sensors that trigger innate immunity against RNA virus infection. However, it remains unclear if DRH-1 acts analogously to initiate antiviral RNAi in C. elegans. Here, we performed a forward genetic screen to characterize antiviral RNAi in C. elegans. Using a mapping-by-sequencing strategy, we uncovered four loss-of-function alleles of drh-1, three of which caused mutations in the helicase and C-terminal domains conserved in RLRs. Deep sequencing of small RNAs revealed an abundant population of Dicer-dependent virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) in drh-1 single and double mutant animals after infection with Orsay virus, a positive-strand RNA virus. These findings provide further genetic evidence for the antiviral function of DRH-1 and illustrate that DRH-1 is not essential for the sensing and Dicer-mediated processing of the viral dsRNA replicative intermediates. Interestingly, vsiRNAs produced by drh-1 mutants were mapped overwhelmingly to the terminal regions of the viral genomic RNAs, in contrast to random distribution of vsiRNA hot spots when DRH-1 is functional. As RIG-I translocates on long dsRNA and DRH-1 exists in a complex with Dicer, we propose that DRH-1 facilitates the biogenesis of vsiRNAs in nematodes by catalyzing translocation of the Dicer complex on the viral long dsRNA precursors. PMID:28325765

  20. Combination of small interfering RNAs mediates greater suppression on hepatitis B virus cccDNA in HepG2.2.15 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Min Xin; Gui-Qiu U; Ying-Yu Jin; Min Zhuang; Di Li

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To observe the inhibition of hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication and expression in HepG2.2.15 cells by combination of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs).METHODS: Recombinant plasmid psil-HBV was constructed and transfected into HepG2.2.15 cells.At 48 h,72 h and 96 h after transfection,culture media were collected and cells were harvested for HBV replication assay.HBsAg and HBeAg in the cell culture medium were detected by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA).Intracellular viral DNA and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA)were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR).HBV viral mRNA was reverse transcribed and quantified by reverse-transcript PCR (RT-PCR).RESULTS: siRNAs showed marked anti-HBV effects.siRNAs could specifically inhibit the expression of HBsAg and the replication of HBV DNA in a dosedependent manner.Furthermore,combination of siRNAs,compared with individual use of each siRNA,exerted a stronger inhibition on antigen expression and viral replication.More importantly,combination of siRNAs significantly suppressed HBV cccDNA amplification.CONCLUSION: Combination of siRNAs mediates a stronger inhibition on viral replication and antigen expression in HepG2.2.15 cells,especially on cccDNA amplification.

  1. Integrating Small RNA Sequencing with QTL Mapping for Identification of miRNAs and Their Target Genes Associated with Heat Tolerance at the Flowering Stage in Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Yang, Tifeng; Yu, Ting; Zhang, Shaohong; Mao, Xingxue; Zhao, Junliang; Wang, Xiaofei; Dong, Jingfang; Liu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Although, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to be associated with heat tolerance at the seedling stage in rice, their involvement in heat tolerance at the flowering stage is still unknown. In this study, small RNA profiling was conducted in a heat-tolerant variety Gan-Xiang-Nuo (GXN) and a heat-sensitive variety Hua-Jing-Xian-74 (HJX), respectively. Totally, 102 miRNAs were differentially expressed (DE) under heat stress. Compared to HJX, GXN had more DE miRNAs and its DE miRNAs changed earlier under heat stress. Plant Ontology (PO) analysis of the target genes revealed that many DE miRNAs were involved in flower development. As a parallel experiment, QTL mapping was also conducted and four QTLs for heat tolerance at the flowering stage were identified using chromosome single-segment substitution lines derived from GXN and HJX. Further, through integrating analysis of DE miRNAs with QTLs, we identified 8 target genes corresponding to 26 miRNAs within the four QTL regions. Some meaningful target genes such as LOC_Os12g42400, SGT1, and pectinesterase were within the QTL regions. The negative correlation between miR169r-5p and its target gene LOC_Os12g42400 was confirmed under heat stress, and overexpression of miR169r-5p enhanced heat tolerance at flowering stage in rice. Our results demonstrate that the integrated analysis of genome-wide miRNA profiling with QTL mapping can facilitate identification of miRNAs and their target genes associated with the target traits and the limited candidates identified in this study offer an important source for further functional analysis and molecular breeding for heat tolerance in rice. PMID:28174587

  2. Identification of novel growth phase- and media-dependent small non-coding RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes M49 using intergenic tiling arrays

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    Patenge Nadja

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs have attracted attention as a new class of gene regulators in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Genome-wide screening methods have been successfully applied in Gram-negative bacteria to identify sRNA regulators. Many sRNAs are well characterized, including their target mRNAs and mode of action. In comparison, little is known about sRNAs in Gram-positive pathogens. In this study, we identified novel sRNAs in the exclusively human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes M49 (Group A Streptococcus, GAS M49, employing a whole genome intergenic tiling array approach. GAS is an important pathogen that causes diseases ranging from mild superficial infections of the skin and mucous membranes of the naso-pharynx, to severe toxic and invasive diseases. Results We identified 55 putative sRNAs in GAS M49 that were expressed during growth. Of these, 42 were novel. Some of the newly-identified sRNAs belonged to one of the common non-coding RNA families described in the Rfam database. Comparison of the results of our screen with the outcome of two recently published bioinformatics tools showed a low level of overlap between putative sRNA genes. Previously, 40 potential sRNAs have been reported to be expressed in a GAS M1T1 serotype, as detected by a whole genome intergenic tiling array approach. Our screen detected 12 putative sRNA genes that were expressed in both strains. Twenty sRNA candidates appeared to be regulated in a medium-dependent fashion, while eight sRNA genes were regulated throughout growth in chemically defined medium. Expression of candidate genes was verified by reverse transcriptase-qPCR. For a subset of sRNAs, the transcriptional start was determined by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR (RACE-PCR analysis. Conclusions In accord with the results of previous studies, we found little overlap between different screening methods, which underlines the fact that a comprehensive analysis of sRNAs

  3. Bovine Leukemia Virus Small Noncoding RNAs Are Functional Elements That Regulate Replication and Contribute to Oncogenesis In Vivo.

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    Nicolas A Gillet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses are not expected to encode miRNAs because of the potential problem of self-cleavage of their genomic RNAs. This assumption has recently been challenged by experiments showing that bovine leukemia virus (BLV encodes miRNAs from intragenomic Pol III promoters. The BLV miRNAs are abundantly expressed in B-cell tumors in the absence of significant levels of genomic and subgenomic viral RNAs. Using deep RNA sequencing and functional reporter assays, we show that miRNAs mediate the expression of genes involved in cell signaling, cancer and immunity. We further demonstrate that BLV miRNAs are essential to induce B-cell tumors in an experimental model and to promote efficient viral replication in the natural host.

  4. Identification of Circulating miRNAs in a Mouse Model of Nerve Allograft Transplantation under FK506 Immunosuppression by Illumina Small RNA Deep Sequencing

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    Shao-Chun Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to establish the expression profile of circulating microRNAs (miRNAs during nerve allotransplantation in the presence and absence of FK506 immunosuppression. Methods. A 1 cm BALB/c donor sciatic nerve graft was transplanted into the sciatic nerve gaps created in recipient C57BL/6 mice with or without daily FK506 immunosuppression [1 mg/(kg·d]. At 3, 7, and 14 d after nerve allotransplantation, serum samples were collected for miRNA expression analysis by Illumina small RNA deep sequencing. Results. Sequence analysis showed that the dominant size of circulating small RNAs after nerve allotransplantation was 22 nucleotides, followed by 23-nucleotide sequences. Nine upregulated circulating miRNAs (let-7e-5p, miR-101a-3p, miR-151-5p, miR-181a-5p, miR-204-5p, miR-340-5p, miR-381-3p, miR-411-5p, miR-9-5p, and miR-219-2-3p were identified at 3 d, but none was identified at 7 or 14 d. Among them, miR-9-5p had the highest fold-change of >50-fold, followed by miR-340-5p with 38.8-fold. The presence of these nine miRNAs was not significant at 7 and 14 d after nerve allotransplantation with or without immunosuppression, showing that these miRNAs are not ideal biomarkers for monitoring rejection of deep-buried nerve allografts, a response usually observed later. Conclusions. We identified nine upregulated circulating miRNAs, which may have a biological function, particularly during the early stages after nerve allotransplantation under FK506 immunosuppression.

  5. Stem-Loop RT-qPCR as an Efficient Tool for the Detection and Quantification of Small RNAs in Giardia lamblia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Fierro, Francisco; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Rufino-González, Yadira; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Castillo-Villanueva, Adriana; Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa Angélica; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    Stem-loop quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) is a molecular technique used for identification and quantification of individual small RNAs in cells. In this work, we used a Universal ProbeLibrary (UPL)-based design to detect—in a rapid, sensitive, specific, and reproducible way—the small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) GlsR17 and its derived miRNA (miR2) of Giardia lamblia using a stem-loop RT-qPCR approach. Both small RNAs could be isolated from both total RNA and small RNA samples. Identification of the two small RNAs was carried out by sequencing the PCR-amplified small RNA products upon ligation into the pJET1.2/blunt vector. GlsR17 is constitutively expressed during the 72 h cultures of trophozoites, while the mature miR2 is present in 2-fold higher abundance during the first 48 h than at 72 h. Because it has been suggested that miRNAs in G. lamblia have an important role in the regulation of gene expression, the use of the stem-loop RT-qPCR method could be valuable for the study of miRNAs of G. lamblia. This methodology will be a powerful tool for studying gene regulation in G. lamblia, and will help to better understand the features and functions of these regulatory molecules and how they work within the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway in G. lamblia. PMID:27999395

  6. Transfer RNA Derived Small RNAs Targeting Defense Responsive Genes Are Induced during Phytophthora capsici Infection in Black Pepper (Piper nigrum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, Srinivasan; Soniya, Eppurath V

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs derived from transfer RNAs were recently assigned as potential gene regulatory candidates for various stress responses in eukaryotes. In this study, we report on the cloning and identification of tRNA derived small RNAs from black pepper plants in response to the infection of the quick wilt pathogen, Phytophthora capsici. 5'tRFs cloned from black pepper were validated as highly expressed during P. capsici infection. A high-throughput systematic analysis of the small RNAome (sRNAome) revealed the predominance of 5'tRFs in the infected leaf and root. The abundance of 5'tRFs in the sRNAome and the defense responsive genes as their potential targets indicated their regulatory role during stress response in black pepper. The 5'Ala(CGC) tRF mediated cleavage was experimentally mapped at the tRF binding sites on the mRNA targets of Non-expresser of pathogenesis related protein (NPR1), which was down-regulated during pathogen infection. Comparative sRNAome further demonstrated sequence conservation of 5'Ala tRFs across the angiosperm plant groups, and many important genes in the defense response were identified in silico as their potential targets. Our findings uncovered the diversity, differential expression and stress responsive functional role of tRNA-derived small RNAs during Phytophthora infection in black pepper.

  7. Comprehensive Small RNA-Seq of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV)-Infected Human Cells Detects Patterns of Novel, Non-Coding AAV RNAs in the Absence of Cellular miRNA Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutika, Catrin; Mietzsch, Mario; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Weger, Stefan; Sohn, Madlen; Chen, Wei; Heilbronn, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Most DNA viruses express small regulatory RNAs, which interfere with viral or cellular gene expression. For adeno-associated virus (AAV), a small ssDNA virus with a complex biphasic life cycle miRNAs or other small regulatory RNAs have not yet been described. This is the first comprehensive Illumina-based RNA-Seq analysis of small RNAs expressed by AAV alone or upon co-infection with helper adenovirus or HSV. Several hotspots of AAV-specific small RNAs were detected mostly close to or within the AAV-ITR and apparently transcribed from the newly identified anti-p5 promoter. An additional small RNA hotspot was located downstream of the p40 promoter, from where transcription of non-coding RNAs associated with the inhibition of adenovirus replication were recently described. Parallel detection of known Ad and HSV miRNAs indirectly validated the newly identified small AAV RNA species. The predominant small RNAs were analyzed on Northern blots and by human argonaute protein-mediated co-immunoprecipitation. None of the small AAV RNAs showed characteristics of bona fide miRNAs, but characteristics of alternative RNA processing indicative of differentially regulated AAV promoter-associated small RNAs. Furthermore, the AAV-induced regulation of cellular miRNA levels was analyzed at different time points post infection. In contrast to other virus groups AAV infection had virtually no effect on the expression of cellular miRNA, which underscores the long-established concept that wild-type AAV infection is apathogenic. PMID:27611072

  8. Modular degradable dendrimers enable small RNAs to extend survival in an aggressive liver cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kejin; Nguyen, Liem H.; Miller, Jason B.; Yan, Yunfeng; Kos, Petra; Xiong, Hu; Li, Lin; Hao, Jing; Minnig, Jonathan T.; Siegwart, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-based cancer therapies are hindered by the lack of delivery vehicles that avoid cancer-induced organ dysfunction, which exacerbates carrier toxicity. We address this issue by reporting modular degradable dendrimers that achieve the required combination of high potency to tumors and low hepatotoxicity to provide a pronounced survival benefit in an aggressive genetic cancer model. More than 1,500 dendrimers were synthesized using sequential, orthogonal reactions where ester degradability was systematically integrated with chemically diversified cores, peripheries, and generations. A lead dendrimer, 5A2-SC8, provided a broad therapeutic window: identified as potent [EC50 75 mg/kg dendrimer repeated dosing). Delivery of let-7g microRNA (miRNA) mimic inhibited tumor growth and dramatically extended survival. Efficacy stemmed from a combination of a small RNA with the dendrimer’s own negligible toxicity, therefore illuminating an underappreciated complication in treating cancer with RNA-based drugs. PMID:26729861

  9. Independent activity of the homologous small regulatory RNAs AbcR1 and AbcR2 in the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti.

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    Omar Torres-Quesada

    Full Text Available The legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti expresses a plethora of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs whose function is mostly unknown. Here, we have functionally characterized two tandemly encoded S. meliloti Rm1021 sRNAs that are similar in sequence and structure. Homologous sRNAs (designated AbcR1 and AbcR2 have been shown to regulate several ABC transporters in the related α-proteobacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Brucella abortus. In Rm1021, AbcR1 and AbcR2 exhibit divergent unlinked regulation and are stabilized by the RNA chaperone Hfq. AbcR1 is transcribed in actively dividing bacteria, either in culture, rhizosphere or within the invasion zone of mature alfalfa nodules. Conversely, AbcR2 expression is induced upon entry into stationary phase and under abiotic stress. Only deletion of AbcR1 resulted into a discrete growth delay in rich medium, but both are dispensable for symbiosis. Periplasmic proteome profiling revealed down-regulation of the branched-chain amino acid binding protein LivK by AbcR1, but not by AbcR2. A double-plasmid reporter assay confirmed the predicted specific targeting of the 5'-untranslated region of the livK mRNA by AbcR1 in vivo. Our findings provide evidences of independent regulatory functions of these sRNAs, probably to fine-tune nutrient uptake in free-living and undifferentiated symbiotic rhizobia.

  10. Inhibition of genes expression of SARS coronavirus by synthetic small interfering RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi SHI; De Hua YANG; Jie XIONG; Jie JIA; Bing HUANG; You Xin JIN

    2005-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is triggered by the presence of a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and results in the silencing of homologous gene expression through the specific degradation of an mRNA containing the same sequence. dsRNAmediated RNAi can be used in a wide variety of eucaryotes to induce the sequence-specific inhibition of gene expression.Synthetic 21-23 nucleotide (nt) small interfering RNA (siRNA) with 2 nt 3' overhangs was recently found to mediate efficient sequence-specific mRNA degradation in mammalian cells. Here, we studied the effects of synthetic siRNA duplexes targeted to SARS coronavirus structural proteins E, M, and N in a cell culture system. Among total 26 siRNA duplexes, we obtained 3 siRNA duplexes which could sequence-specifically reduce target genes expression over 80% at the concentration of 60 nM in Vero E6 cells. The downregulation effect was in correlation with the concentrations of the siRNA duplexes in a range of 0~60 nM. Our results also showed that many inactive siRNA duplexes may be brought to life simply by unpairing the 5' end of the antisense strands. Results suggest that siRNA is capable of inhibiting SARS coronavirus genes expression and thus may be a new therapeutic strategy for treatment of SARS.

  11. Downregulation of six microRNAs is associated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis in small cell carcinoma of the cervix.

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    Long Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC is very rare, and due to the long time period required to recruit sufficient numbers of patients, there is a paucity of information regarding the prognostic factors associated with survival. MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been used as cancer-related biomarkers in a variety of tumor types, and the objective of this study was to determine whether microRNA expression profiles can predict clinical outcome in SCCC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Forty-four patients with SCCC who underwent radical hysterectomy between January 2000 and October 2009 were enrolled. Using the GeneCopoeia All-in-One™ Customized Human qPCR Primer Array, the expression profiles of 30 miRNAs associated with tumor metastasis was obtained from the formalin-fixed paraffin embedded samples of all 44 patients. Seven miRNAs, has-let-7c, has-miR-10b, has-miR-100, has-miR-125b, has-miR-143, has-miR-145 and has-miR-199a-5p were significantly down-regulated in advanced stage SCCC patients (FIGO IB2-IV compared to early stage SCCC patients (FIGOIB1. Among, downregulation of six miRNAs, has-let-7c, has-miR-100, has-miR-125b, has-miR-143, has-miR-145 and has-miR-199a-5p were significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and reduced survival in SCCC. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses revealed that SCCC patients with low expression of has-miR-100 (P = 0.019 and has-miR-125b (P = 0.020 projected a significant tendency towards poorer prognosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that downregulation of 7 miRNA associated with advanced stage, 6 miRNAs with metastasis and 2 with poor prognosis in SCCC. Functional analysis of these miRNAs may enhance our understanding of SCCC, as altered expression of specific miRNAs may regulate the metastatic pathway and provide novel targets for therapy.

  12. The rnc Gene Promotes Exopolysaccharide Synthesis and Represses the vicRKX Gene Expressions via MicroRNA-Size Small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Meng-Ying; Yang, Ying-Ming; Li, Ke-Zeng; Lei, Lei; Li, Meng; Yang, Yan; Tao, Xiang; Yin, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Ru; Ma, Xin-Rong; Hu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-dependent disease that largely relies on the ability of Streptococcus mutans to synthesize exopolysaccharides. Although the rnc gene is suggested to be involved in virulence mechanisms in many other bacteria, the information regarding it in S. mutans is very limited. Here, using deletion or overexpression mutant assay, we demonstrated that rnc in S. mutans significantly positively regulated exopolysaccharide synthesis and further altered biofilm formation. Meanwhile, the cariogenecity of S. mutans was decreased by deletion of rnc in a specific pathogen-free (SPF) rat model. Interestingly, analyzing the expression at mRNA level, we found the downstream vic locus was repressed by rnc in S. mutans. Using deep sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, for the first time, three putative microRNA-size small RNAs (msRNAs) targeting vicRKX were predicted in S. mutans. The expression levels of these msRNAs were negatively correlated with vicRKX but positively correlated with rnc, indicating rnc probably repressed vicRKX expression through msRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. In all, the results present that rnc has a potential role in the regulation of exopolysaccharide synthesis and can affect vicRKX expressions via post-transcriptional repression in S. mutans. This study provides an alternative avenue for further research aimed at preventing caries.

  13. Small RNAs targeting transcription start site induce heparanase silencing through interference with transcription initiation in human cancer cells.

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    Guosong Jiang

    Full Text Available Heparanase (HPA, an endo-h-D-glucuronidase that cleaves the heparan sulfate chain of heparan sulfate proteoglycans, is overexpressed in majority of human cancers. Recent evidence suggests that small interfering RNA (siRNA induces transcriptional gene silencing (TGS in human cells. In this study, transfection of siRNA against -9/+10 bp (siH3, but not -174/-155 bp (siH1 or -134/-115 bp (siH2 region relative to transcription start site (TSS locating at 101 bp upstream of the translation start site, resulted in TGS of heparanase in human prostate cancer, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells in a sequence-specific manner. Methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing revealed no DNA methylation of CpG islands within heparanase promoter in siH3-transfected cells. The TGS of heparanase did not involve changes of epigenetic markers histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2, histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3 or active chromatin marker acetylated histone H3 (AcH3. The regulation of alternative splicing was not involved in siH3-mediated TGS. Instead, siH3 interfered with transcription initiation via decreasing the binding of both RNA polymerase II and transcription factor II B (TFIIB, but not the binding of transcription factors Sp1 or early growth response 1, on the heparanase promoter. Moreover, Argonaute 1 and Argonaute 2 facilitated the decreased binding of RNA polymerase II and TFIIB on heparanase promoter, and were necessary in siH3-induced TGS of heparanase. Stable transfection of the short hairpin RNA construct targeting heparanase TSS (-9/+10 bp into cancer cells, resulted in decreased proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of cancer cells in vitro and in athymic mice models. These results suggest that small RNAs targeting TSS can induce TGS of heparanase via interference with transcription initiation, and significantly suppress the tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of cancer cells.

  14. Small RNA in situ hybridization in Caenorhabditis elegans, combined with RNA-seq, identifies germline-enriched microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Tamara J; Yao, Qiuming; Yun, Sijung; Lee, Chin-Yung; Bennett, Karen L

    2016-10-15

    Over four hundred different microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in the genome of the model organism the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. As the germline is dedicated to the preservation of each species, and almost half of all the cells in an adult nematode are germline, it is likely that regulatory miRNAs are important for germline development and maintenance. In C. elegans the miR35 family has strong maternal effects, contributing to normal embryogenesis and to adult fecundity. To determine whether any particular miRNAs are greatly enriched in the C. elegans germline we used RNA-seq to compare the miRNA populations in several germline-defective strains of adult C. elegans worms, including glp-4(germline proliferation-4), glh-1(germline helicase-1) and dcr-1(dicer-1). Statistical analyses of RNA-seq comparisons identified 13 miRNAs that are germline-enriched, including seven members of the well-studied miR35 family that were reduced as much as 1000-fold in TaqMan qRT PCR miRNA assays. Along with the miR35s, six others: miR-56 (a member of the miR51 family),-70, -244, -260 , -788 and -4813, none of which previously considered as such, were also identified by RNA-seq as germline-enriched candidates. We went on to develop a successful miRNA in situ hybridization protocol for C. elegans, revealing miR35s specifically concentrate during oogenesis in the pachytene region of the gonad, and persist throughout early embryogenesis, while in adult animals neither let-7 nor miR-228 has a germline-bias.

  15. Micro RNAs and Short-interfering RNAs in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramanjulu Sunkar; Jian-Kang Zhu

    2007-01-01

    Gene silencing can occur either at the transcriptional level or post-transcriptional level or both. Many instances of sequence-specific silencing requires small RNAs that can be divided into two major classes: microRNAs (miRNAs) and short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs). miRNAs function in post-transcriptional gene silencing by guiding mRNA degradation or translational repression. Endogenous siRNAs are more diverse in plants than in animals and can direct post-transcriptional gene silencing through mRNA degradation or transcriptional gene silencing by triggering DNA methylation and histone modifications. This review discusses recent advances in the field of small RNA-guided gene silencing in plants including rice.

  16. Inhibition of vaccinia virus replication by two small interfering RNAs targeting B1R and G7L genes and their synergistic combination with cidofovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigne, Solenne; Duraffour, Sophie; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert; Garin, Daniel; Crance, Jean-Marc

    2009-06-01

    In view of the threat of the potential use of variola virus in a terrorist attack, considerable efforts have been performed to develop new antiviral strategies against orthopoxviruses. Here we report on the use of RNA interference, either alone or in combination with cidofovir, as an approach to inhibit orthopoxvirus replication. Two selected small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), named siB1R-2 and siG7L-1, and a previously reported siRNA, i.e., siD5R-2 (which targets the viral D5R mRNA), were evaluated for antiviral activity against vaccinia virus (VACV) by plaque reduction and virus yield assays. siB1R-2 and siG7L-1, administered before or after viral infection, reduced VACV replication by more than 90%. Also, these two siRNAs decreased monkeypox virus replication by 95% at a concentration of 1 nM. siB1R-2 and siG7L-1 were demonstrated to specifically silence their corresponding transcripts, i.e., B1R and G7L mRNAs, without induction of a beta interferon response. Strong synergistic effects were observed when siB1R-2, siG7L-1, or siD5R-2 was combined with cidofovir. In addition, the antiviral activities of these three siRNAs were evaluated against VACV resistant to cidofovir and other acyclic nucleoside phosphonates. siG7L-1 and siD5R-2 remained active against four of five VACV mutants, while siB1R-2 showed activity against only one of the mutants. Our results showed that siRNAs are potent inhibitory agents in vitro, not only against wild-type VACV but also against several cidofovir-resistant VACV. Furthermore, we showed that a combined therapy using siRNA and cidofovir may be useful in the treatment of poxvirus infections.

  17. 日本血吸虫非编码小RNA研究进展%Advances in small noncoding RNAs of schistosoma japonicum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳青兰(综述); 肖建华(审校)

    2016-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs,a growing family of regulatory RNAs that includes micro-RNAs,endogenous small inter-fering RNA,Piwi-interacting RNA and competitive endogenous RNA,have recently emerged as cruicial components in many biological processes. Recent findings have provided the small noncoding RNAs expression to undergo dramatic changes in the schistosomiasis. Accumulated evidence suggests that host miRNAs may be involved in regulating the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis (miR-454 and miR-203). MiR-223 and miR-451 may be involved in regulating the development of schisto-some. Besides,recent work implies that schistosome-derived miRNAs may play critical regulatory roles in schistosome de-velopment and sexual maturation,egg production,as well as the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis (sja-let-7,sja-bantam). Moreover,sja-miR-3479 and sja-miR-0001 could be used as biomarkers for schistosomiasis diagnosis. Here,we summarize recent progress in regarding small noncoding RNAs in schistosoma japonicum. This may be helpful in search for potential new drugs,and for biomarkers in control of schistosoma japonicum infection leading to schistosomiasis in the future.%非编码小RNA是一类通过调节基因的表达从而影响生命活动的小分子,主要包括微小RNA、内源性小干扰RNA、Piwi蛋白相互作用的RNA及竞争性内源RNA。研究发现日本血吸虫感染动物后,宿主和虫体的非编码小RNA的表达水平均发生了改变。宿主源的非编码小RNA主要为微小RNA,其中miR-454和miR-203与日本血吸虫病发生发展有关,miR-223和miR-451与日本血吸虫自身生长发育有关;日本血吸虫非编码小 RNA包括微小RNA、内源性小干扰RNA,这些非编码小RNA在日本血吸虫的生长、发育、性成熟及产卵中发挥着重要作用,如sja-let-7、sja-bantam,而且像sja-miR-3479和sja-miR-0001还可以诊断日本血吸虫病。就日本血吸虫非编码小RNA的研究进展进行综述,为日本血吸虫病的防治提供参考。

  18. Synthesis of small interfering RNAs containing acetal-type nucleoside analogs at their 3'-ends and analysis of their silencing activity and their ability to bind to the Argonaute2 PAZ domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Natsumi; Nakamoto, Kosuke; Yokogawa, Takashi; Ueno, Yoshihito

    2015-10-20

    In this study, we aimed to create small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) with increased silencing activities and nuclease resistance properties. Therefore, we designed and synthesized five types of siRNA containing acetal-type nucleoside analogs at their 3'-dangling ends. We found that the siRNA containing 1-O-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-β-D-ribofuranose at the 3'-dangling end was the most potent among the synthesized siRNAs and showed more resistance to nucleolytic degradation by a 3' exonuclease than a natural RNA did. Thus, modification of siRNAs by addition of 1-O-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-β-D-ribofuranose may hold promise as a means of improving the silencing activity and nuclease resistance of siRNAs.

  19. Small interfering RNAs targeting peste des petits ruminants virus M mRNA increase virus-mediated fusogenicity and inhibit viral replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuxiao; Wu, Xiaodong; Zou, Yanli; Li, Lin; Liu, Shan; Chi, Tianying; Wang, Zhiliang

    2015-11-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), caused by peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), is an acute or subacute, highly contagious and economically important disease of small ruminants. The PPRV is classified into the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. The PPRV matrix (M) protein possesses an intrinsic ability to bind to lipid membranes, and plays a crucial role in viral assembly and further budding. In this study, three different small interfering RNAs (siRNA) were designed on the basis of translated region for PPRV Nigeria 75/1M mRNA, and were subsequently synthesized for their transfection into Vero-SLAM cells, followed by infection with PPRVs. The results showed that two out of three siRNAs robustly induced cell-to-cell fusion as early as 36h post-infection with PPRVs, effectively suppressed expression of the M protein by interference for the M mRNA, and eventually inhibited viral replication in vitro. These findings led us to speculate that siRNA-mediated knockdown of the M protein would alter its interaction with viral glycoproteins, thus exacerbating intercellular fusion but hampering virus release.

  20. Role of miRNAs and siRNAs in biotic and abiotic stress responses of plants

    KAUST Repository

    Khraiwesh, Basel

    2012-02-01

    Small, non-coding RNAs are a distinct class of regulatory RNAs in plants and animals that control a variety of biological processes. In plants, several classes of small RNAs with specific sizes and dedicated functions have evolved through a series of pathways. The major classes of small RNAs include microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which differ in their biogenesis. miRNAs control the expression of cognate target genes by binding to reverse complementary sequences, resulting in cleavage or translational inhibition of the target RNAs. siRNAs have a similar structure, function, and biogenesis as miRNAs but are derived from long double-stranded RNAs and can often direct DNA methylation at target sequences. Besides their roles in growth and development and maintenance of genome integrity, small RNAs are also important components in plant stress responses. One way in which plants respond to environmental stress is by modifying their gene expression through the activity of small RNAs. Thus, understanding how small RNAs regulate gene expression will enable researchers to explore the role of small RNAs in biotic and abiotic stress responses. This review focuses on the regulatory roles of plant small RNAs in the adaptive response to stresses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant gene regulation in response to abiotic stress. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) are present in fractions related to exosomes released by EBV-transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Waqar; Philip, Pretty S; Tariq, Saeed; Khan, Gulfaraz

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus associated with a number of human malignancies of epithelial and lymphoid origin. However, the mechanism of oncogenesis is unclear. A number of viral products, including EBV latent proteins and non-protein coding RNAs have been implicated. Recently it was reported that EBV-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) are released from EBV infected cells and they can induce biological changes in cells via signaling from toll-like receptor 3. Here, we investigated if these abundantly expressed non-protein coding EBV RNAs (EBER-1 and EBER-2) are excreted from infected cells in exosomal fractions. Using differential ultracentrifugation we isolated exosomes from three EBV positive cell lines (B95-8, EBV-LCL, BL30-B95-8), one EBER-1 transfected cell line (293T-pHEBo-E1) and two EBV-negative cell lines (BL30, 293T-pHEBo). The identity of purified exosomes was determined by electron microscopy and western blotting for CD63. The presence of EBERs in cells, culture supernatants and purified exosomal fractions was determined using RT-PCR and confirmed by sequencing. Purified exosomal fractions were also tested for the presence of the EBER-1-binding protein La, using western blotting. Both EBER-1 and EBER-2 were found to be present not only in the culture supernatants, but also in the purified exosome fractions of all EBV-infected cell lines. EBER-1 could also be detected in exosomal fractions from EBER-1 transfected 293T cells whilst the fractions from vector only transfectants were clearly negative. Furthermore, purified exosomal fractions also contained the EBER-binding protein (La), supporting the notion that EBERs are most probably released from EBV infected cells in the form of EBER-La complex in exosomes.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNAs (EBERs are present in fractions related to exosomes released by EBV-transformed cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqar Ahmed

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is an oncogenic herpesvirus associated with a number of human malignancies of epithelial and lymphoid origin. However, the mechanism of oncogenesis is unclear. A number of viral products, including EBV latent proteins and non-protein coding RNAs have been implicated. Recently it was reported that EBV-encoded small RNAs (EBERs are released from EBV infected cells and they can induce biological changes in cells via signaling from toll-like receptor 3. Here, we investigated if these abundantly expressed non-protein coding EBV RNAs (EBER-1 and EBER-2 are excreted from infected cells in exosomal fractions. Using differential ultracentrifugation we isolated exosomes from three EBV positive cell lines (B95-8, EBV-LCL, BL30-B95-8, one EBER-1 transfected cell line (293T-pHEBo-E1 and two EBV-negative cell lines (BL30, 293T-pHEBo. The identity of purified exosomes was determined by electron microscopy and western blotting for CD63. The presence of EBERs in cells, culture supernatants and purified exosomal fractions was determined using RT-PCR and confirmed by sequencing. Purified exosomal fractions were also tested for the presence of the EBER-1-binding protein La, using western blotting. Both EBER-1 and EBER-2 were found to be present not only in the culture supernatants, but also in the purified exosome fractions of all EBV-infected cell lines. EBER-1 could also be detected in exosomal fractions from EBER-1 transfected 293T cells whilst the fractions from vector only transfectants were clearly negative. Furthermore, purified exosomal fractions also contained the EBER-binding protein (La, supporting the notion that EBERs are most probably released from EBV infected cells in the form of EBER-La complex in exosomes.

  3. MicroRNAs, macrocontrol : Regulation of miRNA processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slezak-Prochazka, Izabella; Durmus, Selvi; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; van den Berg, Anke

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a set of small, non-protein-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Maturation of miRNAs comprises several regulated steps resulting in similar to 22-nucleotide single-stranded mature miRNAs. Regulation of miRNA expression can occur both at

  4. SeqBuster, a bioinformatic tool for the processing and analysis of small RNAs datasets, reveals ubiquitous miRNA modifications in human embryonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantano, Lorena; Estivill, Xavier; Martí, Eulàlia

    2010-03-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies enable direct approaches to catalog and analyze snapshots of the total small RNA content of living cells. Characterization of high-throughput sequencing data requires bioinformatic tools offering a wide perspective of the small RNA transcriptome. Here we present SeqBuster, a highly versatile and reliable web-based toolkit to process and analyze large-scale small RNA datasets. The high flexibility of this tool is illustrated by the multiple choices offered in the pre-analysis for mapping purposes and in the different analysis modules for data manipulation. To overcome the storage capacity limitations of the web-based tool, SeqBuster offers a stand-alone version that permits the annotation against any custom database. SeqBuster integrates multiple analyses modules in a unique platform and constitutes the first bioinformatic tool offering a deep characterization of miRNA variants (isomiRs). The application of SeqBuster to small-RNA datasets of human embryonic stem cells revealed that most miRNAs present different types of isomiRs, some of them being associated to stem cell differentiation. The exhaustive description of the isomiRs provided by SeqBuster could help to identify miRNA-variants that are relevant in physiological and pathological processes. SeqBuster is available at http://estivill_lab.crg.es/seqbuster.

  5. Higher order structure in the 3'-minor domain of small subunit ribosomal RNAs from a gram negative bacterium, a gram positive bacterium and a eukaryote

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Christensen, A; Garrett, R A

    1983-01-01

    . Several unusual structural features were detected. Multiple G X A pairings in two of the putative helices, which are compatible with phylogenetic sequence comparisons, are strongly supported by the occurrence of cobra venom ribonuclease cuts adjacent to, and in one case between, these pairings. Evidence......An experimental approach was used to determine and compare the highest order structure within the 150 to 200 nucleotides at the 3'-ends of the RNAs from the small ribosomal subunits of Escherichia coli, Bacillus stearothermophilus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Chemical reagents were employed...... of additional higher order structure in the renatured free RNA. It can be concluded that a high level of conservation of higher order structure has occurred during the evolution of the gram negative and gram positive eubacteria and the eukaryote in both the double helical regions and the "unstructured" regions...

  6. Small RNAs derived from lncRNA RNase MRP have gene-silencing activity relevant to human cartilage–hair hypoplasia

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional processing of some long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) reveals that they are a source of miRNAs. We show that the 268-nt non-coding RNA component of mitochondrial RNA processing endoribonuclease, (RNase MRP), is the source of at least two short (∼20 nt) RNAs designated RMRP-S1 and RMRP-S2, which function as miRNAs. Point mutations in RNase MRP cause human cartilage–hair hypoplasia (CHH), and several disease-causing mutations map to RMRP-S1 and -S2. SHAPE chemical probing ident...

  7. Expanding the RpoS/σS-network by RNA sequencing and identification of σS-controlled small RNAs in Salmonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Lévi-Meyrueis

    Full Text Available The RpoS/σS sigma subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP controls a global adaptive response that allows many Gram-negative bacteria to survive starvation and various stresses. σS also contributes to biofilm formation and virulence of the food-borne pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium. In this study, we used directional RNA-sequencing and complementary assays to explore the σS-dependent transcriptome of S. Typhimurium during late stationary phase in rich medium. This study confirms the large regulatory scope of σS and provides insights into the physiological functions of σS in Salmonella. Extensive regulation by σS of genes involved in metabolism and membrane composition, and down-regulation of the respiratory chain functions, were important features of the σS effects on gene transcription that might confer fitness advantages to bacterial cells and/or populations under starving conditions. As an example, we show that arginine catabolism confers a competitive fitness advantage in stationary phase. This study also provides a firm basis for future studies to address molecular mechanisms of indirect regulation of gene expression by σS. Importantly, the σS-controlled downstream network includes small RNAs that might endow σS with post-transcriptional regulatory functions. Of these, four (RyhB-1/RyhB-2, SdsR, SraL were known to be controlled by σS and deletion of the sdsR locus had a competitive fitness cost in stationary phase. The σS-dependent control of seven additional sRNAs was confirmed in Northern experiments. These findings will inspire future studies to investigate molecular mechanisms and the physiological impact of post-transcriptional regulation by σS.

  8. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter T; Wang, Wang-Xia; Rajeev, Bernard W

    2008-01-01

    Aging-related neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) are the culmination of many different genetic and environmental influences. Prior studies have shown that RNAs are pathologically altered during the inexorable course of some NDs. Recent evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) may be a contributing factor in neurodegeneration. miRNAs are brain-enriched, small ( approximately 22 nucleotides) non-coding RNAs that participate in mRNA translational regulation. Although discovered in the framework of worm development, miRNAs are now appreciated to play a dynamic role in many mammalian brain-related biochemical pathways, including neuroplasticity and stress responses. Research about miRNAs in the context of neurodegeneration is accumulating rapidly, and the goal of this review is to provide perspective for these new data that may be helpful to specialists in either field. An overview is provided about the normal functions for miRNAs, including some of the newer concepts related to the human brain. Recently published studies pertaining to the roles of miRNAs in NDs--including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and triplet repeat disorders-are described. Finally, a discussion is included with theoretical syntheses and possible future directions in exploring the nexus between miRNA and ND research.

  9. A Comprehensive NGS Data Analysis of Differentially Regulated miRNAs, piRNAs, lncRNAs and sn/snoRNAs in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, Srinivas V; Tiwari, Amit K; Leberfinger, Ashley; Hazard, Sprague W; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Mahajan, Milind; Ravnic, Dino J

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States and is a major public health concern worldwide. Basic, clinical and epidemiological research is leading to improved cancer detection, prevention, and outcomes. Recent technological advances have allowed unbiased and comprehensive screening of genome-wide gene expression. Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) have been shown to play an important role in biological processes and could serve as a diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic biomarker for specific diseases. Recent findings have begun to reveal and enhance our understanding of the complex architecture of sncRNA expression including miRNAs, piRNAs, lncRNAs, sn/snoRNAs and their relationships with biological systems. We used publicly available small RNA sequencing data that was derived from 24 triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) and 14 adjacent normal tissue samples to remap various types of sncRNAs. We found a total of 55 miRNAs were aberrantly expressed (p<0.005) in TNBC samples (8 miRNAs upregulated; 47 downregulated) compared to adjacent normal tissues whereas the original study reported only 25 novel miRs. In this study, we used pathway analysis of differentially expressed miRNAs which revealed TGF-beta signaling pathways to be profoundly affected in the TNBC samples. Furthermore, our comprehensive re-mapping strategy allowed us to discover a number of other differentially expressed sncRNAs including piRNAs, lncRNAs, sn/snoRNAs, rRNAs, miscRNAs and nonsense-mediated decay RNAs. We believe that our sncRNA analysis workflow is extremely comprehensive and suitable for discovery of novel sncRNAs changes, which may lead to the development of innovative diagnostic and therapeutic tools for TNBC.

  10. An Efficient Method for Electroporation of Small Interfering RNAs into ENCODE Project Tier 1 GM12878 and K562 Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Ryan Y; Hammond, Ming C; Rio, Donald C; Lee, Yeon J

    2015-12-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project aims to identify all functional sequence elements in the human genome sequence by use of high-throughput DNA/cDNA sequencing approaches. To aid the standardization, comparison, and integration of data sets produced from different technologies and platforms, the ENCODE Consortium selected several standard human cell lines to be used by the ENCODE Projects. The Tier 1 ENCODE cell lines include GM12878, K562, and H1 human embryonic stem cell lines. GM12878 is a lymphoblastoid cell line, transformed with the Epstein-Barr virus, that was selected by the International HapMap Project for whole genome and transcriptome sequencing by use of the Illumina platform. K562 is an immortalized myelogenous leukemia cell line. The GM12878 cell line is attractive for the ENCODE Projects, as it offers potential synergy with the International HapMap Project. Despite the vast amount of sequencing data available on the GM12878 cell line through the ENCODE Project, including transcriptome, chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing for histone marks, and transcription factors, no small interfering siRNA-mediated knockdown studies have been performed in the GM12878 cell line, as cationic lipid-mediated transfection methods are inefficient for lymphoid cell lines. Here, we present an efficient and reproducible method for transfection of a variety of siRNAs into the GM12878 and K562 cell lines, which subsequently results in targeted protein depletion.

  11. Novel meiotic miRNAs and indications for a role of phasiRNAs in meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small RNAs (sRNA) add additional layers to the regulation of gene expression, with siRNAs directing gene silencing at the DNA level by RdDM (RNA-directed DNA methylation), and miRNAs directing post-transcriptional regulation of specific target genes, mostly by mRNA cleavage. We used manually isolate...

  12. Transfer RNA-derived Small RNAs:Degradation Fragments or Novel Regulatory Molecules?%来源于tRNA的小分子RNA——降解碎片还是新的调控分子

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鑫; 王恩多

    2011-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) with classic clover structure, have been researched as a key component of cellular protein synthesis machine for decades. However, the pace of progress in the understanding of Trna function is still staggering, especially in the role of Trna as the precursor of potential molecules to regulate gene expression globally. Several recent studies suggest that some Trna-derived small RNAs have been detected in many cell lines by deep sequencing. These cleavage products of tRNAs are indicated to interact with some important protein factors like Dicer and Ago family in microRNA processing system. In additional, luciferase reporter assay results implied that the small RNAs derived from Trna might play some roles in response to the stress as regulatory molecules with microRNA-like features. If their regulatory functions were to be confirmed by more evidence, these newly revealed RNAs would provide expanding insight into the repertoire of small noncoding RNAs.%具有经典三叶草结构的tRNA作为细胞蛋白质合成机器的重要元件,已经拥有几十年深入细致的研究历史.但是,对于其功能的认识远没有止境,尤其在其作为潜在的基因表达调控分子前体的功能目前正逐渐被人们认识.最新的多项研究结果表明,在多种细胞系中通过高通量测序发现某种来源于tRNA的小片段RNA,这些剪切产物被认为与多种microRNA加工体系关键分子(如Dicer、Ago家族中的蛋白质)具有相互作用的能力.同时,报告基因检测系统的研究结果也暗示,这些小片段RNA具有类似microRNA的潜在调控功能,可能在细胞应对外界环境刺激时发挥重要的调节作用.如其具体的作用机制能够被更多的实验结果阐明,将极大地扩展我们对于非编码RNA调控功能的认识.

  13. Genomic Organization of Zebrafish microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paydar Ima

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs are small (~22 nt non-coding RNAs that regulate cell movement, specification, and development. Expression of miRNAs is highly regulated, both spatially and temporally. Based on direct cloning, sequence conservation, and predicted secondary structures, a large number of miRNAs have been identified in higher eukaryotic genomes but whether these RNAs are simply a subset of a much larger number of noncoding RNA families is unknown. This is especially true in zebrafish where genome sequencing and annotation is not yet complete. Results We analyzed the zebrafish genome to identify the number and location of proven and predicted miRNAs resulting in the identification of 35 new miRNAs. We then grouped all 415 zebrafish miRNAs into families based on seed sequence identity as a means to identify possible functional redundancy. Based on genomic location and expression analysis, we also identified those miRNAs that are likely to be encoded as part of polycistronic transcripts. Lastly, as a resource, we compiled existing zebrafish miRNA expression data and, where possible, listed all experimentally proven mRNA targets. Conclusion Current analysis indicates the zebrafish genome encodes 415 miRNAs which can be grouped into 44 families. The largest of these families (the miR-430 family contains 72 members largely clustered in two main locations along chromosome 4. Thus far, most zebrafish miRNAs exhibit tissue specific patterns of expression.

  14. Non-Coding RNAs in Retinal Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hindges

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal development is dependent on an accurately functioning network of transcriptional and translational regulators. Among the diverse classes of molecules involved, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs play a significant role. Members of this family are present in the cell as transcripts, but are not translated into proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small ncRNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators. During the last decade, they have been implicated in a variety of biological processes, including the development of the nervous system. On the other hand, long-ncRNAs (lncRNAs represent a different class of ncRNAs that act mainly through processes involving chromatin remodeling and epigenetic mechanisms. The visual system is a prominent model to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying neurogenesis or circuit formation and function, including the differentiation of retinal progenitor cells to generate the seven principal cell classes in the retina, pathfinding decisions of retinal ganglion cell axons in order to establish the correct connectivity from the eye to the brain proper, and activity-dependent mechanisms for the functionality of visual circuits. Recent findings have associated ncRNAs in several of these processes and uncovered a new level of complexity for the existing regulatory mechanisms. This review summarizes and highlights the impact of ncRNAs during the development of the vertebrate visual system, with a specific focus on the role of miRNAs and a synopsis regarding recent findings on lncRNAs in the retina.

  15. A Regulatory MDM4 Genetic Variant Locating in the Binding Sequence of Multiple MicroRNAs Contributes to Susceptibility of Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Gao

    Full Text Available A functional rs4245739 A>C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP locating in the MDM43'-untranslated (3'-UTR region creates a miR-191-5p or miR-887-3p targeting sites. This change results in decreased expression of oncogene MDM4. Therefore, we examined the association between this SNP and small cell lung cancer (SCLC risk as well as its regulatory function in SCLC cells. Genotypes were determined in two independent case-control sets consisted of 520SCLC cases and 1040 controls from two regions of China. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were estimated by logistic regression. The impact of the rs4245739 SNP on miR-191-5p/miR-887-3p mediated MDM4 expression regulation was investigated using luciferase reporter gene assays. We found that the MDM4 rs4245739AC and CC genotypes were significantly associated with decreased SCLC susceptibility compared with the AA genotype in both case-control sets (Shandong set: OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.32-0.89, P = 0.014; Jiangsu set: OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.26-0.879, P = 0.017. Stratified analyses indicated that there was a significantly multiplicative interaction between rs4245739 and smoking (Pinteractioin = 0.048. After co-tranfection of miRNAs and different allelic-MDM4 reporter constructs into SCLC cells, we found that the both miR-191-5p and miR-887-3p can lead to significantly decreased MDM4 expression activities in the construct with C-allelic 3'-UTR but not A-allelic 3'-UTR, suggesting a consistent genotype-phenotype correlation. Our data illuminate that the MDM4rs4245739SNP contributes to SCLC risk and support the notion that gene 3'-UTR genetic variants, impacting miRNA-binding, might modify SCLC susceptibility.

  16. 植物非细胞自主性小RNA分子研究进展%Advances on the Research of Non-cell-autonomous Small RNAs in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓帅; 张婷婷; 王茹茹; 刘宇; 张元湖

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fascinating features of RNA interference(RNAi)is its ability to transmit and spread from cell to cell. Such non-cell-autonomous silencing effects can also occur between tissues and organisms, in which the mobile small RNAs play a key role. However, the nature of non-cell-autonomous small RNAs is somewhat elusive. Recent studies have implied that small RNAs, including siRNAs and miRNAs, can transmit intercellular messages as transcriptional factors, peptide ligands and plant hormones do, and specifically are involved in a variety of biological processes of regulating developmental patterns, responding environmental stress, enhancing antiviral defense, and maintaining the silence of transposon. In this article we review the recent major research advances on the non-cell-autonomous RNAi, mainly focusing on the varied small RNAs transmitting the silence signals via the pathways of phloem and plasmodesma as well as their biological roles, also their molecular properties and regulation of mobility. Further potential problems and prospects of future researches are discussed .%非细胞自主性是RNA干扰的主要特点之一,表现为沉默效应可以在细胞、组织和生物个体间传递和扩散,可移动的小RNA分子在这种非细胞自主性的沉默扩散中发挥了核心作用。近年来的研究表明小RNA分子可以与转录因子、多肽和植物激素一样传递胞间信息,并以其特有的方式调控发育模式、响应环境胁迫、增强病毒抗性和维持转座子的沉默。综述了近年来在植物非细胞自主性RNAi研究中取得的主要进展,主要介绍了通过韧皮部和胞间连丝途径传递沉默信号的各种小RNA分子及其生物学作用、非细胞自主性小RNA的分子特征和运输效率的调控,并对存在的问题及其研究前景进行了展望。

  17. Small RNAs derived from lncRNA RNase MRP have gene-silencing activity relevant to human cartilage-hair hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogler, Leslie E; Kosmyna, Brian; Moskowitz, David; Bebawee, Remon; Rahimzadeh, Joseph; Kutchko, Katrina; Laederach, Alain; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Giliani, Silvia; Bouhassira, Eric; Frenette, Paul; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta; Rogler, Charles E

    2014-01-15

    Post-transcriptional processing of some long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) reveals that they are a source of miRNAs. We show that the 268-nt non-coding RNA component of mitochondrial RNA processing endoribonuclease, (RNase MRP), is the source of at least two short (∼20 nt) RNAs designated RMRP-S1 and RMRP-S2, which function as miRNAs. Point mutations in RNase MRP cause human cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH), and several disease-causing mutations map to RMRP-S1 and -S2. SHAPE chemical probing identified two alternative secondary structures altered by disease mutations. RMRP-S1 and -S2 are significantly reduced in two fibroblast cell lines and a B-cell line derived from CHH patients. Tests of gene regulatory activity of RMRP-S1 and -S2 identified over 900 genes that were significantly regulated, of which over 75% were down-regulated, and 90% contained target sites with seed complements of RMRP-S1 and -S2 predominantly in their 3' UTRs. Pathway analysis identified regulated genes that function in skeletal development, hair development and hematopoietic cell differentiation including PTCH2 and SOX4 among others, linked to major CHH phenotypes. Also, genes associated with alternative RNA splicing, cell proliferation and differentiation were highly targeted. Therefore, alterations RMRP-S1 and -S2, caused by point mutations in RMRP, are strongly implicated in the molecular mechanism of CHH.

  18. sRNASVM——基于SVM方法构建大肠杆菌sRNA预测模型%sRNASVM: A MODEL FOR PREDICTION OF SMALL NON-CODING RNAS IN E. coli USING SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立贵; 应晓敏; 曹源; 查磊; 李伍举

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the bacterial small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) that plays an important role in understanding interactions between bacteria and their environments. Here the authors introduced a scheme for constructing models for prediction of bacterial sRNAs through incorporating validated sRNAs into training dataset, and Escherichia coli (E. coli) K-12 was taken as an example to demonstrate the performance of the scheme. The results indicated that the 10-fold cross-validation classification accuracy of the constructed model, sRNASVM, was as high as 92.45%, which had better performance than two existing models. Therefore, the present work provides better support for experimental identification of bacterial sRNAs. The models and detailed results can be downloaded from the webpage http://ccb.bmi.ac.cn/smasvm/.%在理解细菌与环境的相互作用方面,细菌sRNA的识别发挥重要作用.文章介绍了一个通过增加训练集中实验证实的sRNA来构建细菌sRNA预测模型的策略,并以大肠杆菌K-12的sRNA预测为例来说明策略的可行性.结果表明,按此策略构建的模型sRNASVM的10倍交叉检验精度达到92.45%,高于目前文献中报道的精度.因此,构建的这一模型将为实验发现sRNA提供较好的生物信息学支持.有关模型和详细结果可以从网站http://ccb.bmi.ac.cn/smasvm/下载.

  19. In vivo screening of modified siRNAs for non-specific antiviral effect in a small fish model: number and localization in the strands are important

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram; Pakula, Malgorzata Maria;

    2012-01-01

    but often only examining the expression of specific immunologically relevant genes in selected cell populations typically blood cells from treated animals or humans. Assays using a relevant physiological state in biological models as read-out are not common. Here we use a fish model where the innate......, increase the antiviral effect of siRNAs. The applied fish model represents a potent tool for conducting fast but statistically and scientifically relevant evaluations of chemically optimized siRNAs with respect to non-specific antiviral effects in vivo....

  20. A bifunctional archaeal protein that is a component of 30S ribosomal subunits and interacts with C/D box small RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ciammaruconi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have identified a novel archaeal protein that apparently plays two distinct roles in ribosome metabolism. It is a polypeptide of about 18 kDa (termed Rbp18 that binds free cytosolic C/D box sRNAs in vivo and in vitro and behaves as a structural ribosomal protein, specifically a component of the 30S ribosomal subunit. As Rbp18 is selectively present in Crenarcheota and highly thermophilic Euryarchaeota, we propose that it serves to protect C/D box sRNAs from degradation and perhaps to stabilize thermophilic 30S subunits.

  1. Cardiac Regeneration and microRNAs : Regulators of Pluripotency, Reprogramming, and Cardiovascular Lineage Commitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeleman, Martijn J. H.; Feyen, DAM; de Veij Mestdagh, Christina F.; Sluijter, JPG

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a small class of ~22 nucleotide long RNAs, which control gene expression through repression of mRNA translation and induction of mRNA decay. One miRNA can potentially target up to several hundred mRNAs, which makes miRNAs powerful regulators of gene expression patterns rather

  2. The Tumor Cytosol miRNAs, Fluid miRNAs and Exosome miRNAs in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin eQin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this review is to provide an update on the progress of microRNAs (miRNAs as potential biomarkers for lung cancer. miRNAs are single-stranded, small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression and show tissue-specific signatures. Accumulating evidence indicates that miRNA expression patterns represent the in vivo status in physiology and disease. Moreover, miRNAs are stable in serum and other clinically convenient and available tissue sources, so they are being developed as biomarkers for cancer and other diseases. Cancer is currently the primary driver of the field, but miRNA biomarkers are being developed for many other diseases such as cardiovascular and central nervous system diseases. Here we examine the framework and scope of the miRNA landscape as it specifically relates to the translation of miRNA expression patterns/signatures into biomarkers for developing diagnostics for lung cancer. We focus on examining tumor cytosol miRNAs, fluid miRNAs, and exosome miRNAs in lung cancer, the connections among these miRNAs, and the potential of miRNA biomarkers for the development of diagnostics. In lung cancer, miRNAs have been studied in both cell populations and in the circulation. However, a major challenge is to develop biomarkers to monitor cancer development and to identify circulating miRNAs that are linked to cancer stage. Importantly, the fact that miRNAs can be successfully harvested from biological fluids allows for the development of biofluid biopsies, in which miRNAs as circulating biomarkers can be captured and analyzed ex vivo. Our hope is that these minimally invasive entities provide a window to the in vivo milieu of the patients without the need for costly, complex invasive procedures, rapidly moving miRNAs from research to the clinic.

  3. Transcriptomic profiling of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis reveals reprogramming of the Crp regulon by temperature and uncovers Crp as a master regulator of small RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M Nuss

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available One hallmark of pathogenic yersiniae is their ability to rapidly adjust their life-style and pathogenesis upon host entry. In order to capture the range, magnitude and complexity of the underlying gene control mechanisms we used comparative RNA-seq-based transcriptomic profiling of the enteric pathogen Y. pseudotuberculosis under environmental and infection-relevant conditions. We identified 1151 individual transcription start sites, multiple riboswitch-like RNA elements, and a global set of antisense RNAs and previously unrecognized trans-acting RNAs. Taking advantage of these data, we revealed a temperature-induced and growth phase-dependent reprogramming of a large set of catabolic/energy production genes and uncovered the existence of a thermo-regulated 'acetate switch', which appear to prime the bacteria for growth in the digestive tract. To elucidate the regulatory architecture linking nutritional status to virulence we also refined the CRP regulon. We identified a massive remodelling of the CRP-controlled network in response to temperature and discovered CRP as a transcriptional master regulator of numerous conserved and newly identified non-coding RNAs which participate in this process. This finding highlights a novel level of complexity of the regulatory network in which the concerted action of transcriptional regulators and multiple non-coding RNAs under control of CRP adjusts the control of Yersinia fitness and virulence to the requirements of their environmental and virulent life-styles.

  4. Genome-wide identification of small RNAs in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis KLDS 2.0603 and their regulation role in the adaption to gastrointestinal environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Quan Zhu

    Full Text Available Bifidobacteria are one of the predominant bacterial species in the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT and play a vital role in the host's health by acting as probiotics. However, how they regulate themselves to adapt to GIT of their host remains unknown.Eighteen bifidobacterial strains were used to analyze their adaptive capacities towards simulated GIT environment. The strain with highest survival rate and adhesion ability was selected for comparative genome as well as transcriptomic analysis.The Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis KLDS 2.0603 strain was demonstrated to have the highest survival rate and adhesion ability in simulated GIT treatments. The comparative genome analysis revealed that the KLDS 2.0603 has most similar whole genome sequence compared with BB-12 strain. Eleven intergenic sRNAs were identified after genomes prediction and transcriptomic analysis of KLDS 2.0603. Transcriptomic analysis also showed that genes (mainly sRNAs targeted genes and sRNAs were differentially expressed in different stress conditions, suggesting that sRNAs might play a crucial role in regulating genes involved in the stress resistance of this strain towards environmental changes.This study first provided deep and comprehensive insights into the regulation of KLDS 2.0603 strain at transcription and post-transcription level towards environmental.

  5. Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cerchia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Several signalling proteins involved in cell growth and differentiation represent attractive candidate targets for cancer diagnosis and/or therapy since they can act as oncogenes. Because of their high specificity and low immunogeneicity, using artificial small noncoding RNA (ncRNAs as therapeutics has recently become a highly promising and rapidly expanding field of interest. Indeed, ncRNAs may either interfere with RNA transcription, stability, translation or directly hamper the function of the targets by binding to their surface. The recent finding that the expression of several genes is under the control of small single-stranded regulatory RNAs, including miRNAs, makes these genes as appropriate targets for ncRNA gene silencing. Furthermore, another class of small ncRNA, aptamers, act as high-affinity ligands and potential antagonists of disease-associated proteins. We will review here the recent and innovative methods that have been developed and the possible applications of ncRNAs as inhibitors or tracers in cancer medicine.

  6. Differential expressions of small RNAs in prolactinomas%垂体泌乳素腺瘤小分子RNA的差异表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛志钢; 何东升; 罗斌; 范翔; 蒋小兵; 王海军

    2013-01-01

    目的 检测小分子RNA (miRNA)在垂体泌乳素腺瘤和正常垂体组织中的差异表达,探讨miRNA在垂体腺瘤发生、发展过程中的作用.方法 用miRCURYTM锁核酸芯片检测6例垂体泌乳素腺瘤和6例正常垂体组织中miRNA的差异表达,一些差异表达的miRNA用实时定量PCR验证.结果 垂体泌乳素腺瘤和正常垂体组织有35个miRNA差异表达,其中上调18个,下调17个.垂体泌乳素腺瘤和正常垂体的miRNA分类群聚图差异明显.结论 垂体泌乳素腺瘤和正常垂体组织中存在差异表达的miRNA,其可能与垂体泌乳素腺瘤的形成、增殖和侵袭性有关.%Objective To detect the differential expressions of miRNAs in prolactinomas and normal pituitaries, and to investigate the role of miRNAs in the development and progression of pituitary adenomas. Methods The differential expressions of miRNAs in 6 prolactinomas and 6 normal pituitaries were detected by miRCURYTM LNA array, and some differential expressions of miRNAs were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Results Thirty-five miRNAs were differentially expressed in prolactinomas and normal pituitaries, including 18 up-regulations and 17 down-regulations. Cluster analysis showed an obvious difference in expression of miRNAs between prolactinomas and normal pituitaries. Conclusions There are differential expressions of miRNAs between prolactinomas and normal pituitaries, which may be related to tumorigenesis, proliferation and invasion of prolactinomas.

  7. miRNAs in brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Åkerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan, E-mail: johan.jakobsson@med.lu.se

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function.

  8. Panning for Long Noncoding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent advent of high-throughput approaches has revealed widespread transcription of the human genome, leading to a new appreciation of transcription regulation, especially from noncoding regions. Distinct from most coding and small noncoding RNAs, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are generally expressed at low levels, are less conserved and lack protein-coding capacity. These intrinsic features of lncRNAs have not only hampered their full annotation in the past several years, but have also generated controversy concerning whether many or most of these lncRNAs are simply the result of transcriptional noise. Here, we assess these intrinsic features that have challenged lncRNA discovery and further summarize recent progress in lncRNA discovery with integrated methodologies, from which new lessons and insights can be derived to achieve better characterization of lncRNA expression regulation. Full annotation of lncRNA repertoires and the implications of such annotation will provide a fundamental basis for comprehensive understanding of pervasive functions of lncRNAs in biological regulation.

  9. Bioinformatics analysis suggests base modifications of tRNAs and miRNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hailing

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modifications of RNA bases have been found in some mRNAs and non-coding RNAs including rRNAs, tRNAs, and snRNAs, where modified bases are important for RNA function. Little is known about RNA base modifications in Arabidopsis thaliana. Results In the current work, we carried out a bioinformatics analysis of RNA base modifications in tRNAs and miRNAs using large numbers of cDNA sequences of small RNAs (sRNAs generated with the 454 technology and the massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS method. We looked for sRNAs that map to the genome sequence with one-base mismatch (OMM, which indicate candidate modified nucleotides. We obtained 1,187 sites with possible RNA base modifications supported by both 454 and MPSS sequences. Seven hundred and three of these sites were within tRNA loci. Nucleotide substitutions were frequently located in the T arm (substitutions from A to U or G, upstream of the D arm (from G to C, U, or A, and downstream of the D arm (from G to U. The positions of major substitution sites corresponded with the following known RNA base modifications in tRNAs: N1-methyladenosine (m1A, N2-methylguanosine (m2G, and N2-N2-methylguanosine (m22G. Conclusion These results indicate that our bioinformatics method successfully detected modified nucleotides in tRNAs. Using this method, we also found 147 substitution sites in miRNA loci. As with tRNAs, substitutions from A to U or G and from G to C, U, or A were common, suggesting that base modifications might be similar in tRNAs and miRNAs. We suggest that miRNAs contain modified bases and such modifications might be important for miRNA maturation and/or function.

  10. Targeting of microRNAs for therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Jan; Lindow, Morten; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2008-01-01

    miRNAs (microRNAs) comprise a class of small endogenous non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally repress gene expression by base-pairing with their target mRNAs. Recent evidence has shown that miRNAs play important roles in a wide variety of human diseases, such as viral infections, cancer...... and cardiovascular diseases, and thus miRNAs have rapidly emerged as potential targets for therapeutics. LNAs (locked nucleic acids) comprise a class of bicyclic conformational analogues of RNA, which exhibit high binding affinity to complementary RNA molecules and high stability in blood and tissues in vivo. Recent...... reports on LNA-mediated miRNA silencing in rodents and primates support the potential of LNA-modified oligonucleotides in studying miRNA functions in vivo and in the future development of miRNA-based therapeutics....

  11. MicroRNAs in pancreas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumortier, O; Van Obberghen, E

    2012-10-01

    The development of the pancreas is a tightly regulated process involving extensive morphogenesis, proliferation and differentiation of the epithelium. The finely orchestrated control of gene expression plays a key role in this equilibrium by coordinating the expression of selected gene products at specific moments and in precise locations. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that function in general as negative regulators of gene transcripts by interacting with the three prime untranslated regions (3'UTR) of target mRNAs. MiRNAs modulate the expression of numerous target genes that are involved in a variety of cellular systems. Hence the homeostatic control of miRNA biosynthesis and activity is important for the fine-tuning of many physiological processes such as cell differentiation, cell proliferation and organ development. In the present review, we will focus on the implication of these miRNAs on the development of the pancreas and more specifically on β-cells.

  12. Gene expression regulators--MicroRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Fang; YIN Q. James

    2005-01-01

    A large class of non-coding RNAs found in small molecule RNAs are closely associated with the regulation of gene expression, which are called microRNA (miRNA). MiRNAs are coded in intergenic or intronic regions and can be formed into foldback hairpin RNAs. These transcripts are cleaved by Dicer, generating mature miRNAs that can silence their target genes in different modes of action. Now, research on small molecule RNAs has gotten breakthrough advance in biology. To discover miRNA genes and their target genes has become hot topics in RNA research. This review attempts to look back the history of miRNA discovery, to introduce the methods of screening miRNAs, to localize miRNA loci in genome, to seek miRNA target genes and the biological function, and to discuss the working mechanisms of miRNAs. Finally, we will discuss the potential important roles of miRNAs in modulating the genesis, development, growth, and differentiation of organisms. Thus, it can be predicted that a complete understanding of miRNA functions will bring us some new concepts, approaches and strategies for the study of living beings.

  13. Characterization of piRNAs across postnatal development in mouse brain

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosheh, Yanal

    2016-04-26

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are responsible for maintaining the genome stability by silencing retrotransposons in germline tissues– where piRNAs were first discovered and thought to be restricted. Recently, novel functions were reported for piRNAs in germline and somatic cells. Using deep sequencing of small RNAs and CAGE of postnatal development of mouse brain, we identified piRNAs only in adult mouse brain. These piRNAs have similar sequence length as those of MILI-bound piRNAs. In addition, we predicted novel candidate regulators and putative targets of adult brain piRNAs.

  14. Systematic identification of long noncoding RNAs expressed during zebrafish embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauli, Andrea; Valen, Eivind; Lin, Michael F.;

    2012-01-01

    vertebrate embryogenesis has been elusive. To identify lncRNAs with potential functions in vertebrate embryogenesis, we performed a time series of RNA-Seq experiments at eight stages during early zebrafish development. We reconstructed 56,535 high-confidence transcripts in 28,912 loci, recovering the vast...... overlapping lncRNAs, and precursors for small RNAs (sRNAs). Zebrafish lncRNAs share many of the characteristics of their mammalian counterparts: relatively short length, low exon number, low expression, and conservation levels comparable to introns. Subsets of lncRNAs carry chromatin signatures characteristic...

  15. Micromanagement of the immune system by microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Harvey F; Zhou, Beiyan; Liu, Gwen; Chen, Chang-Zheng

    2008-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of evolutionarily conserved small non-coding RNAs that are thought to control gene expression by targeting mRNAs for degradation or translational repression. Emerging evidence suggests that miRNA-mediated gene regulation represents a fundamental layer of genetic programmes at the post-transcriptional level and has diverse functional roles in animals. Here, we provide an overview of the mechanisms by which miRNAs regulate gene expression, with specific focus on the role of miRNAs in regulating the development of immune cells and in modulating innate and adaptive immune responses.

  16. Role of Exosomal Noncoding RNAs in Lung Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the major cause of cancer death worldwide. Novel, recently discovered classes of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs have diverse functional and regulatory activities and increasing evidence suggests crucial roles for deregulated ncRNAs in the onset and progression of cancer, including lung cancer. Exosomes are small extracellular membrane vesicles of endocytic origin that are released by many cells and are found in most body fluids. Tumor-derived exosomes mediate tumorigenesis by facilitating tumor growth and metastasis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a subclass of ncRNAs that are present in exosomes. miRNAs are taken up by neighboring or distant cells and modulate various functions of recipient cells. Here, we review exosome-derived ncRNAs with a focus on miRNAs and their role in lung cancer biology.

  17. Regulatory RNAs in prokaryotes: here, there and everywhere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narberhaus, Franz; Vogel, Jörg

    2009-10-01

    A recent meeting on 'Regulatory RNAs in prokaryotes' reflected the growing interest in this research topic. Almost 200 scientists met to discuss the identification, structure, function and mechanistic details of regulatory RNAs in bacteria and archaea. The topics included small regulatory RNAs, riboswitches, RNA thermosensors and CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) elements.

  18. The long non coding RNAs (lncRNAs : a new (player in the dark matter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eDerrien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptome of a cell is represented by a myriad of different RNA molecules with and without protein-coding capacities. In recent years, advances in sequencing technologies have allowed researchers to more fully appreciate the complexity of whole transcriptomes, showing that the vast majority of the genome is transcribed, producing a diverse population of non-protein coding RNAs (ncRNAs. Thus, the biological significance of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs have been largely underestimated. Amongst these multiple classes of ncRNAs, the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are apparently the most numerous and functionally diverse. A small but growing number of lncRNAs have been experimentally studied, and a view is emerging that these are key regulators of epigenetic gene regulation in mammalian cells. LncRNAs have already been implicated in human diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration, highlighting the importance of this emergent field. In this article, we review the catalogues of annotated lncRNAs and the latest advances in our understanding of long non-coding RNAs.

  19. MicroRNAs regulate osteogenesis and chondrogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Shiwu, E-mail: shiwudong@gmail.com [Laboratory of Biomechanics, Department of Anatomy, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Yang, Bo; Guo, Hongfeng; Kang, Fei [Laboratory of Biomechanics, Department of Anatomy, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To focus on the role of miRNAs in chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Involved in the regulation of miRNAs in osteoarthritis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To speculate some therapeutic targets for bone diseases. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small molecules and non-coding single strand RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by binding to specific sequences within target genes. miRNAs have been recognized as important regulatory factors in organism development and disease expression. Some miRNAs regulate the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts, osteoclasts and chondrocytes, eventually influencing metabolism and bone formation. miRNAs are expected to provide potential gene therapy targets for the clinical treatment of metabolic bone diseases and bone injuries. Here, we review the recent research progress on the regulation of miRNAs in bone biology, with a particular focus on the miRNA-mediated control mechanisms of bone and cartilage formation.

  20. Construction of Small RNA Library and Characterization of MiRNAs in Larix kaempferi%日本落叶松小RNA文库构建及其microRNA鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴涛; 张俊红; 韩素英; 杨文华; 李万峰; 齐力旺

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a small RNA library mixed equally sRNA of needle leaves, stem and root tissues was constructed for 2-year-old seedling of Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi). Two hundred and eighty three recombinants from library were partially selected randomly and sequenced. These sequenced sequences were searched and compared in Rfam, Repbase, miRBase and PMRD databases by BLASTN to remove rRNA, tRNA, snRNA snoRNa and other non-candidate small RNA. The results indicated that 28 miRNAs were acquired and these sequences were same (miR159c, miR160a, miR162a, miR164b, miR165a, miR166a, miR166a*, miR166b* , miR169a, miR169b, miR171a, miR171b, miR172a, miR319b, and miR396a) as or highly homologous ( miR156a, miR159a, miR159b, miR164a, miR166b, miR168a, miR169b* miR319a, miR396b, miR408, miR482a, miR2111, and miR3701 ) to other known plant miRNAs, which belonging to 17 miRNA families. Additional 4sequences could be matched to stem-arm sequences of stem-loop structure M-folded with our lab's transcriptome data (contigs/singlets) . The 4 sequences could be characterized novel miRNAs of Japanese larch. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that 20 miRNAs were expressed in larch. The putative target genes of these miRNAs were predicted using psRNATarget online service. There were 69 targets obtained by the prediction for 24 miRNAs among 28 conserved and 4 novel larch miRNAs, which are highly enriched in transcription factor (TF) , signal transduction protein, stress-induced-associate protein and other uncharacterized protein.%以2年生日本落叶松实生苗为材料构建其小RNA文库,对283个克隆进行POR验证后测序,通过生物信息学分析鉴定文库中的microRNA并进行qRT-PCR验证.结果表明:(1)小RNA文库的体积为50 mL,总库容量为5.25×106 cfu,重组率为92.6%,插入片段长度约65 bp,与小RNA连接片段长度吻合.(2)去除rRNA(86个)、tRNA(14个)等非目的序列后,获得日本落叶松28

  1. AaeDV编码的miRNA样分子的分析与鉴定%Identification of MicroRNA-like Viral Small RNAs from AaeDV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王衍海; 吴江; 顾金保

    2015-01-01

    一些双链DNA病毒和RNA病毒可以在宿主细胞内编码自身的miRNAs分子,其在病毒感染宿主细胞与病毒复制过程中发挥重要的作用,为研究单链DNA病毒是否可编码miRNAs,我们利用VMir、miRNAFold和MaturePred软件,通过生物信息学方法预测了一株单链DNA病毒-埃及伊蚊浓核病毒(Aedes aegypti densovirus,AaeDV)编码的miRNAs分子的颈环结构前体与成熟体,并通过Northern blot与stem-loop RT-PCR方法进行了验证,结果在预测的4个茎环结构前体中,通过stem-loop RT-PCR方法验证到一个miRNA样分子AaeDVMD.该结果证实了单链DNA病毒可编码miRNAs,为进一步研究蚊浓核病毒与宿主蚊类之间的相互作用提供了新的研究方向.

  2. Detection of piRNAs in whitespotted bamboo shark liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lingrong; Ge, Yinghua; Cheng, Dandan; Nie, Zuoming; Lv, Zhengbing

    2016-09-15

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are 26 to 31-nt small non-coding RNAs that have been reported mostly in germ-line cells and cancer cells. However, the presence of piRNAs in the whitespotted bamboo shark liver has not yet been reported. In a previous study of microRNAs in shark liver, some piRNAs were detected from small RNAs sequenced by Solexa technology. A total of 4857 piRNAs were predicted and found in shark liver. We further selected 17 piRNAs with high and significantly differential expression between normal and regenerative liver tissues for subsequent verification by Northern blotting. Ten piRNAs were further identified, and six of these were matched to known piRNAs in piRNABank. The actual expression of six known and four novel piRNAs was validated by qRT-PCR. In addition, a total of 401 target genes of the 10 piRNAs were predicted by miRanda. Through GO and pathway function analyses, only five piRNAs could be annotated with eighteen GO annotations. The results indicated that the identified piRNAs are involved in many important biological responses, including immune inflammation, cell-specific differentiation and development, and angiogenesis. This manuscript provides the first identification of piRNAs in the liver of whitespotted bamboo shark using Solexa technology as well as further elucidation of the regulatory role of piRNAs in whitespotted bamboo shark liver. These findings may provide a useful resource and may facilitate the development of therapeutic strategies against liver damage.

  3. Complete modification maps for the cytosolic small and large subunit rRNAs of Euglena gracilis: functional and evolutionary implications of contrasting patterns between the two rRNA components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnare, Murray N; Gray, Michael W

    2011-10-14

    In the protist Euglena gracilis, the cytosolic small subunit (SSU) rRNA is a single, covalently continuous species typical of most eukaryotes; in contrast, the large subunit (LSU) rRNA is naturally fragmented, comprising 14 separate RNA molecules instead of the bipartite (28S+5.8S) eukaryotic LSU rRNA typically seen. We present extensively revised secondary structure models of the E. gracilis SSU and LSU rRNAs and have mapped the positions of all of the modified nucleosides in these rRNAs (88 in SSU rRNA and 262 in LSU rRNA, with only 3 LSU rRNA modifications incompletely characterized). The relative proportions of ribose-methylated nucleosides and pseudouridine (∼60% and ∼35%, respectively) are closely similar in the two rRNAs; however, whereas the Euglena SSU rRNA has about the same absolute number of modifications as its human counterpart, the Euglena LSU rRNA has twice as many modifications as the corresponding human LSU rRNA. The increased levels of rRNA fragmentation and modification in E. gracilis LSU rRNA are correlated with a 3-fold increase in the level of mispairing in helical regions compared to the human LSU rRNA. In contrast, no comparable increase in mispairing is seen in helical regions of the SSU rRNA compared to its homologs in other eukaryotes. In view of the reported effects of both ribose-methylated nucleoside and pseudouridine residues on RNA structure, these correlations lead us to suggest that increased modification in the LSU rRNA may play a role in stabilizing a 'looser' structure promoted by elevated helical mispairing and a high degree of fragmentation.

  4. The expression profile of microRNAs in mouse embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineno, Junichi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Ando, Tatsuya; Sato, Masahiro; Chono, Hideto; Izu, Hiroyuki; Takayama, Masanori; Asada, Kiyozo; Mirochnitchenko, Oleg; Inouye, Masayori; Kato, Ikunoshin

    2006-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which are non-coding RNAs 18-25 nt in length, regulate a variety of biological processes, including vertebrate development. To identify new species of miRNA and to simultaneously obtain a comprehensive quantitative profile of small RNA expression in mouse embryos, we used the massively parallel signature sequencing technology that potentially identifies virtually all of the small RNAs in a sample. This approach allowed us to detect a total of 390 miRNAs, including 195 known miRNAs covering approximately 80% of previously registered mouse miRNAs as well as 195 new miRNAs, which are so far unknown in mouse. Some of these miRNAs showed temporal expression profiles during prenatal development (E9.5, E10.5 and E11.5). Several miRNAs were positioned in polycistron clusters, including one particular large transcription unit consisting of 16 known and 23 new miRNAs. Our results indicate existence of a significant number of new miRNAs expressed at specific stages of mammalian embryonic development and which were not detected by earlier methods.

  5. MicroRNAs in cardiac arrhythmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Carlsen, Anting L; Christiansen, Kasper M

    2014-01-01

    LQTS-causing mutations have been identified in 13 genes worldwide. Despite this, the genetic cause of 30-50% of LQTS is presently unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (∼ 22 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by binding complementary sequences within...... messenger RNAs (mRNAs). The human genome encodes over 1800 miRNAs, which target about 60% of human genes. Consequently, miRNAs are likely to regulate many complex processes in the body, indeed aberrant expression of various miRNA species has been implicated in numerous disease states, including...... cardiovascular diseases. MiR-1 and MiR-133A are the most abundant miRNAs in the heart and have both been reported to regulate cardiac ion channels. We hypothesized that, as a consequence of their role in regulating cardiac ion channels, genetic variation in the genes which encode MiR-1 and MiR-133A might explain...

  6. Exploiting tRNAs to Boost Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suki Albers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are powerful small RNA entities that are used to translate nucleotide language of genes into the amino acid language of proteins. Their near-uniform length and tertiary structure as well as their high nucleotide similarity and post-transcriptional modifications have made it difficult to characterize individual species quantitatively. However, due to the central role of the tRNA pool in protein biosynthesis as well as newly emerging roles played by tRNAs, their quantitative assessment yields important information, particularly relevant for virus research. Viruses which depend on the host protein expression machinery have evolved various strategies to optimize tRNA usage—either by adapting to the host codon usage or encoding their own tRNAs. Additionally, several viruses bear tRNA-like elements (TLE in the 5′- and 3′-UTR of their mRNAs. There are different hypotheses concerning the manner in which such structures boost viral protein expression. Furthermore, retroviruses use special tRNAs for packaging and initiating reverse transcription of their genetic material. Since there is a strong specificity of different viruses towards certain tRNAs, different strategies for recruitment are employed. Interestingly, modifications on tRNAs strongly impact their functionality in viruses. Here, we review those intersection points between virus and tRNA research and describe methods for assessing the tRNA pool in terms of concentration, aminoacylation and modification.

  7. Exploiting tRNAs to Boost Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Suki; Czech, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are powerful small RNA entities that are used to translate nucleotide language of genes into the amino acid language of proteins. Their near-uniform length and tertiary structure as well as their high nucleotide similarity and post-transcriptional modifications have made it difficult to characterize individual species quantitatively. However, due to the central role of the tRNA pool in protein biosynthesis as well as newly emerging roles played by tRNAs, their quantitative assessment yields important information, particularly relevant for virus research. Viruses which depend on the host protein expression machinery have evolved various strategies to optimize tRNA usage—either by adapting to the host codon usage or encoding their own tRNAs. Additionally, several viruses bear tRNA-like elements (TLE) in the 5′- and 3′-UTR of their mRNAs. There are different hypotheses concerning the manner in which such structures boost viral protein expression. Furthermore, retroviruses use special tRNAs for packaging and initiating reverse transcription of their genetic material. Since there is a strong specificity of different viruses towards certain tRNAs, different strategies for recruitment are employed. Interestingly, modifications on tRNAs strongly impact their functionality in viruses. Here, we review those intersection points between virus and tRNA research and describe methods for assessing the tRNA pool in terms of concentration, aminoacylation and modification. PMID:26797637

  8. MicroRNAs: Potential biomarkers in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    George, G. P.; Mittal, Rama Devi

    2010-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionarily conserved small noncoding RNAs, also known as micromanagers of gene expression. Polymorphisms in the miRNA pathway (miR-polymorphisms) are emerging as powerful tools to study the biology of a disease and have the potential to be used in disease prognosis and diagnosis. Advancements in the miRNA field also indicate a clear involvement of deregulated miRNA gene signatures in cancers, and several polymorphisms in pre-miRNA, miRNA binding sites or targets hav...

  9. Iron- and Quorum-sensing Signals Converge on Small Quorum-regulatory RNAs for Coordinated Regulation of Virulence Factors in Vibrio vulnificus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yancheng; Kim, In Hwang; Kim, Kun-Soo

    2016-07-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a marine bacterium that causes human infections resulting in high mortality. This pathogen harbors five quorum-regulatory RNAs (Qrr1-5) that affect the expression of pathogenicity genes by modulating the expression of the master regulator SmcR. The qrr genes are activated by phosphorylated LuxO to different degrees; qrr2 is strongly activated; qrr3 and qrr5 are moderately activated, and qrr1 and qrr4 are marginally activated and are the only two that do not respond to cell density-dependent regulation. Qrrs function redundantly to inhibit SmcR at low cell density and fully repress when all five are activated. In this study, we found that iron inhibits qrr expression in three distinct ways. First, the iron-ferric uptake regulator (Fur) complex directly binds to qrr promoter regions, inhibiting LuxO activation by competing with LuxO for cis-acting DNA elements. Second, qrr transcription is repressed by iron independently of Fur. Third, LuxO expression is repressed by iron independently of Fur. We also found that, under iron-limiting conditions, the five Qrrs functioned additively, not redundantly, to repress SmcR, suggesting that cells lacking iron enter a high cell density mode earlier and could thereby modulate expression of virulence factors sooner. This study suggests that iron and quorum sensing, along with their cognate regulatory circuits, are linked together in the coordinated expression of virulence factors.

  10. MicroRNAs of parasites: current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan; Tuo, Wenbin; Gao, Hongwei; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2010-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous non-coding small RNAs regulating gene expression in eukaryotes at the post-transcriptional level. The complex life cycles of parasites may require the ability to respond to environmental and developmental signals through miRNA-mediated gene expression. Over the past 17 years, thousands of miRNAs have been identified in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and other parasites. Here, we review the current status and potential functions of miRNAs in protozoan, helminths, and arthropods, and propose some perspectives for future studies.

  11. Controlling the specificity of modularly assembled small molecules for RNA via ligand module spacing: targeting the RNAs that cause myotonic muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Melissa M; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Pushechnikov, Alexei; French, Jonathan M; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2009-12-02

    Myotonic muscular dystrophy types 1 and 2 (DM1 and DM2, respectively) are caused by expansions of repeating nucleotides in noncoding regions of RNA. In DM1, the expansion is an rCUG triplet repeat, whereas the DM2 expansion is an rCCUG quadruplet repeat. Both RNAs fold into hairpin structures with periodically repeating internal loops separated by two 5'GC/3'CG base pairs. The sizes of the loops, however, are different: the DM1 repeat forms 1 x 1 nucleotide UU loops while the DM2 repeat forms 2 x 2 nucleotide 5'CU/3'UC loops. DM is caused when the expanded repeats bind the RNA splicing regulator Muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1), thus compromising its function. Therefore, one potential therapeutic strategy for these diseases is to prevent MBNL1 from binding the toxic RNA repeats. Previously, we designed nanomolar inhibitors of the DM2-MBNL1 interaction by modularly assembling 6'-N-5-hexyonate kanamycin A (K) onto a peptoid backbone. The K ligand binds the 2 x 2 pyrimidine-rich internal loops found in the DM2 RNA with high affinity. The best compound identified from that study contains three K modules separated by four propylamine spacing modules and is 20-fold selective for the DM2 RNA over the DM1 RNA. Because the modularly assembled K-containing compounds also bound the DM1 RNA, albeit with lower affinity, and because the loop size is different, we hypothesized that the optimal DM1 RNA binder may display K modules separated by a shorter distance. Indeed, here the ideal DM1 RNA binder has only two propylamine spacing modules separating the K ligands. Peptoids displaying three and four K modules on a peptoid scaffold bind the DM1 RNA with K(d)'s of 20 nM (3-fold selective for DM1 over DM2) and 4 nM (6-fold selective) and inhibit the RNA-protein interaction with IC(50)'s of 40 and 7 nM, respectively. Importantly, by coupling the two studies together, we have determined that appropriate spacing can affect binding selectivity by 60-fold (20- x 3-fold). The trimer and

  12. A Csr-type regulatory system, including small non-coding RNAs, regulates the global virulence regulator RovA of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis through RovM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Böhme, Katja; Rohde, Manfred; Dersch, Petra

    2008-06-01

    The MarR-type regulator RovA controls expression of virulence genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in response to environmental signals. Using a genetic strategy to discover components that influence rovA expression, we identified new regulatory factors with homology to components of the carbon storage regulator system (Csr). We showed that overexpression of a CsrB- or a CsrC-type RNA activates rovA, whereas a CsrA-like protein represses RovA synthesis. We further demonstrate that influence of the Csr system on rovA is indirect and occurs through control of the LysR regulator RovM, which inhibits rovA transcription. The CsrA protein had also a major influence on the motility of Yersinia, which was independent of RovM. The CsrB and CsrC RNAs are differentially expressed in Yersinia. CsrC is highly induced in complex but not in minimal media, indicating that medium-dependent rovM expression is mediated through CsrC. CsrB synthesis is generally very low. However, overexpression of the response regulator UvrY was found to activate CsrB production, which in turn represses CsrC synthesis independent of the growth medium. In summary, the post-transcriptional Csr-type components were shown to be key regulators in the co-ordinated environmental control of physiological processes and virulence factors, which are crucial for the initiation of Yersinia infections.

  13. Noncoding RNAs in cancer and cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianzhi Huang; Angel Alvarez; Bo Hu; Shi-Yuan Cheng

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) are of crucial importance for human cancer. The functional relevance of ncRNAs is particularly evident for microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). miRNAs are endogenously expressed small RNA sequences that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and have been extensively studied for their roles in cancers, whereas lncRNAs are emerging as important players in the cancer paradigm in recent years. These noncoding genes are often aberrantly expressed in a variety of human cancers. However, the biological functions of most ncRNAs remain largely unknown. Recently, evidence has begun to accumulate describing how ncRNAs are dysregulated in cancer and cancer stem cells, a subset of cancer cells harboring self-renewal and differentiation capacities. These studies provide insight into the functional roles that ncRNAs play in tumor initiation, progression, and resistance to therapies, and they suggest ncRNAs as attractive therapeutic targets and potential y useful diagnostic tools.

  14. Isolation of microRNA targets using biotinylated synthetic microRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørom, Ulf Andersson; Lund, Anders H

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small regulatory RNAs found in multicellular organisms where they post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. In animals, microRNAs bind mRNAs via incomplete base pairings making the identification of microRNA targets inherently difficult. Here, we present a detailed method...... for experimental identification of microRNA targets based on affinity purification of tagged microRNAs associated with their targets. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Oct...

  15. MicroRNAs in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junn, Eunsung; Mouradian, M Maral

    2010-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, small, noncoding RNAs regulating eukaryotic gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. During the last decade, considerable advances have been made in our understanding the biogenesis of miRNAs, the molecular mechanisms by which they regulate gene expression and their functional role in various physiological situations. miRNAs are abundant in the brain where they have crucial roles in development and synaptic plasticity. Accumulating evidence from postmortem brain analyses and animal model studies has begun to suggest that miRNA dysfunction contributes to neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we discuss several examples of investigations demonstrating the role of miRNAs in neurodegenerative disorders. As the expression of disease-causing genes is regulated by certain miRNA(s), changes in these miRNAs could lead to the accumulation of disease-causing proteins, and subsequently to neuronal dysfunction and death. Detailed understanding of these mechanisms can provide potential new therapeutic approaches to slow down or halt the progression of neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Micro RNAs in animal development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasterk, R.H.A.

    2006-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are approximately 22 nucleotide single-stranded noncoding RNA molecules that bind to target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and silence their expression. This Essay explores the importance of miRNAs in animal development and their possible roles in disease and evolution.

  17. Progress, challenges and new concepts in microRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YouYi

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a group of small noncoding RNAs.They have rapidly gained attention in the field as novel regulators of cellular morphology and function.Currently hundreds of microRNAs have been described in human genome.MicroRNAs play important roles in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by inhibiting protein translation and/or promoting mRNA degradation.MicroRNAs were initially thought to be subtle regulators of gene expression,but increasing evidence demonstrates that the regulatory functions of microRNAs are crucial for the cell.MicroRNAs have been found to be involved in the development,tissue homeostasis as well as diseases.

  18. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of small RNAs in human endothelial cells and exosomes provides insights into localized RNA processing, degradation and sorting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Balkom, Bas W M; Eisele, Almut S; Pegtel, D Michiel; Bervoets, Sander; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles that mediate cell-cell communication. They contain proteins, lipids and RNA, and evidence is accumulating that these molecules are specifically sorted for release via exosomes. We recently showed that endothelial-cell-produced exosomes promote angiogenesis in vivo in a sm

  19. Antibiotic drugs targeting bacterial RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiling Hong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available RNAs have diverse structures that include bulges and internal loops able to form tertiary contacts or serve as ligand binding sites. The recent increase in structural and functional information related to RNAs has put them in the limelight as a drug target for small molecule therapy. In addition, the recognition of the marked difference between prokaryotic and eukaryotic rRNA has led to the development of antibiotics that specifically target bacterial rRNA, reduce protein translation and thereby inhibit bacterial growth. To facilitate the development of new antibiotics targeting RNA, we here review the literature concerning such antibiotics, mRNA, riboswitch and tRNA and the key methodologies used for their screening.

  20. MicroRNAs in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violaine Havelange

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate critical cell processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation by modulating gene expression. MiRNAs deregulation has been observed extensively in cancer. Elegant studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are involved in the initiation and progression of several malignancies. In this review we will address the role of miRNAs in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. The development of new drugs mimicking or blocking miRNAs will be discussed.

  1. Genome organization and characteristics of soybean microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Marie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs are key regulators of gene expression and play important roles in many aspects of plant biology. The role(s of miRNAs in nitrogen-fixing root nodules of leguminous plants such as soybean is not well understood. We examined a library of small RNAs from Bradyrhizobium japonicum-inoculated soybean roots and identified novel miRNAs. In order to enhance our understanding of miRNA evolution, diversification and function, we classified all known soybean miRNAs based on their phylogenetic conservation (conserved, legume- and soybean-specific miRNAs and examined their genome organization, family characteristics and target diversity. We predicted targets of these miRNAs and experimentally validated several of them. We also examined organ-specific expression of selected miRNAs and their targets. Results We identified 120 previously unknown miRNA genes from soybean including 5 novel miRNA families. In the soybean genome, genes encoding miRNAs are primarily intergenic and a small percentage were intragenic or less than 1000 bp from a protein-coding gene, suggesting potential co-regulation between the miRNA and its parent gene. Difference in number and orientation of tandemly duplicated miRNA genes between orthologous genomic loci indicated continuous evolution and diversification. Conserved miRNA families are often larger in size and produce less diverse mature miRNAs than legume- and soybean-specific families. In addition, the majority of conserved and legume-specific miRNA families produce 21 nt long mature miRNAs with distinct nucleotide distribution and regulate a more conserved set of target mRNAs compared to soybean-specific families. A set of nodule-specific target mRNAs and their cognate regulatory miRNAs had inverse expression between root and nodule tissues suggesting that spatial restriction of target gene transcripts by miRNAs might govern nodule-specific gene expression in soybean. Conclusions Genome

  2. Transposon defense by endo-siRNAs, piRNAs and somatic pilRNAs in Drosophila: contributions of Loqs-PD and R2D2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milijana Mirkovic-Hösle

    Full Text Available Transposable elements are a serious threat for genome integrity and their control via small RNA mediated silencing pathways is an ancient strategy. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has two silencing activities that target transposons: endogenous siRNAs (esiRNAs or endo-siRNAs and Piwi-interacting small RNAs (piRNAs. The biogenesis of endo-siRNAs involves the Dicer-2 co-factors Loqs-PD, which acts predominantly during processing of dsRNA by Dcr-2, and R2D2, which primarily helps to direct siRNAs into the RNA interference effector Ago2. Nonetheless, loss of either protein is not sufficient to produce a phenotype comparable with a dcr-2 mutation. We provide further deep sequencing evidence supporting the notion that R2D2 and Loqs-PD have partially overlapping function. Certain transposons display a preference for either dsRBD-protein during production or loading; this appeared to correlate neither with overall abundance, classification of the transposon or a specific site of genomic origin. The endo-siRNA biogenesis pathway in germline operates according to the same principles as the existing model for the soma, and its impairment does not significantly affect piRNAs. Expanding the analysis, we confirmed the occurrence of somatic piRNA-like RNAs (pilRNAs that show a ping-pong signature. We detected expression of the Piwi-family protein mRNAs only barely above background, indicating that the somatic pilRNAs may arise from a small sub-population of somatic cells that express a functional piRNA pathway.

  3. Novel and conserved microRNAs in soybean floral whorls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulcheski, F R; Molina, L G; da Fonseca, G C; de Morais, G L; de Oliveira, L F V; Margis, R

    2016-01-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) correspond to a class of endogenous small non-coding RNAs (19-24 nt) that regulates the gene expression, through mRNA target cleavage or translation inhibition. In plants, miRNAs have been shown to play pivotal roles in a wide variety of metabolic and biological processes like plant growth, development, and response to biotic and abiotic stress. Soybean is one of the most important crops worldwide, due to the production of oil and its high protein content. The reproductive phase is considered the most important for soybean yield, which is mainly intended to produce the grains. The identification of miRNAs is not yet saturated in soybean, and there are no studies linking them to the different floral organs. In this study, three different mature soybean floral whorls were used in the construction of sRNA libraries. The sequencing of petal, carpel and stamen libraries generated a total of 10,165,661 sequences. Subsequent analyses identified 200 miRNAs sequences, among which, 41 were novel miRNAs, 80 were conserved soybean miRNAs, 31 were new antisense conserved soybean miRNAs and 46 were soybean miRNAs isoforms. We also found a new miRNA conserved in other plant species, and finally one miRNA-sibling of a soybean conserved miRNA. Conserved and novel miRNAs were evaluated by RT-qPCR. We observed a differential expression across the three whorls for six miRNAs. Computational predicted targets for miRNAs analyzed by RT-qPCR were identified and present functions related to reproductive process in plants. In summary, the increased accumulation of specific and novel miRNAs in different whorls indicates that miRNAs are an important part of the regulatory network in soybean flower.

  4. Identifying microRNAs and transcript targets in Jatropha seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Galli

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs, or miRNAs, are endogenously encoded small RNAs that play a key role in diverse plant biological processes. Jatropha curcas L. has received significant attention as a potential oilseed crop for the production of renewable oil. Here, a sRNA library of mature seeds and three mRNA libraries from three different seed development stages were generated by deep sequencing to identify and characterize the miRNAs and pre-miRNAs of J. curcas. Computational analysis was used for the identification of 180 conserved miRNAs and 41 precursors (pre-miRNAs as well as 16 novel pre-miRNAs. The predicted miRNA target genes are involved in a broad range of physiological functions, including cellular structure, nuclear function, translation, transport, hormone synthesis, defense, and lipid metabolism. Some pre-miRNA and miRNA targets vary in abundance between the three stages of seed development. A search for sequences that produce siRNA was performed, and the results indicated that J. curcas siRNAs play a role in nuclear functions, transport, catalytic processes and disease resistance. This study presents the first large scale identification of J. curcas miRNAs and their targets in mature seeds based on deep sequencing, and it contributes to a functional understanding of these miRNAs.

  5. Microarray profiling of microRNAs expressed in testis tissues of developing primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Naihong; Lu, Yilu; Sun, Huaqin

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that have been identified as potent regulators of gene expression. Recent studies indicate that miRNAs are involved in mammalian spermatogenesis but the mechanism of regulation is largely unknown.......MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that have been identified as potent regulators of gene expression. Recent studies indicate that miRNAs are involved in mammalian spermatogenesis but the mechanism of regulation is largely unknown....

  6. The Roles of MicroRNAs in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryou-u [Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Miyazaki, Hiroaki [Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Showa University School of Dentistry, 1-5-8 Hatanodai Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Ochiya, Takahiro, E-mail: tochiya@ncc.go.jp [Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2015-04-09

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a large family of small, approximately 20–22 nucleotide, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of target genes, mainly at the post-transcriptional level. Accumulating lines of evidence have indicated that miRNAs play important roles in the maintenance of biological homeostasis and that aberrant expression levels of miRNAs are associated with the onset of many diseases, including cancer. In various cancers, miRNAs play important roles in tumor initiation, drug resistance and metastasis. Recent studies reported that miRNAs could also be secreted via small endosome-derived vesicles called exosomes, which are derived from multiple cell types, including dendritic cells, lymphocytes, and tumor cells. Exosomal miRNAs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication and have been investigated as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the major findings related to the functions of miRNAs in breast cancer, which is the most frequent cancer in women, and discuss the potential clinical uses of miRNAs, including their roles as therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers.

  7. The Roles of MicroRNAs in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryou-u Takahashi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs constitute a large family of small, approximately 20–22 nucleotide, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of target genes, mainly at the post-transcriptional level. Accumulating lines of evidence have indicated that miRNAs play important roles in the maintenance of biological homeostasis and that aberrant expression levels of miRNAs are associated with the onset of many diseases, including cancer. In various cancers, miRNAs play important roles in tumor initiation, drug resistance and metastasis. Recent studies reported that miRNAs could also be secreted via small endosome-derived vesicles called exosomes, which are derived from multiple cell types, including dendritic cells, lymphocytes, and tumor cells. Exosomal miRNAs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication and have been investigated as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the major findings related to the functions of miRNAs in breast cancer, which is the most frequent cancer in women, and discuss the potential clinical uses of miRNAs, including their roles as therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers.

  8. Endogenous Small RNA Clusters in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Xin Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In plants, small RNAs (sRNAs usually refer to non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs with lengths of 20–24 nucleotides. sRNAs are involved in the regulation of many essential processes related to plant development and environmental responses. sRNAs in plants are mainly grouped into microRNAs (miRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, and the latter can be further classified into trans-acting siRNAs (ta-siRNAs, repeat-associated siRNAs (ra-siRNAs, natural anti-sense siRNAs (nat-siRNAs, etc. Many sRNAs exhibit a clustered distribution pattern in the genome. Here, we summarize the features and functions of cluster-distributed sRNAs, aimed to not only provide a thorough picture of sRNA clusters (SRCs in plants, but also shed light on the identification of new classes of functional sRNAs.

  9. Transcription start site associated RNAs (TSSaRNAs are ubiquitous in all domains of life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia S Zaramela

    Full Text Available A plethora of non-coding RNAs has been discovered using high-resolution transcriptomics tools, indicating that transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation is much more complex than previously appreciated. Small RNAs associated with transcription start sites of annotated coding regions (TSSaRNAs are pervasive in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Here, we provide evidence for existence of TSSaRNAs in several archaeal transcriptomes including: Halobacterium salinarum, Pyrococcus furiosus, Methanococcus maripaludis, and Sulfolobus solfataricus. We validated TSSaRNAs from the model archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 by deep sequencing two independent small-RNA enriched (RNA-seq and a primary-transcript enriched (dRNA-seq strand-specific libraries. We identified 652 transcripts, of which 179 were shown to be primary transcripts (∼7% of the annotated genome. Distinct growth-associated expression patterns between TSSaRNAs and their cognate genes were observed, indicating a possible role in environmental responses that may result from RNA polymerase with varying pausing rhythms. This work shows that TSSaRNAs are ubiquitous across all domains of life.

  10. Identification and characterization of microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Heng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small endogenous non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs such as small interfering RNA (siRNA, microRNA and other small RNA transcripts are derived from distinct loci in the genome and play critical roles in RNA-mediated gene silencing mechanisms in plants and metazoa. They are approximately 22 nucleotides long; regulate mRNA stability through perfect or imperfect match to the targets. The biological activities of sncRNAs have been related to many biological events, from resistance to microbe infections to cellular differentiation. The development of the zoonotic parasite Schistosoma japonicum parasite includes multiple steps of morphological alterations and biological differentiations, which provide a unique model for studies on the functions of small RNAs. Characterization of the genome-wide transcription of the sncRNAs will be a major step in understanding of the parasite biology. The objective of this study is to investigate the transcriptional profile and potential function of the small non-coding RNAs in the development of S. japanicum. Results The endogenous siRNAs were found mainly derived from transposable elements (TE or transposons and the natural antisense transcripts (NAT. In contrast to other organisms, the TE-derived siRNAs in S. japonicum were more predominant than other sncRNAs including microRNAs (miRNAs. Further, there were distinct length and 3'end variations in the sncRNAs, which were associated with the developmental differentiation of the parasite. Among the identified miRNA transcripts, there were 38 unique to S. japonicum and 16 that belonged to 13 miRNA families are common to other metazoan lineages. These miRNAs were either ubiquitously expressed, or they exhibited specific expression patterns related to the developmental stages or sex. Genes that encoded miRNAs are mainly located in clusters within the genome of S. japonicum. However, genes within one cluster could be differentially transcribed, which suggested

  11. HIV-1 RNAs are Not Part of the Argonaute 2 Associated RNA Interference Pathway in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Vongrad

    Full Text Available MiRNAs and other small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs are key players in post-transcriptional gene regulation. HIV-1 derived small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs have been described in HIV-1 infected cells, but their biological functions still remain to be elucidated. Here, we approached the question whether viral sncRNAs may play a role in the RNA interference (RNAi pathway or whether viral mRNAs are targeted by cellular miRNAs in human monocyte derived macrophages (MDM.The incorporation of viral sncRNAs and/or their target RNAs into RNA-induced silencing complex was investigated using photoactivatable ribonucleoside-induced cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP as well as high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP, which capture Argonaute2-bound miRNAs and their target RNAs. HIV-1 infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM were chosen as target cells, as they have previously been shown to express HIV-1 sncRNAs. In addition, we applied small RNA deep sequencing to study differential cellular miRNA expression in HIV-1 infected versus non-infected MDMs.PAR-CLIP and HITS-CLIP data demonstrated the absence of HIV-1 RNAs in Ago2-RISC, although the presence of a multitude of HIV-1 sncRNAs in HIV-1 infected MDMs was confirmed by small RNA sequencing. Small RNA sequencing revealed that 1.4% of all sncRNAs were of HIV-1 origin. However, neither HIV-1 derived sncRNAs nor putative HIV-1 target sequences incorporated into Ago2-RISC were identified suggesting that HIV-1 sncRNAs are not involved in the canonical RNAi pathway nor is HIV-1 targeted by this pathway in HIV-1 infected macrophages.

  12. Rational Design of Micro-RNA-like Bifunctional siRNAs Targeting HIV and the HIV Coreceptor CCR5

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are distinguished by their modes of action. SiRNAs serve as guides for sequence-specific cleavage of complementary mRNAs and the targets can be in coding or noncoding regions of the target transcripts. MiRNAs inhibit translation via partially complementary base-pairing to 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) and are generally ineffective when targeting coding regions of a transcript. In this study, we deliberately designed siRNAs that simultan...

  13. MicroRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devaux, Yvan; Stammet, Pascal; Friberg, Hans

    2015-01-01

    cardiac arrest would allow subsequent health care delivery to be tailored to individual patients. However, currently available predictive methods and biomarkers lack sufficient accuracy and therefore cannot be generally recommended in clinical practice. MicroRNAs have recently emerged as potential...... biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases. While the biomarker value of microRNAs for myocardial infarction or heart failure has been extensively studied, less attention has been devoted to their prognostic value after cardiac arrest. This review highlights the recent discoveries suggesting that microRNAs may...

  14. Insights in microRNAs biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargalionis, Antonios N; Basdra, Efthimia K

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs, that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Recent studies now predict that numerous miRNA molecules regulate a large proportion of the human transcriptome, thus creating a whole new research field that utilizes their potential impact on gene expression in favor of diagnosis, prognosis and drug development. MiRNAs are generated from transcription of respective genes into primary structures that usually follow a two-step maturation process in the cell nucleus and cytoplasm. Active miRNA folds downregulate protein expression either via direct repression of targeted messenger RNA (mRNA) or mRNA cleavage. They are critical factors that control human development and organogenesis and reemerge as key-molecules that profoundly influence adult cells and tissues under stress-responsive conditions. Therefore, several miRNAs exhibit dysregulated functions in almost all aspects of human pathology such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, metabolic disorders, genetic and neurodegenerative diseases, forming tissue-specific molecular profiles that further define salient pathologic features. The present article offers an overview on miRNAs biogenesis and functional processes, major aspects of their participation in human development and milestones regarding their contribution in human diseases. Furthermore, their utility as extracellular biomarkers and the rationale behind miRNA inhibition or miRNA delivery are being discussed.

  15. microRNAs and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lifeng; Tan, Eng King; Zeng, Li

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNA molecules that through imperfect base-pairing with complementary sequences of target mRNA molecules, typically cleave target mRNA, causing subsequent degradation or translation inhibition. Although an increasing number of studies have identified misregulated miRNAs in the neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which suggests that alterations in the miRNA regulatory pathway could contribute to disease pathogenesis, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathological implications of misregulated miRNA expression and the regulation of the key genes involved in NDDs remain largely unknown. In this chapter, we provide evidence of the function and regulation of miRNAs and their association with the neurological events in NDDs. This will help improve our understanding of how miRNAs govern the biological functions of key pathogenic genes in these diseases, which potentially regulate several pathways involved in the progression of neurodegeneration. Additionally, given the growing interest in the therapeutic potential of miRNAs, we discuss current clinical challenges to developing miRNA-based therapeutics for NDDs.

  16. Co-injection of a targeted, reversibly masked endosomolytic polymer dramatically improves the efficacy of cholesterol-conjugated small interfering RNAs in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, So C; Klein, Jason J; Hamilton, Holly L; Chu, Qili; Frey, Christina L; Trubetskoy, Vladimir S; Hegge, Julia; Wakefield, Darren; Rozema, David B; Lewis, David L

    2012-12-01

    Effective in vivo delivery of small interfering (siRNA) has been a major obstacle in the development of RNA interference therapeutics. One of the first attempts to overcome this obstacle utilized intravenous injection of cholesterol-conjugated siRNA (chol-siRNA). Although studies in mice revealed target gene knockdown in the liver, delivery was relatively inefficient, requiring 3 daily injections of 50 mg/kg of chol-siRNA to obtain measurable reduction in gene expression. Here we present a new delivery approach that increases the efficacy of the chol-siRNA over 500-fold and allows over 90% reduction in target gene expression in mice and, for the first time, high levels of gene knockdown in non-human primates. This improved efficacy is achieved by the co-injection of a hepatocyte-targeted and reversibly masked endosomolytic polymer. We show that knockdown is absolutely dependent on the presence of hepatocyte-targeting ligand on the polymer, the cognate hepatocyte receptor, and the cholesterol moiety of the siRNA. Importantly, we provide evidence that this increase in efficacy is not dependent on interactions between the chol-siRNA with the polymer prior to injection or in the bloodstream. The simplicity of the formulation and efficacy of this mode of siRNA delivery should prove beneficial in the use of siRNA as a therapeutic.

  17. Human herpesvirus miRNAs statistically preferentially target host genes involved in cell signaling and adhesion/junction pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Gao; Jiong-Tang Li; Lei Kong; Louis Tao; Liping Wei

    2009-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play key roles in the regulation of major biologi-cal processes in plants and animals. Recent research has revealed that viruses also encode their own miRNAs [1].

  18. Genome-wide identification of microRNAs in pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) by high-throughput sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding endogenous RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally, play multiple key roles in plant growth and development and in biotic and abiotic stress response. Knowledge and roles of miRNAs in pomegranate fruit development have not...

  19. MicroRNA-10a binds the 5'UTR of ribosomal protein mRNAs and enhances their translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørom, Ulf Andersson; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that function as posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. miRNAs affect a variety of signaling pathways, and impaired miRNA regulation may contribute to the development of cancer and other diseases. Here we show that miRNA miR-10a interacts with the 5' ...

  20. Variety of RNAs in Peripheral Blood Cells, Plasma, and Plasma Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyeva, Anna V; Kuligina, Elena V; Bariakin, Dmitry N; Kozlov, Vadim V; Ryabchikova, Elena I; Richter, Vladimir A; Semenov, Dmitry V

    2017-01-01

    Human peripheral blood contains RNA in cells and in extracellular membrane vesicles, microvesicles and exosomes, as well as in cell-free ribonucleoproteins. Circulating mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, being internalized, possess the ability to modulate vital processes in recipient cells. In this study, with SOLiD sequencing technology, we performed identification, classification, and quantification of RNAs from blood fractions: cells, plasma, plasma vesicles pelleted at 16,000g and 160,000g, and vesicle-depleted plasma supernatant of healthy donors and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. It was determined that 16,000g blood plasma vesicles were enriched with cell-free mitochondria and with a set of mitochondrial RNAs. The variable RNA set of blood plasma 160,000g pellets reflected the prominent contribution of U1, U5, and U6 small nuclear RNAs' fragments and at the same time was characterized by a remarkable depletion of small nucleolar RNAs. Besides microRNAs, the variety of fragments of mRNAs and snoRNAs dominated in the set of circulating RNAs differentially expressed in blood fractions of NSCLC patients. Taken together, our data emphasize that not only extracellular microRNAs but also circulating fragments of messenger and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs represent prominent classes of circulating regulatory ncRNAs as well as promising circulating biomarkers for the development of disease diagnostic approaches.

  1. Role of MicroRNAs in Lung Disease✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Martín; Lecuona, Emilia; Sznajder, Jacob Iasha

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that negatively regulate gene expression. They actively participate in the modulation of important cell physiological processes and are involved in the pathogenesis of lung diseases such as lung cancer, pulmonary fibrosis, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A better understanding of the role that miRNAs play in these diseases could lead to the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In this review, we discuss the role of some miRNAs in different lung diseases as well as the possible future of these discoveries in clinical applications. PMID:22607962

  2. MicroRNAs in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glud, M; Gniadecki, R

    2013-01-01

    characteristics, histopathological features and mutation patterns within NRAS and BRAF genes. Recent data indicate that microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma. MiRNAs are small, non-coding, regulatory RNA molecules expressed in a tissue and cell specific manner and are known...... to play a crucial role in cell homeostasis and carcinogenesis. MiRNAs might prove to be powerful cancer biomarkers and future therapeutic targets. In this review, we focused on the miRNA involvement in four molecular pathways known to be deregulated in malignant melanoma, including the RAS...

  3. Circulating MicroRNAs and Life Expectancy Among Identical Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shenghui; Kim, Taek-Kyun; Wu, Xiaogang; Scherler, Kelsey; Baxter, David; Wang, Kai; Krasnow, Ruth E; Reed, Terry; Dai, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Human life expectancy is influenced not only by longevity assurance mechanisms and disease susceptibility loci but also by the environment, gene-environment interactions, and chance. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs closely related to genes. Circulating miRNAs have been shown as promising noninvasive biomarkers in the development of many pathophysiological conditions. However, the concentration of miRNA in the circulation may also be affected by environmental factors. We used a next-generation sequencing platform to assess the association of circulating miRNA with life expectancy, for which deaths are due to all causes independent of genes. In addition, we showed that miRNAs are present in 41-year archived plasma samples, which may be useful for both life expectancy and all-cause mortality risk assessment. Plasma miRNAs from nine identical male twins were profiled using next-generation sequencing. The average absolute difference in the minimum life expectancy was 9.68 years. Intraclass correlation coefficients were above 0.4 for 50% of miRNAs. Comparing deceased twins with their alive co-twin brothers, the concentrations were increased for 34 but decreased for 30 miRNAs. Identical twins discordant in life expectancy were dissimilar in the majority of miRNAs, suggesting that environmental factors are pivotal in miRNAs related to life expectancy.

  4. Extracellular MicroRNAs in Urologic Malignancies: Chances and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Small noncoding RNAs that are 19-23 nucleotides long, known as microRNAs (miRNAs, are involved in almost all biological mechanisms during carcinogenesis. Recent studies show that miRNAs released from live cells are detectable in body fluids and may be taken up by other cells to confer cell-cell communication. These released miRNAs (here referred to as extracellular miRNAs are often protected by RNA-binding proteins or embedded inside circulating microvesicles. Due to their relative stability, extracellular miRNAs are believed to be promising candidates as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of disease, or even as therapeutic agents for targeted treatment. In this review, we first describe biogenesis and characteristics of these miRNAs. We then summarize recent publications involving extracellular miRNA profiling studies in three representative urologic cancers, including: prostate cancer, bladder cancer, and renal cell carcinoma. We focus on the diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic potential of these miRNAs in biological fluids, such as serum, plasma, and urine. Finally, we discuss advantages and challenges of these miRNAs in clinical applications.

  5. MicroRNAs in Breast Cancer -Our Initial Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovska-Jankovic, K; Noveski, P; Chakalova, L; Petrusevska, G; Kubelka, K; Plaseska-Karanfilska, D

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small [∼21 nucleotide (nt)] non coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally. About 3.0% of human genes encode for miRNAs, and up to 30.0% of human protein coding genes may be regulated by miRNAs. Currently, more than 2000 unique human mature microRNAs are known. MicroRNAs play a key role in diverse biological processes including development, cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. These processes are commonly dysregulated in cancer, implicating miRNAs in carcinogenesis, where they act as tumor supressors or oncogenes. Several miRNAs are associated with breast cancer. Here we present our initial results of miRNA analyses of breast cancer tissues using quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (ReTi-PCR) (qPCR) involving stem-loop reverse transcriptase (RT) primers combined with TaqMan® PCR and miRNA microarray analysis.

  6. Surveillance and Cleavage of Eukaryotic tRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille Megel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Beyond their central role in protein synthesis, transfer RNAs (tRNAs have many other crucial functions. This includes various roles in the regulation of gene expression, stress responses, metabolic processes and priming reverse transcription. In the RNA world, tRNAs are, with ribosomal RNAs, among the most stable molecules. Nevertheless, they are not eternal. As key elements of cell function, tRNAs need to be continuously quality-controlled. Two tRNA surveillance pathways have been identified. They act on hypo-modified or mis-processed pre-tRNAs and on mature tRNAs lacking modifications. A short overview of these two pathways will be presented here. Furthermore, while the exoribonucleases acting in these pathways ultimately lead to complete tRNA degradation, numerous tRNA-derived fragments (tRFs are present within a cell. These cleavage products of tRNAs now potentially emerge as a new class of small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs and are suspected to have important regulatory functions. The tRFs are evolutionarily widespread and created by cleavage at different positions by various endonucleases. Here, we review our present knowledge on the biogenesis and function of tRFs in various organisms.

  7. New insights into microRNAs in skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahs, Fatima; Bi, Xinling; Yu, Fu-Shin; Zhou, Li; Mi, Qing-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Chronic wounds are a major burden to overall healthcare cost and patient morbidity. Chronic wounds affect a large portion of the US, and billions of healthcare dollars are spent in their treatment and management. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding double-stranded RNAs that post-transcriptionally downregulate the expression of protein-coding genes. Studies have identified miRNAs involved in all three phases of wound healing including inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Some miRNAs have been demonstrated in vitro with primary keratinocyte wound healing model and in vivo with mouse wound healing model through regulation of miRNA expression to affect the wound healing process. This review updates the current miRNAs involved in wound healing and discusses the future therapeutic implications and research directions.

  8. MicroRNAs Related to Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anja Elaine; Wissing, Marie Louise Muff; Salö, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    with infertility, insulin resistance, chronic low-grade inflammation and an increased life time risk of type 2 diabetes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that are able to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Altered miRNA levels have been associated with diabetes, insulin...... resistance, inflammation and various cancers. Studies have shown that circulating miRNAs are present in whole blood, serum, plasma and the follicular fluid of PCOS patients and that they might serve as potential biomarkers and a new approach for the diagnosis of PCOS. In this review, recent work on miRNAs...... with respect to PCOS will be summarized. Our understanding of miRNAs, particularly in relation to PCOS, is currently at a very early stage, and additional studies will yield important insight into the molecular mechanisms behind this complex and heterogenic syndrome...

  9. MicroRNAs Expression Profiles in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Bronze-da-Rocha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current search for new markers of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs is explained by the high morbidity and mortality still observed in developed and developing countries due to cardiovascular events. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs have emerged as potential new biomarkers and are small sequences of RNAs that regulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level by inhibiting translation or inducing degradation of the target mRNAs. Circulating miRNAs are involved in the regulation of signaling pathways associated to aging and can be used as novel diagnostic markers for acute and chronic diseases such as cardiovascular pathologies. This review summarizes the biogenesis, maturation, and stability of miRNAs and their use as potential biomarkers for coronary artery disease (CAD, myocardial infarction (MI, and heart failure (HF.

  10. MicroRNAs and Osteolytic Bone Metastasis: The Roles of MicroRNAs in Tumor-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadayoshi Kagiya

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteolytic bone metastasis frequently occurs in the later stages of breast, lung, and several other cancers. Osteoclasts, the only cells that resorb bone, are hijacked by tumor cells, which break down bone remodeling systems. As a result, osteolysis occurs and may cause patients to suffer bone fractures, pain, and hypercalcemia. It is important to understand the mechanism of bone metastasis to establish new cancer therapies. MicroRNAs are small, noncoding RNAs that are involved in various biological processes, including cellular differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. MicroRNAs have significant clinical potential, including their use as new therapeutic targets and disease-specific biomarkers. Recent studies have revealed that microRNAs are involved in osteoclast differentiation and osteolytic bone metastasis. In this review focusing on microRNAs, the author discusses the roles of microRNAs in osteoclastogenesis and osteolytic bone metastasis.

  11. MicroRNAs in Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small regulatory RNAs that play important roles in development of diseases. Several studies have provided evidences showing that miRNAs affect pathways that are fundamental for metabolic control in adipocyte and skeletal muscle differentiations. Some miRNAs have been implicated in lipid, amino acid, and glucose homeostasis. This leads to the possibility that miRNAs may contribute to common metabolic diseases and point to novel therapeutic opportunities based on targeting of miRNAs. CONTENT: miRNAs have been recognized as a class of epigenetic regulators of metabolism and energy homeostasis, primarily because the simultaneous regulation of a large number of target genes can be accomplished by a single miRNA. Emerging evidences suggest that miRNAs play a key role in the pathological development of obesity by affecting adipocyte differentiation. miRNAs have been implicated as novel protagonists in the pathogenesis of Diabetes Mellitus (DM, regulation of insulin production, secretion and action. They also appear to play a role in the development of diabetic complications such as nephropathy and cardiac hypertrophy. SUMMARY: Involvement of miRNAs in glucose and lipid metabolism has provided strong evidences to confirm their roles as key players in regulation of complex metabolic pathways. Additionally, it indicates potential outlook for novel therapeutic strategies in the management of obesity, metabolic syndrome and DM. Further research in this field is needed to ascertain the full potential of miRNAs as novel metabolic biomarkers and potent therapeutic agents against obesity and its metabolic disorders. KEYWORDS: obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, miRNAs, adipogenesis, insulin, pancreatic cells.

  12. 番茄果实中成熟衰老相关small RNAs的最新研究进展%Latest Research Progress of Small RNAs Related to Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Fruit Ripening and Senescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左进华; 王清; 鞠正; 曹东艳; 朱本忠; 罗云波; 高丽朴

    2016-01-01

    番茄(Lycopersicon esculentum)是研究果实成熟衰老的模式材料,其成熟是一个多基因调控的高度协调的遗传调控过程,伴随着色泽、质地、风味、香气和其他代谢等许多显著的生理生化变化.近年来,small RNAs作为一种新型的转录后调控因子受到越来越多的关注,几乎参与了动植物中所有的生理和生化过程.在植物中参与生长发育、果实成熟、生物和非生物胁迫反应等过程.本文系统地综述了番茄果实中small RNAs的分离鉴定现状,对番茄果实中与乙烯信号途径、颜色、风味、软化等代谢途径相关的small RNAs进行了系统总结,并展望了未来small RNAs在果实成熟过程中的相关研究方向.

  13. Rational design of micro-RNA-like bifunctional siRNAs targeting HIV and the HIV coreceptor CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Ali; Saetrom, Pål; Zhang, Jane; Alluin, Jessica; Li, Haitang; Snøve, Ola; Aagaard, Lars; Rossi, John J

    2010-04-01

    Small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are distinguished by their modes of action. SiRNAs serve as guides for sequence-specific cleavage of complementary mRNAs and the targets can be in coding or noncoding regions of the target transcripts. MiRNAs inhibit translation via partially complementary base-pairing to 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) and are generally ineffective when targeting coding regions of a transcript. In this study, we deliberately designed siRNAs that simultaneously direct cleavage and translational suppression of HIV RNAs, or cleavage of the mRNA encoding the HIV coreceptor CCR5 and suppression of translation of HIV. These bifunctional siRNAs trigger inhibition of HIV infection and replication in cell culture. The design principles have wide applications throughout the genome, as about 90% of genes harbor sites that make the design of bifunctional siRNAs possible.

  14. 非小细胞肺癌中微小RNA与表皮生长因子受体-酪氨酸激酶抑制剂敏感性关系的研究进展%MicroRNAs and epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors sensitivity in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴冬; 陈晓锋; 束永前

    2012-01-01

    表皮生长因子受体(epidermal growth factor receptor,EGFR) -酪氨酸激酶抑制剂(tyrosine kinase inhibitor,TKI)被广泛应用于肿瘤的治疗,尤其是伴有EGFR基因突变的非小细胞肺癌(non-small cell lung cancer,NSCLC)的治疗,但EGFR- TKI耐药性的产生已成为制约其疗效的主要瓶颈.微小RNA (microRNAs,miRNAs)是一类非编码小分子RNA,在转录后水平调控基因的表达.近年来的研究发现,miRNAs在多个环节参与调节NSCLC对EGFR-TKI的敏感性,提示其可能在TKI耐药中扮演了重要角色,并有可能成为一种新的预测TKI敏感性的生物学标志物.因此,本文就有关NSCLC对EGFR-TKI的敏感性与miRNAs之间关系的最新研究进展进行综述.%Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (ECFR-TKIs) have been wildly used in cancer treatment, especially in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutation. However, the resistance to EGFR-TKIs has been a major problem which has resulted in a limitation for therapeutic effectiveness of ECFR-TKIs. MiRNAs (microRNAs) are a group of small non-coding RNAs, which are involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. More recently, miRNAs have also been found to be involved in the regulation of EGFR-TKIs sensitivity in the treatment of NSCLC through multiple pathways, it suggests that EGFR-TKIs may play an important role in the resistance to TKI and it may be used as a new biomarker in the prediction of TKI sensitivity. This review summarizes the advance in the relationship between miRNAs and EGFR-TKI sensitivity in NSCLC.

  15. Novel transcriptome data analysis implicates circulating microRNAs in epigenetic inheritance in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Abhay

    2014-04-01

    Experimental evidence supports a role of mobile small non-coding RNAs in mediating soma to germline hereditary information transfer in epigenetic inheritance in plants and worms. Similar evidence in mammals has not been reported so far. In this bioinformatic analysis, differentially expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) or mRNAs reported previously in genome level expression profiling studies related to or relevant in epigenetic inheritance in mammals were examined for circulating miRNA association. The reported sets of differentially expressed miRNAs or miRNAs that are known to target the reported sets of differentially expressed genes, in that order, showed enrichment of circulating miRNAs across environmental factors, tissues, life cycle stages, generations, genders and species. Circulating miRNAs commonly representing the expression profiles enriched various epigenetic processes. These results provide bioinformatic evidence for a role of circulating miRNAs in epigenetic inheritance in mammals.

  16. An expanding universe of noncoding RNAs between the poles of basic science and clinical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Patrick P; Hensel, Kai O; Weber, David; Postberg, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The Keystone Symposium 'MicroRNAs and Noncoding RNAs in Cancer', Keystone, CO, USA, 7-12 June 2015 Since the discovery of RNAi, great efforts have been undertaken to unleash the potential biomedical applicability of small noncoding RNAs, mainly miRNAs, involving their use as biomarkers for personalized diagnostics or their usability as active agents or therapy targets. The research's focus on the noncoding RNA world is now slowly moving from a phase of basic discoveries into a new phase, where every single molecule out of many hundreds of cataloged noncoding RNAs becomes dissected in order to investigate these molecules' biomedical relevance. In addition, RNA classes neglected before, such as long noncoding RNAs or circular RNAs attract more attention. Numerous timely results and hypotheses were presented at the 2015 Keystone Symposium 'MicroRNAs and Noncoding RNAs in Cancer'.

  17. Selective recruitment of mRNAs and miRNAs to polyribosomes in response to rhizobia infection in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynoso, Mauricio Alberto; Blanco, Flavio Antonio; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Crespi, Martín; Zanetti, María Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Translation of mRNAs is a key regulatory step that contributes to the coordination and modulation of eukaryotic gene expression during development or adaptation to the environment. mRNA stability or translatability can be regulated by the action of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs), which control diverse biological processes. Under low nitrogen conditions, leguminous plants associate with soil bacteria and develop a new organ specialized in nitrogen fixation: the nodule. To gain insight into the translational regulation of mRNAs during nodule formation, the association of mRNAs and sRNAs to polysomes was characterized in roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula during the symbiotic interaction with Sinorhizobium meliloti. Quantitative comparison of steady-state and polysomal mRNAs for 15 genes involved in nodulation identified a group of transcripts with slight or no change in total cellular abundance that were significantly upregulated at the level of association with polysomes in response to rhizobia. This group included mRNAs encoding receptors like kinases required either for nodule organogenesis, bacterial infection or both, and transcripts encoding GRAS and NF-Y transcription factors (TFs). Quantitative analysis of sRNAs in total and polysomal RNA samples revealed that mature microRNAs (miRNAs) were associated with the translational machinery, notably, miR169 and miR172, which target the NF-YA/HAP2 and AP2 TFs, respectively. Upon inoculation, levels of miR169 pronouncedly decreased in polysomal complexes, concomitant with the increased accumulation of the NF-YA/HAP2 protein. These results indicate that both mRNAs and miRNAs are subject to differential recruitment to polysomes, and expose the importance of selective mRNA translation during root nodule symbiosis.

  18. Role of microRNAs in arbovirus/vector interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Sassan

    2014-09-23

    The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) as small non-coding RNAs in regulation of gene expression has been recognized. They appear to be involved in regulation of a wide range of cellular pathways that affect several biological processes such as development, the immune system, survival, metabolism and host-pathogen interactions. Arthropod-borne viruses impose great economic and health risks around the world. Recent advances in miRNA biology have shed some light on the role of these small RNAs in vector-virus interactions. In this review, I will reflect on our current knowledge on the role of miRNAs in arbovirus-vector interactions and the potential avenues for their utilization in limiting virus replication and/or transmission.

  19. The expression and function of microRNAs in vertebrate embryonic development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by binding to the 3'UTR of mRNAs. These small RNA molecules (~22 bases in length) are processed from long primary transcripts (pri-miRNA). In animals, microRNAs bind with imperfect complementarity to their target mRNA. This leads to

  20. Tumor suppressor microRNAs are downregulated in myelodysplastic syndrome with spliceosome mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslan, Derya; Garde, Christian; Nygaard, Mette Katrine;

    2016-01-01

    Spliceosome mutations are frequently observed in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, it is largely unknown how these mutations contribute to the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs, which have been implicated in most human cancers due to their role in post...

  1. Write 'systemic small RNAs': read 'systemic immunity'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifi Abdolabad, A.R.

    2011-01-01

    About 50 years ago, it was reported that pathogen-infected plants are less susceptible to a broad spectrum of the subsequent pathogen attacks. This form of induced resistance, which resembles the immunisation in mammalian cells, is called systemic acquired resistance (SAR). In the last 10 years, pla

  2. MicroRNAs in biliary diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patricia Munoz-Garrido; Maite García-Fernández de Barrena; Elizabeth Hijona; Miguel Carracedo; José J G Marín; Luis Bujanda; Jesús M Banales

    2012-01-01

    Cholangiopathies are a group of diseases primarily or secondarily affecting bile duct cells,and result in cholangiocyte proliferation,regression,and/or transformation.Their etiopathogenesis may be associated with a broad variety of causes of different nature,which includes genetic,neoplastic,immune-associated,infectious,vascular,and drug-induced alterations,or being idiopathic.miRNAs,small non-coding endogenous RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression,have been associated with pathophysiological processes in different organs and cell types,and are postulated as potential targets for diagnosis and therapy.In the current manuscript,knowledge regarding the role of miRNAs in the development and/or progression of cholangiopathies has been reviewed and the most relevant findings in this promising field of hepatology have been highlighted.

  3. Role of Regulatory Micro RNAs in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus–Related Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Hamar, Péter

    2012-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs with the function of post-transcriptional gene expression regulation. Micro RNAs may function in networks, forming a complex relationship with diseases. Alterations of specific miRNA levels have significant correlation with diseases of divergent origin, such as diabetes. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has an increasing worldwide epidemic with serious complications. However, T2DM is a chronic process, and from early metabolic alterations to manif...

  4. Identification of Cassava MicroRNAs under Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Ballén-Taborda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of microRNAs (miRNAs in plants has gained significant attention in recent years due to their regulatory role during development and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Although cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz is tolerant to drought and other adverse conditions, most cassava miRNAs have been predicted using bioinformatics alone or through sequencing of plants challenged by biotic stress. Here, we use high-throughput sequencing and different bioinformatics methods to identify potential cassava miRNAs expressed in different tissues subject to heat and drought conditions. We identified 60 miRNAs conserved in other plant species and 821 potential cassava-specific miRNAs. We also predicted 134 and 1002 potential target genes for these two sets of sequences. Using real time PCR, we verified the condition-specific expression of 5 cassava small RNAs relative to a non-stress control. We also found, using publicly available expression data, a significantly lower expression of the predicted target genes of conserved and nonconserved miRNAs under drought stress compared to other cassava genes. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis along with condition specific expression of predicted miRNA targets, allowed us to identify several interesting miRNAs which may play a role in stress-induced posttranscriptional regulation in cassava and other plants.

  5. MicroRNAs Involved in Anti-Tumour Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. S. Cho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a category of small RNAs that constitute a new layer of complexity to gene regulation within the cell, which has provided new perspectives in understanding cancer biology. The deregulation of miRNAs contributes critically to the development and pathophysiology of a number of cancers. miRNAs have been found to participate in cell transformation and multiplication by acting as tumour oncogenes or suppressors; therefore, harnessing miRNAs may provide promising cancer therapeutics. Another major function of miRNAs is their activity as critical regulatory vehicles eliciting important regulatory processes in anti-tumour immunity through their influence on the development, differentiation and activation of various immune cells of both innate and adaptive immunity. This review aims to summarise recent findings focusing on the regulatory mechanisms of the development, differentiation, and proliferative aspects of the major immune populations by a diverse profile of miRNAs and may enrich our current understanding of the involvement of miRNAs in anti-tumour immunity.

  6. Micro-RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taipaleenmäki, H.; Hokland, L. B.; Chen, Li

    2012-01-01

    Osteoblast differentiation and bone formation (osteogenesis) are regulated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Recently, a novel class of regulatory factors termed microRNAs has been identified as playing an important role in the regulation of many aspects of osteoblast biology...... including proliferation, differentiation, metabolism and apoptosis. Also, preliminary data from animal disease models suggest that targeting miRNAs in bone can be a novel approach to increase bone mass. This review highlights the current knowledge of microRNA biology and their role in bone formation...

  7. Endogenous TasiRNAs mediate non-cell autonomous effects on gene regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Schwab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Different classes of small RNAs (sRNAs refine the expression of numerous genes in higher eukaryotes by directing protein partners to complementary nucleic acids, where they mediate gene silencing. Plants encode a unique class of sRNAs, called trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs, which post-transcriptionally regulate protein-coding transcripts, as do microRNAs (miRNAs, and both sRNA classes control development through their targets. TasiRNA biogenesis requires multiple components of the siRNA pathway and also miRNAs. But while 21mer siRNAs originating from transgenes can mediate silencing across several cell layers, miRNA action seems spatially restricted to the producing or closely surrounding cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have previously described the isolation of a genetrap reporter line for TAS3a, the major locus producing AUXIN RESPONS FACTOR (ARF-regulating tasiRNAs in the Arabidopsis shoot. Its activity is limited to the adaxial (upper side of leaf primordia, thus spatially isolated from ARF-activities, which are located in the abaxial (lower side. We show here by in situ hybridization and reporter fusions that the silencing activities of ARF-regulating tasiRNAs are indeed manifested non-cell autonomously to spatially control ARF activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Endogenous tasiRNAs are thus mediators of a mobile developmental signal and might provide effective gene silencing at a distance beyond the reach of most miRNAs.

  8. Identification and functional analysis of 23 novel box C/D snoRNAs from Oryza sativa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUO Min; ZHOU Hui; HUANG Zhanpeng; LIANG Dan; CHEN Chunlong; CHEN Yueqin; QU Lianghu

    2003-01-01

    In a eDNA library generated from rice small nuclear RNAs, 30 box C/D small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs)were identified through preliminary screen. Except 7 known snoRNAs such as U14, all snoRNAs were identified in rice for the first time experimentally. Among the 23 novel snoRNAs,11 snoRNAs appear rice-specific, 6 snoRNAs are unique to plants, the remaining 6 snoRNAs have their counterparts in both Arabidopsis and yeast or mammals according to the conserved antisense sequences that guide 2'-O-ribose methylation of rRNA. 17 of the 23 novel snoRNAs were predicted to guide 24 2'-O-ribose methylations at the specific sites of rice 5.8S, 18S, 25S rRNAs, among which 19 methylated sites were determined by primer extension at low dNTP concentrations. The remaining 6 snoRNAs devoid of rRNA antisense elements may represent novel snoRNA species in rice.The results show that constructing a cDNA library from small nuclear RNAs is an effective experimental approach for novel snoRNA identification. The novel snoRNAs are important in elucidating the genomic organization and expression of plant snoRNA genes and the mechanism through which 2'-O-ribose methylations took place in rRNAs.

  9. Identification of conserved microRNAs in peripheral blood from giant panda: expression of mammary gland-related microRNAs during late pregnancy and early lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C D; Long, K; Jin, L; Huang, S; Li, D H; Ma, X P; Wei, M; Gu, Y; Ma, J D; Zhang, H

    2015-11-13

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the world's most endangered mammals, and it has evolved several unusual biological and behavioral traits. During puberty, pregnancy, lactation, and involution, the mammary gland undergoes profound morphological and functional changes. A large number of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified to be involved in mammary gland development and lactation. In this study, we identified 202 conserved mature miRNAs, corresponding to 147 pre-miRNAs, in giant panda peripheral blood using a small RNA-sequencing approach. In addition, 27 miRNA families and 29 miRNA clusters were identified. We analyzed the arm selection preference of pre-miRNAs and found that: 1) most giant panda pre-miRNAs generated one-strand miRNAs, and the 5p-arm only miRNAs have a higher expression level than 3p-arm only miRNAs; 2) there were more 5p-arm dominant miRNAs than 3p-arm dominant miRNAs; and 3) 5p-arm dominant miRNAs have a larger fold change within miRNA pairs than 3p-arm dominant miRNAs. Expression of 12 lactation-related miRNAs was detected across late pregnancy and early lactation stages by qPCR, and seven miRNAs were identified as clustered in one significant model. Most of these clustered miRNAs exhibited inhibitory roles in proliferation and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells. Functional analysis highlighted important roles of the seven as signed miRNAs in mammary development and metabolic changes, including blood vessel morphogenesis, macromolecule biosynthesis, cell cycle regulation, and protein transport.

  10. MicroRNAs: A Puzzling Tool in Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Barbara; Benedetti, Elisabetta; Cimini, Annamaria; Giordano, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a dominating class of small RNAs that regulate diverse cellular functions. Due the pivotal role of miRNAs in biological processes, a deregulated miRNA expression is likely involved in human cancers. MicroRNAs possess tumor suppressor capability, as well as display oncogenic characteristics. Interestingly, miRNAs exist in various biological fluids as circulating entities. Changes in the profile of circulating miRNAs are indicative of pathophysiological conditions in human cancer. This concept has led to consider circulating miRNAs valid biomarkers in cancer diagnostics. Furthermore, current research promotes the use of miRNAs as a target in cancer therapy. However, miRNAs are an evolving research field. Although miRNAs have been demonstrated to be potentially valuable tools both in cancer diagnosis and treatment, a greater effort should be made to improve our understanding of miRNAs biology. This review describes the biology of microRNAs, emphasizing on the use of miRNAs in cancer diagnostics and therapy.

  11. Computational identification of citrus microRNAs and target analysis in citrus expressed sequence tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, C; Jia, Q; Fang, J; Li, F; Wang, C; Zhang, Z

    2010-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a new family of small RNA molecules found in plants and animals. We developed a comprehensive strategy for identifying new miRNA homologues by mining the repository of available citrus expressed sequence tags (ESTs). By adopting a range of filtering criteria, we identified a total of 38 potential miRNAs--nine, five, nine and 15 miRNAs in Citrus trifoliata (ctr-miRNAs), C. clementina (ccl-miRNAs), C. reticulata (crt-miRNAs) and C. sinensis (csi-miRNAs), respectively--from more than 430,000 EST sequences in citrus. Using the potential miRNA sequences, we conducted a further BLAST search of the mRNA database and found six potential target genes in these citrus species. Eight miRNAs were selected in order to verify their existence in citrus using Northern blotting, and the functions of several miRNAs in miRNA-mediated gene regulation are experimentally suggested. It appears that all these miRNAs regulate expression of their target genes by cleavage, which is the most common situation in gene regulation mediated by plant miRNAs. Our achievement in identifying new miRNAs in citrus provides a powerful incentive for further studies on the important roles of these miRNAs.

  12. High-throughput sequencing, characterization and detection of new and conserved cucumber miRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Martínez

    Full Text Available Micro RNAS (miRNAs are a class of endogenous small non coding RNAs involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In plants, a great number of conserved and specific miRNAs, mainly arising from model species, have been identified to date. However less is known about the diversity of these regulatory RNAs in vegetal species with agricultural and/or horticultural importance. Here we report a combined approach of bioinformatics prediction, high-throughput sequencing data and molecular methods to analyze miRNAs populations in cucumber (Cucumis sativus plants. A set of 19 conserved and 6 known but non-conserved miRNA families were found in our cucumber small RNA dataset. We also identified 7 (3 with their miRNA* strand not previously described miRNAs, candidates to be cucumber-specific. To validate their description these new C. sativus miRNAs were detected by northern blot hybridization. Additionally, potential targets for most conserved and new miRNAs were identified in cucumber genome.In summary, in this study we have identified, by first time, conserved, known non-conserved and new miRNAs arising from an agronomically important species such as C. sativus. The detection of this complex population of regulatory small RNAs suggests that similarly to that observe in other plant species, cucumber miRNAs may possibly play an important role in diverse biological and metabolic processes.

  13. Utility of MicroRNAs and siRNAs in Cervical Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacnite del Mar Díaz-González

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs and siRNAs belong to a family of small noncoding RNAs which bind through partial sequence complementarity to 3′-UTR regions of mRNA from target genes, resulting in the regulation of gene expression. MicroRNAs have become an attractive target for genetic and pharmacological modulation due to the critical function of their target proteins in several signaling pathways, and their expression profiles have been found to be altered in various cancers. A promising technology platform for selective silencing of cell and/or viral gene expression using siRNAs is currently in development. Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women in the developing world and sexually transmitted infection with HPV is the cause of this malignancy. Therefore, a cascade of abnormal events is induced during cervical carcinogenesis, including the induction of genomic instability, reprogramming of cellular metabolic pathways, deregulation of cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptotic mechanisms, disruption of cell cycle control mechanisms, and alteration of gene expression. Thus, in the present review article, we highlight new research on microRNA expression profiles which may be utilized as biomarkers for cervical cancer. Furthermore, we discuss selective silencing of HPV E6 and E7 with siRNAs which represents a potential gene therapy strategy against cervical cancer.

  14. Utility of MicroRNAs and siRNAs in Cervical Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-González, Sacnite del Mar; Benítez-Boijseauneau, Odelia; Gómez-Cerón, Claudia; Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo; Rodríguez-Dorantes, Mauricio; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs and siRNAs belong to a family of small noncoding RNAs which bind through partial sequence complementarity to 3′-UTR regions of mRNA from target genes, resulting in the regulation of gene expression. MicroRNAs have become an attractive target for genetic and pharmacological modulation due to the critical function of their target proteins in several signaling pathways, and their expression profiles have been found to be altered in various cancers. A promising technology platform for selective silencing of cell and/or viral gene expression using siRNAs is currently in development. Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women in the developing world and sexually transmitted infection with HPV is the cause of this malignancy. Therefore, a cascade of abnormal events is induced during cervical carcinogenesis, including the induction of genomic instability, reprogramming of cellular metabolic pathways, deregulation of cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptotic mechanisms, disruption of cell cycle control mechanisms, and alteration of gene expression. Thus, in the present review article, we highlight new research on microRNA expression profiles which may be utilized as biomarkers for cervical cancer. Furthermore, we discuss selective silencing of HPV E6 and E7 with siRNAs which represents a potential gene therapy strategy against cervical cancer. PMID:25874209

  15. Identification of microRNAs in the coral Stylophora pistillata.

    KAUST Repository

    Liew, Yi Jin

    2014-03-21

    Coral reefs are major contributors to marine biodiversity. However, they are in rapid decline due to global environmental changes such as rising sea surface temperatures, ocean acidification, and pollution. Genomic and transcriptomic analyses have broadened our understanding of coral biology, but a study of the microRNA (miRNA) repertoire of corals is missing. miRNAs constitute a class of small non-coding RNAs of ∼22 nt in size that play crucial roles in development, metabolism, and stress response in plants and animals alike. In this study, we examined the coral Stylophora pistillata for the presence of miRNAs and the corresponding core protein machinery required for their processing and function. Based on small RNA sequencing, we present evidence for 31 bona fide microRNAs, 5 of which (miR-100, miR-2022, miR-2023, miR-2030, and miR-2036) are conserved in other metazoans. Homologues of Argonaute, Piwi, Dicer, Drosha, Pasha, and HEN1 were identified in the transcriptome of S. pistillata based on strong sequence conservation with known RNAi proteins, with additional support derived from phylogenetic trees. Examination of putative miRNA gene targets indicates potential roles in development, metabolism, immunity, and biomineralisation for several of the microRNAs. Here, we present first evidence of a functional RNAi machinery and five conserved miRNAs in S. pistillata, implying that miRNAs play a role in organismal biology of scleractinian corals. Analysis of predicted miRNA target genes in S. pistillata suggests potential roles of miRNAs in symbiosis and coral calcification. Given the importance of miRNAs in regulating gene expression in other metazoans, further expression analyses of small non-coding RNAs in transcriptional studies of corals should be informative about miRNA-affected processes and pathways.

  16. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  17. The regulatory epicenter of miRNAs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashwani Jha; Mrigaya Mehra; Ravi Shankar

    2011-09-01

    miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs with average length of ∼21 bp. miRNA formation seems to be dependent upon multiple factors besides Drosha and Dicer, in a tissue/stage-specific manner, with interplay of several specific binding factors. In the present study, we have investigated transcription factor binding sites in and around the genomic sequences of precursor miRNAs and RNA-binding protein (RBP) sites in miRNA precursor sequences, analysed and tested in comprehensive manner. Here, we report that miRNA precursor regions are positionally enriched for binding of transcription factors as well as RBPs around the 3′ end of mature miRNA region in 5′ arm. The pattern and distribution of such regulatory sites appears to be a characteristic of precursor miRNA sequences when compared with non-miRNA sequences as negative dataset and tested statistically. When compared with 1 kb upstreamregions, a sudden sharp peak for binding sites arises in the enriched zone near the mature miRNA region. An expression-data-based correlation analysis was performed between such miRNAs and their corresponding transcription factors and RBPs for this region. Some specific groups of binding factors and associated miRNAs were identified. We also identified some of the overrepresented transcription factors and associated miRNAs with high expression correlation values which could be useful in cancer-related studies. The highly correlated groups were found to host experimentally validated composite regulatory modules, in which Lmo2-GATA1 appeared as the predominant one. For many of RBP–miRNAs associations, co-expression similarity was also evident among the associated miRNA common to given RBPs, supporting the Regulon model, suggesting a common role and common control of these miRNAs by the associated RBPs. Based on our findings, we propose that the observed characteristic distribution of regulatory sites in precursor miRNA sequence regions could be critical inmiRNA transcription, processing

  18. MicroRNAs in Cardiometabolic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are ~22-nucleotide noncoding RNAs with critical functions in multiple physiological and pathological processes. An explosion of reports on the discovery and characterization of different miRNA species and their involvement in almost every aspect of cardiac biology and diseases has established an exciting new dimension in gene regulation networks for cardiac development and pathogenesis. CONTENT: Alterations in the metabolic control of lipid and glucose homeostasis predispose an individual to develop cardiometabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Work over the last years has suggested that miRNAs play an important role in regulating these physiological processes. Besides a cell-specific transcription factor profile, cell-specific miRNA-regulated gene expression is integral to cell fate and activation decisions. Thus, the cell types involved in atherosclerosis, vascular disease, and its myocardial sequelae may be differentially regulated by distinct miRNAs, thereby controlling highly complex processes, for example, smooth muscle cell phenotype and inflammatory responses of endothelial cells or macrophages. The recent advancements in using miRNAs as circulating biomarkers or therapeutic modalities, will hopefully be able to provide a strong basis for future research to further expand our insights into miRNA function in cardiovascular biology. SUMMARY: MiRNAs are small, noncoding RNAs that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. They are potent modulators of diverse biological processes and pathologies. Recent findings demonstrated the importance of miRNAs in the vasculature and the orchestration of lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis. MiRNA networks represent an additional layer of regulation for gene expression that absorbs perturbations and ensures the robustness of biological systems. A detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mi

  19. Ingested plant miRNAs regulate gene expression in animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hervé Vaucheret; Yves Chupeau

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of genetic material or epigenetic information transferred from one organism to another is an important biological question.A recent study demonstrated that plant small RNAs acquired orally through food intake directly influence gene expression in animals after migration through the plasma and delivery to specific organs.Non-protein coding RNAs,and in particular small RNAs,were recently revealed as master chief regulators of gene expression in all organisms.Endogenous small RNAs come in different flavors,depending on their mode of biogenesis.Most microRNAs (miRNA)and short interferring RNAs (siRNA)derive from long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) precursors that are processed into small RNA duplexes,20 to 25-nt long,by RNaselll enzymes called Dicer [1].One strand of small RNA duplexes is loaded onto an Argonaute protein that executes silencing by cleaving or repressing the translation of homologous mRNA [2].In certain species,RNA cleavage is followed by DNA methylation and/or histone modification,leading to heritable epigenetic modification [3].

  20. MicroRNAs as Novel Regulators of Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Justyna Ksiazek-Winiarek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are relatively recently discovered class of small noncoding RNAs, which function as important regulators of gene expression. They fine-tune protein expression either by translational inhibition or mRNA degradation. MicroRNAs act as regulators of diverse cellular processes, such as cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Their defective biogenesis or function has been identified in various pathological conditions, like inflammation, neurodegeneration, or autoimmunity. Multiple sclerosis is one of the predominated debilitating neurological diseases affecting mainly young adults. It is a multifactorial disorder of as yet unknown aetiology. As far, it is suggested that interplay between genetic and environmental factors is responsible for MS pathogenesis. The role of microRNAs in this pathology is now extensively studied. Here, we want to review the current knowledge of microRNAs role in multiple sclerosis.

  1. Mechanism of T cell regulation by microRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Liu; Chang-Ping Wu; Bin-Feng Lu; Jing-Ting Jiang

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding single-stranded RNAs that can modulate target gene expression at post-transcriptional level and participate in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. T cells have important functions in acquired immune response;miRNAs regulate this immune response by targeting the mRNAs of genes involved in T cell development, proliferation, differentiation, and function. For instance, miR-181 family members function in progression by targeting Bcl2 and CD69, among others. MiR-17 to miR-92 clusters function by binding to CREB1, PTEN, and Bim. Considering that the suppression of T cell-mediated immune responses against tumor cells is involved in cancer progression, we should investigate the mechanism by which miRNA regulates T cells to develop new approaches for cancer treatment.

  2. Non-coding RNAs in chromatin disease involving neurological defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriana eDella Ragione

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Novel classes of small and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are increasingly becoming apparent, being engaged in diverse structural, functional and regulatory activities. They take part in target gene silencing, play roles in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic processes, such as chromatin remodeling, nuclear reorganization with the formation of silent compartments and fine-tuning of gene recruitment into them. Among their functions, non-coding RNAs are thought to act either as guide or scaffold for epigenetic modifiers that write, erase and read the epigenetic signature over the genome. Studies on human disorders caused by defects in epigenetic modifiers and involving neurological phenotypes highlight the disruption of diverse classes of non-coding RNAs. Noteworthy, these molecules mediate a wide spectrum of neuronal functions, including brain development, and synaptic plasticity. These findings imply a significant contribution of ncRNAs in pathophysiology of the aforesaid diseases and provide new concepts for potential therapeutic applications.

  3. MicroRNAs: novel therapeutic targets in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, Reema; Ghosh, Tanay; Scaria, Vinod; Pillai, Beena

    2009-12-01

    The prevalence of neurodegenerative disorders is rising steadily as human life expectancy increases. However, limited knowledge of the molecular basis of disease pathogenesis is a major hurdle in the identification of drug targets and development of therapeutic strategies for these largely incurable disorders. Recently, differential expression of endogenous regulatory small RNAs, known as 'microRNAs' (miRNAs), in patients of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and models of ataxia suggest that they might have key regulatory roles in neurodegeneration. miRNAs that can target known mediators of neurodegeneration offer potential therapeutic targets. Our bioinformatic analysis suggests novel miRNA-target interactions that could potentially influence neurodegeneration. The recent development of molecules that alter miRNA expression promises valuable tools that will enhance the therapeutic potential of miRNAs.

  4. MicroRNAs as mediators of insect host-pathogen interactions and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mazhar; Asgari, Sassan

    2014-11-01

    Insects are the most successful group of animals on earth, owing this partly to their very effective immune responses to microbial invasion. These responses mainly include cellular and humoral responses as well as RNA interference (RNAi). Small non-coding RNAs (snRNAs) produced through RNAi are important molecules in the regulation of gene expression in almost all living organisms; contributing to important processes such as development, differentiation, immunity as well as host-microorganism interactions. The main snRNAs produced by the RNAi response include short interfering RNAs, microRNAs and piwi-interacting RNAs. In addition to the host snRNAs, some microorganisms encode snRNAs that affect the dynamics of host-pathogen interactions. In this review, we will discuss the latest developments in regards to the role of microRNA in insect host-pathogen interactions and provide some insights into this rapidly developing area of research.

  5. Roles of microRNAs in the life cycles of mammalian viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwein, Eva

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs expressed by plants, animals, and some viruses. miRNAs generally function as part of miRNA-induced silencing complexes to modestly repress mRNAs with imperfect sequence complementarity. Over the last years, many different roles of miRNA mediated regulation in the life cycles of mammalian viruses have been uncovered. In this chapter, I will mainly explore four different examples of how cellular miRNAs interact with viruses: the role of miR-155 in viral oncogenesis, viral strategies to eliminate cellular miR-27, the contribution of miR-122 to the replication of hepatitis C virus, and miRNAs as an experimental tool to control virus replication and vector transgene expression. In the final part of this chapter, I will give a brief overview of virally encoded microRNAs.

  6. The Role of MicroRNAs in Bovine Infection and Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan eLawless

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small, non-coding RNAs that are recognised as critical regulators of immune gene expression during infection. Many immunologically significant human miRNAs have been found to be conserved in agriculturally important species, including cattle. Discovering how bovine miRNAs mediate the immune defence during infection is critical to understanding the aetiology of the most prevalent bovine diseases. Here, we review current knowledge of miRNAs in the bovine genome, and discuss the advances in understanding of miRNAs as regulators of immune cell function, and bovine immune response activation, regulation, and resolution. Finally, we consider the future perspectives on miRNAs in bovine viral disease, their role as potential biomarkers and in therapy.

  7. MicroRNAs and genomic variations: from Proteus tricks to Prometheus gift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Muller; Valeri, Nicola; Calin, George A

    2009-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs with regulatory functions. MiRNAs are aberrantly expressed in almost all human cancers, leading to abnormal levels of target genes. Recently, an increasing number of studies have addressed whether genomic variations including germ line or somatic mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms can count for miRNA abnormal expression by altering their biogenesis and/or affect the ability of miRNAs to bind to target messenger RNAs. Here, we provide an extensive review of the studies that have investigated variations occurring both in miRNA genes and in target genes and we discuss the possible clinical implications of these findings. Furthermore, we propose that sequence variations in miRNAs or interactor sites located in mRNAs can be involved in cancer predisposition.

  8. Role of Non-Coding RNAs in the Transgenerational Epigenetic Transmission of the Effects of Reprotoxicants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Larriba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are regulatory elements of gene expression and chromatin structure. Both long and small ncRNAs can also act as inductors and targets of epigenetic programs. Epigenetic patterns can be transmitted from one cell to the daughter cell, but, importantly, also through generations. Diversity of ncRNAs is emerging with new and surprising roles. Functional interactions among ncRNAs and between specific ncRNAs and structural elements of the chromatin are drawing a complex landscape. In this scenario, epigenetic changes induced by environmental stressors, including reprotoxicants, can explain some transgenerationally-transmitted phenotypes in non-Mendelian ways. In this review, we analyze mechanisms of action of reprotoxicants upon different types of ncRNAs and epigenetic modifications causing transgenerationally transmitted characters through germ cells but affecting germ cells and reproductive systems. A functional model of epigenetic mechanisms of transgenerational transmission ncRNAs-mediated is also proposed.

  9. Role of Non-Coding RNAs in the Transgenerational Epigenetic Transmission of the Effects of Reprotoxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larriba, Eduardo; del Mazo, Jesús

    2016-03-25

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are regulatory elements of gene expression and chromatin structure. Both long and small ncRNAs can also act as inductors and targets of epigenetic programs. Epigenetic patterns can be transmitted from one cell to the daughter cell, but, importantly, also through generations. Diversity of ncRNAs is emerging with new and surprising roles. Functional interactions among ncRNAs and between specific ncRNAs and structural elements of the chromatin are drawing a complex landscape. In this scenario, epigenetic changes induced by environmental stressors, including reprotoxicants, can explain some transgenerationally-transmitted phenotypes in non-Mendelian ways. In this review, we analyze mechanisms of action of reprotoxicants upon different types of ncRNAs and epigenetic modifications causing transgenerationally transmitted characters through germ cells but affecting germ cells and reproductive systems. A functional model of epigenetic mechanisms of transgenerational transmission ncRNAs-mediated is also proposed.

  10. Long noncoding RNAs and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian; Ding, Jia-wang; Wang, Xin-an; Zheng, Xia-xia

    2016-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is universally recognized as a chronic lipid-induced inflammation of the vessel wall in response to dyslipidemia and haemodynamic stress involving dysfunction and activation of resident vascular cells as well as infiltration of leukocytes. As members of nonprotein-coding RNAs, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are implicated in various biological processes. Accumulating evidences suggest that lncRNAs regulate the function of vascular wall, activation of macrophages, lipid metabolism and immune response. Here, we review the effects of lncRNAs on the progress of atherosclerosis.

  11. MicroRNAs and spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaja, Noora

    2014-06-01

    In mammals, male gametes are produced inside the testis by spermatogenesis, which has three phases: mitotic proliferation of spermatogonia, meiosis of spermatocytes, and haploid differentiation of spermatids. The genome of male germ cells is actively transcribed to produce phase-specific gene expression patterns. Male germ cells have a complex transcriptome. In addition to protein-coding messenger RNAs, many noncoding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), are produced. The miRNAs are important regulators of gene expression. They function mainly post-transcriptionally to control the stability or translation of their target messenger RNAs. The miRNAs are expressed in a cell-specific manner during spermatogenesis to participate in the control of each step of male germ cell differentiation. Genetically modified mouse models have demonstrated the importance of miRNA pathways for normal spermatogenesis, and functional studies have been designed to dissect the roles of specific miRNAs in distinct cell types. Clinical studies have exploited the well-defined expression profiles of miRNAs, and human spermatozoal or seminal plasma miRNAs have been explored as potential biomarkers for male factor infertility. This review article discusses the current findings that support the central role of miRNAs in the regulation of spermatogenesis and male fertility.

  12. MicroRNAs in rhabdomyosarcoma: pathogenetic implications and translational potentiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano Antonio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is growing evidence that interconnections among molecular pathways governing tissue differentiation are nodal points for malignant transformation. In this scenario, microRNAs appear as crucial players. This class of non-coding small regulatory RNA molecules controls developmental programs by modulating gene expression through post-transcriptional silencing of target mRNAs. During myogenesis, muscle-specific and ubiquitously-expressed microRNAs tightly control muscle tissue differentiation. In recent years, microRNAs have emerged as prominent players in cancer as well. Rhabdomyosarcoma is a pediatric skeletal muscle-derived soft-tissue sarcoma that originates from myogenic precursors arrested at different stages of differentiation and that continue to proliferate indefinitely. MicroRNAs involved in muscle cell fate determination appear down-regulated in rhabdomyosarcoma primary tumors and cell lines compared to their normal counterparts. More importantly, they behave as tumor suppressors in this malignancy, as their re-expression is sufficient to restore the differentiation capability of tumor cells and to prevent tumor growth in vivo. In addition, up-regulation of pro-oncogenic microRNAs has also been recently detected in rhabdomyosarcoma. In this review, we provide an overview of current knowledge on microRNAs de-regulation in rhabdomyosarcoma. Additionally, we examine the potential of microRNAs as prognostic and diagnostic markers in this soft-tissue sarcoma, and discuss possible therapeutic applications and challenges of a "microRNA therapy".

  13. Identification of MicroRNAs in Zebrafish Spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun-Tong; Zhang, Jing; Jia, Peng; Zeng, Lin; Jin, Yilin; Yuan, Yongming; Chen, Jieying; Hong, Yunhan; Yi, Meisheng

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) participate in almost all biological processes. Plenty of evidences show that some testis- or spermatozoa-specific miRNAs play crucial roles in the process of gonad and germ cell development. In this study, the spermatozoa miRNA profiles were investigated through a combination of illumina deep sequencing and bioinformatics analysis in zebrafish. Deep sequencing of small RNAs yielded 11,820,680 clean reads. By mapping to the zebrafish genome, we identified 400 novel and 204 known miRNAs that could be grouped into 104 families. Furthermore, we selected the six highest expressions of known miRNAs to detect their expression patterns in different tissues by stem-loop quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We found that among the six miRNAs, dre-miR-202-5p displayed specific and high expression in zebrafish spermatozoa and testis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis indicated that dre-miR-202-5p was predominantly expressed in all kind of germ cells at different spermatogenetic stages, including spermatogonia and spermatozoa, but barely expressed in the germ cells in the ovary. This sex-biased expression pattern suggests that dre-miR-202-5p might be related to spermatogenesis and the functioning of spermatozoa. The identification of miRNAs in zebrafish spermatozoa and germ cells offers new insights into the spermatogenesis and spermatozoa in the teleost and other vertebrates.

  14. Identification of microRNA-like RNAs from Curvularia lunata associated with maize leaf spot by bioinformation analysis and deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Hu, John; Zuo, Yuhu; Jin, Yazhong; Hou, Jumei

    2016-04-01

    Deep sequencing of small RNAs is a useful tool to identify novel small RNAs that may be involved in fungal growth and pathogenesis. In this study, we used HiSeq deep sequencing to identify 747,487 unique small RNAs from Curvularia lunata. Among these small RNAs were 1012 microRNA-like RNAs (milRNAs), which are similar to other known microRNAs, and 48 potential novel milRNAs without homologs in other organisms have been identified using the miRBase© database. We used quantitative PCR to analyze the expression of four of these milRNAs from C. lunata at different developmental stages. The analysis revealed several changes associated with germinating conidia and mycelial growth, suggesting that these milRNAs may play a role in pathogen infection and mycelial growth. A total of 8334 target mRNAs for the 1012 milRNAs that were identified, and 256 target mRNAs for the 48 novel milRNAs were predicted by computational analysis. These target mRNAs of milRNAs were also performed by gene ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis. To our knowledge, this study is the first report of C. lunata's milRNA profiles. This information will provide a better understanding of pathogen development and infection mechanism.

  15. microRNAs of parasitic helminths - Identification, characterization and potential as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Collette; Winter, Alan D; Gillan, Victoria; Devaney, Eileen

    2014-08-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation. They were first identified in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, where the miRNAs lin-4 and let-7 were shown to be essential for regulating correct developmental progression. The sequence of let-7 was subsequently found to be conserved in higher organisms and changes in expression of let-7, as well as other miRNAs, are associated with certain cancers, indicating important regulatory roles. Some miRNAs have been shown to have essential functions, but the roles of many are currently unknown. With the increasing availability of genome sequence data, miRNAs have now been identified from a number of parasitic helminths, by deep sequencing of small RNA libraries and bioinformatic approaches. While some miRNAs are widely conserved in a range of organisms, others are helminth-specific and many are novel to each species. Here we review the potential roles of miRNAs in regulating helminth development, in interacting with the host environment and in development of drug resistance. Use of fluorescently-labeled small RNAs demonstrates uptake by parasites, at least in vitro. Therefore delivery of miRNA inhibitors or mimics has potential to alter miRNA activity, providing a useful tool for probing the roles of miRNAs and suggesting novel routes to therapeutics for parasite control.

  16. Identification of novel and candidate miRNAs in rice by high throughput sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Weixiong

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small RNA-guided gene silencing at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels has emerged as an important mode of gene regulation in plants and animals. Thus far, conventional sequencing of small RNA libraries from rice led to the identification of most of the conserved miRNAs. Deep sequencing of small RNA libraries is an effective approach to uncover rare and lineage- and/or species-specific microRNAs (miRNAs in any organism. Results In order to identify new miRNAs and possibly abiotic-stress regulated small RNAs in rice, three small RNA libraries were constructed from control rice seedlings and seedlings exposed to drought or salt stress, and then subjected to pyrosequencing. A total of 58,781, 43,003 and 80,990 unique genome-matching small RNAs were obtained from the control, drought and salt stress libraries, respectively. Sequence analysis confirmed the expression of most of the conserved miRNAs in rice. Importantly, 23 new miRNAs mostly each derived from a unique locus in rice genome were identified. Six of the new miRNAs are conserved in other monocots. Additionally, we identified 40 candidate miRNAs. Allowing not more than 3 mis-matches between a miRNA and its target mRNA, we predicted 20 targets for 9 of the new miRNAs. Conclusion Deep sequencing proved to be an effective strategy that allowed the discovery of 23 low-abundance new miRNAs and 40 candidate miRNAs in rice.

  17. Circulating microRNAs: Novel biomarkers for esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process, involving a variety of changes in gene expression and physiological structure change. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding endogenous RNA molecules. Recent innovation in miRNAs profiling technology have shed new light on the pathology of esophageal carcinoma (EC), and also heralded great potential for exploring novel biomarkers for both EC diagnosis and treatment. Frequent dysregulation of miRNA in malignancy highlights the study of molecular...

  18. Long Noncoding RNAs in Metabolic Syndrome Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Losko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ribonucleic acids (RNAs are very complex and their all functions have yet to be fully clarified. Noncoding genes (noncoding RNA, sequences, and pseudogenes comprise 67% of all genes and they are represented by housekeeping noncoding RNAs (transfer RNA (tRNA, ribosomal RNA (rRNA, small nuclear RNA (snRNA, and small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA that are engaged in basic cellular processes and by regulatory noncoding RNA (short and long noncoding RNA (ncRNA that are important for gene expression/transcript stability. In this review, we summarize data concerning the significance of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in metabolic syndrome related disorders, focusing on adipose tissue and pancreatic islands.

  19. Potential MiRNAs recognition site identification in 3' UTR regions by DSP methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Norbert; Arrigo, Patrizio; Ruggiero, Carmelina

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate fundamental cellular processes in diverse organisms and that have an important function in gene expression regulation. miRNAs seem capable to concurrently modulate hundreds of target genes. Their abnormal expression is emerging as important element in many pathological conditions. The identification of microRNA binding sites on those proteins that can be disease biomarker is fundamental to design synthetic artificial oligomers. In this paper we suggest a method, based on signal processing, to filter out potential miRNA recognition sites in the 3' UTR region of mRNAs.

  20. MicroRNAs horizon in retinoblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Mirakholi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the retinoblastoma research, it is of great interest to identify molecular markers associated with the genetics of tumorigenesis. microRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that play a regulatory role in many crucial cellular pathways such as differentiation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. A body of evidences showed dysregulation of miRNAs in tumor biology and many diseases. They potentially play a significant role in tumorigenesis processes and have been the subject of research in many types of cancers including retinal tumorigenesis. miRNA expression profiling was found to be associated with tumor development, progression and treatment. These associations demonstrate the putative applications of miRNAs in monitoring of different aspect of tumors consisting diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic. Herein, we review the current literature concerning to the study of miRNA target recognition, function to tumorigenesis and treatment in retinoblastoma. Identification the specific miRNA biomarkers associated with retinoblastoma cancer may help to establish new therapeutic approaches for salvage affected eyes in patients.

  1. Circulating microRNAs in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlicka-Płocka, Marta; Gurda, Dorota; Fedoruk-Wyszomirska, Agnieszka; Smolarek, Iwona; Wyszko, Eliza

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CD) are currently one of the most common causes of death. Because heart related deaths occur on such an enormous scale this phenomenon is referred to as an epidemic. Chronic and acute injury of the heart could be an effect of cardiac remodeling, which is a result of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes, influenced by hemodynamic load or neurohormonal activation (Cohn et al., 2000). These small deviations in cardiac activity and morphology may lead to an enormous negative effect. Despite a significant progress, knowledge of standard risk factors for cardiovascular diseases has become less and less effective, which is why predicting and seeking an appropriate treatment is very challenging. As a result, there is a growing interest in finding new markers of the CD. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), are short, non-coding RNAs responsible for regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Among them that have the greatest potential are microRNA molecules that circulate in the blood plasma or serum, that are related to direct activation of signaling pathways, implicated in the aging process and thus for the development of cardiovascular disease. This paper is a summary of the current state of knowledge on miRNAs, their biogenesis and potential role as biomarkers to diagnose heart disease.

  2. MicroRNAs in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jong Y Park; James Helm; Domenico Coppola; Donghwa Kim; Mokenge Malafa; Seung Joon Kim

    2011-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is a lethal cancer for which the only chance of long-term survival belongs to the patient with localized disease in whom a potentially curative resection can be done.Therefore,biomarkers for early detection and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed.miRNAs are a recently discovered class of small endogenous non-coding RNAs of about 22 nucleotides that have gained attention for their role in downregulation of mRNA expression at the posttranscriptional level.miRNAs regulate proteins involved in critical cellular processes such as differentiation,proliferation,and apoptosis.Evidence suggests that deregulated miRNA expression is involved in carcinogenesis at many sites,including the pancreas.Aberrant expression of miRNAs may upregulate the expression of oncogenes or downregulate the expression of tumor suppressor genes,as well as play a role in other mechanisms of carcinogenesis.The purpose of this review is to summarize our knowledge of deregulated miRNA expression in pancreatic cancer and discuss the implication for potential translation of this knowledge into clinical practice.

  3. Deregulated microRNAs in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetatos, Leonidas; Vartholomatos, George

    2012-02-15

    MicroRNAs are short noncoding RNAS involved in gene expression regulation under physiological and pathological situations. They bind to mRNA of target genes and are potential regulators of gene expression at a post-transcription level through the RNA interference pathway. They are estimated to represent 1% to 2% of the known eukaryotic genome, and it has been demonstrated that they are involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, metabolism disorders, and heart disease. MicroRNAs are known to act as tumor suppressors or oncogenes in cancer biology. The authors describe the current knowledge on microRNA involvement in regulatory pathways that characterize multiple myeloma pathogenesis gained from in vitro and in vivo studies. These small molecules interact with important factors such as p53, SOCS1, IGF-1, IGF-1R, vascular endothelial growth factor, NF-κB, and others. As such, microRNAs represent an attractive therapeutic target in the context of multiple myeloma interfering with the myeloma regulatory networks. Further studies are needed to better understand their role in myelomagenesis and their therapeutic potential.

  4. MicroRNAs and potential targets in osteosarcoma: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie B. Sampson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in children and young adults. Surgery and multi-agent chemotherapy are the standard treatment regimens for this disease. New therapies are being investigated to improve overall survival in patients. Molecular targets that actively modulate cell processes such as cell-cycle control, cell proliferation, metabolism and apoptosis, have been studied, but it remains a challenge to develop novel, effective targeted therapies to treat this heterogeneous and complex disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that play critical roles in regulating cell processes including growth, development and disease. miRNAs function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors to regulate gene and protein expression. Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma with the potential for development in disease diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on the role of miRNAs and their target genes and evaluate their potential use as therapeutic agents in osteosarcoma. We also summarize the efficacy of inhibition of oncogenic miRNAs or expression of tumor suppressor miRNAs in preclinical models of osteosarcoma. Recent progress on systemic delivery as well as current applications for miRNAs as therapeutic agents has seen the advancement of miR-34a in clinical trials for adult patients with non-resectable primary liver cancer or metastatic cancer with liver involvement. We suggest a global approach to the understanding of the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma may identify candidate miRNAs as promising biomarkers for this rare disease.

  5. MicroRNAs in diabetes: tiny players in big disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Amit K; Agarwal, Priyanka; Kaur, Kirandeep; Datta, Malabika

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a novel group of universally present small non-coding RNAs that have been implicated in wide ranging physiological processes and thereby are critical in the manifestation of diverse diseases. Since their discovery as developmental regulators in C.elegans, they have come a long way and are currently associated with normal and diverse pathophysiological states including Parkinson's syndrome, cardiac hypertrophy, viral infection, diabetes and several types of cancer. Of special significance is their involvement in diabetes, an area in which several emerging reports point to the fact that these small RNA species could be special and critical in this complex disease and they or their specific inhibitors may be exploited as targets for therapeutic intervention. The stable nature of these miRNAs over mRNAs is an added advantage of them being projected for the same. This review focuses on and discusses the current diabetic epidemic and the potential role(s) of these miRNAs in various physiological processes that lead to the diabetic phenotype with an objective of better understanding the emerging mechanisms of these small molecules in the development and progression of diabetes and its complications.

  6. MicroRNAs and their therapeutic potential for human diseases: aberrant microRNA expression in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Jun-ichi

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small noncoding RNAs that regulate translational repression of multiple target mRNAs. The miRNAs in a whole cell regulate greater than 30% of all protein-coding genes. The vast majority of presently identified miRNAs are expressed in the brain in a spatially and temporally controlled manner. They play a key role in neuronal development, differentiation, and synaptic plasticity. However, at present, the pathological implications of deregulated miRNA expression in neurodegenerative diseases remain largely unknown. This review will briefly summarize recent studies that focus attention on aberrant miRNA expression in Alzheimer's disease brains.

  7. Long noncoding RNAs regulate adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Goff, Loyal A; Trapnell, Cole; Alexander, Ryan; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Hacisuleyman, Ezgi; Sauvageau, Martin; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Kelley, David R; Hendrickson, David G; Yuan, Bingbing; Kellis, Manolis; Lodish, Harvey F; Rinn, John L

    2013-02-26

    The prevalence of obesity has led to a surge of interest in understanding the detailed mechanisms underlying adipocyte development. Many protein-coding genes, mRNAs, and microRNAs have been implicated in adipocyte development, but the global expression patterns and functional contributions of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) during adipogenesis have not been explored. Here we profiled the transcriptome of primary brown and white adipocytes, preadipocytes, and cultured adipocytes and identified 175 lncRNAs that are specifically regulated during adipogenesis. Many lncRNAs are adipose-enriched, strongly induced during adipogenesis, and bound at their promoters by key transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (CEBPα). RNAi-mediated loss of function screens identified functional lncRNAs with varying impact on adipogenesis. Collectively, we have identified numerous lncRNAs that are functionally required for proper adipogenesis.

  8. MicroRNAs: Key Regulators in the Central Nervous System and Their Implication in Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Dan Cao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small, well-conserved noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They have been demonstrated to regulate a lot of biological pathways and cellular functions. Many miRNAs are dynamically regulated during central nervous system (CNS development and are spatially expressed in adult brain indicating their essential roles in neural development and function. In addition, accumulating evidence strongly suggests that dysfunction of miRNAs contributes to neurological diseases. These observations, together with their gene regulation property, implicated miRNAs to be the key regulators in the complex genetic network of the CNS. In this review, we first focus on the ways through which miRNAs exert the regulatory function and how miRNAs are regulated in the CNS. We then summarize recent findings that highlight the versatile roles of miRNAs in normal CNS physiology and their association with several types of neurological diseases. Subsequently we discuss the limitations of miRNAs research based on current studies as well as the potential therapeutic applications and challenges of miRNAs in neurological disorders. We endeavor to provide an updated description of the regulatory roles of miRNAs in normal CNS functions and pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  9. Pathological microRNAs in acute cardiovascular diseases and microRNA therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Syed Salman Ali; Chandra Kala; Mohd Abid; Nabeel Ahmad; Uma Shankar Sharma; Najam Ali Khan

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. In recent researches, it is demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) are expressed exten-sively in cardiovascular system and regulate gene expression in various cardiovascular diseases. Here, we are giving overview on number of miRNAs involved in patho-physiology of various cardiovascular diseases, and diagnostic and therapeutic potentials of miRNAs in these diseases. MiRNAs are a group of small non-coding mRNAs with approximately 18–22 nucleotides in length that regulate gene expression post tran-scriptionally. MiRNAs are regulated in various cardiovascular diseases like hyperten-sion, congestive heart failure, congenital heart defects, coronary artery disease and stroke. Some of these miRNAs also act as potential biomarker of these cardiovascular diseases. Inhibition of these miRNAs via different approaches like chemically modified antisense oligonucleotide, antagomirs, and locked nucleic acids serves as effective approaches for inactivating pathological miRNAs. Clinical trials are being conducted on therapeutic and diagnostic potentials of miRNAs. However, extensive researches are required to explore the therapeutic and diagnostic values of miRNAs as successful as classical approaches.

  10. MicroRNAs: Key Regulators in the Central Nervous System and Their Implication in Neurological Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dan-Dan; Li, Lu; Chan, Wai-Yee

    2016-05-28

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, well-conserved noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They have been demonstrated to regulate a lot of biological pathways and cellular functions. Many miRNAs are dynamically regulated during central nervous system (CNS) development and are spatially expressed in adult brain indicating their essential roles in neural development and function. In addition, accumulating evidence strongly suggests that dysfunction of miRNAs contributes to neurological diseases. These observations, together with their gene regulation property, implicated miRNAs to be the key regulators in the complex genetic network of the CNS. In this review, we first focus on the ways through which miRNAs exert the regulatory function and how miRNAs are regulated in the CNS. We then summarize recent findings that highlight the versatile roles of miRNAs in normal CNS physiology and their association with several types of neurological diseases. Subsequently we discuss the limitations of miRNAs research based on current studies as well as the potential therapeutic applications and challenges of miRNAs in neurological disorders. We endeavor to provide an updated description of the regulatory roles of miRNAs in normal CNS functions and pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  11. Roles of host and viral microRNAs in human cytomegalovirus biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuruvasan, Kavitha; Sivasubramanian, Geetha; Pellett, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has a relatively large and complex genome, a protracted lytic replication cycle, and employs a strategy of replicational latency as part of its lifelong persistence in the infected host. An important form of gene regulation in plants and animals revolves around a type of small RNA known as microRNA (miRNA). miRNAs can serve as major regulators of key developmental pathways, as well as provide subtle forms of regulatory control. The human genome encodes over 900 miRNAs, and miRNAs are also encoded by some viruses, including HCMV, which encodes at least 14 miRNAs. Some of the HCMV miRNAs are known to target both viral and cellular genes, including important immunomodulators. In addition to expressing their own miRNAs, infections with some viruses, including HCMV, can result in changes in the expression of cellular miRNAs that benefit virus replication. In this review, we summarize the connections between miRNAs and HCMV biology. We describe the nature of miRNA genes, miRNA biogenesis and modes of action, methods for studying miRNAs, HCMV-encoded miRNAs, effects of HCMV infection on cellular miRNA expression, roles of miRNAs in HCMV biology, and possible HCMV-related diagnostic and therapeutic applications of miRNAs. PMID:20969901

  12. Pathological microRNAs in acute cardiovascular diseases and microRNA therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Salman Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. In recent researches, it is demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs are expressed extensively in cardiovascular system and regulate gene expression in various cardiovascular diseases. Here, we are giving overview on number of miRNAs involved in pathophysiology of various cardiovascular diseases, and diagnostic and therapeutic potentials of miRNAs in these diseases. MiRNAs are a group of small non-coding mRNAs with approximately 18–22 nucleotides in length that regulate gene expression post transcriptionally. MiRNAs are regulated in various cardiovascular diseases like hypertension, congestive heart failure, congenital heart defects, coronary artery disease and stroke. Some of these miRNAs also act as potential biomarker of these cardiovascular diseases. Inhibition of these miRNAs via different approaches like chemically modified antisense oligonucleotide, antagomirs, and locked nucleic acids serves as effective approaches for inactivating pathological miRNAs. Clinical trials are being conducted on therapeutic and diagnostic potentials of miRNAs. However, extensive researches are required to explore the therapeutic and diagnostic values of miRNAs as successful as classical approaches.

  13. Tumor suppressor microRNAs: Targeted molecules and signaling pathways in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari, F; Haghnavaz, N; Baradaran, B; Hemmatzadeh, M; Kazemi, T

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women whose prevalence is increasing every year. Common strategies for diagnosis, prognosis and specific treatment of breast cancer need improvements to increase patients' survival. For this reason, there is growing number of efforts world-wide with molecular approaches. With the advent of microRNAs (miRNAs), they have been interested for almost all aspects of tumorgenesis and correlation of breast cancer and microRNAs was discovered for the first time in 2005. MiRNAs form a group of small noncoding RNAs which participate in regulation of gene expression and subsequently several biological processes and pathogenesis of various diseases. As other cancers, miRNAs involved in breast cancer are classified in two groups: the first group is tumor inducing miRNAs (also called oncomirs) that can induce tumor initiation and progression, and their expression is increased in cancerous cells. The second group is tumor suppressor miRNAs. In normal situation, tumor suppressor miRNAs prevent beginning and progression of breast cancer through suppressing the expression of various oncogenes. In this review we will give a general overview about miRNAs and breast cancer, and in the following, more discussion about tumor suppressor miRNAs, with focus on the best known of them and their targeted oncogenes and signaling pathways. Finally, we will point to application of this group of miRNAs in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of patients.

  14. miRConnect:Identifying effector genes of miRNAs and miRNA families in cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hua, Youjia; Duan, Shiwei; Murmann, Andrea E

    2011-01-01

    have generated custom data sets containing expression information of 54 miRNA families sharing the same seed match. We have developed a novel strategy for correlating miRNAs with individual genes based on a summed Pearson Correlation Coefficient (sPCC) that mimics an in silico titration experiment......micro(mi)RNAs are small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate expression of most mRNAs. They are powerful regulators of various differentiation stages, and the expression of genes that either negatively or positively correlate with expressed miRNAs is expected to hold information....... By focusing on the genes that correlate with the expression of miRNAs without necessarily being direct targets of miRNAs, we have clustered miRNAs into different functional groups. This has resulted in the identification of three novel miRNAs that are linked to the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT...

  15. Advance in MicroRNAs and EGFR-TKIs Secondary Resistance Research in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer%非小细胞肺癌中microRNAs与EGFR-TKIs继发性耐药机制的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段晓阳; 史健

    2014-01-01

    近年来,在非小细胞肺癌(non-small cell lung cancer, NSCLC)靶向治疗中,尤其是伴有表皮生长因子受体(epidermal growth factor receptor,EGFR)基因突变的患者,EGFR酪氨酸激酶抑制剂(tyrosine kinase inhibitor, TKI)越来越多地进入到临床治疗,但EGFR-TKI耐药的产生不仅影响药物敏感性,甚至出现疾病进展,成为制约其疗效的主要瓶颈。微小RNA(microRNAs, miRNAs)是一种非编码蛋白的RNA,参与转录后水平基因的表达调控,最近研究发现,miRNAs参与了EGFR-TKIs耐药,影响肿瘤细胞对吉非替尼的敏感性。本文就NSCLC中miRNAs与EGFR-TKIs继发性耐药之间的相关性研究进展做简要的综述。%In recent years, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) targeted therapy, especially in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) more and more come into the clinical treatment, but EGFR-TKI resistance not only inlfuence the drug sensitivity, appear even disease progression, become the main bottleneck of its curative effect. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) is a non coding RNA and protein involved in regulating gene expression in the transcription level. Recent studies found that miRNAs involved in EGFR-TKIs resistance, which affect the sensitivity of tumor cells to treatment. In this paper, we reviewed brielfy advance in miRNAs and EGFR-TKIs secondary resis-tance research in NSCLC.

  16. MicroRNAs and drug addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Kenny

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is considered a disorder of neuroplasticity in brain reward and cognition systems resulting from aberrant activation of gene expression programs in response to prolonged drug consumption. Noncoding RNAs are key regulators of almost all aspects of cellular physiology. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small (~21–23 nucleotides noncoding RNA transcripts that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, microRNAs were shown to play key roles in the drug-induced remodeling of brain reward systems that likely drives the emergence of addiction. Here, we review evidence suggesting that one particular miRNA, miR-212, plays a particularly prominent role in vulnerability to cocaine addiction. We review evidence showing that miR-212 expression is increased in the dorsal striatum of rats that show compulsive-like cocaine-taking behaviors. Increases in miR-212 expression appear to protect against cocaine addiction, as virus-mediated striatal miR-212 over-expression decreases cocaine consumption in rats. Conversely, disruption of striatal miR-212 signaling using an antisense oligonucleotide increases cocaine intake. We also review data that identify two mechanisms by which miR-212 may regulate cocaine intake. First, miR-212 has been shown to amplify striatal CREB signaling through a mechanism involving activation of Raf1 kinase. Second, miR-212 was also shown to regulate cocaine intake by repressing striatal expression of methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2, consequently decreasing protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. The concerted actions of miR-212 on striatal CREB and MeCP2/BDNF activity greatly attenuate the motivational effects of cocaine. These findings highlight the unique role for miRNAs in simultaneously controlling multiple signaling cascades implicated in addiction.

  17. Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Liu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunology is the study of interaction between cancer cells and immune system by the application of immunology principle and theory. With the recent approval of several new drugs targeting immune checkpoints in cancer, cancer immunology has become a very attractive field of research and is thought to be the new hope to conquer cancer. This chapter introduces the aberrant expression and function of noncoding RNAs, mainly microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, in tumor-infiltrating immune cells, and their significance in tumor immunity. It also illustrates how noncoding RNAs are shuttled between tumor cells and immune cells in tumor microenvironments via exosomes or other microvesicles to modulate tumor immunity.

  18. The silkworm (Bombyx mori microRNAs and their expressions in multiple developmental stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomin Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs play crucial roles in various physiological processes through post-transcriptional regulation of gene expressions and are involved in development, metabolism, and many other important molecular mechanisms and cellular processes. The Bombyx mori genome sequence provides opportunities for a thorough survey for miRNAs as well as comparative analyses with other sequenced insect species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified 114 non-redundant conserved miRNAs and 148 novel putative miRNAs from the B. mori genome with an elaborate computational protocol. We also sequenced 6,720 clones from 14 developmental stage-specific small RNA libraries in which we identified 35 unique miRNAs containing 21 conserved miRNAs (including 17 predicted miRNAs and 14 novel miRNAs (including 11 predicted novel miRNAs. Among the 114 conserved miRNAs, we found six pairs of clusters evolutionarily conserved cross insect lineages. Our observations on length heterogeneity at 5' and/or 3' ends of nine miRNAs between cloned and predicted sequences, and three mature forms deriving from the same arm of putative pre-miRNAs suggest a mechanism by which miRNAs gain new functions. Analyzing development-related miRNAs expression at 14 developmental stages based on clone-sampling and stem-loop RT PCR, we discovered an unusual abundance of 33 sequences representing 12 different miRNAs and sharply fluctuated expression of miRNAs at larva-molting stage. The potential functions of several stage-biased miRNAs were also analyzed in combination with predicted target genes and silkworm's phenotypic traits; our results indicated that miRNAs may play key regulatory roles in specific developmental stages in the silkworm, such as ecdysis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taking a combined approach, we identified 118 conserved miRNAs and 151 novel miRNA candidates from the B. mori genome sequence. Our expression analyses by sampling miRNAs and real-time PCR over

  19. Identification of microRNAs from Plutella xylostella larvae associated with parasitization by Diadegma semiclausum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etebari, Kayvan; Hussain, Mazhar; Asgari, Sassan

    2013-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) as small non-coding RNAs play important roles in many biological processes such as development, cell signaling and immune response. Small RNA deep sequencing technology provided an opportunity for a thorough survey of miRNAs in a global key pest Plutella xylostella as well as comparative analysis of miRNA expression profile of the insect in association with parasitization by Diadegma semiclausum. Combining the deep sequencing data and bioinformatics, 235 miRNAs were identified from P. xylostella. Differential expression of host cellular miRNAs in response to parasitism was examined by making small RNA libraries from parasitized and naive second instar larvae of P. xylostella. Bantam, miR-276*, miR-10, miR-31 and miR-184 were detected as five most abundant miRNAs in both libraries and 96 miRNAs were identified that were differentially expressed after parasitization. Bantam*, miR-184 and miR-281* were significantly down-regulated and two miRNAs miR-279b and miR-2944b* were highly induced in parasitized larvae. Interestingly, high copy numbers and differential expression of several miRNA passenger strands (miRNA*) suggest their potential roles in host-parasitoid interaction. In conclusion, expression profiling of miRNAs provided insights into their possible involvement in insect immune response to parasitism and offer an important resource for further studies.

  20. Circulating microRNAs as Potential Biomarkers of Infectious Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Carolina N.; Nalpas, Nicolas C.; McLoughlin, Kirsten E.; Browne, John A.; Gordon, Stephen V.; MacHugh, David E.; Shaughnessy, Ronan G.

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding endogenous RNA molecules that regulate a wide range of biological processes by post-transcriptionally regulating gene expression. Thousands of these molecules have been discovered to date, and multiple miRNAs have been shown to coordinately fine-tune cellular processes key to organismal development, homeostasis, neurobiology, immunobiology, and control of infection. The fundamental regulatory role of miRNAs in a variety of biological processes suggests that differential expression of these transcripts may be exploited as a novel source of molecular biomarkers for many different disease pathologies or abnormalities. This has been emphasized by the recent discovery of remarkably stable miRNAs in mammalian biofluids, which may originate from intracellular processes elsewhere in the body. The potential of circulating miRNAs as biomarkers of disease has mainly been demonstrated for various types of cancer. More recently, however, attention has focused on the use of circulating miRNAs as diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers of infectious disease; for example, human tuberculosis caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, sepsis caused by multiple infectious agents, and viral hepatitis. Here, we review these developments and discuss prospects and challenges for translating circulating miRNA into novel diagnostics for infectious disease. PMID:28261201

  1. Nanomaterials-Based Fluorimetric Methods for MicroRNAs Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming La

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small endogenous non-coding RNAs of ~22 nucleotides that play important functions in the regulation of many biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and death. Since their expression has been in close association with the development of many diseases, recently, miRNAs have been regarded as clinically important biomarkers and drug discovery targets. However, because of the short length, high sequence similarity and low abundance of miRNAs in vivo, it is difficult to realize the sensitive and selective detection of miRNAs with conventional methods. In line with the rapid development of nanotechnology, nanomaterials have attracted great attention and have been intensively studied in biological analysis due to their unique chemical, physical and size properties. In particular, fluorimetric methodologies in combination with nanotechnology are especially rapid, sensitive and efficient. The aim of this review is to provide insight into nanomaterials-based fluorimetric methods for the detection of miRNAs, including metal nanomaterials, quantum dots (QDs, graphene oxide (GO and silicon nanoparticles.

  2. Circulating MicroRNAs as Potential Biomarkers of Exercise Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mája Polakovičová

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Systematic physical activity increases physical fitness and exercise capacity that lead to the improvement of health status and athletic performance. Considerable effort is devoted to identifying new biomarkers capable of evaluating exercise performance capacity and progress in training, early detection of overtraining, and monitoring health-related adaptation changes. Recent advances in OMICS technologies have opened new opportunities in the detection of genetic, epigenetic and transcriptomic biomarkers. Very promising are mainly small non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs. miRNAs post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by binding to mRNA and causing its degradation or inhibiting translation. A growing body of evidence suggests that miRNAs affect many processes and play a crucial role not only in cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, but also affect extracellular matrix composition and maintaining processes of homeostasis. A number of studies have shown changes in distribution profiles of circulating miRNAs (c-miRNAs associated with various diseases and disorders as well as in samples taken under physiological conditions such as pregnancy or physical exercise. This overview aims to summarize the current knowledge related to the response of blood c-miRNAs profiles to different modes of exercise and to highlight their potential application as a novel class of biomarkers of physical performance capacity and training adaptation.

  3. Promoter-associated RNAs and promoter-targeted RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bing-Xue; Ma, Jin-Xia

    2012-09-01

    The world of RNAs is much more complex than previously thought, and has rapidly emerged as one of the most actively researched topics in the life sciences. Recently, two findings in this field were reported and given special attention: promoter-associated RNAs (paRNAs), a novel class of RNAs with numerous potential functions; and promoter-targeted RNA-induced transcriptional gene regulation, a new regulatory mechanism to control transcription. In this review, we summarize the studies in these two areas, and outline the current understanding with respect to the potential biological functions of paRNAs, and the molecular mechanisms of promoter-targeted RNA-induced transcriptional gene silencing and activation. Additionally, we seek to integrate these two areas, as paRNAs may have potential biological links with promoter-targeted RNA-induced transcriptional gene regulation. Finally, we will discuss the significance of identifying paRNAs and the possible use of promoter-targeted RNAs in gene regulation and therapy.

  4. Noncoding RNAs that associate with YB-1 alter proliferation in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Teresa T; Arango-Argoty, Gustavo; Li, Zhihua; Lin, Yuefeng; Kim, Sang Woo; Dueck, Anne; Ozsolak, Fatih; Monaghan, A Paula; Meister, Gunter; DeFranco, Donald B; John, Bino

    2015-06-01

    The highly conserved, multifunctional YB-1 is a powerful breast cancer prognostic indicator. We report on a pervasive role for YB-1 in which it associates with thousands of nonpolyadenylated short RNAs (shyRNAs) that are further processed into small RNAs (smyRNAs). Many of these RNAs have previously been identified as functional noncoding RNAs (http://www.johnlab.org/YB1). We identified a novel, abundant, 3'-modified short RNA antisense to Dicer1 (Shad1) that colocalizes with YB-1 to P-bodies and stress granules. The expression of Shad1 was shown to correlate with that of YB-1 and whose inhibition leads to an increase in cell proliferation. Additionally, Shad1 influences the expression of additional prognostic markers of cancer progression such as DLX2 and IGFBP2. We propose that the examination of these noncoding RNAs could lead to better understanding of prostate cancer progression.

  5. LNA-FISH for detection of microRNAs in frozen sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silahtaroglu, Asli N

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small ( approximately 22 nt) noncoding RNA molecules that regulate the expression of protein coding genes either by cleavage or translational repression. miRNAs comprise one of the most abundant classes of gene regulatory molecules in multicellular organisms. Yet......, the function of miRNAs at the tissue, cell, and subcellular levels is still to be explored. Especially, determining spatial and temporal expression of miRNAs has been a challenge due to their short size and low expression. This protocol describes a fast and effective method for detection of miRNAs in frozen...... tissue sections using fluorescence in situ hybridization. The method employs the unique recognition power of locked nucleic acids as probes together with enhanced detection power of the tyramide signal amplification system for detection of miRNAs in frozen tissues of human and animal origin within...

  6. The Role of miRNAs as Key Regulators in the Neoplastic Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Wentz-Hunter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The neoplastic microenvironment has been recognized to play a critical role in the development of cancer. Although a large body of evidence has established the importance of the cancer microenvironment, the manners of crosstalk between it and the cancer cells still remains unclear. Emerging mechanisms of communication include microRNAs (miRNAs. miRNAs are small noncoding RNA molecules that are involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of mRNA. Both intracellular and circulating miRNAs are differentially expressed in cancer and some of these alterations have been correlated with clinical patient outcomes. The role of miRNAs in the tumor microenvironment has only recently become a focus of research, however. In this paper, we discuss the influence of miRNAs on the tumor microenvironment as it relates to cancer progression. We conclude that miRNAs are a critical component in understanding invasion and metastasis of cancer cells.

  7. MicroRNAs of the immune system: roles in inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson-Moncada, Jan; Papavasiliou, F Nina; Tam, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to complementary target mRNAs and either promoting their decay or inhibiting their translation. Most eukaryotic genomes studied encode miRNAs, which are processed from longer noncoding transcripts through pathways conserved from fungi to plants to animals. miRNAs are now understood to be key mediators of developmental transitions in a number of model organisms. With respect to the immune system, miRNAs affect all facets of immune system development, from hematopoiesis to activation in response to infection during both the innate and the adaptive immune response. At the same time, miRNA dysregulation is a central event in the development and pathophysiology of a number of cancers of the immune system. Here we will discuss our current understanding of this general regulatory mechanism, focusing on its involvement in inflammation and in oncogenesis.

  8. MicroRNAs in Coronary Heart Disease: Ready to Enter the Clinical Arena?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Cavarretta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD and its complication remain the leading cause of mortality in industrialized countries despite great advances in terms of diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment options. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, small noncoding RNAs, act as posttranscriptional gene expression modulators and have been implicated as key regulators in several physiological and pathological processes linked to CAD. Circulating miRNAs have been evaluated as promising novel biomarkers of CAD, acute coronary syndromes, and acute myocardial infarction, with prognostic implications. Several challenges related to technical aspects, miRNAs normalization, drugs interaction, and quality reporting of statistical multivariable analysis of the miRNAs observational studies remain unresolved. MicroRNA-based therapies in cardiovascular diseases are not ready yet for human trials but definitely appealing. Through this review we will provide clinicians with a concise overview of the pros and cons of microRNAs.

  9. The Function of MicroRNAs in Renal Development and Pathophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liming Ma; Lianghu Qu

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous small non-coding RNAs that modulate diverse biological processes predominantly by translation inhibition or induction of mRNA degradation.They are important regulatory elements involved in renal physiology and pathology.Dysregulation of miRNAs disrupts early kidney development,renal progenitor cell differentiation and the maintenance of mature nephrons.miRNAs are also reported to participate in various renal diseases,including chronic kidney disease,acute kidney injury,allograft acute rejection and renal cell carcinoma.Differentially regulated miRNAs may represent innovative biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis.Therefore,determining the roles of miRNAs in different types of renal diseases will help to clarify the pathogenesis and facilitate the development of novel therapies.

  10. Characterization of siRNAs derived from cucumber green mottle mosaic virus in infected cucumber plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqiang; Deng, Congliang; Shang, Qiaoxia; Zhao, Xiaoli; Liu, Xingliang; Zhou, Qi

    2016-02-01

    Virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), a member of the genus Tobamovirus, were characterised in cucumber plants by deep sequencing. CGMMV vsiRNAs of 21-22 nt in length predominated, suggesting that there might be a conserved mechanism of DCL2 and DCL4 involvement in the biogenesis of vsiRNAs, as well as a common RNA silencing pathway in CGMMV-infected cucumber plants. The 5'-terminal base of vsiRNAs was biased towards C/A/U, suggesting that CGMMV vsiRNAs might be loaded into diverse AGO-containing RISCs to disturb the gene expression of host plants. Possible targets for some of the vsiRNAs were also predicted.

  11. Implications of microRNAs in Colorectal Cancer Development, Diagnosis, Prognosis and Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan eZhai

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of non-coding small RNAs with critical regulatory functions as post-transcriptional regulators. Due to the fundamental importance and broad impact of miRNAs on multiple genes and pathways, dysregulated miRNAs have been associated with human diseases, including cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is among the most deadly diseases, and miRNAs offer a new frontier for target discovery and novel biomarkers for both diagnosis and prognosis. In this review, we summarize the recent advancement of miRNA research in CRC, in particular, the roles of miRNAs in colorectal cancer stem cells, EMT, chemoresistance, therapeutics, diagnosis and prognosis.

  12. Next-Generation Sequencing of Protein-Coding and Long Non-protein-Coding RNAs in Two Types of Exosomes Derived from Human Whole Saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yuko; Tsujimoto, Masafumi; Yanoshita, Ryohei

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles containing microRNAs and mRNAs that are produced by various types of cells. We previously used ultrafiltration and size-exclusion chromatography to isolate two types of human salivary exosomes (exosomes I, II) that are different in size and proteomes. We showed that salivary exosomes contain large repertoires of small RNAs. However, precise information regarding long RNAs in salivary exosomes has not been fully determined. In this study, we investigated the compositions of protein-coding RNAs (pcRNAs) and long non-protein-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) of exosome I, exosome II and whole saliva (WS) by next-generation sequencing technology. Although 11% of all RNAs were commonly detected among the three samples, the compositions of reads mapping to known RNAs were similar. The most abundant pcRNA is ribosomal RNA protein, and pcRNAs of some salivary proteins such as S100 calcium-binding protein A8 (protein S100-A8) were present in salivary exosomes. Interestingly, lncRNAs of pseudogenes (presumably, processed pseudogenes) were abundant in exosome I, exosome II and WS. Translationally controlled tumor protein gene, which plays an important role in cell proliferation, cell death and immune responses, was highly expressed as pcRNA and pseudogenes in salivary exosomes. Our results show that salivary exosomes contain various types of RNAs such as pseudogenes and small RNAs, and may mediate intercellular communication by transferring these RNAs to target cells as gene expression regulators.

  13. Regulation of small RNA stability: methylation and beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijuan Ji; Xuemei Chen

    2012-01-01

    As central components of RNA silencing,small RNAs play diverse and important roles in many biological processes in eukaryotes.Aberrant reduction or elevation in the levels of small RNAs is associated with many developmental and physiological defects.The in vivo levels of small RNAs are precisely regulated through modulating the rates of their biogenesis and turnover.2'-O-methylation on the 3' terminal ribose is a major mechanism that increases the stability of small RNAs.The small RNA methyltransferase HUA ENHANCER1 (HEN1) and its homologs methylate microRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in plants,Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) in animals,and siRNAs in Drosophila.3' nucleotide addition,especially uridylation,and 3'-5' exonucleolytic degradation are major mechanisms that turnover small RNAs.Other mechanisms impacting small RNA stability include complementary RNAs,cis-elements in small RNA sequences and RNA-binding proteins.Investigations are ongoing to further understand how small RNA stability impacts their accumulation in vivo in order to improve the utilization of RNA silencing in biotechnology and therapeutic applications.

  14. MicroRNAs in human embryonic and cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Alfons; Monzo, Mariano

    2010-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate messenger RNAs at the post-transcriptional level. They play an important role in the control of cell physiological functions, and their alterations have been related to cancer, where they can function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. Recently, they have emerged as key regulators of "stemness", collaborating in the maintenance of pluripotency, control of self-renewal, and differentiation of stem cells. The miRNA pathway has been shown to be crucial in embryonic development and in embryonic stem (ES) cells, as shown by Dicer knockout analysis. Specific patterns of miRNAs have been reported to be expressed only in ES cells and in early phases of embryonic development. Moreover, many cancers present small populations of cells with stem cell characteristics, called cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are responsible for relapse and treatment failure in many cancer patients, and the comparative analysis of expression patterns between ES cells and tumors can lead to the identification of a miRNA signature to define CSCs. Most of the key miRNAs identified to date in ES cells have been shown to play a role in tumor diagnosis or prognosis, and may well prove to be essential in cancer therapy in the foreseeable future.

  15. Comparative analysis of known miRNAs across platyhelminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaoliang; Lu, Lixia; Su, Hailong; Lou, Zhongzi; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yadong; Xu, Guo-Tong

    2013-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a subtype of small regulatory RNAs that are involved in numerous biological processes through small RNA-induced silencing networks. In an attempt to explore the phylogeny of miRNAs across five platyhelminths, we integrated annotated miRNAs and their full genomes. We identified conserved miRNA clusters and, in particular, miR-71/2 was conserved from planarian to parasitic flatworms and was expanded in free-living Schmidtea mediterranea. Analysis of 22 miRNA loci provided compelling evidence that most known miRNAs are conserved across platyhelminths. Meanwhile, we also observed alterations of known protein-coding genes flanking miRNA(s), such as transcriptional direction conversion and locus relocation, in around ~ 41% of 22 known miRNA loci. Compared with Echinococcus multilocularis, the majority of these events occurred in evolution-distant Hymenolepis microstoma, Schistosoma japonicum or/and S. mediterranea. These results imply rearrangement events occurred near the known miRNA loci.

  16. Identification and characterization of microRNAs from tree peony (Paeonia ostii) and their response to copper stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qijiang; Xue, Zeyun; Dong, Chunlan; Wang, Yanjie; Chu, Lingling; Xu, Yingchun

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding, small RNAs recognized as important regulators of gene expression. Although plant miRNAs have been extensively studied in model systems, less is known in other plants with limited genome sequence data, including Paeonia ostii. In this work, we used high-throughput sequencing to identify conserved and nonconserved miRNAs and other short RNAs in Paeonia ostii under control and copper stressed condition. 102 previously known plant miRNAs were identified and classified into 89 families according to their gene sequence identity. Some miRNAs were highly conserved in the plant kingdom suggesting that these miRNA play important and conserved roles. Combined our transcriptome sequencing data of Paeonia ostii under same conditions, 34 novel potential miRNAs were identified. The potential targets of the identified known and novel miRNAs were also predicted based on sequence homology search. Comparing the two libraries, it was observed that 12 conserved miRNAs and 18 novel miRNAs showed significantly changes in response to copper stress. Some of the new identified potential miRNAs might be involved in Paeonia ostii-specific regulating mechanisms under copper stress. These results provide a framework for further analysis of miRNAs and their role in regulating Paeonia ostii response to copper stress.

  17. Identification and characterization of microRNAs from tree peony (Paeonia ostii and their response to copper stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qijiang Jin

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of non-coding, small RNAs recognized as important regulators of gene expression. Although plant miRNAs have been extensively studied in model systems, less is known in other plants with limited genome sequence data, including Paeonia ostii. In this work, we used high-throughput sequencing to identify conserved and nonconserved miRNAs and other short RNAs in Paeonia ostii under control and copper stressed condition. 102 previously known plant miRNAs were identified and classified into 89 families according to their gene sequence identity. Some miRNAs were highly conserved in the plant kingdom suggesting that these miRNA play important and conserved roles. Combined our transcriptome sequencing data of Paeonia ostii under same conditions, 34 novel potential miRNAs were identified. The potential targets of the identified known and novel miRNAs were also predicted based on sequence homology search. Comparing the two libraries, it was observed that 12 conserved miRNAs and 18 novel miRNAs showed significantly changes in response to copper stress. Some of the new identified potential miRNAs might be involved in Paeonia ostii-specific regulating mechanisms under copper stress. These results provide a framework for further analysis of miRNAs and their role in regulating Paeonia ostii response to copper stress.

  18. MicroRNAs and Type 2 Diabetes/Obesity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mustafa Abdo Saif Dehwah; Aimin Xu; Qingyang Huang

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs belong to a newly identified class of small non-coding RNAs that have been widely implicated in the fine-tuning of many physiological processes such as the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity.Microarray studies have highlighted an altered profile of miRNA expression in insulin target tissues in diabetic and obese models.Emerging evidences suggest that miRNAs play significant roles in insulin production,secretion and actions,as well as in diverse aspects of glucose homeostasis and adipocyte differentiation.The identification of tissue-specific miRNAs implicated in T2D and obesity might be useful for the future development of effective strategies for early diagnosis and therapeutic intervention of obesity-related medical complications.

  19. MicroRNAs and type 2 diabetes/obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehwah, Mustafa Abdo Saif; Xu, Aimin; Huang, Qingyang

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs belong to a newly identified class of small non-coding RNAs that have been widely implicated in the fine-tuning of many physiological processes such as the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity. Microarray studies have highlighted an altered profile of miRNA expression in insulin target tissues in diabetic and obese models. Emerging evidences suggest that miRNAs play significant roles in insulin production, secretion and actions, as well as in diverse aspects of glucose homeostasis and adipocyte differentiation. The identification of tissue-specific miRNAs implicated in T2D and obesity might be useful for the future development of effective strategies for early diagnosis and therapeutic intervention of obesity-related medical complications.

  20. MicroRNAs: Processing, Maturation, Target Recognition and Regulatory Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Girish C.; Singh, Jagjit; Barik, Sailen

    2012-01-01

    The remarkable discovery of small noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) and their role in posttranscriptional gene regulation have revealed another fine-tuning step in the expression of genetic information. A large number of cellular pathways, which act in organismal development and are important in health and disease, appear to be modulated by miRNAs. At the molecular level, miRNAs restrain the production of proteins by affecting the stability of their target mRNA and/or by down-regulating their translation. This review attempts to offer a snapshot of aspects of miRNA coding, processing, target recognition and function in animals. Our goal here is to provide the readers with a thought-provoking and mechanistic introduction to the miRNA world rather than with a detailed encyclopedia. PMID:22468167

  1. MicroRNAs associated with metastatic prostate cancer.

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    Akira Watahiki

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Metastasis is the most common cause of death of prostate cancer patients. Identification of specific metastasis biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets is considered essential for improved prognosis and management of the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs form a class of non-coding small RNA molecules considered to be key regulators of gene expression. Their dysregulation has been shown to play a role in cancer onset, progression and metastasis, and miRNAs represent a promising new class of cancer biomarkers. The objective of this study was to identify down- and up-regulated miRNAs in prostate cancer that could provide potential biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets for prostate cancer metastasis. METHODS: Next generation sequencing technology was applied to identify differentially expressed miRNAs in a transplantable metastatic versus a non-metastatic prostate cancer xenograft line, both derived from one patient's primary cancer. The xenografts were developed via subrenal capsule grafting of cancer tissue into NOD/SCID mice, a methodology that tends to preserve properties of the original cancers (e.g., tumor heterogeneity, genetic profiles. RESULTS: Differentially expressed known miRNAs, isomiRs and 36 novel miRNAs were identified. A number of these miRNAs (21/104 have previously been reported to show similar down- or up-regulation in prostate cancers relative to normal prostate tissue, and some of them (e.g., miR-16, miR-34a, miR-126*, miR-145, miR-205 have been linked to prostate cancer metastasis, supporting the validity of the analytical approach. CONCLUSIONS: The use of metastatic and non-metastatic prostate cancer subrenal capsule xenografts derived from one patient's cancer makes it likely that the differentially expressed miRNAs identified in this study include potential biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets for human prostate cancer metastasis.

  2. A common sequence motif determines the Cajal body-specific localization of box H/ACA scaRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Patricia; Darzacq, Xavier; Bertrand, Edouard; Jády, Beáta E; Verheggen, Céline; Kiss, Tamás

    2003-08-15

    Post-transcriptional synthesis of 2'-O-methylated nucleotides and pseudouridines in Sm spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs takes place in the nucleoplasmic Cajal bodies and it is directed by guide RNAs (scaRNAs) that are structurally and functionally indistinguishable from small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) directing rRNA modification in the nucleolus. The scaRNAs are synthesized in the nucleoplasm and specifically targeted to Cajal bodies. Here, mutational analysis of the human U85 box C/D-H/ACA scaRNA, followed by in situ localization, demonstrates that box H/ACA scaRNAs share a common Cajal body-specific localization signal, the CAB box. Two copies of the evolutionarily conserved CAB consensus (UGAG) are located in the terminal loops of the 5' and 3' hairpins of the box H/ACA domains of mammalian, Drosophila and plant scaRNAs. Upon alteration of the CAB boxes, mutant scaRNAs accumulate in the nucleolus. In turn, authentic snoRNAs can be targeted into Cajal bodies by addition of exogenous CAB box motifs. Our results indicate that scaRNAs represent an ancient group of small nuclear RNAs which are localized to Cajal bodies by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism.

  3. MicroRNAs as potential therapeutics for treating spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hualin Yan; Peiwei Hong; Mei Jiang; Hedong Li

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of recently discovered, small non-coding RNAs that have been shown to play essential roles in a vast majority of biological processes. Very little is known about the role of microRNAs during spinal cord injury. This review summarizes the changes in expression levels of microRNAs after spinal cord injury. These aberrant changes suggest that microRNAs play an important role in inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis, glial scar formation and axonal regeneration. Given their small size and specificity of action, microRNAs could be potential therapeutics for treating spinal cord injury in the future. There are rapidly developing techniques for manipulating microRNA levels in animals; we review different chemical modification and delivery strategies. These may provide platforms for designing efficient microRNA delivery protocols for use in the clinic.

  4. Non-Protein Coding RNAs

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Nils G; Batey, Robert T

    2009-01-01

    This book assembles chapters from experts in the Biophysics of RNA to provide a broadly accessible snapshot of the current status of this rapidly expanding field. The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to the discoverers of RNA interference, highlighting just one example of a large number of non-protein coding RNAs. Because non-protein coding RNAs outnumber protein coding genes in mammals and other higher eukaryotes, it is now thought that the complexity of organisms is correlated with the fraction of their genome that encodes non-protein coding RNAs. Essential biological processes as diverse as cell differentiation, suppression of infecting viruses and parasitic transposons, higher-level organization of eukaryotic chromosomes, and gene expression itself are found to largely be directed by non-protein coding RNAs. The biophysical study of these RNAs employs X-ray crystallography, NMR, ensemble and single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, optical tweezers, cryo-electron microscopy, and ot...

  5. MicroRNAs in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushati, Natascha; Cohen, Stephen M

    2008-06-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in diverse cellular and developmental processes. Many miRNAs are expressed specifically in the central nervous system, where they have roles in differentiation, neuronal survival, and potentially also in plasticity and learning. The absence of miRNAs in a variety of specific postmitotic neurons can lead to progressive loss of these neurons and behavioral defects reminiscent of the phenotypes seen in the pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review recent studies which provide a link between miRNA function and neurodegeneration. We also discuss evidence which might suggest involvement of miRNAs in the emergence or progression of neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Two novel aspects of the kinetics of gene expression including miRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    In eukaryotic cells, many genes are transcribed into non-coding RNAs. Small RNAs or, more specifically, microRNAs (miRNAs) form an abundant sub-class of such RNAs. miRNAs are transcribed as long noncoding RNA and then generated via a processing pathway down to the 20-24-nucleotide length. The key ability of miRNAs is to associate with target mRNAs and to suppress their translation and/or facilitate degradation. Using the mean-field kinetic equations and Monte Carlo simulations, we analyze two aspects of this interplay. First, we describe the situation when the formation of mRNA or miRNA is periodically modulated by a transcription factor which itself is not perturbed by these species. Depending on the ratio between the mRNA and miRNA formation rates, the corresponding induced periodic kinetics are shown to be either nearly harmonic or shaped as anti-phase pulses. The second part of the work is related to recent experimental studies indicating that differentiation of stem cells often involves changes in gene transcription into miRNAs and/or the interference between miRNAs, mRNAs and proteins. In particular, the regulatory protein obtained via mRNA translation may suppress the miRNA formation, and the latter may suppress in turn the miRNA-mRNA association and degradation. The corresponding bistable kinetics are described in detail.

  7. Transcriptome-wide identification of Rauvolfia serpentina microRNAs and prediction of their potential targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Pravin; Rajakani, Raja; Gupta, Vikrant

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs of ∼ 19-24 nucleotides (nt) in length and considered as potent regulators of gene expression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Here we report the identification and characterization of 15 conserved miRNAs belonging to 13 families from Rauvolfia serpentina through in silico analysis of available nucleotide dataset. The identified mature R. serpentina miRNAs (rse-miRNAs) ranged between 20 and 22nt in length, and the average minimal folding free energy index (MFEI) value of rse-miRNA precursor sequences was found to be -0.815 kcal/mol. Using the identified rse-miRNAs as query, their potential targets were predicted in R. serpentina and other plant species. Gene Ontology (GO) annotation showed that predicted targets of rse-miRNAs include transcription factors as well as genes involved in diverse biological processes such as primary and secondary metabolism, stress response, disease resistance, growth, and development. Few rse-miRNAs were predicted to target genes of pharmaceutically important secondary metabolic pathways such as alkaloids and anthocyanin biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis showed the evolutionary relationship of rse-miRNAs and their precursor sequences to homologous pre-miRNA sequences from other plant species. The findings under present study besides giving first hand information about R. serpentina miRNAs and their targets, also contributes towards the better understanding of miRNA-mediated gene regulatory processes in plants.

  8. Computational identification of four spliceosomal snRNAs from the deep-branching eukaryote Giardia intestinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Sylvia Chen

    Full Text Available RNAs processing other RNAs is very general in eukaryotes, but is not clear to what extent it is ancestral to eukaryotes. Here we focus on pre-mRNA splicing, one of the most important RNA-processing mechanisms in eukaryotes. In most eukaryotes splicing is predominantly catalysed by the major spliceosome complex, which consists of five uridine-rich small nuclear RNAs (U-snRNAs and over 200 proteins in humans. Three major spliceosomal introns have been found experimentally in Giardia; one Giardia U-snRNA (U5 and a number of spliceosomal proteins have also been identified. However, because of the low sequence similarity between the Giardia ncRNAs and those of other eukaryotes, the other U-snRNAs of Giardia had not been found. Using two computational methods, candidates for Giardia U1, U2, U4 and U6 snRNAs were identified in this study and shown by RT-PCR to be expressed. We found that identifying a U2 candidate helped identify U6 and U4 based on interactions between them. Secondary structural modelling of the Giardia U-snRNA candidates revealed typical features of eukaryotic U-snRNAs. We demonstrate a successful approach to combine computational and experimental methods to identify expected ncRNAs in a highly divergent protist genome. Our findings reinforce the conclusion that spliceosomal small-nuclear RNAs existed in the last common ancestor of eukaryotes.

  9. Identification and characterization of the expression profile of microRNAs in Anopheles anthropophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wenquan; Huang, Huicong; Xing, Cuicui; Li, Chunxiang; TAN, FENG; Liang, Shaohui

    2014-01-01

    Background Anopheles anthropophagus, one of the most important mosquito-borne disease vectors in Asia, mainly takes blood meals from humans and transmits both malaria and filariae. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs, and play a critical role in many cellular processes, including development, differentiation, apoptosis and innate immunity. Methods We investigated the global miRNA expression profile of male and female adults of A. anthropophagus using illumina Hiseq2000 sequencing com...

  10. Global Annotation of Small RNA and MicroRNA Mature Sequences from Developing Ovules of Gossypium hirsutum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ABDURAKHMONOV Ibrokhim Y; DEVOR Eric J; HUANG Ling-yan; BURIEV Zabardast T; MAKAMOV Abdusalom; SHERMATOV Shukhrat E; ABDUKARIMOV Abdusattor

    2008-01-01

    @@ The involvement of small RNAs in cotton fiber development is under explored.The objective of this work was to directly clone,annotate,and analyze small RNAs of developing ovules to reveal the candidate small interfering RNA/microRNAs (siRNAs/miRNAs) involved in cotton ovule and fiber development.We cloned small RNA sequences from 0~10 days post anthesis (DPA) developing ovules of Gossypium hirsutum var.

  11. Rapid in situ codetection of noncoding RNAs and proteins in cells and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections without protease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Planell-Saguer, Mariàngels; Rodicio, María Celina; Mourelatos, Zissimos

    2010-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) comprise a diverse group of RNAs that function in essential cellular processes such as pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation and also regulate various aspects of gene expression in physiology and development. Methods of subcellular and tissue localization of ncRNAs are essential to understand their biological roles and their contribution to disease. We describe a rapid fluorescent (FISH) or chromogenic (CISH) in situ hybridization protocol for localization of ncRNAs (including microRNAs (miRNAs), small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), piwi-associated RNAs (piRNAs) and ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs)) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and cultured cells, using locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotides. In this protocol, sections are heated in citrate buffer, which eliminates the need for protease treatment, thus preserving optimal morphology and protein epitopes, and allowing the simultaneous detection of proteins with immunofluorescence staining (IF). LNA-FISH requires 5 h, or between 10 and 36 h when combined with IF; LNA-CISH requires 2 d.

  12. Identification of novel non-coding RNAs using profiles of short sequence reads from next generation sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makunin Igor V

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing interest in small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs such as microRNAs (miRNAs, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs and recent advances in sequencing technology have yielded large numbers of short (18-32 nt RNA sequences from different organisms, some of which are derived from small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs and transfer RNAs (tRNAs. We observed that these short ncRNAs frequently cover the entire length of annotated snoRNAs or tRNAs, which suggests that other loci specifying similar ncRNAs can be identified by clusters of short RNA sequences. Results We combined publicly available datasets of tens of millions of short RNA sequence tags from Drosophila melanogaster, and mapped them to the Drosophila genome. Approximately 6 million perfectly mapping sequence tags were then assembled into 521,302 tag-contigs (TCs based on tag overlap. Most transposon-derived sequences, exons and annotated miRNAs, tRNAs and snoRNAs are detected by TCs, which show distinct patterns of length and tag-depth for different categories. The typical length and tag-depth of snoRNA-derived TCs was used to predict 7 previously unrecognized box H/ACA and 26 box C/D snoRNA candidates. We also identified one snRNA candidate and 86 loci with a high number of tags that are yet to be annotated, 7 of which have a particular 18mer motif and are located in introns of genes involved in development. A subset of new snoRNA candidates and putative ncRNA candidates was verified by Northern blot. Conclusions In this study, we have introduced a new approach to identify new members of known classes of ncRNAs based on the features of TCs corresponding to known ncRNAs. A large number of the identified TCs are yet to be examined experimentally suggesting that many more novel ncRNAs remain to be discovered.

  13. Identification and characterization of microRNAs in white and brown alpaca skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Xue

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, non-coding 21–25 nt RNA molecules that play an important role in regulating gene expression. Little is known about the expression profiles and functions of miRNAs in skin and their role in pigmentation. Alpacas have more than 22 natural coat colors, more than any other fiber producing species. To better understand the role of miRNAs in control of coat color we performed a comprehensive analysis of miRNA expression profiles in skin of white versus brown alpacas. Results Two small RNA libraries from white alpaca (WA and brown alpaca (BA skin were sequenced with the aid of Illumina sequencing technology. 272 and 267 conserved miRNAs were obtained from the WA and BA skin libraries, respectively. Of these conserved miRNAs, 35 and 13 were more abundant in WA and BA skin, respectively. The targets of these miRNAs were predicted and grouped based on Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analysis. Many predicted target genes for these miRNAs are involved in the melanogenesis pathway controlling pigmentation. In addition to the conserved miRNAs, we also obtained 22 potentially novel miRNAs from the WA and BA skin libraries. Conclusion This study represents the first comprehensive survey of miRNAs expressed in skin of animals of different coat colors by deep sequencing analysis. We discovered a collection of miRNAs that are differentially expressed in WA and BA skin. The results suggest important potential functions of miRNAs in coat color regulation.

  14. Analyses of a Glycine max Degradome Library Identify microRNA Targets and MicroRNAs that Trigger Secondary SiRNA Biogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Hu; Qiyan Jiang; Zhiyong Ni; Rui Chen; Shuo Xu; Hui Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression mainly by guiding cleavage of target mRNAs.In this study,a degradome library constructed from different soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) tissues was deep-sequenced.428 potential targets of small interfering RNAs and 25 novel miRNA families were identified.A total of 211 potential miRNA targets,including 174 conserved miRNA targets and 37 soybeanspecific miRNA targets,were identified.Among them,121 targets were first discovered in soybean.The signature distribution of soybean primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs) showed that most pri-miRNAs had the characteristic pattern of Dicer processing.The biogenesis of TAS3 small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was conserved in soybean,and nine Auxin Response Factors were identified as TAS3 siRNA targets.Twentythree miRNA targets produced secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in soybean.These targets were guided by five miRNAs:gma-miR393,gma-miR1508,gma-miR1510,gma-miR1514,and novel-11.Multiple targets of these secondary siRNAs were detected.These 23 miRNA targets may be the putative novel TAS genes in soybean.Global identification of miRNA targets and potential novel TAS genes will contribute to research on the functions of miRNAs in soybean.

  15. Analyses of a Glycine max degradome library identify microRNA targets and microRNAs that trigger secondary siRNA biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zheng; Jiang, Qiyan; Ni, Zhiyong; Chen, Rui; Xu, Shuo; Zhang, Hui

    2013-02-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression mainly by guiding cleavage of target mRNAs. In this study, a degradome library constructed from different soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) tissues was deep-sequenced. 428 potential targets of small interfering RNAs and 25 novel miRNA families were identified. A total of 211 potential miRNA targets, including 174 conserved miRNA targets and 37 soybean-specific miRNA targets, were identified. Among them, 121 targets were first discovered in soybean. The signature distribution of soybean primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs) showed that most pri-miRNAs had the characteristic pattern of Dicer processing. The biogenesis of TAS3 small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was conserved in soybean, and nine Auxin Response Factors were identified as TAS3 siRNA targets. Twenty-three miRNA targets produced secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in soybean. These targets were guided by five miRNAs: gma-miR393, gma-miR1508, gma-miR1510, gma-miR1514, and novel-11. Multiple targets of these secondary siRNAs were detected. These 23 miRNA targets may be the putative novel TAS genes in soybean. Global identification of miRNA targets and potential novel TAS genes will contribute to research on the functions of miRNAs in soybean.

  16. Identification and Characterization of MicroRNAs and Their Targets in Grapevine ( Vitis vinifera)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of newly identified, small, non-coding RNAs that play vital roles in regulation. Based on miRNAs unique features of expression pattern, evolutionary conservation, secondary structure and genetic requirements for biogenesis, computational predication strategy is adopted to predicate the novel miRNAs. In this research, potential miRNAs and their targets in grapevine (Vitis vinifera) were predicted. We used previously known plant miRNAs against grapevine genome sequence databases to search for potential miRNAs. A total of 81 potential miRNAs were detected following a range of strict filtering criteria. Using these potential miRNA sequences, we could further blast the mRNA database to find the potential targets in this species. Comparative analysis of miRNAs in grapevine and other species reveals that miRNAs exhibit an evolutional conservation, the number and function of miRNAs must have significantly expanded during the evolution of land plants. Furthermore divergence made versatile functions of miRNAs feasible. Cluster of miRNAs likely represents an ancient expression mechanism. Predicted target genes include not only transcription factors but also genes implicated in floral development, signal transduction, diseases and stress response. Till now, little is known about experimental or computational identification of miRNA in grapevine species. Increased knowledge of the biological mechanisms of the grapevine will allow targeted approaches to increase the quality of fruit and reduce the impact of parasites together with stress, which could enable a sustainable, environmentally-sound, farming policy.

  17. Genome-wide identification of novel microRNAs and their target genes in the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Gomes, Matheus; Muniyappa, Mohan Kumar; Carvalho, Sávio Gonçalves; Guerra-Sá, Renata; Spillane, Charles

    2011-08-01

    Mature microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding regulatory RNAs which can elicit post-transcriptional repression of mRNA levels of target genes. Here, we report the identification of 67 mature and 42 precursor miRNAs in the Schistosoma mansoni parasite. The evolutionarily conserved S. mansoni miRNAs consisted of 26 precursor miRNAs and 35 mature miRNAs, while we identified 16 precursor miRNAs and 32 mature miRNAs that displayed no conservation. These S. mansoni miRNAs are located on seven autosomal chromosomes and a sex (W) chromosome. miRNA expansion through gene duplication was suggested for at least two miRNA families miR-71 and mir-2. miRNA target finding analysis identified 389 predicted mRNA targets for the identified miRNAs and suggests that the sma-mir-71 may be involved in female sexual maturation. Given the important roles of miRNAs in animals, the identification and characterization of miRNAs in S. mansoni will facilitate novel approaches towards prevention and treatment of Schistosomiasis.

  18. Insights into the regulation of human CNV-miRNAs from the view of their target genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xudong

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs represent a class of small (typically 22 nucleotides in length non-coding RNAs that can degrade their target mRNAs or block their translation. Recent research showed that copy number alterations of miRNAs and their target genes are highly prevalent in cancers; however, the evolutionary and biological functions of naturally existing copy number variable miRNAs (CNV-miRNAs among individuals have not been studied extensively throughout the genome. Results In this study, we comprehensively analyzed the properties of genes regulated by CNV-miRNAs, and found that CNV-miRNAs tend to target a higher average number of genes and prefer to synergistically regulate the same genes; further, the targets of CNV-miRNAs tend to have higher variability of expression within and between populations. Finally, we found the targets of CNV-miRNAs are more likely to be differentially expressed among tissues and developmental stages, and participate in a wide range of cellular responses. Conclusions Our analyses of CNV-miRNAs provide new insights into the impact of copy number variations on miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional networks. The deeper interpretation of patterns of gene expression variation and the functional characterization of CNV-miRNAs will help to broaden the current understanding of the molecular basis of human phenotypic diversity.

  19. Noncoding RNAs in protein clearance pathways: implications in neurodegenerative diseases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SONALI SENGUPTA

    2017-03-01

    The importance of noncoding genome has become more evident in recent years. Before genome sequencing, the most well studied portion of our genome was protein coding genes. Interestingly, this coding portion accounted only for 1.5% of the genome, the rest being the noncoding sequences. Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) are involved in normal cell physiology, stress, and disease states. A class of small ncRNAs and miRNAs has gained much importance because of its involvement in human diseases such as cancer. Involvement of long ncRNAs have also been acknowledged in other human diseases, especially inneurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the presence of abnormally folded proteins that are toxic to the cell. Several studies from model organisms suggest upregulation of pathways that clear this toxic protein may provide protection against neurodegeneration. In this review, I summarize the importance of ncRNAs in protein quality control system of cell that is implicated in this fatal group of neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Use of miRNAs as Biomarkers in Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumache, Raluca; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Alina Carmen; Papurica, Marius; Dumbuleu, Corina Maria; Nartita, Radu; Sandesc, Dorel

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the most common causes of death in critical patients. Severe generalized inflammation, infections, and severe physiological imbalances significantly decrease the survival rate with more than 50%. Moreover, monitoring, evaluation, and therapy management often become extremely difficult for the clinician in this type of patients. Current methods of diagnosing sepsis vary based especially on the determination of biochemical-humoral markers, such as cytokines, components of the complement, and proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory compounds. Recent studies highlight the use of new biomarkers for sepsis, namely, miRNAs. miRNAs belong to a class of small, noncoding RNAs with an approximate content of 19–23 nucleotides. Following biochemical and physiological imbalances, the expression of miRNAs in blood or other body fluids changes significantly. Moreover, its stability, specificity, and selectivity make miRNAs ideal candidates for sepsis biomarkers. In conclusion, we can affirm that stable species of circulating miRNAs represent potential biomarkers for monitoring the evolution of sepsis. PMID:26221578

  1. Use of miRNAs as Biomarkers in Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Dumache

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is one of the most common causes of death in critical patients. Severe generalized inflammation, infections, and severe physiological imbalances significantly decrease the survival rate with more than 50%. Moreover, monitoring, evaluation, and therapy management often become extremely difficult for the clinician in this type of patients. Current methods of diagnosing sepsis vary based especially on the determination of biochemical-humoral markers, such as cytokines, components of the complement, and proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory compounds. Recent studies highlight the use of new biomarkers for sepsis, namely, miRNAs. miRNAs belong to a class of small, noncoding RNAs with an approximate content of 19–23 nucleotides. Following biochemical and physiological imbalances, the expression of miRNAs in blood or other body fluids changes significantly. Moreover, its stability, specificity, and selectivity make miRNAs ideal candidates for sepsis biomarkers. In conclusion, we can affirm that stable species of circulating miRNAs represent potential biomarkers for monitoring the evolution of sepsis.

  2. Roles of MicroRNAs in Plant Stress Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Peng; YANG Liang; BAI Xi; ZHU Yanming

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are one kind of small RNA in all eukaryote.MicroRNAs can regulate gene expression of eukaryote;they widely participate in every physiological process.They can block mRNA expression or cleave mRNA by complement to target mRNA.Scholars estimate miRNA genes occuping about 1% of genome,but they can regulate 10%-30% genes of whole genome.The genes are regulated by miRNA including signal proteins,enzymes,transcription factors,and so on.In the field of plant research,the start of miRNA research is later,but it is proved that plant miRNAs are important to every plant physiological process.Now miRNA has become the hotspot of plant molecular biology research.This paper introduced the biology function,action mechanism,researching method and recently development of microRNAs,also focused on advances in plant microRNAs.This paper has important reference value for plant stress tolerance miRNA research.

  3. Analytical Study of Hexapod miRNAs using Phylogenetic Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, A K

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. Identification of total number of miRNAs even in completely sequenced organisms is still an open problem. However, researchers have been using techniques that can predict limited number of miRNA in an organism. In this paper, we have used homology based approach for comparative analysis of miRNA of hexapoda group .We have used Apis mellifera, Bombyx mori, Anopholes gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster miRNA datasets from miRBase repository. We have done pair wise as well as multiple alignments for the available miRNAs in the repository to identify and analyse conserved regions among related species. Unfortunately, to the best of our knowledge, miRNA related literature does not provide in depth analysis of hexapods. We have made an attempt to derive the commonality among the miRNAs and to identify the conserved regions which are still not available in miRNA repositories. The results are good approximation with a small number of mis...

  4. MicroRNAs: Emerging Novel Clinical Biomarkers for Hepatocellular Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumadi Lukman Anwar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of small non-coding RNAs known as microRNAs has refined our view of the complexity of gene expression regulation. In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, the fifth most frequent cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide, dysregulation of microRNAs has been implicated in all aspects of hepatocarcinogenesis. In addition, alterations of microRNA expression have also been reported in non-cancerous liver diseases including chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis. MicroRNAs have been proposed as clinically useful diagnostic biomarkers to differentiate HCC from different liver pathologies and healthy controls. Unique patterns of microRNA expression have also been implicated as biomarkers for prognosis as well as to predict and monitor therapeutic responses in HCC. Since dysregulation has been detected in various specimens including primary liver cancer tissues, serum, plasma, and urine, microRNAs represent novel non-invasive markers for HCC screening and predicting therapeutic responses. However, despite a significant number of studies, a consensus on which microRNA panels, sample types, and methodologies for microRNA expression analysis have to be used has not yet been established. This review focuses on potential values, benefits, and limitations of microRNAs as new clinical markers for diagnosis, prognosis, prediction, and therapeutic monitoring in HCC.

  5. Clinical implications of microRNAs in human glioblastoma

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    Masahiro eMizoguchi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is one of the most common and dismal brain tumors in adults. Further elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of GBM is mandatory to improve the overall survival of patients. A novel small non-coding RNA molecule, microRNA (miRNA, appears to represent one of the most attractive target molecules contributing to the pathogenesis of various types of tumors. Recent global analyses have revealed that several miRNAs are clinically implicated in GBM, with some reports indicating the association of miRNA dysregulation with acquired temozolomide (TMZ resistance. More recent studies have revealed that miRNAs could play a role in cancer stem cell (CSC properties, contributing to treatment resistance. In addition, greater impact might be expected from miRNA-targeted therapies based on tumor-derived exosomes that contain numerous functional miRNAs, which could be transferred between tumor cells and surrounding structures. Tumor-derived miRNAs are now considered to be a novel molecular mechanism promoting the progression of GBM. Establishment of miRNA-targeted therapies based on miRNA dysregulation of CSCs could provide effective therapeutic strategies for TMZ-resistant GBM. Recent progress has revealed that miRNAs are not only putative biological markers for diagnosis, but also one of the most promising targets for GBM treatment. Herein, we summarize the translational aspects of miRNAs in the diagnosis and treatment of GBM.

  6. MicroRNAs Related to Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Elaine Sørensen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most common, though heterogeneous, endocrine aberration in women of reproductive age, with high prevalence and socioeconomic costs. The syndrome is characterized by polycystic ovaries, chronic anovulation and hyperandrogenism, as well as being associated with infertility, insulin resistance, chronic low-grade inflammation and an increased life time risk of type 2 diabetes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that are able to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Altered miRNA levels have been associated with diabetes, insulin resistance, inflammation and various cancers. Studies have shown that circulating miRNAs are present in whole blood, serum, plasma and the follicular fluid of PCOS patients and that they might serve as potential biomarkers and a new approach for the diagnosis of PCOS. In this review, recent work on miRNAs with respect to PCOS will be summarized. Our understanding of miRNAs, particularly in relation to PCOS, is currently at a very early stage, and additional studies will yield important insight into the molecular mechanisms behind this complex and heterogenic syndrome.

  7. Tumor suppressor p53 meets microRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaohui Feng; Cen Zhang; Rui Wu; Wenwei Hu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in tumor prevention. As a transcription factor, p53 mainly exerts its function through transcription regulation of its target genes to initiate various cellular responses. To maintain its proper function, p53 is tightly regulated by a wide variety of regulators in cells. Thus, p53, its regulators and regulated genes form a complex p53 network which is composed of hundreds of genes and their products. microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenously expressed, small non-coding RNA molecules which play a key role in regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs interact with p53 and its network at multiple levels. p53 regulates the transcription expression and the maturation of a group of miRNAs. On the other hand, miRNAs can regulate the activity and function of p53 through direct repression of p53 or its regulators in cells. These findings have demonstrated that miRNAs are important components in the p53 network, and also added another layer of complexity to the p53 network.

  8. Identification and characterization of microRNAs from peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. by high-throughput sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyuan Chi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are noncoding RNAs of approximately 21 nt that regulate gene expression in plants post-transcriptionally by endonucleolytic cleavage or translational inhibition. miRNAs play essential roles in numerous developmental and physiological processes and many of them are conserved across species. Extensive studies of miRNAs have been done in a few model plants; however, less is known about the diversity of these regulatory RNAs in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L., one of the most important oilseed crops cultivated worldwide. RESULTS: A library of small RNA from peanut was constructed for deep sequencing. In addition to 126 known miRNAs from 33 families, 25 novel peanut miRNAs were identified. The miRNA* sequences of four novel miRNAs were discovered, providing additional evidence for the existence of miRNAs. Twenty of the novel miRNAs were considered to be species-specific because no homolog has been found for other plant species. qRT-PCR was used to analyze the expression of seven miRNAs in different tissues and in seed at different developmental stages and some showed tissue- and/or growth stage-specific expression. Furthermore, potential targets of these putative miRNAs were predicted on the basis of the sequence homology search. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified large numbers of miRNAs and their related target genes through deep sequencing of a small RNA library. This study of the identification and characterization of miRNAs in peanut can initiate further study on peanut miRNA regulation mechanisms, and help toward a greater understanding of the important roles of miRNAs in peanut.

  9. Long noncoding RNAs and neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gaurav Kumar; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2015-07-30

    Neuroblastoma is a disease that affects infants and despite intense multimodal therapy, high-risk patients have low survival rates (neuroblastoma have just begun to be elucidated. This review summarises where we are with regards to lncRNAs in neuroblastoma. The known mechanistic roles of lncRNAs during neuroblastoma pathogenesis are discussed, as well as the relationship between lncRNA expression and the differentiation capacity of neuroblastoma cells. We speculate about the use of some of these lncRNAs, such as those mapping to the 6p22 hotspot, as biomarkers for neuroblastoma prognosis and treatment. This novel way of thinking about both neuroblastoma and lncRNAs brings a new perspective to the prognosis and treatment of high-risk patients.

  10. Gene dosage compensation calibrates four regulatory RNAs to control Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Sine L; Tu, Kimberly C; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2009-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a mechanism of cell-to-cell communication that allows bacteria to coordinately regulate gene expression in response to changes in cell-population density. At the core of the Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing signal transduction pathway reside four homologous small RNAs (sRNAs), named...

  11. Bidirectional cross-kingdom RNAi and fungal uptake of external RNAs confer plant protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Ming; Weiberg, Arne; Lin, Feng Mao; Thomma, Bart P.H.J.; Huang, Hsien Da; Jin, Hailing

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive fungal pathogens such as Botrytis and Verticillium spp. cause severe crop losses worldwide. We recently discovered that Botrytis cinerea delivers small RNAs (Bc-sRNAs) into plant cells to silence host immunity genes. Such sRNA effectors are mostly produced by Botrytis cinerea Dicer-lik

  12. Identification of novel non-coding RNAs as potential antisense regulators in the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    tang, T. H.; Polacek, N.; Zywicki, M.;

    2005-01-01

    to target the 3'-untranslated regions of certain mRNAs. Furthermore, one of the ncRNAs that does not show antisense elements is transcribed from a repeat unit of a cluster of small regularly spaced repeats in S. solfataricus which is potentially involved in replicon partitioning. In conclusion...

  13. Computational evidence for hundreds of non-conserved plant microRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    2005-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small (20-25 nt) non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression through interaction with mRNA in plants and metazoans. A few hundred miRNAs are known or predicted, and most of those are evolutionarily conserved. In general plant miRNA are different from...

  14. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseda, Clement A.; Srinivasan, Kumar; Wise, Jasen; Catalano, Jennifer; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2017-01-01

    Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection. PMID:25450361

  15. MicroRNAs in inflammation and response to injuries induced by environmental pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonkoly, Enikoe [Molecular Dermatology Research Group, Unit of Dermatology and Venerology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Dermatology and Allergology, University of Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); Pivarcsi, Andor, E-mail: andor.pivarcsi@ki.se [Molecular Dermatology Research Group, Unit of Dermatology and Venerology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Dermatology and Allergology, University of Szeged, Szeged (Hungary)

    2011-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate basic biological processes by posttranscriptional suppression of their target genes. Altered miRNA expression may lead to widespread gene expression changes and has been implicated in pathophysiological processes such as cancer and inflammation. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge about the role of miRNAs in inflammation and in the response to environmental agents and pollutants, such as cigarette smoke, ethanol, carcinogenic chemicals such as benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and dioxin, and UV radiation.

  16. Micro-masters of glioblastoma biology and therapy: increasingly recognized roles for microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Desiree; Purow, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs encoded in eukaryotic genomes that have been found to play critical roles in most biological processes, including cancer. This is true for glioblastoma, the most common and lethal primary brain tumor, for which microRNAs have been shown to strongly influence cell viability, stem cell characteristics, invasiveness, angiogenesis, metabolism, and immune evasion. Developing microRNAs as prognostic markers or as therapeutic agents is showing increasing promise and has potential to reach the clinic in the next several years. This succinct review summarizes current progress and future directions in this exciting and steadily expanding field.

  17. Comparison of non-coding RNAs in human and canine cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried eWagner

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the post-transcriptional gene silencing by small non-protein-coding RNAs is considered as a major breakthrough in biology. In the last decade we just started to realize the biologic function and complexity of gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs. Post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS is a conserved phenomenon which was observed in various species such as fungi, worms, plants and mammals. Micro RNAs (miRNA and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs are two gene silencing mediators constituting an evolutionary conserved class of non-coding RNAs regulating many biological processes in eukaryotes. As this small RNAs appear to regulate gene expression at translational and transcriptional level it is not surprising that during the last decade many human diseases among them Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular diseases and various cancer types were associated with deregulated miRNA expression. Consequently small RNAs are considered to hold big promises as therapeutic agents. However despite of the enormous therapeutic potential many questions remain unanswered. A major critical point, when evaluating novel therapeutic approaches, is the transfer of in vitro settings to an in vivo model. Classical animal models rely on the laboratory kept animals under artificial conditions and often missing an intact immune system. Model organisms with spontaneously occurring tumors as e.g. dogs provide the possibility to evaluate therapeutic agents under the surveillance of an in intact immune system and thereby providing an authentic tumor reacting scenario. Considering the genomic similarity between canines and humans and the advantages of the dog as cancer model system for human neoplasias the analyses of the complex role of small RNAs in canine tumor development could be of major value for both species. Herein we discuss comparatively the role of miRNAs in human and canine cancer development and highlight the potential and advantages of the model

  18. Discovery of replicating circular RNAs by RNA-seq and computational algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhixiang; Qi, Shuishui; Tang, Nan; Zhang, Xinxin; Chen, Shanshan; Zhu, Pengfei; Ma, Lin; Cheng, Jinping; Xu, Yun; Lu, Meiguang; Wang, Hongqing; Ding, Shou-Wei; Li, Shifang; Wu, Qingfa

    2014-12-01

    Replicating circular RNAs are independent plant pathogens known as viroids, or act to modulate the pathogenesis of plant and animal viruses as their satellite RNAs. The rate of discovery of these subviral pathogens was low over the past 40 years because the classical approaches are technical demanding and time-consuming. We previously described an approach for homology-independent discovery of replicating circular RNAs by analysing the total small RNA populations from samples of diseased tissues with a computational program known as progressive filtering of overlapping small RNAs (PFOR). However, PFOR written in PERL language is extremely slow and is unable to discover those subviral pathogens that do not trigger in vivo accumulation of extensively overlapping small RNAs. Moreover, PFOR is yet to identify a new viroid capable of initiating independent infection. Here we report the development of PFOR2 that adopted parallel programming in the C++ language and was 3 to 8 times faster than PFOR. A new computational program was further developed and incorporated into PFOR2 to allow the identification of circular RNAs by deep sequencing of long RNAs instead of small RNAs. PFOR2 analysis of the small RNA libraries from grapevine and apple plants led to the discovery of Grapevine latent viroid (GLVd) and Apple hammerhead viroid-like RNA (AHVd-like RNA), respectively. GLVd was proposed as a new species in the genus Apscaviroid, because it contained the typical structural elements found in this group of viroids and initiated independent infection in grapevine seedlings. AHVd-like RNA encoded a biologically active hammerhead ribozyme in both polarities, and was not specifically associated with any of the viruses found in apple plants. We propose that these computational algorithms have the potential to discover novel circular RNAs in plants, invertebrates and vertebrates regardless of whether they replicate and/or induce the in vivo accumulation of small RNAs.

  19. Discovery of replicating circular RNAs by RNA-seq and computational algorithms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixiang Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Replicating circular RNAs are independent plant pathogens known as viroids, or act to modulate the pathogenesis of plant and animal viruses as their satellite RNAs. The rate of discovery of these subviral pathogens was low over the past 40 years because the classical approaches are technical demanding and time-consuming. We previously described an approach for homology-independent discovery of replicating circular RNAs by analysing the total small RNA populations from samples of diseased tissues with a computational program known as progressive filtering of overlapping small RNAs (PFOR. However, PFOR written in PERL language is extremely slow and is unable to discover those subviral pathogens that do not trigger in vivo accumulation of extensively overlapping small RNAs. Moreover, PFOR is yet to identify a new viroid capable of initiating independent infection. Here we report the development of PFOR2 that adopted parallel programming in the C++ language and was 3 to 8 times faster than PFOR. A new computational program was further developed and incorporated into PFOR2 to allow the identification of circular RNAs by deep sequencing of long RNAs instead of small RNAs. PFOR2 analysis of the small RNA libraries from grapevine and apple plants led to the discovery of Grapevine latent viroid (GLVd and Apple hammerhead viroid-like RNA (AHVd-like RNA, respectively. GLVd was proposed as a new species in the genus Apscaviroid, because it contained the typical structural elements found in this group of viroids and initiated independent infection in grapevine seedlings. AHVd-like RNA encoded a biologically active hammerhead ribozyme in both polarities, and was not specifically associated with any of the viruses found in apple plants. We propose that these computational algorithms have the potential to discover novel circular RNAs in plants, invertebrates and vertebrates regardless of whether they replicate and/or induce the in vivo accumulation of small

  20. [MicroRNAs in neurobiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Yukio

    2008-12-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as a new regulatory factor of gene expression. They mediate translational repression or degradation of their target mRNAs by RNA interference (RNAi). The expression of each microRNA is tightly regulated in a development- and cell-specific manner by various mechanisms such as blockade of let-7 family expression by Lin-28 or RNA editing. They also act as regulatory switches for development, organogenesis, and cellular differentiation or for controlling distinct functions that are required for the maintenance of each tissue and cell subtypes. The abundant expression of microRNAs as well as the exclusive expression of certain microRNAs in the central nervous system highlights their biological importance at all stages of neural development and in postmitotic and differentiated neurons. Further, some microRNAs, such as miRNA-134, and miRNA-132 are localized and are synthesized in part at synaptic sites in dendrites to regulate synaptic formation and plasticity. In addition to the imparting of basic knowledge about the biogenesis and mechanism of action of microRNAs, this review focuses on the recent advances in microRNA studies in neurobiology, including the expression pattern of microRNAs in the mammalian brain, the role of microRNAs in neural differentiation and maturation, formation and plasticity of synaptic connections, and maintenance of neural function such as the synthesis of the neurotransmitters in selected neurons. Finally, the possible connection between microRNA dysfunction and neurological diseases, and future implications for diagnosis, and treatment of defects in human brain development and neurodegenerative diseases are discussed.

  1. Identifying cancer-causing noncoding RNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Sage, Carlos Karel

    2008-01-01

    To circumvent the dependency on prediction models, we developed a microRNA-screen-based assay to establish links between cellular phenotypes and microRNAs (miRNAs). To this end, a miRNA expression library (miR-Lib) was built consisting of 300 annotated miRNAs and around 100 candidate miRNAs. These m

  2. Improvement of the design and generation of highly specific plant knockdown lines using primary synthetic microRNAs (pri-smiRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Leonardo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. In plants, they typically show high complementarity to a single sequence motif within their target mRNAs and act by catalyzing specific mRNA cleavage and degradation. miRNAs are processed from much longer primary transcripts via precursor miRNAs containing fold-back structures. Leaving these secondary structures intact, miRNAs can be re-designed experimentally to target mRNAs of choice. Results We designed primary synthetic miRNAs (pri-smiRNAs on the basis of the primary transcript of the Arabidopsis MIR159A gene by replacing the original miR159a and the corresponding miR159a* with novel sequences, keeping the overall secondary structure as predicted by the program RNAfold. We used the program RNAhybrid to optimize smiRNA design and to screen the complete Arabidopsis transcriptome for potential off-targets. To improve the molecular cloning of the pri-smiRNA we inserted restriction sites in the original MIR159A primary transcript to easily accommodate the smiRNA/smiRNA* DNA fragment. As a proof-of-concept, we targeted the single gene encoding chalcone synthase (CHS in Arabidopsis. We demonstrate smiRNA(CHS expression and CHS mRNA cleavage in different transgenic lines. Phenotypic changes in these lines were observed for seed color and flavonol derivatives, and quantified with respect to anthocyanin content. We also tested the effect of mismatches and excess G:U base pairs on knockdown efficiency. Conclusions RNAhybrid-assisted design of smiRNAs and generation of pri-smiRNAs using a novel vector containing restriction sites greatly improves specificity and speed of the generation of stable knockdown lines for functional analyses in plants.

  3. MicroRNAs as potential biomarkers in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoni-Rugiu E

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eric Santoni-Rugiu, Morten Andersen, Morten Grauslund Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM, a highly lethal cancer strictly related to asbestos exposure, is usually characterized by delayed diagnosis, resistance to current therapies, and dismal prognosis. MPM is difficult to distinguish histologically from nonmalignant reactive mesothelial proliferations (RMPs as there are no clinically validated immunohistochemical markers yet and the main diagnostic criterion remains deep invasion into the pleura and underlying fat tissue, which is often not appreciable in small pleural biopsies. In this regard, microRNAs (miRNAs, given their size and stability, are particularly attractive biomarkers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens for routine pathology. Moreover, circulating miRNAs appear to be promising biomarkers for early detection and monitoring of patients with MPM. Here, we review the studies mostly performed by miRNA arrays and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded or frozen tissue samples, MPM cell lines, and blood/plasma/serum samples that have highlighted the potential of miRNAs as biomarkers in MPM. Certain studies have pointed to the ability of miRNAs to distinguish the different histological MPM subtypes or separate MPM from lung adenocarcinoma, and other investigations have revealed that miRNAs can aid in differentiating MPM from RMP or have prognostic value in predicting the patient outcome. Mechanistic aspects of the involvement of miRNAs in mesothelioma genesis and possible use of miRNAs as future therapeutic targets in MPM are also emphasized. Finally, limitations of the data currently obtained due to the drawbacks of reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, heterogeneity of MPM tissue samples, and

  4. MicroRNAs in Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vienberg, Sara; Geiger, Julian; Madsen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have within the past decade emerged as key regulators of metabolic homeostasis. Major tissues in intermediary metabolism important during development of the metabolic syndrome, such as β-cells, liver, skeletal and heart muscle as well as adipose tissue have all been shown...... to be affected by miRNAs. In the pancreatic β-cell a number of miRNAs are important in maintaining the balance between differentiation and proliferation (miR-200 and miR-29 families) and insulin exocytosis in the differentiated state is controlled by miR-7, miR-375 and miR-335. MiR-33a and -33b play crucial...... roles in cholesterol and lipid metabolism, whereas miR-103 and -107 regulates hepatic insulin sensitivity. In muscle tissue a defined number of miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, mir-206) control myofiber type switch and induce myogenic differentiation programs. Similarly, in adipose tissue a defined number of miRNAs...

  5. Global identification of microRNAs associated with chlorantraniliprole resistance in diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bin; Li, Xiuxia; Liu, Ying; Gao, Xiwu; Liang, Pei

    2017-01-01

    The diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (L.), is one of the most serious cruciferous pests and has developed high resistance to most insecticides, including chlorantraniliprole. Previous studies have reported several protein-coding genes that involved in chlorantraniliprole resistance, but research on resistance mechanisms at the post-transcription level is still limited. In this study, a global screen of microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with chlorantraniliprole resistance in P. xylostella was performed. The small RNA libraries for a susceptible (CHS) and two chlorantraniliprole resistant strains (CHR, ZZ) were constructed and sequenced, and a total of 199 known and 30 novel miRNAs were identified. Among them, 23 miRNAs were differentially expressed between CHR and CHS, and 90 miRNAs were differentially expressed between ZZ and CHS, of which 11 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in both CHR and ZZ. Using miRanda and RNAhybrid, a total of 1,411 target mRNAs from 102 differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted, including mRNAs in several groups of detoxification enzymes. The expression of several differentially expressed miRNAs and their potential targets was validated by qRT-PCR. The results may provide important clues for further study of the mechanisms of miRNA-mediated chlorantraniliprole resistance in DBM and other target insects. PMID:28098189

  6. microRNAs and the mammary gland: a new understanding of gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Gigli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been identified in cells as well as in exosomes in biological fluids such as milk. In mammary gland, most of the miRNAs studied have functions related to immunity and show alterations in their pattern of expression during lactation. In mastitis, the inflammatory response caused by Streptococcus uberis alters the expression of miRNAs that may regulate the innate immune system. These small RNAs are stable at room temperature and are resistant to repeated freeze/thaw cycles, acidic conditions and degradation by RNAse, making them resistant to industrial procedures. These properties mean that miRNAs could have multiple applications in veterinary medicine and biotechnology. Indeed, lactoglobulin-free milk has been produced in transgenic cows expressing specific miRNAs. Although plant and animal miRNAs have undergone independent evolutionary adaptation recent studies have demonstrated a cross-kingdom passage in which rice miRNA was isolated from human serum. This finding raises questions about the possible effect that miRNAs present in foods consumed by humans could have on human gene regulation. Further studies are needed before applying miRNA biotechnology to the milk industry. New discoveries and a greater knowledge of gene expression will lead to a better understanding of the role of miRNAs in physiology, nutrition and evolution.

  7. Does regulation of skeletal muscle function involve circulating microRNAs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru eAoi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs involved in posttranscriptional gene regulation. Recently, growing evidence has shown that miRNAs are taken in by intracellular exosomes, secreted into circulation, and taken up by other cells. Circulating levels of several miRNAs are changed in diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases; therefore, they are suggested to regulate functions of the recipient cells by modulating protein expression. Circulating miRNAs (c-miRNAs may also modulate skeletal muscle function in physiological and pathological conditions. It has been suggested that acute and chronic exercise transiently or adaptively changes the level of c-miRNAs, thus posttranscriptionally regulating proteins associated with energy metabolism, myogenesis, and angiogenesis. Circulating levels of several miRNAs that are enriched in muscle are altered in muscle disorders and may be involved in their development and progression. In addition, such c-miRNAs may be useful as biomarkers to determine various interactions between tissues and also to reflect athletic performance, physical fatigue, incidence risk, and development of diseases.

  8. Circulating miRNAs: roles in cancer diagnosis, prognosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guofeng

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) belong to a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate numerous biological processes by targeting a broad set of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNAs have been detected in remarkably stable forms in many types of body fluids. A comparison between cancer patients and healthy individuals has clearly shown that certain types of circulating miRNAs are associated with cancer initiation and progression. Research on miRNA-based biomarkers has witnessed phenomenal growth, owing to the non-invasive nature of miRNA-based screening assays and their sensitivity and specificity in detecting cancers. Consequently, a considerable effort has been devoted to identify suitable miRNAs for cancer diagnosis and also decode the information carried by circulating miRNAs. This review highlights the current studies that focus on the identification of circulating miRNA-based diagnostic and prognostic markers, for the most prevalent types of cancer. Additionally, the review also provides an insight into the putative functions of miRNAs, and attempts to delineate the mechanisms through which they are released into the bloodstream. Moreover, methodologies and strategies for identification of circulating miRNAs in cancers are summarized. Finally, potential strategies for circulating miRNA-based cancer therapies are proposed.